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Sample records for highly toxic protein

  1. A Highly Toxic Cellular Prion Protein Induces a Novel, Nonapoptotic Form of Neuronal Death

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Heather M.; Dikranian, Krikor; Li, Aimin; Baysac, Kathleen C.; Walls, Ken C.; Olney, John W.; Roth, Kevin A.; Harris, David A.

    2010-01-01

    Several different deletions within the N-terminal tail of the prion protein (PrP) induce massive neuronal death when expressed in transgenic mice. This toxicity is dose-dependently suppressed by coexpression of full-length PrP, suggesting that it results from subversion of a normal physiological activity of cellular PrP. We performed a combined biochemical and morphological analysis of Tg(ΔCR) mice, which express PrP carrying a 21-aa deletion (residues 105-125) within a highly conserved region of the protein. Death of cerebellar granule neurons in Tg(ΔCR) mice is not accompanied by activation of either caspase-3 or caspase-8 or by increased levels of the autophagy marker, LC3-II. In electron micrographs, degenerating granule neurons displayed a unique morphology characterized by heterogeneous condensation of the nuclear matrix without formation of discrete chromatin masses typical of neuronal apoptosis. Our data demonstrate that perturbations in PrP functional activity induce a novel, nonapoptotic, nonautophagic form of neuronal death whose morphological features are reminiscent of those associated with excitotoxic stress. PMID:20472884

  2. Protective effect of a high protein diet against the toxicity of some organophosphorus compounds in albino rats.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, A K; Kaveeshwar, U

    1991-10-01

    The present investigation deals with determining the efficacy of a high protein diet (HPD) in combating toxicity in albino rats of some organophosphorus compounds (OPCs) that follow dissimilar metabolic patterns in a living system. As assessed by an increase or decrease in the levels of some biochemical and nutritional parameters, the high protein diet containing 59% protein seems to have a beneficial effect in alleviating toxicity of low but prolonged doses of OPCs over the standard diet (SD) containing 19% protein. OPCs undergoing direct detoxication in a living system like diisopropyl phosphoro-fluoridate (DFP) appear to be more susceptible to HPD than those undergoing biotoxication like EPN (O-ethyl O-p-nitrophenyl phenyl-phosphonothioate) and malathion (S-(1,2-dicarbethoxyethyl) O,O-dimethyldithiophosphate). PMID:1812296

  3. Neurons Lacking Iron Regulatory Protein-2 Are Highly Resistant to the Toxicity of Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Raymond F.; Chen, Mai; Li, Zhi; Zhang, Xuefeng; Benvenisti-Zarom, Luna; Chen-Roetling, Jing

    2008-01-01

    The effect of iron regulatory protein-2 (IRP2) on ferritin expression and neuronal vulnerability to hemoglobin was assessed in primary cortical cell cultures prepared from wild-type and IRP2 knockout mice. Baseline levels of H and L-ferritin subunits were significantly increased in IRP2 knockout neurons and astrocytes. Hemoglobin was toxic to wild-type neurons in mixed neuron-astrocyte cultures, with an LC50 near 3 µM for a 24 hour exposure. Neuronal death was reduced by 85–95% in knockout cultures, and also in cultures containing knockout neurons plated on wild-type astrocytes. Protein carbonylation, reactive oxygen species formation, and heme oxygenase-1 expression after hemoglobin treatment were also attenuated by IRP2 gene deletion. These results suggest that IRP2 binding activity increases the vulnerability of neurons to hemoglobin, possibly by reducing ferritin expression. Therapeutic strategies that target this regulatory mechanism may be beneficial after hemorrhagic CNS injuries. PMID:18571425

  4. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  5. Pulchellin, a highly toxic type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein from Abrus pulchellus. Cloning heterologous expression of A-chain and structural studies.

    PubMed

    Silva, André L C; Goto, Leandro S; Dinarte, Anemari R; Hansen, Daiane; Moreira, Renato A; Beltramini, Leila M; Araújo, Ana P U

    2005-03-01

    Pulchellin is a type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein isolated from seeds of the Abrus pulchellus tenuiflorus plant. This study aims to obtain active and homogeneous protein for structural and biological studies that will clarify the functional aspects of this toxin. The DNA fragment encoding pulchellin A-chain was cloned and inserted into pGEX-5X to express the recombinant pulchellin A-chain (rPAC) as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The deduced amino acid sequence analyses of the rPAC presented a high sequential identity (> 86%) with the A-chain of abrin-c. The ability of the rPAC to depurinate rRNA in yeast ribosome was also demonstrated in vitro. In order to validate the toxic activity we promoted the in vitro association of the rPAC with the recombinant pulchellin binding chain (rPBC). Both chains were incubated in the presence of a reduced/oxidized system, yielding an active heterodimer (rPAB). The rPAB showed an apparent molecular mass of approximately 60 kDa, similar to the native pulchellin. The toxic activities of the rPAB and native pulchellin were compared by intraperitoneal injection of different dilutions into mice. The rPAB was able to kill 50% of the tested mice with doses of 45 microg x kg(-1). Our results indicated that the heterodimer showed toxic activity and a conformational pattern similar to pulchellin. In addition, rPAC produced in this heterologous system might be useful for the preparation of immunoconjugates with potential as a therapeutic agent. PMID:15720394

  6. Comparison of three protein extraction procedures from toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates for proteomics analysis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xi-Wen; Wang, Jing; Chan, Leo Lai; Lam, Paul Kwan Sing; Gu, Ji-Dong

    2015-08-01

    Three methods for extraction and preparation of high-quality proteins from both toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates for proteomics analysis, including Trizol method, Lysis method and Tris method, were compared with the subsequent protein separation profiles using 2-D differential gel electrophoresis (2-D DIGE), Coomassie Blue and silver staining. These methods showed suitability for proteins with different pIs and molecular weights. Tris method was better for low molecular weight and low pI protein isolation; whereas both Lysis and Trizol method were better for high-molecular weight and high pI protein purification. Trizol method showed good results with Alexandrium species and Gynodinium species, and the background in gel was much clearer than the other two methods. At the same time, only Lysis method caused breaking down of the target proteins. On the other hand, Trizol method obtained higher concentration of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase proteins by Western-blotting, while Tris method was the best for peridinin-chlorophyll-protein complexes protein and T1 protein preparation. DIGE was better than Coomassie Blue and silver staining, except for some limitations, such as the high cost of the dyes, relatively short shelf life and the requirements for extensive and special image capturing equipment. Some proteins related to PSTs synthesis in dinoflagellates are hydrophobic with high molecular weight or binding on membranes and Trizol method performed better than Tris method for these proteins. The Trizol method and 2-D DIGE were effective combination for proteomics investigations of dinoflagellates. This procedure allows reliable and high recovery efficiency of proteins from dinoflagellates for better understanding on their occurrence and toxin-production for physiological and biochemical information. PMID:26197730

  7. Protein expression analysis of rat testes induced testicular toxicity with several reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Toshinori; Fukushima, Tamio; Kikkawa, Rie; Yamada, Hiroshi; Horii, Ikuo

    2005-05-01

    The utilization of safety biomarkers to predict the possibility of compound-related toxicity provides several advantages for drug discovery and development, especially at an early stage. The objectives of this study were to investigate the effects of male reproductive toxicants on protein expression profiles in the rat testes and to identify potential biomarker candidates. Four well-known reproductive toxicants, ethylene glycol monomethyl ether (EGME), cyclophosphamide (CP), sulfasalazine (SASP) and 2,5-hexanedione (2,5-HD), were administered to male rats in a single dose, and protein expression profiles were investigated after 24 hr by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2DE). Histopathological examination of the testes and serum concentration analysis were also performed. From the results of the comparison of 2D-gels among different doses of a compound and among compounds, 52, 20, 24 and 111 spots were nominated as differentially expressed spots with EGME, CP, SASP and 2,5-HD treatments, respectively. Several spermatogenesis-involved proteins were identified, including glutathione S-transferase (GST), testis-specific heat shock protein 70-2 (HSP70-2), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein (PEBP). Some of them were altered by more than one compound. In summary, remarkable histopathological findings were observed only in the EGME high-dose group, and most of the protein changes were detected before histopathological changes occurred. Therefore, the proteins identified in this study could potentially serve as biomarkers to evaluate male reproductive toxicity at an early stage of drug discovery and development. PMID:15928459

  8. Drug bioactivation, covalent binding to target proteins and toxicity relevance.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shufeng; Chan, Eli; Duan, Wei; Huang, Min; Chen, Yu-Zong

    2005-01-01

    A number of therapeutic drugs with different structures and mechanisms of action have been reported to undergo metabolic activation by Phase I or Phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. The bioactivation gives rise to reactive metabolites/intermediates, which readily confer covalent binding to various target proteins by nucleophilic substitution and/or Schiff's base mechanism. These drugs include analgesics (e.g., acetaminophen), antibacterial agents (e.g., sulfonamides and macrolide antibiotics), anticancer drugs (e.g., irinotecan), antiepileptic drugs (e.g., carbamazepine), anti-HIV agents (e.g., ritonavir), antipsychotics (e.g., clozapine), cardiovascular drugs (e.g., procainamide and hydralazine), immunosupressants (e.g., cyclosporine A), inhalational anesthetics (e.g., halothane), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDSs) (e.g., diclofenac), and steroids and their receptor modulators (e.g., estrogens and tamoxifen). Some herbal and dietary constituents are also bioactivated to reactive metabolites capable of binding covalently and inactivating cytochrome P450s (CYPs). A number of important target proteins of drugs have been identified by mass spectrometric techniques and proteomic approaches. The covalent binding and formation of drug-protein adducts are generally considered to be related to drug toxicity, and selective protein covalent binding by drug metabolites may lead to selective organ toxicity. However, the mechanisms involved in the protein adduct-induced toxicity are largely undefined, although it has been suggested that drug-protein adducts may cause toxicity either through impairing physiological functions of the modified proteins or through immune-mediated mechanisms. In addition, mechanism-based inhibition of CYPs may result in toxic drug-drug interactions. The clinical consequences of drug bioactivation and covalent binding to proteins are unpredictable, depending on many factors that are associated with the administered drugs and patients

  9. A multigrain protein enriched diet mitigates fluoride toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vasant, Rupal A; Amaravadi V R L, Narasimhacharya

    2013-06-01

    Fluorosis is a major health problem in many parts of the world. The present work focuses on investigating the utility of nutrient and antioxidant rich grains- ragi, jowar, bajra, maize in formulation of basal, high carbohydrate low protein and low carbohydrate high protein diets in mitigating fluoride toxicity. Exposure to fluoride through drinking water not only significantly increased plasma glucose and lipid profiles, but also elevated both hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation, hepatic lipid profiles and G-6-Pase activity with a reduction in plasma HDL-C, hepatic glycogen content, hexokinase activity and antioxidant status. Even though basal and high carbohydrate diets did not significantly alter plasma glucose, lipid profiles in fluoride administered animals, protein enriched multigrain diet significantly decreased plasma glucose and lipid levels. However, the multigrain basal and high carbohydrate diets influenced the hepatic glycogen, lipid profiles, hexokinase and G-6-Pase activities, hepatic and renal lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status though not as significantly as that of multigrain diet enriched with protein. Thus the results of the present study indicate that both a multigrain diet rich in nutrients and antioxidants, and fortified with protein is useful in mitigating the fluoride toxicity. PMID:24425948

  10. High-Throughput Cell Toxicity Assays.

    PubMed

    Murray, David; McWilliams, Lisa; Wigglesworth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Understanding compound-driven cell toxicity is vitally important for all drug discovery approaches. With high-throughput screening (HTS) being the key strategy to find hit and lead compounds for drug discovery projects in the pharmaceutical industry [1], an understanding of the cell toxicity profile of hit molecules from HTS activities is fundamentally important. Recently, there has been a resurgence of interest in phenotypic drug discovery and these cell-based assays are now being run in HTS labs on ever increasing numbers of compounds. As the use of cell assays increases the ability to measure toxicity of compounds on a large scale becomes increasingly important to ensure that false hits are not progressed and that compounds do not carry forward a toxic liability that may cause them to fail at later stages of a project. Here we describe methods employed in the AstraZeneca HTS laboratory to carry out very large scale cell toxicity screening. PMID:27317000

  11. Oxidative Stress, Unfolded Protein Response, and Apoptosis in Developmental Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kupsco, Allison; Schlenk, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Physiological development requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular and molecular processes. Disruption of these key events can generate developmental toxicity in the form of teratogenesis or mortality. The mechanism behind many developmental toxicants remains unknown. While recent work has focused on the unfolded protein response (UPR), oxidative stress, and apoptosis in the pathogenesis of disease, few studies have addressed their relationship in developmental toxicity. Redox regulation, UPR, and apoptosis are essential for physiological development and can be disturbed by a variety of endogenous and exogenous toxicants to generate lethality and diverse malformations. This review examines the current knowledge of the role of oxidative stress, UPR, and apoptosis in physiological development as well as in developmental toxicity, focusing on studies and advances in vertebrates model systems. PMID:26008783

  12. Synergistic Effects of Toxic Elements on Heat Shock Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, Khalid; Mahmood, Qaisar; Irshad, Muhammad; Hussain, Jamshaid

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock proteins show remarkable variations in their expression levels under a variety of toxic conditions. A research span expanded over five decades has revealed their molecular characterization, gene regulation, expression patterns, vast similarity in diverse groups, and broad range of functional capabilities. Their functions include protection and tolerance against cytotoxic conditions through their molecular chaperoning activity, maintaining cytoskeleton stability, and assisting in cell signaling. However, their role as biomarkers for monitoring the environmental risk assessment is controversial due to a number of conflicting, validating, and nonvalidating reports. The current knowledge regarding the interpretation of HSPs expression levels has been discussed in the present review. The candidature of heat shock proteins as biomarkers of toxicity is thus far unreliable due to synergistic effects of toxicants and other environmental factors. The adoption of heat shock proteins as “suit of biomarkers in a set of organisms” requires further investigation. PMID:25136596

  13. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis crystal proteins against eri silkworm, Samia cynthia ricini (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae).

    PubMed

    Sandeep Kumar, Donthula; Tarakeswari, Muddanuru; Lakshminarayana, Maddukuri; Sujatha, Mulpuri

    2016-07-01

    Ten purified crystal proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) were tested at concentrations ranging from 2.93 to 3000ng/cm(2) for their toxicity to eri silkworm through protein paint bioassays using castor leaves. Based on LC50 values, Cry1Aa (2.6ng/cm(2)) was highly toxic followed by Cry1Ac (29.3ng/cm(2)) and Cry1Ab (68.7ng/cm(2)). The Cry1Ca and Cry1Ea proteins were moderately toxic to eri silkworm larvae and resulted in 23% and 28% mortality, respectively at the highest concentration tested (3000ng/cm(2)). Only reduction in larval weight was observed with Cry2Aa, Cry1Da and Cry9Aa proteins while Cry3Aa and Cry1Ba proteins were found to be nontoxic. PMID:27377590

  14. Big Data in Chemical Toxicity Research: The Use of High-Throughput Screening Assays To Identify Potential Toxicants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays that measure the in vitro toxicity of environmental compounds have been widely applied as an alternative to in vivo animal tests of chemical toxicity. Current HTS studies provide the community with rich toxicology information that has the potential to be integrated into toxicity research. The available in vitro toxicity data is updated daily in structured formats (e.g., deposited into PubChem and other data-sharing web portals) or in an unstructured way (papers, laboratory reports, toxicity Web site updates, etc.). The information derived from the current toxicity data is so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. For this reason, it is necessary to develop a big data approach when conducting modern chemical toxicity research. In vitro data for a compound, obtained from meaningful bioassays, can be viewed as a response profile that gives detailed information about the compound’s ability to affect relevant biological proteins/receptors. This information is critical for the evaluation of complex bioactivities (e.g., animal toxicities) and grows rapidly as big data in toxicology communities. This review focuses mainly on the existing structured in vitro data (e.g., PubChem data sets) as response profiles for compounds of environmental interest (e.g., potential human/animal toxicants). Potential modeling and mining tools to use the current big data pool in chemical toxicity research are also described. PMID:25195622

  15. Big data in chemical toxicity research: the use of high-throughput screening assays to identify potential toxicants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Jun; Kim, Marlene T; Boison, Abena; Sedykh, Alexander; Moran, Kimberlee

    2014-10-20

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays that measure the in vitro toxicity of environmental compounds have been widely applied as an alternative to in vivo animal tests of chemical toxicity. Current HTS studies provide the community with rich toxicology information that has the potential to be integrated into toxicity research. The available in vitro toxicity data is updated daily in structured formats (e.g., deposited into PubChem and other data-sharing web portals) or in an unstructured way (papers, laboratory reports, toxicity Web site updates, etc.). The information derived from the current toxicity data is so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. For this reason, it is necessary to develop a big data approach when conducting modern chemical toxicity research. In vitro data for a compound, obtained from meaningful bioassays, can be viewed as a response profile that gives detailed information about the compound's ability to affect relevant biological proteins/receptors. This information is critical for the evaluation of complex bioactivities (e.g., animal toxicities) and grows rapidly as big data in toxicology communities. This review focuses mainly on the existing structured in vitro data (e.g., PubChem data sets) as response profiles for compounds of environmental interest (e.g., potential human/animal toxicants). Potential modeling and mining tools to use the current big data pool in chemical toxicity research are also described. PMID:25195622

  16. Defining the Limits: Protein Aggregation and Toxicity In vivo

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, William M.; Klaips, Courtney L.; Serio, Tricia R.

    2014-01-01

    The proper folding of proteins to their functional forms is essential to cellular homeostasis. Perhaps not surprisingly, cells have evolved multiple pathways, some overlapping and others complementary, to resolve misfolded proteins when they arise, ranging from refolding through the action of molecular chaperones to elimination through regulated proteolytic mechanisms. These protein quality control pathways are sufficient, under normal conditions, to maintain a functioning proteome, but in response to diverse environmental, genetic, and/or stochastic events, protein misfolding exceeds the corrective capacity of these pathways, leading to the accumulation of aggregates and ultimately toxicity. Particularly devastating examples of these effects include certain neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington’s Disease, which are associated with the expansion of polyglutamine tracks in proteins. In these cases, protein misfolding and aggregation are clear contributors to pathogenesis, but uncovering the precise mechanistic links between the two events remains an area of active research. Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other model systems have uncovered previously unanticipated complexity in aggregation pathways, the contributions of protein quality control processes to them, and the cellular perturbations that result from them. Together these studies suggest that aggregate interactions and localization, rather than their size, are the crucial considerations in understanding the molecular basis of toxicity. PMID:24766537

  17. Restrained expression, a method to overproduce toxic membrane proteins by exploiting operator-repressor interactions.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, Anoop; Ridilla, Marc; Yernool, Dinesh A

    2011-01-01

    A major rate-limiting step in determining structures of membrane proteins is heterologous protein production. Toxicity often associated with rapid overexpression results in reduced biomass along with low yields of target protein. Mitigation of toxic effects was achieved using a method we call "restrained expression," a controlled reduction in the frequency of transcription initiation by exploiting the infrequent transitions of Lac repressor to a free state from its complex with the lac-operator site within a T7lac promoter that occur in the absence of the inducer isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside. In addition, production of the T7 RNA polymerase that drives transcription of the target is limited using the tightly regulated arabinose promoter in Escherichia coli strain BL21-AI. Using this approach, we can achieve a 200-fold range of green fluorescent protein expression levels. Application to members of a family of ion pumps results in 5- to 25-fold increases in expression over the benchmark BL21(DE3) host strain. A viral ion channel highly toxic to E. coli can also be overexpressed. In comparative analyses, restrained expression outperforms commonly used E. coli expression strategies. The mechanism underlying improved target protein yield arises from minimization of protein aggregation and proteolysis that reduce membrane integrity and cell viability. This study establishes a method to overexpress toxic proteins. PMID:21031485

  18. Low toxicity high temperature PMR polyimide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    In-situ polymerization of monomer reactants (PMR) type polyimides constitute an important class of ultra high performance composite matrix resins. PMR-15 is the best known and most widely used PMR polyimide. An object of the present invention is to provide a substantially improved high temperature PMR-15 system that exhibits better processability, toughness, and thermo-oxidative stability than PMR-15, as well as having a low toxicity. Another object is to provide new PMR polyimides that are useful as adhesives, moldings, and composite matrices. By the present invention, a new PMR polyimide comprises a mixture of the following compounds: 3,4'-oxydianiline (3,4'-ODA), NE, and BTDE which are then treated with heat. This PMR was designated LaRC-RP46 and has a broader processing window, better reproducibility of high quality composite parts, better elevated temperature mechanical properties, and higher retention of mechanical properties at an elevated temperature, particularly, at 371 C.

  19. Studies on protein characteristics and toxic constituents of Simarouba glauca oilseed meal.

    PubMed

    Govindaraju, K; Darukeshwara, J; Srivastava, Alok K

    2009-06-01

    In order to exploit the protein rich (47.7 g/100g) simarouba meal in food/feed, studies were conducted on its chemical composition with emphasis on protein characteristics and toxic constituents. Simarouba meal contained high calcium (143 mg/100g) and sodium (79 mg/100g). Saponins with triterpenoid aglycone (3.7 g/100g), alkaloids (1.01 g/100g), phenolics (0.95 g/100g) and phytic acid (0.73 g/100g) were the major toxic constituents identified in simarouba meal. TLC and HPLC results indicated that among different fractions of simarouba saponins, one dominant fraction accounted for about 28%. Proteins of simarouba recorded high in vitro digestibility (88%). SDS-PAGE revealed four major protein bands in molecular weight ranges of 20-24, 36-45 and 55-66 kDa. Apart from, glutamic acid (23.43 g/100g protein) and arginine (10.75 g/100g protein), simarouba protein contained high essential amino acids like leucine (7.76 g/100g protein), lysine (5.62 g/100g protein) and valine (6.12 g/100g protein). Among nutritional indices, simarouba meal recorded a good EAA Index (75.02), C-PER (1.90) and PDCAAS (1.0-Adult group). PMID:19286447

  20. Oligomerization and toxicity of A{beta} fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Caine, Joanne M.; Bharadwaj, Prashant R.; Sankovich, Sonia E.; Ciccotosto, Giuseppe D.; Streltsov, Victor A.; Varghese, Jose

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} We expressed amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) peptide as a soluble maltose binding protein fusion (MBP-A{beta}42 and MBP-A{beta}16). {yields} The full length A{beta} peptide fusion, MBP-A{beta}42, forms oligomeric species as determined by SDS-PAGE gels, gel filtration and DLS. {yields} The MBP-A{beta}42, but not MBP-A{beta}16 or MBP alone, is toxic to both yeast and mammalian cells as determined by toxicity assays. -- Abstract: This study has found that the Maltose binding protein A{beta}42 fusion protein (MBP-A{beta}42) forms soluble oligomers while the shorter MBP-A{beta}16 fusion and control MBP did not. MBP-A{beta}42, but neither MBP-A{beta}16 nor control MBP, was toxic in a dose-dependent manner in both yeast and primary cortical neuronal cells. This study demonstrates the potential utility of MBP-A{beta}42 as a reagent for drug screening assays in yeast and neuronal cell cultures and as a candidate for further A{beta}42 characterization.

  1. "Non-Toxic" Proteins of the Botulinum Toxin Complex Exert In-vivo Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes muscle paralysis and is the most potent toxin in nature. BoNT is associated with a complex of auxiliary "Non-Toxic" proteins, which constitute a large-sized toxin complex (L-TC). However, here we report that the "Non-Toxic" complex of serotype D botulinum L-TC, when administered to rats, exerts in-vivo toxicity on small-intestinal villi. Moreover, Serotype C and D of the "Non-Toxic" complex, but not BoNT, induced vacuole-formation in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), resulting in cell death. Our results suggest that the vacuole was formed in a manner distinct from the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) and Vibrio cholerae haemolysin induce vacuolation. We therefore hypothesise that the serotype C and D botulinum toxin complex is a functional hybrid of the neurotoxin and vacuolating toxin (VT) which arose from horizontal gene transfer from an ancestral BoNT-producing bacterium to a hypothetical VT-producing bacterium. PMID:27507612

  2. Effects of cadmium on Drosophila: toxicity, proteins, and transfer RNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, K.B.; Opresko, L.; Owenby, R.K.; Christie, N.T.

    1981-01-01

    An animal model with well-defined genetic and biochemical characteristics is needed for a detailed understanding of the mechanism of toxicity by metal ions. Drosophila melanogaster was used in the present study to demonstrate a number of responses to Cd/sup 2 +/, including lethality, age-related changes in resistance, alterations of the normal developmental changes in proteins, and alterations in specific transfer RNAs. Genotype-specific differences in resistance to Cd/sup 2 +/ were found: the v; bw strain was 5-10 times more resistant than su(s)/sup 2/v; bw for developmental exposure; upon treatment of the young adults the differences were in the same direction, but the sensitivities differed by only two- to three-fold. The adult fly became more sensitive to Cd/sup 2 +/ as it aged through 2 weeks, but changed little thereafter.The electrophoretic patterns of proteins of adult flies underwent changes during aging from 1 to 8 days; these changes were markedly altered by 0.55 mM CdCl/sub 2/ but not by 0.74 mM ZnCl/sub 2/ in the medium on which the flies were maintained. The appearance of queuosine-containing tRNA was stimulated by CdCl/sub 2/ (0.05-0.8 mM) in the growth medium, but not by ZnCl/sub 2/ (0.07-1.1 mM).Further studies involving D. melanogaster should be useful in defining specific interactions of toxic metal ions with macromolecules to enhance the understanding of the toxic effects of these and similar pollutants.

  3. Is Protein Phosphatase Inhibition Responsible for the Toxic Effects of Okadaic Acid in Animals?

    PubMed Central

    Munday, Rex

    2013-01-01

    Okadaic acid (OA) and its derivatives, which are produced by dinoflagellates of the genera Prorocentrum and Dinophysis, are responsible for diarrhetic shellfish poisoning in humans. In laboratory animals, these toxins cause epithelial damage and fluid accumulation in the gastrointestinal tract, and at high doses, they cause death. These substances have also been shown to be tumour promoters, and when injected into the brains of rodents, OA induces neuronal damage reminiscent of that seen in Alzheimer’s disease. OA and certain of its derivatives are potent inhibitors of protein phosphatases, which play many roles in cellular metabolism. In 1990, it was suggested that inhibition of these enzymes was responsible for the diarrhetic effect of these toxins. It is now repeatedly stated in the literature that protein phosphatase inhibition is not only responsible for the intestinal effects of OA and derivatives, but also for their acute toxic effects, their tumour promoting activity and their neuronal toxicity. In the present review, the evidence for the involvement of protein phosphatase inhibition in the induction of the toxic effects of OA and its derivatives is examined, with the conclusion that the mechanism of toxicity of these substances requires re-evaluation. PMID:23381142

  4. Differential Toxicity of Antibodies to the Prion Protein

    PubMed Central

    Hornemann, Simone; Herrmann, Uli S.; Arand, Michael; Hawke, Simon; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies against the prion protein PrPC can antagonize prion replication and neuroinvasion, and therefore hold promise as possible therapeutics against prion diseases. However, the safety profile of such antibodies is controversial. It was originally reported that the monoclonal antibody D13 exhibits strong target-related toxicity, yet a subsequent study contradicted these findings. We have reported that several antibodies against certain epitopes of PrPC, including antibody POM1, are profoundly neurotoxic, yet antibody ICSM18, with an epitope that overlaps with POM1, was reported to be innocuous when injected into mouse brains. In order to clarify this confusing situation, we assessed the neurotoxicity of antibodies D13 and ICSM18 with dose-escalation studies using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and various histological techniques. We report that both D13 and ICSM18 induce rapid, dose-dependent, on-target neurotoxicity. We conclude that antibodies directed to this region may not be suitable as therapeutics. No such toxicity was found when antibodies against the flexible tail of PrPC were administered. Any attempt at immunotherapy or immunoprophylaxis of prion diseases should account for these potential untoward effects. PMID:26821311

  5. A Bacillus thuringiensis S-Layer Protein Involved in Toxicity against Epilachna varivestis (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Guadalupe; Miranda-Rios, Juan; de la Riva, Gustavo; Pardo-López, Liliana; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra

    2006-01-01

    The use of Bacillus thuringiensis as a biopesticide is a viable alternative for insect control since the insecticidal Cry proteins produced by these bacteria are highly specific; harmless to humans, vertebrates, and plants; and completely biodegradable. In addition to Cry proteins, B. thuringiensis produces a number of extracellular compounds, including S-layer proteins (SLP), that contribute to virulence. The S layer is an ordered structure representing a proteinaceous paracrystalline array which completely covers the surfaces of many pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we report the identification of an S-layer protein by the screening of B. thuringiensis strains for activity against the coleopteran pest Epilachna varivestis (Mexican bean beetle; Coleoptera: Coccinellidae). We screened two B. thuringiensis strain collections containing unidentified Cry proteins and also strains isolated from dead insects. Some of the B. thuringiensis strains assayed against E. varivestis showed moderate toxicity. However, a B. thuringiensis strain (GP1) that was isolated from a dead insect showed a remarkably high insecticidal activity. The parasporal crystal produced by the GP1 strain was purified and shown to have insecticidal activity against E. varivestis but not against the lepidopteran Manduca sexta or Spodoptera frugiperda or against the dipteran Aedes aegypti. The gene encoding this protein was cloned and sequenced. It corresponded to an S-layer protein highly similar to previously described SLP in Bacillus anthracis (EA1) and Bacillus licheniformis (OlpA). The phylogenetic relationships among SLP from different bacteria showed that these proteins from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus sphaericus, B. anthracis, B. licheniformis, and B. thuringiensis are arranged in the same main group, suggesting similar origins. This is the first report that demonstrates that an S-layer protein is directly involved in toxicity to a coleopteran pest. PMID:16391064

  6. Effect of fiber, protein source and time of feeding on methotrexate toxicity in rats.

    PubMed

    Funk, M A; Baker, D H

    1991-10-01

    Several rat experiments were conducted to determine effects of fiber and alternate protein sources on methotrexate (MTX) toxicity associated with a casein-based semipurified diet. Additional experiments were conducted to determine the critical time of feeding in relation to toxicity development. Rats adapted to a casein-based semipurified diet developed severe anorexia and diarrhea on d 3 and 4 post-MTX dosing. Addition of amorphous cellulose to the semipurified casein-based diet slightly reduced toxicity symptoms. Additions of crystalline cellulose, hemicellulose and pectin did not lessen toxicity symptoms. Replacing casein with soybean concentrate totally alleviated the toxicity symptoms. Toxicity was lower when 25% of the protein normally supplied by casein was replaced with soybean concentrate, and no toxicity symptoms were present when 50% or more of the protein was provided by soybean concentrate. Replacing casein with whey isolate or hamburger had no effect on toxicity; replacing casein with egg albumen or corn gluten meal lessened toxicity symptoms but did not totally alleviate them. Feeding the casein-based diet only 1 d before and 1 d after MTX injection resulted in toxicity. However, feeding the same diet only after MTX injection did not cause toxicity. Results indicate that fiber sources have little effect on MTX toxicity, but replacing casein with soybean concentrate completely alleviates toxicity symptoms. Time of feeding affects subsequent development of toxicity. PMID:1662714

  7. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  8. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  9. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  10. Partial restoration of protein synthesis rates by the small molecule ISRIB prevents neurodegeneration without pancreatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Halliday, M; Radford, H; Sekine, Y; Moreno, J; Verity, N; le Quesne, J; Ortori, C A; Barrett, D A; Fromont, C; Fischer, P M; Harding, H P; Ron, D; Mallucci, G R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the transient repression of protein synthesis, mediated by the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). This is part of a wider integrated physiological response to maintain proteostasis in the face of ER stress, the dysregulation of which is increasingly associated with a wide range of diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders. In prion-diseased mice, persistently high levels of eIF2α cause sustained translational repression leading to catastrophic reduction of critical proteins, resulting in synaptic failure and neuronal loss. We previously showed that restoration of global protein synthesis using the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414 was profoundly neuroprotective, preventing clinical disease in prion-infected mice. However, this occured at the cost of toxicity to secretory tissue, where UPR activation is essential to healthy functioning. Here we show that pharmacological modulation of eIF2α-P-mediated translational inhibition can be achieved to produce neuroprotection without pancreatic toxicity. We found that treatment with the small molecule ISRIB, which restores translation downstream of eIF2α, conferred neuroprotection in prion-diseased mice without adverse effects on the pancreas. Critically, ISRIB treatment resulted in only partial restoration of global translation rates, as compared with the complete restoration of protein synthesis seen with GSK2606414. ISRIB likely provides sufficient rates of protein synthesis for neuronal survival, while allowing some residual protective UPR function in secretory tissue. Thus, fine-tuning the extent of UPR inhibition and subsequent translational de-repression uncouples neuroprotective effects from pancreatic toxicity. The data support the pursuit of this approach to develop new treatments for a range of neurodegenerative

  11. Partial restoration of protein synthesis rates by the small molecule ISRIB prevents neurodegeneration without pancreatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Halliday, M; Radford, H; Sekine, Y; Moreno, J; Verity, N; le Quesne, J; Ortori, C A; Barrett, D A; Fromont, C; Fischer, P M; Harding, H P; Ron, D; Mallucci, G R

    2015-01-01

    Activation of the PERK branch of the unfolded protein response (UPR) in response to protein misfolding within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the transient repression of protein synthesis, mediated by the phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2α). This is part of a wider integrated physiological response to maintain proteostasis in the face of ER stress, the dysregulation of which is increasingly associated with a wide range of diseases, particularly neurodegenerative disorders. In prion-diseased mice, persistently high levels of eIF2α cause sustained translational repression leading to catastrophic reduction of critical proteins, resulting in synaptic failure and neuronal loss. We previously showed that restoration of global protein synthesis using the PERK inhibitor GSK2606414 was profoundly neuroprotective, preventing clinical disease in prion-infected mice. However, this occured at the cost of toxicity to secretory tissue, where UPR activation is essential to healthy functioning. Here we show that pharmacological modulation of eIF2α-P-mediated translational inhibition can be achieved to produce neuroprotection without pancreatic toxicity. We found that treatment with the small molecule ISRIB, which restores translation downstream of eIF2α, conferred neuroprotection in prion-diseased mice without adverse effects on the pancreas. Critically, ISRIB treatment resulted in only partial restoration of global translation rates, as compared with the complete restoration of protein synthesis seen with GSK2606414. ISRIB likely provides sufficient rates of protein synthesis for neuronal survival, while allowing some residual protective UPR function in secretory tissue. Thus, fine-tuning the extent of UPR inhibition and subsequent translational de-repression uncouples neuroprotective effects from pancreatic toxicity. The data support the pursuit of this approach to develop new treatments for a range of neurodegenerative

  12. Essential bacterial helicases that counteract the toxicity of recombination proteins.

    PubMed

    Petit, Marie-Agnès; Ehrlich, Dusko

    2002-06-17

    PcrA, Rep and UvrD are three closely related bacterial helicases with a DExx signature. PcrA is encoded by Gram-positive bacteria and is essential for cell growth. Rep and UvrD are encoded by Gram-negative bacteria, and mutants lacking both helicases are also not viable. To understand the non-viability of the helicase mutants, we characterized spontaneous extragenic suppressors of a Bacillus subtilis pcrA null mutation. Here we report that one of these suppressors maps in recF and that previously isolated mutations in B.subtilis recF, recL, recO and recR, which belong to the same complementation group, all suppress the lethality of a pcrA mutation. Similarly, recF, recO or recR mutations suppress the lethality of the Escherichia coli rep uvrD double mutant. We conclude that RecFOR proteins are toxic in cells devoid of PcrA in Gram-positive bacteria, or Rep and UvrD in Gram-negative bacteria, and propose that the RecFOR proteins interfere with an essential cellular process, possibly replication, when DExx helicases PcrA, or Rep and UvrD are absent. PMID:12065426

  13. Reversible tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Walsh, R M; Bath, A P; Bance, M L

    2000-01-01

    We report an unusual case of tobramycin-induced bilateral high-frequency vestibular toxicity with subsequent clinical and objective evidence of functional recovery. In those patients with a clinical presentation suggestive of aminoglycoside-induced bilateral vestibular toxicity (ataxia and oscillopsia) and normal low-frequency (ENG-caloric) responses, high-frequency rotation chair testing should be performed to exclude a high-frequency vestibular deficit. PMID:10810261

  14. Aldehydes with high and low toxicities inactivate cells by damaging distinct cellular targets.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming-Zhang; Shoulkamy, Mahmoud I; Salem, Amir M H; Oba, Shunya; Goda, Mizuki; Nakano, Toshiaki; Ide, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    Aldehydes are genotoxic and cytotoxic molecules and have received considerable attention for their associations with the pathogenesis of various human diseases. In addition, exposure to anthropogenic aldehydes increases human health risks. The general mechanism of aldehyde toxicity involves adduct formation with biomolecules such as DNA and proteins. Although the genotoxic effects of aldehydes such as mutations and chromosomal aberrations are directly related to DNA damage, the role of DNA damage in the cytotoxic effects of aldehydes is poorly understood because concurrent protein damage by aldehydes has similar effects. In this study, we have analysed how saturated and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes exert cytotoxic effects through DNA and protein damage. Interestingly, DNA repair is essential for alleviating the cytotoxic effect of weakly toxic aldehydes such as saturated aldehydes but not highly toxic aldehydes such as long α,β-unsaturated aldehydes. Thus, highly toxic aldehydes inactivate cells exclusively by protein damage. Our data suggest that DNA interstrand crosslinks, but not DNA-protein crosslinks and DNA double-strand breaks, are the critical cytotoxic DNA damage induced by aldehydes. Further, we show that the depletion of intracellular glutathione and the oxidation of thioredoxin 1 partially account for the DNA damage-independent cytotoxicity of aldehydes. On the basis of these findings, we have proposed a mechanistic model of aldehyde cytotoxicity mediated by DNA and protein damage. PMID:26917342

  15. The protein corona protects against size- and dose-dependent toxicity of amorphous silica nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bantz, Christoph; Westmeier, Dana; Galla, Hajo J; Wang, Qiangbin; Kirkpatrick, James C; Nielsen, Peter; Maskos, Michael; Stauber, Roland H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Besides the lung and skin, the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is one of the main targets for accidental exposure or biomedical applications of nanoparticles (NP). Biological responses to NP, including nanotoxicology, are caused by the interaction of the NP with cellular membranes and/or cellular entry. Here, the physico-chemical characteristics of NP are widely discussed as critical determinants, albeit the exact mechanisms remain to be resolved. Moreover, proteins associate with NP in physiological fluids, forming the protein corona potentially transforming the biological identity of the particle and thus, adding an additional level of complexity for the bio–nano responses. Here, we employed amorphous silica nanoparticles (ASP) and epithelial GI tract Caco-2 cells as a model to study the biological impact of particle size as well as of the protein corona. Caco-2 or mucus-producing HT-29 cells were exposed to thoroughly characterized, negatively charged ASP of different size in the absence or presence of proteins. Comprehensive experimental approaches, such as quantifying cellular metabolic activity, microscopic observation of cell morphology, and high-throughput cell analysis revealed a dose- and time-dependent toxicity primarily upon exposure with ASP30 (Ø = 30 nm). Albeit smaller (ASP20, Ø = 20 nm) or larger particles (ASP100; Ø = 100 nm) showed a similar zeta potential, they both displayed only low toxicity. Importantly, the adverse effects triggered by ASP30/ASP30L were significantly ameliorated upon formation of the protein corona, which we found was efficiently established on all ASP studied. As a potential explanation, corona formation reduced ASP30 cellular uptake, which was however not significantly affected by ASP surface charge in our model. Collectively, our study uncovers an impact of ASP size as well as of the protein corona on cellular toxicity, which might be relevant for processes at the nano–bio interface in general. PMID:25247121

  16. Dissipation of insecticidal Cry1Ac protein and its toxicity to nontarget aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Liang; Du, Juan; Fang, Zhi-Xiang; You, Jing

    2013-11-20

    The widespread cultivation of Bacillus thuringiensis crops has raised public concerns on their risk to nontarget organisms. Persistence of Cry1Ac protein in soil, sediment and water and its toxicity to nontarget aquatic organisms were determined. The dissipation of Cry1Ac toxin was well described using first order kinetics, with the half-lives (DT50) ranging from 0.8 to 3.2, 2.1 to 7.6 and 11.0 to 15.8 d in soil, sediment and water, respectively. Microbial degradation played a key role in the dissipation of Cry1Ac toxin and high temperature accelerated the processes. Cry1Ac toxin was more toxic to the midge Chironomus dilutus than the amphipod Hyalella azteca, with the median lethal concentration (LC50) of C. dilutus being 155 ng/g dry weight and 201 ng/mL in 10-d sediment and 4-d water bioassays, respectively. While Cry1Ac toxin showed toxicity to the midges, risk of Bt proteins to aquatic nontarget organisms was limited because their environmentally relevant concentrations were much lower than the LC50s. PMID:24151928

  17. [Toxic effects of high concentrations of ammonia on Euglena gracilis].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Shi, Xiao-Rong; Cui, Yi-Bin; Li, Mei

    2013-11-01

    Ammonia is among the common contaminants in aquatic environments. The present study aimed at evaluation of the toxicity of ammonia at high concentration by detecting its effects on the growth, pigment contents, antioxidant enzyme activities, and DNA damage (comet assay) of a unicellular microalga, Euglena gracilis. Ammonia restrained the growth of E. gracilis, while at higher concentrations, ammonia showed notable inhibition effect, the growth at 2 000 mg x L(-1) was restrained to 55.7% compared with that of the control; The contents of photosynthetic pigments and protein went up with increasing ammonia dosage and decreased when the ammonia concentration was above 1000 mg x L(-1); In addition, there was an obvious increase in SOD and POD activities, at higher concentration (2 000 mg x L(-1)), activities of SOD and POD increased by 30.7% and 49.4% compared with those of the control, indicating that ammonia could promote activities of antioxidant enzymes in E. gracilis; The degree of DNA damage observed in the comet assay increased with increasing ammonia concentration, which suggested that high dose of ammonia may have potential mutagenicity on E. gracilis. PMID:24455949

  18. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    SciTech Connect

    Sah, Shweta; Vandenberg, Albert; Smits, Judit

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  19. Accelerated Hematopoietic Toxicity by High Energy 56Fe Radiation

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Kamal; Suman, Shubhankar; Trani, Daniela; Doiron, Kathryn; Rotolo, Jimmy A.; Kallakury, Bhaskar V. S.; Kolesnick, Richard; Cole, Michael F.; Fornace, Albert J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose There is little information on the relative toxicity of highly charged (Z) high-energy (HZE) radiation in animal models compared to γ or x-rays, and the general assumption based on in vitro studies has been that acute toxicity is substantially greater. Methods C57BL/6J mice were irradiated with 56Fe ions (1 GeV/nucleon), and acute (within 30 d) toxicity compared to that of γ rays or protons (1 GeV). To assess relative hematopoietic and gastrointestinal toxicity, the effects of 56Fe ions were compared to γ rays using complete blood count (CBC), bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage colony forming unit (GM-CFU), terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay for apoptosis in bone marrow, and intestinal crypt survival. Results Although onset was more rapid, 56Fe ions were only slightly more toxic than γ rays or protons with lethal dose (LD)50/30 (a radiation dose at which 50% lethality occurs at 30-day) values of 5.8, 7.25, and 6.8 Gy respectively with relative biologic effectiveness for 56Fe ions of 1.25 and 1.06 for protons. Conclusions 56Fe radiation caused accelerated and more severe hematopoietic toxicity. Early mortality correlated with more profound leukopenia and subsequent sepsis. Results indicate that there is selective enhanced toxicity to bone marrow progenitor cells, which are typically resistant to γ rays, and bone marrow stem cells, because intestinal crypt cells did not show increased HZE toxicity. PMID:22077279

  20. The major vault protein is related to the toxic anion resistance protein (TelA) family.

    PubMed

    Suprenant, Kathy A; Bloom, Nathan; Fang, Jianwen; Lushington, Gerald

    2007-03-01

    Vaults are barrel-shaped ribonucleoprotein particles that are abundant in certain tumors and multidrug resistant cancer cells. Prokaryotic relatives of the major vault protein, MVP, have not been identified. We used sequence analysis and molecular modeling to show that MVP and the toxic anion resistance protein, TelA of Rhodobacter sphaeroides strain 2.4.1, share a novel fold that consists of a three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet. Because of this strong structural correspondence, we examined whether mammalian cell vaults respond to tellurite treatment. In the presence of the oxyanion tellurite, large vault aggregates, or vaultosomes, appear at the cell periphery in 15 min or less. Vaultosome formation is temperature-dependent, reversible, and occurs in normal human umbilical vein endothelial cells as well as transformed HeLa cervical cancer cells. Vaultosome formation is not restricted to tellurite and occurs in the presence of other toxic oxyanions (selenate, selinite, arsenate, arsenite, vanadate). In addition, vaultosomes form independently from other stress-induced ribonucleoprotein complexes, stress granules and aggresomes. Vaultosome formation is therefore a unique cellular response to an environmental toxin. PMID:17337707

  1. High throughput protein production screening

    DOEpatents

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  2. Multidrug Resistance Protein-4 Influences Aspirin Toxicity in Human Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Isabella; Ciuffetta, Ambra; Temperilli, Flavia; Ferrandino, Francesca; Zicari, Alessandra; Pulcinelli, Fabio M; Felli, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    Overexpression of efflux transporters, in human cells, is a mechanism of resistance to drug and also to chemotherapy. We found that multidrug resistance protein-4 (MRP4) overexpression has a role in reducing aspirin action in patients after bypass surgery and, very recently, we found that aspirin enhances platelet MRP4 levels through peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPARα). In the present paper, we verified whether exposure of human embryonic kidney-293 cells (Hek-293) to aspirin modifies MRP4 gene expression and its correlation with drug elimination and cell toxicity. We first investigated the effect of high-dose aspirin in Hek-293 and we showed that aspirin is able to increase cell toxicity dose-dependently. Furthermore, aspirin effects, induced at low dose, already enhance MRP4 gene expression. Based on these findings, we compared cell viability in Hek-293, after high-dose aspirin treatment, in MRP4 overexpressing cells, either after aspirin pretreatment or in MRP4 transfected cells; in both cases, a decrease of selective aspirin cell growth inhibition was observed, in comparison with the control cultures. Altogether, these data suggest that exposing cells to low nontoxic aspirin dosages can induce gene expression alterations that may lead to the efflux transporter protein overexpression, thus increasing cellular detoxification of aspirin. PMID:26491233

  3. Caterpillar attack triggers accumulation of the toxic maize protein RIP2.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Herde, Marco; Ray, Swayamjit; Castano-Duque, Lina; Howe, Gregg A; Luthe, Dawn S

    2014-02-01

    Some plant-derived anti-herbivore defensive proteins are induced by insect feeding, resist digestion in the caterpillar gut and are eliminated in the frass. We have identified several maize proteins in fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) frass that potentially play a role in herbivore defense. Furthermore, the toxicity of one of these proteins, ribosome-inactivating protein 2 (RIP2), was assessed and factors regulating its accumulation were determined. To understand factors regulating RIP2 protein accumulation, maize (Zea mays) plants were infested with fall armyworm larvae or treated with exogenous hormones. The toxicity of recombinant RIP2 protein against fall armyworm was tested. The results show that RIP2 protein is synthesized as an inactive proenzyme that can be processed in the caterpillar gut. Also, caterpillar feeding, but not mechanical wounding, induced foliar RIP2 protein accumulation. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that RIP2 transcripts were rapidly induced (1 h) and immunoblot analysis indicated that RIP2 protein accumulated soon after attack and was present in the leaf for up to 4 d after caterpillar removal. Several phytohormones, including methyl jasmonate, ethylene, and abscisic acid, regulated RIP2 protein expression. Furthermore, bioassays of purified recombinant RIP2 protein against fall armyworm significantly retarded caterpillar growth. We conclude that the toxic protein RIP2 is induced by caterpillar feeding and is one of a potential suite of proteins that defend maize against chewing herbivores. PMID:24304477

  4. In vivo protection against Tityus serrulatus scorpion toxins by immunization of mice with a non-toxic protein.

    PubMed

    Moreira-Ferreira, A M; Kalapothakis, E; Diniz, C R; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    1998-02-01

    The possibility of inducing a humoral immune response able to produce neutralizing antibodies against the lethal effects of scorpion toxins was evaluated in the mouse model. A non-toxic protein (TsNTxP) was purified from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus by combining gel filtration, ion exchange and reverse phase HPLC chromatographic steps. After four injections of TsNTxP the mice developed an IgG response. The anti-TsNTxP antibodies had a comparable high cross-reactivity for the crude venom, toxic fraction (toxic fraction of venom that represents most of the toxicity of the crude venom -- TsTFG50) and TsIV, a representative alpha-type toxin of T. serrulatus, and moderate binding capacity for TsVII, a representative beta-type toxin. In vitro neutralization assays indicated that preincubation of a lethal dose of the toxic fraction with immune serum strongly reduced its toxicity. In vivo protection assays showed that mice immunized with TsNTxP resisted a challenge of 10 LD50 (s.c.) of the toxic fraction of T. serrulatus venom. PMID:9620580

  5. A Key Role for Lysine Residues in Amyloid β-Protein Folding, Assembly, and Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions is important in initiating the aberrant self-assembly process that leads to formation of toxic oligomers and aggregates by multiple disease-related proteins, including amyloid β-protein (Aβ), whose self-assembly is believed to initiate brain pathogenesis in Alzheimer’s disease. Lys residues play key roles in this process and participate in both types of interaction. They also are the target of our recently reported molecular tweezer inhibitors. To obtain further insight into the role of the two Lys residues in Aβ assembly and toxicity, here we substituted each by Ala in both Aβ40 and Aβ42 and studied the impact of the substitution on Aβ oligomerization, aggregation, and toxicity. Our data show that each substitution has a major impact on Aβ assembly and toxicity, with significant differences depending on peptide length (40 versus 42 amino acids) and the position of the substitution. In particular, Lys16→Ala substitution dramatically reduces Aβ toxicity. The data support the use of compounds targeting Lys residues specifically as inhibitors of Aβ toxicity and suggest that exploring the role of Lys residues in other disease-related amyloidogenic proteins may help understanding the mechanisms of aggregation and toxicity of these proteins. PMID:22860216

  6. Legal but lethal: functional protein aggregation at the verge of toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, Angelika; Falsone, S. Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders are linked to irreversible protein aggregation, a process that usually comes along with toxicity and serious cellular damage. However, it is emerging that protein aggregation can also serve for physiological purposes, as impressively shown for prions. While the aggregation of this protein family was initially considered exclusively toxic in mammalians organisms, it is now almost clear that many other proteins adopt prion-like attributes to rationally polymerize into higher order complexes with organized physiologic roles. This implies that cells can tolerate at least in some measure the accumulation of inherently dangerous protein aggregates for functional profit. This review summarizes currently known strategies that living organisms adopt to preserve beneficial aggregation, and to prevent the catastrophic accumulation of toxic aggregates that frequently accompany neurodegeneration. PMID:25741240

  7. Modulation of Protein Fermentation Does Not Affect Fecal Water Toxicity: A Randomized Cross-Over Study in Healthy Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Windey, Karen; De Preter, Vicky; Louat, Thierry; Schuit, Frans; Herman, Jean; Vansant, Greet; Verbeke, Kristin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Protein fermentation results in production of metabolites such as ammonia, amines and indolic, phenolic and sulfur-containing compounds. In vitro studies suggest that these metabolites might be toxic. However, human and animal studies do not consistently support these findings. We modified protein fermentation in healthy subjects to assess the effects on colonic metabolism and parameters of gut health, and to identify metabolites associated with toxicity. Design After a 2-week run-in period with normal protein intake (NP), 20 healthy subjects followed an isocaloric high protein (HP) and low protein (LP) diet for 2 weeks in a cross-over design. Protein fermentation was estimated from urinary p-cresol excretion. Fecal metabolite profiles were analyzed using GC-MS and compared using cluster analysis. DGGE was used to analyze microbiota composition. Fecal water genotoxicity and cytotoxicity were determined using the Comet assay and the WST-1-assay, respectively, and were related to the metabolite profiles. Results Dietary protein intake was significantly higher during the HP diet compared to the NP and LP diet. Urinary p-cresol excretion correlated positively with protein intake. Fecal water cytotoxicity correlated negatively with protein fermentation, while fecal water genotoxicity was not correlated with protein fermentation. Heptanal, 3-methyl-2-butanone, dimethyl disulfide and 2-propenyl ester of acetic acid are associated with genotoxicity and indole, 1-octanol, heptanal, 2,4-dithiapentane, allyl-isothiocyanate, 1-methyl-4-(1-methylethenyl)-benzene, propionic acid, octanoic acid, nonanoic acid and decanoic acid with cytotoxicity. Conclusion This study does not support a role of protein fermentation in gut toxicity. The identified metabolites can provide new insight into colonic health. Trial Registration ClinicalTrial.gov NCT01280513 PMID:23285019

  8. Formation of a Protein Corona on Silver Nanoparticles Mediates Cellular Toxicity via Scavenger Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Shannahan, Jonathan H.; Podila, Ramakrishna; Aldossari, Abdullah A.; Emerson, Hilary; Powell, Brian A.; Ke, Pu Chun; Rao, Apparao M.; Brown, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Addition of a protein corona (PC) or protein adsorption layer on the surface of nanomaterials following their introduction into physiological environments may modify their activity, bio-distribution, cellular uptake, clearance, and toxicity. We hypothesize that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) will associate with proteins common to human serum and cell culture media forming a PC that will impact cell activation and cytotoxicity. Furthermore, the role of scavenger receptor BI (SR-BI) in mediating this toxicity was evaluated. Citrate-suspended 20 nm AgNPs were incubated with human serum albumin (HSA), bovine serum albumin (BSA), high-density lipoprotein (HDL), or water (control) to form a PC. AgNPs associated with each protein (HSA, BSA, and HDL) forming PCs as assessed by electron microscopy, hyperspectral analysis, ζ-potential, and hydrodynamic size. Addition of the PC decreased uptake of AgNPs by rat lung epithelial and rat aortic endothelial cells. Hyperspectral analysis demonstrated a loss of the AgNP PC following internalization. Cells demonstrated concentration-dependent cytotoxicity following exposure to AgNPs with or without PCs (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25 or 50 μg/ml). All PC-coated AgNPs were found to activate cells by inducing IL-6 mRNA expression. A small molecule SR-BI inhibitor was utilized to determine the role of SR-BI in the observed effects. Pretreatment with the SR-BI inhibitor decreased internalization of AgNPs with or without PCs, and reduced both cytotoxicity and IL-6 mRNA expression. This study characterizes the formation of a PC on AgNPs and demonstrates its influence on cytotoxicity and cell activation through a cell surface receptor. PMID:25326241

  9. Developmental toxicity assay using high content screening of zebrafish embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lantz-McPeak, Susan; Guo, Xiaoqing; Cuevas, Elvis; Dumas, Melanie; Newport, Glenn D.; Ali, Syed F.; Paule, Merle G.; Kanungo, Jyotshna

    2016-01-01

    Typically, time-consuming standard toxicological assays using the zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model evaluate mortality and teratogenicity after exposure during the first 2 days post-fertilization. Here we describe an automated image-based high content screening (HCS) assay to identify the teratogenic/embryotoxic potential of compounds in zebrafish embryos in vivo. Automated image acquisition was performed using a high content microscope system. Further automated analysis of embryo length, as a statistically quantifiable endpoint of toxicity, was performed on images post-acquisition. The biological effects of ethanol, nicotine, ketamine, caffeine, dimethyl sulfoxide and temperature on zebrafish embryos were assessed. This automated developmental toxicity assay, based on a growth-retardation endpoint should be suitable for evaluating the effects of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants in a high throughput manner. This approach can significantly expedite the screening of potential teratogens and developmental toxicants, thereby improving the current risk assessment process by decreasing analysis time and required resources. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. PMID:24871937

  10. Cellular toxicity of yeast prion protein Rnq1 can be modulated by N-terminal wild type huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Ratnika; Patel, Vishal; Saleh, Aliabbas A; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-15

    Aggregation of the N-terminal human mutant huntingtin and the consequent toxicity in the yeast model of Huntington's disease (HD) requires the presence of Rnq1 protein (Rnq1p) in its prion conformation [RNQ1(+)]. The understanding of interaction of wild-type huntingtin (wt-Htt) with the amyloidogenic prion has some gaps. In this work, we show that N-terminal fragment of wt-Htt (N-wt-Htt) ameliorated the toxic effect of [RNQ1(+)] depending on expression levels of both proteins. When the expression of N-wt-Htt was high, it increased the expression and delayed the aggregation of [RNQ1(+)]. As the expression of N-wt-Htt was reduced, it formed high molecular weight aggregates along with the prion. Even when sequestered by [RNQ1(+)], the beneficial effect of N-wt-Htt on expression of Rnq1p and on cell survival was evident. Huntingtin protein ameliorated toxicity due to the prion protein [RNQ1(+)] in yeast cells in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in increase in cell survival, hinting at its probable role as a component of the proteostasis network of the cell. Taking into account the earlier reports of the beneficial effect of expression of N-wt-Htt on the aggregation of mutant huntingtin, the function of wild-type huntingtin as an inhibitor of protein aggregation in the cell needs to be explored. PMID:26628321

  11. Toxicity and oxidative stress of different forms of organic selenium and dietary protein in mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoffman, D.J.; Heinz, G.H.; LeCaptain, L.J.; Eisemann, J.D.; Pendleton, G.W.

    1996-01-01

    Concentrations of over 100 ppm (mg/kg) selenium (Se) have been found in aquatic plants and insects associated with irrigation drainwater and toxicity to fish and wildlife. Composition of diet for wild ducklings may vary in selenium-contaminated environments. Earlier studies have compared toxicities and oxidative stress of Se as selenite to those of seleno-DL-methionine (DL) in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). This study compares DL, seleno-L-methionine (L), selenized yeast (Y) and selenized wheat (W). Day-old mallard ducklings received an untreated diet (controls) containing 75% wheat (22% protein) or the same diet containing 15 or 30 ppm Se in the above forms except for 30 ppm Se as W. After 2 weeks blood and liver samples were collected for biochemical assays and Se analysis. All forms of selenium caused significant increases in plasma and hepatic glutathione peroxidase activities. Se as L at 30 ppm in the diet was the most toxic form, resulting in high mortality (64%) and impaired growth (>50%) in survivors and the greatest increase in ratio of oxidized to reduced hepatic glutathione (GSH). Se as both L and DL decreased the concentrations of hepatic GSH and total thiols. Se as Y accumulated the least in liver (approximately 50% of other forms) and had less effect on GSH and total thiols. In a second experiment, in which the basal diet was a commercial duck feed (22 % protein), survival was not affected by 30 ppm Se as DL, L, or Y and oxidative effects on GSH metabolism were less pronounced than with the wheat diet.

  12. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins to Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Bouwer, Gustav

    2012-01-01

    The susceptibility of one of the most important pests in southern Africa, Helicoverpa armigera (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins was evaluated by bioassay. Cry proteins were produced in Escherichia coli BL21 cells that were transformed with plasmids containing one of six cry genes. The toxicity of each Cry protein to H. armigera larvae was determined by the diet contamination method for second instar larvae and the droplet feeding method for neonate larvae. For each of the proteins, dose-mortality and dose-growth inhibition responses were analyzed and the median lethal dose (LD(50)) and median inhibitory dose (ID(50)) determined. Second instar larvae were consistently less susceptible to the evaluated Cry proteins than neonate larvae. The relative toxicity of Cry proteins ranked differently between neonate larvae and second instar larvae. On the basis of the LD(50) and ID(50) values, Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and Cry2Aa were the most toxic of the evaluated proteins to H. armigera larvae. The study provides an initial benchmark of the toxicity of individual Cry proteins to H. armigera in South Africa. PMID:22019386

  13. In vitro bioassay for reactive toxicity towards proteins implemented for water quality monitoring.

    PubMed

    Tang, Janet Y M; Glenn, Eva; Thoen, Hanne; Escher, Beate I

    2012-03-01

    , Australia were used to evaluate the applicability of the E. coli assay for reactive toxicity in water samples. While the EC(50) values of the GSH+ strain showed similar trends as in other biological endpoints over the various treatment chains, the specific response indicative of protein damage was only observed in samples that had undergone chlorination as a disinfection process. High natural organic matter or other matrix components disturbed the bioassay so much that we recommend it for future routine testing only in tertiary treated water or drinking water. PMID:22331350

  14. Molecular and Insecticidal Characterization of a Novel Cry-Related Protein from Bacillus Thuringiensis Toxic against Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Leopoldo; Muñoz, Delia; Berry, Colin; Murillo, Jesús; Ruiz de Escudero, Iñigo; Caballero, Primitivo

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the insecticidal activity of a novel Bacillus thuringiensis Cry-related protein with a deduced 799 amino acid sequence (~89 kDa) and ~19% pairwise identity to the 95-kDa-aphidicidal protein (sequence number 204) from patent US 8318900 and ~40% pairwise identity to the cancer cell killing Cry proteins (parasporins Cry41Ab1 and Cry41Aa1), respectively. This novel Cry-related protein contained the five conserved amino acid blocks and the three conserved domains commonly found in 3-domain Cry proteins. The protein exhibited toxic activity against the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer) (Homoptera: Aphididae) with the lowest mean lethal concentration (LC50 = 32.7 μg/mL) reported to date for a given Cry protein and this insect species, whereas it had no lethal toxicity against the Lepidoptera of the family Noctuidae Helicoverpa armigera (Hübner), Mamestra brassicae (L.), Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), S. frugiperda (J.E. Smith) and S. littoralis (Boisduval), at concentrations as high as ~3.5 μg/cm2. This novel Cry-related protein may become a promising environmentally friendly tool for the biological control of M. persicae and possibly also for other sap sucking insect pests. PMID:25384108

  15. Neutralizing capacity of antibodies elicited by a non-toxic protein purified from the venom of the scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    PubMed

    Chávez-Olórtegui, C; Kalapothakis, E; Ferreira, A M; Ferreira, A P; Diniz, C R

    1997-02-01

    Polyclonal rabbit antibodies raised against a non-toxic protein (TsNTxP) purified from the toxic fraction of the crude venom of Tityus serrulatus can neutralize the effects of the venom. The antigenic specificities of anti-TsNTxP were compared by an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay using TsNTxP, TstFG50 (toxic fraction of venom that represents most of the toxicity of the crude venom), and crude venoms from T. serrulatus, T. bahiensis, T. cambridgei, T. stigmurus, Androctonus australis Hector and Centruroides sculpturatus to coat microtitration plates. The anti-TsNTxP antibodies had a comparable high cross-reactivity with the toxic fraction and crude venom of T. serrulatus, moderate binding capacity for T. bahiensis, T. cambridgei, T. stigmurus and were unable to recognize the venoms of A. australis Hector and C. sculpturatus. Quantities of venom equivalent to 20 LD50 were effectively neutralized by 1 ml of the anti-TsNTxP serum. This result shows that this protein may be of interest in the production of antivenoms for clinical use. PMID:9080578

  16. Quinone-induced protein handling changes: Implications for major protein handling systems in quinone-mediated toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Rui; Siegel, David; Ross, David

    2014-10-15

    Para-quinones such as 1,4-Benzoquinone (BQ) and menadione (MD) and ortho-quinones including the oxidation products of catecholamines, are derived from xenobiotics as well as endogenous molecules. The effects of quinones on major protein handling systems in cells; the 20/26S proteasome, the ER stress response, autophagy, chaperone proteins and aggresome formation, have not been investigated in a systematic manner. Both BQ and aminochrome (AC) inhibited proteasomal activity and activated the ER stress response and autophagy in rat dopaminergic N27 cells. AC also induced aggresome formation while MD had little effect on any protein handling systems in N27 cells. The effect of NQO1 on quinone induced protein handling changes and toxicity was examined using N27 cells stably transfected with NQO1 to generate an isogenic NQO1-overexpressing line. NQO1 protected against BQ–induced apoptosis but led to a potentiation of AC- and MD-induced apoptosis. Modulation of quinone-induced apoptosis in N27 and NQO1-overexpressing cells correlated only with changes in the ER stress response and not with changes in other protein handling systems. These data suggested that NQO1 modulated the ER stress response to potentiate toxicity of AC and MD, but protected against BQ toxicity. We further demonstrated that NQO1 mediated reduction to unstable hydroquinones and subsequent redox cycling was important for the activation of the ER stress response and toxicity for both AC and MD. In summary, our data demonstrate that quinone-specific changes in protein handling are evident in N27 cells and the induction of the ER stress response is associated with quinone-mediated toxicity. - Highlights: • Unstable hydroquinones contributed to quinone-induced ER stress and toxicity.

  17. Protein kinase c inhibitor attenuates cyanide toxicity in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Maduh, E.U.; Nealley, E.W.; Song, H.; Wang, P.C.; Baskin, S.I.

    1995-12-31

    We have examined the effect of pretreatment with a potent protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor, l-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methylpiperazine (H-7), against metabolic alterations induced by sodium cyanide (NaCN), 4.2 mg/kg, in brain of anesthetized male micropigs (6-10 kg). Brain high energy phosphates were analyzed using a 3/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic surface coil in a 4.7 Tesla horizontal bore magnet. H-7, I mg/kg, was given intravenously (i.v.) 30 min before NaCN challenge (H-7 + CN). Prior to NaCN, H-7, or H-7 + CN administration, baseline 31P resonance spectra of 1-min duration were acquired for 5-10 min, and continued for an additional 60 min following i.v. NaCN injection, each animal serving as its own control. Peaks were identified as phosphomonoester (PME), inorganic phosphate (Pi), phosphodiester (PDE), phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), based on their respective chemical shifts. Without H-7 pretreatment, NaCN effects were marked by a rising Pi and a declining PCr peak 2 min after injection, with only 2/5 of the animals surviving the 60 min experiment. Through a pretreatment period of 30 min, H-7 did not affect baseline cell energy profile as reflected by the 31P-NMR spectra, but in its presence, those changes (i.e. diminishing PCr and rising Pi peaks) elicited by NaCN were markedly blunted; 4/5 of the animals in this group survived the NaCN challenge. It is proposed that H-7, a pharmacologic inhibitor of PKC, may be useful in CN antagonism, underscoring the role of PKC in cyanide intoxication.

