Science.gov

Sample records for highway traffic simulation

  1. Simulations of highway traffic with various degrees of automation

    SciTech Connect

    Doss, E.; Hanebutte, U.; Vitela, J.; Brown-VanHoozer, A.; Ewing, T.; Tentner, A.

    1996-10-01

    A traffic simulator to study highway traffic under various degrees of automation is being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The key components of this simulator include a global and a local Expert Drive Mode, a human factor study and a graphical user interface. Further, an Autonomous Intelligent Cruise Control (AICC) which is based on a neural network controller is described and results for a typical driving scenario are given.

  2. Simulation study of traffic accidents on a three-lane highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jau-Yang; Lai, Wun-Cing

    2015-07-01

    Unsuitable driving behaviors often lead to the occurrence of traffic accidents. To reduce accidents and to prolong human life, simulated investigations are highly desirable to evaluate the effect of traffic safety in terms of number of traffic accidents. In this paper, a three-lane traffic flow model is proposed to analyze the probability of the occurrence of traffic accidents on highway. We define appropriate driving rules for the forward moving and lane changing of the vehicles. Three types of vehicle accidents are designed to investigate the relationships between different driving behaviors and traffic accidents. We simulate four road driving strategies, and compute the traffic flow, velocity, lane-changing frequency and the probability of the occurrence of traffic accidents for different road driving strategies. According to the simulation and analysis, it is shown that the probability of the occurrence of traffic accidents can be reduced by using the specified road driving strategies. Additionally, we found that the occurrence of traffic accidents can be avoided when the slow vehicles are suitably constrained to move on a three-lane highway.

  3. Theory and Simulation for Traffic Characteristics on the Highway with a Slowdown Section.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dejie; Mao, Baohua; Rong, Yaping; Wei, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We study the traffic characteristics on a single-lane highway with a slowdown section using the deterministic cellular automaton (CA) model. Based on the theoretical analysis, the relationships among local mean densities, velocities, traffic fluxes, and global densities are derived. The results show that two critical densities exist in the evolutionary process of traffic state, and they are significant demarcation points for traffic phase transition. Furthermore, the changing laws of the two critical densities with different length of limit section are also investigated. It is shown that only one critical density appears if a highway is not slowdown section; nevertheless, with the growing length of slowdown section, one critical density separates into two critical densities; if the entire highway is slowdown section, they finally merge into one. The contrastive analysis proves that the analytical results are consistent with the numerical ones. PMID:26089864

  4. Dynamic simulation of energy consumption in mixed traffic flow considering highway toll station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Yong-Sheng; Zhang, Xiao-Long; Zeng, Jun-Wei; Shao, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Neng

    2015-01-01

    An improved model of energy consumption including toll station is presented in this paper. Using the model, we study the influences of mixed ratio, the idling energy consumption of vehicle, vehicle peak velocity, dwell time and random deceleration probability on energy consumption of Electronic Toll Collection or Manual Toll Collection mixed traffic flow on single lane under periodic condition. Simulating results indicate that the above five parameters are all increasing functions of total energy consumption, in which the idling energy consumption represents the major amounts with the increase of mixed ratio and occupancy rate. Thus, the existence of toll station has significant effect on the energy consumption of mixed traffic flow.

  5. Highway Traffic Safety Manpower Functions Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    The purpose of the project, "Revision and Update of Traffic Safety Manpower Training Program Development Guide," was to develop the HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY MANPOWER FUNCTIONS GUIDE. This document provides an organizational schema illustrating the functions essential to be performed and the interrelationship of these functions to carry out highway…

  6. Simulation study of traffic car accidents in single-lane highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentaleb, Khalid; Lakouari, Noureddine; Marzoug, Rachid; Ez-Zahraouy, Hamid; Benyoussef, Abdelilah

    2014-11-01

    In this paper we numerically study the probability Pac of the occurrence of car accidents in the extended Nagel-Schreckenberg (NS) model in the case of mixture of fast (Vmax1=5) and slow vehicles (Vmax2=1) by taking also to the risky overtaking of fast vehicles. In comparison with previous existing models, we find that accidents can occur in the free traffic phase and/or congested one depending on the overtaking rate of fast vehicles. The effect of evacuation of damaged vehicles from the road with probabilities Pevf and Pevs of fast and slow vehicles respectively on the traffic flow behavior is also computed.

  7. 76 FR 8400 - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Petition for Exemption From the Vehicle Theft Prevention Standard; Mitsubishi Motors AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) Department...

  8. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 10: Traffic Records.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 10 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic records. The purpose and specific objectives of a traffic records program are discussed. Federal authority in the area of highway safety and policies regarding a traffic records…

  9. Microscopic modeling of multi-lane highway traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodas, Nathan O.; Jagota, Anand

    2003-12-01

    We discuss a microscopic model for the study of multi-lane highway traffic flow dynamics. Each car experiences a force resulting from a combination of the desire of the driver to attain a certain velocity, aerodynamic drag, and change of the force due to car-car interactions. The model also includes multi-lane simulation capability and the ability to add and remove obstructions. We implement the model via a Java applet, which is used to simulate traffic jam formation, the effect of bottlenecks on traffic flow, and the existence of light, medium, and heavy traffic flow. The simulations also provide insight into how the properties of individual cars result in macroscopic behavior. Because the investigation of emergent characteristics is so common in physics, the study of traffic in this manner sheds new light on how the micro-to-macro transition works in general.