  18. Antitumor immunotherapeutic and toxic properties of an HDL-conjugated chimeric IL-15 fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Maria C; Fioravanti, Jessica; Rodriguez, Inmaculada; Hervas-Stubbs, Sandra; Azpilikueta, Arantza; Mazzolini, Guillermo; Gúrpide, Alfonso; Prieto, Jesus; Pardo, Julian; Berraondo, Pedro; Melero, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-15 effects on CD8 T and natural killer (NK) lymphocytes hold promise to treat cancer. Fusion proteins have been engineered to provide IL-15 receptor alpha (IL-15Rα) mediated trans-presentation to lymphocytes and extend the plasma half-life of the cytokine. In this study, we report on a triple fusion protein combining apolipoprotein A-I (Apo A-I), IL-15, and IL-15Rα's sushi domain. Apo A-I conveys IL-15 to high-density lipoproteins (HDL), from which the cytokine is trans-presented by the IL-15Rα's sushi domain. Such a construction was tested by hydrodynamic gene transfer to the liver of mice. Lethal toxicity was observed upon injection of 10 μg of the expression plasmid. Mice died from an acute lymphocytic pneumonitis in which T and NK cells dominate a severe inflammatory infiltrate. Importantly, mice devoid of NK cells were not susceptible to such toxicity and mice lacking granzymes A and B also survived the otherwise lethal gene transfer. Lower plasmid doses (<2.5 μg) were tolerated and dramatically increased the numbers of NK and memory CD8 T lymphocytes in the liver, spleen, and lungs, to the point of rescuing the deficiency of such lymphocyte subsets in IL-15Rα(-/-) mice. Doses of plasmid within the therapeutic window successfully treated metastatic tumor models, including B16OVA lung metastasis of melanoma and MC38 colon cancer liver metastasis. Sushi-IL-15-Apo as a recombinant protein was also bioactive in vivo, became conjugated to HDL, and displayed immunotherapeutic effects against metastatic disease. PMID:23149919

  19. Predictive model of rat reproductive toxicity from ToxCast high throughput screening.

    PubMed

    Martin, Matthew T; Knudsen, Thomas B; Reif, David M; Houck, Keith A; Judson, Richard S; Kavlock, Robert J; Dix, David J

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening (HTS) for profiling bioactivity and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase I tested 309 well-characterized chemicals in more than 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular responses. Of the 309 environmental chemicals in Phase I, 256 were linked to high-quality rat multigeneration reproductive toxicity studies in the relational Toxicity Reference Database. Reproductive toxicants were defined here as having achieved a reproductive lowest-observed-adverse-effect level of less than 500 mg kg(-1) day(-1). Eight-six chemicals were identified as reproductive toxicants in the rat, and 68 of those had sufficient in vitro bioactivity to model. Each assay was assessed for univariate association with the identified reproductive toxicants. Significantly associated assays were linked to gene sets and used for the subsequent predictive modeling. Using linear discriminant analysis and fivefold cross-validation, a robust and stable predictive model was produced capable of identifying rodent reproductive toxicants with 77% ± 2% and 74% ± 5% (mean ± SEM) training and test cross-validation balanced accuracies, respectively. With a 21-chemical external validation set, the model was 76% accurate, further indicating the model's potential for prioritizing the many thousands of environmental chemicals with little to no hazard information. The biological features of the model include steroidal and nonsteroidal nuclear receptors, cytochrome P450 enzyme inhibition, G protein-coupled receptors, and cell signaling pathway readouts-mechanistic information suggesting additional targeted, integrated testing strategies and potential applications of in vitro HTS to risk assessment. PMID:21565999

  20. Acclimation and toxicity of high ammonium concentrations to unicellular algae.

    PubMed

    Collos, Yves; Harrison, Paul J

    2014-03-15

    A literature review on the effects of high ammonium concentrations on the growth of 6 classes of microalgae suggests the following rankings. Mean optimal ammonium concentrations were 7600, 2500, 1400, 340, 260, 100 μM for Chlorophyceae, Cyanophyceae, Prymnesiophyceae, Diatomophyceae, Raphidophyceae, and Dinophyceae respectively and their tolerance to high toxic ammonium levels was 39,000, 13,000, 2300, 3600, 2500, 1200 μM respectively. Field ammonium concentrations <100 μM would not likely reduce the growth rate of most microalgae. Chlorophytes were significantly more tolerant to high ammonium than diatoms, prymnesiophytes, dinoflagellates, and raphidophytes. Cyanophytes were significantly more tolerant than dinoflagellates which were the least tolerant. A smaller but more complete data set was used to estimate ammonium EC₅₀ values, and the ranking was: Chlorophyceae>Cyanophyceae, Dinophyceae, Diatomophyceae, and Raphidophyceae. Ammonia toxicity is mainly attributed to NH₃ at pHs >9 and at pHs <8, toxicity is likely associated with the ammonium ion rather than ammonia. PMID:24533997

  1. Ubiquilin overexpression reduces GFP-polyalanine-induced protein aggregates and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hongmin; Monteiro, Mervyn J. . E-mail: monteiro@umbi.umd.edu

    2007-08-01

    Several human disorders are associated with an increase in a continuous stretch of alanine amino acids in proteins. These so-called polyalanine expansion diseases share many similarities with polyglutamine-related disorders, including a length-dependent reiteration of amino acid induction of protein aggregation and cytotoxicity. We previously reported that overexpression of ubiquilin reduces protein aggregates and toxicity of expanded polyglutamine proteins. Here, we demonstrate a similar role for ubiquilin toward expanded polyalanine proteins. Overexpression of ubiquilin-1 in HeLa cells reduced protein aggregates and the cytotoxicity associated with expression of a transfected nuclear-targeted GFP-fusion protein containing 37-alanine repeats (GFP-A37), in a dose dependent manner. Ubiquilin coimmunoprecipitated more with GFP proteins containing a 37-polyalanine tract compared to either 7 (GFP-A7), or no alanine tract (GFP). Moreover, overexpression of ubiquilin suppressed the increased vulnerability of HeLa cell lines stably expressing the GFP-A37 fusion protein to oxidative stress-induced cell death compared to cell lines expressing GFP or GFP-A7 proteins. By contrast, siRNA knockdown of ubiquilin expression in the GFP-A37 cell line was associated with decreased cellular proliferation, and increases in GFP protein aggregates, nuclear fragmentation, and cell death. Our results suggest that boosting ubiquilin levels in cells might provide a universal and attractive strategy to prevent toxicity of proteins containing reiterative expansions of amino acids involved in many human diseases.

  2. Effects of protein-calorie malnutrition and refeeding on fluorouracil toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gamelli, R.L.; Foster, R.S. Jr.

    1983-10-01

    Mice were used to study the effects of protein-calorie malnutrition and its reversal on granulocyte-macrophage production and fluorouracil's toxic effect on bone marrow. An in vitro quantitative clonal culture technique for bone marrow granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cells (GM-CFC) was used. Animals on a protein-free but otherwise complete diet for ten days had a significant contraction in total marrow cellularity and GM-CFC numbers paralleling the animal's weight loss. The acute toxic effect of fluorouracil on bone marrow was not increased in protein-deprived animals. On refeeding, there was a biphasic response in the degree of toxic effect on marrow. Animals refed for one day had significantly increased fluorouracil-related marrow abnormalities. However, animals refed for four days, when marrows were repleted, were partially protected from the drug's cytotoxic effects. The increased sensitivity in mice refed for one day was related to more GM-CFC in active DNA synthesis.

  3. Atorvastatin-induced cell toxicity in yeast is linked to disruption of protein isoprenylation.

    PubMed

    Callegari, Sylvie; McKinnon, Ross A; Andrews, Stuart; de Barros Lopes, Miguel A

    2010-03-01

    Statins, used to treat hypercholesterolemia, are one of the most frequently prescribed drug classes in the developed world. However, a significant proportion of users suffer symptoms of myotoxicity, and currently, the molecular mechanisms underlying myotoxicity remain ambiguous. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was exploited as a model system to gain further insight into the molecular mechanisms of atorvastatin toxicity. Atorvastatin-treated yeast cells display marked morphological deformities, have reduced cell viability and are highly vulnerable to perturbed mitochondrial function. Supplementation assays of atorvastatin-treated cells reveal that both loss of viability and mitochondrial dysfunction occur as a consequence of perturbation of the sterol synthesis pathway. This was further investigated by supplementing statin-treated cells with various metabolites of the sterol synthesis pathway that are believed to be essential for cell function. Ergosterol, coenzyme Q and a heme precursor were all ineffective in the prevention of statin-induced mitochondrial disruption and cell death. However, the addition of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate and farnesyl pyrophosphate significantly restored cell viability, although these did not overcome petite induction. This highlights the pleiotropic nature of statin toxicity, but has established protein prenylation disruption as one of the principal mechanisms underlying statin-induced cell death in yeast. PMID:20002195

  4. Predictive models of prenatal developmental toxicity from ToxCast high-throughput screening data.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Nisha S; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C; Judson, Richard S; Singh, Amar V; Chandler, Kelly J; Dix, David J; Kavlock, Robert J; Knudsen, Thomas B

    2011-11-01

    Environmental Protection Agency's ToxCast project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemicals to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesized that developmental toxicity in guideline animal studies captured in the ToxRefDB database would correlate with cell-based and cell-free in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) data to reveal meaningful mechanistic relationships and provide models identifying chemicals with the potential to cause developmental toxicity. To test this hypothesis, we built statistical associations based on HTS and in vivo developmental toxicity data from ToxRefDB. Univariate associations were used to filter HTS assays based on statistical correlation with distinct in vivo endpoint. This revealed 423 total associations with distinctly different patterns for rat (301 associations) and rabbit (122 associations) across multiple HTS assay platforms. From these associations, linear discriminant analysis with cross-validation was used to build the models. Species-specific models of predicted developmental toxicity revealed strong balanced accuracy (> 70%) and unique correlations between assay targets such as transforming growth factor beta, retinoic acid receptor, and G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in the rat and inflammatory signals, such as interleukins (IL) (IL1a and IL8) and chemokines (CCL2), in the rabbit. Species-specific toxicity endpoints were associated with one another through common Gene Ontology biological processes, such as cleft palate to urogenital defects through placenta and embryonic development. This work indicates the utility of HTS assays for developing pathway-level models predictive of developmental toxicity. PMID:21873373

  5. Ubiquitin ligase ITCH recruitment suppresses the aggregation and cellular toxicity of cytoplasmic misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chhangani, Deepak; Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The protein quality control (QC) system protects cells against cellular toxicity induced by misfolded proteins and maintains overall cellular fitness. Inefficient clearance of or failure to degrade damaged proteins causes several diseases, especially age-linked neurodegenerative disorders. Attenuation of misfolded protein degradation under severe stress conditions leads to the rapid over-accumulation of toxic proteinaceous aggregates in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, the precise cytoplasmic quality control degradation mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Nedd4-like E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH specifically interacts with mutant bona fide misfolded proteins and colocalizes with their perinuclear aggregates. In a cell culture model, we demonstrate ITCH recruitment by cytoplasmic inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin or ataxin-3 proteins. Transient overexpression of ITCH dramatically induced the degradation of thermally denatured misfolded luciferase protein. Partial depletion of ITCH increased the rate of aggregate formation and cell death generated by expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of ITCH alleviates the cytotoxic potential of expanded polyglutamine proteins and reduces aggregation. These observations indicate that ITCH is involved in the cytosolic quality control pathway and may help to explain how abnormal proteins are targeted by QC ubiquitin-protein ligases. PMID:24865853

  6. Development of a Fur-dependent and tightly regulated expression system in Escherichia coli for toxic protein synthesis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is a continuous demanding for tightly regulated prokaryotic expression systems, which allow functional synthesis of toxic proteins in Escherichia coli for bioscience or biotechnology application. However, most of the current promoter options either are tightly repressed only with low protein production levels, or produce substantial protein but lacking of the necessary repression to avoid mutations initiated by leaky expression in the absence of inducer. The aim of this study was to develop a tightly regulated, relatively high-efficient expression vector in E. coli based on the principle of iron uptake system. Results By using GFP as reporter, PfhuA with the highest relative fluorescence units, but leaky expression, was screened from 23 iron-regulated promoter candidates. PfhuA was repressed by ferric uptake regulator (Fur)-Fe2+ complex binding to Fur box locating at the promoter sequence. Otherwise, PfhuA was activated without Fur-Fe2+ binding in the absence of iron. In order to improve the tightness of PfhuA regulation for toxic gene expression, Fur box in promoter sequence and fur expression were refined through five different approaches. Eventually, through substituting E. coli consensus Fur box for original one of PfhuA, the induction ratio of modified PfhuA (named PfhuA1) was improved from 3 to 101. Under the control of PfhuA1, strong toxic gene E was successfully expressed in high, middle, low copy-number vectors, and other two toxic proteins, Gef and MazF were functionally synthesized without E. coli death before induction. Conclusions The features of easy control, tight regulation and relatively high efficiency were combined in the newly engineered PfhuA1. Under this promoter, the toxic genes E, gef and mazF were functionally expressed in E. coli induced by iron chelator in a tightly controllable way. This study provides a tightly regulated expression system that might enable the stable cloning, and functional synthesis of toxic proteins

  7. A protein polymerization cascade mediates toxicity of non-pathological human huntingtin in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Serpionov, Genrikh V.; Alexandrov, Alexander I.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative amyloidoses, including Huntington disease, are caused by expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in otherwise unrelated proteins. In a yeast model, an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin with a stretch of 103 glutamine residues aggregates and causes toxicity, while its non-toxic wild type variant with a sequence of 25 glutamines (Htt25Q) does not aggregate. Here, we observed that non-toxic polymers of various proteins with glutamine-rich domains could seed polymerization of Htt25Q, which caused toxicity by seeding polymerization of the glutamine/asparagine-rich Sup35 protein thus depleting the soluble pools of this protein and its interacting partner, Sup45. Importantly, only polymers of Htt25Q, but not of the initial benign polymers, induced Sup35 polymerization, indicating an intermediary role of Htt25Q in cross-seeding Sup35 polymerization. These data provide a novel insight into interactions between amyloidogenic proteins and suggest a possible role for these interactions in the pathogenesis of Huntington and other polyQ diseases. PMID:26673834

  8. A protein polymerization cascade mediates toxicity of non-pathological human huntingtin in yeast.

    PubMed

    Serpionov, Genrikh V; Alexandrov, Alexander I; Antonenko, Yuri N; Ter-Avanesyan, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Several neurodegenerative amyloidoses, including Huntington disease, are caused by expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in otherwise unrelated proteins. In a yeast model, an N-terminal fragment of mutant huntingtin with a stretch of 103 glutamine residues aggregates and causes toxicity, while its non-toxic wild type variant with a sequence of 25 glutamines (Htt25Q) does not aggregate. Here, we observed that non-toxic polymers of various proteins with glutamine-rich domains could seed polymerization of Htt25Q, which caused toxicity by seeding polymerization of the glutamine/asparagine-rich Sup35 protein thus depleting the soluble pools of this protein and its interacting partner, Sup45. Importantly, only polymers of Htt25Q, but not of the initial benign polymers, induced Sup35 polymerization, indicating an intermediary role of Htt25Q in cross-seeding Sup35 polymerization. These data provide a novel insight into interactions between amyloidogenic proteins and suggest a possible role for these interactions in the pathogenesis of Huntington and other polyQ diseases. PMID:26673834

  9. Toxic Compound, Anti-Nutritional Factors and Functional Properties of Protein Isolated from Detoxified Jatropha curcas Seed Cake

    PubMed Central

    Saetae, Donlaporn; Suntornsuk, Worapot

    2011-01-01

    Jatropha curcas is a multipurpose tree, which has potential as an alternative source for biodiesel. All of its parts can also be used for human food, animal feed, fertilizer, fuel and traditional medicine. J. curcas seed cake is a low-value by-product obtained from biodiesel production. The seed cake, however, has a high amount of protein, with the presence of a main toxic compound: phorbol esters as well as anti-nutritional factors: trypsin inhibitors, phytic acid, lectin and saponin. The objective of this work was to detoxify J. curcas seed cake and study the toxin, anti-nutritional factors and also functional properties of the protein isolated from the detoxified seed cake. The yield of protein isolate was approximately 70.9%. The protein isolate was obtained without a detectable level of phorbol esters. The solubility of the protein isolate was maximal at pH 12.0 and minimal at pH 4.0. The water and oil binding capacities of the protein isolate were 1.76 g water/g protein and 1.07 mL oil/g protein, respectively. The foam capacity and stability, including emulsion activity and stability of protein isolate, had higher values in a range of basic pHs, while foam and emulsion stabilities decreased with increasing time. The results suggest that the detoxified J. curcas seed cake has potential to be exploited as a novel source of functional protein for food applications. PMID:21339978

  10. Potentiated Hsp104 variants suppress toxicity of diverse neurodegenerative disease-linked proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackrel, Meredith E; Shorter, James

    2014-10-01

    Protein misfolding is implicated in numerous lethal neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson disease (PD). There are no therapies that reverse these protein-misfolding events. We aim to apply Hsp104, a hexameric AAA+ protein from yeast, to target misfolded conformers for reactivation. Hsp104 solubilizes disordered aggregates and amyloid, but has limited activity against human neurodegenerative disease proteins. Thus, we have previously engineered potentiated Hsp104 variants that suppress aggregation, proteotoxicity and restore proper protein localization of ALS and PD proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and mitigate neurodegeneration in an animal PD model. Here, we establish that potentiated Hsp104 variants possess broad substrate specificity and, in yeast, suppress toxicity and aggregation induced by wild-type TDP-43, FUS and α-synuclein, as well as missense mutant versions of these proteins that cause neurodegenerative disease. Potentiated Hsp104 variants also rescue toxicity and aggregation of TAF15 but not EWSR1, two RNA-binding proteins with a prion-like domain that are connected with the development of ALS and frontotemporal dementia. Thus, potentiated Hsp104 variants are not entirely non-specific. Indeed, they do not unfold just any natively folded protein. Rather, potentiated Hsp104 variants are finely tuned to unfold proteins bearing short unstructured tracts that are not recognized by wild-type Hsp104. Our studies establish the broad utility of potentiated Hsp104 variants. PMID:25062688

  11. Apolipoprotein E expression and behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higuchi, Yoshinori; Nelson, Gregory A.; Vazquez, Marcelo; Laskowitz, Daniel T.; Slater, James M.; Pearlstein, Robert D.

    2002-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is a lipid binding protein that plays an important role in tissue repair following brain injury. In the present studies, we have investigated whether apoE affects the behavioral toxicity of high charge, high energy (HZE) particle radiation. METHODS: Sixteen male apoE knockout (KO) mice and sixteen genetically matched wild-type (WT) C57BL mice were used in this experiment. Half of the KO and half of the WT animals were irradiated with 600 MeV/amu iron particles (2 Gy whole body). The effect of irradiation on motor coordination and stamina (Rotarod test), exploratory behavior (open field test), and spatial working and reference memory (Morris water maze) was assessed. ROTAROD TEST: Performance was adversely affected by radiation exposure in both KO and WT groups at 30 d after irradiation. By 60 d after radiation, the radiation effect was lost in WT, but still apparent in irradiated KO mice. OPEN FIELD TEST: Radiation reduced open field exploratory activity 14, 28, 56, 84, and 168 d after irradiation of KO mice, but had no effect on WT mice. MORRIS WATER MAZE: Radiation adversely affected spatial working memory in the KO mice, but had no discernible effect in the WT mice as assessed 180 d after irradiation. In contrast, irradiated WT mice showed marked impairment of spatial reference memory in comparison to non-irradiated mice, while no effect of radiation was observed in KO mice. CONCLUSIONS: These studies show that apoE expression influences the behavioral toxicity of HZE particle radiation and suggest that apoE plays a role in the repair/recovery from radiation injury of the CNS. ApoE deficiency may exacerbate the previously reported effects of HZE particle radiation in accelerating the brain aging process.

  12. Antioxidant-Mediated Modulation of Protein Reactivity for 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde, a Toxic Dopamine Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Anderson, David G; Florang, Virginia R; Schamp, Josephine H; Buettner, Garry R; Doorn, Jonathan A

    2016-07-18

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL) is an endogenously produced toxic aldehyde. It is a bifunctional electrophile implicated in the loss of dopaminergic cells concomitant with Parkinson's disease and neurodegeneration. DOPAL is known to react with proteins and amino acids such as N-acetyl lysine (NAL); oxidation of the catechol moiety to the quinone of DOPAL increases this reactivity. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and ascorbic acid to mitigate the reactivity of DOPAL with proteins and amino acids in a dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, Trolox did not lessen the observed reactivity with proteins. Interestingly, use of tricine, a buffer and reducing agent, in these systems also decreased the reactivity of DOPAL with amines, yielding tricine-derived free radical species. Modification of amines with aldehydes typically involves Schiff base chemistry; however, the observance of free radicals suggests that an oxidative step is involved in the reaction of DOPAL with lysine. Furthermore, while Schiff base formation is usually optimal at pH 5, the reaction rate of DOPAL with NAL is negligible at pH 5 and is enhanced under basic conditions (e.g., pH 9). Conditions of high pH are also favorable for catechol auto-oxidation, known to occur for DOPAL. The antioxidant-mediated protection demonstrated here suggests that oxidative stress may impart cellular vulnerability to protein modification by DOPAL. Therefore, depleted antioxidants and increased levels of lipid peroxidation products, known to prevent the detoxifying metabolism of DOPAL, may present a survival challenge to dopaminergic cells targeted in Parkinson's disease. PMID:27268734

  13. BH3 domain-independent apolipoprotein L1 toxicity rescued by BCL2 prosurvival proteins.

    PubMed

    Heneghan, J F; Vandorpe, D H; Shmukler, B E; Giovinazzo, J A; Giovinnazo, J A; Raper, J; Friedman, D J; Pollak, M R; Alper, S L

    2015-09-01

    The potent trypanolytic properties of human apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) can be neutralized by the trypanosome variant surface antigen gene product known as serum resistance-associated protein. However, two common APOL1 haplotypes present uniquely in individuals of West African ancestry each encode APOL1 variants resistant to serum resistance-associated protein, and each confers substantial resistance to human African sleeping sickness. In contrast to the dominantly inherited anti-trypanosomal activity of APOL1, recessive inheritance of these two trypanoprotective APOL1 alleles predisposes to kidney disease. Proposed mechanisms of APOL1 toxicity have included BH3 domain-dependent autophagy and/or ion channel activity. We probed these potential mechanisms by expressing APOL1 in Xenopus laevis oocytes. APOL1 expression in oocytes increased ion permeability and caused profound morphological deterioration (toxicity). Coexpression of BCL2 family members rescued APOL1-associated oocyte toxicity in the order MCL1 ∼ BCLW > BCLXL ∼ BCL2A1 ≫ BCL2. Deletion of nine nominal core BH3 domain residues abolished APOL1-associated toxicity, but missense substitution of the same residues abolished neither oocyte toxicity nor its rescue by coexpressed MCL1. The APOL1 BH3 domain was similarly dispensable for the ability of APOL1 to rescue intact mice from lethal trypanosome challenge. Replacement of most extracellular Na(+) by K(+) also reduced APOL1-associated oocyte toxicity, allowing demonstration of APOL1-associated increases in Ca(2+) and Cl(-) fluxes and oocyte ion currents, which were similarly reduced by MCL1 coexpression. Thus APOL1 toxicity in Xenopus oocytes is BH3-independent, but can nonetheless be rescued by some BCL2 family proteins. PMID:26108665

  14. Persistence of detectable insecticidal proteins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Cry) and toxicity after adsorption on contrasting soils.

    PubMed

    Hung, T P; Truong, L V; Binh, N D; Frutos, R; Quiquampoix, H; Staunton, S

    2016-01-01

    Insecticidal Cry, or Bt, proteins are produced by the soil-endemic bacterium, Bacillus thuringiensis and some genetically modified crops. Their environmental fate depends on interactions with soil. Little is known about the toxicity of adsorbed proteins and the change in toxicity over time. We incubated Cry1Ac and Cry2A in contrasting soils subjected to different treatments to inhibit microbial activity. The toxin was chemically extracted and immunoassayed. Manduca sexta was the target insect for biotests. Extractable toxin decreased during incubation for up to four weeks. Toxicity of Cry1Ac was maintained in the adsorbed state, but lost after 2 weeks incubation at 25 °C. The decline in extractable protein and toxicity were much slower at 4 °C with no significant effect of soil sterilization. The major driving force for decline may be time-dependent fixation of adsorbed protein, leading to a decrease in the extraction yield in vitro, paralleled by decreasing solubilisation in the larval gut. PMID:26549751

  15. MYELIN BASIC PROTEIN-MRNA USED TO MONITOR TRIMETHYLTIN TOXIC NEUROPATHY IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trimethyltin (TMT) is an alkyltin that selectively targets neurons of the limbic system. ene probe (i.e., mRNA) for myelin basic protein (MBP) was used to monitor this toxic neuropathy. prague Dawley rats, were dosed (IP) acutely with hydroxide at neuropathic (8.0 mg/kg) or non-n...

  16. Destabilizing Protein Polymorphisms in the Genetic Background Direct Phenotypic Expression of Mutant SOD1 Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2009-01-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  17. Destabilizing protein polymorphisms in the genetic background direct phenotypic expression of mutant SOD1 toxicity.

    PubMed

    Gidalevitz, Tali; Krupinski, Thomas; Garcia, Susana; Morimoto, Richard I

    2009-03-01

    Genetic background exerts a strong modulatory effect on the toxicity of aggregation-prone proteins in conformational diseases. In addition to influencing the misfolding and aggregation behavior of the mutant proteins, polymorphisms in putative modifier genes may affect the molecular processes leading to the disease phenotype. Mutations in SOD1 in a subset of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cases confer dominant but clinically variable toxicity, thought to be mediated by misfolding and aggregation of mutant SOD1 protein. While the mechanism of toxicity remains unknown, both the nature of the SOD1 mutation and the genetic background in which it is expressed appear important. To address this, we established a Caenorhabditis elegans model to systematically examine the aggregation behavior and genetic interactions of mutant forms of SOD1. Expression of three structurally distinct SOD1 mutants in C. elegans muscle cells resulted in the appearance of heterogeneous populations of aggregates and was associated with only mild cellular dysfunction. However, introduction of destabilizing temperature-sensitive mutations into the genetic background strongly enhanced the toxicity of SOD1 mutants, resulting in exposure of several deleterious phenotypes at permissive conditions in a manner dependent on the specific SOD1 mutation. The nature of the observed phenotype was dependent on the temperature-sensitive mutation present, while its penetrance reflected the specific combination of temperature-sensitive and SOD1 mutations. Thus, the specific toxic phenotypes of conformational disease may not be simply due to misfolding/aggregation toxicity of the causative mutant proteins, but may be defined by their genetic interactions with cellular pathways harboring mildly destabilizing missense alleles. PMID:19266020

  18. Slight temperature changes affect protein affinity and cellular uptake/toxicity of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudi, Morteza; Shokrgozar, Mohammad A.; Behzadi, Shahed

    2013-03-01

    It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular/organ temperature.It is known that what the cell actually ``sees'' at the nanoscale is an outer shell formed of `protein corona' on the surface of nanoparticles (NPs). The amount and composition of various proteins on the corona are strongly dependent on the biophysicochemical properties of NPs, which have been extensively studied. However, the effect of a small variation in temperature, due to the human circadian rhythm, on the composition of the protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs, was ignored. Here, the effect of temperature on the composition of protein corona and the affinity of various proteins to the surface of NPs and, subsequently, cell responses to the protein coated NPs are probed. The results confirmed that cellular entrance, dispersion, and toxicity of NPs are strongly diverse with slight body temperature changes. This new finding can help scientists to maximise NP entrance to specific cells/organs with lower toxicity by adjusting the cellular

  19. Encapsulation of Aconitine in Self-Assembled Licorice Protein Nanoparticles Reduces the Toxicity In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Li-jing; Gao, Guan-zhen; Shen, Yong; Zhou, Jian-wu; Rao, Ping-fan

    2015-11-01

    Many herbal medicines and compositions are clinically effective but challenged by its safety risks, i.e., aconitine (AC) from aconite species. The combined use of Radix glycyrrhizae (licorice) with Radix aconite L. effectively eliminates toxicity of the later while increasing efficacy. In this study, a boiling-stable 31-kDa protein (namely GP) was purified from licorice and self-assembled into nanoparticles (206.2 ± 2.0 nm) at pH 5.0, 25 °C. The aconitine-encapsulated GP nanoparticles (238.2 ± 1.2 nm) were prepared following the same procedure and tested for its toxicity by intraperitoneal injection on ICR mouse ( n = 8). Injection of GP-AC nanoparticles and the mixed licorice-aconite decoction, respectively, caused mild recoverable toxic effects and no death, while the aconitine, particle-free GP-AC mixture and aconite decoction induced sever toxic effects and 100 % death. Encapsulation of poisonous alkaloids into self-assembled herbal protein nanoparticles contributes to toxicity attenuation of combined use of herbs, implying a prototype nanostructure and a universal principle for the safer clinical applications of herbal medicines.

  20. Interaction of tau with the RNA-Binding Protein TIA1 Regulates tau Pathophysiology and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Vanderweyde, Tara; Apicco, Daniel J; Youmans-Kidder, Katherine; Ash, Peter E A; Cook, Casey; Lummertz da Rocha, Edroaldo; Jansen-West, Karen; Frame, Alissa A; Citro, Allison; Leszyk, John D; Ivanov, Pavel; Abisambra, Jose F; Steffen, Martin; Li, Hu; Petrucelli, Leonard; Wolozin, Benjamin

    2016-05-17

    Dendritic mislocalization of microtubule associated protein tau is a hallmark of tauopathies, but the role of dendritic tau is unknown. We now report that tau interacts with the RNA-binding protein (RBP) TIA1 in brain tissue, and we present the brain-protein interactome network for TIA1. Analysis of the TIA1 interactome in brain tissue from wild-type (WT) and tau knockout mice demonstrates that tau is required for normal interactions of TIA1 with proteins linked to RNA metabolism, including ribosomal proteins and RBPs. Expression studies show that tau regulates the distribution of TIA1, and tau accelerates stress granule (SG) formation. Conversely, TIA1 knockdown or knockout inhibits tau misfolding and associated toxicity in cultured hippocampal neurons, while overexpressing TIA1 induces tau misfolding and stimulates neurodegeneration. Pharmacological interventions that prevent SG formation also inhibit tau pathophysiology. These studies suggest that the pathophysiology of tauopathy requires an intimate interaction with RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27160897

  1. Screening and Toxicity Analysis of Catechin Isomers Against FemA Protein.

    PubMed

    Singhal, Divya; Saxena, S

    2015-01-01

    Fem proteins are the essential structural proteins of various gram-positive bacteria. These are of three different types namely FemX (FmhB), FemA and FemB. Only two Fem protein crystallographic structures are available till date, one for FemA in Staphylococcus aureus and another for FemX in Weissella viridescensis. In this study, computational methods are used to evaluate interaction of FemA protein with catechin and epicatechin analogues. The interaction of FemA protein with catechin and epicatechin analogues are confirmed by binding energy and scores given by Autodock Vina and UCSF Dock docking softwares, which is followed by Lipinski filters and toxicity studies using online Lipinski server of SCFBIO and OSIRIS. Catechin gallate has been found as the best ligand for FemA protein in all aspects and it has outperformed all catechin and epicatechin isomers. PMID:26997705

  2. Bioactivation, protein haptenation, and toxicity of sulfamethoxazole and dapsone in normal human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaiya, Payal; Roychowdhury, Sanjoy; Vyas, Piyush M.; Doll, Mark A.; Hein, David W.; Svensson, Craig K. . E-mail: craig-svensson@uiowa.edu

    2006-09-01

    Cutaneous drug reactions (CDRs) associated with sulfonamides are believed to be mediated through the formation of reactive metabolites that result in cellular toxicity and protein haptenation. We evaluated the bioactivation and toxicity of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) and dapsone (DDS) in normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). Incubation of cells with DDS or its metabolite (D-NOH) resulted in protein haptenation readily detected by confocal microscopy and ELISA. While the metabolite of SMX (S-NOH) haptenated intracellular proteins, adducts were not evident in incubations with SMX. Cells expressed abundant N-acetyltransferase-1 (NAT1) mRNA and activity, but little NAT2 mRNA or activity. Neither NAT1 nor NAT2 protein was detected. Incubation of NHDF with S-NOH or D-NOH increased reactive oxygen species formation and reduced glutathione content. NHDF were less susceptible to the cytotoxic effect of S-NOH and D-NOH than are keratinocytes. Our studies provide the novel observation that NHDF are able to acetylate both arylamine compounds and bioactivate the sulfone DDS, giving rise to haptenated proteins. The reactive metabolites of SMX and DDS also provoke oxidative stress in these cells in a time- and concentration-dependent fashion. Further work is needed to determine the role of the observed toxicity in mediating CDRs observed with these agents.

  3. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ((59)Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca(2+) uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. PMID:25545986

  4. Toxicity detection using lysosomal enzymes, glycoamylase and thioredoxin fused with fluorescent protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Tu; Shin, Hwa-Yoon; Kim, Yang-Hoon; Min, Jiho

    2015-11-20

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the simplest and a favorite eukaryotic system that contains lysosome and thus, is a suitable organism for monitoring some toxic effects in environmental pollution. In this study, S. cerevisiae was transformed with two recombinant plasmids. Sporulation-specific glycoamylase (SGA1), which was upregulated in response to arsenic, was fused with the blue fluorescent protein (BFP) for the construction of an oxidative stress-causing chemicals sensor. Additionally, thioredoxin (TRX2), a protein overexpressed exclusively under tetracycline's influence, fused with the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) to create a detector for this kind of chemical. In summary, we developed two recombinant S. cerevisiae that facilitate the detection of both kinds of toxic chemicals, specifically visualized by different color indicators. PMID:26410455

  5. E6-AP promotes misfolded polyglutamine proteins for proteasomal degradation and suppresses polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Amit; Dikshit, Priyanka; Purkayastha, Sudarshana; Sharma, Jaiprakash; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2008-03-21

    The accumulation of intracellular protein deposits as inclusion bodies is the common pathological hallmark of most age-related neurodegenerative disorders including polyglutamine diseases. Appearance of aggregates of the misfolded mutant disease proteins suggest that cells are unable to efficiently degrade them, and failure of clearance leads to the severe disturbances of the cellular quality control system. Recently, the quality control ubiquitin ligase CHIP has been shown to suppress the polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity. Here we have identified another ubiquitin ligase, called E6-AP, which is able to promote the proteasomal degradation of misfolded polyglutamine proteins and suppress the polyglutamine protein aggregation and polyglutamine protein-induced cell death. E6-AP interacts with the soluble misfolded polyglutamine protein and associates with their aggregates in both cellular and transgenic mouse models. Partial knockdown of E6-AP enhances the rate of aggregate formation and cell death mediated by the polyglutamine protein. Finally, we have demonstrated the up-regulation of E6-AP in the expanded polyglutamine protein-expressing cells as well as cells exposed to proteasomal stress. These findings suggest that E6-AP is a critical mediator of the neuronal response to misfolded polyglutamine proteins and represents a potential therapeutic target in the polyglutamine diseases. PMID:18201976

  6. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  7. Transcytosis, Antitumor Activity and Toxicity of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin C2 as an Oral Administration Protein Drug.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenbin; Li, Yangyang; Liu, Wenhui; Ding, Ding; Xu, Yingchun; Pan, Liqiang; Chen, Shuqing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin C2 (SEC2) is a classical superantigen (SAg), which can tremendously activate T lymphocytes at very low dosage, thus exerting its powerful antitumor activity. As an intravenous protein drug and a bacterial toxin, SEC2 has some limitations including poor patient compliance and toxic side effects. In this research, we devoted our attention to studying the antitumor activity and toxicity of SEC2 as a potential oral administration protein drug. We proved that His-tagged SEC2 (SEC2-His) could undergo facilitated transcytosis on human colon adenocarcinoma (Caco-2) cells and SEC2-His was detected in the blood of rats after oral administration. Furthermore, oral SEC2-His caused massive cytokine release and immune cell enrichment around tumor tissue, leading to inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Meanwhile, although SEC2-His was dosed up to 32 mg/kg in mice, no significant toxicity was observed. These data showed that SEC2 can cross the intestinal epithelium in an immunologically integral form, maintaining antitumor activity but with reduced systemic toxicity. Therefore, these results may have implications for developing SEC2 as an oral administration protein drug. PMID:27322320

  8. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  9. Neuronal response in Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease: the effect of toxic proteins on intracellular pathways.

    PubMed

    Majd, Shohreh; Power, John H; Grantham, Hugh J M

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of protein aggregates is the leading cause of cellular dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders. Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Huntington's disease, Prion disease and motor disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, present with a similar pattern of progressive neuronal death, nervous system deterioration and cognitive impairment. The common characteristic is an unusual misfolding of proteins which is believed to cause protein deposition and trigger degenerative signals in the neurons. A similar clinical presentation seen in many neurodegenerative disorders suggests the possibility of shared neuronal responses in different disorders. Despite the difference in core elements of deposits in each neurodegenerative disorder, the cascade of neuronal reactions such as activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta, mitogen-activated protein kinases, cell cycle re-entry and oxidative stress leading to a progressive neurodegeneration are surprisingly similar. This review focuses on protein toxicity in two neurodegenerative diseases, AD and PD. We reviewed the activated mechanisms of neurotoxicity in response to misfolded beta-amyloid and α-synuclein, two major toxic proteins in AD and PD, leading to neuronal apoptosis. The interaction between the proteins in producing an overlapping pathological pattern will be also discussed. PMID:26499115

  10. Molecular and Immunological Characterization of Gluten Proteins Isolated from Oat Cultivars That Differ in Toxicity for Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; de Lorenzo, Laura; Merchán, Francisco; Gil-Humanes, Javier; Giménez, María J.; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco; Pistón, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD). Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate. The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD. In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. At the protein level, we have accomplished an exhaustive characterization and quantification of avenins by RP-HPLC and an analysis of immunogenicity of peptides present in prolamins of different oat cultivars. Avenin sequences were classified into three different groups, which have homology with S-rich prolamins of Triticeae. Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. The expression of avenin genes throughout the development stages has shown a pattern similar to that of prolamins of wheat and barley. RP-HPLC chromatograms showed protein peaks in the alcohol-soluble and reduced-soluble fractions. Therefore, oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins. We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars that could be due to differences in the degree of immunogenicity in their sequences. PMID:23284616

  11. Molecular and immunological characterization of gluten proteins isolated from oat cultivars that differ in toxicity for celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Comino, Isabel; de Lorenzo, Laura; Merchán, Francisco; Gil-Humanes, Javier; Giménez, María J; López-Casado, Miguel Ángel; Torres, M Isabel; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Barro, Francisco; Pistón, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    A strict gluten-free diet (GFD) is the only currently available therapeutic treatment for patients with celiac disease (CD). Traditionally, treatment with a GFD has excluded wheat, barley and rye, while the presence of oats is a subject of debate. The most-recent research indicates that some cultivars of oats can be a safe part of a GFD. In order to elucidate the toxicity of the prolamins from oat varieties with low, medium, and high CD toxicity, the avenin genes of these varieties were cloned and sequenced, and their expression quantified throughout the grain development. At the protein level, we have accomplished an exhaustive characterization and quantification of avenins by RP-HPLC and an analysis of immunogenicity of peptides present in prolamins of different oat cultivars. Avenin sequences were classified into three different groups, which have homology with S-rich prolamins of Triticeae. Avenin proteins presented a lower proline content than that of wheat gliadin; this may contribute to the low toxicity shown by oat avenins. The expression of avenin genes throughout the development stages has shown a pattern similar to that of prolamins of wheat and barley. RP-HPLC chromatograms showed protein peaks in the alcohol-soluble and reduced-soluble fractions. Therefore, oat grains had both monomeric and polymeric avenins, termed in this paper gliadin- and glutenin-like avenins. We found a direct correlation between the immunogenicity of the different oat varieties and the presence of the specific peptides with a higher/lower potential immunotoxicity. The specific peptides from the oat variety with the highest toxicity have shown a higher potential immunotoxicity. These results suggest that there is wide range of variation of potential immunotoxicity of oat cultivars that could be due to differences in the degree of immunogenicity in their sequences. PMID:23284616

  12. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Durante, Lorenzo; Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200-250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15-18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96-98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  13. Rational Design of a Carrier Protein for the Production of Recombinant Toxic Peptides in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Pizzo, Elio; Varcamonti, Mario; Zanfardino, Anna; Sgambati, Valeria; Di Maro, Antimo; Carpentieri, Andrea; Izzo, Viviana; Di Donato, Alberto; Cafaro, Valeria; Notomista, Eugenio

    2016-01-01

    Commercial uses of bioactive peptides require low cost, effective methods for their production. We developed a new carrier protein for high yield production of recombinant peptides in Escherichia coli very well suited for the production of toxic peptides like antimicrobial peptides. GKY20, a short antimicrobial peptide derived from the C-terminus of human thrombin, was fused to the C-terminus of Onconase, a small ribonuclease (104 amino acids), which efficiently drove the peptide into inclusion bodies with very high expression levels (about 200–250 mg/L). After purification of the fusion protein by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography, peptide was obtained by chemical cleavage in diluted acetic acid of an acid labile Asp-Pro sequence with more than 95% efficiency. To improve peptide purification, Onconase was mutated to eliminate all acid labile sequences thus reducing the release of unwanted peptides during the acid cleavage. Mutations were chosen to preserve the differential solubility of Onconase as function of pH, which allows its selective precipitation at neutral pH after the cleavage. The improved carrier allowed the production of 15–18 mg of recombinant peptide per liter of culture with 96–98% purity without the need of further chromatographic steps after the acid cleavage. The antimicrobial activity of the recombinant peptide, with an additional proline at the N-terminus, was tested on Gram-negative and Gram-positive strains and was found to be identical to that measured for synthetic GKY20. This finding suggests that N-terminal proline residue does not change the antimicrobial properties of recombinant (P)GKY20. The improved carrier, which does not contain cysteine and methionine residues, Asp-Pro and Asn-Gly sequences, is well suited for the production of peptides using any of the most popular chemical cleavage methods. PMID:26808536

  14. Dynamic development of the protein corona on silica nanoparticles: composition and role in toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Ninell P.; Hurst, Gregory B.; Wang, Wei; Foster, Carmen M.; Nallathamby, Prakash D.; Retterer, Scott T.

    2013-06-01

    The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated over time. Native SiO2, amine (-NH2) and carboxy (-COO-) modified NP were examined following incubation in mammalian growth media containing fetal bovine serum (FBS) for 1, 4, 24 and 48 hours. The protein corona transition from its early dynamic state to the later more stable corona was evaluated using mass spectrometry. The NP diameter was 22.4 +/- 2.2 nm measured by scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Changes in hydrodynamic diameter and agglomeration kinetics were studied using dynamic light scattering (DLS). The initial surface chemistry of the NP played an important role in the development and final composition of the protein corona, impacting agglomeration kinetics and NP toxicity. Particle toxicity, indicated by changes in membrane integrity and mitochondrial activity, was measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and tetrazolium reduction (MTT), respectively, in mouse alveolar macrophages (RAW264.7) and mouse lung epithelial cells (C10). SiO2-COO- NP had a slower agglomeration rate, formed smaller aggregates, and exhibited lower cytotoxicity compared to SiO2 and SiO2-NH2. Composition of the protein corona for each of the three NP was unique, indicating a strong dependence of corona development on NP surface chemistry. This work underscores the need to understand all aspects of NP toxicity, particularly the influence of agglomeration on effective dose and particle size. Furthermore, the interplay between materials and local biological environment is emphasized and highlights the need to conduct toxicity profiling under physiologically relevant conditions that provide an appropriate estimation of material modifications that occur during exposure in natural environments.The formation and composition of the protein corona on silica (SiO2) nanoparticles (NP) with different surface chemistries was evaluated

  15. Transthyretin suppresses the toxicity of oligomers formed by misfolded proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Cascella, Roberta; Conti, Simona; Mannini, Benedetta; Li, Xinyi; Buxbaum, Joel N; Tiribilli, Bruno; Chiti, Fabrizio; Cecchi, Cristina

    2013-12-01

    Although human transthyretin (TTR) is associated with systemic amyloidoses, an anti-amyloidogenic effect that prevents Aβ fibril formation in vitro and in animal models has been observed. Here we studied the ability of three different types of TTR, namely human tetramers (hTTR), mouse tetramers (muTTR) and an engineered monomer of the human protein (M-TTR), to suppress the toxicity of oligomers formed by two different amyloidogenic peptides/proteins (HypF-N and Aβ42). muTTR is the most stable homotetramer, hTTR can dissociate into partially unfolded monomers, whereas M-TTR maintains a monomeric state. Preformed toxic HypF-N and Aβ42 oligomers were incubated in the presence of each TTR then added to cell culture media. hTTR, and to a greater extent M-TTR, were found to protect human neuroblastoma cells and rat primary neurons against oligomer-induced toxicity, whereas muTTR had no protective effect. The thioflavin T assay and site-directed labeling experiments using pyrene ruled out disaggregation and structural reorganization within the discrete oligomers following incubation with TTRs, while confocal microscopy, SDS-PAGE, and intrinsic fluorescence measurements indicated tight binding between oligomers and hTTR, particularly M-TTR. Moreover, atomic force microscopy (AFM), light scattering and turbidimetry analyses indicated that larger assemblies of oligomers are formed in the presence of M-TTR and, to a lesser extent, with hTTR. Overall, the data suggest a generic capacity of TTR to efficiently neutralize the toxicity of oligomers formed by misfolded proteins and reveal that such neutralization occurs through a mechanism of TTR-mediated assembly of protein oligomers into larger species, with an efficiency that correlates inversely with TTR tetramer stability. PMID:24075940

  16. Toxicity assessment of wild bean seed protein--arcelin on Asian armyworm, Spodoptera litura (Fabricius).

    PubMed

    Malaikozhundan, B; Suresh, P; Seshadri, S; Janarthanan, S

    2003-12-01

    Arcelin, an anti-metabolic protein was purified from the seeds of wild bean, Lablab purpureus. The feeding assay containing arcelin at 5, 10 and 15 microg concentrations revealed no antifeedant effect against fifth instar larvae of S. litura. However, the enhanced activity of alpha- and beta-naphthyl esterases in the mid-gut samples of S. litura treated with arcelin suggests countermeasure against the toxic effect of arcelin. PMID:15320504

  17. Mitochondrial iron accumulation exacerbates hepatic toxicity caused by hepatitis C virus core protein

    SciTech Connect

    Sekine, Shuichi; Ito, Konomi; Watanabe, Haruna; Nakano, Takafumi; Moriya, Kyoji; Shintani, Yoshizumi; Fujie, Hajime; Tsutsumi, Takeya; Miyoshi, Hideyuki; Fujinaga, Hidetake; Shinzawa, Seiko; Koike, Kazuhiko; Horie, Toshiharu

    2015-02-01

    Patients with long-lasting hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are at major risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Iron accumulation in the livers of these patients is thought to exacerbate conditions of oxidative stress. Transgenic mice that express the HCV core protein develop HCC after the steatosis stage and produce an excess of hepatic reactive oxygen species (ROS). The overproduction of ROS in the liver is the net result of HCV core protein-induced dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. This study examined the impact of ferric nitrilacetic acid (Fe-NTA)-mediated iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing HepG2 (human HCC) cells (Hep39b cells). A decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and ROS production were observed following Fe-NTA treatment. After continuous exposure to Fe-NTA for six days, cell toxicity was observed in Hep39b cells, but not in mock (vector-transfected) HepG2 cells. Moreover, mitochondrial iron ({sup 59}Fe) uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. This increase in mitochondrial iron uptake was inhibited by Ru360, a mitochondrial Ca{sup 2+} uniporter inhibitor. Furthermore, the Fe-NTA-induced augmentation of mitochondrial dysfunction, ROS production, and cell toxicity were also inhibited by Ru360 in Hep39b cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates hepatocyte toxicity caused by the HCV core protein. - Highlights: • Iron accumulation in the livers of patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is thought to exacerbate oxidative stress. • The impact of iron overload on mitochondrial damage and ROS production in HCV core protein-expressing cells were examined. • Mitochondrial iron uptake was increased in the livers of HCV core protein-expressing transgenic mice. • Ca{sup 2+} uniporter-mediated mitochondrial accumulation of iron exacerbates

  18. Prohibitin, an essential protein for Colorado potato beetle larval viability, is relevant to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry3Aa toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Campuzano, Camila; Martínez-Ramírez, Amparo C; Contreras, Estefanía; Rausell, Carolina; Real, M Dolores

    2013-11-01

    Bacillus thuringienesis (Bt) Cry toxins constitute the most extensively used environmentally safe biopesticide and their mode of action relies on the interaction of the toxins with membrane proteins in the midgut of susceptible insects that mediate toxicity and insect specificity. Therefore, identification of Bt Cry toxin interacting proteins in the midgut of target insects and understanding their role in toxicity is of great interest to exploit their insecticidal action. Using ligand blot, we demonstrated that Bt Cry3Aa toxin bound to a 30kDa protein in Colorado potato beetle (CPB) larval midgut membrane, identified by sequence homology as prohibitin-1 protein. Prohibitins comprise a highly conserved family of proteins implicated in important cellular processes. We obtained the complete CPB prohibitin-1 DNA coding sequence of 828pb, in silico translated into a 276-amino acid protein. The analysis at the amino acid level showed that the protein contains a prohibitin-homology domain (Band7_prohibitin, cd03401) conserved among prohibitin proteins. A striking feature of the CPB identified prohibitin-1 is the predicted presence of cadherin elements, potential binding sites for Cry toxins described in other Bt susceptible insects. We also showed that CPB prohibitin-1 protein partitioned into both, detergent soluble and insoluble membrane fractions, as well as a prohibitin-2 homologous protein, previously reported to form functional complexes with prohibitin-1 in other organisms. Prohibitin complexes act as membrane scaffolds ensuring the recruitment of membrane proteases to facilitate substrate processing. Accordingly, sequestration of prohibitin-1 by an anti-prohibitin-1 antibody impaired the Cry3Aa toxin inhibition of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic synthetic substrate of an ADAM-like metalloprotease previously reported to proteolize this toxin. In this work, we also demonstrated that prohibitin-1 RNAi silencing in CPB larvae produced deleterious effects and

  19. Expression and purification of toxic anti-breast cancer p28-NRC chimeric protein

    PubMed Central

    Soleimani, Meysam; Mirmohammad-Sadeghi, Hamid; Sadeghi-Aliabadi, Hojjat; Jahanian-Najafabadi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Chimeric proteins consisting of a targeting moiety and a cytotoxic moiety are now under intense research focus for targeted therapy of cancer. Here, we report cloning, expression, and purification of such a targeted chimeric protein made up of p28 peptide as both targeting and anticancer moiety fused to NRC peptide as a cytotoxic moiety. However, since the antimicrobial activity of the NRC peptide would intervene expression of the chimeric protein in Escherichia coli, we evaluated the effects of two fusion tags, that is, thioredoxin (Trx) and 6x-His tags, and various expression conditions, on the expression of p28-NRC chimeric protein. Materials and Methods: In order to express the chimeric protein with only 6x-His tag, pET28 expression plasmid was used. Cloning in pET32 expression plasmid was performed to add both Trx and 6x-His tags to the chimeric protein. Expression of the chimeric protein with both plasmids was evaluated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis following optimization of expression conditions and host strains. Results: Expression of the chimeric protein in pET28a was performed. However, expression yield of the chimeric protein was low. Optimization of culture conditions and host strains led to reasonable expression yield of the toxic chimeric protein in pET32a vector. In cases of both plasmids, approximately 10 kDa deviation of the apparent molecular weight from the theoretical one was seen in SDS-PAGE of purified chimeric proteins. Conclusions: The study leads to proper expression and purification yield of p28-NRC chimeric protein with Trx tag following optimizing culture conditions and host strains. PMID:27169101

  20. Recombinant murine toxin from Yersinia pestis shows high toxicity and β-adrenergic blocking activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yanxiao; Zhou, Yazhou; Feng, Na; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Wu, Xiaohong; Liu, Zizhong; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2016-05-01

    Yersinia pestis murine toxin (Ymt) encoded on pMT1 is a 61-kDa protein, a member of the phospholipase D superfamily, which is found in all the domains of life. It is considered to be an intracellular protein required for the survival of Y. pestis in the midgut of the flea, but the exact role of Ymt in the pathogenesis of Y. pestis has not been clarified. Purified Ymt is highly toxic to mice and rats, but the exact mechanism of the animals' death is unclear. Here, we prepared a recombinant Ymt in Escherichia coli BL21 cells, and determined its toxicity and activity. We demonstrated that recombinant Ymt was as toxic to mice as the native protein when administered via the intraperitoneal or intravenous route, and inhibited the elevation of blood sugar caused by adrenaline. We also demonstrated that recombinant Ymt was highly toxic to mice when administered via the muscular or subcutaneous route. We also show that the multiple organ congestion or hemorrhage caused by Ymt poisoning may explain the death of the mice. PMID:26774329

  1. Non-toxic invert analog glass compositions of high modulus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    Glass compositions having a Young's modulus of at least 15 million psi are described. They and a specific modulus of at least 110 million inches consist essentially of, in mols, 15 to 40% SiO2, 6 to 15% Li2O, 24 to 45% of at least two bivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Ca, NzO, MgO and CuO; 13 to 39% of at least two trivalent oxides selected from the group consisting of Al2O3, Fe2O3, B2O3, La2O3, and Y2O3 and up to 15% of one or more tetravelent oxides selected from the group consisting of ZrO2, TiO2 and CeO2. The high modulus, low density glass compositions contain no toxic elements. The composition, glass density, Young's modulus, and specific modulus for 28 representative glasses are presented. The fiber modulus of five glasses are given.

  2. Regulation of OSU-03012 toxicity by ER stress proteins and ER stress inducing drugs

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Laurence; Roberts, Jane L.; Cruickshanks, Nichola; Grant, Steven; Poklepovic, Andrew; Dent, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The present studies examined the toxic interaction between the non-coxib celecoxib derivative OSU-03012 and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors, and to determine the roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress response regulators in cell survival. PDE5 inhibitors interacted in a greater than additive fashion with OSU-03012 to kill parental glioma and stem-like glioma cells. Knock down of the endoplasmic reticulum stress response proteins IRE1 or XBP1 enhanced the lethality of OSU-03012, and of [OSU-03012 + PDE5 inhibitor] treatment. Pan-caspase and caspase 9 inhibition did not alter OSU-03012 lethality but did abolish enhanced killing in the absence of IRE1 or XBP1. Expression of the mitochondrial protective protein BCL-XL or the caspase 8 inhibitor c-FLIP-s, or knock down of death receptor CD95 or the death receptor – caspase 8 linker protein FADD, suppressed killing by [OSU-03012 + PDE5 inhibitor] treatment. CD95 activation was blocked by the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor L-NAME. Knock down of the autophagy regulatory proteins Beclin1 or ATG5 protected cells from OSU-03012 and of [OSU-03012 + PDE5 inhibitor] toxicity. Knock down of IRE1 enhanced OSU-03012/[OSU-03012 + PDE5 inhibitor] –induced JNK activation and inhibition of JNK suppressed the elevated killing caused by IRE1 knock down. Knock down of CD95 blunted JNK activation. Collectively our data demonstrates that PDE5 inhibitors recruit death receptor signaling to enhance OSU-03012 toxicity in GBM cells. PMID:25103559

  3. Polyglutamine protein aggregation and toxicity are linked to the cellular stress response.

    PubMed

    Cowan, K J; Diamond, M I; Welch, W J

    2003-06-15

    Chronic exposure of cells to expanded polyglutamine proteins results in eventual cell demise. We constructed mouse cell lines expressing either the full-length androgen receptor (AR), or truncated forms of AR containing 25 or 65 glutamines to study the cellular consequences of chronic low-level exposure to these proteins. Expression of the polyglutamine-expanded truncated AR protein, but not the full-length expanded protein, resulted in the formation of cytoplasmic and nuclear aggregates and eventual cell death. Nuclear aggregates preferentially stained positive for heat shock protein (hsp)72, a sensitive indicator of a cellular stress response. Biochemical studies revealed that the presence of nuclear aggregates correlated with activation of the c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK). Different metabolic insults, including heat shock treatment, and exposure to sodium arsenite or menadione, proved more toxic to those cells expressing the polyglutamine-expanded truncated protein than to cells expressing the non-expanded form. Cells containing cytoplasmic polyglutamine-protein aggregates exhibited a delayed expression of hsp72 after heat shock. Once expressed, hsp72 failed to localize normally and instead was sequestered within the protein aggregates. This was accompanied by an inability of the aggregate-containing cells to cease their stress response as evidenced by the continued presence of activated JNK. Finally, activation of the cellular stress response increased the overall extent of polyglutamine protein aggregation, especially within the nucleus. Inclusion of a JNK inhibitor reduced this stress-dependent increase in nuclear aggregates. Abnormal stress responses may contribute to enhanced cell vulnerability in cells expressing polyglutamine-expanded proteins and may increase the propensity of such cells to form cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions. PMID:12783846

  4. Subacute toxicity of Dietary T-2 toxin in mice: influence of protein nutrition.

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, M A; Schiefer, H B

    1980-01-01

    The subacute toxic effects of dietary T-2 toxin (20 ppm) incorporated in semipurified diets of 8%, 12% or 16% protein, were examined in young Swiss mice after one, two, three and four weeks. Dietary T-2 toxin caused substantial reductions in growth and food consumptaion, the degrees of which were greatest in mice fed the diets of reduced protein content. T-2 toxin consistently caused similar degrees of nonregenerative anemia, lymphopenia, thymic atrophy and gastric hyperkeratosis irrespective of the dietary protein level. However, erythroid hypoplasia was temporary in mice fed T-2 toxin in the 16%-protein diet such that erythroid precursors regenerated in splenic and bone marrow and were hyperplastic after four weeks. Liver to body weight ratios of mice fed T-2 toxin in the 16%-and 12%-protein diets increased during the four week trial in comparison to control mice fed at a similar rate. These observations indicated that suppression of erythropoiesis in mice by dietary T-2 toxin was temporarty and that the interval before regeneration was prolonged by diets of reduced protein content. PMID:7407693

  5. High density protein crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rouleau, Robyn (Inventor); Delucas, Lawrence (Inventor); Hedden, Douglas Keith (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A protein crystal growth assembly including a crystal growth cell and further including a cell body having a top side and a bottom side and a first aperture defined therethrough, the cell body having opposing first and second sides and a second aperture defined therethrough. A cell barrel is disposed within the cell body, the cell barrel defining a cavity alignable with the first aperture of the cell body, the cell barrel being rotatable within the second aperture. A reservoir is coupled to the bottom side of the cell body and a cap having a top side is disposed on the top side of the cell body. The protein crystal growth assembly may be employed in methods including vapor diffusion crystallization, liquid to liquid crystallization, batch crystallization, and temperature induction batch mode crystallization.

  6. Neferine attenuates the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin in PC-12 cells via induction of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Vincent Kam Wai; Wu, An Guo; Wang, Jing Rong; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Mutant huntingtin aggregation is highly associated with the pathogenesis of Huntington's disease, an adult-onset autosomal dominant disorder, which leads to a loss of motor control and decline in cognitive function. Recent literature has revealed the protective role of autophagy in neurodegenerative diseases through degradation of mutant toxic proteins, including huntingtin or a-synuclein. Through the GFP-LC3 autophagy detection platform, we have  identified  neferine,  isolated  from  the  lotus  seed  embryo  of Nelumbo nucifera, which is able to induce autophagy through an AMPK-mTOR-dependent pathway. Furthermore, by overexpressing huntingtin with 74 CAG repeats (EGFP-HTT 74) in PC-12 cells, neferine reduces both the protein level and toxicity of mutant huntingtin through an autophagy-related gene 7 (Atg7)-dependent mechanism. With the variety of novel active compounds present in medicinal herbs, our current study suggests the possible protective mechanism of an autophagy inducer isolated from Chinese herbal medicine, which is crucial for its further development into a potential therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders in the future. PMID:25699594

  7. Studies on Bacterial Proteins Corona Interaction with Saponin Imprinted ZnO Nanohoneycombs and Their Toxic Responses.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Deepali; Ashaduzzaman, Md; Golabi, Mohsen; Shriwastav, Amritanshu; Bisetty, Krishna; Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2015-11-01

    Molecular imprinting generates robust, efficient, and highly mesoporous surfaces for biointeractions. Mechanistic interfacial interaction between the surface of core substrate and protein corona is crucial to understand the substantial microbial toxic responses at a nanoscale. In this study, we have focused on the mechanistic interactions between synthesized saponin imprinted zinc oxide nanohoneycombs (SIZnO NHs), average size 80-125 nm, surface area 20.27 m(2)/g, average pore density 0.23 pore/nm and number-average pore size 3.74 nm and proteins corona of bacteria. The produced SIZnO NHs as potential antifungal and antibacterial agents have been studied on Sclerotium rolfsii (S. rolfsii), Pythium debarynum (P. debarynum) and Escherichia coli (E. coli), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), respectively. SIZnO NHs exhibited the highest antibacterial (∼50%) and antifungal (∼40%) activity against Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) and fungus (P. debarynum), respectively at concentration of 0.1 mol. Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) observation showed that the ZnO NHs ruptured the cell wall of bacteria and internalized into the cell. The molecular docking studies were carried out using binding proteins present in the gram negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharide and lipocalin Blc) and gram positive bacteria (Staphylococcal Protein A, SpA). It was envisaged that the proteins present in the bacterial cell wall were found to interact and adsorb on the surface of SIZnO NHs thereby blocking the active sites of the proteins used for cell wall synthesis. The binding affinity and interaction energies were higher in the case of binding proteins present in gram negative bacteria as compared to that of gram positive bacteria. In addition, a kinetic mathematical model (KMM) was developed in MATLAB to predict the internalization in the bacterial cellular uptake of the ZnO NHs for better understanding of their controlled toxicity. The results obtained from KMM exhibited a good

  8. High content analysis of an in vitro model for metabolic toxicity: results with the model toxicants 4-aminophenol and cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie D; Madren-Whalley, Janna S; Li, Albert P; Dorsey, Russell; Salem, Harry

    2014-12-01

    In vitro models that accurately and rapidly assess hepatotoxicity and the effects of hepatic metabolism on nonliver cell types are needed by the U.S. Department of Defense and the pharmaceutical industry to screen compound libraries. Here, we report the first use of high content analysis on the Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture (IdMOC) system, a high-throughput method for such studies. We cultured 3T3-L1 cells in the presence and absence of primary human hepatocytes, and exposed the cultures to 4-aminophenol and cyclophosphamide, model toxicants that are respectively detoxified and activated by the liver. Following staining with calcein-AM, ethidium homodimer-1, and Hoechst 33342, high content analysis of the cultures revealed four cytotoxic endpoints: fluorescence intensities of calcein-AM and ethidium homodimer-1, nuclear area, and cell density. Using these endpoints, we observed that the cytotoxicity of 4-aminophenol in 3T3-L1 cells in co-culture was less than that observed for 3T3-L1 monocultures, consistent with the known detoxification of 4-aminophenol by hepatocytes. Conversely, cyclophosphamide cytotoxicity for 3T3-L1 cells was enhanced by co-culturing with hepatocytes, consistent with the known metabolic activation of this toxicant. The use of IdMOC plates combined with high content analysis is therefore a multi-endpoint, high-throughput capability for measuring the effects of metabolism on toxicity. PMID:25239051

  9. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  10. Toxicity of cinnamomin--a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein to bollworm and mosquito.

    PubMed

    Zhou, X; Li, X D; Yuan, J Z; Tang, Z H; Liu, W Y

    2000-03-01

    The toxicity of cinnamomin, a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein purified from the seeds of camphor tree (Cinnamomum camphora), to bollworm (Helicoverpa armigera) and mosquito (Culex pipines pallens) during larval stage was tested. The LC50 of cinnamomin to bollworm larvae fed on diet containing cinnamomin was 1839 ppm and the LC50 to larvae of mosquito was 168 ppm. The gut extract of bollworm larvae could apparently hydrolyze cinnamomin. The inhibition of protein synthesis by cinnamomin was tested in in vitro translation system of bollworm larvae, and its LC50 was determined to be approx. 14 nM. Bollworm larvae ribosome treated with cinnamomin produced a specific RNA fragment (R-fragment) characterized on urea-denatured polyacrylamide gel. Evidence was provided that hidden breaks exist in the largest ribosomal RNA of bollworm larvae. PMID:10732994

  11. Toxicity and differential protein analysis following destruxin A treatment of Spodoptera litura (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) SL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiang; Xu, Xiaoxia; Hu, Junjie; Jin, Fengliang; Hu, Qiongbo; Sun, Qiang; Yu, Xiaoqiang; Ren, Shunxiang

    2011-09-15

    The cytotoxicity of a destruxin A (DA) treatment of Spodoptera litura SL-1 cells was investigated. An MTT assay showed that DA was highly toxic to SL-1 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The IC(50) values of DA, after 24 h and 48 h of treatment, were 17.86 μg/mL and 7.80 μg/mL, respectively. Under inverted phase contrast microscopy (IPCM), it was found that prolonged treatment with DA could induce cell rounding, cellular membrane shrinking, formation of apoptotic bodies, vacuole appearance and cytoplasm leak out. Apoptosis induced by DA was further confirmed by fluorescence microscopy (FM) and flow cytometry (FCM) studies. SL-1 cells entered early apoptosis following a treatment with 2.5 μg/mL DA and entered late apoptosis following a treatment with increasing concentrations of DA. Furthermore, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) analysis was used to identify 22 proteins which were differentially expressed (≥2-fold difference) between control cells and DA-treated cells, and the expression level of these proteins was significantly different between the treated and untreated cells. Our results suggest that these differentially expressed proteins may help explain the diverse biological effects caused by the destruxin A treatment of cells; additionally, some of the identified proteins may have roles in SL-1 cellular proliferation and apoptosis. PMID:21718714

  12. A reversible and highly selective inhibitor of the proteasomal ubiquitin receptor rpn13 is toxic to multiple myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    Trader, Darci J; Simanski, Scott; Kodadek, Thomas

    2015-05-20

    The proteasome is a multisubunit complex responsible for most nonlysosomal turnover of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Proteasome inhibitors are of great interest clinically, particularly for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM). Unfortunately, resistance arises almost inevitably to these active site-targeted drugs. One strategy to overcome this resistance is to inhibit other steps in the protein turnover cascade mediated by the proteasome. Previously, Anchoori et al. identified Rpn13 as the target of an electrophilic compound (RA-190) that was selectively toxic to MM cells (Cancer Cell 2013, 24, 791-805), suggesting that this subunit of the proteasome is also a viable cancer drug target. Here we describe the discovery of the first highly selective, reversible Rpn13 ligands and show that they are also selectively toxic to MM cells. These data strongly support the hypothesis that Rpn13 is a viable target for the development of drugs to treat MM and other cancers. PMID:25914958

  13. Sertoli cell junctional proteins as early targets for different classes of reproductive toxicants.

    PubMed

    Fiorini, Céline; Tilloy-Ellul, Anne; Chevalier, Stephan; Charuel, Claude; Pointis, Georges

    2004-05-01

    In the testis, Sertoli cells establish intercellular junctions that are essential for spermatogenesis. The SerW3 Sertoli cell line displays some features of native Sertoli cells. Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses showed that SerW3 Sertoli cells expressed typical components of tight (occludin and zonula occludens-1), anchoring (N-cadherin) and gap (connexin 43) junctions. Testicular toxicants (DDT, pentachlorophenol, dieldrin, dinitrobenzene, cadmium chloride, cisplatin, gossypol, bisphenol A and tert-octylphenol) affected intercellular junctions by either reducing the amount or inducing aberrant intracellular localization of these membranous proteins. Phosphodiesterase inhibitors (isobutyl methylxantine, rolipram, zaprinast, zardaverine) did not alter junctional-complex component levels but caused a rapid and reversible redistribution of these proteins to the cytoplasmic compartment. The present study showed that occludin, ZO-1, N-cadherin and specifically Cx43 could be early targets for testicular toxicants. The SerW3 cell line therefore appears as a useful in vitro model to evaluate molecules with potential anti-reproductive effects. PMID:15082077

  14. Suppression of polyglutamine protein toxicity by co-expression of a heat-shock protein 40 and a heat-shock protein 110.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Y; Ren, S; Lao, U; Edgar, B A; Wang, T

    2013-01-01

    A network of heat-shock proteins mediates cellular protein homeostasis, and has a fundamental role in preventing aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In a Drosophila model of polyglutamine (polyQ) disease, the HSP40 family protein, DNAJ-1, is a superior suppressor of toxicity caused by the aggregation of polyQ containing proteins. Here, we demonstrate that one specific HSP110 protein, 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein cb (HSC70cb), interacts physically and genetically with DNAJ-1 in vivo, and that HSC70cb is necessary for DNAJ-1 to suppress polyglutamine-induced cell death in Drosophila. Expression of HSC70cb together with DNAJ-1 significantly enhanced the suppressive effects of DNAJ-1 on polyQ-induced neurodegeneration, whereas expression of HSC70cb alone did not suppress neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of either general polyQ disease or Huntington's disease. Furthermore, expression of a human HSP40, DNAJB1, together with a human HSP110, APG-1, protected cells from polyQ-induced neural degeneration in flies, whereas expression of either component alone had little effect. Our data provide a functional link between HSP40 and HSP110 in suppressing the cytotoxicity of aggregation-prone proteins, and suggest that HSP40 and HSP110 function together in protein homeostasis control. PMID:24091676

  15. Suppression of polyglutamine protein toxicity by co-expression of a heat-shock protein 40 and a heat-shock protein 110

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Y; Ren, S; Lao, U; Edgar, B A; Wang, T

    2013-01-01

    A network of heat-shock proteins mediates cellular protein homeostasis, and has a fundamental role in preventing aggregation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. In a Drosophila model of polyglutamine (polyQ) disease, the HSP40 family protein, DNAJ-1, is a superior suppressor of toxicity caused by the aggregation of polyQ containing proteins. Here, we demonstrate that one specific HSP110 protein, 70 kDa heat-shock cognate protein cb (HSC70cb), interacts physically and genetically with DNAJ-1 in vivo, and that HSC70cb is necessary for DNAJ-1 to suppress polyglutamine-induced cell death in Drosophila. Expression of HSC70cb together with DNAJ-1 significantly enhanced the suppressive effects of DNAJ-1 on polyQ-induced neurodegeneration, whereas expression of HSC70cb alone did not suppress neurodegeneration in Drosophila models of either general polyQ disease or Huntington's disease. Furthermore, expression of a human HSP40, DNAJB1, together with a human HSP110, APG-1, protected cells from polyQ-induced neural degeneration in flies, whereas expression of either component alone had little effect. Our data provide a functional link between HSP40 and HSP110 in suppressing the cytotoxicity of aggregation-prone proteins, and suggest that HSP40 and HSP110 function together in protein homeostasis control. PMID:24091676

  16. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis Outer Membrane Channel Protein CpnT Confers Susceptibility to Toxic Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Danilchanka, Olga; Pires, David

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is protected from toxic solutes by an effective outer membrane permeability barrier. Recently, we showed that the outer membrane channel protein CpnT is required for efficient nutrient uptake by M. tuberculosis and Mycobacterium bovis BCG. In this study, we found that the cpnT mutant of M. bovis BCG is more resistant than the wild type to a large number of drugs and antibiotics, including rifampin, ethambutol, clarithromycin, tetracycline, and ampicillin, by 8- to 32-fold. Furthermore, the cpnT mutant of M. bovis BCG was 100-fold more resistant to nitric oxide, a major bactericidal agent required to control M. tuberculosis infections in mice. Thus, CpnT constitutes the first outer membrane susceptibility factor in slow-growing mycobacteria. The dual functions of CpnT in uptake of nutrients and mediating susceptibility to toxic molecules are reflected in macrophage infection experiments: while loss of CpnT was detrimental for M. bovis BCG in macrophages that enable bacterial replication, presumably due to inadequate nutrient uptake, it conferred a survival advantage in macrophages that mount a strong bactericidal response. Importantly, the cpnT gene showed a significantly higher density of nonsynonymous mutations in drug-resistant clinical M. tuberculosis strains, indicating that CpnT is under selective pressure in human tuberculosis and/or during chemotherapy. Our results indicate that the CpnT channel constitutes an outer membrane gateway controlling the influx of nutrients and toxic molecules into slow-growing mycobacteria. This study revealed that reducing protein-mediated outer membrane permeability might constitute a new drug resistance mechanism in slow-growing mycobacteria. PMID:25645841

  17. A High-Throughput Screening Assay to Identify Kidney Toxic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Ramm, Susanne; Adler, Melanie; Vaidya, Vishal S

    2016-01-01

    Kidney toxicity due to drugs and chemicals poses a significant health burden for patients and a financial risk for pharmaceutical companies. However, currently no sensitive and high-throughput in vitro method exists for predictive nephrotoxicity assessment. Primary human proximal tubular epithelial cells (HPTECs) possess characteristics of differentiated epithelial cells, making them a desirable model to use in in vitro screening systems. Additionally, heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) protein expression is upregulated as a protective mechanism during kidney toxicant-induced oxidative stress or inflammation in HPTECs and can therefore be used as a biomarker for nephrotoxicity. In this article, we describe two different methods to screen for HO-1 increase: A homogeneous time resolved fluorescence (HTRF) assay and an immunofluorescence assay. The latter provides lower throughput but higher sensitivity due to the combination of two readouts, HO-1 intensity and cell number. The methods described in the protocol are amendable for other cell types as well. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27479365

  18. TDP-43 toxicity is mediated by the unfolded protein response-unrelated induction of C/EBP homologous protein expression.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hiroaki; Matsuoka, Masaaki

    2012-03-01

    Transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) neuronal toxicity plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration with ubiquitin-positive inclusions. In our previous study, we showed that low-grade overexpression of TDP-43, which is thought to mimic the gain-of-function of TDP-43, caused neuronal death, mediated by the upregulation of Bim and the downregulation of Bcl-xL in vitro. In this study, we show that TDP-43 overexpression caused the upregulation of C/EBP-homologous protein (CHOP) and that disruption of the CHOP gene markedly attenuated TDP-43-induced cell death. These results indicate that increases in CHOP expression contribute to TDP-43-induced cell death. We also show that the TDP-43-induced upregulation of CHOP expression is mediated by both the upregulation of the mRNA level of CHOP and the attenuation of thedegradation of CHOP, which is independent on the PERK/eIF2α/ATF4 or other pathway related to the unfolded protein response (UPR) to endoplasmic reticulum stress. This study provides the first example of the CHOP-mediated cell death that is independent of the UPR. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:22057717

  19. Inferring high-confidence human protein-protein interactions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background As numerous experimental factors drive the acquisition, identification, and interpretation of protein-protein interactions (PPIs), aggregated assemblies of human PPI data invariably contain experiment-dependent noise. Ascertaining the reliability of PPIs collected from these diverse studies and scoring them to infer high-confidence networks is a non-trivial task. Moreover, a large number of PPIs share the same number of reported occurrences, making it impossible to distinguish the reliability of these PPIs and rank-order them. For example, for the data analyzed here, we found that the majority (>83%) of currently available human PPIs have been reported only once. Results In this work, we proposed an unsupervised statistical approach to score a set of diverse, experimentally identified PPIs from nine primary databases to create subsets of high-confidence human PPI networks. We evaluated this ranking method by comparing it with other methods and assessing their ability to retrieve protein associations from a number of diverse and independent reference sets. These reference sets contain known biological data that are either directly or indirectly linked to interactions between proteins. We quantified the average effect of using ranked protein interaction data to retrieve this information and showed that, when compared to randomly ranked interaction data sets, the proposed method created a larger enrichment (~134%) than either ranking based on the hypergeometric test (~109%) or occurrence ranking (~46%). Conclusions From our evaluations, it was clear that ranked interactions were always of value because higher-ranked PPIs had a higher likelihood of retrieving high-confidence experimental data. Reducing the noise inherent in aggregated experimental PPIs via our ranking scheme further increased the accuracy and enrichment of PPIs derived from a number of biologically relevant data sets. These results suggest that using our high-confidence protein interactions

  20. Diethylcarbamazine and Non-Diethylcarbamazine Related Bancroftian Granuloma: An Immunohistochemical Study of Eosinophil Toxic Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Figueredo-Silva, Jose; Cavalcanti, Carmelita; Montenegro, Luciano Tavares; Norões, Joaquim; Dreyer, Gerusa

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested, mostly using in vitro experiments, that defenses against parasites involve mainly activated eosinophils and their toxic proteins, such as major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO). Eosinophil degranulation has been described around degenerating onchocercal microfilariae in patients treated with diethylcarbamazine (DEC). In bancroftian filariasis, traditional histopathologic studies have shown remarkable numbers of eosinophils in granulomatous lesions associated with both DEC-induced and spontaneous death of adult Wuchereria bancrofti parasites. No immunohistochemical study targeting eosinophil degranulation has been previously performed in these granulomas, which are found mainly within intrascrotal lymphatic vessels. This investigation was undertaken in 22 (12 DEC-treated and 10 untreated) male patients in order to determine the immunohistochemical expressions of MBP, EPO and ECP in bancofitian granulomas, using the indirect method. Stained intact esosinophils, as well as granular, extra-cellular material positive for all three proteins, were found in all granulomas. The immunohistochemical patterns were similar in both DEC-treated and untreated cases, irrespective of microfilaremia, blood eosinophilia, and granuloma age. Positive intact cells were observed mostly at the periphery of the granulomas, whereas granular material predominated in central areas around dead or degenerating parasites. These results indicate that eosinophils accumulate in the granulomas and degranulate preferentially in close proximity to degenerating or dead adult parasites. In bancroftian granulomas, influx and degranulation of eosinophils are considered a consequence of parasite death, rather than its cause. PMID:23675184

  1. Synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters using egg white proteins.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Dickson; Geckeler, Kurt E

    2014-03-01

    Gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) have gained interest during the recent years because of their low toxicity and finer size for the bioimaging and biolabeling applications in comparison to the semiconductor quantum dot analogues. Diverse materials such as sulfur compounds, peptides, dendrimers, proteins, etc., are exploited for the preparation of AuNCs. Henceforth, highly fluorescent, water-soluble, and few atom-containing gold nanoclusters are created using a rapid, straightforward, and green method. In this regard for the first time chicken egg white (CEW), one of the most unique materials, is utilized in an aqueous solution under basic conditions at physiological temperature for the preparation of AuNCs. Tyrosine and tryptophan amino acid residues are responsible for the conversion of Au ions to Au(0) under alkaline condtions. CEW contains four major proteins of which the main constituent protein, ovalbumin also leads to the formation of the AuNCs with a higher fluorescence emission compared to the CEW. The ratios between the different reaction partners are very crucial, along with temperature and time for the preparation of AuNCs with high photoluminescence emission. The limited vibrational motion of the proteins under alkaline condition and the bulkiness of the proteins help in the formation of AuNCs. PMID:24321847

  2. The protein transportation pathway from Golgi to vacuoles via endosomes plays a role in enhancement of methylmercury toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Gi-Wook; Murai, Yasutaka; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Naganuma, Akira

    2014-07-01

    Methylmercury causes serious damage to the central nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms of methylmercury toxicity are only marginally understood. In this study, we used a gene-deletion mutant library of budding yeast to conduct genome-wide screening for gene knockouts affecting the sensitivity of methylmercury toxicity. We successfully identified 31 genes whose deletions confer resistance to methylmercury in yeast, and 18 genes whose deletions confer hypersensitivity to methylmercury. Yeast genes whose deletions conferred resistance to methylmercury included many gene encoding factors involved in protein transport to vacuoles. Detailed examination of the relationship between the factors involved in this transport system and methylmercury toxicity revealed that mutants with loss of the factors involved in the transportation pathway from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the endosome, protein uptake into the endosome, and endosome-vacuole fusion showed higher methylmercury resistance than did wild-type yeast. The results of our genetic engineering study suggest that this vesicle transport system (proteins moving from the TGN to vacuole via endosome) is responsible for enhancing methylmercury toxicity due to the interrelationship between the pathways. There is a possibility that there may be proteins in the cell that enhance methylmercury toxicity through the protein transport system.

  3. Estimating Toxicity Pathway Activating Doses for High Throughput Chemical Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estimating a Toxicity Pathway Activating Dose (TPAD) from in vitro assays as an analog to a reference dose (RfD) derived from in vivo toxicity tests would facilitate high throughput risk assessments of thousands of data-poor environmental chemicals. Estimating a TPAD requires def...

  4. The Mitochondrial Chaperone Protein TRAP1 Mitigates α-Synuclein Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, A. Kathrin; Toegel, Jane P.; Gerhardt, Ellen; Karsten, Peter; Falkenburger, Björn; Reinartz, Andrea; Winklhofer, Konstanze F.; Schulz, Jörg B.

    2012-01-01

    Overexpression or mutation of α-Synuclein is associated with protein aggregation and interferes with a number of cellular processes, including mitochondrial integrity and function. We used a whole-genome screen in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster to search for novel genetic modifiers of human [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced neurotoxicity. Decreased expression of the mitochondrial chaperone protein tumor necrosis factor receptor associated protein-1 (TRAP1) was found to enhance age-dependent loss of fly head dopamine (DA) and DA neuron number resulting from [A53T]α-Synuclein expression. In addition, decreased TRAP1 expression in [A53T]α-Synuclein–expressing flies resulted in enhanced loss of climbing ability and sensitivity to oxidative stress. Overexpression of human TRAP1 was able to rescue these phenotypes. Similarly, human TRAP1 overexpression in rat primary cortical neurons rescued [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to rotenone treatment. In human (non)neuronal cell lines, small interfering RNA directed against TRAP1 enhanced [A53T]α-Synuclein–induced sensitivity to oxidative stress treatment. [A53T]α-Synuclein directly interfered with mitochondrial function, as its expression reduced Complex I activity in HEK293 cells. These effects were blocked by TRAP1 overexpression. Moreover, TRAP1 was able to prevent alteration in mitochondrial morphology caused by [A53T]α-Synuclein overexpression in human SH-SY5Y cells. These results indicate that [A53T]α-Synuclein toxicity is intimately connected to mitochondrial dysfunction and that toxicity reduction in fly and rat primary neurons and human cell lines can be achieved using overexpression of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1. Interestingly, TRAP1 has previously been shown to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine kinase PINK1, thus providing a potential link of PINK1 via TRAP1 to α-Synuclein. PMID:22319455

  5. Esophageal Toxicity From High-Dose, Single-Fraction Paraspinal Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, Brett W.; Jackson, Andrew; Hunt, Margie; Bilsky, Mark; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report the esophageal toxicity from single-fraction paraspinal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and identify dosimetric and clinical risk factors for toxicity. Methods and Materials: A total of 204 spinal metastases abutting the esophagus (182 patients) were treated with high-dose single-fraction SRS during 2003-2010. Toxicity was scored using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Dose-volume histograms were combined to generate a comprehensive atlas of complication incidence that identifies risk factors for toxicity. Correlation of dose-volume factors with esophageal toxicity was assessed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression. Clinical factors were correlated with toxicity. Results: The median dose to the planning treatment volume was 24 Gy. Median follow-up was 12 months (range, 3-81). There were 31 (15%) acute and 24 (12%) late esophageal toxicities. The rate of grade {>=}3 acute or late toxicity was 6.8% (14 patients). Fisher's exact test resulted in significant median splits for grade {>=}3 toxicity at V12 = 3.78 cm{sup 3} (relative risk [RR] 3.7, P=.05), V15 = 1.87 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013), V20 = 0.11 cm{sup 3} (RR 6, P=0.01), and V22 = 0.0 cm{sup 3} (RR 13, P=.0013). The median split for D2.5 cm{sup 3} (14.02 Gy) was also a significant predictor of toxicity (RR 6; P=.01). A highly significant logistic regression model was generated on the basis of D2.5 cm{sup 3}. One hundred percent (n = 7) of grade {>=}4 toxicities were associated with radiation recall reactions after doxorubicin or gemcitabine chemotherapy or iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus. Conclusions: High-dose, single-fraction paraspinal SRS has a low rate of grade {>=}3 esophageal toxicity. Severe esophageal toxicity is minimized with careful attention to esophageal doses during treatment planning. Iatrogenic manipulation of the irradiated esophagus and systemic agents classically associated with radiation

  6. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  7. Comparison of Bile Acids and Acetaminophen Protein Adducts in Children and Adolescents with Acetaminophen Toxicity.

    PubMed

    James, Laura; Yan, Ke; Pence, Lisa; Simpson, Pippa; Bhattacharyya, Sudeepa; Gill, Pritmohinder; Letzig, Lynda; Kearns, Gregory; Beger, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics approaches have enabled the study of new mechanisms of liver injury in experimental models of drug toxicity. Disruption of bile acid homeostasis is a known mechanism of drug induced liver injury. The relationship of individual bile acids to indicators of oxidative drug metabolism (acetaminophen protein adducts) and liver injury was examined in children with acetaminophen overdose, hospitalized children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and children with no recent exposure to acetaminophen. Nine bile acids were quantified through targeted metabolomic analysis in the serum samples of the three groups. Bile acids were compared to serum levels of acetaminophen protein adducts and alanine aminotransferase. Glycodeoxycholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycochenodeoxycholic acid were significantly increased in children with acetaminophen overdose compared to healthy controls. Among patients with acetaminophen overdose, bile acids were higher in subjects with acetaminophen protein adduct values > 1.0 nmol/mL and modest correlations were noted for three bile acids and acetaminophen protein adducts as follows: taurodeoxycholic acid (R=0.604; p<0.001), glycodeoxycholic acid (R=0.581; p<0.001), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (R=0.571; p<0.001). Variability in bile acids was greater among hospitalized children receiving low doses of acetaminophen than in healthy children with no recent acetaminophen exposure. Compared to bile acids, acetaminophen protein adducts more accurately discriminated among children with acetaminophen overdose, children with low dose exposure to acetaminophen, and healthy control subjects. In children with acetaminophen overdose, elevations of conjugated bile acids were associated with specific indicators of acetaminophen metabolism and non-specific indicators of liver injury. PMID:26208104

  8. A cationic tetrapyrrole inhibits toxic activities of the cellular prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Massignan, Tania; Cimini, Sara; Stincardini, Claudia; Cerovic, Milica; Vanni, Ilaria; Elezgarai, Saioa R.; Moreno, Jorge; Stravalaci, Matteo; Negro, Alessandro; Sangiovanni, Valeria; Restelli, Elena; Riccardi, Geraldina; Gobbi, Marco; Castilla, Joaquín; Borsello, Tiziana; Nonno, Romolo; Biasini, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) into PrPSc, a self-replicating isoform (prion) that accumulates in the central nervous system of affected individuals. The structure of PrPSc is poorly defined, and likely to be heterogeneous, as suggested by the existence of different prion strains. The latter represents a relevant problem for therapy in prion diseases, as some potent anti-prion compounds have shown strain-specificity. Designing therapeutics that target PrPC may provide an opportunity to overcome these problems. PrPC ligands may theoretically inhibit the replication of multiple prion strains, by acting on the common substrate of any prion replication reaction. Here, we characterized the properties of a cationic tetrapyrrole [Fe(III)-TMPyP], which was previously shown to bind PrPC, and inhibit the replication of a mouse prion strain. We report that the compound is active against multiple prion strains in vitro and in cells. Interestingly, we also find that Fe(III)-TMPyP inhibits several PrPC-related toxic activities, including the channel-forming ability of a PrP mutant, and the PrPC-dependent synaptotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers, which are associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. These results demonstrate that molecules binding to PrPC may produce a dual effect of blocking prion replication and inhibiting PrPC-mediated toxicity. PMID:26976106

  9. Probing High-density Functional Protein Microarrays to Detect Protein-protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Fasolo, Joseph; Im, Hogune; Snyder, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    High-density functional protein microarrays containing ~4,200 recombinant yeast proteins are examined for kinase protein-protein interactions using an affinity purified yeast kinase fusion protein containing a V5-epitope tag for read-out. Purified kinase is obtained through culture of a yeast strain optimized for high copy protein production harboring a plasmid containing a Kinase-V5 fusion construct under a GAL inducible promoter. The yeast is grown in restrictive media with a neutral carbon source for 6 hr followed by induction with 2% galactose. Next, the culture is harvested and kinase is purified using standard affinity chromatographic techniques to obtain a highly purified protein kinase for use in the assay. The purified kinase is diluted with kinase buffer to an appropriate range for the assay and the protein microarrays are blocked prior to hybridization with the protein microarray. After the hybridization, the arrays are probed with monoclonal V5 antibody to identify proteins bound by the kinase-V5 protein. Finally, the arrays are scanned using a standard microarray scanner, and data is extracted for downstream informatics analysis to determine a high confidence set of protein interactions for downstream validation in vivo. PMID:26274875

  10. [Fluorescence spectra study of a new toxic protein from Malania oleifera].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yan; Xiao, Han; Kang, Hong-Jun; Chen, Rui-Yan; Dai, Xiao-Chang

    2009-03-01

    A new toxic protein named malanin was isolated from seeds of Malania olei fera by hydrophobic chromatography, whose cytotoxic activities against carcinoma cells were very strong. The conformational changes of malanin at various temperatures, pH, organic solvents, surfactant, denaturant and fluorescence quenching solvents were studied by fluorescence spectra. The fluorescence spectra of malanin excited at 280 nm and 295 nm showed a maximum at 340 nm. The emission spectra of malanin showed that Trp residues were located by a great degree in the hydrophobic area. Addition of SDS, CH5N3 x HSCN, acrylamide and KI led to changes in the molecular conformation of malanin, and caused the fluorescence quenching of Trp residues. The red-shifted emission band of malanin after adding CH5 N3 x HSCN showed that Trp residues were exposed in polar solvents. PMID:19455822

  11. HIGH SENSITIVITY FOURIER TRANSFORM NMR. INTERMOLECULAR INTERACTIONS BETWEEN ENVIRONMENTAL TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND BIOLOGICAL MACROMOLECULES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project explored the feasibility of developing new techniques for evaluation of the effects of environmental toxic materials on complex biopolymer systems using high sensitivity Fourier transform nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) spectroscopy. Commercial instrumentation avail...

  12. Integration of Dosimetry, Exposure and High-Throughput Screening Data in Chemical Toxicity Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    High-throughput in vitro toxicity screening can provide an efficient way to identify potential biological targets for chemicals. However, relying on nominal assay concentrations may misrepresent potential in vivo effects of these chemicals due to differences in bioavailability, c...

  13. High Protein Diet and Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yih-Ru; Chen, Pei; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Yang, Chueh-Lien; Tsao, Ya-Tzu; Chang, Wen; Hsieh, I-Shan; Chern, Yijuang; Soong, Bing-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by the huntingtin (HTT) gene with expanded CAG repeats. In addition to the apparent brain abnormalities, impairments also occur in peripheral tissues. We previously reported that mutant Huntingtin (mHTT) exists in the liver and causes urea cycle deficiency. A low protein diet (17%) restores urea cycle activity and ameliorates symptoms in HD model mice. It remains unknown whether the dietary protein content should be monitored closely in HD patients because the normal protein consumption is lower in humans (~15% of total calories) than in mice (~22%). We assessed whether dietary protein content affects the urea cycle in HD patients. Thirty HD patients were hospitalized and received a standard protein diet (13.7% protein) for 5 days, followed by a high protein diet (HPD, 26.3% protein) for another 5 days. Urea cycle deficiency was monitored by the blood levels of citrulline and ammonia. HD progression was determined by the Unified Huntington’s Disease Rating Scale (UHDRS). The HPD increased blood citrulline concentration from 15.19 μmol/l to 16.30 μmol/l (p = 0.0378) in HD patients but did not change blood ammonia concentration. A 2-year pilot study of 14 HD patients found no significant correlation between blood citrulline concentration and HD progression. Our results indicated a short period of the HPD did not markedly compromise urea cycle function. Blood citrulline concentration is not a reliable biomarker of HD progression. PMID:25992839

  14. High Incidence of Methotrexate Associated Renal Toxicity in Patients with Lymphoma: A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    May, Jori; Carson, Kenneth R.; Butler, Sara; Liu, Weijian; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Wagner-Johnston, Nina D.

    2014-01-01

    High dose methotrexate (HDMTX), defined by doses of methotrexate (MTX) ≥ 1g/m2, is a widely used regimen known to cause renal toxicity. The reported incidence of renal toxicity in osteosarcoma patients is 1.8%, but the incidence in hematologic malignancies is not well characterized. In this retrospective study of 649 cycles of HDMTX in 194 patients, renal toxicity occurred in 9.1% of cycles in patients with lymphoma compared to 1.5% in patients with sarcoma. Older age, male sex, decreased baseline CrCl, and increased proton pump inhibitor use among the lymphoma population likely contributed to the observed difference. The incidence of renal toxicity was independent of the incidence of delayed MTX elimination, suggesting that kidney function is only one factor involved in MTX clearance. Renal toxicity prolonged the duration of hospitalization but severe renal insufficiency was uncommon. No significant impact on progression free or overall survival was observed. PMID:24004183

  15. Relative Impact of Incorporating Pharmacokinetics on Predicting In Vivo Hazard and Mode of Action from High-Throughput In Vitro Toxicity Assays

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of high-throughput in vitro assays has been proposed to play a significant role in the future of toxicity testing. In this study, rat hepatic metabolic clearance and plasma protein binding were measured for 59 ToxCast phase I chemicals. Computational in vitro-to-in vivo e...

  16. The Protein Oxidation Repair Enzyme Methionine Sulfoxide Reductase A Modulates Aβ Aggregation and Toxicity In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Minniti, Alicia N.; Arrazola, Macarena S.; Bravo-Zehnder, Marcela; Ramos, Francisca; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims: To examine the role of the enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase A-1 (MSRA-1) in amyloid-β peptide (Aβ)-peptide aggregation and toxicity in vivo, using a Caenorhabditis elegans model of the human amyloidogenic disease inclusion body myositis. Results: MSRA-1 specifically reduces oxidized methionines in proteins. Therefore, a deletion of the msra-1 gene was introduced into transgenic C. elegans worms that express the Aβ-peptide in muscle cells to prevent the reduction of oxidized methionines in proteins. In a constitutive transgenic Aβ strain that lacks MSRA-1, the number of amyloid aggregates decreases while the number of oligomeric Aβ species increases. These results correlate with enhanced synaptic dysfunction and mislocalization of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ACR-16 at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Innovation: This approach aims at modulating the oxidation of Aβ in vivo indirectly by dismantling the methionine sulfoxide repair system. The evidence presented here shows that the absence of MSRA-1 influences Aβ aggregation and aggravates locomotor behavior and NMJ dysfunction. The results suggest that therapies which boost the activity of the Msr system could have a beneficial effect in managing amyloidogenic pathologies. Conclusion: The absence of MSRA-1 modulates Aβ-peptide aggregation and increments its deleterious effects in vivo. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 22, 48–62. PMID:24988428

  17. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F.; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (–/–) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (–/–) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (–/–) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:22512859

  18. Fragile X protein mitigates TDP-43 toxicity by remodeling RNA granules and restoring translation.

    PubMed

    Coyne, Alyssa N; Yamada, Shizuka B; Siddegowda, Bhavani Bagevalu; Estes, Patricia S; Zaepfel, Benjamin L; Johannesmeyer, Jeffrey S; Lockwood, Donovan B; Pham, Linh T; Hart, Michael P; Cassel, Joel A; Freibaum, Brian; Boehringer, Ashley V; Taylor, J Paul; Reitz, Allen B; Gitler, Aaron D; Zarnescu, Daniela C

    2015-12-15

    RNA dysregulation is a newly recognized disease mechanism in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here we identify Drosophila fragile X mental retardation protein (dFMRP) as a robust genetic modifier of TDP-43-dependent toxicity in a Drosophila model of ALS. We find that dFMRP overexpression (dFMRP OE) mitigates TDP-43 dependent locomotor defects and reduced lifespan in Drosophila. TDP-43 and FMRP form a complex in flies and human cells. In motor neurons, TDP-43 expression increases the association of dFMRP with stress granules and colocalizes with polyA binding protein in a variant-dependent manner. Furthermore, dFMRP dosage modulates TDP-43 solubility and molecular mobility with overexpression of dFMRP resulting in a significant reduction of TDP-43 in the aggregate fraction. Polysome fractionation experiments indicate that dFMRP OE also relieves the translation inhibition of futsch mRNA, a TDP-43 target mRNA, which regulates neuromuscular synapse architecture. Restoration of futsch translation by dFMRP OE mitigates Futsch-dependent morphological phenotypes at the neuromuscular junction including synaptic size and presence of satellite boutons. Our data suggest a model whereby dFMRP is neuroprotective by remodeling TDP-43 containing RNA granules, reducing aggregation and restoring the translation of specific mRNAs in motor neurons. PMID:26385636

  19. Highly toxic ribbon worm Cephalothrix simula containing tetrodotoxin in Hiroshima Bay, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan.

    PubMed

    Asakawa, Manabu; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kajihara, Hiroshi

    2013-02-01

    In 1998, during a toxicological surveillance of various marine fouling organisms in Hiroshima Bay, Japan, specimens of the ribbon worm, Cephalothrix simula (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea) were found. These ribbon worms contained toxins with extremely strong paralytic activity. The maximum toxicity in terms of tetrodotoxin (TTX) was 25,590 mouse units (MU) per gram for the whole worm throughout the monitoring period. The main toxic component was isolated and recrystallized from an acidified methanolic solution. The crystalline with a specific toxicity of 3520 MU/mg was obtained and identified as TTX by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescent detection (FLD) (HPLC-FLD), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest toxicity of C. simula exceeded the human lethal dose per a single worm. A toxicological surveillance of C. simula from 1998 to 2005 indicated approximately 80% of the individuals were ranked as "strongly toxic" (≥1000 MU/g). Forty-eight percent of the specimens possessed toxicity scores of more than 2000 MU/g. Seasonal variations were observed in the lethal potency of C. simula. Specimens collected on January 13, 2000 to December 26, 2000 showed mean toxicities of 665-5300 MU/g (n = 10). These data prompted a toxicological surveillance of ribbon worms from other localities with different habitats in Japan, including Akkeshi Bay (Hokkaido) under stones on rocky intertidal beaches, as well as Otsuchi (Iwate) among calcareous tubes of serpulid polychaetes on rocky shores. Within twelve species of ribbon worms examined, only C. simula possessed extremely high toxicity. Therefore, C. simula appears to show generally high toxicity irrespective of their locality and habitat. PMID:23430577

  20. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using

  1. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au(25) nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au(25) clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au(+) ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of approximately 5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f(7/2) approximately 83.97 eV and Au 4f(5/2) approximately 87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size approximately 1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size approximately 8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at approximately 674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 microg ml(-1). Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR(+ve) oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au(25) clusters were found internalized in significantly higher

  2. Toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis (L.) Cry proteins against summer fruit tortrix (Adoxophyes orana - Fischer von Rösslerstamm).

    PubMed

    Radosavljevic, Jelena; Naimov, Samir

    2016-07-01

    The activity of seven Cry1, one Cry9 and one hybrid Cry1 protoxins against neonate larvae of summer fruit tortrix (Adoxophyes orana - Fischer von Rösslerstamm) has been investigated. Cry1Ia is identified as the most toxic protein, followed by Cry1Aa and Cry1Ac. Cry1Ca, Cry1Cb, Cry1Da and Cry1Fa were less active, while SN19 (Cry1 hybrid protein with domain composition 1Ba/1Ia/1Ba) and Cry9Aa exhibited negligible toxicity against A. orana. In vitro trypsin-activated Cry1Ac is still less active than Cry1Ia protoxin, suggesting that toxicity of Cry1Ia is most probably due to more complex differences in further downstream processing, toxin-receptor interactions and pore formation in A. orana's midgut epithelium. PMID:27311897

  3. Application of high performance capillary electrophoresis on toxic alkaloids analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Wang, Rong; Zhang, Yurong; Yu, Yunqiu

    2007-06-01

    We employed CE to identify mixtures of the toxic alkaloids lappaconitine, bullatine A, atropine sulfate, atropine methobromide, scopolamine hydrobromide, anisodamine hydrobromide, brucine, strychnine, quinine sulfate, and chloroquine in human blood and urine, using procaine hydrochloride as an internal standard. The separation employed a fused-silica capillary of 75 microm id x 60 cm length (effective length: 50.2 cm) and a buffer containing 100 mM phosphate and 5% ACN (pH 4.0). The sample was injected in a pressure mode and the separation was performed at a voltage of 16 kV and a temperature of 25 degrees C. The compounds were detected by UV absorbance at wavelengths of 195 and 235 nm. All the ten alkaloids were separated within 16 min. The method was validated with regard to precision (RSD), accuracy, sensitivity, linear range, LOD, and LOQ. In blood and urine samples, the detection limits were 5-40 ng/mL and linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 0.02-10 microg/mL. The precision of intra- and interday measurements was less than 15%. Electrophoretic peaks could be identified either by the relative migration time or by their UV spectrum. PMID:17623479

  4. Lysis of Trypanosoma brucei by a toxic subspecies of human high density lipoprotein.

    PubMed

    Hajduk, S L; Moore, D R; Vasudevacharya, J; Siqueira, H; Torri, A F; Tytler, E M; Esko, J D

    1989-03-25

    Trypanosoma brucei brucei is an important pathogen of domestic cattle in sub-Saharan Africa and is closely related to the human sleeping sickness parasites, Trypanosoma brucei gambiense and Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense. However, T. b. brucei is non-infectious to humans. The restriction of the host range of T. b. brucei results from the sensitivity of the parasite to lysis by toxic human high density lipoproteins (HDL) (Rifkin, M. R. (1978) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 75, 3450-3454). We show in this report that trypanosome lytic activity is not a universal feature of all human HDL particles but rather that it is associated with a minor subclass of HDL. We have purified the lytic activity about 8,000-fold and have identified and characterized the subspecies of HDL responsible for trypanosome lysis. This class of HDL has a relative molecular weight of 490,000, a buoyant density of 1.21-1.24 g/ml, and a particle diameter of 150-210 A. It contains apolipoproteins AI, AII, CI, CII, and CIII, and monoclonal antibodies against apo-AI and apo-AII inhibit trypanocidal activity. In addition to these common apolipoproteins, the particles also contain at least three unique proteins, as measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nonreducing conditions. Treatment of the particles with dithiothreitol resulted in the disappearance of two of the proteins and abolished trypanocidal activity. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that these proteins were a disulfide-linked trimer of 45,000, 36,000, and 13,500-Da polypeptides and dimers of the 36,000- and 13,500-Da polypeptides or of 65,000- and 8,500-Da polypeptides. Studies on the lysis of T. b. brucei by the purified particle suggest that the lytic pathway may involve the uptake of the trypanocidal subspecies of HDL by endocytosis. PMID:2494183

  5. Identification of Novel Potentially Toxic Oligomers Formed in Vitro from Mammalian-derived Expanded huntingtin Exon-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Nucifora, Leslie G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Feng, Xia; Arbez, Nicolas; Zhu, Shanshan; Miller, Jason; Yang, Guocheng; Ratovitski, Tamara; Delannoy, Michael; Muchowski, Paul J.; Finkbeiner, Steven; Legleiter, Justin; Ross, Christopher A.; Poirier, Michelle A.

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder that arises from an expanded polyglutamine region in the N terminus of the HD gene product, huntingtin. Protein inclusions comprised of N-terminal fragments of mutant huntingtin are a characteristic feature of disease, though are likely to play a protective role rather than a causative one in neurodegeneration. Soluble oligomeric assemblies of huntingtin formed early in the aggregation process are candidate toxic species in HD. In the present study, we established an in vitro system to generate recombinant huntingtin in mammalian cells. Using both denaturing and native gel analysis, we have identified novel oligomeric forms of mammalian-derived expanded huntingtin exon-1 N-terminal fragment. These species are transient and were not previously detected using bacterially expressed exon-1 protein. Importantly, these species are recognized by 3B5H10, an antibody that recognizes a two-stranded hairpin conformation of expanded polyglutamine believed to be associated with a toxic form of huntingtin. Interestingly, comparable oligomeric species were not observed for expanded huntingtin shortstop, a 117-amino acid fragment of huntingtin shown previously in mammalian cell lines and transgenic mice, and here in primary cortical neurons, to be non-toxic. Further, we demonstrate that expanded huntingtin shortstop has a reduced ability to form amyloid-like fibrils characteristic of the aggregation pathway for toxic expanded polyglutamine proteins. Taken together, these data provide a possible candidate toxic species in HD. In addition, these studies demonstrate the fundamental differences in early aggregation events between mutant huntingtin exon-1 and shortstop proteins that may underlie the differences in toxicity. PMID:22433867

  6. Integrated process for high conversion and high yield protein PEGylation.

    PubMed

    Pfister, David; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Over the past decades, PEGylation has become a powerful technique to increase the in vivo circulation half-life of therapeutic proteins while maintaining their activity. The development of new therapeutic proteins is likely to require further improvement of the PEGylation methods to reach even better selectivity and yield for reduced costs. The intensification of the PEGylation process was investigated through the integration of a chromatographic step in order to increase yield and conversion for the production of mono-PEGylated protein. Lysozyme was used as a model protein to demonstrate the feasibility of such approach. In the integrated reaction/separation process, chromatography was used as fractionation technique in order to isolate and recycle the unreacted protein from the PEGylated products. This allows operating the reactor with short reaction times so as to minimize the production of multi-PEGylated proteins (i.e., conjugated to more than one polymer). That is, the reaction is stopped before the desired product (i.e., the mono-PEGylated protein) can further react, thus leading to limited conversion but high yield. The recycling of the unreacted protein was then considered to drive the protein overall conversion to completion. This approach has great potential to improve processes whose yield is limited by the further reaction of the product leading to undesirable by-products. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1711-1718. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26757029

  7. Integration of dosimetry, exposure, and high-throughput screening data in chemical toxicity assessment.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Wambaugh, John F; Ferguson, Stephen S; Sochaski, Mark A; Rotroff, Daniel M; Freeman, Kimberly; Clewell, Harvey J; Dix, David J; Andersen, Melvin E; Houck, Keith A; Allen, Brittany; Judson, Richard S; Singh, Reetu; Kavlock, Robert J; Richard, Ann M; Thomas, Russell S

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput in vitro toxicity screening can provide an efficient way to identify potential biological targets for chemicals. However, relying on nominal assay concentrations may misrepresent potential in vivo effects of these chemicals due to differences in bioavailability, clearance, and exposure. Hepatic metabolic clearance and plasma protein binding were experimentally measured for 239 ToxCast Phase I chemicals. The experimental data were used in a population-based in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation model to estimate the daily human oral dose, called the oral equivalent dose, necessary to produce steady-state in vivo blood concentrations equivalent to in vitro AC(50) (concentration at 50% of maximum activity) or lowest effective concentration values across more than 500 in vitro assays. The estimated steady-state oral equivalent doses associated with the in vitro assays were compared with chronic aggregate human oral exposure estimates to assess whether in vitro bioactivity would be expected at the dose-equivalent level of human exposure. A total of 18 (9.9%) chemicals for which human oral exposure estimates were available had oral equivalent doses at levels equal to or less than the highest estimated U.S. population exposures. Ranking the chemicals by nominal assay concentrations would have resulted in different chemicals being prioritized. The in vitro assay endpoints with oral equivalent doses lower than the human exposure estimates included cell growth kinetics, cytokine and cytochrome P450 expression, and cytochrome P450 inhibition. The incorporation of dosimetry and exposure provide necessary context for interpretation of in vitro toxicity screening data and are important considerations in determining chemical testing priorities. PMID:21948869

  8. A cationic tetrapyrrole inhibits toxic activities of the cellular prion protein.

    PubMed

    Massignan, Tania; Cimini, Sara; Stincardini, Claudia; Cerovic, Milica; Vanni, Ilaria; Elezgarai, Saioa R; Moreno, Jorge; Stravalaci, Matteo; Negro, Alessandro; Sangiovanni, Valeria; Restelli, Elena; Riccardi, Geraldina; Gobbi, Marco; Castilla, Joaquín; Borsello, Tiziana; Nonno, Romolo; Biasini, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are rare neurodegenerative conditions associated with the conformational conversion of the cellular prion protein (PrP(C)) into PrP(Sc), a self-replicating isoform (prion) that accumulates in the central nervous system of affected individuals. The structure of PrP(Sc) is poorly defined, and likely to be heterogeneous, as suggested by the existence of different prion strains. The latter represents a relevant problem for therapy in prion diseases, as some potent anti-prion compounds have shown strain-specificity. Designing therapeutics that target PrP(C) may provide an opportunity to overcome these problems. PrP(C) ligands may theoretically inhibit the replication of multiple prion strains, by acting on the common substrate of any prion replication reaction. Here, we characterized the properties of a cationic tetrapyrrole [Fe(III)-TMPyP], which was previously shown to bind PrP(C), and inhibit the replication of a mouse prion strain. We report that the compound is active against multiple prion strains in vitro and in cells. Interestingly, we also find that Fe(III)-TMPyP inhibits several PrP(C)-related toxic activities, including the channel-forming ability of a PrP mutant, and the PrP(C)-dependent synaptotoxicity of amyloid-β (Aβ) oligomers, which are associated with Alzheimer's Disease. These results demonstrate that molecules binding to PrP(C) may produce a dual effect of blocking prion replication and inhibiting PrP(C)-mediated toxicity. PMID:26976106

  9. Environmental toxicants perturb human Sertoli cell adhesive function via changes in F-actin organization mediated by actin regulatory proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiang; Mruk, Dolores D.; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Wong, Chris K.C.; Lee, Will M.; John, Constance M.; Turek, Paul J.; Silvestrini, Bruno; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro and that have formed an epithelium be used as a model to monitor toxicant-induced junction disruption and to better understand the mechanism(s) by which toxicants disrupt cell adhesion at the Sertoli cell blood–testis barrier (BTB)? SUMMARY ANSWER Our findings illustrate that human Sertoli cells cultured in vitro serve as a reliable system to monitor the impact of environmental toxicants on the BTB function. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Suspicions of a declining trend in semen quality and a concomitant increase in exposures to environmental toxicants over the past decades reveal the need of an in vitro system that efficiently and reliably monitors the impact of toxicants on male reproductive function. Furthermore, studies in rodents have confirmed that environmental toxicants impede Sertoli cell BTB function in vitro and in vivo. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE AND DURATION We examined the effects of two environmental toxicants: cadmium chloride (0.5–20 µM) and bisphenol A (0.4–200 µM) on human Sertoli cell function. Cultured Sertoli cells from three men were used in this study, which spanned an 18-month period. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Human Sertoli cells from three subjects were cultured in F12/DMEM containing 5% fetal bovine serum. Changes in protein expression were monitored by immunoblotting using specific antibodies. Immunofluorescence analyses were used to assess changes in the distribution of adhesion proteins, F-actin and actin regulatory proteins following exposure to two toxicants: cadmium chloride and bisphenol A (BPA). MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Human Sertoli cells were sensitive to cadmium and BPA toxicity. Changes in the localization of cell adhesion proteins were mediated by an alteration of the actin-based cytoskeleton. This alteration of F-actin network in Sertoli cells as manifested by truncation and depolymerization of actin microfilaments at the Sertoli cell BTB was caused by

  10. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) inhibits agglomeration and macrophage uptake of toxic amine modified nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Zofi; Kendall, Michaela; Mackay, Rose-Marie; Whitwell, Harry; Elgy, Christine; Ding, Ping; Mahajan, Sumeet; Morgan, Cliff; Griffiths, Mark; Clark, Howard; Madsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The lung provides the main route for nanomaterial exposure. Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an important respiratory innate immune molecule with the ability to bind or opsonise pathogens to enhance phagocytic removal from the airways. We hypothesised that SP-A, like surfactant protein D, may interact with inhaled nanoparticulates, and that this interaction will be affected by nanoparticle (NP) surface characteristics. In this study, we characterise the interaction of SP-A with unmodified (U-PS) and amine-modified (A-PS) polystyrene particles of varying size and zeta potential using dynamic light scatter analysis. SP-A associated with both 100 nm U-PS and A-PS in a calcium-independent manner. SP-A induced significant calcium-dependent agglomeration of 100 nm U-PS NPs but resulted in calcium-independent inhibition of A-PS self agglomeration. SP-A enhanced uptake of 100 nm U-PS into macrophage-like RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner but in contrast inhibited A-PS uptake. Reduced association of A-PS particles in RAW264.7 cells following pre-incubation of SP-A was also observed with coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy. Consistent with these findings, alveolar macrophages (AMs) from SP-A−/− mice were more efficient at uptake of 100 nm A-PS compared with wild type C57Bl/6 macrophages. No difference in uptake was observed with 500 nm U-PS or A-PS particles. Pre-incubation with SP-A resulted in a significant decrease in uptake of 100 nm A-PS in macrophages isolated from both groups of mice. In contrast, increased uptake by AMs of U-PS was observed after pre-incubation with SP-A. Thus we have demonstrated that SP-A promotes uptake of non-toxic U-PS particles but inhibits the clearance of potentially toxic A-PS particles by blocking uptake into macrophages. PMID:25676620

  11. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D.; Davis, Jared H.; Gordon, Patricia B.; Breaker, Ronald R.; Strobel, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, 18F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  12. Eukaryotic resistance to fluoride toxicity mediated by a widespread family of fluoride export proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Sanshu; Smith, Kathryn D; Davis, Jared H; Gordon, Patricia B; Breaker, Ronald R; Strobel, Scott A

    2013-11-19

    Fluorine is an abundant element and is toxic to organisms from bacteria to humans, but the mechanisms by which eukaryotes resist fluoride toxicity are unknown. The Escherichia coli gene crcB was recently shown to be regulated by a fluoride-responsive riboswitch, implicating it in fluoride response. There are >8,000 crcB homologs across all domains of life, indicating that it has an important role in biology. Here we demonstrate that eukaryotic homologs [renamed FEX (fluoride exporter)] function in fluoride export. FEX KOs in three eukaryotic model organisms, Neurospora crassa, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and Candida albicans, are highly sensitized to fluoride (>200-fold) but not to other halides. Some of these KO strains are unable to grow in fluoride concentrations found in tap water. Using the radioactive isotope of fluoride, (18)F, we developed an assay to measure the intracellular fluoride concentration and show that the FEX deletion strains accumulate fluoride in excess of the external concentration, providing direct evidence of FEX function in fluoride efflux. In addition, they are more sensitive to lower pH in the presence of fluoride. These results demonstrate that eukaryotic FEX genes encode a previously unrecognized class of fluoride exporter necessary for survival in standard environmental conditions. PMID:24173035

  13. Highly Toxic Ribbon Worm Cephalothrix simula Containing Tetrodotoxin in Hiroshima Bay, Hiroshima Prefecture, Japan

    PubMed Central

    Asakawa, Manabu; Ito, Katsutoshi; Kajihara, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    In 1998, during a toxicological surveillance of various marine fouling organisms in Hiroshima Bay, Japan, specimens of the ribbon worm, Cephalothrix simula (Nemertea: Palaeonemertea) were found. These ribbon worms contained toxins with extremely strong paralytic activity. The maximum toxicity in terms of tetrodotoxin (TTX) was 25,590 mouse units (MU) per gram for the whole worm throughout the monitoring period. The main toxic component was isolated and recrystallized from an acidified methanolic solution. The crystalline with a specific toxicity of 3520 MU/mg was obtained and identified as TTX by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)-fluorescent detection (FLD) (HPLC-FLD), electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), infrared (IR), nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The highest toxicity of C. simula exceeded the human lethal dose per a single worm. A toxicological surveillance of C. simula from 1998 to 2005 indicated approximately 80% of the individuals were ranked as “strongly toxic” (≥1000 MU/g). Forty-eight percent of the specimens possessed toxicity scores of more than 2000 MU/g. Seasonal variations were observed in the lethal potency of C. simula. Specimens collected on January 13, 2000 to December 26, 2000 showed mean toxicities of 665–5300 MU/g (n = 10). These data prompted a toxicological surveillance of ribbon worms from other localities with different habitats in Japan, including Akkeshi Bay (Hokkaido) under stones on rocky intertidal beaches, as well as Otsuchi (Iwate) among calcareous tubes of serpulid polychaetes on rocky shores. Within twelve species of ribbon worms examined, only C. simula possessed extremely high toxicity. Therefore, C. simula appears to show generally high toxicity irrespective of their locality and habitat. PMID:23430577

  14. Disrupting self-assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic protein oligomers by "molecular tweezers" - from the test tube to animal models.

    PubMed

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs - primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific "molecular tweezers" (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. PMID:23859557

  15. A review on the cause-effect relationship between oxidative stress and toxic proteins in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Borza, Liana Rada

    2014-01-01

    Protein aggregates are the defining pathological feature of human neurodegenerative diseases. Studies have revealed that mutant huntingtin, polyglutamine-expanded ataxin-1 and ataxin-3 can cause elevated levels of reactive oxygen species in neuronal cells. It has also been indicated that the normal host prion protein behaves as an antioxidant, while the neurotoxic peptide based on the sequence of the scrapie isoform increases hydrogen peroxide toxicity in neuronal cultures. Additionally, not only can oxidative stress contribute to the aggregation of beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein, but both beta-amyloid and alpha-synuclein can induce oxidative damage. Furthermore, oxidative stressors have been shown to play a critical role in neurofibrillary pathology leading to tau hyperphosphorylation. In conclusion, the present review supports a cause-effect relationship between oxidative stress and toxic proteins in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24741770

  16. A multi-endpoint, high-throughput study of nanomaterial toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sang-Kyu; Qu, Xiaolei; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Wang, Tianxiao; Riepe, Celeste; Liu, Zheng; Li, Qilin; Zhong, Weiwei

    2015-01-01

    The booming nanotech industry has raised public concerns about the environmental health and safety impact of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs). High-throughput assays are needed to obtain toxicity data for the rapidly increasing number of ENMs. Here we present a suite of high-throughput methods to study nanotoxicity in intact animals using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model. At the population level, our system measures food consumption of thousands of animals to evaluate population fitness. At the organism level, our automated system analyzes hundreds of individual animals for body length, locomotion speed, and lifespan. To demonstrate the utility of our system, we applied this technology to test the toxicity of 20 nanomaterials under four concentrations. Only fullerene nanoparticles (nC60), fullerol, TiO2, and CeO2 showed little or no toxicity. Various degrees of toxicity were detected from different forms of carbon nanotubes, graphene, carbon black, Ag, and fumed SiO2 nanoparticles. Aminofullerene and UV irradiated nC60 also showed small but significant toxicity. We further investigated the effects of nanomaterial size, shape, surface chemistry, and exposure conditions on toxicity. Our data are publicly available at the open-access nanotoxicity database www.QuantWorm.org/nano. PMID:25611253

  17. A mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase inhibitor induced compound skin toxicity with oedema in metastatic malignant melanoma.

    PubMed

    Thomas, C L; Mortimer, P S; Larkin, J M; Basu, T N; Gore, M E; Fearfield, L

    2016-04-01

    We report three cases of skin toxicity associated with oral mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibitor treatment for metastatic malignant melanoma (MM). All three patients developed oedema, and a single patient experienced eyelash trichomegaly. This is the first known report of eyelash trichomegaly secondary to MEK inhibitor use. We also discuss possible mechanisms for MEK inhibitor-associated oedema development. This series supports the role of the dermatologist in the screening and management of patients in the rapidly developing oncology setting, as new targeted agents can give rise to marked skin toxicity. PMID:26411345

  18. “Non-Toxic” Proteins of the Botulinum Toxin Complex Exert In-vivo Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Suzuki, Tomonori; Matsumoto, Takashi; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) causes muscle paralysis and is the most potent toxin in nature. BoNT is associated with a complex of auxiliary “Non-Toxic” proteins, which constitute a large-sized toxin complex (L-TC). However, here we report that the “Non-Toxic” complex of serotype D botulinum L-TC, when administered to rats, exerts in-vivo toxicity on small-intestinal villi. Moreover, Serotype C and D of the “Non-Toxic” complex, but not BoNT, induced vacuole-formation in a rat intestinal epithelial cell line (IEC-6), resulting in cell death. Our results suggest that the vacuole was formed in a manner distinct from the mechanism by which Helicobacter pylori vacuolating toxin (VacA) and Vibrio cholerae haemolysin induce vacuolation. We therefore hypothesise that the serotype C and D botulinum toxin complex is a functional hybrid of the neurotoxin and vacuolating toxin (VT) which arose from horizontal gene transfer from an ancestral BoNT-producing bacterium to a hypothetical VT-producing bacterium. PMID:27507612

  19. Ocular toxicity following high dose chemotherapy and autologous transplant.

    PubMed

    Rubin, P; Hulette, C; Khawly, J A; Elkordy, M; Hussein, A; Vredenburgh, J J; Jaffe, G J; Peters, W P

    1996-07-01

    A 49-year-old woman received an autologous transplant for breast cancer. Six weeks later she noticed visual disturbance of the left eye which correlated with a visual field abnormality. There was a milder degree of visual disturbance in the right eye. Treatment with high-dose steroids partially stabilized the problem, which was felt to be an ischemic optic neuropathy. She ultimately died of respiratory failure. Pathology of the optic nerves revealed demyelination. Visual disturbances following high-dose chemotherapy are uncommon; the pathology to date has not been elucidated. Steroid therapy may be useful. PMID:8832031

  20. Probing calmodulin protein-protein interactions using high-content protein arrays.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, David J; Bauer, Mikael; Linse, Sara; Cahill, Dolores J

    2011-01-01

    The calcium ion (Ca(2+)) is a ubiquitous second messenger that is crucial for the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The diverse transient signals transduced by Ca(2+) are mediated by intracellular -Ca(2+)-binding proteins. Calcium ions shuttle into and out of the cytosol, transported across membranes by channels, exchangers, and pumps that regulate flux across the ER, mitochondrial and plasma membranes. Calcium regulates both rapid events, such as cytoskeleton remodelling or release of vesicle contents, and slower ones, such as transcriptional changes. Moreover, sustained cytosolic calcium elevations can lead to unwanted cellular activation or apoptosis. Calmodulin represents the most significant of the Ca(2+)-binding proteins and is an essential regulator of intracellular processes in response to extracellular stimuli mediated by a rise in Ca(2+) ion concentration. To profile novel protein-protein interactions that calmodulin participates in, we probed a high-content recombinant human protein array with fluorophore-labelled calmodulin in the presence of Ca(2+). This protein array contains 37,200 redundant proteins, incorporating over 10,000 unique human proteins expressed from a human brain cDNA library. We describe the identification of a high affinity interaction between calmodulin and the single-pass transmembrane proteins STIM1 and STIM2 that localise to the ER. Translocation of STIM1 and STIM2 from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane is a key step in store operated calcium entry in the cell. PMID:21901608

  1. Optimization of high-throughput nanomaterial developmental toxicity testing in zebrafish embryos

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanomaterial (NM) developmental toxicities are largely unknown. With an extensive variety of NMs available, high-throughput screening methods may be of value for initial characterization of potential hazard. We optimized a zebrafish embryo test as an in vivo high-throughput assay...

  2. Detrimental effects of highly efficient interference competition: invasive Argentine ants outcompete native ants at toxic baits.

    PubMed

    Buczkowski, Grzegorz; Bennett, Gary W

    2008-06-01

    The Argentine ant (Linepithema humile) is an invasive species that disrupts the balance of natural ecosystems by displacing indigenous ant species throughout its introduced range. Previous studies that examined the mechanisms by which Argentine ants attain ecological dominance showed that superior interference and exploitation competition are key to the successful displacement of native ant species. The objective of this research was to test the hypothesis that effective interference competition by Argentine ants may also be detrimental to the survival of Argentine ant colonies where Argentine ants and native ants compete at toxic baits used to slow the spread of Argentine ants. To study this hypothesis, we examined the competitive interactions between Argentine ants and native odorous house ants, Tapinoma sessile, in the presence and absence of toxic baits. Results showed that Argentine ants aggressively outcompete T. sessile from toxic baits through efficient interference competition and monopolize bait resources. This has severe negative consequences for the survival of Argentine ants as colonies succumb to the toxic effects of the bait. In turn, T. sessile avoid areas occupied by Argentine ants, give up baits, and consequently suffer minimal mortality. Our results provide experimental evidence that highly efficient interference competition may have negative consequences for Argentine ants in areas where toxic baits are used and may provide a basis for designing innovative management programs for Argentine ants. Such programs would have the double benefit of selectively eliminating the invasive species while simultaneously protecting native ants from the toxic effects of baits. PMID:18559180

  3. A single amino acid (Asp159) from the dog prion protein suppresses the toxicity of the mouse prion protein in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Garcia, J; Jensen, K; Zhang, Y; Rincon-Limas, D E; Fernandez-Funez, P

    2016-11-01

    Misfolding of the prion protein (PrP) is the key step in the transmission of spongiform pathologies in humans and several animals. Although PrP is highly conserved in mammals, a few changes in the sequence of endogenous PrP are proposed to confer protection to dogs, which were highly exposed to prion during the mad-cow epidemics. D159 is a unique amino acid found in PrP from dogs and other canines that was shown to alter surface charge, but its functional relevance has never been tested in vivo. Here, we show in transgenic Drosophila that introducing the N159D substitution on mouse PrP decreases its turnover. Additionally, mouse PrP-N159D demonstrates no toxicity and accumulates no pathogenic conformations, suggesting that a single D159 substitution is sufficient to prevent PrP conformational change and pathogenesis. Understanding the mechanisms mediating the protective activity of D159 is likely to lessen the burden of prion diseases in humans and domestic animals. PMID:27477054

  4. Toxin-screening and identification of bacteria isolated from highly toxic marine gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Jie; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Luo, Xuan; Zhou, Ming-Jiang; Lin, Xiang-Tian

    2008-07-01

    Bacteria isolated from a highly toxic sample of gastropod Nassarius semiplicatus in Lianyungang, Jiangsu Province in July 2007, were studied to probe into the relationship between bacteria and toxicity of nassariid gastropod. The toxicity of the gastropod sample was 2 x 10(2)mouse unit (MU) per gram of tissue (wet weight). High concentration of tetrodotoxin (TTX) and its analogues (TTXs) were found in the digestive gland and muscle of the gastropod, using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass chromatography (LC-MS). Bacterial strains isolated from the digestive gland were cultured and screened for TTX with a competitive ELISA method. Tetrodotoxin was detected in a proportion of bacterial strains, but the toxin content was low. Partial 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) of the TTX-producing strains was then sequenced and compared with those published in the GenBank to tentatively identify the toxic strains. It was found that most of the toxic strains were closely affiliated with genus Vibrio, and the others were related to genus Shewanella, Marinomonas, Tenacibaculum and Aeromonas. These findings suggest that tetrodotoxin-producing bacteria might play an important role in tetrodotoxin accumulation/production in N. semiplicatus. PMID:18573274

  5. Disarmed anthrax toxin delivers antisense oligonucleotides and siRNA with high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dyer, Paul D R; Shepherd, Thomas R; Gollings, Alexander S; Shorter, Susan A; Gorringe-Pattrick, Monique A M; Tang, Chun-Kit; Cattoz, Beatrice N; Baillie, Les; Griffiths, Peter C; Richardson, Simon C W

    2015-12-28

    .1% after 24h. PA:LFn-GAL4:ASO transfection of non- or terminally-differentiated THP-1 cells and Vero cells resulted in 35.2 ± 19.1%, 36.4 ± 1.8% and 22.9 ± 6.9% (respectively) Synt5 expression after treatment with 200 pmol of ASO and demonstrated versatility. Nucleofection® with Stealth RNAi™ siRNA reduced HeLa Synt5 levels to 4.6 ± 6.1% whereas treatment with the PA:LFn-PKR:siRNA resulted in 8.5 ± 3.4% Synt5 expression after 24h (HeLa cells). These studies report for the first time an ASO and RNAi delivery system based upon protein toxin architecture that is devoid of polycations. This system may utilize regulated membrane back-fusion for the cytosolic delivery of ASOs and siRNA, which would account for the lack of toxicity observed. High delivery efficiency suggests further in vivo evaluation is warranted. PMID:26546271

  6. Quantitative GFP fluorescence as an indicator of arsenite developmental toxicity in mosaic heat shock protein 70 transgenic zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Seok, Seung-Hyeok; Baek, Min-Won; Lee, Hui-Young; Kim, Dong-Jae; Na, Yi-Rang; Noh, Kyoung-Jin; Park, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Hyun-Kyoung; Lee, Byoung-Hee; Ryu, Doug-Young; Park, Jae-Hak

    2007-12-01

    In transgenic zebrafish (Danio rerio), green fluorescent protein (GFP) is a promising marker for environmental pollutants. In using GFP, one of the obstacles which we faced was how to compare toxicity among different toxicants or among a specific toxicant in different model species with the intensity of GFP expression. Using a fluorescence detection method, we first validated our method for estimating the amount of GFP fluorescence present in transgenic fish, which we used as an indicator of developmental toxicity caused by the well-known toxicant, arsenite. To this end, we developed mosaic transgenic zebrafish with the human heat shock response element (HSE) fused to the enhanced GFP (EGFP) reporter gene to indicate exposure to arsenite. We confirmed that EGFP expression sites correlate with gross morphological disruption caused by arsenite exposure. Arsenite (300.0 {mu}M) caused stronger EGFP fluorescence intensity and quantity than 50.0 {mu}M and 10.0 {mu}M arsenite in our transgenic zebrafish. Furthermore, arsenite-induced apoptosis was demonstrated by TUNEL assay. Apoptosis was inhibited by the antioxidant, N-acetyl-cystein (NAC) in this transgenic zebrafish. The distribution of TUNEL-positive cells in embryonic tissues was correlated with the sites of arsenite toxicity and EGFP expression. The EGFP values quantified using the standard curve equation from the known GFP quantity were consistent with the arsenite-induced EGFP expression pattern and arsenite concentration, indicating that this technique can be a reliable and applicable measurement. In conclusion, we propose that fluorescence-based EGFP quantification in transgenic fish containing the hsp70 promoter-EGFP reporter-gene construct is a useful indicator of development toxicity caused by arsenite.

  7. Characterization of a highly toxic strain of Bacillus thuringiensis serovar kurstaki very similar to the HD-73 strain.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Pozo, Yaritza; Del Rincón-Castro, Ma Cristina; Ibarra, Jorge E

    2016-09-01

    The LBIT-1200 strain of Bacillus thuringiensis was recently isolated from soil, and showed a 6.4 and 9.5 increase in toxicity, against Manduca sexta and Trichoplusia ni, respectively, compared to HD-73. However, LBIT-1200 was still highly similar to HD-73, including the production of bipyramidal crystals containing only one protein of ∼130 000 kDa, its flagellin gene sequence related to the kurstaki serotype, plasmid and RepPCR patterns similar to HD-73, no production of β-exotoxin and no presence of VIP genes. Sequencing of its cry gene showed the presence of a cry1Ac-type gene with four amino acid differences, including two amino acid replacements in domain III, compared to Cry1Ac1, which may explain its higher toxicity. In conclusion, the LBIT-1200 strain is a variant of the HD-73 strain but shows a much higher toxicity, which makes this new strain an important candidate to be developed as a bioinsecticide, once it passes other tests, throughout its biotechnological development. PMID:27535648

  8. Isolation and characterization of toxic proteins from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, S V; Laure, C J; Giglio, J R

    1983-01-01

    Through gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 and chromatography on CM-cellulose-52 five toxic proteins, electrophoretically pure, were isolated from the venom of the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and partially characterized, as follows: 1. Toxin T1 VIII, with 61 amino acid residues, mol. wt 6675 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Glx-Gly-Tyr-Leu-Met-Asx-His-Glx-Gly-Cys-Lys-; 2. Toxin T1VI with amino acid residues, mol. wt. 7549 and amino terminal sequence Gly-His-Phe-Gly-Lys; 3. Toxin T2III(I), with 63 amino acid residues, mol. wt. 7216 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Lys-Asx-Gly-Tyr-Pro-Val-Cys-Cys-Ser-; 4. Toxin T2IV, which is apparently identical to toxin T1VIII above, since it showed the same elution volume in chromatography on CM-cellulose-52, the same N-terminal Lys and the same electrophoretic mobility as T1VIII; 5. Toxin T1IV, a not previously described toxin from the venom of T. serrulatus, with 45 amino acid residues, mol. wt. 5188 and amino terminal sequence Lys-Glx-Gly-Tyr-Leu-, identical to the first five residues of T1VIII, although with a lower molecular weight. The pharmacological study of T1VIII in guinea pig vas deferens showed a pre-junctional sensitizing action, evidenced by a decrease of the dose-response curves to adrenaline and acetylcholine, with no increase of the maximum. This effect may be due to the liberation of noradrenaline. PMID:6857710

  9. The toxic effect of lead on seed germination, growth, chlorophyll and protein contents of wheat and lens.

    PubMed

    Mesmar, M N; Jaber, K

    1991-01-01

    Lead is a heavy metal which is believed to be toxic when present in excessive amount. Excess Pb in Triticum sativum and Lens esculanta alters several physiological and biochemical processes in both species. Seed germination of both species grown on soaked filter paper with Pb (NO3)2 was highly inhibited (about 60% at 20 mM Pb (NO3)2). Results obtained from measurement of lead content in the roots and shoots of both species indicated that most of the lead accumulated in the roots of both species with a lower degree within the shoots. Lead uptake by both species whether grown in perlite medium or on filter paper soaked with Pb (NO3)2, was correlated with lead concentration. These results indicate a passive process of lead translocation. These results also show that lead inhibits the growth of both plant species, but root growth inhibition was more pronounced than shoot growth inhibition at different lead concentration. Total chlorophyll content was found to be decreased in both species after treatment with Pb (NO3)2. Total protein content in the seedlings, as our results have indicated, was found to be increased with increasing lead concentration in both species. PMID:1841484

  10. Label-free detection of protein molecules secreted from an organ-on-a-chip model for drug toxicity assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, Andres W.; Zhang, Yu S.; Aleman, Julio; Alerasool, Parissa; Dokmeci, Mehmet R.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-03-01

    Clinical attrition is about 30% from failure of drug candidates due to toxic side effects, increasing the drug development costs significantly and slowing down the drug discovery process. This partly originates from the fact that the animal models do not accurately represent human physiology. Hence there is a clear unmet need for developing drug toxicity assays using human-based models that are complementary to traditional animal models before starting expensive clinical trials. Organ-on-a-chip techniques developed in recent years have generated a variety of human organ models mimicking different human physiological conditions. However, it is extremely challenging to monitor the transient and long-term response of the organ models to drug treatments during drug toxicity tests. First, when an organ-on-a-chip model interacts with drugs, a certain amount of protein molecules may be released into the medium due to certain drug effects, but the amount of the protein molecules is limited, since the organ tissue grown inside microfluidic bioreactors have minimum volume. Second, traditional fluorescence techniques cannot be utilized for real-time monitoring of the concentration of the protein molecules, because the protein molecules are continuously secreted from the tissue and it is practically impossible to achieve fluorescence labeling in the dynamically changing environment. Therefore, direct measurements of the secreted protein molecules with a label-free approach is strongly desired for organs-on-a-chip applications. In this paper, we report the development of a photonic crystal-based biosensor for label-free assays of secreted protein molecules from a liver-on-a-chip model. Ultrahigh detection sensitivity and specificity have been demonstrated.

  11. pH controlled gating of toxic protein pores by dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kanchi, Subbarao; Ayappa, K. G.; Maiti, Prabal K.

    2016-06-01

    Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent bacterial strains, on a target cell membrane is a challenging and active area of research. Here we demonstrate that PAMAM dendrimers can act as effective pH controlled gating devices once the pore has been formed. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the cytolysin A (ClyA) protein pores modified with fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimers. Our results show that the PAMAM dendrimer, in either its protonated (P) or non-protonated (NP) states can spontaneously enter the protein lumen. Protonated dendrimers interact strongly with the negatively charged protein pore lumen. As a consequence, P dendrimers assume a more expanded configuration efficiently blocking the pore when compared with the more compact configuration adopted by the neutral NP dendrimers creating a greater void space for the passage of water and ions. To quantify the effective blockage of the protein pore, we have calculated the pore conductance as well as the residence times by applying a weak force on the ions/water. Ionic currents are reduced by 91% for the P dendrimers and 31% for the NP dendrimers. The preferential binding of Cl- counter ions to the P dendrimer creates a zone of high Cl- concentration in the vicinity of the internalized dendrimer and a high concentration of K+ ions in the transmembrane region of the pore lumen. In addition to steric effects, this induced charge segregation for the P dendrimer effectively blocks ionic transport through the pore. Our investigation shows that the bio-compatible PAMAM dendrimers can potentially be used to develop therapeutic protocols based on the pH sensitive gating of pores formed by pore forming toxins to mitigate bacterial infections.Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent

  12. Incorporating human dosimetry and exposure into high-throughput in vitro toxicity screening.

    PubMed

    Rotroff, Daniel M; Wetmore, Barbara A; Dix, David J; Ferguson, Stephen S; Clewell, Harvey J; Houck, Keith A; Lecluyse, Edward L; Andersen, Melvin E; Judson, Richard S; Smith, Cornelia M; Sochaski, Mark A; Kavlock, Robert J; Boellmann, Frank; Martin, Matthew T; Reif, David M; Wambaugh, John F; Thomas, Russell S

    2010-10-01

    Many chemicals in commerce today have undergone limited or no safety testing. To reduce the number of untested chemicals and prioritize limited testing resources, several governmental programs are using high-throughput in vitro screens for assessing chemical effects across multiple cellular pathways. In this study, metabolic clearance and plasma protein binding were experimentally measured for 35 ToxCast phase I chemicals. The experimental data were used to parameterize a population-based in vitro-to-in vivo extrapolation model for estimating the human oral equivalent dose necessary to produce a steady-state in vivo concentration equivalent to in vitro AC(50) (concentration at 50% of maximum activity) and LEC (lowest effective concentration) values from the ToxCast data. For 23 of the 35 chemicals, the range of oral equivalent doses for up to 398 ToxCast assays was compared with chronic aggregate human oral exposure estimates in order to assess whether significant in vitro bioactivity occurred within the range of maximum expected human oral exposure. Only 2 of the 35 chemicals, triclosan and pyrithiobac-sodium, had overlapping oral equivalent doses and estimated human oral exposures. Ranking by the potencies of the AC(50) and LEC values, these two chemicals would not have been at the top of a prioritization list. Integrating both dosimetry and human exposure information with the high-throughput toxicity screening efforts provides a better basis for making informed decisions on chemical testing priorities and regulatory attention. Importantly, these tools are necessary to move beyond hazard rankings to estimates of possible in vivo responses based on in vitro screens. PMID:20639261

  13. pH controlled gating of toxic protein pores by dendrimers.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Taraknath; Kanchi, Subbarao; Ayappa, K G; Maiti, Prabal K

    2016-07-14

    Designing effective nanoscale blockers for membrane inserted pores formed by pore forming toxins, which are expressed by several virulent bacterial strains, on a target cell membrane is a challenging and active area of research. Here we demonstrate that PAMAM dendrimers can act as effective pH controlled gating devices once the pore has been formed. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to characterize the cytolysin A (ClyA) protein pores modified with fifth generation (G5) PAMAM dendrimers. Our results show that the PAMAM dendrimer, in either its protonated (P) or non-protonated (NP) states can spontaneously enter the protein lumen. Protonated dendrimers interact strongly with the negatively charged protein pore lumen. As a consequence, P dendrimers assume a more expanded configuration efficiently blocking the pore when compared with the more compact configuration adopted by the neutral NP dendrimers creating a greater void space for the passage of water and ions. To quantify the effective blockage of the protein pore, we have calculated the pore conductance as well as the residence times by applying a weak force on the ions/water. Ionic currents are reduced by 91% for the P dendrimers and 31% for the NP dendrimers. The preferential binding of Cl(-) counter ions to the P dendrimer creates a zone of high Cl(-) concentration in the vicinity of the internalized dendrimer and a high concentration of K(+) ions in the transmembrane region of the pore lumen. In addition to steric effects, this induced charge segregation for the P dendrimer effectively blocks ionic transport through the pore. Our investigation shows that the bio-compatible PAMAM dendrimers can potentially be used to develop therapeutic protocols based on the pH sensitive gating of pores formed by pore forming toxins to mitigate bacterial infections. PMID:27328315

  14. Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Late Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Quon, Harvey; Cheung, Patrick C.F.; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian; Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicities of patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer treated using a concomitant hypofractionated, intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study of patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8-10. A dose of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy/fraction) was delivered to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost, to a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy/fraction) in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group late morbidity scores were used to assess the acute and late toxicities, respectively. Biochemical failure was determined using the Phoenix definition. Results: A total of 97 patients were treated and followed up for a median of 39 months, with 88% having a minimum of 24 months of follow-up. The maximal toxicity scores were recorded. The grade of acute gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 4%, 1 in 59%, and 2 in 37%. The grade of acute urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 8%, 1 in 50%, 2 in 39%, and 3 in 4%. The grade of late gastrointestinal toxicity was Grade 0 in 54%, 1 in 40%, and 2 in 7%. No Grade 3 or greater late gastrointestinal toxicities developed. The grade of late urinary toxicity was Grade 0 in 82%, 1 in 9%, 2 in 5%, 3 in 3%, and 4 in 1% (1 patient). All severe toxicities (Grade 3 or greater) had resolved at the last follow-up visit. The 4-year biochemical disease-free survival rate was 90.5%. Conclusions: A hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost delivering 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks combined with pelvic nodal radiotherapy and long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated, with low rates

  15. Green fluorescent protein as a scaffold for high efficiency production of functional bacteriotoxic proteins in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Soundrarajan, Nagasundarapandian; Cho, Hye-sun; Ahn, Byeongyong; Choi, Minkyung; Thong, Le Minh; Choi, Hojun; Cha, Se-Yeoun; Kim, Jin-Hoi; Park, Choi-Kyu; Seo, Kunho; Park, Chankyu

    2016-01-01

    The availability of simple, robust, and cost-effective methods for the large-scale production of bacteriotoxic peptides such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) is essential for basic and pharmaceutical research. However, the production of bacteriotoxic proteins has been difficult due to a high degree of toxicity in bacteria and proteolytic degradation. In this study, we inserted AMPs into the Green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a loop region and expressed them as insoluble proteins in high yield, circumventing the inherent toxicity of AMP production in Escherichia coli. The AMPs inserted were released by cyanogen bromide and purified by chromatography. We showed that highly potent AMPs such as Protegrin-1, PMAP-36, Buforin-2, and Bactridin-1 are produced in high yields and produced AMPs showed similar activities compared to chemically synthesized AMPs. We increased the yield more than two-fold by inserting three copies of Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold. The immunogold electron micrographs showed that the expressed Protegrin-1 in the GFP scaffold forms large and small size aggregates in the core region of the inclusion body and become entirely nonfunctional, therefore not influencing the proliferation of E. coli. Our novel method will be applicable for diverse bacteriotoxic peptides which can be exploited in biomedical and pharmaceutical researches. PMID:26864123

  16. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Protein Adducts: Potential Non-invasive Biomarkers of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid-Induced Liver Toxicity and Exposure.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Lin, Ge; Beland, Frederick A; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2016-08-15

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are phytochemicals present in hundreds of plant species from different families widely distributed in many geographical regions around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common type of poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. There have been many large-scale human poisonings caused by the consumption of food contaminated with toxic PAs. PAs require metabolic activation to generate pyrrolic metabolites to exert their toxicity. In this study, we developed a novel method to quantify pyrrole-protein adducts present in the blood. This method involves the use of AgNO3 in acidic ethanol to cleave the thiol linkage of pyrrole-protein (DHP-protein) adducts, and the resulting 7,9-di-C2H5O-DHP is quantified by HPLC-ES-MS/MS multiple reaction monitoring analysis in the presence of a known quantity of isotopically labeled 7,9-di-C2D5O-DHP internal standard. Using this method, we determined that diester-type PAs administered to rats produced higher levels of DHP-protein adducts than other types of PAs. The results suggest that DHP-protein adducts can potentially serve as minimally invasive biomarkers of PA exposure. PMID:27388689

  17. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  18. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. ...

  19. High Throughput Prioritization for Integrated Toxicity Testing Based on ToxCast Chemical Profiling

    EPA Science Inventory

    The rational prioritization of chemicals for integrated toxicity testing is a central goal of the U.S. EPA’s ToxCast™ program (http://epa.gov/ncct/toxcast/). ToxCast includes a wide-ranging battery of over 500 in vitro high-throughput screening assays which in Phase I was used to...

  20. How Much is Too Much? Toxic Chemicals in High School Labs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagel, Miriam C.

    1982-01-01

    Lists 37 chemicals classified as suspected carcinogens and suspected teratogens (chemicals capable of producing malformations in an embryo). Offers suggestions to high school chemistry teachers for conducting safe laboratory investigations by avoiding use of these potentially toxic materials. (Author/JN)

  1. Predictive Model of Rat Reproductive Toxicity from ToxCast High Throughput Screening

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA ToxCast research program uses high throughput screening for bioactivity profiling and predicting the toxicity of large numbers of chemicals. ToxCast Phase‐I tested 309 well‐characterized chemicals in over 500 assays for a wide range of molecular targets and cellular respo...

  2. Screening of the toxic effects of a high melamine dose on the biochemical hematological and histopathological investigations in male rats.

    PubMed

    El Rabey, Haddad A; Al-Sieni, Abdulbasit I; Majami, Abdullah A

    2014-11-01

    Screening of the toxic effect of a high oral melamine dose (30,000 ppm supplemented in the diet) was performed for 28 days on male rats. The morphology, anatomy, complete blood count (CBC), serum electrolytes, kidney function, serum proteins, serum bilirubin, serum liver enzymes, catalase, glutathion-S-transferase, lipid peroxide, serum melamine concentration, total body weight, food intake, food efficiency ratio (FER), body weight gain percentage (BWG%), body weight gain, water consumption, and histopathological examinations of kidney, urinary bladder, testis, liver, heart, and spleen were investigated. The melamine-supplemented rats turned yellow and showed different degrees of hypertrophy and congestion, particularly the kidney and the ureter as a result of melamine toxicity. The CBC showed minimal changes in the melamine-supplemented groups. Na and Cl were decreased, whereas K, P, and Ca were increased. Serum creatinine, uric acid, and urea were elevated. Liver function enzymes were nonsignificantly affected. Catalase and glutathion-S-transferase were decreased, whereas lipid peroxide was increased in the kidney tissue homogenate. It was also noted that serum protein was decreased and serum bilirubin was increased. Histopathologically, most examined organs were severely injured specially the kidneys, liver, and testes. PMID:24253415

  3. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  4. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7–12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  5. Next generation high density self assembling functional protein arrays

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Niroshan; Raphael, Jacob V.; Hainsworth, Eugenie; Demirkan, Gokhan; Fuentes, Manuel G.; Rolfs, Andreas; Hu, Yanhui; LaBaer, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    We report a high-density self assembling protein microarray that displays thousands of proteins, produced and captured in situ from immobilized cDNA templates. Over 1500 unique cDNAs were tested with > 90% success with nearly all proteins displaying yields within 2 fold of the mean, minimal sample variation and good day to day reproducibility. The displayed proteins revealed selective protein interactions. This method will enable various experimental approaches to study protein function in high throughput. PMID:18469824

  6. Copper-based nanoparticles induce high toxicity in leukemic HL60 cells.

    PubMed

    Rodhe, Ylva; Skoglund, Sara; Odnevall Wallinder, Inger; Potácová, Zuzana; Möller, Lennart

    2015-10-01

    From the increasing societal use of nanoparticles (NPs) follows the necessity to understand their potential toxic effects. This requires an in-depth understanding of the relationship between their physicochemical properties and their toxicological behavior. The aim of the present work was to study the toxicity of Cu and CuO NPs toward the leukemic cell line HL60. The toxicity was explored in terms of mitochondrial damage, DNA damage, oxidative DNA damage, cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Particle characteristics and copper release were specifically investigated in order to gain an improved understanding of prevailing toxic mechanisms. The Cu NPs revealed higher toxicity compared with both CuO NPs and dissolved copper (CuCl2), as well as a more rapid copper release compared with CuO NPs. Mitochondrial damage was induced by Cu NPs already after 2 h exposure. Cu NPs induced oxidation at high levels in an acellular ROS assay, and a small increase of intracellular ROS was observed. The increase of DNA damage was limited. CuO NPs did not induce any mitochondrial damage up to 6 h of exposure. No acellular ROS was induced by the CuO NPs, and the levels of intracellular ROS and DNA damage were limited after 2 h exposure. Necrosis was the main type of cell death observed after 18 h exposure to CuO NP and dissolved copper. PMID:26028147

  7. RecQ promotes toxic recombination in cells lacking recombination intermediate-removal proteins.

    PubMed

    Magner, Daniel B; Blankschien, Matthew D; Lee, Jennifer A; Pennington, Jeanine M; Lupski, James R; Rosenberg, Susan M

    2007-04-27

    The RecQ-helicase family is widespread, is highly conserved, and includes human orthologs that suppress genomic instability and cancer. In vivo, some RecQ homologs promote reduction of steady-state levels of bimolecular recombination intermediates (BRIs), which block chromosome segregation if not resolved. We find that, in vivo, E. coli RecQ can promote the opposite: the net accumulation of BRIs. We report that cells lacking Ruv and UvrD BRI-resolution and -prevention proteins die and display failed chromosome segregation attributable to accumulation of BRIs. Death and segregation failure require RecA and RecF strand exchange proteins. FISH data show that replication is completed during chromosome-segregation failure/death of ruv uvrD recA(Ts) cells. Surprisingly, RecQ (and RecJ) promotes this death. The data imply that RecQ promotes the net accumulation of BRIs in vivo, indicating a second paradigm for the in vivo effect of RecQ-like proteins. The E. coli RecQ paradigm may provide a useful model for some human RecQ homologs. PMID:17466628

  8. RecQ Promotes Toxic Recombination in Cells Lacking Recombination-Intermediate-Removal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magner, Daniel B.; Blankschien, Matthew D.; Lee, Jennifer A.; Pennington, Jeanine M.; Lupski, James R.; Rosenberg, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The RecQ-helicase family is widespread, highly conserved, and includes human orthologues that suppress genomic instability and cancer. In vivo, some RecQ homologues promote reduction of steady-state levels of bimolecular recombination intermediates (BRIs), which block chromosome segregation if not resolved. We find that in vivo, E. coli RecQ can promote the opposite: the net accumulation of BRIs. We report that cells lacking Ruv and UvrD BRI-resolution and -prevention proteins die and display failed chromosome segregation attributable to accumulation of BRIs. Death and segregation failure require RecA and RecF strand-exchange proteins. FISH data show that replication is completed during chromosome-segregation failure/death of ruv uvrD recA(Ts) cells. Surprisingly, RecQ (and RecJ) promote this death. The data imply that RecQ promotes the net accumulation of BRIs in vivo, indicating a second paradigm for the in-vivo effect of RecQ-like proteins. The E. coli RecQ paradigm may provide a useful model for some human RecQ homologues. PMID:17466628

  9. Evaluation of the non-toxic mutant of the diphtheria toxin K51E/E148K as carrier protein for meningococcal vaccines.

    PubMed

    Pecetta, S; Vijayakrishnan, B; Romano, M R; Proietti, D; Surdo, P Lo; Balocchi, C; Mori, E; Davis, B G; Berti, F

    2016-03-01

    Diphtheria toxin mutant CRM197 is a common carrier protein for glycoconjugate vaccines, which has been proven an effective protein vector for, among others, meningococcal carbohydrates. The wide-range use of this protein in massive vaccine production requires constant increase of production yields and adaptability to an ever-growing market. Here we compare CRM197 with the alternative diphtheria non-toxic variant DT-K51E/E148K, an inactive mutant that can be produced in the periplasm of Escherichia coli. Biophysical characterization of DT-K51E/E148K suggested high similarity with CRM197, with main differences in their alpha-helical content, and a suitable purity for conjugation and vaccine preparation. Meningococcal serogroup A (MenA) glycoconjugates were synthesized using CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K as carrier proteins, obtaining the same conjugation yields and comparable biophysical profiles. Mice were then immunized with these CRM197 and DT-K51E/E148K conjugates, and essentially identical immunogenic and protective effects were observed. Overall, our data indicate that DT-K51E/E148K is a readily produced protein that now allows the added flexibility of E. coli production in vaccine development and that can be effectively used as protein carrier for a meningococcal conjugate vaccine. PMID:26845738

  10. Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, Alex; Delistraty, Damon

    2010-11-15

    Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was

  11. Predictors of Toxicity After Image-guided High-dose-rate Interstitial Brachytherapy for Gynecologic Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Larissa J.; Viswanathan, Akila N.

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To identify predictors of grade 3-4 complications and grade 2-4 rectal toxicity after three-dimensional image-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer. Methods and Materials: Records were reviewed for 51 women (22 with primary disease and 29 with recurrence) treated with HDR interstitial brachytherapy. A single interstitial insertion was performed with image guidance by computed tomography (n = 43) or magnetic resonance imaging (n = 8). The median delivered dose in equivalent 2-Gy fractions was 72.0 Gy (45 Gy for external-beam radiation therapy and 24 Gy for brachytherapy). Toxicity was reported according to the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events. Actuarial toxicity estimates were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: At diagnosis, the median patient age was 62 years and the median tumor size was 3.8 cm. The median D90 and V100 were 71.4 Gy and 89.5%; the median D2cc for the bladder, rectum, and sigmoid were 64.6 Gy, 61.0 Gy, and 52.7 Gy, respectively. The actuarial rates of all grade 3-4 complications at 2 years were 20% gastrointestinal, 9% vaginal, 6% skin, 3% musculoskeletal, and 2% lymphatic. There were no grade 3-4 genitourinary complications and no grade 5 toxicities. Grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was observed in 10 patients, and grade 3-4 complications in 4; all cases were proctitis with the exception of 1 rectal fistula. D2cc for rectum was higher for patients with grade 2-4 (68 Gy vs 57 Gy for grade 0-1, P=.03) and grade 3-4 (73 Gy vs 58 Gy for grade 0-2, P=.02) rectal toxicity. The estimated dose that resulted in a 10% risk of grade 2-4 rectal toxicity was 61.8 Gy (95% confidence interval, 51.5-72.2 Gy). Discussion: Image-guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy results in acceptable toxicity for women with primary or recurrent gynecologic cancer. D2cc for the rectum is a reliable predictor of late rectal complications. Three-dimensional-based treatment planning should be performed to ensure

  12. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury in rats and mice: Comparison of protein adducts, mitochondrial dysfunction, and oxidative stress in the mechanism of toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    McGill, Mitchell R.; Williams, C. David; Xie, Yuchao; Ramachandran, Anup; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2012-11-01

    Acetaminophen (APAP) overdose is the most common cause of acute liver failure in the West. In mice, APAP hepatotoxicity can be rapidly induced with a single dose. Because it is both clinically relevant and experimentally convenient, APAP intoxication has become a popular model of liver injury. Early data demonstrated that rats are resistant to APAP toxicity. As a result, mice are the preferred species for mechanistic studies. Furthermore, recent work has shown that the mechanisms of APAP toxicity in humans are similar to mice. Nevertheless, some investigators still use rats. New mechanistic information from the last forty years invites a reevaluation of the differences between these species. Comparison may provide interesting insights and confirm or exclude the rat as an option for APAP studies. To this end, we treated rats and mice with APAP and measured parameters of liver injury, APAP metabolism, oxidative stress, and activation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Consistent with earlier data, we found that rats were highly resistant to APAP toxicity. Although overall APAP metabolism was similar in both species, mitochondrial protein adducts were significantly lower in rats. Accordingly, rats also had less oxidative stress. Finally, while mice showed extensive activation and mitochondrial translocation of JNK, this could not be detected in rat livers. These data support the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is critical for the development of necrosis after APAP treatment. Because mitochondrial damage also occurs in humans, rats are not a clinically relevant species for studies of APAP hepatotoxicity. Highlights: ► Acetaminophen overdose causes severe liver injury only in mice but not in rats. ► APAP causes hepatic GSH depletion and protein adduct formation in rats and mice. ► Less protein adducts were measured in rat liver mitochondria compared to mouse. ► No oxidant stress, peroxynitrite formation or JNK activation was present in rats. ► The

  13. Highly Charged Proteins: The Achilles' Heel of Aging Proteomes.

    PubMed

    de Graff, Adam M R; Hazoglou, Michael J; Dill, Ken A

    2016-02-01

    As cells and organisms age, their proteins sustain increasing amounts of oxidative damage. It is estimated that half of all proteins are damaged in old organisms, yet the dominant mechanisms by which damage affects proteins and cellular phenotypes are not known. Here, we show that random modification of side chain charge induced by oxidative damage is likely to be a dominant source of protein stability loss in aging cells. Using an established model of protein electrostatics, we find that short, highly charged proteins are particularly susceptible to large destabilization from even a single side chain oxidation event. This mechanism identifies 20 proteins previously established to be important in aging that are at particularly high risk for oxidative destabilization, including transcription factors, histone and histone-modifying proteins, ribosomal and telomeric proteins, and proteins essential for homeostasis. Cellular processes enriched in high-risk proteins are shown to be particularly abundant in the aggregates of old organisms. PMID:26724998

  14. Printing Proteins as Microarrays for High-Throughput Function Determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacBeath, Gavin; Schreiber, Stuart L.

    2000-09-01

    Systematic efforts are currently under way to construct defined sets of cloned genes for high-throughput expression and purification of recombinant proteins. To facilitate subsequent studies of protein function, we have developed miniaturized assays that accommodate extremely low sample volumes and enable the rapid, simultaneous processing of thousands of proteins. A high-precision robot designed to manufacture complementary DNA microarrays was used to spot proteins onto chemically derivatized glass slides at extremely high spatial densities. The proteins attached covalently to the slide surface yet retained their ability to interact specifically with other proteins, or with small molecules, in solution. Three applications for protein microarrays were demonstrated: screening for protein-protein interactions, identifying the substrates of protein kinases, and identifying the protein targets of small molecules.

  15. Highly efficient and lowly toxic docetaxel nanoemulsions for intravenous injection to animals.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Du, Lina; Wang, Chenyun; Liu, Yan; Mei, Xingguo; Jin, Yiguang

    2011-07-01

    Hypersensitivity many occur with commercial docetaxel injections containing Tween 80 and ethanol. An alternative formulation of docetaxel, an oil-in-water nanoemulsion was prepared using the high-pressure homogenization method. It was composed of medium-chain triglyceride, oleic acid, egg lecithin, and poloxamer. These ingredients are known as safe agents for intravenous (i.v.) injection. The nanoemulsion had a small size of 169 nm, and a high surface charge with the zeta potential of -33.9 mV. It maintained well stable even under high centrifugation. Acute toxicity of i.v. injection, erythrocyte hemolysis experiment, and rabbit ear vein irritation test showed no toxicity for the docetaxel nanoemulsion. The docetaxel nanoemulsion led to a larger apparent distribution volume and area under curve than the docetaxel injection after i.v. administration to rats. The histopathological test of tumor further demonstrated the highly anticancer efficiency of the docetaxel nanoemulsion. Thus, the nanoemulsion is a promising delivery system for docetaxel with highly anticancer efficiency and low toxicity. PMID:21812321

  16. The neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NANT blocks acetaminophen toxicity and protein nitration in freshly isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sudip; Melnyk, Stepan B; Krager, Kimberly J; Aykin-Burns, Nukhet; Letzig, Lynda G; James, Laura P; Hinson, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    3-Nitrotyrosine (3NT) in liver proteins of mice treated with hepatotoxic doses of acetaminophen (APAP) has been postulated to be causative in toxicity. Nitration is by a reactive nitrogen species formed from nitric oxide (NO). The source of the NO is unclear. iNOS knockout mice were previously found to be equally susceptible to APAP toxicity as wildtype mice and iNOS inhibitors did not decrease toxicity in mice or in hepatocytes. In this work we examined the potential role of nNOS in APAP toxicity in hepatocytes using the specific nNOS inhibitor NANT (10 µM)(N-[(4S)-4-amino-5-[(2-aminoethyl)amino]pentyl]-N'-nitroguanidinetris (trifluoroacetate)). Primary hepatocytes (1 million/ml) from male B6C3F1 mice were incubated with APAP (1mM). Cells were removed and assayed spectrofluorometrically for reactive nitrogen and oxygen species using diaminofluorescein (DAF) and Mitosox red, respectively. Cytotoxicity was determined by LDH release into media. Glutathione (GSH, GSSG), 3NT, GSNO, acetaminophen-cysteine adducts, NAD, and NADH were measured by HPLC. APAP significantly increased cytotoxicity at 1.5-3.0 h. The increase was blocked by NANT. NANT did not alter APAP mediated GSH depletion or acetaminophen-cysteine adducts in proteins which indicated that NANT did not inhibit metabolism. APAP significantly increased spectroflurometric evidence of reactive nitrogen and oxygen formation at 0.5 and 1.0 h, respectively, and increased 3NT and GSNO at 1.5-3.0 h. These increases were blocked by NANT. APAP dramatically increased NADH from 0.5-3.0 h and this increase was blocked by NANT. Also, APAP decreased the Oxygen Consumption Rate (OCR), decreased ATP production, and caused a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, which were all blocked by NANT. PMID:26454079

  17. High throughput kinetic Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition assay for study of toxic effects of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, M; Kasemets, K; Heinlaan, M; Kurvet, I; Kahru, A

    2008-08-01

    Despite of the growing production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) in various applications, current regulations, including EC new chemical policy REACH, fail to address the environmental, health, and safety risks posed by NPs. This paper shows that kinetic Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition test--Flash Assay--that up to now was mainly used for toxicity analysis of solid and colored environmental samples (e.g. sediments, soil suspensions), is a powerful tool for screening the toxic properties of NPs. To demonstrate that Flash Assay (initially designed for a tube luminometer) can also be adapted to a microplate format for high throughput toxicity screening of NPs, altogether 11 chemicals were comparatively analyzed. The studied chemicals included bulk and nanosized CuO and ZnO, polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyamidoamine dendrimer generations 2 and 5 (PAMAM G2 and G5). The results showed that EC50 values of 30-min Flash Assay in tube and microplate formats were practically similar and correlated very well (log-logR2=0.98), classifying all analyzed chemicals, except nano CuO (that was more toxic in cuvette format), analogously when compared to the risk phrases of the EC Directive 93/67/EEC for ranking toxicity of chemicals for aquatic organisms. The 30-min EC50 values of nanoscale organic cationic polymers (PEI and dendrimers) ranged from 215 to 775 mg/l. Thirty-minute EC50 values of metal oxides varied largely, ranging from approximately 4 mg/l (bulk and nano ZnO) to approximately 100 mg/l (nano CuO) and approximately 4000 mg/l (bulk CuO). Thus, considering an excellent correlation between both formats, 96-well microplate Flash Assay can be successfully used for high throughput evaluation of harmful properties of chemicals (including organic and inorganic NPs) to bacteria. PMID:18400463

  18. In vitro induction of the ubiquitous 60 and 70KD heat shock proteins by pesticides monocrotophos and endosulphan in Musca domestica: potential biomarkers of toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, M S; Reddy, P V J; Sharma, S; Tiwari, P K

    2011-01-01

    This study has investigated the effect of two highly toxic pesticides, monocrotophos (organophosphate) and endosulphan (organochlorine), on the inducibility of two major heat shock proteins, the HSP60 and HSP70, essential for cell survival, in the house fly Musca domestica. The LC50 values of the two pesticides for larva and adult (monocrotophos: 0.05 ppm for larva and 0.025 ppm for adult; endosulphan: 15 ppm for larva and 2 ppm for adult) revealed monocrotophos to be potentially more toxic than endosulphan. The relative susceptibility (lethality) of adult to either of these pesticides appeared much higher than that of larva. The expression patterns of HSP60 and HSP70 were analysed in various larval and adult tissues, exposed to varying sub-acute doses of monocrotophos (0.00010 ppm - 0.00075 ppm for larva and 0.00010 ppm - 0.00050 ppm for adult) and endosulphan (0.5ppm - 2.0ppm for larva and 0.01ppm-0.10 ppm for adult). The immunoblots revealed significant correlation between the pattern of HSP's expression and the pesticides-induced tissue injury/ mortality, visualized by trypan blue dye exclusion test. Both the pesticides caused significant induction of these HSPs in a tissue and dose—dependent manner, suggesting their importance as molecular indicators (biomarker) in the assessment of cellular toxicity caused by endosulphan and monocrotophos. PMID:21366969

  19. Estimating the impact of high-production-volume chemicals on remote ecosystems by toxic pressure calculation.

    PubMed

    Harbers, Jasper V; Huijbregts, Mark A J; Posthuma, Leo; Van de Meent, Dik

    2006-03-01

    Although many chemicals are in use, the environmental impacts of only a few have been established, usually on per-chemical basis. Uncertainty remains about the overall impact of chemicals. This paper estimates combined toxic pressure on coastal North Sea ecosystems from 343 high-production-volume chemicals used within the catchment of rivers Rhine, Meuse, and Scheldt. Multimedia fate modeling and species sensitivity distribution-based effects estimation are applied. Calculations start from production volumes and emission rates and use physicochemical substance properties and aquatic ecotoxicity data. Parameter uncertainty is addressed by Monte Carlo simulations. Results suggest that the procedure is technically feasible. Combined toxic pressure of all 343 chemicals in coastal North Seawater is 0.025 (2.5% of the species are exposed to concentration levels above EC50 values), with a wide confidence interval of nearly 0-1. This uncertainty appears to be largely due to uncertainties in interspecies variances of aquatic toxicities and, to a lesser extent, to uncertainties in emissions and degradation rates. Due to these uncertainties, the results support gross ranking of chemicals in categories: negligible and possibly relevant contributions only. With 95% confidence, 283 of the 343 chemicals (83%) contribute negligibly (less than 0.1%) to overall toxic pressure, and only 60 (17%) need further consideration. PMID:16568772

  20. Two Distinct Amyloid β-Protein (Aβ) Assembly Pathways Leading to Oligomers and Fibrils Identified by Combined Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy, Morphology, and Toxicity Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Satoko; Shinoda, Keiko; Yamada, Mayumi; Yokojima, Satoshi; Inoue, Masafumi; Ohnishi, Takayuki; Shimada, Tetsuya; Kikuchi, Kazuya; Masui, Dai; Hashimoto, Shigeki; Sato, Michio; Ito, Akane; Akioka, Manami; Takagi, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Kiyokazu; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Takamoto, Hisayoshi; Inoue, Haruo; Nakamura, Shinichiro; Nabeshima, Yo-ichi; Teplow, David B.; Kinjo, Masataka; Hoshi, Minako

    2011-01-01

    Nonfibrillar assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are considered to play primary roles in Alzheimer disease (AD). Elucidating the assembly pathways of these specific aggregates is essential for understanding disease pathogenesis and developing knowledge-based therapies. However, these assemblies cannot be monitored in vivo, and there has been no reliable in vitro monitoring method at low protein concentration. We have developed a highly sensitive in vitro monitoring method using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) combined with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and toxicity assays. Using Aβ labeled at the N terminus or Lys16, we uncovered two distinct assembly pathways. One leads to highly toxic 10–15-nm spherical Aβ assemblies, termed amylospheroids (ASPDs). The other leads to fibrils. The first step in ASPD formation is trimerization. ASPDs of ∼330 kDa in mass form from these trimers after 5 h of slow rotation. Up to at least 24 h, ASPDs remain the dominant structures in assembly reactions. Neurotoxicity studies reveal that the most toxic ASPDs are ∼128 kDa (∼32-mers). In contrast, fibrillogenesis begins with dimer formation and then proceeds to formation of 15–40-nm spherical intermediates, from which fibrils originate after 15 h. Unlike ASPD formation, the Lys16-labeled peptide disturbed fibril formation because the Aβ16–20 region is critical for this final step. These differences in the assembly pathways clearly indicated that ASPDs are not fibril precursors. The method we have developed should facilitate identifying Aβ assembly steps at which inhibition may be beneficial. PMID:21292768

  1. THE ROLE OF PROTEIN BINDING OF TRIVALENT ARSENICALS IN ARSENIC CARCINOGENESIS AND TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three of the most plausible biological theories of arsenic carcinogenesis are protein binding, oxidative stress and altered DNA methylation. This review presents the role of trivalent arsenicals binding to proteins in arsenic carcinogenesis. Using vacuum filtration based receptor...

  2. Investigating the Spreading and Toxicity of Prion-like Proteins Using the Metazoan Model Organism C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nussbaum-Krammer, Carmen I.; Neto, Mário F.; Brielmann, Renée M.; Pedersen, Jesper S.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2016-01-01

    Prions are unconventional self-propagating proteinaceous particles, devoid of any coding nucleic acid. These proteinaceous seeds serve as templates for the conversion and replication of their benign cellular isoform. Accumulating evidence suggests that many protein aggregates can act as self-propagating templates and corrupt the folding of cognate proteins. Although aggregates can be functional under certain circumstances, this process often leads to the disruption of the cellular protein homeostasis (proteostasis), eventually leading to devastating diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs). The exact mechanisms of prion propagation and cell-to-cell spreading of protein aggregates are still subjects of intense investigation. To further this knowledge, recently a new metazoan model in Caenorhabditis elegans, for expression of the prion domain of the cytosolic yeast prion protein Sup35 has been established. This prion model offers several advantages, as it allows direct monitoring of the fluorescently tagged prion domain in living animals and ease of genetic approaches. Described here are methods to study prion-like behavior of protein aggregates and to identify modifiers of prion-induced toxicity using C. elegans. PMID:25591151

  3. Nutritional study of two Brazilian soybean (Glycine max) cultivars differing in the contents of antinutritional and toxic proteins.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, I M.; Maia, A A.B.; Siebra, E A.; Oliveira, J T.A.; Carvalho, A d.F.F.U.; Melo, V M.M.; Carlini, C R.; Castelar, L I.d.M.

    2001-01-01

    The research was conducted with two different recently released Brazilian soybean cultivars (Rio Balsas and Bays) to evaluate whether there is any correlation between the different levels of antinutritional and/or toxic proteins in the cultivars and their nutritive value as sources of protein for monogastric animals (rats). Furthermore, it is discussed, for the first time, the role of the dietary soyatoxin on the performance of rats fed on diets containing soyatoxin-rich (cv. Bays) and soyatoxin-free (cv. Rio Balsas) soybean cultivars. Feeding rats with diets containing raw soybean cultivars showed a lower growth rate, net protein utilization and digestibility, a much higher dry matter and nitrogen excretion and macroscopic alterations in internal organs when compared to rats fed on egg-white protein. The nutritional parameters measured for the diet based on raw Bays cultivar were poorer than those of the diet prepared with Rio Balsas. In the raw soybeans, trypsin inhibitor and lectin, and urease to a lesser extent, significantly affected at different fashion the soybean protein utilization. Heating treatment of the Bays seeds increased the growth rate, NPU, in vivo protein digestibility and practically eliminated or attenuated all the organ alterations observed. This study might be helpful in the choice of safe and nutritious soybean cultivars. PMID:11179862

  4. The putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 inhibits methylmercury-associated animal toxicity and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    VanDuyn, Natalia; Nass, Richard

    2014-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative motor disorder worldwide, and results in the progressive loss of dopamine (DA) neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Gene-environment interactions are believed to play a significant role in the vast majority of PD cases, yet the toxicants and the associated genes involved in the neuropathology are largely ill-defined. Recent epidemiological and biochemical evidence suggests that methylmercury (MeHg) may be an environmental toxicant that contributes to the development of PD. Here, we report that a gene coding for the putative multidrug resistance protein MRP-7 in Caenorhabditis elegans modulates whole animal and DA neuron sensitivity to MeHg. In this study, we demonstrate that genetic knockdown of MRP-7 results in a twofold increase in Hg levels and a dramatic increase in stress response proteins associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, golgi apparatus, and mitochondria, as well as an increase in MeHg-associated animal death. Chronic exposure to low concentrations of MeHg induces MRP-7 gene expression, while exposures in MRP-7 genetic knockdown animals results in a loss of DA neuron integrity without affecting whole animal viability. Furthermore, transgenic animals expressing a fluorescent reporter behind the endogenous MRP-7 promoter indicate that the transporter is expressed in DA neurons. These studies show for the first time that a multidrug resistance protein is expressed in DA neurons, and its expression inhibits MeHg-associated DA neuron pathology. PMID:24266639

  5. High efficiency InP solar cells from low toxicity tertiarybutylphosphine and trimethylindium by OMVPE

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, R.W. Jr.; Fatemi, N.S.; Wilt, D.M.; Brinker, D.J.; Jenkins, P.P.; Scheiman, D.A.

    1994-12-31

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based compound semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p-type and n-type respectively. 16% efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with V{sub oc} of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6%. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  6. High efficiency InP solar cells from low toxicity tertiarybutylphosphine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1994-05-01

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p and n type respectively. 16 percent efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with Voc of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6 percent. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  7. High Efficiency InP Solar Cells from Low Toxicity Tertiarybutylphosphine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, Richard W., Jr.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Brinker, David J.; Scheiman, David A.

    1994-01-01

    Large scale manufacture of phosphide based semiconductor devices by organo-metallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) typically requires the use of highly toxic phosphine. Advancements in phosphine substitutes have identified tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP) as an excellent precursor for OMVPE of InP. High quality undoped and doped InP films were grown using TBP and trimethylindium. Impurity doped InP films were achieved utilizing diethylzinc and silane for p and n type respectively. 16 percent efficient solar cells under air mass zero, one sun intensity were demonstrated with Voc of 871 mV and fill factor of 82.6 percent. It was shown that TBP could replace phosphine, without adversely affecting device quality, in OMVPE deposition of InP thus significantly reducing toxic gas exposure risk.

  8. Acute Toxicity in High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Androgen Suppression and Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pervez, Nadeem; Small, Cormac; MacKenzie, Marc; Yee, Don; Parliament, Matthew; Ghosh, Sunita; Mihai, Alina; Amanie, John; Murtha, Albert; Field, Colin; Murray, David; Fallone, Gino; Pearcey, Robert

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: To report acute toxicity resulting from radiotherapy (RT) dose escalation and hypofractionation using intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) treatment combined with androgen suppression in high-risk prostate cancer patients. Methods and Materials: Sixty patients with a histological diagnosis of high-risk prostatic adenocarcinoma (having either a clinical Stage of >=T3a or an initial prostate-specific antigen [PSA] level of >=20 ng/ml or a Gleason score of 8 to 10 or a combination of a PSA concentration of >15 ng/ml and a Gleason score of 7) were enrolled. RT prescription was 68 Gy in 25 fractions (2.72 Gy/fraction) over 5 weeks to the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles. The pelvic lymph nodes and distal seminal vesicles concurrently received 45 Gy in 25 fractions. The patients were treated with helical TomoTherapy-based IMRT and underwent daily megavoltage CT image-guided verification prior to each treatment. Acute toxicity scores were recorded weekly during RT and at 3 months post-RT, using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity scales. Results: All patients completed RT and follow up for 3 months. The maximum acute toxicity scores were as follows: 21 (35%) patients had Grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity; 4 (6.67%) patients had Grade 3 genitourinary (GU) toxicity; and 30 (33.33%) patients had Grade 2 GU toxicity. These toxicity scores were reduced after RT; there were only 8 (13.6%) patients with Grade 1 GI toxicity, 11 (18.97%) with Grade 1 GU toxicity, and 5 (8.62%) with Grade 2 GU toxicity at 3 months follow up. Only the V60 to the rectum correlated with the GI toxicity. Conclusion: Dose escalation using a hypofractionated schedule to the prostate with concurrent pelvic lymph node RT and long-term androgen suppression therapy is well tolerated acutely. Longer follow up for outcome and late toxicity is required.

  9. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  10. Microstructural Changes in High-Protein Nutrition Bars Formulated with Extruded or Toasted Milk Protein Concentrate.

    PubMed

    Banach, J C; Clark, S; Lamsal, B P

    2016-02-01

    Milk protein concentrates with more than 80% protein (that is, MPC80) are underutilized as the primary protein source in high-protein nutrition bars as they impart crumbliness and cause hardening during storage. High-protein nutrition bar texture changes are often associated with internal protein aggregations and macronutrient phase separation. These changes were investigated in model high-protein nutrition bars formulated with MPC80 and physically modified MPC80s. High-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80s hardened slower than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. Extruded MPC80 had reduced free sulfhydryl group exposure, whereas measurable increases were seen in the toasted MPC80. High-protein nutrition bar textural performance may be related to the number of exposed free sulfhydryl groups in MPC80. Protein aggregations resulting from ingredient modification and high-protein nutrition bar storage were studied with sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Disulfide-based protein aggregations and changes in free sulfhydryl concentration were not consistently relatable to high-protein nutrition bar texture change. However, the high-protein nutrition bars formulated with extruded MPC80 were less prone to phase separations, as depicted by confocal laser scanning microscopy, and underwent less texture change during storage than those formulated with toasted or unmodified MPC80. PMID:26748454

  11. Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins potently ubiquitylate and degrade familial ALS-related mutant SOD1 proteins and reduce their cellular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Niwa, Jun-ichi; Yamada, Shin-ichi; Takahashi, Miho; Ito, Takashi; Sone, Jun; Doyu, Manabu; Urano, Fumihiko; Sobue, Gen

    2007-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Dorfin is a ubiquitin ligase (E3) that degrades mutant SOD1 proteins, which are responsible for familial ALS. Although Dorfin has potential as an anti-ALS molecule, its life in cells is short. To improve its stability and enhance its E3 activity, we developed chimeric proteins containing the substrate-binding hydrophobic portion of Dorfin and the U-box domain of the carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP), which has strong E3 activity through the U-box domain. All the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins were more stable in cells than was wild-type Dorfin (Dorfin(WT)). One of the Dorfin-CHIP chimeric proteins, Dorfin-CHIP(L), ubiquitylated mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT) and CHIP in vivo, and degraded mutant SOD1 protein more rapidly than Dorfin(WT) does. Furthermore, Dorfin-CHIP(L) rescued neuronal cells from mutant SOD1-associated toxicity and reduced the aggresome formation induced by mutant SOD1 more effectively than did Dorfin(WT). PMID:17157513

  12. Protein-Protein Interactions in high moisture-extruded meat analogs and heat-induce soy Protein Gels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two commercial soy protein isolates were made into fibrous meat analogs by high moisture extrusion or into gels by heating and cooling, at varying concentrations and/or temperatures. Protein-protein interactions by extrusion or gelation were investigated through protein solubility studies of raw an...

  13. A high throughput passive dosing format for the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Vergauwen, Lucia; Schmidt, Stine N; Stinckens, Evelyn; Maho, Walid; Blust, Ronny; Mayer, Philipp; Covaci, Adrian; Knapen, Dries

    2015-11-01

    High throughput testing according to the Fish Embryo Acute Toxicity (FET) test (OECD Testing Guideline 236) is usually conducted in well plates. In the case of hydrophobic test substances, sorptive and evaporative losses often result in declining and poorly controlled exposure conditions. Therefore, our objective was to improve exposure conditions in FET tests by evaluating a passive dosing format using silicone O-rings in standard 24-well polystyrene plates. We exposed zebrafish embryos to a series of phenanthrene concentrations until 120h post fertilization (hpf), and obtained a linear dilution series. We report effect values for both mortality and sublethal morphological effects based on (1) measured exposure concentrations, (2) (lipid normalized) body residues and (3) chemical activity. The LC50 for 120hpf was 310μg/L, CBR50 (critical body residue) was 2.72mmol/kg fresh wt and La50 (lethal chemical activity) was 0.047. All values were within ranges expected for baseline toxicity. Impaired swim bladder inflation was the most pronounced morphological effect and swimming activity was reduced in all exposure concentrations. Further analysis showed that the effect on swimming activity was not attributed to impaired swim bladder inflation, but rather to baseline toxicity. We conclude that silicone O-rings (1) produce a linear dilution series of phenanthrene in the 120hpf FET test, (2) generate and maintain aqueous concentrations for reliable determination of effect concentrations, and allow for obtaining mechanistic toxicity information, and (3) cause no toxicity, demonstrating its potential as an extension of the FET test when testing hydrophobic chemicals. PMID:26026258

  14. Transcript and protein profiling analysis of OTA-induced cell death reveals the regulation of the toxicity response process in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Peng, Xiaoli; Xu, Wentao; Luo, YunBo; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Liang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic isocoumarin derivative produced by various species of mould which mainly grow on grain, coffee, and nuts. Recent studies have suggested that OTA induces cell death in plants. To investigate possible mechanisms of OTA phytotoxicity, both digital gene expression (DGE) transcriptomic and two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic analyses were used, through which 3118 genes and 23 proteins were identified as being up- or down-regulated at least 2-fold in Arabidopsis leaf in response to OTA treatment. First, exposure of excised Arabidopsis thaliana leaves to OTA rapidly causes the hypersensitive reponse, significantly accelerates the increase of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and enhances antioxidant enzyme defence responses and xenobiotic detoxification. Secondly, OTA stimulation causes dynamic changes in transcription factors and activates the membrane transport system dramatically. Thirdly, a concomitant persistence of compromised photosynthesis and photorespiration is indicative of a metabolic shift from a highly active to a weak state. Finally, the data revealed that ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling molecules mediate the process of toxicity caused by OTA. Profiling analyses on Arabidopsis in response to OTA will provide new insights into signalling transduction that modulates the OTA phytotoxicity mechanism, facilitate mapping of regulatory networks, and extend the ability to improve OTA tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:22207617

  15. Transcript and protein profiling analysis of OTA-induced cell death reveals the regulation of the toxicity response process in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Peng, Xiaoli; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Weiwei; Hao, Junran; Liang, Zhihong; Zhang, Yu; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-03-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) is a toxic isocoumarin derivative produced by various species of mould which mainly grow on grain, coffee, and nuts. Recent studies have suggested that OTA induces cell death in plants. To investigate possible mechanisms of OTA phytotoxicity, both digital gene expression (DGE) transcriptomic and two-dimensional electrophoresis proteomic analyses were used, through which 3118 genes and 23 proteins were identified as being up- or down-regulated at least 2-fold in Arabidopsis leaf in response to OTA treatment. First, exposure of excised Arabidopsis thaliana leaves to OTA rapidly causes the hypersensitive reponse, significantly accelerates the increase of reactive oxygen species and malondialdehyde, and enhances antioxidant enzyme defence responses and xenobiotic detoxification. Secondly, OTA stimulation causes dynamic changes in transcription factors and activates the membrane transport system dramatically. Thirdly, a concomitant persistence of compromised photosynthesis and photorespiration is indicative of a metabolic shift from a highly active to a weak state. Finally, the data revealed that ethylene, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling molecules mediate the process of toxicity caused by OTA. Profiling analyses on Arabidopsis in response to OTA will provide new insights into signalling transduction that modulates the OTA phytotoxicity mechanism, facilitate mapping of regulatory networks, and extend the ability to improve OTA tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:22207617

  16. Toxic Membrane Fractions from Mycoplasma fermentans1

    PubMed Central

    Gabridge, Michael G.; Murphy, William H.

    1971-01-01

    A recent isolate of Mycoplasma fermentans (strain K10, from human leukemic bone marrow) induced a lethal toxicity syndrome in mice. High doses of both viable and inactivated cells were toxic when injected intraperitoneally. Whole lysates and membranes from osmotically shocked cells killed mice, but cytoplasm did not. When membranes were dissolved in detergents and reaggregated by dialysis in the presence of Mg2+, the lipid-protein complex thus formed was toxic. Lipids extracted from membranes with chloroform-methanol did not kill mice. Protein-rich fractions (obtained by reaggregation plus acetone washes or ammonium sulfate precipitation of dissolved membranes) were also not toxic. No qualitative differences in proteins from three toxic isolates and three nontoxic laboratory strains of M. fermentans were detectable by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The toxic factor contained in reaggregated membranes was heat-stable but sensitive to Pronase, trypsin, and lipase. Images PMID:5154902

  17. A high-throughput method for assessing chemical toxicity using a Caenorhabditis elegans reproduction assay

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, Windy A.; McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2010-06-01

    The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle {<=} 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected; however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC{sub 50} values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 {mu}M) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 {mu}M). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms.

  18. A HIGH-THROUGHPUT METHOD FOR ASSESSING CHEMICAL TOXICITY USING A CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS REPRODUCTION ASSAY

    PubMed Central

    Boyd, Windy A.; McBride, Sandra J.; Rice, Julie R.; Snyder, Daniel W.; Freedman, Jonathan H.

    2010-01-01

    The National Research Council has outlined the need for non-mammalian toxicological models to test the potential health effects of a large number of chemicals while also reducing the use of traditional animal models. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive alternative model because of its well-characterized and evolutionarily-conserved biology, low cost, and ability to be used in high-throughput screening. A high-throughput method is described for quantifying the reproductive capacity of C. elegans exposed to chemicals for 48 h from the last larval stage (L4) to adulthood using a COPAS Biosort. Initially, the effects of exposure conditions that could influence reproduction were defined. Concentrations of DMSO vehicle ≤ 1% did not affect reproduction. Previous studies indicated that C. elegans may be influenced by exposure to low pH conditions. At pHs greater than 4.5, C. elegans reproduction was not affected, however below this pH there was a significant decrease in the number of offspring. Cadmium chloride was chosen as a model toxicant to verify that automated measurements were comparable to those of traditional observational studies. EC50 values for cadmium for automated measurements (176-192 μM) were comparable to those previously reported for a 72-h exposure using manual counting (151 μM). The toxicity of seven test toxicants on C. elegans reproduction was highly correlative with rodent lethality suggesting that this assay may be useful in predicting the potential toxicity of chemicals in other organisms. PMID:20206647

  19. Fluorescence imaging for a noninvasive in vivo toxicity-test using a transgenic silkworm expressing green fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Inagaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Ishii, Masaki; Uchino, Keiro; Sezutsu, Hideki; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    In drug development, the toxicity of candidate chemicals must be carefully examined in an animal model. Here we developed a live imaging technique using silkworms for a noninvasive toxicity test applicable for drug screening. Injection of carbon tetrachloride, a tissue-injuring chemical, into transgenic silkworms expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced leakage of GFP from the tissues into the hemolymph. The leakage of GFP was suppressed by pre-administration of either cimetidine, a cytochrome P450 inhibitor, or N-acetyl cysteine, a free-radical scavenger. The transgenic silkworm was made transparent by feeding a diet containing chemicals that inhibit uric acid deposition in the epithelial cells. In the transparent silkworms, GFP fluorescence in the fat body could be observed from outside the body. Injection of salicylic acid or iron sulfate, tissue-injuring chemicals, into the transparent silkworms decreased the fluorescence intensity of the GFP in the fat body. These findings suggest that the transparent GFP-expressing silkworm model is useful for evaluating the toxicity of chemicals that induce tissue injury. PMID:26061948

  20. High-Yield Secretion of Multiple Client Proteins in Aspergillus

    SciTech Connect

    Segato, F.; Damasio, A. R. L.; Goncalves, T. A.; de Lucas, R. C.; Squina, F. M.; Decker, S. R.; Prade, R. A.

    2012-07-15

    Production of pure and high-yield client proteins is an important technology that addresses the need for industrial applications of enzymes as well as scientific experiments in protein chemistry and crystallization. Fungi are utilized in industrial protein production because of their ability to secrete large quantities of proteins. In this study, we engineered a high-expression-secretion vector, pEXPYR that directs proteins towards the extracellular medium in two Aspergillii host strains, examine the effect of maltose-induced over-expression and protein secretion as well as time and pH-dependent protein stability in the medium. We describe five client proteins representing a core set of hemicellulose degrading enzymes that accumulated up to 50-100 mg/L of protein. Using a recyclable genetic marker that allows serial insertion of multiple genes, simultaneous hyper-secretion of three client proteins in a single host strain was accomplished.

  1. Carbaryl toxicity prediction to soil organisms under high and low temperature regimes.

    PubMed

    Lima, Maria P R; Cardoso, Diogo N; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Loureiro, Susana

    2015-04-01

    Many studies on risk assessment of pesticides on non-target organisms have been performed based on standardized protocols that reflect conditions in temperate climates. However, the responses of organisms to chemical compounds may differ according to latitude and thus predicting the toxicity of chemicals at different temperatures is an important factor to consider in risk assessment. The toxic effects of the pesticide carbaryl were evaluated at different temperature regimes, which are indicative of temperate and tropical climates and are relevant to climate change predictions or seasonal temperature fluctuations. Four standard organisms were used (Folsomia candida, Eisenia andrei; Triticum aestivum and Brassica rapa) and the effects were assessed using synergistic ratios, calculated from EC/LC50 values. When possible, the MIXTOX tool was used based on the reference model of independent action (IA) and possible deviations. A decrease on carbaryl toxicity at higher temperatures was found in F. candida reproduction, but when the mixtox tool was used no interactions between these stressors (Independent Action) was observed, so an additive response was suggested. Synergistic ratios showed a tendency to synergism at high temperatures for E. andrei and B. rapa and antagonism at low temperatures for both species. T. aestivum showed to be less affected than expected (antagonism), when exposed to both low and high temperatures. The results showed that temperature may increase the deleterious effects of carbaryl to non-target organisms, which is important considering both seasonal and latitude related differences, as well as the global climate change context. PMID:24836932

  2. The added value of the 90-day repeated dose oral toxicity test for industrial chemicals with a low (sub)acute toxicity profile in a high quality dataset.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Katy; Andrew, David J; Rego, Laura

    2014-08-01

    A survey conducted on the EU Notification of New Substances (NONS) database suggested that for industrial chemicals with a profile of low toxicity in (sub)acute toxicity tests there is little added value to the conduct of the 90-day repeated dose study. Avoiding unnecessary animal testing is a central aim of the EU REACH chemicals legislation; therefore we sought to verify the profile using additional data. The OECD's eChemPortal was searched for substances that had both a 28-day and a 90-day study and their robust study summaries were then examined from the ECHA CHEM database. Out of 182 substances with high quality 28-day and 90-day study results, only 18 reported no toxicity of any kind in the (sub)acute tests. However, for 16 of these there were also no reported signs of toxicity at or close to the limit dose (1000mg/kgbw/d) in the 90-day study. Restricting the 'low (sub)acute toxicity in a high quality dataset' profile to general industrial chemicals of no known biological activity, whilst allowing irritant substances, increases the data set and improves the prediction to 95% (20 substances out of 21 substances). The low toxicity profile appears to be of low prevalence within industrial chemicals (10-15%), nevertheless, avoidance of the conduct of a redundant 90-day study for this proportion of the remaining REACH phase-in substances would avoid the use of nearly 50,000 animals and save industry 50million Euros, with no impact on the assessment of human health. PMID:24768988

  3. A high-performance "sweeper" for toxic cationic herbicides: an anionic metal-organic framework with a tetrapodal cage.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yan-Yuan; Zhang, Ying-Hui; Xu, Jian; Feng, Rui; Zhang, Ming-Shi; Bu, Xian-He

    2015-12-21

    This communication reports a novel metal-organic framework exhibiting an excellent performance in adsorbing small toxic cationic herbicides, i.e. methyl viologen and diquat, with large adsorption capacities and ultratrace residue levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of high-performance MOFs trapping toxic cationic herbicides. PMID:26468513

  4. FATE AND TOXICITY OF HIGH DENSITY MISSILE FUELS RJ-5 AND JP-9 IN AQUATIC TEST SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The high density missile fuels RJ-5 and JP-9 resisted biodegradation when incubated with water/sediment suspensions collected from aquatic habitats. RJ-5 and JP-9 were not toxic to the microbial communities at concentrations of 400 mg per liter, but RJ-5 was toxic to Mysidopsis b...

  5. Transformation of crystalline starch nanoparticles into highly luminescent carbon nanodots: Toxicity studies and their applications.

    PubMed

    Sonthanasamy, Regina Sisika A; Ahmad, Wan Yaacob Wan; Fazry, Shazrul; Hassan, Nurul I; Lazim, Azwan Mat

    2016-02-10

    Being abundant in many tropical part of the world, Dioscorea sp. as food is limited due to its toxicity. However polysaccharides derive from these tubers could be important for other applications. Here we developed a Highly Luminescent Carbon Nanodots (C-dots) via acid hydrolysis of Gadong starch (GS). The hydrolysis rate of GS increased from 49% to 86% within 7 days while the X-ray diffraction showed the native GS particle is a C-crystalline type. The GS particles were either round or oval with diameters ranging from 50-90 nm. Further acid dehydration and surface oxidation reduced the size of GS nanoparticles to 6-25 nm. The C-dots produced a fluorescent emission at wavelength 441 nm. Toxicity tests demonstrate that zebrafish embryo were able to tolerate the C-dots for 48 h after exposure. This study has successfully demonstrated a novel approach of converting GS into excellent fluorescent C-dot. PMID:26686155

  6. Influence of agglomeration and specific lung lining lipid/protein interaction on short-term inhalation toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Driessen, Marc D; Raesch, Simon; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Schulze, Christine; Vacano, Bernhard von; Vennemann, Antje; Wiemann, Martin; Ruge, Christian A; Platsch, Herbert; Mues, Sarah; Ossig, Rainer; Tomm, Janina M; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Luch, Andreas; Lehr, Claus-Michael; Haase, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Lung lining fluid is the first biological barrier nanoparticles (NPs) encounter during inhalation. As previous inhalation studies revealed considerable differences between surface functionalized NPs with respect to deposition and toxicity, our aim was to investigate the influence of lipid and/or protein binding on these processes. Thus, we analyzed a set of surface functionalized NPs including different SiO2 and ZrO2 in pure phospholipids, CuroSurf(TM) and purified native porcine pulmonary surfactant (nS). Lipid binding was surprisingly low for pure phospholipids and only few NPs attracted a minimal lipid corona. Additional presence of hydrophobic surfactant protein (SP) B in CuroSurf(TM) promoted lipid binding to NPs functionalized with Amino or PEG residues. The presence of the hydrophilic SP A in nS facilitated lipid binding to all NPs. In line with this the degree of lipid and protein affinities for different surface functionalized SiO2 NPs in nS followed the same order (SiO2 Phosphate ∼ unmodified SiO2 < SiO2 PEG < SiO2 Amino NPs). Agglomeration and biomolecule interaction of NPs in nS was mainly influenced by surface charge and hydrophobicity. Toxicological differences as observed in short-term inhalation studies (STIS) were mainly influenced by the core composition and/or surface reactivity of NPs. However, agglomeration in lipid media and lipid/protein affinity appeared to play a modulatory role on short-term inhalation toxicity. For instance, lipophilic NPs like ZrO2, which are interacting with nS to a higher extent, exhibited a far higher lung burden than their hydrophilic counterparts, which deserves further attention to predict or model effects of respirable NPs. PMID:26984182

  7. Protective activity of andrographolide and arabinogalactan proteins from Andrographis paniculata Nees. against ethanol-induced toxicity in mice.

    PubMed

    Singha, Prajjal K; Roy, Somenath; Dey, Satyahari

    2007-04-20

    To find out the active principles against ethanol-induced toxicity in mice, Andrographis paniculata Nees. (Ap) was chosen and isolated andrographolide (ANDRO) and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs). ANDRO was detected by HPTLC, FTIR and quantified by HPLC (10mg/g of Ap powder). AGPs was detected by beta-glucosyl Yariv staining of SDS-PAGE gel, FTIR and quantified by single radial gel diffusion assay with beta-glucosyl Yariv reagent (0.5mg/g Ap powder). The mice are pretreated intra-peritoneally (i.p.) with different doses (62.5, 125, 250, and 500mg/kg) of body weight of mice] of ANDRO and AGPs for 7 days and then ethanol (7.5g/kg of body weight) was injected, i.p. Besides, silymarin was used as standard hepatoprotective agent for comparative study with ANDRO and AGPs. The ameliorative activity of ANDRO and AGP against hepatic renal alcohol toxicity was measured by assessing GOT, GPT, ACP, ALP and LP levels in liver and kidney. It has been observed that pretreatment of mice with ANDRO and AGPs at 500mg/kg of body weight and 125mg/kg of body weight respectively could able to minimize the toxicity in compare to ethanol treated group as revealed by the different enzymatic assay in liver and kidney tissues and the results were comparable with silymarin. Hence, out of several ill-defined compounds present in Ap, ANDRO and AGPs are the potential bioactive compounds responsible for protection against ethanol-induced toxicity. PMID:17127022

  8. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN SEED YIELD AND SEED PROTEIN IN HIGH PROTEIN SOYBEAN POPULATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean seed yield and protein concentration often show a strong negative correlation. Initial results of our study indicate that development of soybean lines with high yield and high protein concentration is possible by selecting for protein concentration first. We evaluated the relationship of yie...

  9. Development of protein based bioremediation and drugs for heavy metal toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Opella, Stanley J.

    2001-09-18

    Structural studies were performed on several proteins of the bacterial detoxification system. These proteins are responsible for binding (MerP) and transport of heavy metals, including mercury, across membranes. The structural information obtained from NMR experiments provides insight into the selectivity and sequestration processes towards heavy metal toxins.

  10. Immunosilencing a Highly Immunogenic Protein Trimerization Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Sliepen, Kwinten; van Montfort, Thijs; Melchers, Mark; Isik, Gözde; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2015-01-01

    Many therapeutic proteins and protein subunit vaccines contain heterologous trimerization domains, such as the widely used GCN4-based isoleucine zipper (IZ) and the T4 bacteriophage fibritin foldon (Fd) trimerization domains. We found that these domains induced potent anti-IZ or anti-Fd antibody responses in animals when fused to an HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) immunogen. To dampen IZ-induced responses, we constructed an IZ domain containing four N-linked glycans (IZN4) to shield the underlying protein surface. When fused to two different vaccine antigens, HIV-1 Env and influenza hemagglutinin (HA), IZN4 strongly reduced the antibody responses against the IZ, but did not affect the antibody titers against Env or HA. Silencing of immunogenic multimerization domains with glycans might be relevant for therapeutic proteins and protein vaccines. PMID:25635058

  11. ELEVATED LEVELS OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN (HSP70-1) PROTECT MCF-7 CELLS FROM ARSENITE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Heat shock proteins (HSPs) belong to the highly conserved family of stress proteins and are induced following exposure to arsenic. Elevated HSPs protect against cellular damage from heat but it is unclear whether HSP induction alters the damaging effects of environmental chemical...

  12. Toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater and effects on constructed wetland plants.

    PubMed

    Calheiros, Cristina S C; Silva, Gabriela; Quitério, Paula V B; Crispim, Luís F C; Brix, Hans; Moura, Sandra C; Castro, Paula M L

    2012-08-01

    The toxicity of high salinity tannery wastewater produced after an activated sludge secondary treatment on the germination and seedling growth of Trifolium pratense, a species used as indicator in toxicity tests, was evaluated. Growth was inhibited by wastewater concentrations >25% and undiluted effluent caused a complete germination inhibition. Constructed wetlands (CWs) with Arundo donax or Sarcocornia fruticosa were envisaged to further polish this wastewater. Selection of plant species to use in CWs for industrial wastewater treatment is an important issue, since for a successful establishment they have to tolerate the often harsh wastewater composition. For that, the effects of this wastewater on the growth of Arundo and Sarcocornia were assessed in pot assays. Plants were subject to different wastewater contents (0/50/100%), and both were resilient to the imposed conditions. Arundo had higher growth rates and biomass than Sarcocornia and may therefore be the preferred species for use in CWs treating tannery wastewater. CWs planted with the above mentioned plants significantly decreased the toxicity of the wastewater, as effluent from the CWs outlet stimulated the growth of Trifolium at concentrations <50%, and seed germination and growth even occurred in undiluted effluent. PMID:22908635

  13. Gender-specific reduction of hepatic Mrp2 expression by high-fat diet protects female mice from ANIT toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Bo; Csanaky, Iván L.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Patni, Meghan; Chen, Qi; Ma, Xiaochao; Jaeschke, Hartmut; Weir, Scott; Broward, Melinda; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Guo, Grace L.

    2012-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that feeding a high-fat diet (HFD) to rodents affects the expression of genes involved in drug transport. However, gender-specific effects of HFD on drug transport are not known. The multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2, Abcc2) is a transporter highly expressed in the hepatocyte canalicular membrane and is important for biliary excretion of glutathione-conjugated chemicals. The current study showed that hepatic Mrp2 expression was reduced by HFD feeding only in female, but not male, C57BL/6J mice. In order to determine whether down-regulation of Mrp2 in female mice altered chemical disposition and toxicity, the biliary excretion and hepatotoxicity of the Mrp2 substrate, α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT), were assessed in male and female mice fed control diet or HFD for 4 weeks. ANIT-induced biliary injury is a commonly used model of experimental cholestasis and has been shown to be dependent upon Mrp2-mediated efflux of an ANIT glutathione conjugate that selectively injures biliary epithelial cells. Interestingly, HFD feeding significantly reduced early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice and largely protected against ANIT-induced liver injury. In summary, the current study showed that, at least in mice, HFD feeding can differentially regulate Mrp2 expression and function and depending upon the chemical exposure may enhance or reduce susceptibility to toxicity. Taken together, these data provide a novel interaction between diet and gender in regulating hepatobiliary excretion and susceptibility to injury. -- Highlights: ► High-fat diet decreases hepatic Mrp2 expression only in female but not in male mice. ► HFD significantly reduces early-phase biliary ANIT excretion in female mice. ► HFD protects female mice against ANIT-induced liver injury.

  14. A cadherin-like protein influences Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxicity in the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Jiang, Xingfu; Luo, Lizhi; Stanley, David; Sappington, Thomas W; Zhang, Lei

    2013-06-01

    Cadherins comprise a family of calcium-dependent cell adhesion proteins that act in cell-cell interactions. Cadherin-like proteins (CADs) in midguts of some insects act as receptors that bind some of the toxins produced by the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). We cloned a CAD gene associated with larval midguts prepared from Mythimna separata. The full-length cDNA (MsCAD1, GenBank Accession No. JF951432) is 5642 bp, with an open reading frame encoding a 1757 amino acid and characteristics typical of insect CADs. Expression of MsCAD1 is predominantly in midgut tissue, with highest expression in the 3rd- to 6th-instars and lowest in newly hatched larvae. Knocking-down MsCAD1 decreased Cry1Ab susceptibility, indicated by reduced developmental time, increased larval weight and reduced larval mortality. We expressed MsCAD1 in E. coli and recovered the recombinant protein, rMsCAD1, which binds Cry1Ab toxin. Truncation analysis and binding experiments revealed that a contiguous 209-aa, located in CR11 and CR12, is the minimal Cry1Ab binding region. These results demonstrate that MsCAD1 is associated with Cry1Ab toxicity and is one of the Cry1Ab receptors in this insect. The significance of this work lies in identifying MsCAD1 as a Cry1Ab receptor, which helps understand the mechanism of Cry1Ab toxicity and of potential resistance to Bt in M. separata. PMID:23754724

  15. Role of uptake of (14C)valine into protein in the development of tolerance to diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.C.; Dettbarn, W.D.

    1986-07-01

    In a subchronic toxicity study male Sprague-Dawley rats were daily treated with diisopropylphosphorofluoridate (DFP) (0.5 mg/kg, sc) for 14 days. Maximum signs of anticholinesterase toxicity were observed during Days 4 and 5 comparable to those seen 10-15 min following a single sublethal dosage (1.5 mg DFP/kg, sc). Signs disappeared after Days 6-7 of exposure and rats became apparently normal during the remainder of the treatment period. Significant hypothermia was seen following the second to fifth doses with maximum effect after the fifth injection. Subsequent injections of DFP did not cause any reduction in temperature. Incorporation of (/sup 14/C)valine was measured 24 hr after the 5th and 14th injections of DFP, at a time when body temperature had recovered to control values. The rate of in vivo incorporation of (/sup 14/C)valine was measured 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 hr after a subcutaneous injection of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine at a dose of 5 microCi/mmol/100 g body wt. After five injections the rate of L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine uptake into the free amino acid pool and the incorporation into the protein bound pool was significantly (p less than 0.01) reduced in discrete brain regions, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscles. At the end of the 14-day treatment, protein synthesis in all the skeletal muscles tested had recovered completely (p greater than 0.01) to the values of nontreated control animals. In brain, liver, and kidney, however, no recovery was seen during this period. The recovery of protein synthesis in skeletal muscle may be one of the mechanisms that lead to tolerance development during prolonged administration of subacute concentrations of DFP.

  16. Adapting the medaka embryo assay to a high-throughput approach for developmental toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Oxendine, Sharon L; Cowden, John; Hinton, David E; Padilla, Stephanie

    2006-09-01

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro methods are useful for screening, these methods do not replicate all the intricacies of embryonic development and should ideally be complemented by an in vivo screening strategy. In this study, we modify a medaka fish embryo assay to meet the requirements of high-throughput, developmental toxicant testing in vivo. The Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) offers several advantages over traditional mammalian model systems, including economic husbandry, high fecundity, and rapid ex utero development. In most studies where fish eggs are exposed to a chemical, the exposure takes place in a common vessel, with many embryos being exposed to the same solution. This type of design is not amenable to high-throughput methodology, does not allow the investigator to follow the same embryo throughout gestation, and may confound statistical analysis of the results. Therefore, we developed a 96-well microtiter plate method to facilitate exposure of individual medaka embryos in single wells and compared this approach to the common vessel method using the industrial solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the test compound. At lower DMSO concentrations (0% or 1%), the 96-well microtiter plate assay replicated results obtained using the common vessel exposure method. There was, however, increased lethality and decreased hatching rate in the bottle-reared embryos treated with the higher DMSO concentrations (5% or 10%). Because the embryos reared in the 96-well microtiter plates never showed increased adverse effects (as compared to the bottle-reared embryos) at any DMSO concentration, we conclude that the 96-well microtiter plate assay provides a rapid and efficient alternative for developmental toxicity screens that

  17. Toxic and nontoxic components of botulinum neurotoxin complex are evolved from a common ancestral zinc protein

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, Ken; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Miyata, Keita; Miyashita, Shin-Ichiro; Suzuki, Tomonori; Shikamori, Yasuyuki; Ohyama, Tohru; Niwa, Koichi; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2012-03-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BoNT and NTNHA proteins share a similar protein architecture. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA and BoNT were both identified as zinc-binding proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NTNHA does not have a classical HEXXH zinc-coordinating motif similar to that found in all serotypes of BoNT. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Homology modeling implied probable key residues involved in zinc coordination. -- Abstract: Zinc atoms play an essential role in a number of enzymes. Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT), the most potent toxin known in nature, is a zinc-dependent endopeptidase. Here we identify the nontoxic nonhemagglutinin (NTNHA), one of the BoNT-complex constituents, as a zinc-binding protein, along with BoNT. A protein structure classification database search indicated that BoNT and NTNHA share a similar domain architecture, comprising a zinc-dependent metalloproteinase-like, BoNT coiled-coil motif and concanavalin A-like domains. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that every single NTNHA molecule contains a single zinc atom. This is the first demonstration of a zinc atom in this protein, as far as we know. However, the NTNHA molecule does not possess any known zinc-coordinating motif, whereas all BoNT serotypes possess the classical HEXXH motif. Homology modeling of the NTNHA structure implied that a consensus K-C-L-I-K-X{sub 35}-D sequence common among all NTNHA serotype molecules appears to coordinate a single zinc atom. These findings lead us to propose that NTNHA and BoNT may have evolved distinct functional specializations following their branching out from a common ancestral zinc protein.

  18. High levels of plasma protein C in nephrotic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pabinger-Fasching, I; Lechner, K; Niessner, H; Schmidt, P; Balzar, E; Mannhalter, C

    1985-02-18

    In patients with severe nephrotic syndrome determinations of plasma protein C: Ag levels (8 patients: 5 adults, 3 children) and protein C activity (3 out of 8 patients) revealed significantly elevated plasma protein C concentrations. Furthermore we observed a significant inverse correlation of protein C: Ag to AT III: Ag levels. No protein C: Ag could be detected in the urine of two patients studied. We conclude from our data, that changes of plasma protein C do not contribute to the high thrombotic tendency in nephrotic syndrome. PMID:3838827

  19. The novel hydroxylamine derivative NG-094 suppresses polyglutamine protein toxicity in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Haldimann, Pierre; Muriset, Maude; Vígh, László; Goloubinoff, Pierre

    2011-05-27

    Aggregation-prone polyglutamine (polyQ) expansion proteins cause several neurodegenerative disorders, including Huntington disease. The pharmacological activation of cellular stress responses could be a new strategy to combat protein conformational diseases. Hydroxylamine derivatives act as co-inducers of heat-shock proteins (HSPs) and can enhance HSP expression in diseased cells, without significant adverse effects. Here, we used Caenorhabditis elegans expressing polyQ expansions with 35 glutamines fused to the yellow fluorescent protein (Q35-YFP) in body wall muscle cells as a model system to investigate the effects of treatment with a novel hydroxylamine derivative, NG-094, on the progression of polyQ diseases. NG-094 significantly ameliorated polyQ-mediated animal paralysis, reduced the number of Q35-YFP aggregates and delayed polyQ-dependent acceleration of aging. Micromolar concentrations of NG-094 in animal tissues with only marginal effects on the nematode fitness sufficed to confer protection against polyQ proteotoxicity, even when the drug was administered after disease onset. NG-094 did not reduce insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1-like signaling, but conferred cytoprotection by a mechanism involving the heat-shock transcription factor HSF-1 that potentiated the expression of stress-inducible HSPs. NG-094 is thus a promising candidate for tests on mammalian models of polyQ and other protein conformational diseases. PMID:21471208

  20. Soy-Protein-Based Nanofabrics for Highly Efficient and Multifunctional Air Filtration.

    PubMed

    Souzandeh, Hamid; Johnson, Kyle S; Wang, Yu; Bhamidipaty, Keshava; Zhong, Wei-Hong

    2016-08-10

    Proteins are well-known by their numerous active functional groups along the polypeptide chain. The variety of functional groups of proteins provides a great potential for proteins to interact with airborne pollutants with varying surface properties. However, to our knowledge, a successful demonstration of this potential has not been reported before. In this work, soy protein, a type of abundant plant protein, has been employed for the first time to fabricate multifunctional air-filtration materials. To take advantage of the functional groups of soy protein for air filtration, the soy protein was first well denatured to unfold the polypeptide chains and then fabricated into nanofibers with the help of poly(vinyl alcohol). It was found that the resultant nanofabrics showed high filtration efficiency not only for airborne particulates with a broad range of size but also for various toxic gaseous chemicals (e.g., formaldehyde and carbon monoxide), a capability that has not been realized by conventional air-filtering materials. This study indicates that protein-based nanofabrics are promising nanomaterials for multifunctional air-filtration applications. PMID:27439677

  1. A fusion protein containing a lepidopteran-specific toxin from the South Indian red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus) and snowdrop lectin shows oral toxicity to target insects

    PubMed Central

    Trung, Nghia Pham; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2006-01-01

    Background Despite evidence suggesting a role in plant defence, the use of plant lectins in crop protection has been hindered by their low and species-specific insecticidal activity. Snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) is transported to the haemolymph of insects after oral ingestion, and can be used as a basis for novel insecticides. Recombinant proteins containing GNA expressed as a fusion with a peptide or protein, normally only toxic when injected into the insect haemolymph, have the potential to show oral toxicity as a result of GNA-mediated uptake. Results A gene encoding a toxin, ButaIT, from the red scorpion (Mesobuthus tamulus) was synthesised and assembled into expression constructs. One construct contained ButaIT alone, whereas the other contained ButaIT fused N-terminally to a GNA polypeptide (ButaIT/GNA). Both recombinant proteins were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as an expression host, and purified. Recombinant ButaIT and ButaIT/GNA were acutely toxic when injected into larvae of tomato moth (Lacanobia oleracea), causing slow paralysis, leading to mortality or decreased growth. ButaIT/GNA was chronically toxic when fed to L. oleracea larvae, causing decreased survival and weight gain under conditions where GNA alone was effectively non-toxic. Intact ButaIT/GNA was detected in larval haemolymph from insects fed the fusion protein orally, demonstrating transport of the linked polypeptide across the gut. Proteolysis of the fusion protein was also observed. ButaIT/GNA was significantly more toxic that GNA alone when fed to the homopteran Nilaparvata lugens (rice brown planthopper) in liquid artificial diet. Conclusion The ButaIT/GNA recombinant fusion protein is toxic to lepidopteran larvae both when injected and when fed orally, showing the utility of GNA as a carrier to transport potentially toxic peptides and proteins across the insect gut. Although ButaIT has been claimed to be lepidopteran-specific, the fusion protein has

  2. A systematic study of mitochondrial toxicity of environmental chemicals using quantitative high throughput screening

    PubMed Central

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Huang, Ruili; Sakamuru, Srilatha; Witt, Kristine L.; Beeson, Gyda C.; Shou, Louie; Schnellmann, Rick G.; Beeson, Craig C.; Tice, Raymond R.; Austin, Christopher P.; Xia, Menghang

    2014-01-01

    A goal of the Tox21 program is to transit toxicity testing from traditional in vivo models to in vitro assays that assess how chemicals affect cellular responses and toxicity pathways. A critical contribution of the NIH Chemical Genomics center (NCGC) to the Tox21 program is the implementation of a quantitative high throughput screening (qHTS) approach, using cell- and biochemical-based assays to generate toxicological profiles for thousands of environmental compounds. Here, we evaluated the effect of chemical compounds on mitochondrial membrane potential in HepG2 cells by screening a library of 1,408 compounds provided by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) in a qHTS platform. Compounds were screened over 14 concentrations, and results showed that 91 and 88 compounds disrupted mitochondrial membrane potential after treatment for one or five h, respectively. Seventy-six compounds active at both time points were clustered by structural similarity, producing 11 clusters and 23 singletons. Thirty-eight compounds covering most of the active chemical space were more extensively evaluated. Thirty-six of the 38 compounds were confirmed to disrupt mitochondrial membrane potential using a fluorescence plate reader and 35 were confirmed using a high content imaging approach. Among the 38 compounds, 4 and 6 induced LDH release, a measure of cytotoxicity, at 1 or 5 h, respectively. Compounds were further assessed for mechanism of action (MOA) by measuring changes in oxygen consumption rate, which enabled identification of 20 compounds as uncouplers. This comprehensive approach allows for evaluation of thousands of environmental chemicals for mitochondrial toxicity and identification of possible MOAs. PMID:23895456

  3. Artificial supramolecular protein assemblies as functional high-order protein scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yu-Na; Jung, Yongwon

    2016-06-28

    Supramolecular assemblies of protein building blocks potentially offer unique biomaterials with unmatched functionalities as well as atomic level structural accuracy. An increasing number of assembling strategies have been reported for the fabrication of diverse artificial protein assemblies, ranging from rather heterogeneous protein oligomers to computationally designed discrete protein architectures. In this perspective, we discuss these artificial protein supramolecules in terms of their use as highly potent high-order protein scaffolds that can display various functional proteins with precise structural and valency control. Following a brief overview of current approaches for protein assembly, several examples of functional protein assemblies have been introduced, with a particular focus on our recent report of valency-controlled green fluorescent protein nano-assemblies. Our supramolecular protein scaffolds allow building a series of polygonal assemblies of functional binding proteins, which provide unprecedented ways to study multivalent protein interactions. Even with many remaining challenges, there is unlimited potential of artificial protein scaffolds in many fields from nanotechnology to vaccine development. PMID:26964520

  4. Effect of salicylic acid on the attenuation of aluminum toxicity in Coffea arabica L. suspension cells: A possible protein phosphorylation signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Sanchez, J Armando; Chan-May, Abril; Cab-Guillén, Yahaira; Hernández-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-11-01

    The protective effect of salicylic acid (SA) on aluminum (Al) toxicity was studied in suspension cells of Coffea arabica L. The results showed that SA does not produce any effect on cell growth and that the growth inhibition produced by aluminum is restored during simultaneous treatment of the cells with Al and SA. In addition, the cells exposed to both compounds, Al and SA, showed evident morphological signals of recovery from the toxic state produced in the presence of Al. The cells treated with SA showed a lower accumulation of Al, which was linked to restoration from Al toxicity because the concentration of Al(3+) outside the cells, measured as the Al(3+)-morin complex, was not modified by the presence of SA. Additionally, the inhibition of phospholipase C by Al treatment was restored during the exposure of the cells to SA and Al. The involvement of protein phosphorylation in the protective effect of SA on Al-toxicity was suggested because staurosporine, a protein kinase inhibitor, reverted the stimulatory effect of the combination of Al and SA on protein kinase activity. These results suggest that SA attenuates aluminum toxicity by affecting a signaling pathway linked to protein phosphorylation. PMID:23953991

  5. Interactions of Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors with Organic Cation Transporters, OCTs, and Multidrug and Toxic Compound Extrusion Proteins, MATEs

    PubMed Central

    Minematsu, Tsuyoshi; Giacomini, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    The drug-drug interaction (DDI) potential of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as interacting drugs via transporter inhibition has not been fully assessed. Here, we estimated the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for eight small-molecule TKIs (imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, sunitinib, lapatinib, and sorafenib) on [14C]metformin transport by human organic cation transporters (OCT1, OCT2, and OCT3), and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion proteins (MATE1 and MATE2-K), using HEK293 cells stably expressing these transporters. We then compared the estimated IC50 values to the maximum clinical concentrations of unbound TKIs in plasma (unbound Cmax,sys,p). Results showed that imatinib, nilotinib, gefitinib, and erlotinib exerted selectively potent inhibitory effects, with unbound Cmax,sys,p/IC50 values ≥ 0.1, on MATE1, OCT3, MATE2-K and OCT1, respectively. In comparison to the common form of OCT1, the OCT1 polymorphism, M420del was more sensitive to drug inhibition by erlotinib. Major metabolites of several TKIs showed IC50 values similar to those for unchanged TKIs. Taken together, these findings suggest the potential of clinical transporter-mediated DDIs between specific TKIs and OCTs and MATEs, which may affect the disposition, efficacy and toxicity of metformin and other drugs that are substrates of these transporters. The study provides the basis for further clinical DDI studies with TKIs. PMID:21252289

  6. Zinc Supplementation with Polaprezinc Protects Mouse Hepatocytes against Acetaminophen-Induced Toxicity via Induction of Heat Shock Protein 70.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Tadashi; Ohata, Shuzo; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Mochida, Shinsuke; Nakada, Junya; Inagaki, Yoshimi; Ohta, Yoshiji; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Polaprezinc, a chelate compound consisting of zinc and l-carnosine, is clinically used as a medicine for gastric ulcers. It has been shown that induction of heat shock protein (HSP) is involved in protective effects of polaprezinc against gastric mucosal injury. In the present study, we investigated whether polaprezinc and its components could induce HSP70 and prevent acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in mouse primary cultured hepatocytes. Hepatocytes were treated with polaprezinc, zinc sulfate or l-carnosine at the concentration of 100 microM for 9 h, and then exposed to 10 mM APAP. Polaprezinc or zinc sulfate increased cellular HSP70 expression. However, l-carnosine had no influence on it. Pretreatment of the cells with polaprezinc or zinc sulfate significantly suppressed cell death as well as cellular lipid peroxidation after APAP treatment. In contrast, pretreatment with polaprezinc did not affect decrease in intracellular glutathione after APAP. Furthermore, treatment with KNK437, an HSP inhibitor, attenuated increase in HSP70 expression induced by polaprezinc, and abolished protective effect of polaprezinc on cell death after APAP. These results suggested that polaprezinc, in particular its zinc component, induces HSP70 expression in mouse primary cultured hepatocytes, and inhibits lipid peroxidation after APAP treatment, resulting in protection against APAP toxicity. PMID:20104264

  7. A PLGA-encapsulated chimeric protein protects against adherence and toxicity of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Shahram; Gargari, Seyed Latif Mousavi; Rasooli, Iraj; Hasannia, Sadegh; Pirooznia, Nazanin

    2014-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are the most common cause of diarrhea among children. Colonization factors and enterotoxins are the major ETEC candidate vaccines. Since protection against ETEC mostly occurs by induction of IgA antibodies, much effort is focused on the development of oral vaccines. In this study oral immunogenicity of a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) encapsulated chimeric protein containing CfaB, CstH, CotA and LTB (Heat-labile B subunit) was investigated. The protein was encapsulated in PLGA by double emulsion method and nanoparticles were characterized physicochemically. Immunogenicity was assessed by evaluating IgG1, IgG2 and IgA titers after BALB/c mice vaccination. Non aggregated nanoparticles had a spherical shape with an average particle size of 252.7±23 nm and 91.96±4.4% of encapsulation efficiency. Western blotting showed maintenance of the molecular weight and antigenicity of the released protein. Oral immunization of mice induced serum IgG and fecal IgA antibody responses. Immunization induced protection against ETEC binding to Caco-2 cells. The effect of LT toxin on fluid accumulation in ileal loops was neutralized by inhibition of enterotoxin binding to GM1-ganglosides. Delivery of the chimeric protein in PLGA elicited both systemic and mucosal immune responses. The findings could be exploited to development of oral multi-component ETEC prophylactic measures. PMID:23906742

  8. Total protein or high-abundance protein: Which offers the best loading control for Western blotting?

    PubMed

    Thacker, Jonathan S; Yeung, Derrick H; Staines, W Richard; Mielke, John G

    2016-03-01

    Western blotting routinely involves a control for variability in the amount of protein across immunoblot lanes. Normalizing a target signal to one found for an abundantly expressed protein is widely regarded as a reliable loading control; however, this approach is being increasingly questioned. As a result, we compared blotting for two high-abundance proteins (actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [GAPDH]) and two total protein membrane staining methods (Ponceau and Coomassie Brilliant Blue) to determine the best control for loading variability. We found that Ponceau staining optimally balanced accuracy and precision, and we suggest that this approach be considered as an alternative to normalizing with a high-abundance protein. PMID:26706797

  9. High Ph, Ammonia Toxicity, and the Search for Life on the Jovian Planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deal, P. H.; Souza, K. A.; Mack, H. M.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of pH and ammonia concentration were studied separately, where possible, on a variety of organisms, including some isolated from natural environments of high pH and/or ammonia concentration. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis are both extremely sensitive to ammonia. An aerobic organism (growth up to pH 11.4) from an alkaline spring is more resistant, but exhibits a toxic response to ammonia at a pH much lower than its maximum for growth. The greatest ammonia resistance has been found in an unidentified organism growing at near neutral pH. Even in this case, however, urvival at ammonia concentrations reasonably expected on the Jovian planets is measured in hours. This is two to three orders of magnitude longer than for E. coli. Results support the tentative conclusion that contamination of the Jovian planets with terrestrial organisms that can grow is unlikely. However, the range of toxic response noted, coupled with the observation that terrestrial life has not been exposed to high ammonia concentrations for millions of years, suggests that adaptation to greater ammonia tolerance may be possible.

  10. Synthetic Biological Protein Nanowires with High Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Adhikari, Ramesh Y; Malvankar, Nikhil S; Pi, Shuang; Ward, Joy E; Woodard, Trevor L; Nevin, Kelly P; Xia, Qiangfei; Tuominen, Mark T; Lovley, Derek R

    2016-09-01

    Genetic modification to add tryptophan to PilA, the monomer for the electrically conductive pili of Geobacter sulfurreducens, yields conductive protein filaments 2000-fold more conductive than the wild-type pili while cutting the diameter in half to 1.5 nm. PMID:27409066

  11. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Summary AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post translational modification employed by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes and is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method to identify new substrates using protein microarrays, which can significantly expand the list of potential substrates. Here, we describe procedures to detect AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high throughput, and non-radioactive manner. The approach employs high-density protein microarrays fabricated using NAPPA (Nucleic Acid Programmable Protein Arrays) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition. The assay can be accomplished within 11 hours. PMID:25881200

  12. Polychaete Richness and Abundance Enhanced in Anthropogenically Modified Estuaries Despite High Concentrations of Toxic Contaminants

    PubMed Central

    Dafforn, Katherine A.; Kelaher, Brendan P.; Simpson, Stuart L.; Coleman, Melinda A.; Hutchings, Pat A.; Clark, Graeme F.; Knott, Nathan A.; Doblin, Martina A.; Johnston, Emma L.

    2013-01-01

    Ecological communities are increasingly exposed to multiple chemical and physical stressors, but distinguishing anthropogenic impacts from other environmental drivers remains challenging. Rarely are multiple stressors investigated in replicated studies over large spatial scales (>1000 kms) or supported with manipulations that are necessary to interpret ecological patterns. We measured the composition of sediment infaunal communities in relation to anthropogenic and natural stressors at multiple sites within seven estuaries. We observed increases in the richness and abundance of polychaete worms in heavily modified estuaries with severe metal contamination, but no changes in the diversity or abundance of other taxa. Estuaries in which toxic contaminants were elevated also showed evidence of organic enrichment. We hypothesised that the observed response of polychaetes was not a ‘positive’ response to toxic contamination or a reduction in biotic competition, but due to high levels of nutrients in heavily modified estuaries driving productivity in the water column and enriching the sediment over large spatial scales. We deployed defaunated field-collected sediments from the surveyed estuaries in a small scale experiment, but observed no effects of sediment characteristics (toxic or enriching). Furthermore, invertebrate recruitment instead reflected the low diversity and abundance observed during field surveys of this relatively ‘pristine’ estuary. This suggests that differences observed in the survey are not a direct consequence of sediment characteristics (even severe metal contamination) but are related to parameters that covary with estuary modification such as enhanced productivity from nutrient inputs and the diversity of the local species pool. This has implications for the interpretation of diversity measures in large-scale monitoring studies in which the observed patterns may be strongly influenced by many factors that covary with anthropogenic

  13. High-Throughput Baculovirus Expression System for Membrane Protein Production.

    PubMed

    Kalathur, Ravi C; Panganiban, Marinela; Bruni, Renato

    2016-01-01

    The ease of use, robustness, cost-effectiveness, and posttranslational machinery make baculovirus expression system a popular choice for production of eukaryotic membrane proteins. This system can be readily adapted for high-throughput operations. This chapter outlines the techniques and procedures for cloning, transfection, small-scale production, and purification of membrane protein samples in a high-throughput manner. PMID:27485337

  14. A SURROGATE SUBCHRONIC TOXICITY TEST METHOD FOR WATERS WITH HIGH TOTAL DISSOLVED SOLIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Total dissolved solids (TDS) are often identified as a toxicant in whole-effluent toxicity (WET) testing. The primary test organism used in WET testing, Ceriodaphnia dubia, is very sensitive to TDS ions, which can be problematic when differentiating the toxicity of TDS from those...

  15. Toxicity of extracellular proteins from Diplodia seriata and Neofusicoccum parvum involved in grapevine Botryosphaeria dieback.

    PubMed

    Bénard-Gellon, M; Farine, S; Goddard, M L; Schmitt, M; Stempien, E; Pensec, F; Laloue, H; Mazet-Kieffer, F; Fontaine, F; Larignon, P; Chong, J; Tarnus, C; Bertsch, C

    2015-03-01

    Botryosphaeria dieback, esca and Eutypa dieback are three economic major grapevine trunk diseases that cause severe yield reduction in vineyards worldwide. The frequency of disease symptoms has increased considerably over the past decade, and no efficient treatment is currently available to control these diseases. The different fungi associated with grapevine trunk diseases mainly induce necrotic wood and characteristic foliar symptoms. In this context, fungi virulence factors and host invasion are not well understood. We hypothesise that extracellular proteins produced by Diplodia seriata and Neofusicoccum parvum, two causal agents associated with Botryosphaeria dieback, are virulence factors responsible for the pathogenicity. In our previous work, we demonstrated that the total extracellular compounds produced by N. parvum induced more necrosis on Chardonnay calli and triggered a different defence gene expression pattern than those produced by D. seriata. Furthermore, this aggressiveness was not clearly correlated with the production of mellein, a characteristic phytotoxin of Botryosphaeriaceae, in our in vitro calli model. To characterise other potential virulence factors and to understand the mechanisms of host invasion by the fungus, we evaluated the profile, quantity and the impact of extracellular proteins produced by these fungi on Vitis vinifera calli necrosis and defence gene expression. Our results reveal that, under the same conditions, N. parvum produces more extracellular proteins and in higher concentrations than D. seriata. With Vitis vinifera cv. Chardonnay cells, we showed that equivalent concentrations of proteins secreted by N. parvum were more aggressive than those of D. seriata in producing necrosis and that they clearly induced more grapevine defence genes. PMID:25323623

  16. Myelin Basic Protein Induces Neuron-Specific Toxicity by Directly Damaging the Neuronal Plasma Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Sixin; Liu, Xiao; Jin, Jinghua; Ren, Yi; Luo, Jianhong

    2014-01-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) insults may cause massive demyelination and lead to the release of myelin-associated proteins including its major component myelin basic protein (MBP). MBP is reported to induce glial activation but its effect on neurons is still little known. Here we found that MBP specifically bound to the extracellular surface of the neuronal plasma membrane and induced neurotoxicity in vitro. This effect of MBP on neurons was basicity-dependent because the binding was blocked by acidic lipids and competed by other basic proteins. Further studies revealed that MBP induced damage to neuronal membrane integrity and function by depolarizing the resting membrane potential, increasing the permeability to cations and other molecules, and decreasing the membrane fluidity. At last, artificial liposome vesicle assay showed that MBP directly disturbed acidic lipid bilayer and resulted in increased membrane permeability. These results revealed that MBP induces neurotoxicity through its direct interaction with acidic components on the extracellular surface of neuronal membrane, which may suggest a possible contribution of MBP to the pathogenesis in the CNS disorders with myelin damage. PMID:25255088

  17. High-affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal myeloid lineage without HSC toxicity.

    PubMed

    Lynn, R C; Feng, Y; Schutsky, K; Poussin, M; Kalota, A; Dimitrov, D S; Powell, D J

    2016-06-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here we isolated a high-affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific single-chain variable fragment (2.48 nm KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ(+) AML in vitro and in vivo compared with a low-affinity FRβ CAR (54.3 nm KD). Using the HA-FRβ immunoglobulin G, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T cells lysed mature CD14(+) monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T cells retained effective antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  18. Radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides and proteins in relation to the radiation sterilization of high-protein foods

    SciTech Connect

    Garrison, W. M.

    1981-12-01

    An important source of information on the question of whether or not toxic or other deleterious substances are formed in the radiation sterilization of foods is the chemical study of reaction products and reaction mechanisms in the radiolysis of individual food components. The present evaluation of the radiation chemistry of amino acids, peptides, and proteins outlines the various radiation-induced processes which lead to amino acid degradation and to the synthesis of amino acid derivatives of higher molecular weight. Among the latter are the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino dicarboxylic acids which are formed as major products in the radiolysis of peptides both in aqueous solution and in the solid state. The ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are of particular interest as irradiation products because they represent a class of compounds not normally encountered in plant and animal protein sources. Such compounds have, however, been isolated from certain types of bacteria and bacterial products. All of the available data strongly suggest that the ..cap alpha..,..cap alpha..'-diamino acids are produced in significant yield in the radiation sterilization of high protein foods. The importance of initiating extensive chemical and biological studies of these and of other high molecular weight products in irradiated food is emphasized.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH SERUM PROTEINS BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Anguizola, Jeanethe; Barnaby, Omar; Jackson, Abby; Yoo, Michelle J.; Papastavros, Efthimia; Pfaunmiller, Erika; Sobansky, Matt; Tong, Zenghan

    2011-01-01

    The binding of drugs with serum proteins can affect the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of pharmaceutical agents in the body. One tool that can be used to quickly analyze and characterize these interactions is high-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC). This review shows how HPAC can be used to study drug-protein binding and describes the various applications of this approach when examining drug interactions with serum proteins. Methods for determining binding constants, characterizing binding sites, examining drug-drug interactions, and studying drug-protein dissociation rates will be discussed. Applications that illustrate the use of HPAC with serum binding agents such as human serum albumin, α1-acid glycoprotein, and lipoproteins will be presented. Recent developments will also be examined, such as new methods for immobilizing serum proteins in HPAC columns, the utilization of HPAC as a tool in personalized medicine, and HPAC methods for the high-throughput screening and characterization of drug-protein binding. PMID:21395530

  20. Reproductive toxicity in male mice after exposure to high molybdenum and low copper concentrations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Zhou, Bian-Hua; Zhang, Sen; Guo, Hong-Wei; Zhang, Ji-Liang; Zhao, Jing; Tian, Er-Jie

    2016-09-01

    To evaluate the effects of dietary high molybdenum (HMo) and low copper (LCu) concentrations on reproductive toxicity of male mice, 80 mice were divided into 4 groups of 20. These groups were fed with the following: (1) normal control (NC) diet (NC group); (2) NC and HMo diets (HMo group); (3) LCu diet (LCu group); and (4) HMo and LCu diets (HMoLCu group). On the 50th and 100th day, superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC) were analyzed to determine oxidative stress states. Morphological changes in testicular tissue were evaluated with hematoxylin and eosin staining and ultrastructural changes were monitored by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that administration of HMo, LCu, and HMoLCu not only decreased sperm density and motility but also increased the rate of teratosperm occurrence. A significant increase in MDA content and a decrease in SOD, GSH-Px, and T-AOC contents were observed in LCu, HMo, and HMoLCu groups. Testicular tissues and cells of mice were damaged by HMo and the damages were more serious in the case of Cu deficiency. Exposure to HMo adversely affected the reproductive system of male mice, and dietary LCu plays key roles in HMo-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:25691499

  1. Halopyrroles: a new group of highly toxic disinfection byproducts formed in chlorinated saline wastewater.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mengting; Zhang, Xiangru

    2014-10-21

    Utilizing seawater for toilet flushing is an effective way to conserve freshwater in coastal cities. During chlorination for disinfecting saline wastewater effluents, the high levels of bromide from seawater are oxidized to hypobromous acid which may then react with effluent organics to form brominated disinfection byproducts (DBPs). In this research, by applying a new precursor ion scan method, we detected and identified a group of halopyrroles in a chlorinated saline wastewater effluent, including tetrabromopyrrole, tribromochloropyrrole, tribromoiodopyrrole, and tribromopyrrole, with tetrabromopyrrole as the predominant species. It is the first time that this group of halopyrroles were identified as wastewater DBPs (though 2,3,5-tribromopyrrole has been found to be a DBP in drinking water before). Detection of halopyrroles was problematic as these compounds in the pretreated samples were found to convert to halonitropyrroles; the problem was successfully solved by diluting the pretreated samples. The formation, occurrence, precursor, and toxicity of tetrabromopyrrole were investigated. This DBP showed significantly higher developmental toxicity than any of the haloaliphatic and haloaromatic DBPs previously tested. PMID:25236171

  2. The relationship between developmental toxicity and aromatic-ring class profile of high-boiling petroleum substances.

    PubMed

    Murray, F Jay; Roth, Randy N; Nicolich, Mark J; Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J

    2013-11-01

    In response to the US EPA HPV Challenge Program, this study was conducted to: (1) evaluate the relationship between PAC content and the developmental toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances (HBPS) and (2) develop mathematical models to predict the developmental toxicity of similar untested substances based on their aromatic ring class (ARC) profiles. For this investigation, 68 developmental toxicity studies were reviewed. The ARC models relied on data from 21 rat dermal developmental toxicity studies conducted with similar experimental designs to ensure a consistent data set for comparison. The most sensitive general endpoints of developmental toxicity (i.e., decreased fetal survival and growth) were chosen for modeling. The ARC models demonstrated a strong correlation between the predicted vs. observed values for specific sensitive endpoints of these developmental toxicities (percent resorptions, r=0.99; live fetuses per litter, r=0.98; fetal body weight, r=0.94). Such associations provide a promising approach for predicting the developmental toxicity of untested HBPS. Efforts to corroborate the ARC models using test substances that were not used to build the ARC models produced mixed results, and further development and refinement of the ARC models is recommended before they can be reliably applied to all HBPS. PMID:23680405

  3. High-order fluorescence fluctuation analysis of model protein clusters.

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, A G; Thompson, N L

    1989-01-01

    The technique of high-order fluorescence fluctuation autocorrelation for detecting and characterizing protein oligomers was applied to solutions containing two fluorescent proteins in which the more fluorescent proteins were analogues for clusters of the less fluorescent ones. The results show that the model protein clusters can be detected for average numbers of observed subunits (free monomers plus monomers in oligomers) equal to 10-100 and for relative fluorescent yields that correspond to oligomers as small as trimers. High-order fluorescent fluctuation analysis may therefore be applicable to cell surface receptor clusters in natural or model membranes. PMID:2548201

  4. Versatile protein biotinylation strategies for potential high-throughput proteomics.

    PubMed

    Lue, Rina Y P; Chen, Grace Y J; Hu, Yi; Zhu, Qing; Yao, Shao Q

    2004-02-01

    We present intein-mediated approaches for efficient biotinylation of proteins site-specifically. The reactive C-terminal thioester generated from intein-assisted protein splicing (either in vitro or in live cells) served as an attractive and exclusive site for attaching cysteine-containing biotin. Using these novel biotinylation strategies, we were able to efficiently biotinylate many proteins from different biological sources in a potentially high-throughput, high-content fashion. Some of these proteins were subsequently immobilized, in a very simple manner, onto different avidin-functionalized solid surfaces for applications such as protein microarray and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, highlighting the numerous advantages of using biotin over other tags (e.g., GST, His-tag, etc.) as the method of choice in protein purification/immobilization. In addition, our intein-mediated strategies provided critical advantages over other protein biotinylation strategies in a number of ways. For the first time, we also successfully demonstrated that intein-mediated protein biotinylation proceeded adequately inside both bacterial and mammalian living cells, as well as in a cell-free protein synthesis system. Taken together, our results indicate the versatility of these intein-mediated strategies for potential high-throughput proteomics applications. They may also serve as useful tools for various biochemical and biophysical studies of proteins both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:14746473

  5. Simple Protein Complex Purification and Identification Method Suitable for High- throughput Mapping of Protein Interaction Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Markillie, Lye Meng; Lin, Chiann Tso; Adkins, Joshua N.; Auberry, Deanna L.; Hill, Eric A.; Hooker, Brian S.; Moore, Priscilla A.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Wiley, H. S.; Kery, Vladimir

    2005-04-11

    Most of the current methods for purification and identification of protein complexes use endogenous expression of affinity tagged bait, tandem affinity tag purification of protein complexes followed by specific elution of complexes from beads, gel separation, in-gel digestion and mass spectrometric analysis of protein interactors. We propose a single affinity tag in vitro pulldown assay with denaturing elution, trypsin digestion in organic solvent and LC ESI MS/MS protein identification using SEQUEST analysis. Our method is simple, easy to scale up and automate thus suitable for high throughput mapping of protein interaction networks and functional proteomics.

  6. Antitarget Interaction, Acute Toxicity and Protein Binding Studies of Quinazolinedione Sulphonamides as GABA1 Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Ajeet; Verma, Mansi; Rani, Sangeeta; Kumar, A.

    2016-01-01

    Diseases characterized by recurrent seizures are known as epilepsy. One of the most important mechanisms for handling it is GABA1 receptor mediated inhibition. In the same context while studying the treatment of epilepsy we observed significant effects by derivatives of sulfonamides, which prompted us to design novel derivatives by means of in silico resources with antiepileptic effects. Molecular docking approaches are routinely used in modern drug design to help understand drug–receptor interaction. This study has been performed with the help of Chemdraw Ultra 7.0, GUSAR online tool for IC50 and LD50 predictions, AutoDock Vina (Python Prescription 0.8), and PaDEL software. Results revealed that ligand-protein interaction affinity of all 10 designed molecules ranges from -5.7 Kcal/mol to -5.2 Kcal/mol, which is approximately comparable to pre-existing GABA1 inhibitor i.e. phenytoin (CID: 1775, ligand-protein interaction affinity is -6.5 Kcal/mol). PMID:27168681

  7. Applications in high-content functional protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Moore, Cedric D; Ajala, Olutobi Z; Zhu, Heng

    2016-02-01

    Protein microarray technology provides a versatile platform for characterization of hundreds to thousands of proteins in a parallel and high-throughput manner. Over the last decade, applications of functional protein microarrays in particular have flourished in studying protein function at a systems level and have led to the construction of networks and pathways describing these functions. Relevant areas of research include the detection of various binding properties of proteins, the study of enzyme-substrate relationships, the analysis of host-microbe interactions, and profiling antibody specificity. In addition, discovery of novel biomarkers in autoimmune diseases and cancers is emerging as a major clinical application of functional protein microarrays. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances of functional protein microarrays in both basic and clinical applications. PMID:26599287

  8. Comparative metalloproteomic approaches for the investigation proteins involved in the toxicity of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in rice (Oryza sativa L.) roots.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunyun; Zhao, Jiating; Li, Yu-Feng; Xu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Yongjie; Cui, Liwei; Li, Bai; Gao, Yuxi; Chai, Zhifang

    2016-07-13

    The toxicity mechanisms of rice roots under inorganic mercury (IHg) or methylmercury (MeHg) stress were investigated using metalloproteomic approaches. Rice seedlings were cultivated in nutrient solutions with IHg or MeHg for three weeks. Proteins were extracted from the roots and separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Differentially expressed proteins were analyzed using ESI-MS/MS and identified by PMF. 26 and 29 protein spots were differentially expressed in the IHg- and MeHg-exposed roots, respectively. The proteins responsive to Hg exposure are involved in antioxidative defense, sulfur and glutathione metabolism, carbohydrate and energy metabolism, programmed cell death, and pathogen defense. Chitinase and salt stress-induced proteins exhibited a greater differentially expression in response to MeHg stress compared to IHg stress. Hg-binding proteins were detected by the combined use of 1-DE, SRXRF, and ESI-MS/MS. The results showed that Hg was bound to proteins of 15-25 kDa in rice roots under Hg stress. The Hg contents in the band under IHg stress were remarkably higher than those under MeHg. Hg binds to proteins, which leads to irreversible damage of root growth. Rice roots changed the related protein expression levels in response to Hg stress. These results may provide new insights into the mechanism of toxicity of IHg and MeHg in rice. PMID:26731542

  9. Assessing a peptidylic inhibitor-based therapeutic approach that simultaneously suppresses polyglutamine RNA- and protein-mediated toxicities in patient cells and Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Tsoi, Ho; Peng, Shaohong; Li, Pan P.; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Rudnicki, Dobrila D.; Ngo, Jacky Chi-Ki; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases represent a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by abnormal expansion of CAG triplet nucleotides in disease genes. Recent evidence indicates that not only mutant polyQ proteins, but also their corresponding mutant RNAs, contribute to the pathogenesis of polyQ diseases. Here, we describe the identification of a 13-amino-acid peptide, P3, which binds directly and preferentially to long-CAG RNA within the pathogenic range. When administered to cell and Drosophila disease models, as well as to patient-derived fibroblasts, P3 inhibited expanded-CAG-RNA-induced nucleolar stress and suppressed neurotoxicity. We further examined the combined therapeutic effect of P3 and polyQ-binding peptide 1 (QBP1), a well-characterized polyQ protein toxicity inhibitor, on neurodegeneration. When P3 and QBP1 were co-administered to disease models, both RNA and protein toxicities were effectively mitigated, resulting in a notable improvement of neurotoxicity suppression compared with the P3 and QBP1 single-treatment controls. Our findings indicate that targeting toxic RNAs and/or simultaneous targeting of toxic RNAs and their corresponding proteins could open up a new therapeutic strategy for treating polyQ degeneration. PMID:26839389

  10. Assessing a peptidylic inhibitor-based therapeutic approach that simultaneously suppresses polyglutamine RNA- and protein-mediated toxicities in patient cells and Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Tsoi, Ho; Peng, Shaohong; Li, Pan P; Lau, Kwok-Fai; Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Ngo, Jacky Chi-Ki; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2016-03-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases represent a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders that are caused by abnormal expansion of CAG triplet nucleotides in disease genes. Recent evidence indicates that not only mutant polyQ proteins, but also their corresponding mutant RNAs, contribute to the pathogenesis of polyQ diseases. Here, we describe the identification of a 13-amino-acid peptide, P3, which binds directly and preferentially to long-CAG RNA within the pathogenic range. When administered to cell and Drosophila disease models, as well as to patient-derived fibroblasts, P3 inhibited expanded-CAG-RNA-induced nucleolar stress and suppressed neurotoxicity. We further examined the combined therapeutic effect of P3 and polyQ-binding peptide 1 (QBP1), a well-characterized polyQ protein toxicity inhibitor, on neurodegeneration. When P3 and QBP1 were co-administered to disease models, both RNA and protein toxicities were effectively mitigated, resulting in a notable improvement of neurotoxicity suppression compared with the P3 and QBP1 single-treatment controls. Our findings indicate that targeting toxic RNAs and/or simultaneous targeting of toxic RNAs and their corresponding proteins could open up a new therapeutic strategy for treating polyQ degeneration. PMID:26839389

  11. Non-toxic liquid scintillators with high light output based on phenyl-substituted siloxanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalla Palma, M.; Carturan, S. M.; Degerlier, M.; Marchi, T.; Cinausero, M.; Gramegna, F.; Quaranta, A.

    2015-04-01

    The work describes the development of a new class of liquid scintillators based on polysiloxane liquid compounds. These materials are characterized by low toxicity, chemical inertness, very low volatility and low flammability, allowing their use without concerns even at high temperatures in vacuum. In this view different polysiloxane based liquids have been tested, with variable content and distribution of phenyl lateral substituents and added with suitable dyes, namely 2,5-diphenyloxazole (PPO) and Lumogen Violet (LV). Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy have been used in order to study the emission feature of the various compounds and to investigate the spectral matching between siloxane solvents and dissolved primary dyes. Scintillation efficiency towards 60Co and 137Cs gamma rays, relative to commercial liquid scintillator (EJ-309), has been measured and the results have been related to the energy transfer and energy migration mechanism from monomer and excimer forming sites in liquid siloxanes.

  12. Toxicity and mode of action of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins in the Mediterranean corn borer, Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefebvre).

    PubMed

    González-Cabrera, Joel; Farinós, Gema P; Caccia, Silvia; Díaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Castañera, Pedro; Leonardi, Maria Giovanna; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan

    2006-04-01

    Sesamia nonagrioides is one of the most damaging pests of corn in Spain and other Mediterranean countries. Bt corn expressing the Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ab toxin is being grown on about 58,000 ha in Spain. Here we studied the mode of action of this Cry protein on S. nonagrioides (binding to specific receptors, stability of binding, and pore formation) and the modes of action of other Cry proteins that were found to be active in this work (Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, and Cry1Fa). Binding assays were performed with (125)I- or biotin-labeled toxins and larval brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV). Competition experiments indicated that these toxins bind specifically and that Cry1Aa, Cry1Ab, and Cry1Ac share a binding site. Cry1Ca and Cry1Fa bind to different sites. In addition, Cry1Fa binds to Cry1A's binding site with very low affinity and vice versa. Binding of Cry1Ab and Cry1Ac was found to be stable over time, which indicates that the observed binding is irreversible. The pore-forming activity of Cry proteins on BBMV was determined using the voltage-sensitive fluorescent dye DiSC(3)(5). Membrane permeability increased in the presence of the active toxins Cry1Ab and Cry1Fa but not in the presence of the nonactive toxin Cry1Da. In terms of resistance management, based on our results and the fact that Cry1Ca is not toxic to Ostrinia nubilalis, we recommend pyramiding of Cry1Ab with Cry1Fa in the same Bt corn plant for better long-term control of corn borers. PMID:16597962

  13. In vitro study of acute toxic effects of high iodide doses in human thyroid follicles.

    PubMed

    Many, M C; Mestdagh, C; van den Hove, M F; Denef, J F

    1992-08-01

    The acute effects of increasing doses of sodium iodide were studied on human thyroid follicles isolated from normal paranodular tissue. After 24 h incubation in culture medium, follicles isolated from most thyroids maintained their capacity for 125I accumulation and organification and a normal cellular ultrastructure. 125I accumulation was significantly increased after addition of TSH, whereas 125I organification was not affected. In presence of TSH, numerous follicles had large empty-looking follicular lumina unlabeled on autoradiographies. Follicles incubated for 24 h in the presence of a low concentration (10(-7) M) of iodide retained their function and morphology. However, incubation with a high dose of iodide (10(-3) M) caused marked inhibition of 125I accumulation and organification reaching values similar to those obtained in presence of inhibitors of iodide trapping and organification. At high doses, iodide induced necrosis of thyroid epithelial cells: the percentage of necrotic cells was significantly increased with 10(-5) M and doubled with 10(-3) M as compared to values measured at 10(-7) M. Ultrastructural lesions such as apical blebbing, cytoplasmic fragments desquamation, endoplasmic reticulum vesiculation, and accumulation of lipofuscin in secondary lysosomes were also present. The necrotic effect and the ultrastructural alterations also occurred in the presence of TSH but were prevented by the addition of inhibitors of iodide trapping or organification. These results demonstrate a direct acute toxic effect of iodide in human thyroid cells. The nature of the ultrastructural alterations is in agreement with a mechanism of toxicity involving a free radical attack and lipid peroxidation as observed in other tissues. PMID:1639011

  14. Optimizing high performance computing workflow for protein functional annotation.

    PubMed

    Stanberry, Larissa; Rekepalli, Bhanu; Liu, Yuan; Giblock, Paul; Higdon, Roger; Montague, Elizabeth; Broomall, William; Kolker, Natali; Kolker, Eugene

    2014-09-10

    Functional annotation of newly sequenced genomes is one of the major challenges in modern biology. With modern sequencing technologies, the protein sequence universe is rapidly expanding. Newly sequenced bacterial genomes alone contain over 7.5 million proteins. The rate of data generation has far surpassed that of protein annotation. The volume of protein data makes manual curation infeasible, whereas a high compute cost limits the utility of existing automated approaches. In this work, we present an improved and optmized automated workflow to enable large-scale protein annotation. The workflow uses high performance computing architectures and a low complexity classification algorithm to assign proteins into existing clusters of orthologous groups of proteins. On the basis of the Position-Specific Iterative Basic Local Alignment Search Tool the algorithm ensures at least 80% specificity and sensitivity of the resulting classifications. The workflow utilizes highly scalable parallel applications for classification and sequence alignment. Using Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment supercomputers, the workflow processed 1,200,000 newly sequenced bacterial proteins. With the rapid expansion of the protein sequence universe, the proposed workflow will enable scientists to annotate big genome data. PMID:25313296

  15. Validation of visualized transgenic zebrafish as a high throughput model to assay bradycardia related cardio toxicity risk candidates.

    PubMed

    Wen, Dingsheng; Liu, Aiming; Chen, Feng; Yang, Julin; Dai, Renke

    2012-10-01

    Drug-induced QT prolongation usually leads to torsade de pointes (TdP), thus for drugs in the early phase of development this risk should be evaluated. In the present study, we demonstrated a visualized transgenic zebrafish as an in vivo high-throughput model to assay the risk of drug-induced QT prolongation. Zebrafish larvae 48 h post-fertilization expressing green fluorescent protein in myocardium were incubated with compounds reported to induce QT prolongation or block the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG) K⁺ current. The compounds sotalol, indapaminde, erythromycin, ofoxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin and roxithromycin were additionally administrated by microinjection into the larvae yolk sac. The ventricle heart rate was recorded using the automatic monitoring system after incubation or microinjection. As a result, 14 out of 16 compounds inducing dog QT prolongation caused bradycardia in zebrafish. A similar result was observed with 21 out of 26 compounds which block hERG current. Among the 30 compounds which induced human QT prolongation, 25 caused bradycardia in this model. Thus, the risk of compounds causing bradycardia in this transgenic zebrafish correlated with that causing QT prolongation and hERG K⁺ current blockage in established models. The tendency that high logP values lead to high risk of QT prolongation in this model was indicated, and non-sensitivity of this model to antibacterial agents was revealed. These data suggest application of this transgenic zebrafish as a high-throughput model to screen QT prolongation-related cardio toxicity of the drug candidates. PMID:22744888

  16. High-Content Assay Multiplexing for Toxicity Screening in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes and Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian Alexander; Iwata, Yasuhiro; Sirenko, Oksana; Bittner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based high-content screening (HCS) assays have become an increasingly attractive alternative to traditional in vitro and in vivo testing in pharmaceutical drug development and toxicological safety assessment. The time- and cost-effectiveness of HCS assays, combined with the organotypic nature of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived cells, open new opportunities to employ physiologically relevant in vitro model systems to improve screening for potential chemical hazards. In this study, we used two human iPSC types, cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes, to test various high-content and molecular assay combinations for their applicability in a multiparametric screening format. Effects on cardiomyocyte beat frequency were characterized by calcium flux measurements for up to 90 min. Subsequent correlation with intracellular cAMP levels was used to determine if the effects on cardiac physiology were G-protein-coupled receptor dependent. In addition, we utilized high-content cell imaging to simultaneously determine cell viability, mitochondrial integrity, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in both cell types. Kinetic analysis indicated that ROS formation is best detectable 30 min following initial treatment, whereas cytotoxic effects were most stable after 24 h. For hepatocytes, high-content imaging was also used to evaluate cytotoxicity and cytoskeletal integrity, as well as mitochondrial integrity and the potential for lipid accumulation. Lipid accumulation, a marker for hepatic steatosis, was most reliably detected 48 h following treatment with test compounds. Overall, our results demonstrate how a compendium of assays can be utilized for quantitative screening of chemical effects in iPSC cardiomyocytes and hepatocytes and enable rapid and cost-efficient multidimensional biological profiling of toxicity. PMID:26539751

  17. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    SciTech Connect

    Fenglei Li

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  18. The effect of zinc on amyloid β-protein assembly and toxicity: A mechanistic investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomonov, Inna; Sagi, Irit

    2014-10-01

    Neurotoxic assemblies of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) are widely believed to be the cause for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, understanding the factors and mechanisms that control, modulate, and inhibit formation of these assemblies is crucial for the development of therapeutic intervention of AD. This information also can contribute significantly to our understanding of the mechanisms of other amyloidosis diseases, such as Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, type 2 diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (Lou Gehrig's disease) and prion diseases (e.g. Mad Cow disease). We have developed a multidisciplinary experimental strategy to study structural and dynamic mechanistic aspects that underlie the Aβ assembly process. Utilizing this strategy, we explored the molecular basis leading to the perturbation of the Aβ assembly process by divalent metal ions, mainly Zn2+ ions. Using Zn2+ as reaction physiological relevant probes, it was demonstrated that Zn2+ rapidly (milliseconds) induce self-assembly of Aβ aggregates and stabilize them in a manner that prevents formation of Aβ fibrils. Importantly, the early-formed intermediates are substantially more neurotoxic than fibrils. Our results suggest that relevant Aβ modulators should be targeted against the rapidly evolved intermediate states of Aβ assembly. The design of such modulators is challenging, as they have to compete with different natural mediators (such as Zn2+) of Aβ aggregation, which diverse Aβ assemblies in both specific and nonspecific manners.

  19. Treatment of proteins with dietary polyphenols lowers the formation of AGEs and AGE-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinchen; Hu, Shuting; Chen, Feng; Wang, Mingfu

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are a group of harmful compounds produced either endogenously or during thermal food processing. Once absorbed by humans via food intake, AGEs can cause oxidative cell damage and contribute to pathological development of various diseases. The AGE-inhibitory activity of dietary polyphenols in vitro has been extensively reported before, but the current study is pioneering in examining the antiglycation activity of five selected dietary polyphenols (phloretin, naringenin, epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, and rosmarinic acid) during the thermal protein glycation process. When added into the glucose-casein glycation model heated at 120 °C for 2 h, these polyphenols were capable of inhibiting the formation of both total fluorescent AGEs and nonfluorescent carboxymethyllysine (CML). The thermal stability and transformation of polyphenols are likely important factors affecting their antioxidant activity and inhibitory efficacy of reactive carbonyl species formation. Treatment with epicatechin would lower not only AGE formation but also AGE-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative stress to human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells. PMID:25208810

  20. Phosphatidylcholine protects neurons from toxic effects of amyloid β-protein in culture.

    PubMed

    Ko, Mihee; Hattori, Toshihide; Abdullah, Mohammad; Gong, Jian-Sheng; Yamane, Tsuneo; Michikawa, Makoto

    2016-07-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is the major component of extracellular plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease. It has been suggested that the interaction of Aβ with membrane cholesterol is essential for Aβ to exert neurotoxicity; however, the effect of phospholipids, another major membrane lipid component, on Aβ-induced neurotoxicity remains unclarified. Here we report the protective effect of phosphatidylcholine (PC) on primary cultured neurons against Aβ1-42-induced damage. Aβ1-42 caused neuronal death as demonstrated by lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) release, which was completely prevented by a pretreatment with PC in a dose-dependent manner. PC containing unsaturated long-chain acyl groups, 1,2-dioleoyl-PC (DOPC), also prevented neuronal death caused by Aβ1-42. The oleic acid ethyl-ester (OAEE) partially prevented Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. Neurons that were pretreated with DOPC or OAEE for 24h, washed out, and exposed to Aβ1-42 in the absence of either of these reagents, were still resistant to Aβ1-42-induced neurotoxicity. In contrast, treatment with phosphotidylserine (PS) or docosahexaenoic acid etyl-ester (DHAEE) had no protective effect on neurons against Aβ1-42-induced damage. These results suggest that the control of cellular PC content, not PS content, may prove useful in the prevention or treatment of Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27086970

  1. Naptumomab estafenatox, an engineered antibody-superantigen fusion protein with low toxicity and reduced antigenicity.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Göran; Skartved, Niels-Jörgen; Wallén-Ohman, Marie; Nyhlén, Helen Carlsson; Behm, Kristina; Hedlund, Gunnar; Nederman, Thore

    2010-06-01

    Antibody-targeted superantigens have a potential to become useful drugs for tumor therapy. However, clinical practice has identified several issues that need to be addressed to optimize such molecules. On the basis of the experience from superantigen products in clinical trials, a novel tumor-targeted superantigen, naptumomab estafenatox (5T4FabV18-SEA/E-120 or ABR-217620) has been designed. Critical properties, such as tumor reactivity, therapeutic window, and seroreactivity were all improved. The engineered 5T4Fab moiety recognizes the 5T4 antigen expressed on a large number of solid tumor forms with an affinity in the order of 1 nM. The fusion protein induces T-cell mediated killing of tumor cells at concentrations around 10 pM. Compared with a construct with a wild-type superantigen, it is more potent in mediating killing of tumor cells but a 10,000-fold less active in mediating killing of MHC class II positive cells. The target epitopes for naturally occurring antibodies toward bacterial superantigens are reduced. Only large excesses of human anti-SEA antibodies neutralize the antitumor effects of the antibody-targeted superantigen. Naptumomab estafenatox induces dramatic reduction of established human tumors in Severe Combined Immunodeficient mice grafted with human lymphocytes. Thus, naptumomab estafenatox is a novel optimized tumor-targeted superantigen currently investigated in clinical trials. PMID:20463598

  2. Air Toxics under the Big Sky: A Real-World Investigation to Engage High School Science Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Earle; Smith, Garon; Ward, Tony J.; Vanek, Diana; Marra, Nancy; Jones, David; Henthorn, Melissa; Striebel, Jim

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a problem-based chemistry education model in which students perform scientific research on a local environmentally relevant problem. The project is a collaboration among The University of Montana and local high schools centered around Missoula, Montana. "Air Toxics under the Big Sky" involves high school students in collecting…

  3. Multihydroxylated [Gd@C82(OH)22]n nanoparticles: antineoplastic activity of high efficiency and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunying; Xing, Gengmei; Wang, Jiangxue; Zhao, Yuliang; Li, Bai; Tang, Jun; Jia, Guang; Wang, Tiancheng; Sun, Jin; Xing, Li; Yuan, Hui; Gao, Yuxi; Meng, Huan; Chen, Zhen; Zhao, Feng; Chai, Zhifang; Fang, Xiaohong

    2005-10-01

    [Gd@C82(OH)22]n particles (22 nm in a saline solution) of a dose level as low as 10(-7) mol/kg exhibit a very high antineoplastic efficiency ( approximately 60%) in mice. A dose increment of 1 x 10(-7) mol/kg increases the tumor inhibition rate 26%. [Gd@C82(OH)22]n particles have a strong capacity to improve immunity and interfere with tumor invasion in normal muscle cells, nearly without toxicity in vivo and in vitro. Unlike conventional antineoplastic chemicals, the high antitumor efficiency of nanoparticles is not due to toxic effects to cells because they do not kill the tumor cells directly and only about 0.05% of the used dose is found in the tumor tissues. Results suggest that fullerene derivatives with proper surface modifications and sizes may help realize the dream of tumor chemotherapeutics of high-efficacy and low-toxicity. PMID:16218736

  4. High-throughput Protein Purification and Quality Assessment for Crystallization

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Youngchang; Babnigg, Gyorgy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Eschenfeldt, William H.; Li, Hui; Maltseva, Natalia; Hatzos-Skintges, Catherine; Gu, Minyi; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Wu, Ruiying; An, Hao; Chhor, Gekleng; Joachimiak, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    The ultimate goal of structural biology is to understand the structural basis of proteins in cellular processes. In structural biology, the most critical issue is the availability of high-quality samples. “Structural biology-grade” proteins must be generated in the quantity and quality suitable for structure determination using X-ray crystallography or nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The purification procedures must reproducibly yield homogeneous proteins or their derivatives containing marker atom(s) in milligram quantities. The choice of protein purification and handling procedures plays a critical role in obtaining high-quality protein samples. With structural genomics emphasizing a genome-based approach in understanding protein structure and function, a number of unique structures covering most of the protein folding space have been determined and new technologies with high efficiency have been developed. At the Midwest Center for Structural Genomics (MCSG), we have developed semi-automated protocols for high-throughput parallel protein expression and purification. A protein, expressed as a fusion with a cleavable affinity tag, is purified in two consecutive immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) steps: (i) the first step is an IMAC coupled with buffer-exchange, or size exclusion chromatography (IMAC-I), followed by the cleavage of the affinity tag using the highly specific Tobacco Etch Virus (TEV) protease; [1] the second step is IMAC and buffer exchange (IMAC-II) to remove the cleaved tag and tagged TEV protease. These protocols have been implemented on multidimensional chromatography workstations and, as we have shown, many proteins can be successfully produced in large-scale. All methods and protocols used for purification, some developed by MCSG, others adopted and integrated into the MCSG purification pipeline and more recently the Center for Structural Genomics of Infectious Diseases (CSGID) purification pipeline, are

  5. Brain Responses to High-Protein Diets12

    PubMed Central

    Journel, Marion; Chaumontet, Catherine; Darcel, Nicolas; Fromentin, Gilles; Tomé, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are suspected to have a greater satiating effect than the other 2 macronutrients. After protein consumption, peptide hormones released from the gastrointestinal tract (mainly anorexigenic gut peptides such as cholecystokinin, glucagon peptide 1, and peptide YY) communicate information about the energy status to the brain. These hormones and vagal afferents control food intake by acting on brain regions involved in energy homeostasis such as the brainstem and the hypothalamus. In fact, a high-protein diet leads to greater activation than a normal-protein diet in the nucleus tractus solitarius and in the arcuate nucleus. More specifically, neural mechanisms triggered particularly by leucine consumption involve 2 cellular energy sensors: the mammalian target of rapamycin and AMP-activated protein kinase. In addition, reward and motivation aspects of eating behavior, controlled mainly by neurons present in limbic regions, play an important role in the reduced hedonic response of a high-protein diet. This review examines how metabolic signals emanating from the gastrointestinal tract after protein ingestion target the brain to control feeding, energy expenditure, and hormones. Understanding the functional roles of brain areas involved in the satiating effect of proteins and their interactions will demonstrate how homeostasis and reward are integrated with the signals from peripheral organs after protein consumption. PMID:22585905

  6. Perspectives on Validation of High-Throughput Assays Supporting 21st Century Toxicity Testing1

    PubMed Central

    Judson, Richard; Kavlock, Robert; Martin, Matt; Reif, David; Houck, Keith; Knudsen, Thomas; Richard, Ann; Tice, Raymond R.; Whelan, Maurice; Xia, Menghang; Huang, Ruili; Austin, Christopher; Daston, George; Hartung, Thomas; Fowle, John R.; Wooge, William; Tong, Weida; Dix, David

    2014-01-01

    Summary In vitro, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays are seeing increasing use in toxicity testing. HTS assays can simultaneously test many chemicals, but have seen limited use in the regulatory arena, in part because of the need to undergo rigorous, time-consuming formal validation. Here we discuss streamlining the validation process, specifically for prioritization applications in which HTS assays are used to identify a high-concern subset of a collection of chemicals. The high-concern chemicals could then be tested sooner rather than later in standard guideline bioassays. The streamlined validation process would continue to ensure the reliability and relevance of assays for this application. We discuss the following practical guidelines: (1) follow current validation practice to the extent possible and practical; (2) make increased use of reference compounds to better demonstrate assay reliability and relevance; (3) deemphasize the need for cross-laboratory testing, and; (4) implement a web-based, transparent and expedited peer review process. PMID:23338806

  7. Disrupting Self-Assembly and Toxicity of Amyloidogenic Protein Oligomers by “Molecular Tweezers” - from the Test Tube to Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Attar, Aida; Bitan, Gal

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, therapy for diseases caused by abnormal protein folding and aggregation (amyloidoses) is limited to treatment of symptoms and provides only temporary and moderate relief to sufferers. The failure in developing successful disease-modifying drugs for amyloidoses stems from the nature of the targets for such drugs – primarily oligomers of amyloidogenic proteins, which are distinct from traditional targets, such as enzymes or receptors. The oligomers are metastable, do not have well-defined structures, and exist in dynamically changing mixtures. Therefore, inhibiting the formation and toxicity of these oligomers likely will require out-of-the-box thinking and novel strategies. We review here the development of a strategy based on targeting the combination of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions that are key to the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins using lysine (K)-specific “molecular tweezers” (MTs). Our discussion includes a survey of the literature demonstrating the important role of K residues in the assembly and toxicity of amyloidogenic proteins and the development of a lead MT derivative called CLR01, from an inhibitor of protein aggregation in vitro to a drug candidate showing effective amelioration of disease symptoms in animal models of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. PMID:23859557

  8. Highly Efficient Protein Misfolding Cyclic Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Ostapchenko, Valeriy G.; Savtchenk, Regina; Alexeeva, Irina; Rohwer, Robert G.; Baskakov, Ilia V.

    2011-01-01

    Protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) provides faithful replication of mammalian prions in vitro and has numerous applications in prion research. However, the low efficiency of conversion of PrPC into PrPSc in PMCA limits the applicability of PMCA for many uses including structural studies of infectious prions. It also implies that only a small sub-fraction of PrPC may be available for conversion. Here we show that the yield, rate, and robustness of prion conversion and the sensitivity of prion detection are significantly improved by a simple modification of the PMCA format. Conducting PMCA reactions in the presence of Teflon beads (PMCAb) increased the conversion of PrPC into PrPSc from ∼10% to up to 100%. In PMCAb, a single 24-hour round consistently amplified PrPSc by 600-700-fold. Furthermore, the sensitivity of prion detection in one round (24 hours) increased by 2-3 orders of magnitude. Using serial PMCAb, a 1012-fold dilution of scrapie brain material could be amplified to the level detectible by Western blotting in 3 rounds (72 hours). The improvements in amplification efficiency were observed for the commonly used hamster 263K strain and for the synthetic strain SSLOW that otherwise amplifies poorly in PMCA. The increase in the amplification efficiency did not come at the expense of prion replication specificity. The current study demonstrates that poor conversion efficiencies observed previously have not been due to the scarcity of a sub-fraction of PrPC susceptible to conversion nor due to limited concentrations of essential cellular cofactors required for conversion. The new PMCAb format offers immediate practical benefits and opens new avenues for developing fast ultrasensitive assays and for producing abundant quantities of PrPSc in vitro. PMID:21347353

  9. Protein-DNA binding in high-resolution

    PubMed Central

    Mahony, Shaun; Pugh, B. Franklin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in experimental and computational methodologies are enabling ultra-high resolution genome-wide profiles of protein-DNA binding events. For example, the ChIP-exo protocol precisely characterizes protein-DNA crosslinking patterns by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with 5′ → 3′ exonuclease digestion. Similarly, deeply sequenced chromatin accessibility assays (e.g. DNase-seq and ATACseq) enable the detection of protected footprints at protein-DNA binding sites. With these techniques and others, we have the potential to characterize the individual nucleotides that interact with transcription factors, nucleosomes, RNA polymerases, and other regulatory proteins in a particular cellular context. In this review, we explain the experimental assays and computational analysis methods that enable high-resolution profiling of protein-DNA binding events. We discuss the challenges and opportunities associated with such approaches. PMID:26038153

  10. HIGH-THROUGHPUT CELLULAR ASSAYS FOR MODELING TOXICITY IN THE FISH REPRODUCTIVE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The most important benefit of this project is the experimental evaluation of all essential steps in the development and testing of adverse outcome pathways (AOP) for a diverse set of reproductive and non-reproductive toxicants. In contrast to human testing and the toxicity pat...

  11. Predictive models of prenatal developmental toxicity from ToxCast high-throughput screening data

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's ToxCast™ project is profiling the in vitro bioactivity of chemicals to assess pathway-level and cell-based signatures that correlate with observed in vivo toxicity. We hypothesized that developmental toxicity in guideline animal studies captured in the ToxRefDB database wou...

  12. A Call for Nominations of Quantitative High-Throughput Screening Assays from Relevant Human Toxicity Pathways

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Research Council of the United States National Academies of Science has recently released a document outlining a long-range vision and strategy for transforming toxicity testing from largely whole animal-based testing to one based on in vitro assays. “Toxicity Testin...

  13. Strategies for integrating transcriptional profiling into high throughput toxicity testing (SOT Symposium Workshop presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presentation Description: The release of the National Research Council’s Report “Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy” in 2007 initiated a broad-based movement in the toxicology community to re-think how toxicity testing and risk assessment are performed....

  14. Toxic gain of function from mutant FUS protein is crucial to trigger cell autonomous motor neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Scekic-Zahirovic, Jelena; Sendscheid, Oliver; El Oussini, Hajer; Jambeau, Mélanie; Sun, Ying; Mersmann, Sina; Wagner, Marina; Dieterlé, Stéphane; Sinniger, Jérome; Dirrig-Grosch, Sylvie; Drenner, Kevin; Birling, Marie-Christine; Qiu, Jinsong; Zhou, Yu; Li, Hairi; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Rouaux, Caroline; Shelkovnikova, Tatyana; Witting, Anke; Ludolph, Albert C; Kiefer, Friedemann; Storkebaum, Erik; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Dupuis, Luc

    2016-05-17

    FUS is an RNA-binding protein involved in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Cytoplasmic FUS-containing aggregates are often associated with concomitant loss of nuclear FUS Whether loss of nuclear FUS function, gain of a cytoplasmic function, or a combination of both lead to neurodegeneration remains elusive. To address this question, we generated knockin mice expressing mislocalized cytoplasmic FUS and complete FUS knockout mice. Both mouse models display similar perinatal lethality with respiratory insufficiency, reduced body weight and length, and largely similar alterations in gene expression and mRNA splicing patterns, indicating that mislocalized FUS results in loss of its normal function. However, FUS knockin mice, but not FUS knockout mice, display reduced motor neuron numbers at birth, associated with enhanced motor neuron apoptosis, which can be rescued by cell-specific CRE-mediated expression of wild-type FUS within motor neurons. Together, our findings indicate that cytoplasmic FUS mislocalization not only leads to nuclear loss of function, but also triggers motor neuron death through a toxic gain of function within motor neurons. PMID:26951610

  15. Downregulation of super oxide dismutase level in protein might be due to sulfur mustard induced toxicity in lung.

    PubMed

    Mirbagheri, Leila; Habibi Roudkenar, Mehryar; Imani Fooladi, Abbas Ali; Ghanei, Mostafa; Nourani, Mohammad Reza

    2013-06-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) has been identified as an important chemical weapon. During the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-88, the extensive usage of SM against Iranian civilians and military forces was proven. This agent has been shown to cause severe damage mainly in the skin, eyes, lungs, and respiratory tract in Iranian veterans. The most common disease is bronchiolitis obliterans (BO)). SM increases the endogenous production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are known as protective antioxidants against the harmful effects of ROS. Twenty exposed SM individuals (43.2±6.4 years), and 10 normal controls (41.3±2.5 years) were enrolled in this study. Evaluation of SODs was performed by semiquantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Our results demonstrated that CuZnSOD and MnSOD mRNA were up-regulated 2.79±1.09 and 2.49±1.11 folds, respectively in SM-injured patients in comparison with control levels. In contrast, Immunohistochemistry results showed downregulation of CuZnSOD protein expression in SM injured patients. Our results revealed that SODs may play an important role in cellular protection against oxidative stress due to mustard gas toxicity in airway wall of SM exposed patients. PMID:23754354

  16. Separation of macromolecular proteins and rejection of toxic heavy metal ions by PEI/cSMM blend UF membranes.

    PubMed

    Kanagaraj, P; Nagendran, A; Rana, D; Matsuura, T; Neelakandan, S

    2015-01-01

    The charged surface modifying macromolecule (cSMM) was blended into the casting solution of poly(ether imide) (PEI) to prepare surface modified ultrafiltration membranes by phase inversion technique. The separation of proteins including bovine serum albumin, egg albumin, pepsin and trypsin was investigated by the fabricated membranes. On increasing cSMM content, solute rejection decreases whereas membrane flux increases. The pore size and surface porosity of the 5 wt% cSMM blend PEI membranes increases to 41.4 Å and 14.8%, respectively. Similarly, the molecular weight cut-off of the membranes ranged from 20 to 45 kDa, depending on the various compositions of the prepared membranes. The toxic heavy metal ions Cu(II), Cr(III), Zn(II) and Pb(II) from aqueous solutions were subjected to rejection by the prepared blended membrane with various concentration of polyethyleneimine (PETIM) as water soluble polymeric ligand. It was found that the rejection behavior of metal ion depends on the PETIM concentration and the stability complexation of metal ion with ligand. PMID:25159885

  17. Fluorescent Protein Nanowire-Mediated Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed and Highly Sensitive Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Men, Dong; Zhou, Juan; Li, Wei; Leng, Yan; Chen, Xinwen; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Xian-En

    2016-07-13

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools for high-throughput and simultaneous detection of different target molecules in complex biological samples. However, the sensitivity of conventional fluorescence-labeling protein detection methods is limited by the availability of signal molecules for binding to the target molecule. Here, we built a multifunctional fluorescent protein nanowire (FNw) by harnessing self-assembly of yeast amyloid protein. The FNw integrated a large number of fluorescent molecules, thereby enhancing the fluorescent signal output in target detection. The FNw was then combined with protein microarray technology to detect proteins derived from two pathogens, including influenza virus (hemagglutinin 1, HA1) and human immunodeficiency virus (p24 and gp120). The resulting detection sensitivity achieved a 100-fold improvement over a commercially available detection reagent. PMID:27315221

  18. Modulation of Amyloid β-Protein (Aβ) Assembly by Homologous C-Terminal Fragments as a Strategy for Inhibiting Aβ Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyuan; Rahimi, Farid; Bitan, Gal

    2016-07-20

    Self-assembly of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) into neurotoxic oligomers and fibrillar aggregates is a key process thought to be the proximal event leading to development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Therefore, numerous attempts have been made to develop reagents that disrupt this process and prevent the formation of the toxic oligomers and aggregates. An attractive strategy for developing such reagents is to use peptides derived from Aβ based on the assumption that such peptides would bind to full-length Aβ, interfere with binding of additional full-length molecules, and thereby prevent formation of the toxic species. Guided by this rationale, most of the studies in the last two decades have focused on preventing formation of the core cross-β structure of Aβ amyloid fibrils using β-sheet-breaker peptides derived from the central hydrophobic cluster of Aβ. Though this approach is effective in inhibiting fibril formation, it is generally inefficient in preventing Aβ oligomerization. An alternative approach is to use peptides derived from the C-terminus of Aβ, which mediates both oligomerization and fibrillogenesis. This approach has been explored by several groups, including our own, and led to the discovery of several lead peptides with moderate to high inhibitory activity. Interestingly, the mechanisms of these inhibitory effects have been found to be diverse, and only in a small percentage of cases involved interference with β-sheet formation. Here, we review the strategy of using C-terminal fragments of Aβ as modulators of Aβ assembly and discuss the relevant challenges, therapeutic potential, and mechanisms of action of such fragments. PMID:27322435

  19. Fast removal of high quantities of toxic arsenate via cationic p(APTMACl) microgels.

    PubMed

    Rehman, Saif Ur; Siddiq, Mohammed; Al-Lohedan, Hamad; Aktas, Nahit; Sahiner, Mehtap; Demirci, Sahin; Sahiner, Nurettin

    2016-01-15

    Hydrogels are resourceful materials and can be prepared in different morphology, size, surface charge and porosity adopting different polymerization techniques and reaction conditions. The cationic poly(3-acrylamidopropyl)trimethylammonium chloride (p(APTMACl)) microgels were synthesized by photo-initiated inverse suspension polymerization technique. These microgels were utilized as absorbents for the removal of toxic arsenate (As) from different aqueous environments. The experimental parameters affecting absorption efficiency were investigated, and it was demonstrated that these types of microgels are highly efficient in removing arsenate anions from different aqueous environments compared to the previously reported bulk hydrogel, and cryogel of the same material. A removal efficiency of approximately 97.25% was obtained by immersing 0.5 g microgel in 250 ppm 100 mL solution of arsenate anions for 60 min. Both Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption isotherms were applied to adsorption of arsenate anions by p(APTMACl) microgels, and the Langmuir isotherm was a better representation of the adsorption of arsenate with a high value of R(2) (0.9982). Furthermore, mag-p(APTMACl) microgels were synthesized for the adsorption of arsenate anions to provide easy removal of the microgel composite by using an externally applied magnetic field. Furthermore, re-usability of the p(APTMACl) microgels was also investigated for the adsorption of arsenate anions. PMID:26513320

  20. In Vivo Biodistribution and Toxicity of Highly Soluble PEG-Coated Boron Nitride in Mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Tian, Longlong; Li, Zhan; Miao, Guoying; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wu, Wangsuo

    2015-12-01

    The boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles, as the structural analogues of graphene, are the potential biomedicine materials because of the excellent biocompatibility, but their solubility and biosafety are the biggest obstacle for the clinic application. Here, we first synthesized the highly soluble BN nanoparticles coated by PEG (BN-PEG) with smaller size (~10 nm), then studied their biodistribution in vivo through radioisotope (Tc(99m)O4 (-)) labeling, and the results showed that BN-PEG nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the liver, lung, and spleen with the less uptake by the brain. Moreover, the pathological changes induced by BN-PEG could be significantly observed in the sections of the liver, lung, spleen, and heart, which can be also supported by the test of biochemical indexes in serum. More importantly, we first observed the biodistribution of BN-PEG in the heart tissues with high toxicity, which would give a warning about the cardiovascular disease, and provide some opportunities for the drug delivery and treatment. PMID:26659609

  1. A bioinspired peptide scaffold with high antibiotic activity and low in vivo toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Rabanal, Francesc; Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Gonzalez-Linares, Javier; Borràs, Miquel; Vila, Jordi; Manresa, Angeles; Cajal, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to almost all available antibiotics is an important public health issue. A major goal in antimicrobial drug discovery is the generation of new chemicals capable of killing pathogens with high selectivity, particularly multi-drug-resistant ones. Here we report the design, preparation and activity of new compounds based on a tunable, chemically accessible and upscalable lipopeptide scaffold amenable to suitable hit-to-lead development. Such compounds could become therapeutic candidates and future antibiotics available on the market. The compounds are cyclic, contain two D-amino acids for in vivo stability and their structures are reminiscent of other cyclic disulfide-containing peptides available on the market. The optimized compounds prove to be highly active against clinically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In vitro and in vivo tests show the low toxicity of the compounds. Their antimicrobial activity against resistant and multidrug-resistant bacteria is at the membrane level, although other targets may also be involved depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:26024044

  2. The toxic mechanism of high lethality of herbicide butachlor in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Huarong; Yin, Licheng; Zhang, Shicui; Feng, Wenrong

    2010-09-01

    The toxic mechanism of herbicide butachlor to induce extremely high lethality in marine flatfish flounder, Paralichthys Olivaceus, was analyzed by histopathological examination, antioxidant enzymes activities and ATP content assay. Histopathological examination of gill, liver and kidney of exposed fishes showed that gill was a target organ of butachlor. The butachlor seriously impaired the respiration of gills by a series of lesions such as edema, lifting and detachment of lamellar epithelium, breakdown of pillar cells, and blood congestion. The dysfunction of gill respiration caused suffocation to the exposed flounder with extremely high acute lethality. Antioxidant enzyme activity assay of the in vitro cultured flounder gill (FG) cells exposed to butachlor indicated that butachlor markedly inhibited the antioxidant enzyme activities of Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Furthermore, along with the decline of antioxidant enzyme activities, ATP content in the exposed FG cells decreased, too. This infers that the oxidative stress induced by butachlor can inhibit the production of cellular ATP. Similar decrease of ATP content was also observed in the exposed flounder gill tissues. Taken together, as in FG cells, butachlor possibly induced a short supply of ATP in pillar cells by inhibiting the antioxidant enzyme activities and then affecting the contractibility of the pillar cells, which in turn resulted in the blood congestion and suffocation of exposed flounder.

  3. A bioinspired peptide scaffold with high antibiotic activity and low in vivo toxicity.

    PubMed

    Rabanal, Francesc; Grau-Campistany, Ariadna; Vila-Farrés, Xavier; Gonzalez-Linares, Javier; Borràs, Miquel; Vila, Jordi; Manresa, Angeles; Cajal, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to almost all available antibiotics is an important public health issue. A major goal in antimicrobial drug discovery is the generation of new chemicals capable of killing pathogens with high selectivity, particularly multi-drug-resistant ones. Here we report the design, preparation and activity of new compounds based on a tunable, chemically accessible and upscalable lipopeptide scaffold amenable to suitable hit-to-lead development. Such compounds could become therapeutic candidates and future antibiotics available on the market. The compounds are cyclic, contain two D-amino acids for in vivo stability and their structures are reminiscent of other cyclic disulfide-containing peptides available on the market. The optimized compounds prove to be highly active against clinically relevant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In vitro and in vivo tests show the low toxicity of the compounds. Their antimicrobial activity against resistant and multidrug-resistant bacteria is at the membrane level, although other targets may also be involved depending on the bacterial strain. PMID:26024044

  4. In Vivo Biodistribution and Toxicity of Highly Soluble PEG-Coated Boron Nitride in Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Qi, Wei; Tian, Longlong; Li, Zhan; Miao, Guoying; An, Wenzhen; Liu, Dan; Lin, Jing; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wu, Wangsuo

    2015-12-01

    The boron nitride (BN) nanoparticles, as the structural analogues of graphene, are the potential biomedicine materials because of the excellent biocompatibility, but their solubility and biosafety are the biggest obstacle for the clinic application. Here, we first synthesized the highly soluble BN nanoparticles coated by PEG (BN-PEG) with smaller size (~10 nm), then studied their biodistribution in vivo through radioisotope (Tc99mO4 -) labeling, and the results showed that BN-PEG nanoparticles mainly accumulated in the liver, lung, and spleen with the less uptake by the brain. Moreover, the pathological changes induced by BN-PEG could be significantly observed in the sections of the liver, lung, spleen, and heart, which can be also supported by the test of biochemical indexes in serum. More importantly, we first observed the biodistribution of BN-PEG in the heart tissues with high toxicity, which would give a warning about the cardiovascular disease, and provide some opportunities for the drug delivery and treatment.

  5. High Pressure NMR Methods for Characterizing Functional Substates of Proteins.

    PubMed

    Kalbitzer, Hans Robert

    2015-01-01

    Proteins usually exist in multiple conformational states in solution. High pressure NMR spectroscopy is a well-suited method to identify these states. In addition, these states can be characterized by their thermodynamic parameters, the free enthalpies at ambient pressure, the partial molar volumes, and the partial molar compressibility that can be obtained from the analysis of the high pressure NMR data. Two main types of states of proteins exist, functional states and folding states. There is a strong link between these two types, the functional states represent essential folding states (intermediates), other folding states may have no functional meaning (optional folding states). In this chapter, this concept is tested on the Ras protein, an important proto-oncogen in humans where all substates required by theory can be identified experimentally by high pressure NMR spectroscopy. Finally, we show how these data can be used to develop allosteric inhibitors of proteins. PMID:26174382

  6. High-throughput analysis of protein-DNA binding affinity.

    PubMed

    Franco-Zorrilla, José M; Solano, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Sequence-specific protein-DNA interactions mediate most regulatory processes underlying gene expression, such as transcriptional regulation by transcription factors (TFs) or chromatin organization. Current knowledge about DNA-binding specificities of TFs is based mostly on low- to medium-throughput methodologies that are time-consuming and often fail to identify DNA motifs recognized by a TF with lower affinity but retaining biological relevance. The use of protein-binding microarrays (PBMs) offers a high-throughput alternative for the identification of protein-DNA specificities. PBM consists in an array of pseudorandomized DNA sequences that are optimized to include all the possible 10- or 11-mer DNA sequences, allowing the determination of binding specificities of most eukaryotic TFs. PBMs that can be synthesized by several manufacturing companies as single-stranded DNA are converted into double-stranded in a simple primer extension reaction. The protein of interest fused to an epitope tag is then incubated onto the PBM, and specific DNA-protein complexes are revealed in a series of immunological reactions coupled to a fluorophore. After scanning and quantifying PBMs, specific DNA motifs recognized by the protein are identified with ready-to-use scripts, generating comprehensive but accessible information about the DNA-binding specificity of the protein. This chapter describes detailed procedures for preparation of double-stranded PBMs, incubation with recombinant protein, and detection of protein-DNA complexes. Finally, we outline some cues for evaluating the biological role of DNA motifs obtained in vitro. PMID:24057393

  7. High-Bandwidth Protein Analysis Using Solid-State Nanopores

    PubMed Central

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert Y.; Muthukumar, Murugappan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Wanunu, Meni

    2014-01-01

    High-bandwidth measurements of the ion current through hafnium oxide and silicon nitride nanopores allow the analysis of sub-30 kD protein molecules with unprecedented time resolution and detection efficiency. Measured capture rates suggest that at moderate transmembrane bias values, a substantial fraction of protein translocation events are detected. Our dwell-time resolution of 2.5 μs enables translocation time distributions to be fit to a first-passage time distribution derived from a 1D diffusion-drift model. The fits yield drift velocities that scale linearly with voltage, consistent with an electrophoretic process. Further, protein diffusion constants (D) are lower than the bulk diffusion constants (D0) by a factor of ∼50, and are voltage-independent in the regime tested. We reason that deviations of D from D0 are a result of confinement-driven pore/protein interactions, previously observed in porous systems. A straightforward Kramers model for this inhibited diffusion points to 9- to 12-kJ/mol interactions of the proteins with the nanopore. Reduction of μ and D are found to be material-dependent. Comparison of current-blockage levels of each protein yields volumetric information for the two proteins that is in good agreement with dynamic light scattering measurements. Finally, detection of a protein-protein complex is achieved. PMID:24507610

  8. High resolution electron crystallography of protein molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, R.M. |; Downing, K.H.

    1993-06-01

    Electron diffraction data and high resolution images can now be used to obtain accurate, three-dimensional density maps of biological macromolecules. These density maps can be interpreted by building an atomic-resolution model of the structure into the experimental density. The Cowley-Moodie formalism of dynamical diffraction theory has been used to validate the use of kinematic diffraction theory, strictly the weak phase object approximation, in producing such 3-D density maps. Further improvements in the preparation of very flat specimens and in the retention of diffraction to a resolution of 0.2 nm or better could result in electron crystallography becoming as important a technique as x-ray crystallography currently is for the field of structural molecular biology.

  9. Integrated Protein Array Screening and High Throughput Validation of 70 Novel Neural Calmodulin-binding Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, David J.; Bauer, Mikael C.; O'Brien, John; Johnson, Winifred M.; Divizio, Catherine A.; O'Kane, Sara L.; Berggård, Tord; Merino, Alejandro; Åkerfeldt, Karin S.; Linse, Sara; Cahill, Dolores J.

    2010-01-01

    Calmodulin is an essential regulator of intracellular processes in response to extracellular stimuli mediated by a rise in Ca2+ ion concentration. To profile protein-protein interactions of calmodulin in human brain, we probed a high content human protein array with fluorophore-labeled calmodulin in the presence of Ca2+. This protein array contains 37,200 redundant proteins, incorporating over 10,000 unique human neural proteins from a human brain cDNA library. We designed a screen to find high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm) binding partners of calmodulin and identified 76 human proteins from all intracellular compartments of which 72 are novel. We measured the binding kinetics of 74 targets with calmodulin using a high throughput surface plasmon resonance assay. Most of the novel calmodulin-target complexes identified have low dissociation rates (koff ≤ 10−3 s−1) and high affinity (KD ≤ 1 μm), consistent with the design of the screen. Many of the identified proteins are known to assemble in neural tissue, forming assemblies such as the spectrin scaffold and the postsynaptic density. We developed a microarray of the identified target proteins with which we can characterize the biochemistry of calmodulin for all targets in parallel. Four novel targets were verified in neural cells by co-immunoprecipitation, and four were selected for exploration of the calmodulin-binding regions. Using synthetic peptides and isothermal titration calorimetry, calmodulin binding motifs were identified in the potassium voltage-gated channel Kv6.1 (residues 474–493), calmodulin kinase-like vesicle-associated protein (residues 302–316), EF-hand domain family member A2 (residues 202–216), and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 5-kinase, type I, γ (residues 400–415). PMID:20068228

  10. A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal proteins.

    PubMed

    Izumi Willcoxon, Michi; Dennis, Jaclyn R; Lau, Sabina I; Xie, Weiping; You, You; Leng, Song; Fong, Ryan C; Yamamoto, Takashi

    2016-01-10

    A high-throughput, in-vitro assay for Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) insecticidal proteins designated as Cry was developed and evaluated for screening a large number of Cry protein variants produced by DNA shuffling. This automation-amenable assay exploits an insect cell line expressing a single receptor of Bt Cry proteins. The Cry toxin used to develop this assay is a variant of the Cry1Ab protein called IP1-88, which was produced previously by DNA shuffling. Cell mortality caused by the activated Bt Cry toxin was determined by chemical cell viability assay in 96/384-well microtiter plates utilizing CellTiter 96(®) obtained from Promega. A widely-accepted mode-of-action theory of certain Bt Cry proteins suggests that the activated toxin binds to one or more receptors and forms a pore through the insect gut epithelial cell apical membrane. A number of insect proteins such as cadherin-like protein (Cad), aminopeptidase-N (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and ABC transporter (ABCC) have been identified as the receptors of Bt Cry toxins. In this study, Bt Cry toxin receptors Ostrinia nubilalis (European corn borer) cadherin-like protein (On-Cad) and aminopeptidase-N 1 and 3 (On-APN1, On-APN3) and Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm) cadherin-like protein (Sf-Cad) were cloned in an insect cell line, Sf21, and a mammalian cell line, Expi293F. It was observed by ligand blotting and immunofluorescence microscopy that trypsin-activated IP1-88 bound to On-Cad and On-APN1, but not Sf-Cad or On-APN3. In contrast, IP1-88 bound only to APN1 in BBMV (Brush Border Membrane Vesicles) prepared from the third and fourth-instar O. nubilalis larval midgut. The sensitivity of the recombinant cells to the toxin was then tested. IP1-88 showed no toxicity to non-recombinant Sf21 and Expi293F. Toxicity was observed only when the On-Cad gene was cloned and expressed. Sf-Cad and On-APN1 were not able to make those cells sensitive to the toxin. Since the expression of On-Cad alone was

  11. Incorporating High-Throughput Exposure Predictions With Dosimetry-Adjusted In Vitro Bioactivity to Inform Chemical Toxicity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Wetmore, Barbara A.; Wambaugh, John F.; Allen, Brittany; Ferguson, Stephen S.; Sochaski, Mark A.; Setzer, R. Woodrow; Houck, Keith A.; Strope, Cory L.; Cantwell, Katherine; Judson, Richard S.; LeCluyse, Edward; Clewell, Harvey J.; Thomas, Russell S.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    2015-01-01

    We previously integrated dosimetry and exposure with high-throughput screening (HTS) to enhance the utility of ToxCast HTS data by translating in vitro bioactivity concentrations to oral equivalent doses (OEDs) required to achieve these levels internally. These OEDs were compared against regulatory exposure estimates, providing an activity-to-exposure ratio (AER) useful for a risk-based ranking strategy. As ToxCast efforts expand (ie, Phase II) beyond food-use pesticides toward a wider chemical domain that lacks exposure and toxicity information, prediction tools become increasingly important. In this study, in vitro hepatic clearance and plasma protein binding were measured to estimate OEDs for a subset of Phase II chemicals. OEDs were compared against high-throughput (HT) exposure predictions generated using probabilistic modeling and Bayesian approaches generated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ExpoCast program. This approach incorporated chemical-specific use and national production volume data with biomonitoring data to inform the exposure predictions. This HT exposure modeling approach provided predictions for all Phase II chemicals assessed in this study whereas estimates from regulatory sources were available for only 7% of chemicals. Of the 163 chemicals assessed in this study, 3 or 13 chemicals possessed AERs < 1 or < 100, respectively. Diverse bioactivities across a range of assays and concentrations were also noted across the wider chemical space surveyed. The availability of HT exposure estimation and bioactivity screening tools provides an opportunity to incorporate a risk-based strategy for use in testing prioritization. PMID:26251325

  12. Incorporating High-Throughput Exposure Predictions With Dosimetry-Adjusted In Vitro Bioactivity to Inform Chemical Toxicity Testing.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Wambaugh, John F; Allen, Brittany; Ferguson, Stephen S; Sochaski, Mark A; Setzer, R Woodrow; Houck, Keith A; Strope, Cory L; Cantwell, Katherine; Judson, Richard S; LeCluyse, Edward; Clewell, Harvey J; Thomas, Russell S; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-11-01

    We previously integrated dosimetry and exposure with high-throughput screening (HTS) to enhance the utility of ToxCast HTS data by translating in vitro bioactivity concentrations to oral equivalent doses (OEDs) required to achieve these levels internally. These OEDs were compared against regulatory exposure estimates, providing an activity-to-exposure ratio (AER) useful for a risk-based ranking strategy. As ToxCast efforts expand (ie, Phase II) beyond food-use pesticides toward a wider chemical domain that lacks exposure and toxicity information, prediction tools become increasingly important. In this study, in vitro hepatic clearance and plasma protein binding were measured to estimate OEDs for a subset of Phase II chemicals. OEDs were compared against high-throughput (HT) exposure predictions generated using probabilistic modeling and Bayesian approaches generated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ExpoCast program. This approach incorporated chemical-specific use and national production volume data with biomonitoring data to inform the exposure predictions. This HT exposure modeling approach provided predictions for all Phase II chemicals assessed in this study whereas estimates from regulatory sources were available for only 7% of chemicals. Of the 163 chemicals assessed in this study, 3 or 13 chemicals possessed AERs < 1 or < 100, respectively. Diverse bioactivities across a range of assays and concentrations were also noted across the wider chemical space surveyed. The availability of HT exposure estimation and bioactivity screening tools provides an opportunity to incorporate a risk-based strategy for use in testing prioritization. PMID:26251325

  13. High affinity FRβ-specific CAR T cells eradicate AML and normal yeloid lineage without HSC toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lynn, Rachel C; Feng, Yang; Schutsky, Keith; Poussin, Mathilde; Kalota, Anna; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is an aggressive malignancy, and development of new treatments to prolong remissions is warranted. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies appear promising but on-target, off-tumor recognition of antigen in healthy tissues remains a concern. Here, we isolated a high affinity (HA) folate receptor beta (FRβ)-specific scFv (2.48nM KD) for optimization of FRβ-redirected CAR T-cell therapy for AML. T-cells stably expressing the HA-FRβ CAR exhibited greatly enhanced antitumor activity against FRβ+ AML in vitro and in vivo compared to a low affinity (LA) FRβ CAR (54.3nM KD). Using the HA-FRβ IgG, FRβ expression was detectable in myeloid-lineage hematopoietic cells; however, expression in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) was nearly undetectable. Accordingly, HA-FRβ CAR T-cells lysed mature CD14+ monocytes, while HSC colony formation was unaffected. Because of the potential for elimination of mature myeloid lineage, mRNA CAR electroporation for transient CAR expression was evaluated. mRNA-electroporated HA-FRβ CAR T-cells retained effective anti-tumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Together, our results highlight the importance of antibody affinity in target protein detection and CAR development and suggest that transient delivery of potent HA-FRβ CAR T-cells is highly effective against AML and reduces the risk for long-term myeloid toxicity. PMID:26898190

  14. Can Gas Replace Protein Function? CO Abrogates the Oxidative Toxicity of Myoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Shaklai, Mati; Shaklai, Nurith

    2014-01-01

    Outside their cellular environments, hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb) are known to wreak oxidative damage. Using haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hx) the body defends itself against cell-free Hb, yet mechanisms of protection against oxidative harm from Mb are unclear. Mb may be implicated in oxidative damage both within the myocyte and in circulation following rhabdomyolysis. Data from the literature correlate rhabdomyolysis with the induction of Heme Oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suggesting that either the enzyme or its reaction products are involved in oxidative protection. We hypothesized that carbon monoxide (CO), a product, might attenuate Mb damage, especially since CO is a specific ligand for heme iron. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) was chosen as a substrate in circulation and myosin (My) as a myocyte component. Using oxidation targets, LDL and My, the study compared the antioxidant potential of CO in Mb-mediated oxidation with the antioxidant potential of Hp in Hb-mediated oxidation. The main cause of LDL oxidation by Hb was found to be hemin which readily transfers from Hb to LDL. Hp prevented heme transfer by sequestering hemin within the Hp-Hb complex. Hemin barely transferred from Mb to LDL, and oxidation appeared to stem from heme iron redox in the intact Mb. My underwent oxidative crosslinking by Mb both in air and under N2. These reactions were fully arrested by CO. The data are interpreted to suit several circumstances, some physiological, such as high muscle activity, and some pathological, such as rhabdomyolysis, ischemia/reperfusion and skeletal muscle disuse atrophy. It appear that CO from HO-1 attenuates damage by temporarily binding to deoxy-Mb, until free oxygen exchanges with CO to restore the equilibrium. PMID:25111140

  15. The RdgC protein of Escherichia coli binds DNA and counters a toxic effect of RecFOR in strains lacking the replication restart protein PriA

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Timothy; McGlynn, Peter; Ngo, Hien-Ping; Sharples, Gary J.; Lloyd, Robert G.

    2003-01-01

    PriA protein provides a means to load the DnaB replicative helicase at DNA replication fork and D loop structures, and is therefore a key factor in the rescue of stalled or broken forks and subsequent replication restart. We show that the nucleoid-associated RdgC protein binds non-specifically to single-stranded (ss) DNA and double-stranded DNA. It is also essential for growth of a strain lacking PriA, indicating that it might affect replication fork progression or fork rescue. dnaC suppressors of priA overcome this inviability, especially when RecF, RecO or RecR is inactivated, indicating that RdgC avoids or counters a toxic effect of these proteins. Mutations modifying ssDNA-binding (SSB) protein also negate this toxic effect, suggesting that the toxicity reflects inappropriate loading of RecA on SSB-coated ssDNA, leading to excessive or untimely RecA activity. We suggest that binding of RdgC to DNA limits RecA loading, avoiding problems at replication forks that would otherwise require PriA to promote replication restart. Mutations in RNA polymerase also reduce the toxic effect of RecFOR, providing a further link between DNA replication, transcription and repair. PMID:12554673

  16. Accuracy of Protein-Protein Binding Sites in High-Throughput Template-Based Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kundrotas, Petras J.; Vakser, Ilya A.

    2010-01-01

    The accuracy of protein structures, particularly their binding sites, is essential for the success of modeling protein complexes. Computationally inexpensive methodology is required for genome-wide modeling of such structures. For systematic evaluation of potential accuracy in high-throughput modeling of binding sites, a statistical analysis of target-template sequence alignments was performed for a representative set of protein complexes. For most of the complexes, alignments containing all residues of the interface were found. The full interface alignments were obtained even in the case of poor alignments where a relatively small part of the target sequence (as low as 40%) aligned to the template sequence, with a low overall alignment identity (<30%). Although such poor overall alignments might be considered inadequate for modeling of whole proteins, the alignment of the interfaces was strong enough for docking. In the set of homology models built on these alignments, one third of those ranked 1 by a simple sequence identity criteria had RMSD<5 Å, the accuracy suitable for low-resolution template free docking. Such models corresponded to multi-domain target proteins, whereas for single-domain proteins the best models had 5 Åhigh-throughput techniques had accuracy suitable for meaningful docking experiments. This percentage will grow with the increasing availability of co-crystallized protein-protein complexes. PMID:20369011

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF DRUG-PROTEIN INTERACTIONS IN BLOOD USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY

    PubMed Central

    Hage, David S.; Jackson, Abby; Sobansky, Matt; Schiel, John E.; Yoo, Michelle J.; Joseph, K. S.

    2009-01-01

    The binding of drugs with proteins in blood, serum or plasma is an important process in determining the activity, distribution, rate of excretion, and toxicity of drugs in the body. High-performance affinity chromatography (HPAC) has received a great deal of interest as a means for studying these interactions. This review examines the various techniques that have been used in HPAC to examine drug-protein binding and discusses the types of information that can be obtained through this approach. A comparison of these techniques with traditional methods for binding studies (e.g., equilibrium dialysis and ultrafiltration) will also be presented. The use of HPAC with specific serum proteins and binding agents will then be discussed, including human serum albumin and α1-acid glycoprotein. Several examples from the literature are provided to illustrate the applications of such research. Recent developments in this field are also described, such as the use of improved immobilization techniques, new data analysis methods, techniques for working for directly with complex biological samples, and work with immobilized lipoproteins. The relative advantages and limitations of the methods that are described will be considered and the possible use of these techniques in the high-throughput screening or characterization of drug-protein binding will be discussed. PMID:19278006

  18. High-throughput identification of proteins with AMPylation using self-assembled human protein (NAPPA) microarrays.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaobo; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-05-01

    AMPylation (adenylylation) has been recognized as an important post-translational modification that is used by pathogens to regulate host cellular proteins and their associated signaling pathways. AMPylation has potential functions in various cellular processes, and it is widely conserved across both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. However, despite the identification of many AMPylators, relatively few candidate substrates of AMPylation are known. This is changing with the recent development of a robust and reliable method for identifying new substrates using protein microarrays, which can markedly expand the list of potential substrates. Here we describe procedures for detecting AMPylated and auto-AMPylated proteins in a sensitive, high-throughput and nonradioactive manner. The approach uses high-density protein microarrays fabricated using nucleic acid programmable protein array (NAPPA) technology, which enables the highly successful display of fresh recombinant human proteins in situ. The modification of target proteins is determined via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC). The assay can be accomplished within 11 h. PMID:25881200

  19. Quantifying protein–protein interactions in high throughput using protein domain microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Kaushansky, Alexis; Allen, John E; Gordus, Andrew; Stiffler, Michael A; Karp, Ethan S; Chang, Bryan H; MacBeath, Gavin

    2011-01-01

    Protein microarrays provide an efficient way to identify and quantify protein–protein interactions in high throughput. One drawback of this technique is that proteins show a broad range of physicochemical properties and are often difficult to produce recombinantly. To circumvent these problems, we have focused on families of protein interaction domains. Here we provide protocols for constructing microarrays of protein interaction domains in individual wells of 96-well microtiter plates, and for quantifying domain–peptide interactions in high throughput using fluorescently labeled synthetic peptides. As specific examples, we will describe the construction of microarrays of virtually every human Src homology 2 (SH2) and phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain, as well as microarrays of mouse PDZ domains, all produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli. For domains that mediate high-affinity interactions, such as SH2 and PTB domains, equilibrium dissociation constants (KDs) for their peptide ligands can be measured directly on arrays by obtaining saturation binding curves. For weaker binding domains, such as PDZ domains, arrays are best used to identify candidate interactions, which are then retested and quantified by fluorescence polarization. Overall, protein domain microarrays provide the ability to rapidly identify and quantify protein–ligand interactions with minimal sample consumption. Because entire domain families can be interrogated simultaneously, they provide a powerful way to assess binding selectivity on a proteome-wide scale and provide an unbiased perspective on the connectivity of protein–protein interaction networks. PMID:20360771

  20. Protein engineering by highly parallel screening of computationally designed variants.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mark G F; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Nim, Satra; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M

    2016-07-01

    Current combinatorial selection strategies for protein engineering have been successful at generating binders against a range of targets; however, the combinatorial nature of the libraries and their vast undersampling of sequence space inherently limit these methods due to the difficulty in finely controlling protein properties of the engineered region. Meanwhile, great advances in computational protein design that can address these issues have largely been underutilized. We describe an integrated approach that computationally designs thousands of individual protein binders for high-throughput synthesis and selection to engineer high-affinity binders. We show that a computationally designed library enriches for tight-binding variants by many orders of magnitude as compared to conventional randomization strategies. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of our approach in a proof-of-concept study and successfully obtain low-nanomolar binders using in vitro and in vivo selection systems. PMID:27453948

  1. Protein engineering by highly parallel screening of computationally designed variants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mark G. F.; Seo, Moon-Hyeong; Nim, Satra; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Kim, Philip M.

    2016-01-01

    Current combinatorial selection strategies for protein engineering have been successful at generating binders against a range of targets; however, the combinatorial nature of the libraries and their vast undersampling of sequence space inherently limit these methods due to the difficulty in finely controlling protein properties of the engineered region. Meanwhile, great advances in computational protein design that can address these issues have largely been underutilized. We describe an integrated approach that computationally designs thousands of individual protein binders for high-throughput synthesis and selection to engineer high-affinity binders. We show that a computationally designed library enriches for tight-binding variants by many orders of magnitude as compared to conventional randomization strategies. We thus demonstrate the feasibility of our approach in a proof-of-concept study and successfully obtain low-nanomolar binders using in vitro and in vivo selection systems. PMID:27453948

  2. High-performance liquid chromatography assay of N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine released from bone cements: evidence for toxicity.

    PubMed

    Stea, S; Granchi, D; Zolezzi, C; Ciapetti, G; Visentin, M; Cavedagna, D; Pizzoferrato, A

    1997-02-01

    Five commercially available bone cements were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography for detecting the residual content of an accelerator, the amine N,N-dimethyl-p-toluidine (DMPT), after curing. It was found that the concentration of DMPT in aqueous extracts decreases with time, being almost absent 7 days after curing. Differences were noticed among the cements; residual DMPT is higher in cements prepared with higher content of the amine. It is verified that DMPT's toxic effect on cell cultures is dose-related; a delay in the cell replication cycle is induced in vitro. Damage is reversible, thus justifying the low bone cement toxicity that is clinically ascertained. PMID:9031725

  3. Ag/ZnO nanomaterials as high performance sensors for flammable and toxic gases.

    PubMed

    Simon, Quentin; Barreca, Davide; Gasparotto, Alberto; Maccato, Chiara; Tondello, Eugenio; Sada, Cinzia; Comini, Elisabetta; Devi, Anjana; Fischer, Roland A

    2012-01-20

    Ag/ZnO nanocomposites supported on polycrystalline Al2O3 were synthesized by an unprecedented approach combining plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PE-CVD) of ZnO matrices and the subsequent deposition of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) by radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The system structure, composition and morphology were investigated by glancing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS). A tailored dispersion and distribution of silver particles could be obtained under mild conditions by the sole variation of the sputtering time. Gas sensing properties toward flammable and toxic gases, both reducing (CH3CH2OH, CH3COCH3) and oxidizing (O3), were investigated in the temperature range 100-400 °C. Beside the high sensitivity, the developed sensors exhibited a response proportional to Ag content, thanks to catalytic and electronic effects promoted by silver NPs. In addition, discrimination between oxidizing and reducing analytes was enabled by a suitable choice of the adopted working temperature. PMID:22166305

  4. A novel mithramycin analogue with high antitumor activity and less toxicity generated by combinatorial biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Núñez, Luz E; Nybo, Stephen E; González-Sabín, Javier; Pérez, María; Menéndez, Nuria; Braña, Alfredo F; Shaaban, Khaled A; He, Min; Morís, Francisco; Salas, José A; Rohr, Jürgen; Méndez, Carmen

    2012-06-28

    Mithramycin is an antitumor compound produced by Streptomyces argillaceus that has been used for the treatment of several types of tumors and hypercalcaemia processes. However, its use in humans has been limited because of its side effects. Using combinatorial biosynthesis approaches, we have generated seven new mithramycin derivatives, which differ from the parental compound in the sugar profile or in both the sugar profile and the 3-side chain. From these studies three novel derivatives were identified, demycarosyl-3D-β-d-digitoxosylmithramycin SK, demycarosylmithramycin SDK, and demycarosyl-3D-β-d-digitoxosylmithramycin SDK, which show high antitumor activity. The first one, which combines two structural features previously found to improve pharmacological behavior, was generated following two different strategies, and it showed less toxicity than mithramycin. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of its antitumor activity through hollow fiber assays, and in subcutaneous colon and melanoma cancers xenografts models, suggests that demycarosyl-3D-β-d-digitoxosylmithramycin SK could be a promising antitumor agent worthy of further investigation. PMID:22578073

  5. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F.

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  6. Comparative genomics and experimental evolution of Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains reveal the landscape of toxicity escape from membrane protein overproduction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soon-Kyeong; Kim, Seong Keun; Lee, Dae-Hee; Kim, Jihyun F

    2015-01-01

    Achieving sufficient yields of proteins in their functional form represents the first bottleneck in contemporary bioscience and biotechnology. To accomplish successful overexpression of membrane proteins in a workhorse organism such as E. coli, defined and rational optimization strategies based on an understanding of the genetic background of the toxicity-escape mechanism are desirable. To this end, we sequenced the genomes of E. coli C41(DE3) and its derivative C43(DE3), which were developed for membrane protein production. Comparative analysis of their genomes with those of their ancestral strain E. coli BL21(DE3) revealed various genetic changes in both strains. A series of E. coli variants that are able to tolerate transformation with or overexpression of membrane proteins were generated by in vitro evolution. Targeted sequencing of the evolved strains revealed the mutational hotspots among the acquired genetic changes. By these combinatorial approaches, we found non-synonymous changes in the lac repressor gene of the lac operon as well as nucleotide substitutions in the lacUV5 promoter of the DE3 region, by which the toxic effect to the host caused by overexpression of membrane proteins could be relieved. A mutation in lacI was demonstrated to be crucial for conferring tolerance to membrane protein overexpression. PMID:26531007

  7. Elastic repulsion from polymer brush layers exhibiting high protein repellency.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Yuuki; Nakanishi, Tomoaki; Ishihara, Kazuhiko

    2013-08-27

    Hydrophilic poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) brush layers with different thicknesses and graft densities were prepared to construct a model surface to elucidate protein-surface interactions. In particular, we focused on the steric repulsion of hydrophilic polymer layers as one of the surface properties that strongly influence protein adsorption and employed force-versus-distance (f-d) curve measurements obtained via atomic force microscopy to quantitatively evaluate the steric repulsion force, which is also referred to as the "elastic repulsion energy." We also analyzed direct interactions between the surface and proteins via the f-d curve, because these interactions trigger the protein-adsorption phenomenon. Protein-surface interactions were extremely suppressed at surfaces with high elastic repulsion energies and highly dense polymer brush structures, which is in contrast to those at surfaces with low elastic repulsion energies and low density of the grafted polymer layers. These results indicate that the elastic repulsion from the grafted polymer layer at the surface is an important parameter for controlling protein-surface interactions and protein adsorption phenomenon. PMID:23898820

  8. Overexpression of alpha-synuclein at non-toxic levels increases dopaminergic cell death induced by copper exposure via modulation of protein degradation pathways.

    PubMed

    Anandhan, Annadurai; Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Bohovych, Iryna; Griggs, Amy M; Zavala-Flores, Laura; Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Seravalli, Javier; Stanciu, Lia A; Lee, Jaekwon; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Khalimonchuk, Oleh; Franco, Rodrigo

    2015-09-01

    Gene multiplications or point mutations in alpha (α)-synuclein are associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD). An increase in copper (Cu) levels has been reported in the cerebrospinal fluid and blood of PD patients, while occupational exposure to Cu has been suggested to augment the risk to develop PD. We aimed to elucidate the mechanisms by which α-synuclein and Cu regulate dopaminergic cell death. Short-term overexpression of wild type (WT) or mutant A53T α-synuclein had no toxic effect in human dopaminergic cells and primary midbrain cultures, but it exerted a synergistic effect on Cu-induced cell death. Cell death induced by Cu was potentiated by overexpression of the Cu transporter protein 1 (Ctr1) and depletion of intracellular glutathione (GSH) indicating that the toxic effects of Cu are linked to alterations in its intracellular homeostasis. Using the redox sensor roGFP, we demonstrated that Cu-induced oxidative stress was primarily localized in the cytosol and not in the mitochondria. However, α-synuclein overexpression had no effect on Cu-induced oxidative stress. WT or A53T α-synuclein overexpression exacerbated Cu toxicity in dopaminergic and yeast cells in the absence of α-synuclein aggregation. Cu increased autophagic flux and protein ubiquitination. Impairment of autophagy by overexpression of a dominant negative Atg5 form or inhibition of the ubiquitin/proteasome system (UPS) with MG132 enhanced Cu-induced cell death. However, only inhibition of the UPS stimulated the synergistic toxic effects of Cu and α-synuclein overexpression. Our results demonstrate that α-synuclein stimulates Cu toxicity in dopaminergic cells independent from its aggregation via modulation of protein degradation pathways. PMID:25497688

  9. ADAPTING THE MEDAKA EMBRYO ASSAY TO A HIGH-THROUGHPUT APPROACH FOR DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICITY TESTING.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical exposure during embryonic development may cause persistent effects, yet developmental toxicity data exist for very few chemicals. Current testing procedures are time consuming and costly, underlining the need for rapid and low cost screening strategies. While in vitro ...

  10. Protein quantitation using various modes of high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Grotefend, Sandra; Kaminski, Lukas; Wroblewitz, Stefanie; Deeb, Sami El; Kühn, Nancy; Reichl, Stephan; Limberger, Markus; Watt, Steven; Wätzig, Hermann

    2012-12-01

    Pharmaceuticals based on proteins (biologicals), such as monoclonal antibodies (mAb), attain more and more relevance since they were established as potent drugs in anticancer therapy or for the treatment of autoimmune based diseases. Due to their high efficiency it is essential to have accurate and precise methods for protein quantitation and the detection of protein aggregates, which in some cases may lead to adverse effects after application. Selectivity and precision of traditional protein quantification methods such as the Bradford assay or SDS-PAGE are insufficient for quality control (QC) purposes. In this work several HPLC separation modes, which can significantly improve these important parameters, were compared for their application in this field. High performance size exclusion (HP-SEC), strong anion exchange (SAX), weak cation exchange (WCX) as well as reversed phase chromatography are all already successfully applied in protein analysis. Good precision (SEC: <1.9%, SAX: <5%, RP: <2% and WCX: <3.5% - RSD% for peak areas day-to-day), high selectivity and low quantitation limits (<15μg/ml) for the model proteins ovalbumin, myoglobin and bovine serum albumin (BSA), respectively cytochrome c and lysozyme in the cation exchange mode, could be achieved. Consecutively, the four separation modes were compared to each other and to electrophoretic techniques in terms of precision, selectivity, analysis time, effort of sample and mobile phase preparation as well as separating capacity. Moreover, the analysis of an IgG1-type antibody was included in this study. PMID:22980318

  11. Toxicity of seleno-l-methionine, seleno-dl-methionine, high selenium wheat, and selenized yeast to mallard ducklings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heinz, G.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; LeCaptain, L.J.

    1996-01-01

    The toxicity of four chemical forms of selenium (seleno-L-methionine, seleno-DL-methionine, selenized yeast, and high selenium wheat) was compared in day-old mallard ducklings (Anas platyrhynchos). In the first experiment, in which the basal diet was 75% wheat, survival after 2 weeks was lower for ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-L-methionine (36%) than for ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-DL-methionine (100%) or 30 ?g/g selenium from high selenium yeast (88%). In a second experiment, in which the basal diet was a commercial duck feed, survival after 2 weeks was 100% in ducklings fed 30 ?g/g selenium as seleno-DL-methionine, seleno-L-methionine, or selenized yeast. The greater toxicity of the L form of selenomethionine was probably related to the palatability or nutritional nature of the wheat-based diet used in experiment 1, but the exact reason for the difference between the DL and L forms is unknown. Biologically incorporated selenium, derived from high selenium wheat was no more toxic than selenium derived from the two purified forms of selenomethionine, and the selenium in selenized yeast was not as toxic as that in the two forms of selenomethionine.

  12. Microelectrode array recordings of cardiac action potentials as a high throughput method to evaluate pesticide toxicity.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, A; Molnar, P; Sieverdes, K; Jamshidi, A; Hickman, J J

    2006-04-01

    The threat of environmental pollution, biological warfare agent dissemination and new diseases in recent decades has increased research into cell-based biosensors. The creation of this class of sensors could specifically aid the detection of toxic chemicals and their effects in the environment, such as pyrethroid pesticides. Pyrethroids are synthetic pesticides that have been used increasingly over the last decade to replace other pesticides like DDT. In this study we used a high-throughput method to detect pyrethroids by using multielectrode extracellular recordings from cardiac cells. The data from this cell-electrode hybrid system was compared to published results obtained with patch-clamp electrophysiology and also used as an alternative method to further understand pyrethroid effects. Our biosensor consisted of a confluent monolayer of cardiac myocytes cultured on microelectrode arrays (MEA) composed of 60 substrate-integrated electrodes. Spontaneous activity of these beating cells produced extracellular field potentials in the range of 100 microV to nearly 1200 microV with a beating frequency of 0.5-4 Hz. All of the tested pyrethroids; alpha-Cypermethrin, Tetramethrin and Tefluthrin, produced similar changes in the electrophysiological properties of the cardiac myocytes, namely reduced beating frequency and amplitude. The sensitivity of our toxin detection method was comparable to earlier patch-clamp studies, which indicates that, in specific applications, high-throughput extracellular methods can replace single-cell studies. Moreover, the similar effect of all three pyrethroids on the measured parameters suggests, that not only detection of the toxins but, their classification might also be possible with this method. Overall our results support the idea that whole cell biosensors might be viable alternatives when compared to current toxin detection methods. PMID:16198528

  13. High doses of pseudoephedrine hydrochloride accelerate onset of CNS oxygen toxicity seizures in unanesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Pilla, R; Held, H E; Landon, C S; Dean, J B

    2013-08-29

    Pseudoephedrine (PSE) salts (hydrochloride and sulfate) are commonly used as nasal and paranasal decongestants by scuba divers. Anecdotal reports from the Divers Alert Network suggest that taking PSE prior to diving while breathing pure O₂ increases the risk for CNS oxygen toxicity (CNS-OT), which manifests as seizures. We hypothesized that high doses of PSE reduce the latency time to seizure (LS) in unanesthetized rats breathing 5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) of hyperbaric oxygen. Sixty-three male rats were implanted with radio-transmitters that recorded electroencephalogram activity and body temperature. After ≥7-day recovery, and 2 h before "diving", each rat was administered either saline solution (control) or PSE hydrochloride intragastrically at the following doses (mg PSE/kg): 0, 40, 80, 100, 120, 160, and 320. Rats breathed pure O₂ and were dived to 5ATA until the onset of behavioral seizures coincident with neurological seizures. LS was the time elapsed between reaching 5ATA and exhibiting seizures. We observed a significant dose-dependent decrease in the LS at doses of 100-320 mg/kg, whereas no significant differences in LS from control value were observed at doses ≤80 mg/kg. Our findings showed that high doses of PSE accelerate the onset of CNS-OT seizures in unanesthetized rats breathing 5ATA of poikilocapnic hyperoxia. Extrapolating our findings to humans, we conclude that the recommended daily dose of PSE should not be abused prior to diving with oxygen-enriched gas mixes or pure O₂. PMID:23624060

  14. Toxicity of TDCPP and TCEP on PC12 cell: changes in CAMKII, GAP43, tubulin and NF-H gene and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Ta, Na; Li, Chaonan; Fang, Yanjun; Liu, Huanliang; Lin, Bencheng; Jin, Hong; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Huashan; Zhang, Wei; Xi, Zhuge

    2014-06-16

    TDCPP and TCEP are two major types of organophosphorus flame retardants (OPFRs) that are bioaccumulative and persistent in the environment. The toxicity effects of TDCPP and TCEP on PC12 cell are not well understood. In the present study, we investigated morphology, viability and apoptosis in cultured PC12 cells in response to TDCPP and TCEP. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CAMKII, GAP43, tubulin and NF-H were quantified in PC12 cells treated with varying concentrations of the two agents. Results indicate that, upon treatment with the two OPFRs, cell growth decreased, apoptosis increased, morphology was altered and significant changes were found in the gene and protein levels. Treatment with TDCPP caused a reduction in the levels of each of the six proteins studied and in the gene levels of GAP43, NF-H and the two tubulins, but it resulted in an increase in CAMKII gene levels. Treatment with TCEP resulted in similar changes in gene levels to TDCPP and led to decreases in the protein levels of GAP43 and the tubulins while increasing the CAMKII and NF-H protein levels. These results suggest that changes in the gene and protein levels of the regulatory proteins (CAMKII, GAP43) and the structural proteins (tubulin, NF-H) are due to different mechanisms of the toxins, and these proteins may be useful biomarkers for the cytotoxicity and neurotoxicity. PMID:24717766

  15. Native proteins trap high-energy transit conformations

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Andrew E.; Karplus, P. Andrew

    2015-01-01

    During protein folding and as part of some conformational changes that regulate protein function, the polypeptide chain must traverse high-energy barriers that separate the commonly adopted low-energy conformations. How distortions in peptide geometry allow these barrier-crossing transitions is a fundamental open question. One such important transition involves the movement of a non-glycine residue between the left side of the Ramachandran plot (that is, ϕ < 0°) and the right side (that is, ϕ > 0°). We report that high-energy conformations with ϕ ~ 0°, normally expected to occur only as fleeting transition states, are stably trapped in certain highly resolved native protein structures and that an analysis of these residues provides a detailed, experimentally derived map of the bond angle distortions taking place along the transition path. This unanticipated information lays to rest any uncertainty about whether such transitions are possible and how they occur, and in doing so lays a firm foundation for theoretical studies to better understand the transitions between basins that have been little studied but are integrally involved in protein folding and function. Also, the context of one such residue shows that even a designed highly stable protein can harbor substantial unfavorable interactions. PMID:26601321

  16. Methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum protects murine peritoneal macrophages from nicotine toxicity by decreasing free radical generation, lipid and protein damage and enhances antioxidant protection

    PubMed Central

    Mahapatra, Santanu Kar; Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Das, Subhasis

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, methanol extract of Ocimum gratissimum Linn (ME-Og) was tested against nicotine-induced murine peritoneal macrophage in vitro. Phytochemical analysis of ME-Og shown high amount of flavonoid and phenolic compound present in it. The cytotoxic effect of ME-Og was studied in murine peritoneal macrophages at different concentrations (0.1 to 100 µg/ml) using the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5 diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) method. To establish the protective role of ME-Og against nicotine toxicity, peritoneal macrophages from mice were treated with nicotine (10 mM), nicotine + ME-Og (1 to 25 µg/ml) for 12 h in culture media. The significantly (p < 0.05) increased super oxide anion generation, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase activity, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, lipid peroxidation, protein carbonyls, oxidized glutathione levels were observed in nicotine-treated group as compared to control group; those were significantly (p < 0.05) reduced in ME-Og supplemented groups in concentration dependent manner. More over, significantly (p < 0.05) reduced antioxidant status due to nicotine exposure was effectively ameliorated by ME-Og supplementation in murine peritoneal macrophages. Among the different concentration of ME-Og, maximum protective effect was observed by 25 µg/ml, which does not produce significant cell cytotoxicity in murine peritoneal macrophages. These findings suggest the potential use and beneficial role of O. gratissimum as a modulator of nicotine-induced free radical generation, lipid-protein damage and antioxidant status in important immune cell, peritoneal macrophages. PMID:20716908

  17. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Highly Charged Green Fluorescent Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, E Y; Phillips, J L; Colvin, M E

    2009-03-26

    A recent experimental study showed that green fluorescent protein (GFP) that has been mutated to have ultra-high positive or negative net charges, retain their native structure and fluorescent properties while gaining resistance to aggregation under denaturing conditions. These proteins also provide an ideal test case for studying the effects of surface charge on protein structure and dynamics. They have performed classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the near-neutral wildtype GFP and mutants with net charges of -29 and +35. They analyzed the resulting trajectories to quantify differences in structure and dynamics between the three GFPs. This analyses shows that all three proteins are stable over the MD trajectory, with the near-neutral wild type GFP exhibiting somewhat more flexibility than the positive or negative GFP mutants, as measured by the order parameter and changes in phi-psi angles. There are more dramatic differences in the properties of the water and counter ions surrounding the proteins. The water diffusion constant near the protein surface is closer to the value for bulk water in the positively charged GFP than in the other two proteins. Additionally, the positively charged GFP shows a much greater clustering of the counter ions (CL-) near its surface than corresponding counter ions (Na+) near the negatively charged mutant.

  18. Linking high resolution mass spectrometry data with exposure and toxicity forecasts to advance high-throughput environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Rager, Julia E; Strynar, Mark J; Liang, Shuang; McMahen, Rebecca L; Richard, Ann M; Grulke, Christopher M; Wambaugh, John F; Isaacs, Kristin K; Judson, Richard; Williams, Antony J; Sobus, Jon R

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing need in the field of exposure science for monitoring methods that rapidly screen environmental media for suspect contaminants. Measurement and analysis platforms, based on high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS), now exist to meet this need. Here we describe results of a study that links HRMS data with exposure predictions from the U.S. EPA's ExpoCast™ program and in vitro bioassay data from the U.S. interagency Tox21 consortium. Vacuum dust samples were collected from 56 households across the U.S. as part of the American Healthy Homes Survey (AHHS). Sample extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF/MS) with electrospray ionization. On average, approximately 2000 molecular features were identified per sample (based on accurate mass) in negative ion mode, and 3000 in positive ion mode. Exact mass, isotope distribution, and isotope spacing were used to match molecular features with a unique listing of chemical formulas extracted from EPA's Distributed Structure-Searchable Toxicity (DSSTox) database. A total of 978 DSSTox formulas were consistent with the dust LC-TOF/molecular feature data (match score≥90); these formulas mapped to 3228 possible chemicals in the database. Correct assignment of a unique chemical to a given formula required additional validation steps. Each suspect chemical was prioritized for follow-up confirmation using abundance and detection frequency results, along with exposure and bioactivity estimates from ExpoCast and Tox21, respectively. Chemicals with elevated exposure and/or toxicity potential were further examined using a mixture of 100 chemical standards. A total of 33 chemicals were confirmed present in the dust samples by formula and retention time match; nearly half of these do not appear to have been associated with house dust in the published literature. Chemical matches found in at least 10 of the 56 dust samples include Piperine, N,N-Diethyl-m-toluamide (DEET

  19. High-Resolution Protein Structure Determination by Serial Femtosecond Crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Boutet, Sébastien; Lomb, Lukas; Williams, Garth J.; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Aquila, Andrew; Doak, R. Bruce; Weierstall, Uwe; DePonte, Daniel P.; Steinbrener, Jan; Shoeman, Robert L.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Barty, Anton; White, Thomas A.; Kassemeyer, Stephan; Kirian, Richard A.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Montanez, Paul A.; Kenney, Chris; Herbst, Ryan; Hart, Philip; Pines, Jack; Haller, Gunther; Gruner, Sol M.; Philipp, Hugh T.; Tate, Mark W.; Hromalik, Marianne; Koerner, Lucas J.; van Bakel, Niels; Morse, John; Ghonsalves, Wilfred; Arnlund, David; Bogan, Michael J.; Caleman, Carl; Fromme, Raimund; Hampton, Christina Y.; Hunter, Mark S.; Johansson, Linda C.; Katona, Gergely; Kupitz, Christopher; Liang, Mengning; Martin, Andrew V.; Nass, Karol; Redecke, Lars; Stellato, Francesco; Timneanu, Nicusor; Wang, Dingjie; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Schafer, Donald; Defever, James; Neutze, Richard; Fromme, Petra; Spence, John C. H.; Chapman, Henry N.; Schlichting, Ilme

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of proteins and other macromolecules has historically required the growth of high-quality crystals sufficiently large to diffract x-rays efficiently while withstanding radiation damage. We applied serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) using an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) to obtain high-resolution structural information from microcrystals (less than 1 micrometer by 1 micrometer by 3 micrometers) of the well-characterized model protein lysozyme. The agreement with synchrotron data demonstrates the immediate relevance of SFX for analyzing the structure of the large group of difficult-to-crystallize molecules. PMID:22653729

  20. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the Parkinson’s disease associated protein α-synuclein

    PubMed Central

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-01-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating-protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson’s disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically-relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory-effect on α-synuclein aggregation, whilst not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation. PMID:26492012

  1. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  2. High Throughput Screening Method to Explore Protein Interactions with Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Irem; Fatih, Warda; Svensson, Anja; Radu, Dennis; Linse, Sara; Cabaleiro Lago, Celia; Lundqvist, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The interactions of biological macromolecules with nanoparticles underlie a wide variety of current and future applications in the fields of biotechnology, medicine and bioremediation. The same interactions are also responsible for mediating potential biohazards of nanomaterials. Some applications require that proteins adsorb to the nanomaterial and that the protein resists or undergoes structural rearrangements. This article presents a screening method for detecting nanoparticle-protein partners and conformational changes on time scales ranging from milliseconds to days. Mobile fluorophores are used as reporters to study the interaction between proteins and nanoparticles in a high-throughput manner in multi-well format. Furthermore, the screening method may reveal changes in colloidal stability of nanomaterials depending on the physicochemical conditions. PMID:26313757

  3. Acute and late toxicity following adjuvant high-dose chemotherapy for high-risk primary operable breast cancer--a quality assessment study.

    PubMed

    Svane, Inge M; Homburg, Keld M; Kamby, Claus; Nielsen, Dorte L; Roer, Ole; Sliffsgaard, Dorte; Johnsen, Hans E; Hansen, Steen W

    2002-01-01

    From 1996 to 2000, high-dose chemotherapy with haematopoietic stem-cell support was used as an adjuvant treatment strategy for management of primary high-risk breast cancer patients with more than five positive nodes. This single institution study included 52 women aged < or = 56 years with primary operable breast cancer and > or = 6 tumour-positive axillary lymph nodes. The treatment regimen consisted of at least three initial courses of FEC (5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, cyclophosphamide) followed by high-dose chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, carboplatin) supported by autologous peripheral blood stem-cell reinfusion. This study focuses on quality control including evaluation of toxicity, supportive therapy and assessment of the stem-cell products. Cytokeratin 19 positive cells were found in the stem-cell product from 3/37 patients. Data regarding organ toxicity were used for evaluation of short- and long-term side effects. Substantial acute toxicity and frequent catheter-related infections were found. Long-term toxicities included reduced lung diffusion capacity (n = 36), fatigue (n = 14), arthralgia/myalgia (n = 10), neurotoxicity (n = 9) and memory loss (n = 4). However, most toxicities were grade 1-2 and reversible within two years. No treatment-related death occurred. Within a median follow-up of 30 months (range, 11-57), 25% of the patients had relapsed. Recurrence-free survival was 75% and overall survival was 88% three years after the start of treatment. Overall, high-dose chemotherapy was relatively well tolerated, with manageable toxicity and an acceptable requirement of supportive therapy. Until now, high-dose chemotherapy has not proven superior to conventional-dose adjuvant chemotherapy, therefore it is necessary in the future to focus on well-designed randomized studies. PMID:14651213

  4. High-Grade Acute Organ Toxicity as a Positive Prognostic Factor in Primary Radiochemotherapy for Anal Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Hendrik Andreas; Raus, Ismene; Jung, Klaus; Schueler, Phillip; Herrmann, Markus Karl; Hennies, Steffen; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To test for a possible correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity during primary radiochemotherapy and treatment outcome for patients with anal carcinoma. Methods and Materials: From 1991 to 2009, 72 patients with anal carcinoma were treated at our department (10 patients had stage I, 28 patients had stage II, 11 patients had stage IIIA, and 13 patients had stage IIIB cancer [Union Internationale Contre le Cancer criteria]). All patients received normofractionated (1.8 Gy/day, five times/week) whole-pelvis irradiation including iliac and inguinal lymph nodes with a cumulative dose of 50.4 Gy. Concomitant chemotherapy regimen consisted of two cycles of 5-fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m{sup 2}total body surface area (TBSA)/day as continuous intravenous infusion on days 1-4 and 29-32) and mitomycin C (10 mg/m{sup 2}/TBSA, intravenously on days 1 and 29). Toxicity during treatment was monitored weekly, and any incidence of Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade of {>=}3 for skin reaction, cystitis, proctitis, or enteritis was assessed as high-grade acute organ toxicity for later analysis. Results: We found significant correlation between high-grade acute organ toxicity and overall survival, locoregional control, and stoma-free survival, which was independent in multivariate analysis from other possible prognostic factors: patients with a CTC acute organ toxicity grade of {>=}3 had a 5-year overall survival rate of 97% compared to 30% in patients without (p < 0.01, multivariate analysis; 97% vs. 48%, p = 0.03 for locoregional control, and 95% vs. 59%, p = 0.05 for stoma-free survival). Conclusions: Our data indicate that normal tissue and tumor tissue may behave similarly with respect to treatment response, since high-grade acute organ toxicity during radiochemotherapy showed itself to be an independent prognostic marker in our patient population. This hypothesis should be further analyzed by using biomolecular and clinical levels in future clinical trials.

  5. Sensing protein antigen and microvesicle analytes using high-capacity biopolymer nano-carriers.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Saroj; Milani, Gloria; Takatsuki, Hideyo; Lana, Tobia; Persson, Malin; Frasson, Chiara; te Kronnie, Geertruy; Månsson, Alf

    2016-02-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems with molecular motor driven transport of analytes attached to cytoskeletal filament shuttles (actin filaments, microtubules) circumvent challenges with nanoscale liquid transport. However, the filaments have limited cargo-carrying capacity and limitations either in transportation speed (microtubules) or control over motility direction (actin). To overcome these constraints we here report incorporation of covalently attached antibodies into self-propelled actin bundles (nanocarriers) formed by cross-linking antibody conjugated actin filaments via fascin, a natural actin-bundling protein. We demonstrate high maximum antigen binding activity and propulsion by surface adsorbed myosin motors. Analyte transport capacity is tested using both protein antigens and microvesicles, a novel class of diagnostic markers. Increased incubation concentration with protein antigen in the 0.1-100 nM range (1 min) reduces the fraction of motile bundles and their velocity but maximum transportation capacity of >1 antigen per nm of bundle length is feasible. At sub-nanomolar protein analyte concentration, motility is very well preserved opening for orders of magnitude improved limit of detection using motor driven concentration on nanoscale sensors. Microvesicle-complexing to monoclonal antibodies on the nanocarriers compromises motility but nanocarrier aggregation via microvesicles shows unique potential in label-free detection with the aggregates themselves as non-toxic reporter elements. PMID:26617251

  6. [Toxicodynamic properties of liquids used for cooling high-power turbines. I. Acute, subacute and chronic toxicity].

    PubMed

    Seńczuk, W; Florek, E

    1983-01-01

    Oils IWiOL-3 and OMTI are used to cool the high-power turbines. Their toxicodynamic properties are little known, therefore the studies described herein have been undertaken. The studies did not reveal high acute toxicity, as A-DL50 was found to exceed 15 g/kg of body weight. The simultaneous measurements of cholinesterase activity demonstrated its clear decrease, The studies of subacute toxicity after Lim showed that OMTI after a year's exploitation is the most toxic fluid, as C-LD50 for this compound is 6,21 g/kg of body weight, whereas C-LD50 for the other oils is: 22.449 g/kg of body weight for IW i 02-3-n and 20.93 g/kg of body weight for IWiOL-3-e. Studies of chronic toxicity showed decreased cholinesterase activity and no significant changes in the measurements of certain biochemical and haematological. indices. PMID:6645933

  7. Wet-chemical passivation of InAs: toward surfaces with high stability and low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Jewett, Scott A; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2012-09-18

    In a variety of applications where the electronic and optical characteristics of traditional, siliconbased materials are inadequate, recently researchers have employed semiconductors made from combinations of group III and V elements such as InAs. InAs has a narrow band gap and very high electron mobility in the near-surface region, which makes it an attractive material for high performance transistors, optical applications, and chemical sensing. However, silicon-based materials remain the top semiconductors of choice for biological applications, in part because of their relatively low toxicity. In contrast to silicon, InAs forms an unstable oxide layer under ambient conditions, which can corrode over time and leach toxic indium and arsenic components. To make InAs more attractive for biological applications, researchers have investigated passivation, chemical and electronic stabilization, of the surface by adlayer adsorption. Because of the simplicity, low cost, and flexibility in the type of passivating molecule used, many researchers are currently exploring wet-chemical methods of passivation. This Account summarizes much of the recent work on the chemical passivation of InAs with a particular focus on the chemical stability of the surface and prevention of oxide regrowth. We review the various methods of surface preparation and discuss how crystal orientation affects the chemical properties of the surface. The correct etching of InAs is critical as researchers prepare the surface for subsequent adlayer adsorption. HCl etchants combined with a postetch annealing step allow the tuning of the chemical properties in the near-surface region to either arsenic- or indium-rich environments. Bromine etchants create indium-rich surfaces and do not require annealing after etching; however, bromine etchants are harsh and potentially destructive to the surface. The simultaneous use of NH(4)OH etchants with passivating molecules prevents contact with ambient air that can

  8. Toxic Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Pasnoor, Mamatha; Barohn, Richard J.; Dimachkie, Mazen M.

    2014-01-01

    Muscle tissue is highly sensitive to many substances. Early recognition of toxic myopathies is important, as they potentially are reversible on removal of the offending drug or toxin, with greater likelihood of complete resolution the sooner this is achieved. Clinical features range from mild muscle pain and cramps to severe weakness with rhabdomyolysis, renal failure, and even death. The pathogenic bases can be multifactorial. This article reviews some of the common toxic myopathies and their clinical presentation, histopathologic features and possible underlying cellular mechanisms. PMID:25037083

  9. Whole-pelvic volumetric-modulated arc therapy for high-risk prostate cancer: treatment planning and acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kentaro; Ogino, Ryo; Hosokawa, Yukinari; Fujioka, Chiaki; Okada, Wataru; Nakahara, Ryota; Kawamorita, Ryu; Tada, Takuhito; Hayashi, Yoshiki; Nakajima, Toshifumi

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to evaluate dosimetric quality and acute toxicity of volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and daily image guidance in high-risk prostate cancer patients. A total of 100 consecutive high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with definitive VMAT with prophylactic whole-pelvic radiotherapy (WPRT) were enrolled. All patients were treated with a double-arc VMAT plan delivering 52 Gy to the prostate planning target volume (PTV), while simultaneously delivering 46.8 Gy to the pelvic nodal PTV in 26 fractions, followed by a single-arc VMAT plan delivering 26 Gy to the prostate PTV in 13 fractions. Image-guided RT was performed with daily cone-beam computed tomography. Dose–volume parameters for the PTV and the organs at risk (OARs), total number of monitor units (MUs) and treatment time were evaluated. Acute toxicity was assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. All dosimetric parameters met the present plan acceptance criteria. Mean MU and treatment time were 471 and 146 s for double-arc VMAT, respectively, and were 520 and 76 s for single-arc VMAT, respectively. No Grade 3 or higher acute toxicity was reported. Acute Grade 2 proctitis, diarrhea, and genitourinary toxicity occurred in 12 patients (12%), 6 patients (6%) and 13 patients (13%), respectively. The present study demonstrated that VMAT for WPRT in prostate cancer results in favorable PTV coverage and OAR sparing with short treatment time and an acceptable rate of acute toxicity. These findings support the use of VMAT for delivering WPRT to high-risk prostate cancer patients. PMID:25304328

  10. Assessment of the behavioral toxicity of high-energy iron particles compared to other qualities of radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rabin, B.M.; Hunt, W.A.; Joseph, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion was used to evaluate the behavioral toxicity of exposure to high-energy iron particles (56Fe, 600 MeV/amu) in comparison to that of gamma photons (60 Co), high-energy electrons, or fission neutrons. Exposure to high-energy iron particles (5-500 cGy) produced a dose-dependent taste aversion with a maximal effect achieved with a dose of 30 cGy. Gamma photons and electrons were the least-effective stimuli for producing a conditioned taste aversion, with a maximal aversion obtained only after exposure to 500 cGy, while the effectiveness of fission neutrons was intermediate to that of photons and iron particles, and a maximal aversion was obtained with a dose of 100 CGy. In the second experiment, rats with lesions of the area postrema were exposed to iron particles (3- cGY), but failed to acquire a taste aversion. The results indicate that (1) high-energy iron particles are more toxic than other qualities of radiation and (2) similar mechanisms mediate the behavioral toxicity of gamma photons and high-energy iron particles.

  11. Cadmium toxicity in diazotrophic Anabaena spp. adjudged by hasty up-accumulation of transporter and signaling and severe down-accumulation of nitrogen metabolism proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Shrivastava, Alok Kumar; Chatterjee, Antra; Pandey, Sarita; Rai, Snigdha; Singh, Shilpi; Rai, L C

    2015-09-01

    Present study demonstrates interspecies variation in proteome and survival strategy of three Anabaena species i.e., Anabaena L31, Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Anabaena doliolum subjected to respective LC50 doses of Cd at 0, 1, 3, 5 and 7day intervals. The proteome coverage with 452 differentially accumulated proteins unveiled species and time specific expression and interaction network of proteins involved in important cellular functions. Statistical analysis of protein abundance across Cd-treated proteomes clustered their co-expression pattern into four groups viz., (i) early (days 1 and 3) accumulated proteins, (ii) proteins up-accumulated for longer duration, (iii) late (days 5 and 7) accumulated proteins, and (iv) mostly down-accumulated proteins. Appreciable growth of Cd treated A L31 over other two species may be ascribed to proteins contained in the first and second groups (belonging to energy and carbohydrate metabolism (TK, G6-PI, PGD, FBA, PPA, ATP synthase)), sulfur metabolism (GR, GST, PGDH, PAPS reductase, GDC-P, and SAM synthetase), fatty acid metabolism (AspD, PspA, SQD-1), phosphorous metabolism (PhoD, PstB and SQD1), molecular chaperones (Gro-EL, FKBP-type peptidylprolyl isomerase), and antioxidative defense enzymes (SOD-A, catalase). Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 harboring proteins largely from the third group qualified as a late accumulator and A. doliolum housing majority of proteins from the fourth group emerged as the most sensitive species. Thus early up-accumulation of transporter and signaling category proteins and drastic reduction of nitrogen assimilation proteins could be taken as a vital indicator of cadmium toxicity in Anabaena spp. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Proteomics in India. PMID:26021478

  12. Melatonin prevents cytosolic calcium overload, mitochondrial damage and cell death due to toxically high doses of dexamethasone-induced oxidative stress in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Suwanjang, Wilasinee; Abramov, Andrey Y; Charngkaew, Komgrid; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Chetsawang, Banthit

    2016-07-01

    Stressor exposure activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and causes elevations in the levels of glucocorticoids (GC) from the adrenal glands. Increasing evidence has demonstrated that prolonged exposure to high GC levels can lead to oxidative stress, calcium deregulation, mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis in a number of cell types. However, melatonin, via its antioxidant activity, exhibits a neuroprotective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death. Therefore, in the present study, we explored the protective effect of melatonin in GC-induced toxicity in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Cellular treatment with the toxically high doses of the synthetic GC receptor agonist, dexamethasone (DEX) elicited marked decreases in the levels of glutathione and increases in ROS production, lipid peroxidation and cell death. DEX toxicity also induced increases in the levels of cytosolic calcium and mitochondrial fusion proteins (Mfn1 and Opa1) but decreases in the levels of mitochondrial fission proteins (Fis1 and Drp1). Mitochondrial damage was observed in large proportions of the DEX-treated cells. Pretreatment of the cells with melatonin substantially prevented the DEX-induced toxicity. These results suggest that melatonin might exert protective effects against oxidative stress, cytosolic calcium overload and mitochondrial damage in DEX-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:27155536

  13. Protein carbonylation associated to high-fat, high-sucrose diet and its metabolic effects.

    PubMed

    Méndez, Lucía; Pazos, Manuel; Molinar-Toribio, Eunice; Sánchez-Martos, Vanesa; Gallardo, José M; Rosa Nogués, M; Torres, Josep L; Medina, Isabel

    2014-12-01

    The present research draws a map of the characteristic carbonylation of proteins in rats fed high-caloric diets with the aim of providing a new insight of the pathogenesis of metabolic diseases derived from the high consumption of fat and refined carbohydrates. Protein carbonylation was analyzed in plasma, liver and skeletal muscle of Sprague-Dawley rats fed a high-fat, high-sucrose (HFHS) diet by a proteomics approach based on carbonyl-specific fluorescence-labeling, gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Oxidized proteins along with specific sites of oxidative damage were identified and discussed to illustrate the consequences of protein oxidation. The results indicated that long-term HFHS consumption increased protein oxidation in plasma and liver; meanwhile, protein carbonyls from skeletal muscle did not change. The increment of carbonylation by HFHS diet was singularly selective on specific target proteins: albumin from plasma and liver, and hepatic proteins such as mitochondrial carbamoyl-phosphate synthase (ammonia), mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase, argininosuccinate synthetase, regucalcin, mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate synthase subunit beta, actin cytoplasmic 1 and mitochondrial glutamate dehydrogenase 1. The possible consequences that these specific protein carbonylations have on the excessive weight gain, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease resulting from HFHS diet consumption are discussed. PMID:25282656

  14. The green tea polyphenol (−)-epigallocatechin gallate prevents the aggregation of tau protein into toxic oligomers at substoichiometric ratios

    PubMed Central

    Wobst, Heike J; Sharma, Apurwa; Diamond, Marc I; Wanker, Erich E; Bieschke, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of amyloid-beta (Aβ) and tau aggregates is a pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease. Both polypeptides form fibrillar deposits, but several lines of evidence indicate that Aβ and tau form toxic oligomeric aggregation intermediates. Depleting such structures could thus be a powerful therapeutic strategy. We generated a fragment of tau (His-K18ΔK280) that forms stable, toxic, oligomeric tau aggregates in vitro. We show that (−)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea polyphenol that was previously found to reduce Aβ aggregation, inhibits the aggregation of tau K18ΔK280 into toxic oligomers at ten- to hundred-fold substoichiometric concentrations, thereby rescuing toxicity in neuronal model cells. PMID:25436420

  15. High-throughput functional genomics identifies genes that ameliorate toxicity due to oxidative stress in neuronal HT-22 cells: GFPT2 protects cells against peroxide.

    PubMed

    Zitzler, Jürgen; Link, Dieter; Schäfer, Rolf; Liebetrau, Wolfgang; Kazinski, Michael; Bonin-Debs, Angelika; Behl, Christian; Buckel, Peter; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2004-08-01

    We describe a novel genetic screen that is performed by transfecting every individual clone of an expression clone collection into a separate population of cells in a high-throughput mode. We combined high-throughput functional genomics with experimental validation to discover human genes that ameliorate cytotoxic responses of neuronal HT-22 cells upon exposure to oxidative stress. A collection of 5,000 human cDNAs in mammalian expression vectors were individually transfected into HT-22 cells, which were then exposed to H(2)O(2). Five genes were found that are known to be involved in pathways of detoxification of peroxide (catalase, glutathione peroxidase-1, peroxiredoxin-1, peroxiredoxin-5, and nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2). The presence of those genes in our "hit list" validates our screening platform. In addition, a set of candidate genes was found that has not been previously described as involved in detoxification of peroxide. One of these genes, which was consistently found to reduce H(2)O(2) -induced toxicity in HT-22, was GFPT2. This gene is expressed at significant levels in the central nervous system (CNS) and encodes glutamine-fructose-6-phosphate transaminase (GFPT) 2, a rate-limiting enzyme in hexosamine biosynthesis. GFPT has recently also been shown to ameliorate the toxicity of methylmercury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Methylmercury causes neuronal cell death in part by protein modification as well as enhancing the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The protective effect of GFPT2 against H(2)O(2) toxicity in neuronal HT-22 cells may be similar to its protection against methylmercury in yeast. Thus, GFPT appears to be conserved among yeast and men as a critical target of methylmercury and ROS-induced cytotoxicity. PMID:15181156

  16. Applied Electric Fields and the Aggregation of Highly Charged Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Sorensen, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, along with other neurodegenerative disorders, and there is increasing evidence that prefibrillar clusters, rather than fully-formed amyloid plaques, are primarily responsible. Therefore, weakly invasive methods, such as dynamic light scattering, which can probe the size distribution and structure factor of early nuclei and proto-aggregate clusters, can serve an important role in understanding this process, and may lead to insights regarding future therapeutic interventions. Here we study a highly charged model protein, lysozyme, under the influence of applied AC and DC fields in an effort to evaluate general models of protein aggregation, including the coarse-grained ``patchy protein'' method of visualizing charge heterogeneity. This anisotropy in the interprotein interaction can lead to frustrated crystalline order, resulting in low density phases. Dynamic measurements of the size distribution and structure factor can reveal local ordering, hierarchical clustering, and fractal properties of the aggregates. Early results show that applied fields affect early cluster growth by modulating local protein and counterion concentrations, in addition to their influence on protein alignment.

  17. Highly Branched Pentasaccharide-Bearing Amphiphiles for Membrane Protein Studies.

    PubMed

    Ehsan, Muhammad; Du, Yang; Scull, Nicola J; Tikhonova, Elena; Tarrasch, Jeffrey; Mortensen, Jonas S; Loland, Claus J; Skiniotis, Georgios; Guan, Lan; Byrne, Bernadette; Kobilka, Brian K; Chae, Pil Seok

    2016-03-23

    Detergents are essential tools for membrane protein manipulation. Micelles formed by detergent molecules have the ability to encapsulate the hydrophobic domains of membrane proteins. The resulting protein-detergent complexes (PDCs) are compatible with the polar environments of aqueous media, making structural and functional analysis feasible. Although a number of novel agents have been developed to overcome the limitations of conventional detergents, most have traditional head groups such as glucoside or maltoside. In this study, we introduce a class of amphiphiles, the PSA/Es with a novel highly branched pentasaccharide hydrophilic group. The PSA/Es conferred markedly increased stability to a diverse range of membrane proteins compared to conventional detergents, indicating a positive role for the new hydrophilic group in maintaining the native protein integrity. In addition, PDCs formed by PSA/Es were smaller and more suitable for electron microscopic analysis than those formed by DDM, indicating that the new agents have significant potential for the structure-function studies of membrane proteins. PMID:26966956

  18. Constitutive gene expression profile segregates toxicity in locally advanced breast cancer patients treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radical radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez Hernández, Luis Alberto; Lara, Pedro Carlos; Pinar, Beatriz; Bordón, Elisa; Gallego, Carlos Rodríguez; Bilbao, Cristina; Pérez, Leandro Fernández; Morales, Amílcar Flores

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer patients show a wide variation in normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy. The individual sensitivity to x-rays limits the efficiency of the therapy. Prediction of individual sensitivity to radiotherapy could help to select the radiation protocol and to improve treatment results. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between gene expression profiles of ex vivo un-irradiated and irradiated lymphocytes and the development of toxicity due to high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. Raw data from microarray experiments were uploaded to the Gene Expression Omnibus Database (GEO accession GSE15341). We obtained a small group of 81 genes significantly regulated by radiotherapy, lumped in 50 relevant pathways. Using ANOVA and t-test statistical tools we found 20 and 26 constitutive genes (0 Gy) that segregate patients with and without acute and late toxicity, respectively. Non-supervised hierarchical clustering was used for the visualization of results. Six and 9 pathways were significantly regulated respectively. Concerning to irradiated lymphocytes (2 Gy), we founded 29 genes that separate patients with acute toxicity and without it. Those genes were gathered in 4 significant pathways. We could not identify a set of genes that segregates patients with and without late toxicity. In conclusion, we have found an association between the constitutive gene expression profile of peripheral blood lymphocytes and the development of acute and late toxicity in consecutive, unselected patients. These observations suggest the possibility of predicting normal tissue response to irradiation in high-dose non-conventional radiation therapy regimens. Prospective studies with higher number of patients are needed to validate these preliminary results. PMID:19497124

  19. Highly Effective, Low Toxicity, Low Environmental Impact Total Flooding Fire Suppressants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glass, S. M.; Dhooge, P. M.; Nimitz, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    Halon 1301 (CF3Br) has been used for decades as the primary fire suppression agent for areas where powder agents cannot be used because of concerns for sensitive equipment. Halon 1301 is an excellent extinguishing agent, effective at about 3% in air and quite non-toxic. It has an effective exposure limit much greater than its extinguishing concentration, so it can be used in normally occupied areas. The ability of a chemical to destroy stratospheric ozone is its ozone-depletion potential (ODP). ODP is the amount of ozone destroyed per pound of a chemical, relative to the standard CFC-11 with an ODP = 1.0. Because halons have been implicated in stratospheric ozone depletion, their production was stopped at the end of 1995 under the provisions of the Montreal Protocol plus later amendments. In the US, the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, Presidential directives, and DoD Directive 6050.9 implemented this phaseout. These regulations and penalties have provided strong incentives for US businesses to decrease CFC use. The Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1989 mandates high Federal taxes on CFCs and halons, designed to price them out of the market. The taxes also capture for the government the windfall profits that would otherwise go to producers as scarcity drives up prices. Several replacements have been developed for Halon 1301. One is carbon dioxide, which has been used as a firefighting agent for many years. However, a high concentration of carbon dioxide is necessary to inert fuels. The effective concentration for inerting with carbon dioxide is approximately 29%, which is above the concentration lethal to humans. HFC-227ea is being used extensively to replace Halon 1301 systems in nominally occupied areas and some normally unoccupied areas. However, since the effective concentration of HFC-227ea is about three to four times that of Halon 1301 the extinguishing systems have to be larger and new extinguishing systems have to be installed. HFC-125 is also being

  20. Lipidation of intact proteins produces highly immunogenic vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weiguang; Eriksson, Emily M; Lew, Andrew; Jackson, David C

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigate the feasibility of generating self-adjuvanting vaccines capable of inducing high titre antibody responses following the covalent attachment of the TLR2 agonist Pam(2)Cys to intact proteins. Three Pam(2)Cys-based lipid moieties were prepared which contain a solubilising spacer composed of either lysine residues or polyethyleneglycol. A model protein, hen egg white lysozyme (HEL), was lipidated individually with each of these lipid modules and the immunogenicity of the lipidated species studied in mice by measuring antibody responses. We found that lipidated HEL elicited antibodies which is much stronger than the responses obtained when the HEL was administered in Freund's adjuvant or in Alum. Little or no antibody was elicited by the lipidated HEL in CD4 T cell-deficient mice indicating that the antibody response is T cell dependent. Furthermore, the lipidated protein elicited similar antibody responses in two different strains of mice indicating that sufficient helper T cell epitopes are available to enable antibody production across the histocompatability barrier. In a similar way, lipidated bovine insulin was found to be highly immunogenic in mice despite the largely conserved sequences of bovine and murine insulin. The results provide evidence that lipidation of proteins provides a simple and safe method for the manufacture of soluble self-adjuvanting protein-based vaccines. PMID:21056473

  1. Highly efficient and easy protease-mediated protein purification.

    PubMed

    Last, Daniel; Müller, Janett; Dawood, Ayad W H; Moldenhauer, Eva J; Pavlidis, Ioannis V; Bornscheuer, Uwe T

    2016-02-01

    As both research on and application of proteins are rarely focused on the resistance towards nonspecific proteases, this property remained widely unnoticed, in particular in terms of protein purification and related fields. In the present study, diverse aspects of protease-mediated protein purification (PMPP) were explored on the basis of the complementary proteases trypsin and proteinase K as well as the model proteins green fluorescent protein (GFP) from Aequorea victoria, lipase A from Candida antarctica (CAL-A), a transaminase from Aspergillus fumigatus (AspFum), quorum quenching lactonase AiiA from Bacillus sp., and an alanine dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus (AlaDH). While GFP and AiiA were already known to be protease resistant, the thermostable enzymes CAL-A, AspFum, and AlaDH were selected due to the documented correlation between thermostability and protease resistance. As proof of principle for PMPP, recombinant GFP remained unaffected whereas most Escherichia coli (E. coli) host proteins were degraded by trypsin. PMPP was highly advantageous compared to the widely used heat-mediated purification of commercial CAL-A. The resistance of AspFum towards trypsin was improved by rational protein design introducing point mutation R20Q. Trypsin also served as economical and efficient substitute for site-specific endopeptidases for the removal of a His-tag fused to AiiA. Moreover, proteolysis of host enzymes with interfering properties led to a strongly improved sensitivity and accuracy of the NADH assay in E. coli cell lysate for AlaDH activity measurements. Thus, PMPP is an attractive alternative to common protein purification methods and facilitates also enzyme characterization in cell lysate. PMID:26671615

  2. Design of high-affinity S100-target hybrid proteins.

    PubMed

    Rezvanpour, Atoosa; Phillips, Jeremy M; Shaw, Gary S

    2009-12-01

    S100B and S100A10 are dimeric, EF-hand proteins. S100B undergoes a calcium-dependent conformational change allowing it to interact with a short contiguous sequence from the actin-capping protein CapZ (TRTK12). S100A10 does not bind calcium but is able to recruit the N-terminus of annexin A2 important for membrane fusion events, and to form larger multiprotein complexes such as that with the cation channel proteins TRPV5/6. In this work, we have designed, expressed, purified, and characterized two S100-target peptide hybrid proteins comprised of S100A10 and S100B linked in tandem to annexin A2 (residues 1-15) and CapZ (TRTK12), respectively. Different protease cleavage sites (tobacco etch virus, PreScission) were incorporated into the linkers of the hybrid proteins. In situ proteolytic cleavage monitored by (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra showed the linker did not perturb the structures of the S100A10-annexin A2 or S100B-TRTK12 complexes. Furthermore, the analysis of the chemical shift assignments ((1)H, (15)N, and (13)C) showed that residues T102-S108 of annexin A2 formed a well-defined alpha-helix in the S100A10 hybrid while the TRTK12 region was unstructured at the N-terminus with a single turn of alpha-helix from D108-K111 in the S100B hybrid protein. The two S100 hybrid proteins provide a simple yet extremely efficient method for obtaining high yields of intact S100 target peptides. Since cleavage of the S100 hybrid protein is not necessary for structural characterization, this approach may be useful as a scaffold for larger S100 complexes. PMID:19827097

  3. Influence of genetic polymorphisms in the folate pathway on toxicity after high-dose methotrexate treatment in pediatric osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong A

    2016-01-01

    Background Methotrexate (MTX), one of the main drugs used to treat osteosarcoma, is a representative folic acid antagonist. Polymorphisms of various enzymes involved in the metabolism of MTX could contribute to differences in response to MTX in pediatric osteosarcoma patients. Methods Blood and tissue samples were obtained from 37 pediatric osteosarcoma patients who were treated with high-dose MTX therapy. The following 4 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were analyzed: ATIC 347C>G, MTHFR 677C>T, MTHFR 1298A>C and SLC19A1 80G>A. Serial plasma MTX concentrations after high-dose MTX therapy and MTX-induced toxicities were evaluated. Correlations among polymorphisms, MTX concentrations and treatment-induced toxicities were assessed. Results Plasma MTX levels at 48 hours after high-dose MTX infusion were significantly associated with SLC19A1 80G>A (P=0.031). Higher plasma levels of MTX at 48 and 72 hours were significantly associated with MTX-induced mucositis (P=0.007 and P=0.046) and renal toxicity (P=0.002), respectively. SNP of SLC19A1 gene was associated with development of severe mucositis (P=0.026). Conclusion This study suggests that plasma levels of MTX are associated with GI and renal toxicities after high-dose MTX therapy, and genetic polymorphisms that affect the metabolism of MTX may influence drug concentrations and development of significant side effects in pediatric patients treated with high-dose MTX. PMID:27104192

  4. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  5. Hydrogel Based 3-Dimensional (3D) System for Toxicity and High-Throughput (HTP) Analysis for Cultured Murine Ovarian Follicles.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hong; Malik, Malika Amattullah; Arab, Aarthi; Hill, Matthew Thomas; Shikanov, Ariella

    2015-01-01

    Various toxicants, drugs and their metabolites carry potential ovarian toxicity. Ovarian follicles, the functional unit of the ovary, are susceptible to this type of damage at all stages of their development. However, despite of the large scale of potential negative impacts, assays that study ovarian toxicity are limited. Exposure of cultured ovarian follicles to toxicants of interest served as an important tool for evaluation of toxic effects for decades. Mouse follicles cultured on the bottom of a culture dish continue to serve an important approach for mechanistic studies. In this paper, we demonstrated the usefulness of a hydrogel based 3-dimensional (3D) mouse ovarian follicle culture as a tool to study ovarian toxicity in a different setup. The 3D in vitro culture, based on fibrin alginate interpenetrating network (FA-IPN), preserves the architecture of the ovarian follicle and physiological structure-function relationship. We applied the novel 3D high-throughput (HTP) in vitro ovarian follicle culture system to study the ovotoxic effects of an anti-cancer drug, Doxorobucin (DXR). The fibrin component in the system is degraded by plasmin and appears as a clear circle around the encapsulated follicle. The degradation area of the follicle is strongly correlated with follicle survival and growth. To analyze fibrin degradation in a high throughput manner, we created a custom MATLAB® code that converts brightfield micrographs of follicles encapsulated in FA-IPN to binary images, followed by image analysis. We did not observe any significant difference between manually processed images to the automated MATLAB® method, thereby confirming that the automated program is suitable to measure fibrin degradation to evaluate follicle health. The cultured follicles were treated with DXR at concentrations ranging from 0.005 nM to 200 nM, corresponding to the therapeutic plasma levels of DXR in patients. Follicles treated with DXR demonstrated decreased survival rate in

  6. Approaches to High-Performance Preparative Chromatography of Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yan; Liu, Fu-Feng; Shi, Qing-Hong

    Preparative liquid chromatography is widely used for the purification of chemical and biological substances. Different from high-performance liquid chromatography for the analysis of many different components at minimized sample loading, high-performance preparative chromatography is of much larger scale and should be of high resolution and high capacity at high operation speed and low to moderate pressure drop. There are various approaches to this end. For biochemical engineers, the traditional way is to model and optimize a purification process to make it exert its maximum capability. For high-performance separations, however, we need to improve chromatographic technology itself. We herein discuss four approaches in this review, mainly based on the recent studies in our group. The first is the development of high-performance matrices, because packing material is the central component of chromatography. Progress in the fabrication of superporous materials in both beaded and monolithic forms are reviewed. The second topic is the discovery and design of affinity ligands for proteins. In most chromatographic methods, proteins are separated based on their interactions with the ligands attached to the surface of porous media. A target-specific ligand can offer selective purification of desired proteins. Third, electrochromatography is discussed. An electric field applied to a chromatographic column can induce additional separation mechanisms besides chromatography, and result in electrokinetic transport of protein molecules and/or the fluid inside pores, thus leading to high-performance separations. Finally, expanded-bed adsorption is described for process integration to reduce separation steps and process time.

  7. A Preliminary Study on the Toxic Combustion Products Testing of Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2004-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative _ pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper reports the preliminary results of toxic combustion product testing of selected polymers in a pneumatic-impact test system. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Nylon 6/6, polychlorotrifluoroethylene (CTFE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), fluoroelastomer (Viton(TradeMark) A), and nitrile rubber (Buna N), were tested in a pneumatic-impact test system at 2500- or 3500-psia oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned, then combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed by GC/MS/IRD, GC/FID, and GC/Methanizer/FID. The results of adiabatic-compression tests show that combustion of hydrocarbon polymers, nitrogen-containing polymers, and halogenated polymers in high-pressure oxygen systems are relatively complete. Toxicity of the combustion product gas is presumably much lower than the combustion product gas generated from ambient-pressure oxygen (or air) environments. The NASA-Lewis equilibrium code was used to determine the composition of combustion product gas generated from a simulated, adiabatic-compression test of nine polymers. The results are presented and discussed.

  8. C9orf72 FTLD/ALS-associated Gly-Ala dipeptide repeat proteins cause neuronal toxicity and Unc119 sequestration.

    PubMed

    May, Stephanie; Hornburg, Daniel; Schludi, Martin H; Arzberger, Thomas; Rentzsch, Kristin; Schwenk, Benjamin M; Grässer, Friedrich A; Mori, Kohji; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Banzhaf-Strathmann, Julia; Mann, Matthias; Meissner, Felix; Edbauer, Dieter

    2014-10-01

    Hexanucleotide repeat expansion in C9orf72 is the most common pathogenic mutation in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Despite the lack of an ATG start codon, the repeat expansion is translated in all reading frames into dipeptide repeat (DPR) proteins, which form insoluble, ubiquitinated, p62-positive aggregates that are most abundant in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum. To specifically analyze DPR toxicity and aggregation, we expressed DPR proteins from synthetic genes containing a start codon but lacking extensive GGGGCC repeats. Poly-Gly-Ala (GA) formed p62-positive cytoplasmic aggregates, inhibited dendritic arborization and induced apoptosis in primary neurons. Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis to identify poly-GA co-aggregating proteins revealed a significant enrichment of proteins of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Among the other interacting proteins, we identified the transport factor Unc119, which has been previously linked to neuromuscular and axonal function, as a poly-GA co-aggregating protein. Strikingly, the levels of soluble Unc119 are strongly reduced upon poly-GA expression in neurons, suggesting a loss of function mechanism. Similar to poly-GA expression, Unc119 knockdown inhibits dendritic branching and causes neurotoxicity. Unc119 overexpression partially rescues poly-GA toxicity suggesting that poly-GA expression causes Unc119 loss of function. In C9orf72 patients, Unc119 is detectable in 9.5 % of GA inclusions in the frontal cortex, but only in 1.6 % of GA inclusions in the cerebellum, an area largely spared of neurodegeneration. A fraction of neurons with Unc119 inclusions shows loss of cytosolic staining. Poly-GA-induced Unc119 loss of function may thereby contribute to selective vulnerability of neurons with DPR protein inclusions in the pathogenesis of C9orf72 FTLD/ALS. PMID:25120191

  9. The Effect of High Deltaline Concentration on the Toxicity of Methyllycaconitine in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Larkspurs (Delphinium) are one of the most serious toxic plant problems on foothill and mountain rangelands in the western U.S. Total costs to the livestock industry have been estimated at over $20 million annually. Larkspur plants contain numerous norditerpenoid alkaloids (>18) which occur as one...

  10. Evaluating the Toxicity Pathways Using High-Throughput Environmental Chemical Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of HTS methods to the characterization of human phenotypic response to environmental chemicals is a largely unexplored area of pharmacogenomics. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), through its ToxCast program, is developing predictive toxicity approach...

  11. Nano gold conjugation, anti-arthritic potential and toxicity studies of snake Naja kaouthia (Lesson, 1831) venom protein toxin NKCT1 in male albino rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Saha, Partha Pratim; Bhowmik, Tanmoy; Dasgupta, Anjan Kumar; Gomes, Antony

    2014-08-01

    Nanoscience and Nanotechnology have found their way in the fields of pharmacology and medicine. The conjugation of drug to nanoparticles combines the properties of both. In this study, gold nanoparticle (GNP) was conjugated with NKCT1, a cytotoxic protein toxin from Indian cobra venom for evaluation of anti-arthritic activity and toxicity in experimental animal models. GNP conjugated NKCT1 (GNP-NKCT1) synthesized by NaBH4 reduction method was stable at room temperature (25 +/- 2 degrees C), pH 7.2. Hydrodynamic size of GNP-NKCT1 was 68-122 nm. Arthritis was developed by Freund's complete adjuvant induction in male albino rats and treatment was done with NKCT1/GNP-NKCT1/standard drug. The paw/ankle swelling, urinary markers, serum markers and cytokines were changed significantly in arthritic control rats which were restored after GNP-NKCT1 treatment. Acute toxicity study revealed that GNP conjugation increased the minimum lethal dose value of NKCT1 and partially reduced the NKCT1 induced increase of the serum biochemical tissue injury markers. Histopathological study showed partial restoration of toxic effect in kidney tissue after GNP conjugation. Normal lymphocyte count in culture was in the order of GNP-NKCT1 > NKCT1 > Indomethacine treatment. The present study confirmed that GNP conjugation increased the antiarthritic activity and decreased toxicity profile of NKCT1. PMID:25141538

  12. Protein-directed modulation of high-LET hyperthermic radiosensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, P.Y.

    1991-01-01

    A pair of Chinese Hamster Ovary cell lines, the wild-type CHO-SC1, and its temperature-sensitive mutant (CHO-tsH1) was used to examine the importance of protein synthesis in the development of thermotolerance. The classical biphasic thermotolerant survival response to hyperthermia was observed in the SC1 cells after continuous heating at 41.5C to 42.5C, while tsH1 showed no thermotolerance. In separate experiments, each cell line was triggered and challenged at 45C. The heat doses were separated with graded incubaton periods at 35C or 40C for thermotolerance development. SC1 cells expressed thermoresistance, with the synthesis of heat shock proteins, under both incubation conditions. tsH1 cells expressed thermotolerance similar to that seen in the SC1 cells when incubated at 35C, but the survival response with the non-permissive 40C incubation was much reduced in the absence of protein synthesis. The combined effects of heavy-ion radiation and hyperthermia were examined using the same cell system. A mild heat dose of 41.5C was used in conjunction with Neon particle radiation of various high LET values. The cell killing effects were highly dependent on the sequence of application of heat and Neon radiation. Heat applied immediately after Neon irradiation was more cytotoxic to SC1 cells than when heat was applied prior to the irradiation. The ability of cells to synthesize new proteins plays a key role in this sequence-dependent thermal radiosensitization. In the absence of protein synthesis in the tsH1 cells, the high-LET thermal enhancement for cell-killing was unchanged regardless of the sequence. In the presence of protein synthetic activity in the SC1 cells, the thermal enhancement of radiation-induced cell killing was LET-dependent.

  13. Prediction of Protein Aggregation in High Concentration Protein Solutions Utilizing Protein-Protein Interactions Determined by Low Volume Static Light Scattering.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Melanie; Winzer, Matthias; Weber, Christian; Gieseler, Henning

    2016-06-01

    The development of highly concentrated protein formulations is more demanding than for conventional concentrations due to an elevated protein aggregation tendency. Predictive protein-protein interaction parameters, such as the second virial coefficient B22 or the interaction parameter kD, have already been used to predict aggregation tendency and optimize protein formulations. However, these parameters can only be determined in diluted solutions, up to 20 mg/mL. And their validity at high concentrations is currently controversially discussed. This work presents a μ-scale screening approach which has been adapted to early industrial project needs. The procedure is based on static light scattering to directly determine protein-protein interactions at concentrations up to 100 mg/mL. Three different therapeutic molecules were formulated, varying in pH, salt content, and addition of excipients (e.g., sugars, amino acids, polysorbates, or other macromolecules). Validity of the predicted aggregation tendency was confirmed by stability data of selected formulations. Based on the results obtained, the new prediction method is a promising screening tool for fast and easy formulation development of highly concentrated protein solutions, consuming only microliter of sample volumes. PMID:27157445

  14. Reproductive toxicity in rats with crystal nephropathy following high doses of oral melamine or cyanuric acid.

    PubMed

    Stine, Cynthia B; Reimschuessel, Renate; Keltner, Zachary; Nochetto, Cristina B; Black, Thomas; Olejnik, Nicholas; Scott, Michael; Bandele, Omari; Nemser, Sarah M; Tkachenko, Andriy; Evans, Eric R; Crosby, Tina C; Ceric, Olgica; Ferguson, Martine; Yakes, Betsy J; Sprando, Robert

    2014-06-01

    The industrial chemical melamine was used in 2007 and 2008 to raise the apparent protein content in pet feed and watered down milk, respectively. Because humans may be exposed to melamine via several different routes into the human diet as well as deliberate contamination, this study was designed to characterize the effect of high dose melamine or cyanuric acid oral exposure on the pregnant animal and developing fetus, including placental transfer. Clear rectangular crystals formed following a single triazine exposure which is a different morphology from the golden spherulites caused by combined exposure or the calculi formed when melamine combines with endogenous uric acid. Crystal nephropathy, regardless of cause, induces renal failure which in turn has reproductive sequelae. Specifically, melamine alone-treated dams had increased numbers of early and late fetal deaths compared to controls or cyanuric acid-treated dams. As melamine was found in the amniotic fluid, this study confirms transfer of melamine from mammalian mother to fetus and our study provides evidence that cyanuric acid also appears in the amniotic fluid if mothers are exposed to high doses. PMID:24582682

  15. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the “carrier” snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th – 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  16. A recombinant fusion protein containing a spider toxin specific for the insect voltage-gated sodium ion channel shows oral toxicity towards insects of different orders.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sheng; Pyati, Prashant; Fitches, Elaine; Gatehouse, John A

    2014-04-01

    Recombinant fusion protein technology allows specific insecticidal protein and peptide toxins to display activity in orally-delivered biopesticides. The spider venom peptide δ-amaurobitoxin-PI1a, which targets insect voltage-gated sodium channels, was fused to the "carrier" snowdrop lectin (GNA) to confer oral toxicity. The toxin itself (PI1a) and an amaurobitoxin/GNA fusion protein (PI1a/GNA) were produced using the yeast Pichia pastoris as expression host. Although both proteins caused mortality when injected into cabbage moth (Mamestra brassicae) larvae, the PI1a/GNA fusion was approximately 6 times as effective as recombinant PI1a on a molar basis. PI1a alone was not orally active against cabbage moth larvae, but a single 30 μg dose of the PI1a/GNA fusion protein caused 100% larval mortality within 6 days when fed to 3rd instar larvae, and caused significant reductions in survival, growth and feeding in 4th - 6th instar larvae. Transport of fusion protein from gut contents to the haemolymph of cabbage moth larvae, and binding to the nerve chord, was shown by Western blotting. The PI1a/GNA fusion protein also caused mortality when delivered orally to dipteran (Musca domestica; housefly) and hemipteran (Acyrthosiphon pisum; pea aphid) insects, making it a promising candidate for development as a biopesticide. PMID:24486516

  17. High doses of 2,2'-dithienyl diselenide cause systemic toxicity in rats: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Chagas, Pietro Maria; Bortolatto, Cristiani Folharini; Wilhelm, Ethel Antunes; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2013-06-01

    Organoselenium compounds have important pharmacological properties. However, these compounds can cause toxicity, typically related to oxidation of endogenous thiols. The aim of this study was to investigate whether 2,2'-dithienyl diselenide (DTDS) has potential toxicity in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, sulfhydryl-containing enzyme activities, δ-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (δ-ALA-D) and Na(+) -K(+) -ATPase were used to predict DTDS toxicity in rat brain homogenate in vitro. In in vivo experiments, a DTDS administration (50 or 100 mg kg(-1) , p.o.) to rats was performed and toxicological parameters were determined. DTDS inhibited δ-ALA-D (IC50 2 µm) and Na(+) -K(+) -ATPase (IC50 17 µm) activities in vitro. The inhibitory effect of DTDS on δ-ALA-D and Na(+) -K(+) -ATPase activities was restored by dithiothreitol. DTDS (5-25 µm) elicited a thiol oxidase-like activity. In vivo, DTDS (50 and 100 mg kg(-1) ) caused systemic toxicity, evidenced by a decrease in water and food intakes and body weight gain, as well as the death of rats. DTDS at the dose of 100 mg kg(-1) increased plasma alanine and aspartate aminotransferase activities and decreased urea levels. At 50 and 100 mg kg(-1) , it increased lipid peroxidation levels. At the highest dose, DTDS inhibited δ-ALA-D activity. By contrast, Na(+) -K(+) -ATPase activity and antioxidant defense were not altered in the brains of rats exposed to DTDS. In conclusion, interaction with the cisteinyl residues seems to mediate the inhibitory effect of DTDS on sulfhydryl-containing enzymes in vitro. In addition, high oral doses of DTDS induce toxicity in rats. PMID:22180340

  18. High-throughput analysis and protein engineering using microcapillary arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bob; Lim, Sungwon; Kannan, Arvind; Alford, Spencer C; Sunden, Fanny; Herschlag, Daniel; Dimov, Ivan K; Baer, Thomas M; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a multipurpose technology platform, termed μSCALE (microcapillary single-cell analysis and laser extraction), that enables massively parallel, quantitative biochemical and biophysical measurements on millions of protein variants expressed from yeast or bacteria. μSCALE spatially segregates single cells within a microcapillary array, enabling repeated imaging, cell growth and protein expression. We performed high-throughput analysis of cells and their protein products using a range of fluorescent assays, including binding-affinity measurements and dynamic enzymatic assays. A precise laser-based extraction method allows rapid recovery of live clones and their genetic material from microcapillaries for further study. With μSCALE, we discovered a new antibody against a clinical cancer target, evolved a fluorescent protein biosensor and engineered an enzyme to reduce its sensitivity to its inhibitor. These protein analysis and engineering applications each have unique assay requirements and different host organisms, highlighting the flexibility and technical capabilities of the μSCALE platform. PMID:26641932

  19. Automated High-Content Assay for Compounds Selectively Toxic to Trypanosoma cruzi in a Myoblastic Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Cotillo, Ignacio; Presa, Jesús L.; Cantizani, Juan; Peña, Imanol; Bardera, Ana I.; Martín, Jose J.; Rodriguez, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Background Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, represents a very important public health problem in Latin America where it is endemic. Although mostly asymptomatic at its initial stage, after the disease becomes chronic, about a third of the infected patients progress to a potentially fatal outcome due to severe damage of heart and gut tissues. There is an urgent need for new drugs against Chagas disease since there are only two drugs available, benznidazole and nifurtimox, and both show toxic side effects and variable efficacy against the chronic stage of the disease. Methodology/Principal Findings Genetically engineered parasitic strains are used for high throughput screening (HTS) of large chemical collections in the search for new anti-parasitic compounds. These assays, although successful, are limited to reporter transgenic parasites and do not cover the wide T. cruzi genetic background. With the aim to contribute to the early drug discovery process against Chagas disease we have developed an automated image-based 384-well plate HTS assay for T. cruzi amastigote replication in a rat myoblast host cell line. An image analysis script was designed to inform on three outputs: total number of host cells, ratio of T. cruzi amastigotes per cell and percentage of infected cells, which respectively provides one host cell toxicity and two T. cruzi toxicity readouts. The assay was statistically robust (Z´ values >0.6) and was validated against a series of known anti-trypanosomatid drugs. Conclusions/Significance We have established a highly reproducible, high content HTS assay for screening of chemical compounds against T. cruzi infection of myoblasts that is amenable for use with any T. cruzi strain capable of in vitro infection. Our visual assay informs on both anti-parasitic and host cell toxicity readouts in a single experiment, allowing the direct identification of compounds selectively targeted to the parasite. PMID:25615687

  20. Sterile Filtration of Highly Concentrated Protein Formulations: Impact of Protein Concentration, Formulation Composition, and Filter Material.

    PubMed

    Allmendinger, Andrea; Mueller, Robert; Huwyler, Joerg; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Fischer, Stefan

    2015-10-01

    Differences in filtration behavior of concentrated protein formulations were observed during aseptic drug product manufacturing of biologics dependent on formulation composition. The present study investigates filtration forces of monoclonal antibody formulations in a small-scale set-up using polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) or polyethersulfone (PES) filters. Different factors like formulation composition and protein concentration related to differences in viscosity, as well as different filtration rates were evaluated. The present study showed that filtration behavior was influenced by the presence or absence of a surfactant in the formulation, which defines the interaction between filter membrane and surface active formulation components. This can lead to a change in filter resistance (PES filter) independent on the buffer system used. Filtration behavior was additionally defined by rheological non-Newtonian flow behavior. The data showed that high shear rates resulting from small pore sizes and filtration pressure up to 1.0 bar led to shear-thinning behavior for highly concentrated protein formulations. Differences in non-Newtonian behavior were attributed to ionic strength related to differences in repulsive and attractive interactions. The present study showed that the interplay of formulation composition, filter material, and filtration rate can explain differences in filtration behavior/filtration flux observed for highly concentrated protein formulations thus guiding filter selection. PMID:26149748

  1. High protein production of phytoplankton in the Amundsen Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung Song, Ho; Jung Kang, Jae; Kyung Kim, Bo; Joo, HuiTae; Jin Yang, Eun; Park, Jisoo; Hoon Lee, Sang; Heon Lee, Sang

    2016-01-01

    The Amundsen Sea polynya is one of the largest and most productive polynyas in the Southern Ocean and has recently experienced a rapid change in sea ice coverage. However, very little is known about current physiological status of phytoplankton and its quality as food for pelagic herbivores and consequently higher trophic levels in the Amundsen Sea. Using a 13C isotope tracer technique, macromolecular production measurements of phytoplankton at eleven stations were conducted at three light depths (100, 30, and 1%) onboard R/V ARAON in the Amundsen Sea, 2012. The concentrations of major inorganic nutrients were replete at all the productivity stations and no substantial difference in macromolecular production was found between polynya and non-polynya regions. Distinct vertical trends were not observed in low-molecular-weight metabolites (LMWM) and polysaccharide productions, but weak vertical patterns in lipid and protein productions were found during our cruise period. The vertical patterns of lipids slightly increased with depth whereas decreased for protein synthesis in this study, and these vertical trends were not consistent with the results reported previously in the Arctic Ocean. Overall, phytoplankton allocated more photosynthetic carbon into proteins (60.0%) than other macromolecules in the Amundsen Sea, which is markedly higher than those reported previously in the Antarctic Ocean, ranging from 7 to 23%. The high protein synthesis appears to be sustained by high concentrations of major nutrients, which might be a strong factor for general patterns of macromolecular productions of phytoplankton in polar oceans, even under potential iron limitation.

  2. Manganese deficiency and toxicity: are high or low dietary amounts of manganese cause for concern?

    PubMed

    Finley, J W; Davis, C D

    1999-01-01

    Manganese is an essential trace element that is required for the activity of several enzymes. Manganese is also quite toxic when ingested in large amounts, such as the inhalation of Mn-laden dust by miners. This review examines Mn intake by way of the food supply and poses the question: Is there reason to be concerned with Mn toxicity or deficiency in free-living populations in North America? Although much remains to be learned of the functions of Mn, at present there are only a few vaguely described cases of Mn deficiency in the medical literature. Given the heterogeneity of the North American food supply, it is difficult to see the possibility of more than greatly isolated and unique instances of Mn deficiency. However, low Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase activity may be associated with cancer susceptibility, and deserves further study. There may be reasons, however, to be concerned about Mn toxicity under some very specialized conditions. Increasing numbers of young people are adopting a vegetarian lifestyle which may greatly increase Mn intake. Iron deficiency may increase Mn absorption and further increase the body-burden of Mn, especially in vegetarians. Mn is eliminated primarily through the bile, and hepatic dysfunction could depress Mn excretion and further contribute to the body burden. Would such a combination of events predispose substantial numbers of people to chronic Mn toxicity? At present, there is no definite proof of this occurring, but given the state of knowledge at the present time, more studies with longer time-frames and more sensitive methods of analysis are needed. PMID:10475586

  3. How Toxic Is It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crellin, John R.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the relative danger from toxicity of some typical chemicals. Notes that some materials in solutions have low toxicity, but in dust form have high toxicity. Suggests that more chemical compounds should be treated as the dangerous compounds they are. Lists common compounds found in the lab. (MVL)

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of microalgae based on highly abundant proteins using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hae-Won; Roh, Seong Woon; Cho, Kichul; Kim, Kil-Nam; Cha, In-Tae; Yim, Kyung June; Song, Hye Seon; Nam, Young-Do; Oda, Tatsuya; Chung, Young-Ho; Kim, Soo Jung; Choi, Jong-Soon; Kim, Daekyung

    2015-01-01

    The blooms of toxic phototrophic microorganisms, such as microalgae and cyanobacteria, which are typically found in freshwater and marine environments, are becoming more frequent and problematic in aquatic systems. Due to accumulation of toxic algae, harmful algal blooms (HABs) exert negative effects on aquatic systems. Therefore, rapid detection of harmful microalgae is important for monitoring the occurrence of HABs. Mass spectrometry-based methods have become sensitive, specific techniques for the identification and characterization of microorganisms. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) with time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) allows us to measure a unique molecular fingerprint of highly abundant proteins in a microorganism and has been used for the rapid, accurate identification of bacteria and fungi in clinical microbiology. Here, we tested the specificity of MALDI-TOF MS using microalgal strains (Heterocapsa, Alexandrium, Nannochloropsis, Chaetoceros, Chlorella, and Dunaliella spp.). Our research suggested that this method was comparable in terms of the rapid identification of microalgea to conventional methods based on genetic information and morphology. Thus, this efficient mass spectrometry-based technique may have applications in the rapid identification of harmful microorganisms from aquatic environmental samples. PMID:25476355

  5. High dietary protein decreases fat deposition induced by high-fat and high-sucrose diet in rats.

    PubMed

    Chaumontet, Catherine; Even, Patrick C; Schwarz, Jessica; Simonin-Foucault, Angélique; Piedcoq, Julien; Fromentin, Gilles; Azzout-Marniche, Dalila; Tomé, Daniel

    2015-10-28

    High-protein diets are known to reduce adiposity in the context of high carbohydrate and Western diets. However, few studies have investigated the specific high-protein effect on lipogenesis induced by a high-sucrose (HS) diet or fat deposition induced by high-fat feeding. We aimed to determine the effects of high protein intake on the development of fat deposition and partitioning in response to high-fat and/or HS feeding. A total of thirty adult male Wistar rats were assigned to one of the six dietary regimens with low and high protein, sucrose and fat contents for 5 weeks. Body weight (BW) and food intake were measured weekly. Oral glucose tolerance tests and meal tolerance tests were performed after 4th and 5th weeks of the regimen, respectively. At the end of the study, the rats were killed 2 h after ingestion of a calibrated meal. Blood, tissues and organs were collected for analysis of circulating metabolites and hormones, body composition and mRNA expression in the liver and adipose tissues. No changes were observed in cumulative energy intake and BW gain after 5 weeks of dietary treatment. However, high-protein diets reduced by 20 % the adiposity gain induced by HS and high-sucrose high-fat (HS-HF) diets. Gene expression and transcriptomic analysis suggested that high protein intake reduced liver capacity for lipogenesis by reducing mRNA expressions of fatty acid synthase (fasn), acetyl-CoA carboxylase a and b (Acaca and Acacb) and sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1c (Srebf-1c). Moreover, ketogenesis, as indicated by plasma β-hydroxybutyrate levels, was higher in HS-HF-fed mice that were also fed high protein levels. Taken together, these results suggest that high-protein diets may reduce adiposity by inhibiting lipogenesis and stimulating ketogenesis in the liver. PMID:26285832

  6. High-Sensitivity and Low-Toxicity Fucose Probe for Glycan Imaging and Biomarker Discovery.

    PubMed

    Kizuka, Yasuhiko; Funayama, Sho; Shogomori, Hidehiko; Nakano, Miyako; Nakajima, Kazuki; Oka, Ritsuko; Kitazume, Shinobu; Yamaguchi, Yoshiki; Sano, Masahiro; Korekane, Hiroaki; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Lee, Hsiu-Yu; Wong, Chi-Huey; Taniguchi, Naoyuki

    2016-07-21

    Fucose, a terminal sugar in glycoconjugates, critically regulates various physiological and pathological phenomena, including cancer development and inflammation. However, there are currently no probes for efficient labeling and detection of this sugar. We chemically synthesized a novel series of alkynyl-fucose analogs as probe candidates and found that 7-alkynyl-fucose gave the highest labeling efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Among the fucose analogs, 7-alkynyl-fucose was the best substrate against all five fucosyltransferases examined. We confirmed its conversion to the corresponding guanosine diphosphate derivative in cells and found that cellular glycoproteins were labeled much more efficiently with 7-alkynyl-fucose than with an existing probe. 7-Alkynyl-fucose was detected in the N-glycan core by mass spectrometry, and 7-alkynyl-fucose-modified proteins mostly disappeared in core-fucose-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts, suggesting that this analog mainly labeled core fucose in these cells. These results indicate that 7-alkynyl-fucose is a highly sensitive and powerful tool for basic glycobiology research and clinical application for biomarker discovery. PMID:27447047

  7. Application of Targeted Functional Assays to Assess a Putative Vascular Disruption Developmental Toxicity Pathway Informed By ToxCast High-Throughput Screening Data

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical perturbation of vascular development is a putative toxicity pathway which may result in developmental toxicity. EPA’s high-throughput screening (HTS) ToxCast program contains assays which measure cellular signals and biological processes critical for blood vessel develop...

  8. Purification of a new ribosome-inactivating protein from the seeds of Cinnamomum porrectum and characterization of the RNA N-glycosidase activity of the toxic protein.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Liu, W Y; Niu, C L

    1996-12-01

    Porrectin, a new type II ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP), was purified from the seeds of the camphor tree (Cinnamomum porrectum) by affinity chromatography on acid-treated Sepharose 4B. Porrectin is a glycoprotein (M(r)64,500, sugar content 2.5%) consisting of an A-chain (M(r)30,500) and a B-chain (M(r)33,500) linked by the disulfide bond. The terminal sugar of glycan in porrectin B-chain is determined to be mannose. By non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, porrectin displayed three isoforms that have different pl values with the same molecular weight. Porrectin is a potent inhibitor of eukaryotic protein synthesis in the rabbit reticulocyte lysate system. The molecular mechanism of action of porrectin on rat liver ribosomes is demonstrated to be specific for RNA N-glycosidase. The cleavage site is the adenosine at position 4324 (rat liver 28S rRNA) embedded in the highly conserved ricin/alpha-sarcin ('R/S') domain. PMID:8997493

  9. Incorporating population variability and susceptible subpopulations into dosimetry for high-throughput toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Wetmore, Barbara A; Allen, Brittany; Clewell, Harvey J; Parker, Timothy; Wambaugh, John F; Almond, Lisa M; Sochaski, Mark A; Thomas, Russell S

    2014-11-01

    Momentum is growing worldwide to use in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) to evaluate human health effects of chemicals. However, the integration of dosimetry into HTS assays and incorporation of population variability will be essential before its application in a risk assessment context. Previously, we employed in vitro hepatic metabolic clearance and plasma protein binding data with in vitro in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) modeling to estimate oral equivalent doses, or daily oral chemical doses required to achieve steady-state blood concentrations (Css) equivalent to media concentrations having a defined effect in an in vitro HTS assay. In this study, hepatic clearance rates of selected ToxCast chemicals were measured in vitro for 13 cytochrome P450 and five uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronysyltransferase isozymes using recombinantly expressed enzymes. The isozyme-specific clearance rates were then incorporated into an IVIVE model that captures known differences in isozyme expression across several life stages and ethnic populations. Comparison of the median Css for a healthy population against the median or the upper 95th percentile for more sensitive populations revealed differences of 1.3- to 4.3-fold or 3.1- to 13.1-fold, respectively. Such values may be used to derive chemical-specific human toxicokinetic adjustment factors. The IVIVE model was also used to estimate subpopulation-specific oral equivalent doses that were directly compared with subpopulation-specific exposure estimates. This study successfully combines isozyme and physiologic differences to quantitate subpopulation pharmacokinetic variability. Incorporation of these values with dosimetry and in vitro bioactivities provides a viable approach that could be employed within a high-throughput risk assessment framework. PMID:25145659

  10. Laser trapping and patterning of protein microcrystals: Toward highly integrated protein microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosokawa, Yoichiroh; Matsumura, Satoshi; Masuhara, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Keiko; Shimo-oka, Ai; Mori, Hajime

    2004-09-01

    Some insect virus infections occlude into a crystalline matrix consisting of a protein named polyhedrin. The shape of the matrix is a cubic polyhedron of the size of a few micrometers. Recently it was shown that these polyhedra could immobilize various functional proteins within them. Therefore, the polyhedron is interesting as an element in a protein chip. In this work, individual polyhedra were arrayed and bonded under a microscope by focused laser beams, with the aim of fabricating a highly integrated protein chip. The polyhedron was trapped and transferred to a suitable position on a polymer substrate by optical trapping with a 1064nmNd3+:YAG (YAG, yttrium aluminum garnet) laser. To bond the polyhedron on the substrate, the polymer surface was mechanically and chemically modified by multiphoton absorption of a 120fs, 800nm femtosecond Ti: sapphire laser, which results in strong adhesion of the polyhedron to the substrate. The arraying and bonding of polyhedra were successful, to a precision of about 1μm, with this procedure. The biological activity of polyhedra after these laser irradiations was confirmed by the fluorescence of green fluorescent protein occluded in the polyhedrin matrix.

  11. Perspectives on high-throughput technologies applied to protein crystallization.

    PubMed

    Saridakis, Emmanuel

    2012-07-01

    High-throughput crystallisation requires the rapid and accurate dispensing of protein and precipitating agent solutions at nanovolumes, but does not end there. The choice of the initial screens is very important, especially with respect to the availability of protein material. Data from previous crystallisation experiments that are scattered in the literature and only partially available in databases have to be analysed in efficient ways that will maximise their utility for designing new screens. A larger portion of crystallisation parameter space should be made accessible to screening, through the use of nucleants and seeding. Observation, assessment and scaling up of the crystallisation trials should be efficiently performed and, finally yet importantly, optimisation of conditions must also be adapted to the high-throughput environment. The above requirements are briefly addressed in the following paper. PMID:22489783

  12. Identification of reference proteins for Western blot analyses in mouse model systems of 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) toxicity.

    PubMed

    Prokopec, Stephenie D; Watson, John D; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a well-established, inexpensive and accurate way of measuring protein content. Because of technical variation between wells, normalization is required for valid interpretation of results across multiple samples. Typically this involves the use of one or more endogenous controls to adjust the measured levels of experimental molecules. Although some endogenous controls are widely used, validation is required for each experimental system. This is critical when studying transcriptional-modulators, such as toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).To address this issue, we examined hepatic tissue from 192 mice representing 47 unique combinations of strain, sex, Ahr-genotype, TCDD dose and treatment time. We examined 7 candidate reference proteins in each animal and assessed consistency of protein abundance through: 1) TCDD-induced fold-difference in protein content from basal levels, 2) inter- and intra- animal stability, and 3) the ability of each candidate to reduce instability of the other candidates. Univariate analyses identified HPRT as the most stable protein. Multivariate analysis indicated that stability generally increased with the number of proteins used, but gains from using >3 proteins were small. Lastly, by comparing these new data to our previous studies of mRNA controls on the same animals, we were able to show that the ideal mRNA and protein control-genes are distinct, and use of only 2-3 proteins provides strong stability, unlike in mRNA studies in the same cohort, where larger control-gene batteries were needed. PMID:25329058

  13. Identification of Reference Proteins for Western Blot Analyses in Mouse Model Systems of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-P-Dioxin (TCDD) Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Prokopec, Stephenie D.; Watson, John D.; Pohjanvirta, Raimo; Boutros, Paul C.

    2014-01-01

    Western blotting is a well-established, inexpensive and accurate way of measuring protein content. Because of technical variation between wells, normalization is required for valid interpretation of results across multiple samples. Typically this involves the use of one or more endogenous controls to adjust the measured levels of experimental molecules. Although some endogenous controls are widely used, validation is required for each experimental system. This is critical when studying transcriptional-modulators, such as toxicants like 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).To address this issue, we examined hepatic tissue from 192 mice representing 47 unique combinations of strain, sex, Ahr-genotype, TCDD dose and treatment time. We examined 7 candidate reference proteins in each animal and assessed consistency of protein abundance through: 1) TCDD-induced fold-difference in protein content from basal levels, 2) inter- and intra- animal stability, and 3) the ability of each candidate to reduce instability of the other candidates. Univariate analyses identified HPRT as the most stable protein. Multivariate analysis indicated that stability generally increased with the number of proteins used, but gains from using >3 proteins were small. Lastly, by comparing these new data to our previous studies of mRNA controls on the same animals, we were able to show that the ideal mRNA and protein control-genes are distinct, and use of only 2–3 proteins provides strong stability, unlike in mRNA studies in the same cohort, where larger control-gene batteries were needed. PMID:25329058

  14. Peritoneal Mesothelioma: An Unusual Cause of High-Protein Ascites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We present a case illustrating the workup and diagnosis of peritoneal sarcomatous mesothelioma as an unusual etiology of intestinal obstruction and high-protein ascites in an otherwise healthy man. This rare disorder is diagnosed based on immunohistochemistry, which is necessary to differentiate it from other rare sarcomatous carcinomas. In many cases, localized disease can be treated to cure with surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy. Advanced disease is often treated for palliation of symptoms. PMID:26504886

  15. High-throughput protein analysis integrating bioinformatics and experimental assays.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Mehrle, Alexander; Falkenhahn, Mechthild; Seiler, Markus; Glatting, Karl-Heinz; Poustka, Annemarie; Suhai, Sandor; Wiemann, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    The wealth of transcript information that has been made publicly available in recent years requires the development of high-throughput functional genomics and proteomics approaches for its analysis. Such approaches need suitable data integration procedures and a high level of automation in order to gain maximum benefit from the results generated. We have designed an automatic pipeline to analyse annotated open reading frames (ORFs) stemming from full-length cDNAs produced mainly by the German cDNA Consortium. The ORFs are cloned into expression vectors for use in large-scale assays such as the determination of subcellular protein localization or kinase reaction specificity. Additionally, all identified ORFs undergo exhaustive bioinformatic analysis such as similarity searches, protein domain architecture determination and prediction of physicochemical characteristics and secondary structure, using a wide variety of bioinformatic methods in combination with the most up-to-date public databases (e.g. PRINTS, BLOCKS, INTERPRO, PROSITE SWISSPROT). Data from experimental results and from the bioinformatic analysis are integrated and stored in a relational database (MS SQL-Server), which makes it possible for researchers to find answers to biological questions easily, thereby speeding up the selection of targets for further analysis. The designed pipeline constitutes a new automatic approach to obtaining and administrating relevant biological data from high-throughput investigations of cDNAs in order to systematically identify and characterize novel genes, as well as to comprehensively describe the function of the encoded proteins. PMID:14762202

  16. Toxic action/toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hathway, D E

    2000-02-01

    ,Z-muconaldehyde forms cyclic products containing a pyrrole residue linked to purine. Increased HbCO concentrations reduce the O2-carrying capacity of the blood, and the changed shape of the O2-Hb dissociation curve parallels disturbance in O2 unloading. CN- acts on electron transport and paralyses respiration. In telodrin poisoning, preconvulsive glutamine formation abstracts tricarboxylic acid intermediates incommensurately with normal cerebral respiration. Antigen-antibody complexing depletes the antibody titre, available against infection. At high doses of Cd, Cd-thionein filtered through the kidneys is reabsorbed and tubular lesions produced. Some organophosphate insecticides promote irreversible acetylcholinesterase phosphorylation and blockade nerve function, and others react with neurotoxic esterase to cause delayed neuropathy. The evidence for Paraquat pulmonary poisoning suggests a radical mechanism involving three interrelated cyclic reaction stages. The action of N- and O8 (O substituent in 6-position of the purine) demethylases explains deletion mechanisms for DNA-alkyl adducts. DNA-directed synthesis in the presence of ultimate carcinogens provides for an estimation of misincorporations, which implicate the same transversions as those found by direct mutagenicity testing. Chemical carcinogens recognize tissue-sensitive cells and modify their heritable genetic complement. Oncoproteins encoded by activated oncogenes signal the transformation of normal cells into cancer cells. The importance of the H-ras oncogene and p53 tumour-suppressor gene is stressed. Antidotal action is analysed; for example, parenteral glutamine administration to telodrin-intoxicated rats restores the depleted cerebral glutamate level and prevents seizures. Glutamate acts as anticonvulsant in petit mal epilepsy. In general, therefore, the reaction of the toxicant-related substance with the relevant target-tissue macromolecule accounts for the biochemical/biological events at a cellular level a PMID

  17. Anti-Viral Antibody Profiling by High Density Protein Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xiaofang; Wiktor, Peter; Kahn, Peter; Brunner, Al; Khela, Amritpal; Karthikeyan, Kailash; Barker, Kristi; Yu, Xiaobo; Magee, Mitch; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Gibson, David; Rooney, Madeleine E; Qiu, Ji; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    Viral infections elicit anti-viral antibodies and have been associated with various chronic diseases. Detection of these antibodies can facilitate diagnosis, treatment of infection and understanding of the mechanisms of virus associated diseases. In this work, we assayed anti-viral antibodies using a novel high density-nucleic acid programmable protein array (HD-NAPPA) platform. Individual viral proteins were expressed in situ directly from plasmids encoding proteins in an array of microscopic reaction chambers. Quality of protein display and serum response was assured by comparing intra- and inter- array correlation within or between printing batches with average correlation coefficients of 0.91 and 0.96, respectively. HD-NAPPA showed higher signal to background (S/B) ratio compared with standard NAPPA on planar glass slides and ELISA. Antibody responses to 761 antigens from 25 different viruses were profiled among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and type 1 diabetes (T1D). Common as well as unique antibody reactivity patterns were detected between patients and healthy controls. We believe HD-viral-NAPPA will enable the study of host-pathogen interactions at unprecedented dimensions and elucidate the role of pathogen infections in disease development. PMID:25758251

  18. Bridging the gap between high-throughput genetic and transcriptional data reveals cellular pathways responding to alpha-synuclein toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yeger-Lotem, Esti; Riva, Laura; Su, Linhui Julie; Gitler, Aaron D.; Cashikar, Anil; King, Oliver D.; Auluck, Pavan K.; Geddie, Melissa L.; Valastyan, Julie S.; Karger, David R.; Lindquist, Susan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2009-01-01

    Cells respond to stimuli by changes in various processes, including signaling pathways and gene expression. Efforts to identify components of these responses increasingly depend on mRNA profiling and genetic library screens, yet the functional roles of the genes identified by these assays often remain enigmatic. By comparing the results of these two assays across various cellular responses, we found that they are consistently distinct. Moreover, genetic screens tend to identify response regulators, while mRNA profiling frequently detects metabolic responses. We developed an integrative approach that bridges the gap between these data using known molecular interactions, thus highlighting major response pathways. We harnessed this approach to reveal cellular pathways related to alpha-synuclein, a small lipid-binding protein implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. For this we screened an established yeast model for alpha-synuclein toxicity to identify genes that when overexpressed alter cellular survival. Application of our algorithm to these data and data from mRNA profiling provided functional explanations for many of these genes and revealed novel relations between alpha-synuclein toxicity and basic cellular pathways. PMID:19234470

  19. Non Invasive High Resolution In Vivo Imaging of α-napthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) Induced Hepatobiliary Toxicity in STII Medaka

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Ron; Kullman, Seth; Yuen, Bonny; Hinton, David E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel transparent stock of medaka (Oryzias latipes; STII), homozygous recessive for all four pigments (iridophores, xanthophores, leucophores, melanophores), permits transcutaneous, high resolution ( < 1μm) imaging of internal organs and tissues in living individuals. We applied this model to in vivo investigation of α-napthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) induced hepatobiliary toxicity. Distinct phenotypic responses to ANIT involving all aspects of intrahepatic biliary passageways (IHBPs), particularly bile preductular epithelial cells (BPDECs), associated with transitional passageways between canaliculi and bile ductules, were observed. Alterations included: attenuation/dilation of bile canaliculi, bile preductular lesions, hydropic vacuolation of hepatocytes and BPDECs, mild BPDEC hypertrophy, and biliary epithelial cell (BEC) hyperplasia. Ex vivo histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural studies were employed to aid in interpretation of, and verify, in vivo findings. 3D reconstructions from in vivo investigations provided quantitative morphometric and volumetric evaluation of ANIT exposed and untreated livers. The findings presented show for the first time in vivo evaluation of toxicity in the STII medaka hepatobiliary system, and, in conjunction with prior in vivo work characterizing normalcy, advance our comparative understanding of this lower vertebrate hepatobiliary system and its response to toxic insult. PMID:18022256

  20. DNA Repair Alterations in Children With Pediatric Malignancies: Novel Opportunities to Identify Patients at Risk for High-Grade Toxicities

    SciTech Connect

    Ruebe, Claudia E.

    2010-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in a pilot study, the phosphorylated H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci approach for identifying patients with double-strand break (DSB) repair deficiencies, who may overreact to DNA-damaging cancer therapy. Methods and Materials: The DSB repair capacity of children with solid cancers was analyzed compared with that of age-matched control children and correlated with treatment-related normal-tissue responses (n = 47). Double-strand break repair was investigated by counting {gamma}H2AX foci in blood lymphocytes at defined time points after irradiation of blood samples. Results: Whereas all healthy control children exhibited proficient DSB repair, 3 children with tumors revealed clearly impaired DSB repair capacities, and 2 of these repair-deficient children developed life-threatening or even lethal normal-tissue toxicities. The underlying mutations affecting regulatory factors involved in DNA repair pathways were identified. Moreover, significant differences in mean DSB repair capacity were observed between children with tumors and control children, suggesting that childhood cancer is based on genetic alterations affecting DSB repair function. Conclusions: Double-strand break repair alteration in children may predispose to cancer formation and may affect children's susceptibility to normal-tissue toxicities. Phosphorylated H2AX analysis of blood samples allows one to detect DSB repair deficiencies and thus enables identification of children at risk for high-grade toxicities.

  1. Select Small Core Structure Carbamates Exhibit High Contact Toxicity to “Carbamate-Resistant” Strain Malaria Mosquitoes, Anopheles gambiae (Akron)

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Dawn M.; Li, Jianyong; Chen, Qiao-Hong; Han, Qian; Mutunga, James M.; Wysinski, Ania; Anderson, Troy D.; Ding, Haizhen; Carpenetti, Tiffany L.; Verma, Astha; Islam, Rafique; Paulson, Sally L.; Lam, Polo C.-H.; Totrov, Maxim; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R.; Carlier, Paul R.

    2012-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is a proven target for control of the malaria mosquito (Anopheles gambiae). Unfortunately, a single amino acid mutation (G119S) in An. gambiae AChE-1 (AgAChE) confers resistance to the AChE inhibitors currently approved by the World Health Organization for indoor residual spraying. In this report, we describe several carbamate inhibitors that potently inhibit G119S AgAChE and that are contact-toxic to carbamate-resistant An. gambiae. PCR-RFLP analysis was used to confirm that carbamate-susceptible G3 and carbamate-resistant Akron strains of An. gambiae carry wild-type (WT) and G119S AChE, respectively. G119S AgAChE was expressed and purified for the first time, and was shown to have only 3% of the turnover number (kcat) of the WT enzyme. Twelve carbamates were then assayed for inhibition of these enzymes. High resistance ratios (>2,500-fold) were observed for carbamates bearing a benzene ring core, consistent with the carbamate-resistant phenotype of the G119S enzyme. Interestingly, resistance ratios for two oxime methylcarbamates, and for five pyrazol-4-yl methylcarbamates were found to be much lower (4- to 65-fold). The toxicities of these carbamates to live G3 and Akron strain An. gambiae were determined. As expected from the enzyme resistance ratios, carbamates bearing a benzene ring core showed low toxicity to Akron strain An. gambiae (LC50>5,000 μg/mL). However, one oxime methylcarbamate (aldicarb) and five pyrazol-4-yl methylcarbamates (4a–e) showed good to excellent toxicity to the Akron strain (LC50 = 32–650 μg/mL). These results suggest that appropriately functionalized “small-core” carbamates could function as a resistance-breaking anticholinesterase insecticides against the malaria mosquito. PMID:23049714

  2. Yeast as a platform to explore polyglutamine toxicity and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Duennwald, Martin L

    2013-01-01

    Protein misfolding is associated with many neurodegenerative diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases caused by polyglutamine expansion proteins, such as Huntington's disease. The model organism baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) has provided important general insights into the basic cellular mechanisms underlying protein misfolding. Furthermore, experiments in yeast have identified cellular factors that modulate the toxicity and the aggregation associated with polyglutamine expansion proteins. Notably, many features discovered in yeast have been proven to be highly relevant in other model organisms and in human pathology. The experimental protocols depicted here serve to reliably determine polyglutamine toxicity and polyglutamine aggregation in yeast. PMID:23719914

  3. High Throughput Screening for Drugs that Modulate Intermediate Filament Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jingyuan; Groppi, Vincent E.; Gui, Honglian; Chen, Lu; Xie, Qing; Liu, Li

    2016-01-01

    Intermediate filament (IF) proteins have unique and complex cell and tissue distribution. Importantly, IF gene mutations cause or predispose to more than 80 human tissue-specific diseases (IF-pathies), with the most severe disease phenotypes being due to mutations at conserved residues that result in a disrupted IF network. A critical need for the entire IF-pathy field is the identification of drugs that can ameliorate or cure these diseases, particularly since all current therapies target the IF-pathy complication, such as diabetes or cardiovascular disease, rather than the mutant IF protein or gene. We describe a high throughput approach to identify drugs that can normalize disrupted IF proteins. This approach utilizes transduction of lentivirus that expresses green-fluorescent-protein-tagged keratin 18 (K18) R90C in A549 cells. The readout is drug ‘hits’ that convert the dot-like keratin filament distribution, due to the R90C mutation, to a wildtype-like filamentous array. A similar strategy can be used to screen thousands of compounds and can be utilized for practically any IF protein with a filament-disrupting mutation, and could therefore potentially target many IF-pathies. ‘Hits’ of interest require validation in cell culture then using in vivo experimental models. Approaches to study the mechanism of mutant-IF normalization by potential drugs of interest are also described. The ultimate goal of this drug screening approach is to identify effective and safe compounds that can potentially be tested for clinical efficacy in patients. PMID:26795471

  4. Human and rat hepatocyte toxicity and protein phosphatase 1 and 2A inhibitory activity of naturally occurring desmethyl-microcystins and nodularins.

    PubMed

    Ufelmann, Helena; Krüger, Thomas; Luckas, Bernd; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-03-11

    Contamination of water, foods and food supplements by various genera of cyanobacteria is a serious health problem worldwide for humans and animals, largely due to the toxic effects of microcystins (MCs) and nodularin (NOD), a group of hepatotoxic cyclic peptides. The toxins occur in variable structures resulting in more than 90 different MCs and 8 different NODs, many of them not having been investigated for their toxic potency. Potent MCs such as MC-LR have been shown to elicit their hepatotoxic potency via inhibition of hepatic protein phosphatases (PP) 1 and 2A leading to over-phosphorylation of vital cellular proteins. This mechanism of action is also thought to be responsible for the long term tumor promoting action of certain MCs and NOD in the liver. Here, we report on the isolation of certain MCs and NOD as well as a number of their desmethylated derivatives from algae bloom. Subsequently, we determined the cytotoxicity of these compounds in isolated primary human and rat hepatocytes in culture. In parallel experiments, we analyzed the inhibitory potency of these congeners on PP1 and 2A using commercially available enzymes. We found in primary rat hepatocytes that MC-LR, -YR and NOD were cytotoxic, namely in the 10 to >50 nM range, while MC-RR was not. The desmethylated congeners of MC-LR, -YR, and NOD were equally or more-toxic as/than their fully methylated counterparts. In primary human hepatocytes we could show that MC-LR, NOD and the desmethylated variants [³Asp]MC-LR, [⁷Dha]MC-LR and [¹Asp]NOD were cytotoxic in the 20 to >600 nM range. Inhibition data with human, bovine and rabbit protein phosphatases 1 and 2A were roughly in accordance with the cytotoxicity findings in human and rat hepatocytes, i.e. desmethylation had no pronounced effects on the inhibitory potencies. Thus, a variety of naturally occurring desmethylated MC and NOD congeners have to be considered as being at least as toxic as the corresponding fully methylated derivatives. PMID

  5. Metallothionein protection of cadmium toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Klaassen, Curtis D. Liu, Jie; Diwan, Bhalchandra A.

    2009-08-01

    The discovery of the cadmium (Cd)-binding protein from horse kidney in 1957 marked the birth of research on this low-molecular weight, cysteine-rich protein called metallothionein (MT) in Cd toxicology. MT plays minimal roles in the gastrointestinal absorption of Cd, but MT plays important roles in Cd retention in tissues and dramatically decreases biliary excretion of Cd. Cd-bound to MT is responsible for Cd accumulation in tissues and the long biological half-life of Cd in the body. Induction of MT protects against acute Cd-induced lethality, as well as acute toxicity to the liver and lung. Intracellular MT also plays important roles in ameliorating Cd toxicity following prolonged exposures, particularly chronic Cd-induced nephrotoxicity, osteotoxicity, and toxicity to the lung, liver, and immune system. There is an association between human and rodent Cd exposure and prostate cancers, especially in the portions where MT is poorly expressed. MT expression in Cd-induced tumors varies depending on the type and the stage of tumor development. For instance, high levels of MT are detected in Cd-induced sarcomas at the injection site, whereas the sarcoma metastases are devoid of MT. The use of MT-transgenic and MT-null mice has greatly helped define the role of MT in Cd toxicology, with the MT-null mice being hypersensitive and MT-transgenic mice resistant to Cd toxicity. Thus, MT is critical for protecting human health from Cd toxicity. There are large individual variations in MT expression, which might in turn predispose some people to Cd toxicity.

  6. Dosimetric correlation of acute and late toxicities in high-risk prostate cancer patients treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy followed by intensity modulated radiotherapy boost

    PubMed Central

    Kapoor, Rakesh; Bansal, Anshuma; Kumar, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In prostate cancer, higher radiation doses are often related to higher local control rates. However, the clinical effect of these higher doses on normal tissue toxicities is generally overlooked. We dosimetrically analyze sequential intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans in high-risk prostate cancer patients and correlate them with acute and late normal tissue toxicities. Materials and Methods: Twenty-five high-risk prostate cancer patients were planned with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to a dose of 50 Gy delivered in 25 fractions in 5 weeks, followed by seven-field IMRT boost, to a dose of 24 Gy delivered in 12 fractions in 2.5 weeks, along with hormonal therapy. Acute and late toxicities were analyzed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity criteria. Student's t-test was used for correlating doses received by normal tissues with toxicity grade. Five-year disease-free survival (DFS) and biochemical relapse-free survival (RFS) were evaluated using Kaplan–Meier analysis. Results: Median follow-up of patients was 65 months. Of 25 patients, two developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity. Only 1 patient developed acute Grade 2 bladder toxicity. Late Grade 2 and 3 rectal toxicity was seen in 2 and 1 patient, respectively. Late Grade 2 and 3 bladder toxicity was seen in 1 patient each. Grade 2 or more acute rectal toxicity correlated significantly with rectal volume receiving >70 Gy (P = 0.04). The 5-year DFS and biochemical RFS was 70.2% and 79.2%, respectively. One patient failed locally and seven failed at distant sites. Conclusion: Sequential IMRT with a dose of 74 Gy and maximum androgen blockade is well tolerated in high-risk patients in Indian setup with adequate control rates. PMID:27555679

  7. Transgenic plants expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein show increased resistance and toxicity to both chewing and sucking pests.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Min; Li, Jie; Zhu, Jin-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Wang, Cheng-Shu; Liu, Shu-Sheng; Chen, Xue-Xin; Li, Sheng

    2016-04-01

    The adoption of pest-resistant transgenic plants to reduce yield losses and decrease pesticide use has been successful. To achieve the goal of controlling both chewing and sucking pests in a given transgenic plant, we generated transgenic tobacco, Arabidopsis, and rice plants expressing the fusion protein, AaIT/GNA, in which an insecticidal scorpion venom neurotoxin (Androctonus australis toxin, AaIT) is fused to snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin, GNA). Compared with transgenic tobacco and Arabidopsis plants expressing AaIT or GNA, transgenic plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited increased resistance and toxicity to one chewing pest, the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. Transgenic tobacco and rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA showed increased resistance and toxicity to two sucking pests, the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci, and the rice brown planthopper, Nilaparvata lugens, respectively. Moreover, in the field, transgenic rice plants expressing AaIT/GNA exhibited a significant improvement in grain yield when infested with N. lugens. This study shows that expressing the AaIT/GNA fusion protein in transgenic plants can be a useful approach for controlling pests, particularly sucking pests which are not susceptible to the toxin in Bt crops. PMID:25641865

  8. Coarse-Grained Antibody Models for "Weak" Protein-Protein Interactions from Low to High Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Calero-Rubio, Cesar; Saluja, Atul; Roberts, Christopher J

    2016-07-14

    So-called "weak" protein-protein interactions are important for the control of solution properties and stability at elevated protein concentrations (c2) but are not practical to capture in atomistic simulations. This report focuses on a series of coarse-grained models for predicting second osmotic virial coefficients (B22) and high-concentration Rayleigh scattering (osmotic compressibility) as a function of c2 for monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that are of interest in biotechnology. B22 and molecular volume along with c2-dependent osmotic compressibility were calculated for a series of models with increasing structural detail. Models were refined to include contributions from sterics, short-ranged van der Waals and hydrophobic attractions, screened electrostatics, and the flexibility of the mAb hinge region. The results highlight shortcomings for spherical models of MAbs and a useful balance between numerical accuracy and computational burden offered by models based on 6 or 12 spherical, partly overlapping domains. The results provide bounds for realistic values of effective charges on variable domains in order for MAbs to be stable in solution and more generally illustrate semiquantitative bounds for the space of model parameters that can reproduce experimental behavior and provide a basis for future development of computationally efficient and accurate CG mAb models to predict both low- and high-c2 behavior. PMID:27314827

  9. Toxicities of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin, abortifacient proteins from Chinese medicinal plants, on cultured tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsao, S W; Ng, T B; Yeung, H W

    1990-01-01

    Trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin are abortifacient proteins extracted from Chinese medicinal herbs. Study of their in vitro cytotoxicities showed that the two proteins selectively injured choriocarcinoma and melanoma cells. Hepatoma cells represented the most resistant cell line among the various cell lines investigated. Cytotoxicity profiles of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin differed from those of anti-cancer drugs which interfere with DNA metabolism such as cisplatin, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Radioactive precursor incorporation studies suggested that the two abortifacient proteins inhibited cellular protein synthesis. The marked decrease in secretion of human chorionic gonadotrophin and progesterone by choriocarcinoma cells after treatment with the proteins could be attributed mainly to loss of cells. PMID:2175958

  10. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yan; Murray, Shauna A.; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-01-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r = 0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r = 0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  11. High Specificity of a Quantitative PCR Assay Targeting a Saxitoxin Gene for Monitoring Toxic Algae Associated with Paralytic Shellfish Toxins in the Yellow Sea.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yan; Yu, Ren-Cheng; Murray, Shauna A; Chen, Jian-Hua; Kang, Zhen-Jun; Zhang, Qing-Chun; Kong, Fan-Zhou; Zhou, Ming-Jiang

    2015-10-01

    The identification of core genes involved in the biosynthesis of saxitoxin (STX) offers a great opportunity to detect toxic algae associated with paralytic shellfish toxins (PST). In the Yellow Sea (YS) in China, both toxic and nontoxic Alexandrium species are present, which makes it a difficult issue to specifically monitor PST-producing toxic algae. In this study, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay targeting sxtA4, a domain in the sxt gene cluster that encodes a unique enzyme involved in STX biosynthesis, was applied to analyze samples collected from the YS in spring of 2012. The abundance of two toxic species within the Alexandrium tamarense species complex, i.e., A. fundyense and A. pacificum, was also determined with TaqMan-based qPCR assays, and PSTs in net-concentrated phytoplankton samples were analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a fluorescence detector. It was found that the distribution of the sxtA4 gene in the YS was consistent with the toxic algae and PSTs, and the quantitation results of sxtA4 correlated well with the abundance of the two toxic species (r=0.857). These results suggested that the two toxic species were major PST producers during the sampling season and that sxtA-based qPCR is a promising method to detect toxic algae associated with PSTs in the YS. The correlation between PST levels and sxtA-based qPCR results, however, was less significant (r=0.552), implying that sxtA-based qPCR is not accurate enough to reflect the toxicity of PST-producing toxic algae. The combination of an sxtA-based qPCR assay and chemical means might be a promising method for monitoring toxic algal blooms. PMID:26231652

  12. 20-Year Experience With Intraoperative High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma: Outcomes, Toxicity, and Practice Recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Folkert, Michael R.; Tong, William Y.; LaQuaglia, Michael P.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Chou, Alexander J.; Magnan, Heather; Zelefsky, Michael J.; Wolden, Suzanne L.

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To assess outcomes and toxicity of high-dose-rate intraoperative radiation therapy (HDR-IORT) in the management of pediatric sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Seventy-five pediatric patients underwent HDR-IORT for sarcoma from May 1993 to November 2013. The median age was 9 years old (36 patients were ≤6 years old). HDR-IORT was part of initial therapy in 37 patients (49%) and for recurrent disease in 38 patients (51%). Forty-one patients (55%) received HDR-IORT and postoperative external beam RT (PORT), and 22 patients (29%) were previously treated with external beam radiation therapy to the IORT site. Local control (LC), overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods. Results: At a median follow-up of 7.8 years for surviving patients, 5-year projected rates of LC, EFS, and OS were 63% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50%-76%), 33% (95% CI 21%-45%), and 43% (95% CI 30%-55%), with a median survival of 3.1 years. The 5-year LC, EFS, and OS rates for patients with recurrent disease were 46% (95% CI, 28%-64%), 30% (95% CI, 13%-46%), and 36% (95% CI, 18%-54%). Acute toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in 2 (2.5%) treatments; late toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in 4 (5.3%) patients 0.3-9.9 years after HDR-IORT. The incidence of toxicity ≥grade 3 was not associated with HDR-IORT applicator size, HDR-IORT dose, prior RT or PORT, or prior or postoperative chemotherapy, but all toxicity ≥grade 3 occurred in patients ≤6 years treated with HDR-IORT doses ≥12 Gy. Conclusions: HDR-IORT is a well-tolerated component of multimodality therapy for pediatric sarcoma, allowing additional local treatment while reducing external beam exposure. Taking clinical considerations into account, doses between 8-12 Gy are appropriate for HDR-IORT in patients ≤6 years of age.

  13. OpdA, a bacterial organophosphorus hydrolase, prevents lethality in rats after poisoning with highly toxic organophosphorus pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Steven B.; Sutherland, Tara D.; Gresham, Chip; Oakeshott, John; Scott, Colin; Eddleston, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Organophosphorus (OP) pesticides poison more than 3,000,000 people every year in the developing world, mostly through intentional self-poisoning. Advances in medical therapy for OP poisoning have lagged, and current treatment is not highly effective with mortality of up to 40% in even the most advanced Western medical facilities. Administration of a broadly active bacterial OP hydrolase to patients in order to hydrolyze OPs in circulation might allow current therapies to be more effective. The objective of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of a new recombinant bacterial OP hydrolase (OpdA), cloned from Agrobacterium radiobacter, in rat models of two chemically distinct but highly toxic and rapidly acting OP pesticides: dichlorvos and parathion. Without OpdA treatment, median time to death in rats poisoned with 3 × LD50 of dichlorvos or parathion was 6 minutes and 25.5 minutes, respectively. Administration of a single dose of OpdA immediately after dichlorvos resulted in 100% survival at 24 hours, with no additional antidotal therapy. After parathion poisoning, OpdA alone caused only a delay to death. However, an additional two doses of OpdA resulted in 62.5% survival at 24 hours after parathion poisoning. In combination with pralidoxime therapy, a single dose of OpdA increased survival to 75% after parathion poisoning. Our results demonstrate that OpdA is able to improve survival after poisoning by two chemically distinct and highly toxic OP pesticides. PMID:18378376

  14. Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination for toxic phenols based on coupled cMWCNT/cyclodextrin edge-functionalized graphene composite.

    PubMed

    Gao, Juanjuan; Liu, Maoxiang; Song, Haiou; Zhang, Shupeng; Qian, Yueyue; Li, Aimin

    2016-11-15

    Highly-sensitive electrocatalytic determination of toxic phenol compounds is of significance in environmental monitoring due to their low degradation and high toxicity to the environment and humans. In this paper, a rapid and sensitive electrochemical sensor based on coupled carboxyl-multi-walled carbon nanotube (cMWCNT) and cyclodextrin (CD) edge-functionalized graphene composite was successfully employed towards trace detection of three typical phenols (4-aminophenol, 4-AP; 4-chlorophenol, 4-CP; 4-nitrophenol, 4-NP). The morphology studies from scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope analysis revealed that cMWCNTs as conductive bridges were successfully incorporated into CD edge-functionalized graphene layers. Further, The electrocatalytic detection performance of the 3D simultaneously reduced and self-assembled sensing architecture (GN-CD-cMWCNT) with trace amounts of CDs was evaluated. The electrochemical studies demonstrated that GN-CD-cMWCNT displays excellent electrocatalytic activity, high sensitivity and stability. Under optimal conditions, the current responses of 4-AP, 4-CP and 4-NP are linear to concentrations over two different ranges, with low detection limit of 0.019, 0.017 and 0.027μM (S/N=3), respectively. And, GN-CD-cMWCNT shows an excellent anti-interference ability against electroactive species and metal ions. In addition, validation of the applicability of the presented sensor was also performed for the determination of three phenols in tap water sample with satisfactory results. PMID:27415597

  15. A Brief Study on Toxic Combustion Products of the Polymers Used in High-Pressure Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hshieh, Fu-Yu; Beeson, Harold D.

    2005-01-01

    One likely cause of polymer ignition in a high-pressure oxygen system is the adiabatic-compression heating of polymers caused by pneumatic impact. Oxidative pyrolysis or combustion of polymers in a high-pressure oxygen system could generate toxic gases. This paper investigates the feasibility of using the NASA pneumatic-impact system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and determines the toxic combustion products produced from the burning of five selected polymers. Five polymers commonly used in high-pressure oxygen systems, Zytel(Registered TradeMark) 42 (Nylon 6/6), Buna N (nitrile rubber), Witon(Registered TradeMark) A (copolymer of vinylidene fluoride and hexafluoropropylene), Neoflon(Registered TradeMark) (polychlorotrifluoroethylene), and Teflon(Registered TradeMark) (polytetrafluoroethylene), were tested in the NASA pneumatic-impact test system at 17.2-MPa oxygen pressure. The polymers were ignited and burned; combustion products were collected in a stainless-steel sample bottle and analyzed using various methods. The results show that the NASA pneumatic-impact system is an appropriate test system to conduct adiabatic-compression combustion tests and to collect combustion products for further chemical analysis. The composition of the combustion product gas generated from burning the five selected polymers are presented and discussed.

  16. Behaviour of five pharmaceuticals with high baseline toxicity in wastewater treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Driezum, Inge; McArdell, Christa; Fenner, Kathrin; Helbling, Damian; van Breukelen, Boris

    2013-04-01

    Many pharmaceuticals enter the aquatic environment through sewer systems and are partially removed in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) by sorption to sludge biomass or biodegradation. Biodegradation often does not lead to complete mineralization but to the formation of stable transformation products (TPs), which might still be harmful to the environment. Recently, a study was undertaken to assess the risk of the top 100 pharmaceuticals from wastewater of a hospital in Switzerland. The predicted toxicity was linked to the predicted environmental concentration in order to assess overall risk potential. In this study, biodegradation and sorption studies were carried out on the top five selected pharmaceuticals (amiodarone, atorvastatin, clotrimazole, meclozine and ritonavir). Potential TPs that are formed during activated sludge treatment were identified and concentrations of both the parent compounds and TPs were measured in the WWTP. With this data, the fate of these compounds was modeled in a WWTP system using a multi-reactor steady-state WWTP model. This study showed that sorption was the most important loss process for amiodarone and meclozine. They had an elimination of more than 99%. Sorption was also the main loss process for clotrimazole, but it was combined with some biodegradation. For ritonavir, both biodegradation and sorption played a role in the loss of this compound. The most important removal process for atorvastatin was biodegradation. Four TPs, formed through β-oxidation and monohydroxilation, were identified in both the activated sludge batch reactors and the WWTP effluent. In the WWTP effluent, only atorvastatin, clotrimazole and ritonavir were found. All identified TPs of atorvastatin were detected in the effluent. Risk quotients (RQ) of all five pharmaceuticals were estimated based on effluent concentration and baseline toxicity and ranged from zero to 2.14. Only ritonavir potentially poses an ecotoxicological risk for the aquatic environment.

  17. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution.

    PubMed

    Walters, Benjamin T; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R; Sosnick, Tobin R; Englander, S Walter

    2013-11-19

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (<20 ms), determined by various methods including small angle X-ray scattering. The compaction produces a structurally heterogeneous state with widespread low-level HX protection and spectroscopic signals that match the equilibrium melting posttransition-state baseline. In a much slower step (7-s time constant), all of the MBP molecules, although initially heterogeneously structured, form the same distinct helix plus sheet folding intermediate with the same time constant. The intermediate is composed of segments that are distant in the MBP sequence but adjacent in the native protein where they close the longest residue-to-residue contact. Segments that are most HX protected in the early molecular collapse do not contribute to the initial intermediate, whereas the segments that do participate are among the less protected. The 7-s intermediate persists through the rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (~100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways. PMID:24191053

  18. Folding of a large protein at high structural resolution

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Benjamin T.; Mayne, Leland; Hinshaw, James R.; Sosnick, Tobin R.; Englander, S. Walter

    2013-01-01

    Kinetic folding of the large two-domain maltose binding protein (MBP; 370 residues) was studied at high structural resolution by an advanced hydrogen-exchange pulse-labeling mass-spectrometry method (HX MS). Dilution into folding conditions initiates a fast molecular collapse into a polyglobular conformation (<20 ms), determined by various methods including small angle X-ray scattering. The compaction produces a structurally heterogeneous state with widespread low-level HX protection and spectroscopic signals that match the equilibrium melting posttransition-state baseline. In a much slower step (7-s time constant), all of the MBP molecules, although initially heterogeneously structured, form the same distinct helix plus sheet folding intermediate with the same time constant. The intermediate is composed of segments that are distant in the MBP sequence but adjacent in the native protein where they close the longest residue-to-residue contact. Segments that are most HX protected in the early molecular collapse do not contribute to the initial intermediate, whereas the segments that do participate are among the less protected. The 7-s intermediate persists through the rest of the folding process. It contains the sites of three previously reported destabilizing mutations that greatly slow folding. These results indicate that the intermediate is an obligatory step on the MBP folding pathway. MBP then folds to the native state on a longer time scale (∼100 s), suggestively in more than one step, the first of which forms structure adjacent to the 7-s intermediate. These results add a large protein to the list of proteins known to fold through distinct native-like intermediates in distinct pathways. PMID:24191053

  19. [The gene expression of the protein SLAWD, mediating the toxic effect of destruxin A on Spodoptera litura larvae, in procaryotic cells: purification and characterization].

    PubMed

    Meng, X; Li, L M; Gao, G; Jin, F L; Ren, S X

    2014-01-01

    Spodoptera litura is one of the most destructive phytophagous pest infesting cotton, vegetable, oilseed and ber crops around the world. Dextruxin A (DA), is a one of a kind microbial insecticide, which has potent toxins with bioactivity against S. litura larvae. An abnormal wing disc (AWD) protein was identified as a DA toxic effect protein in S. litura SL-1 cells. To better understand the role of the AWD gene of S. litura (SLAWD) it was purified and characterized. The entire coding region of the SLAWD gene was cloned into a pET-32a(+) expression vector and transformed into competent Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) cells. SDS-PAGE and western blotting analysis and western blotting showed that the best induction conditions were 1 mmol mL(-1) isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) for 6 h at 37°C; the molecular weight of the fusion protein was 35.0 kDa. The production of polyclonal antibodies and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that the titer of antiserum was 1:25,600; western blotting analysis showed that the recombinant SLAWD was recognized by the anti-SLAWD polyclonal antibody. AWD is a key protein involved in wing development in insects. These tools will assist in the further characterization of SLAWD and studies on the mechanism of action of destruxin A. PMID:25845231

  20. The Highly Conserved MraZ Protein Is a Transcriptional Regulator in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Eraso, Jesus M.; Markillie, Lye M.; Mitchell, Hugh D.; Taylor, Ronald C.; Orr, Galya

    2014-01-01

    The mraZ and mraW genes are highly conserved in bacteria, both in sequence and in their position at the head of the division and cell wall (dcw) gene cluster. Located directly upstream of the mraZ gene, the Pmra promoter drives the transcription of mraZ and mraW, as well as many essential cell division and cell wall genes, but no regulator of Pmra has been found to date. Although MraZ has structural similarity to the AbrB transition state regulator and the MazE antitoxin and MraW is known to methylate the 16S rRNA, mraZ and mraW null mutants have no detectable phenotypes. Here we show that overproduction of Escherichia coli MraZ inhibited cell division and was lethal in rich medium at high induction levels and in minimal medium at low induction levels. Co-overproduction of MraW suppressed MraZ toxicity, and loss of MraW enhanced MraZ toxicity, suggesting that MraZ and MraW have antagonistic functions. MraZ-green fluorescent protein localized to the nucleoid, suggesting that it binds DNA. Consistent with this idea, purified MraZ directly bound a region of DNA containing three direct repeats between Pmra and the mraZ gene. Excess MraZ reduced the expression of an mraZ-lacZ reporter, suggesting that MraZ acts as a repressor of Pmra, whereas a DNA-binding mutant form of MraZ failed to repress expression. Transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis suggested that MraZ also regulates the expression of genes outside the dcw cluster. In support of this, purified MraZ could directly bind to a putative operator site upstream of mioC, one of the repressed genes identified by RNA-seq. PMID:24659771

  1. Comparison of the Folding Mechanism of Highly Homologous Proteins in the Lipid-binding Protein Family

    EPA Science Inventory

    The folding mechanism of two closely related proteins in the intracellular lipid binding protein family, human bile acid binding protein (hBABP) and rat bile acid binding protein (rBABP) were examined. These proteins are 77% identical (93% similar) in sequence Both of these singl...

  2. Prolonged Adaptation to a Low or High Protein Diet Does Not Modulate Basal Muscle Protein Synthesis Rates – A Substudy

    PubMed Central

    Hursel, Rick; Martens, Eveline A. P.; Gonnissen, Hanne K. J.; Hamer, Henrike M.; Senden, Joan M. G.; van Loon, Luc J. C.; Westerterp-Plantenga, Margriet S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Based on controlled 36 h experiments a higher dietary protein intake causes a positive protein balance and a negative fat balance. A positive net protein balance may support fat free mass accrual. However, few data are available on the impact of more prolonged changes in habitual protein intake on whole-body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. Objective To assess changes in whole-body protein turnover and basal muscle protein synthesis rates following 12 weeks of adaptation to a low versus high dietary protein intake. Methods A randomized parallel study was performed in 40 subjects who followed either a high protein (2.4 g protein/kg/d) or low protein (0.4 g protein/kg/d) energy-balanced diet (30/35/35% or 5/60/35% energy from protein/carbohydrate/fat) for a period of 12 weeks. A subgroup of 7 men and 8 women (body mass index: 22.8±2.3 kg/m2, age: 24.3±4.9 y) were selected to evaluate the impact of prolonged adaptation to either a high or low protein intake on whole body protein metabolism and basal muscle protein synthesis rates. After the diet, subjects received continuous infusions with L-[ring-2H5]phenylalanine and L-[ring-2H2]tyrosine in an overnight fasted state, with blood samples and muscle biopsies being collected to assess post-absorptive whole-body protein turnover and muscle protein synthesis rates in vivo in humans. Results After 12 weeks of intervention, whole-body protein balance in the fasted state was more negative in the high protein treatment when compared with the low protein treatment (-4.1±0.5 vs -2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001). Whole-body protein breakdown (43.0±4.4 vs 37.8±3.8 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.03), synthesis (38.9±4.2 vs 35.1±3.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.01) and phenylalanine hydroxylation rates (4.1±0.6 vs 2.7±0.6 μmol phenylalanine/kg/h;P<0.001) were significantly higher in the high vs low protein group. Basal muscle protein synthesis rates were maintained on a low

  3. Toxicity challenges in environmental chemicals: Prediction of human plasma protein binding through quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The present study explores the merit of utilizing available pharmaceutical data to construct a quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) for prediction of the fraction of a chemical unbound to plasma protein (Fub) in environmentally relevant compounds. Independent model...

  4. Cyanobacterial high-light-inducible proteins--Protectors of chlorophyll-protein synthesis and assembly.

    PubMed

    Komenda, Josef; Sobotka, Roman

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria contain a family of genes encoding one-helix high-light-inducible proteins (Hlips) that are homologous to light harvesting chlorophyll a/b-binding proteins of plants and algae. Based on various experimental approaches used for their study, a spectrum of functions that includes regulation of chlorophyll biosynthesis, transient chlorophyll binding, quenching of singlet oxygen and non-photochemical quenching of absorbed energy is ascribed to Hlips. However, these functions had not been supported by conclusive experimental evidence until recently when it became clear that Hlips are able to quench absorbed light energy and assist during terminal step(s) of the chlorophyll biosynthesis and early stages of Photosystem II assembly. In this review we summarize and discuss the present knowledge about Hlips and provide a model of how individual members of the Hlip family operate during the biogenesis of chlorophyll-proteins, namely Photosystem II. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Conrad Mullineaux. PMID:26341017

  5. Protein denaturation of whey protein isolates (WPIs) induced by high intensity ultrasound during heat gelation.

    PubMed

    Frydenberg, Rikke P; Hammershøj, Marianne; Andersen, Ulf; Greve, Marie T; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the impact of high intensity ultrasound (HIU) on proteins in whey protein isolates was examined. Effects on thermal behavior, secondary structure and nature of intra- and intermolecular bonds during heat-induced gelling were investigated. Ultrasonication (24 kHz, 300 W/cm(2), 2078 J/mL) significantly reduced denaturation enthalpies, whereas no change in secondary structure was detected by circular dichroism. The thiol-blocking agent N-ethylmaleimide was applied in order to inhibit formation of disulfide bonds during gel formation. Results showed that increased contents of α-lactalbumin (α-La) were associated with increased sensitivity to ultrasonication. The α-La:β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) ratio greatly affected the nature of the interactions formed during gelation, where higher amounts of α-La lead to a gel more dependent on disulfide bonds. These results contribute to clarifying the mechanisms mediating the effects of HIU on whey proteins on the molecular level, thus moving further toward implementing HIU in the processing chain in the food industry. PMID:26304368

  6. Consequences of inducing intrinsic disorder in a high-affinity protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Papadakos, Grigorios; Sharma, Amit; Lancaster, Lorna E; Bowen, Rebecca; Kaminska, Renata; Leech, Andrew P; Walker, Daniel; Redfield, Christina; Kleanthous, Colin

    2015-04-29

    The kinetic and thermodynamic consequences of intrinsic disorder in protein-protein recognition are controversial. We address this by inducing one partner of the high-affinity colicin E3 rRNase domain-Im3 complex (K(d) ≈ 10(-12) M) to become an intrinsically disordered protein (IDP). Through a variety of biophysical measurements, we show that a single alanine mutation at Tyr507 within the hydrophobic core of the isolated colicin E3 rRNase domain causes the enzyme to become an IDP (E3 rRNase(IDP)). E3 rRNase(IDP) binds stoichiometrically to Im3 and forms a structure that is essentially identical to the wild-type complex. However, binding of E3 rRNase(IDP) to Im3 is 4 orders of magnitude weaker than that of the folded rRNase, with thermodynamic parameters reflecting the disorder-to-order transition on forming the complex. Critically, pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of the E3 rRNase(IDP)-Im3 complex demonstrates that the decrease in affinity is mostly accounted for by a drop in the electrostatically steered association rate. Our study shows that, notwithstanding the advantages intrinsic disorder brings to biological systems, this can come at severe kinetic and thermodynamic cost. PMID:25856265

  7. MOLECULAR CLONING, EXPRESSION PATTERN OF MULTIDRUG RESISTANCE ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 1 (MRP1, ABCC1) GENE, AND THE SYNERGISTIC EFFECTS OF VERAPAMIL ON TOXICITY OF TWO INSECTICIDES IN THE BIRD CHERRY-OAT APHID.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xin-Le; Zhang, Meng; Wang, Kang; Qiao, Xian-Feng; Chen, Mao-Hua

    2016-05-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are important transmembrane proteins encoded by a supergene family. The majority of ABC proteins are primary active transporters that bind and hydrolyze ATP to mediate the efflux of a diverse range of substrates across lipid membranes. In this study, we cloned and characterized a putative multidrug resistance associated protein 1 (MRP1) from Rhopalosiphum padi encoded by ABCC1. Structural analysis showed that this protein has structural features typical of the ABC transporter family. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the amino acid sequence was highly similar that of the corresponding protein from Acyrthosiphon pisum. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis showed that ABCC1 was expressed throughout all R. padi developmental stages, with the highest level of expression in the fourth larval instar. We also examined ABCC1 expression in four different tissue types and found that it was most highly expressed in the midgut. Exposing R. padi to imidacloprid and chlorpyrifos increased ABCC1 expression. Furthermore, ABCC1 expression was higher in the imidacloprid-resistant (IR) and chlorpyrifos-resistant (CR) strains than in an insecticide-susceptible strain (SS) of R. padi. Exposing R. padi to verapamil in combination with insecticides significantly increased the toxicity of the insecticides. The respective synergy factor of CR and IR R. padi strain was 1.33 and 1.26, which was lower than that (2.72 and 1.64, respectively) of the SS. Our results clarify the biological function of ABCC1 in R. padi, particularly its role in insecticide resistance, and suggest novel strategies for pest management that use ABC transporter inhibitors to increase the effectiveness of insecticides. PMID:27110952

  8. Reduced systemic toxicity from superselective chemoembolization compared with systemic chemotherapy in patients with high-risk metastatic gestational trophoblastic disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Erich K.

    1997-07-15

    Purpose. The efficacy of chemoembolization of primary and metastatic gestational trophoblastic neoplasms was studied. Methods. Six female patients, 19-33 years old, with high-risk trophoblastic disease were subjected to one to five chemoembolizations in 3-week intervals. Three of the patients had metastases to the liver, 2 had local tumor extension to the pelvic wall, and all 5 had failed initial systemic chemotherapy. The sixth patient was treated for a trophoblastic remnant following surgical expression of a tubal pregnancy. For follow-up, beta hCG levels in urine and serum and dynamic or angiocomputed tomograms were obtained in biweekly to 6-month intervals. Results. Two of 3 patients with liver metastases are alive and free of disease 6 and 7 years after initial chemoembolization. The third is alive at 3 years but with evidence of recurrent disease. Two patients treated for locally invasive trophoblastic disease died 3 months and 4 years, respectively, after initial chemoembolization. One had a 21/2-year remission. The patient treated for a trophoblastic remnant in the tube is alive and free of disease at 6-year follow-up. Hematologic toxicity occurred in only one. Conclusion. Selective chemoembolization in our small series of patients with high-risk trophoblastic disease was equally effective as results reported for multi-drug systemic chemotherapy but had markedly lower renal, liver, and hematologic toxicity.

  9. DNA damage in earthworms from highly contaminated soils: assessing resistance to arsenic toxicity by use of the Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Button, Mark; Jenkin, Gawen R T; Bowman, Karen J; Harrington, Chris F; Brewer, Tim S; Jones, George D D; Watts, Michael J

    2010-02-01

    Earthworms native to the former mine site of Devon Great Consols (DGC), UK reside in soils highly contaminated with arsenic (As). These earthworms are considered to have developed a resistance to As toxicity. The mechanisms underlying this resistance however, remain unclear. In the present study, non-resistant, commercially sourced Lumbricus terrestris were exposed to a typical DGC soil in laboratory mesocosms. The earthworms bio-accumulated As from the soil and incurred DNA-damage levels significantly above those observed in the control mesocosm (assessed using the Comet assay). A dose response was observed between DNA damage (% tail DNA) and As concentration in soil (control, 98, 183, 236, 324 and 436mgkg(-1)). As-resistant earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus, Dendrodrilus rubidus and L. terrestris) collected from contaminated soils at DGC (203 to 9025mgkg(-1) As) had also bio-accumulated high levels of As from their host soils, yet demonstrated low levels of DNA damage compared with earthworms from uncontaminated sites. The results demonstrate that the As-contaminated soils at DGC are genotoxic to non-native earthworms and much less so to earthworms native to DGC, thus providing further evidence of an acquired resistance to As toxicity in the native earthworms. PMID:20015476

  10. Neuroprotection and neurorescue against Abeta toxicity and PKC-dependent release of nonamyloidogenic soluble precursor protein by green tea polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Levites, Yona; Amit, Tamar; Mandel, Silvia; Youdim, Moussa B H

    2003-05-01

    Green tea extract and its main polyphenol constituent (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) possess potent neuroprotective activity in cell culture and mice model of Parkinson's disease. The central hypothesis guiding this study is that EGCG may play an important role in amyloid precursor protein (APP) secretion and protection against toxicity induced by beta-amyloid (Abeta). The present study shows that EGCG enhances (approximately 6-fold) the release of the non-amyloidogenic soluble form of the amyloid precursor protein (sAPPalpha) into the conditioned media of human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma and rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. sAPPalpha release was blocked by the hydroxamic acid-based metalloprotease inhibitor Ro31-9790, which indicated mediation via alpha-secretase activity. Inhibition of protein kinase C (PKC) with the inhibitor GF109203X, or by down-regulation of PKC, blocked the EGCG-induced sAPPalpha secretion, suggesting the involvement of PKC. Indeed, EGCG induced the phosphorylation of PKC, thus identifying a novel PKC-dependent mechanism of EGCG action by activation of the non-amyloidogenic pathway. EGCG is not only able to protect, but it can rescue PC12 cells against the beta-amyloid (Abeta) toxicity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, administration of EGCG (2 mg/kg) to mice for 7 or 14 days significantly decreased membrane-bound holoprotein APP levels, with a concomitant increase in sAPPalpha levels in the hippocampus. Consistently, EGCG markedly increased PKCalpha and PKC in the membrane and the cytosolic fractions of mice hippocampus. Thus, EGCG has protective effects against Abeta-induced neurotoxicity and regulates secretory processing of non-amyloidogenic APP via PKC pathway. PMID:12670874

  11. Evaluation of detoxification methods on toxic and antinutritional composition and nutritional quality of proteins in Jatropha curcas meal.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianhui; Zhang, Hui; Niu, Liya; Wang, Xingguo; Lu, Xia

    2011-04-27

    The Jatropha curcas meal was detoxified by different methods, and the effect of detoxification was evaluated in this study. The method that hydrolysis of enzymes (cellulase plus pectinase) followed by washing with ethanol (65%) had a significant (p < 0.05) effect on the toxin, antinutritional components, and nutritional quality of proteins. After this treatment, the phorbolesters (PEs) were decreased by 100%. The antinutritional components (phytates, tannins, saponins, protease inhibitor, and lectin activities) were decreased to tolerable levels, which were lower than those in soybean meal. The crude protein in detoxified meal was 74.68%, and the total content of amino acids was 66.87 g/100 g of dry matter. The in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) increased from 82.14 to 92.37%. The pepsin-insoluble nitrogen was only 4.57% of the total nitrogen, and about 90% of the protein was true protein. The protein-digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS) of the meal was 0.75. The results showed that this treatment was a promising way to detoxify J. curcas meal, and the nutritional quality of detoxified meal can be simultaneously enriched and improved. PMID:21410262

  12. Anomalous Diffraction at Ultra-High Energy for Protein Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Jakoncic,J.; Di Michiel, M.; Zhong, Z.; Honkimaki, V.; Jouanneau, Y.; Stojanoff, V.

    2006-01-01

    Single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD), multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) and single isomorphous replacement with anomalous scattering (SIRAS) phasing at ultra-high X-ray energy, 55 keV, are used successfully to determine a high-quality and high-resolution experimental electronic density map of hen egg-white lysozyme, a model protein. Several combinations, between single- and three-wavelength, with native data were exploited to demonstrate that standard phasing procedures with standard equipment and software can successfully be applied to three-dimensional crystal structure determination of a macromolecule, even at these very short wavelengths. For the first time, a high-quality three-dimensional molecular structure is reported from SAD phasing with ultra-high-energy X-rays. The quality of the crystallographic data and the experimental electron density maps meet current standards. The 2.7% anomalous signal from three Ho atoms, at the Ho K edge, was sufficient to obtain a remarkable electron density and build the first lanthanide structure for HEWL in its entirety.

  13. Characterization of Diversity in Toxicity Mechanism Using In Vitro Cytotoxicity Assays in Quantitative High Throughput Screening

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruili; Southall, Noel; Cho, Ming-Hsuang; Xia, Menghang; Inglese, James; Austin, Christopher P.

    2009-01-01

    Assessing the potential health risks of environmental chemical compounds is an expensive undertaking which has motivated the development of new alternatives to traditional in vivo toxicological testing. One approach is to stage the evaluation, beginning with less expensive and higher throughput in vitro testing before progressing to more definitive trials. In vitro testing can be used to generate a hypothesis about a compound's mechanism of action, which can then be used to design an appropriate in vivo experiment. Here we begin to address the question of how to design such a battery of in vitro cell-based assays by combining data from two different types of assays, cell viability and caspase activation, with the aim of elucidating mechanism of action. Because caspase activation is a transient event during apoptosis, it is not possible to design a single end-point assay protocol that would identify all instances of compound-induced caspase activation. Nevertheless, useful information about compound mechanism of action can be obtained from these assays in combination with cell viability data. Unsupervised clustering in combination with Dunn's cluster validity index is a robust method for identifying mechanisms of action without requiring any a priori knowledge about mechanisms of toxicity. The performance of this clustering method is evaluated by comparing the clustering results against literature annotations of compound mechanisms. PMID:18281954

  14. A critical evaluation of in vitro cell culture models for high-throughput drug screening and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Astashkina, Anna; Mann, Brenda; Grainger, David W

    2012-04-01

    Drug candidate and toxicity screening processes currently rely on results from early-stage in vitro cell-based assays expected to faithfully represent essential aspects of in vivo pharmacology and toxicology. Several in vitro designs are optimized for high throughput to benefit screening efficiencies, allowing the entire libraries of potential pharmacologically relevant or possible toxin molecules to be screened for different types of cell signals relevant to tissue damage or to therapeutic goals. Creative approaches to multiplexed cell-based assay designs that select specific cell types, signaling pathways and reporters are routine. However, substantial percentages of new chemical and biological entities (NCEs/NBEs) that fail late-stage human drug testing, or receive regulatory "black box" warnings, or that are removed from the market for safety reasons after regulatory approvals all provide strong evidence that in vitro cell-based assays and subsequent preclinical in vivo studies do not yet provide sufficient pharmacological and toxicity data or reliable predictive capacity for understanding drug candidate performance in vivo. Without a reliable translational assay tool kit for pharmacology and toxicology, the drug development process is costly and inefficient in taking initial in vitro cell-based screens to in vivo testing and subsequent clinical approvals. Commonly employed methods of in vitro testing, including dissociated, organotypic, organ/explant, and 3-D cultures, are reviewed here with specific focus on retaining cell and molecular interactions and physiological parameters that determine cell phenotypes and their corresponding responses to bioactive agents. Distinct advantages and performance challenges for these models pertinent to cell-based assay and their predictive capabilities required for accurate correlations to in vivo mechanisms of drug toxicity are compared. PMID:22252140

  15. Studies on the high-sulphur proteins of reduced Merino wool. Amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4

    PubMed Central

    Swart, L. S.; Haylett, T.

    1971-01-01

    The complete amino acid sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 is presented. It is closely related to the sequence of protein SCMKB-IIIB3 (Haylett, Swart & Parris, 1971) differing in only four positions. The peptic and thermolysin peptides of protein SCMKB-IIIB4 were analysed by the dansyl–Edman method (Gray, 1967) and by tritium-labelling of C-terminal residues (Matsuo, Fujimoto & Tatsuno, 1966). This protein is the third member of a group of high-sulphur wool proteins with molecular weight of about 11400. It consists of 98 residues and has acetylalanine and carboxymethylcysteine as N- and C-terminal residues respectively. PMID:4942536

  16. Membrane Signaling Induced by High Doses of Ionizing Radiation in the Endothelial Compartment. Relevance in Radiation Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Corre, Isabelle; Guillonneau, Maëva; Paris, François

    2013-01-01

    Tumor areas can now be very precisely delimited thanks to technical progress in imaging and ballistics. This has also led to the development of novel radiotherapy protocols, delivering higher doses of ionizing radiation directly to cancer cells. Despite this, radiation toxicity in healthy tissue remains a major issue, particularly with dose-escalation in these new protocols. Acute and late tissue damage following irradiation have both been linked to the endothelium irrigating normal tissues. The molecular mechanisms involved in the endothelial response to high doses of radiation are associated with signaling from the plasma membrane, mainly via the acid sphingomyelinase/ceramide pathway. This review describes this signaling pathway and discusses the relevance of targeting endothelial signaling to protect healthy tissues from the deleterious effects of high doses of radiation. PMID:24252908

  17. Toxicity and characterization of cotton expressing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab2 proteins for control of lepidopteran pests.

    PubMed

    Sivasupramaniam, S; Moar, W J; Ruschke, L G; Osborn, J A; Jiang, C; Sebaugh, J L; Brown, G R; Shappley, Z W; Oppenhuizen, M E; Mullins, J W; Greenplate, J T

    2008-04-01

    Cry1Ac protoxin (the active insecticidal toxin in both Bollgard and Bollgard II cotton [Gossypium hirsutum L.]), and Cry2Ab2 toxin (the second insecticidal toxin in Bollgard II cotton) were bioassayed against five of the primary lepidopteran pests of cotton by using diet incorporation. Cry1Ac was the most toxic to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Pectinophora gossypiella (Saunders), demonstrated good activity against Helicoverpa zea (Boddie), and had negligible toxicity against Spodoptera exigua (Hübner) and Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith). Cry2Ab2 was the most toxic to P. gossypiella and least toxic to S. frugiperda. Cry2Ab2 was more toxic to S. exigua and S. frugiperda than Cry1Ac. Of the three insect species most sensitive to both Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) proteins (including H. zea), P. gossypiella was only three-fold less sensitive to Cry2Ab2 than Cry1Ac, whereas H. virescens was 40-fold less sensitive to Cry2Ab2 compared with CrylAc. Cotton plants expressing Cry1Ac only and both Cry1Ac and Cry2Ab2 proteins were characterized for toxicity against H. zea and S.frugiperda larvae in the laboratory and H. zea larvae in an environmental chamber. In no-choice assays on excised squares from plants of different ages, second instar H. zea larvae were controlled by Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab2 cotton with mortality levels of 90% and greater at 5 d compared with 30-80% mortality for Cry1Ac-only cotton, depending on plant age. Similarly, feeding on leaf discs from Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab2 cotton resulted in mortality of second instars of S.frugiperda ranging from 69 to 93%, whereas exposure to Cry1Ac-only cotton yielded 20-69% mortality, depending on plant age. When cotton blooms were infested in situ in an environmental chamber with neonate H. zea larvae previously fed on synthetic diet for 0, 24, or 48 h, 7-d flower abortion levels for Cry1Ac-only cotton were 15, 41, and 63%, respectively, whereas for Cry1Ac/Cry2Ab2 cotton, flower abortion levels were 0, 0, and 5%, respectively. Cry1Ac and

  18. Toxicities of busulfan/melphalan versus carboplatin/etoposide/melphalan for high-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue for high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Desai, A V; Heneghan, M B; Li, Y; Bunin, N J; Grupp, S A; Bagatell, R; Seif, A E

    2016-09-01

    The optimal autologous stem cell rescue (HDC-SCR) regimen for children with high-risk neuroblastoma (HR-NBL) is not defined. Carboplatin/etoposide/melphalan (CEM) is the current US standard; however, European data suggest busulfan/melphalan (Bu/Mel) may have less toxicity. Published data regarding toxicities associated with CEM and Bu/Mel are limited. We conducted a single-institution retrospective cohort study of children with HR-NBL who received CEM or Bu/Mel preparative regimens. Toxicity data were analyzed using χ(2) or Fisher's exact, Wilcoxon two-sample or log-rank tests. Sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) was observed in 7/44 CEM (15.9%) and 5/21 (24%) Bu/Mel patients (P=0.50). Median time to SOS was longer following Bu/Mel than CEM (20 versus 9 days, P=0.02). Pulmonary hypertension (PHTN) was observed in ~20% of children after Bu/Mel and none after CEM (P=0.01). CEM patients had more nephrotoxicity (P=0.001), packed red blood cell (P=0.02) and platelet transfusions (P=0.008), and days on maximum pain support (P=0.0007). Time to engraftment, length of stay, documented infection rates and HDC-SCR-related mortality were similar. Nephrotoxicity and resource utilization associated with cytopenias and mucositis were greater after CEM. Pulmonary toxicities were more severe after Bu/Mel, and increased vigilance for PHTN may be warranted, particularly in children with hypoxemia out of proportion to respiratory distress. PMID:27159174

  19. Toxicity Assessment of Pelvic Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Hypofractionated Simultaneous Integrated Boost to Prostate for Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    McCammon, Robert; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian; Newell, Sherri B.S.; Newman, Francis M.S.; Raben, David

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with hypofractionated simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) to the prostate for patients with intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A retrospective toxicity analysis was performed in 30 consecutive patients treated definitively with pelvic SIB-IMRT, all of whom also received androgen suppression. The IMRT plans were designed to deliver 70 Gy in 28 fractions (2.5 Gy/fraction) to the prostate while simultaneously delivering 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions (1.8 Gy/fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes. The National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, was used to score toxicity. Results: The most common acute Grade 2 events were cystitis (36.7%) and urinary frequency/urgency (26.7%). At a median follow-up of 24 months, late toxicity exceeding Grade 2 in severity was uncommon, with two Grade 3 events and one Grade 4 event. Grade 2 or greater acute bowel toxicity was associated with signficantly greater bowel volume receiving {>=}25 Gy (p = .04); Grade 2 or greater late bowel toxicity was associated with a higher bowel maximal dose (p = .04) and volume receiving {>=}50 Gy (p = .02). Acute or late bladder and rectal toxicity did not correlate with any of the dosimetric parameters examined. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT with SIB to the prostate was well tolerated in this series, with low rates of Grade 3 or greater acute and late toxicity. SIB-IMRT combines pelvic radiotherapy and hypofractionation to the primary site and offers an accelerated approach to treating intermediate- to high-risk disease. Additional follow-up is necessary to fully define the long-term toxicity after hypofractionated, whole pelvic treatment combined with androgen suppression.

  20. Toxicity of endophyte-infected ryegrass hay containing high ergovaline level in lactating ewes.

    PubMed

    Zbib, N; Repussard, C; Tardieu, D; Priymenko, N; Domange, C; Guerre, P

    2015-08-01

    The symbiotic association of var. (formerly named ) with perennial ryegrass () leads to the production of ergovaline (EV) and lolitrem B (LB) that are toxic for livestock. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of feeding endophyte-infected ryegrass (SE+) hay on 16 lactating ewes (BW 80 ± 10 kg) in comparison with endophyte-free ryegrass (SE-) hay to investigate the putative mechanisms of action of EV and LB and to evaluate their persistence in milk and animal tissues. The mean EV and LB concentrations in SE+ hay were 851 and 884 μg/kg DM, respectively, whereas these alkaloids were below the limit of detection in SE- hay. No effect of SE+ was observed on animal health and skin temperature whereas prolactin decreased and significant differences between hays were observed from d 7 to 28 of the study ( < 0.03) but had no effect on milk production. Hematocrit and biochemical analyses of plasma revealed no significant difference between SE+ and SE-, whereas cortisol concentration differed significantly on d 28 ( = 0.001). Measurement of oxidative damage and antioxidant enzyme activities in plasma, liver, and kidneys revealed a slight increase in some enzyme activities involved in defense against oxidative damage in the SE+ fed ewes. Slight variations in the activities of hepatic and kidney flavin monooxygenase enzymes were observed, whereas in the kidney, glutathione -transferase activity decreased significantly ( = 0.002) in the SE+ fed ewes, whereas uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase activity increased ( = 0.001). After 28 d of exposure of ewes to the SE+ hay, low EV and LB concentrations were measured in tissues. The highest concentration of EV was observed in the liver (0.68 μg/kg) whereas fat contained the highest concentration of LB (2.39 μg/kg). Both toxins were also identified at the trace level in milk. PMID:26440189

  1. A high protein diet upregulated whole-body protein turnover during energy deficit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of higher protein diets and sustained energy deficit (ED) on whole-body protein turnover (WBPTO) are not well described. This study examined whether dietary protein level influences whole-body protein breakdown (Ra), non-oxidative leucine disposal (NOLD), and oxidation (Ox) during ED. ...

  2. TCR affinity for p/MHC formed by tumor antigens that are self-proteins: impact on efficacy and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Kranz, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the range of affinities of T cell receptors (TCRs) against non-mutated cancer peptide/class I complexes are lower than TCR affinities for foreign antigens. Raising the affinity of TCRs for optimal activity of CD8 T cells, and for recruitment of CD4 T cell activity against a class I antigen, provides opportunities for more robust adoptive T cell therapies. However, TCRs with enhanced affinities also risk increased reactivity with structurally related self-peptides, and off-target toxicities. Careful selection of tumor peptide antigens, in silico proteome screens, and in vitro peptide specificity assays will be important in the development of the most effective, safe TCR-based adoptive therapies. PMID:25618219

  3. Assessing the mammalian toxicity of high-boiling petroleum substances under the rubric of the HPV program.

    PubMed

    Gray, Thomas M; Simpson, Barry J; Nicolich, Mark J; Murray, F Jay; Verstuyft, Allen W; Roth, Randy N; McKee, Richard H

    2013-11-01

    In 1998, the US EPA announced the HPV Challenge Program, a voluntary chemical data collection effort. The Petroleum HPV Testing Group (PHPVTG(1)) volunteered to provide data on approximately 110 high boiling petroleum substances (HBPS), i.e. substances with final boiling points ≥ approximately 650°F (343°C). These HBPS are substances of unknown and variable composition (UVCBs) that are composed of numerous individual constituents. Toxicity studies have shown that some HBPS can produce systemic (repeat-dose) and developmental effects, and some are mutagenic under in vitro conditions. The papers in this supplement show that these effects are related to the profiles of aromatic constituents in these substances. Further, it is shown that the effects on selected repeat-dose and developmental toxicity endpoints and mutagenic activity in bacterial assays can be predicted from compositional information using models based on the aromatic-ring class profile, "ARC profile" as defined by gas chromatographic separation of the DMSO-soluble fraction of the starting materials. This chromatographic method and the predictive models provide an efficient means of characterizing for screening purposes the potential for repeat-dose, developmental effects and bacterial mutagenicity of HBPS and can reduce the number of animal tests that would be required if these tests were conducted on all 110 HBPS. PMID:23247262

  4. Highly Luminescent Carbon Dots Synthesized by Microwave-Assisted Pyrolysis and Evaluation of Their Toxicity to Physa acuta.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaobo; Jin, Xiaozhe; Pan, Wei; Guo, Enmian; Liu, Weijian; Li, Denghui; Lu, Kunchao; Si, Shuxin; Zhang, Nianxing; Jia, Zhenzhen; Shi, Yanping; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    As a newly emerging class of nanomaterials, carbon dots have increasingly attracted researchers' attention. However, their potentially adverse environmental effects are yet largely unknown. In this work, the highly luminescent carbon dots were synthesized by microwave-assisted pyrolysis of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) and citric acid. Then acute and chronic toxicities of carbon dots to Physa acuta (P. acuta), as well as their effect on reproduction, were evaluated using the as-synthesized dots as an example. The quantum yield of the as-synthesized carbon dots was up to 53.5% excited at 360 nm with the most fluorescent fraction of 82.6% after simple purification by gel column. The results showed that no acute but chronic toxicities to P. acuta exposed to different treatment concentrations of the as-synthesized carbon dots were observed with dose- dependence. In addition, the fecundity of P. acuta was promoted significantly by the carbon dots at the concentrations of 0.5 and 1.0 mg/mL, yet inhibited at the concentration of 3.0 mg/mL after 12-day exposure. Mainly distributing in the visceral mass might be responsible for the effects of the carbon dots on the survival and fecundity of P. acuta. And there was no further evidence to confirm that the carbon dots can cause malformation in developing embryos. PMID:27398502

  5. Protein corona changes mediated by surface modification of amorphous silica nanoparticles suppress acute toxicity and activation of intrinsic coagulation cascade in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Tokuyuki; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Morishita, Yuki; Aoyama, Michihiko; Tochigi, Saeko; Hirai, Toshiro; Tanaka, Kota; Nagano, Kazuya; Kamada, Haruhiko; Tsunoda, Shin-ichi; Nabeshi, Hiromi; Yoshikawa, Tomoaki; Higashisaka, Kazuma; Tsutsumi, Yasuo

    2015-06-01

    Recently, nanomaterial-mediated biological effects have been shown to be governed by the interaction of nanomaterials with some kinds of proteins in biological fluids, and the physical characteristics of the nanomaterials determine the extent and type of their interactions with proteins. Here, we examined the relationships between the surface properties of amorphous silica nanoparticles with diameters of 70 nm (nSP70), their interactions with some proteins in biological fluids, and their toxicity in mice after intravenous administration. The surface modification of nSP70 with amino groups (nSP70-N) prevented acute lethality and abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade found in the nSP70-treated group of mice. Since our previous study showed that coagulation factor XII played a role in the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the coagulation cascade, we examined the interaction of nSP70 and nSP70-N with coagulation factor XII. Coagulation factor XII bonded to the surface of nSP70 to a greater extent than that observed for nSP70-N, and consequently more activation of coagulation factor XII was observed for nSP70 than for nSP70-N. Collectively, our results suggest that controlling the interaction of nSP70 with blood coagulation factor XII by modifying the surface properties would help to inhibit the nSP70-mediated abnormal activation of the blood coagulation cascade.

  6. A Microfluidic, High Throughput Protein Crystal Growth Method for Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers Jr, Carl W.; Gerdts, Cory; Johnson, Michael D.; Webb, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG) capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions’ microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD), as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 103 cm.). After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64%) microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48%) of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories. PMID:24278480

  7. A microfluidic, high throughput protein crystal growth method for microgravity.

    PubMed

    Carruthers, Carl W; Gerdts, Cory; Johnson, Michael D; Webb, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The attenuation of sedimentation and convection in microgravity can sometimes decrease irregularities formed during macromolecular crystal growth. Current terrestrial protein crystal growth (PCG) capabilities are very different than those used during the Shuttle era and that are currently on the International Space Station (ISS). The focus of this experiment was to demonstrate the use of a commercial off-the-shelf, high throughput, PCG method in microgravity. Using Protein BioSolutions' microfluidic Plug Maker™/CrystalCard™ system, we tested the ability to grow crystals of the regulator of glucose metabolism and adipogenesis: peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (apo-hPPAR-γ LBD), as well as several PCG standards. Overall, we sent 25 CrystalCards™ to the ISS, containing ~10,000 individual microgravity PCG experiments in a 3U NanoRacks NanoLab (1U = 10(3) cm.). After 70 days on the ISS, our samples were returned with 16 of 25 (64%) microgravity cards having crystals, compared to 12 of 25 (48%) of the ground controls. Encouragingly, there were more apo-hPPAR-γ LBD crystals in the microgravity PCG cards than the 1g controls. These positive results hope to introduce the use of the PCG standard of low sample volume and large experimental density to the microgravity environment and provide new opportunities for macromolecular samples that may crystallize poorly in standard laboratories. PMID:24278480

  8. Functional Aspects of the Solution Structure and Dynamics of PAF, a Highly Stable Antifungal Protein from Penicillium chrysogenum

    PubMed Central

    Batta, Gyula; Barna, Teréz; Gáspári, Zoltán; Sándor, Szabolcs; Kövér, Katalin E.; Binder, Ulrike; Sarg, Bettina; Kaiserer, Lydia; Chhillar, Anil Kumar; Eigentler, Andrea; Leiter, Éva; Hegedüs, Nikoletta; Pócsi, István; Lindner, Herbert; Marx, Florentine

    2015-01-01

    Summary PAF is a promising antimycotic without toxic effects on mammalian cells and therefore may be a drug candidate against the often lethal Aspergillus infections in human. The pathogenesis of PAF on sensitive fungi involves G-protein coupled signaling followed by apoptosis. Here, the solution structure of this small, cationic, antifungal protein from Penicillium chrysogenum is determined by solution NMR. We proved that PAF belongs to the SCOP fold class of its closest homologue AFP from Aspergillus giganteus. PAF comprises five β—strands forming two orthogonally packed β—sheets sharing a common interface. The ambiguity in the assignment of two disulfide bonds of three was investigated by NMR dynamics combined with restrained molecular dynamics calculations. The clue could not be resolved: two ensembles with different disulfide patterns and the one with no S-S bond exhibit essentially the same fold. 15N relaxation dispersion and interference experiments did not reveal disulfide bond rearrangements via slow exchange. The measured order parameters and the 3.0 ns correlation time is appropriate for a compact monomeric protein of this size. We demonstrated by site-directed mutagenesis that the highly conserved and positively charged lysine-rich domain region on the surface enhances the toxicity of PAF. However, the efficacy of the OB fold is reduced in PAF compared to AFP, due to less solvent exposed aromatic regions explaining the absence of chitobiose binding. The present work lends further support to the understanding of the documented substantial differences between the mode of action of two highly homologous antifungal proteins. PMID:19459942

  9. pFPL Vectors for High-Throughput Protein Localization in Fungi: Detecting Cytoplasmic Accumulation of Putative Effector Proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaoyan; Hurtado, Oscar; Wang, Baohua; Wu, Congqing; Yi, Mihwa; Giraldo, Martha; Valent, Barbara; Goodin, Michael; Farman, Mark

    2015-02-01

    As part of a large-scale project whose goal was to identify candidate effector proteins in Magnaporthe oryzae, we developed a suite of vectors that facilitate high-throughput protein localization experiments in fungi. These vectors utilize Gateway recombinational cloning to place a gene's promoter and coding sequences upstream and in frame with enhanced cyan fluorescent protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), monomeric red fluorescence protein (mRFP), and yellow fluorescent protein or a nucleus-targeted mCHERRY variant. The respective Gateway cassettes were incorporated into Agrobacterium-based plasmids to allow efficient fungal transformation using hygromycin or geneticin resistance selection. mRFP proved to be more sensitive than the GFP spectral variants for monitoring proteins secreted in planta; and extensive testing showed that Gateway-derived fusion proteins produced localization patterns identical to their "directly fused" counterparts. Use of plasmid for fungal protein localization (pFPL) vectors with two different selectable markers provided a convenient way to label fungal cells with different fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the utility of the pFPL vectors for identifying candidate effector proteins and we highlight a number of important factors that must be taken into consideration when screening for proteins that are translocated across the host plasma membrane. PMID:25390188

  10. High SEPT9_i1 Protein Expression Is Associated with High-Grade Prostate Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Gilad, Roni; Meir, Karen; Stein, Ilan; German, Larissa; Pikarsky, Eli; Mabjeesh, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    Septins are a family of GTP-binding cytoskeleton proteins expressed in many solid tumors. Septin 9 (SEPT9) in particular was found overexpressed in diverse carcinomas. Herein, we studied the expression of SEPT9 isoform 1 protein (SEPT9_i1) in human prostate cancer specimens. We utilized immunohistochemical staining to study the expression of SEPT9_i1 protein. Staining level was analyzed in association with clinical characteristics and the pathological Gleason grade and score. Fifty human prostate cancer specimens (42 primary tumors and 8 metastatic lesions) were stained by SEPT9_i1 antibody and analyzed. SEPT9_i1 protein was expressed in prostate cancer cells but absent in normal epithelial cells. The intensity of staining was correlated proportionally to pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood levels and Gleason score (P < 0.05). SEPT9_i1 was highly expressed in all metastatic lesions. A significant assocation between SEPT9_i1 expression and high Gleason score on multivariate linear regression analysis was found. We conclude that SEPT9_i1 is expressed in high-grade prostate tumors suggesting it has a significant role in prostate tumorigenesis and that it could serve as a molecular marker for prostate tumor progression. PMID:25898316

  11. Protein-Protein Interactions during High-Moisture Extrusion for Fibrous Meat Analogues and Comparison of Protein Solubility Methods Using Different Solvent Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein, mixed with gluten and starch, was extruded into fibrous meat analogs under high moisture and high temperature conditions. The protein solubility of samples collected at different extruder zones and extrudates made with different moistures was determined by 11 extraction solutions consi...

  12. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions.

    PubMed

    Kutikhin, Anton G; Velikanova, Elena A; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A; Glushkova, Tatiana V; Borisov, Vadim V; Matveeva, Vera G; Antonova, Larisa V; Filip'ev, Dmitriy E; Golovkin, Alexey S; Shishkova, Daria K; Burago, Andrey Yu; Frolov, Alexey V; Dolgov, Viktor Yu; Efimova, Olga S; Popova, Anna N; Malysheva, Valentina Yu; Vladimirov, Alexandr A; Sozinov, Sergey A; Ismagilov, Zinfer R; Russakov, Dmitriy M; Lomzov, Alexander A; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V; Gutakovsky, Anton K; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A; Demidov, Evgeniy A; Peltek, Sergey E; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F; Babich, Olga O; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V; Brusina, Elena B; Barbarash, Olga L; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease. PMID:27251104

  13. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Borisov, Vadim V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Filip’Ev, Dmitriy E.; Golovkin, Alexey S.; Shishkova, Daria K.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Frolov, Alexey V.; Dolgov, Viktor Yu.; Efimova, Olga S.; Popova, Anna N.; Malysheva, Valentina Yu.; Vladimirov, Alexandr A.; Sozinov, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.; Russakov, Dmitriy M.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V.; Gutakovsky, Anton K.; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A.; Demidov, Evgeniy A.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F.; Babich, Olga O.; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V.; Brusina, Elena B.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.

    2016-06-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease.

  14. Apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not direct calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins defines pathogenic effects of calcium phosphate bions

    PubMed Central

    Kutikhin, Anton G.; Velikanova, Elena A.; Mukhamadiyarov, Rinat A.; Glushkova, Tatiana V.; Borisov, Vadim V.; Matveeva, Vera G.; Antonova, Larisa V.; Filip’ev, Dmitriy E.; Golovkin, Alexey S.; Shishkova, Daria K.; Burago, Andrey Yu.; Frolov, Alexey V.; Dolgov, Viktor Yu.; Efimova, Olga S.; Popova, Anna N.; Malysheva, Valentina Yu.; Vladimirov, Alexandr A.; Sozinov, Sergey A.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.; Russakov, Dmitriy M.; Lomzov, Alexander A.; Pyshnyi, Dmitriy V.; Gutakovsky, Anton K.; Zhivodkov, Yuriy A.; Demidov, Evgeniy A.; Peltek, Sergey E.; Dolganyuk, Viatcheslav F.; Babich, Olga O.; Grigoriev, Evgeniy V.; Brusina, Elena B.; Barbarash, Olga L.; Yuzhalin, Arseniy E.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium phosphate bions (CPB) are biomimetic mineralo-organic nanoparticles which represent a physiological mechanism regulating the function, transport and disposal of calcium and phosphorus in the human body. We hypothesised that CPB may be pathogenic entities and even a cause of cardiovascular calcification. Here we revealed that CPB isolated from calcified atherosclerotic plaques and artificially synthesised CPB are morphologically and chemically indistinguishable entities. Their formation is accelerated along with the increase in calcium salts-phosphates/serum concentration ratio. Experiments in vitro and in vivo showed that pathogenic effects of CPB are defined by apoptosis-mediated endothelial toxicity but not by direct tissue calcification or functional changes in anti-calcification proteins. Since the factors underlying the formation of CPB and their pathogenic mechanism closely resemble those responsible for atherosclerosis development, further research in this direction may help us to uncover triggers of this disease. PMID:27251104

  15. Inorganic–organic hybrids presenting high basic center content: SBA-15 incorporation, toxic metals sorption and energetic behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira, Fernando J.V.E.; Melo, Maurício A.; Airoldi, Claudio

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Mesoporous SBA-15 silicas were organofunctionalized with new silylant agents. ► Thiocarbamate was used to enhance the silylating agent chains and basic centers. ► The synthesized pendant chains contain nitrogen and sulfur basic centers. ► The new hybrids sorb toxic cations from aqueous solutions with high efficiency. ► The thermodynamic data demonstrated favorable cation/basic center interactions. - Abstract: Mesoporous SBA-15 samples were organofunctionalized with mono, di- and tri-aminosilanes that previously reacted with thiocarbamide to enhance the organic chains and attach nitrogen and sulfur basic centers to the surface of the solids. These new organosilanes were synthesized through a non-solvent approach to reduce both cost and hazardous wastes. The high affinities for both hard and soft Lewis acids due to the combination of nitrogen and sulfur atoms attached to the same pendant chain enabled favorable sorption capacities for Cu{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Pb{sup 2+} cations, with maximum capacities of 1.90, 3.48 and 5.30 mmol g{sup −1}, respectively, for the most efficient mesoporous silica. Microcalorimetric investigations allowed the calculation of the thermodynamic data at the solid/liquid interface. All Gibbs energy are negative as expected for spontaneous cation/basic center interactions and the positive entropic values from 49 ± 3 to 108 ± 5 J K{sup −1} mol{sup −1}, also reinforced this favorable interactive process in heterogeneous system. The designed organosilanes covalently bonded to the inorganic siliceous skeleton can be suggested as new materials for toxic metal removal from a wastewater with high efficiency.

  16. Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ia10 and Vip3Aa protein interactions and their toxicity in Spodoptera spp. (Lepidoptera).

    PubMed

    Bergamasco, V B; Mendes, D R P; Fernandes, O A; Desidério, J A; Lemos, M V F

    2013-02-01

    The polyphagous pests belonging to the genus Spodoptera are considered to be among the most important causes of damage and are widely distributed throughout the Americas'. Due to the extensive use of genetic