  10. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 13: Traffic Engineering Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 13 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic engineering services. The introduction outlines the purposes and objectives of Highway Safety Program Standard 13 and the Highway Safety Program Manual. Program development and…

  11. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 7: Traffic Courts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 7 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on traffic courts, their purpose and objectives. Federal authority in the area of traffic courts are described. Program development and operations (a study of courts trying traffic cases, a…

  12. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 15: Police Traffic Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 15 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on police traffic services. The purpose and objectives of a police services program are described. Federal authority in the areas of highway safety and policies regarding a police traffic…

  13. Simulation and intelligent vehicle highway systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K. ); Santiago, A.J. )

    1992-01-01

    Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) is based on the premise of using advanced technologies in telecommunication, electronics, and computers to improve the nature and quality of highway travel while making it safer and more efficient. The safety benefits of the IVHS systems are unquestioned; however, there are different levels of optimism about the operational benefits of these systems. While there is a broad consensus that IVHS can improve the flow of traffic, and thus mobility, currently there is very limited empirical evidence or analytical basis to support this optimism. The lack of analytical framework for design, analysis, and evaluation of IVHS concepts will continue to fuel the debate between the skeptics and the advocates of IVHS. Computer simulation is likely to play a major role in the analysis and assessment of the IVHS technologies. In this paper, we attempt to identify the simulation modelling needs to support the IVHS functional areas dealing with traffic flow on highway networks. The paper outlines the envisioned IVHS operational environment. Functional requirements for the simulation modelling system that could be used to support the development and testing of IVHS concepts, namely Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) and Advanced Traveller Information Systems (ATIS), are defined. Simulation modelling research and development needs to support the design and evaluations of IVHS concepts are described. The paper concludes by presenting on-going work on the traffic simulation models at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  14. Simulation and intelligent vehicle highway systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K.; Santiago, A.J.

    1992-09-01

    Intelligent Vehicle Highway Systems (IVHS) is based on the premise of using advanced technologies in telecommunication, electronics, and computers to improve the nature and quality of highway travel while making it safer and more efficient. The safety benefits of the IVHS systems are unquestioned; however, there are different levels of optimism about the operational benefits of these systems. While there is a broad consensus that IVHS can improve the flow of traffic, and thus mobility, currently there is very limited empirical evidence or analytical basis to support this optimism. The lack of analytical framework for design, analysis, and evaluation of IVHS concepts will continue to fuel the debate between the skeptics and the advocates of IVHS. Computer simulation is likely to play a major role in the analysis and assessment of the IVHS technologies. In this paper, we attempt to identify the simulation modelling needs to support the IVHS functional areas dealing with traffic flow on highway networks. The paper outlines the envisioned IVHS operational environment. Functional requirements for the simulation modelling system that could be used to support the development and testing of IVHS concepts, namely Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) and Advanced Traveller Information Systems (ATIS), are defined. Simulation modelling research and development needs to support the design and evaluations of IVHS concepts are described. The paper concludes by presenting on-going work on the traffic simulation models at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  15. Coal-truck impacts on highway safety and traffic characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Eck, R.W.; Polus, A.; Halkias, J.A.

    1982-07-01

    A computer simulation model of accident rates and delay times is used to quantify highway hazards and congestion introduced by increases in large coal trucks. The effects of trucks on long grades, where the speed differences between trucks and other vehicles becomes greater, increases the potential for accident. Long lines of slow-moving trucks, however, reduce accidents because they reduce the opportunity for passing. At best, the trucks make traffic flow less stable. The results of this study can help in the design of passing lanes and improved grade alignment. 18 references. (DCK)

  16. Simulation analysis of traffic flow elements for restricted truck lanes on interstate highways in Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hoel, L.A.; Peek, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze changes in traffic flow elements, (density, lane changes per vehicle, and speed differential) under conditions of restricted and unrestricted truck lane configurations.

  17. Failure of classical traffic flow theories: Stochastic highway capacity and automatic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2016-05-01

    In a mini-review Kerner (2013) it has been shown that classical traffic flow theories and models failed to explain empirical traffic breakdown - a phase transition from metastable free flow to synchronized flow at highway bottlenecks. The main objective of this mini-review is to study the consequence of this failure of classical traffic-flow theories for an analysis of empirical stochastic highway capacity as well as for the effect of automatic driving vehicles and cooperative driving on traffic flow. To reach this goal, we show a deep connection between the understanding of empirical stochastic highway capacity and a reliable analysis of automatic driving vehicles in traffic flow. With the use of simulations in the framework of three-phase traffic theory, a probabilistic analysis of the effect of automatic driving vehicles on a mixture traffic flow consisting of a random distribution of automatic driving and manual driving vehicles has been made. We have found that the parameters of automatic driving vehicles can either decrease or increase the probability of the breakdown. The increase in the probability of traffic breakdown, i.e., the deterioration of the performance of the traffic system can occur already at a small percentage (about 5%) of automatic driving vehicles. The increase in the probability of traffic breakdown through automatic driving vehicles can be realized, even if any platoon of automatic driving vehicles satisfies condition for string stability.

  18. Analysis of Yearly Traffic Fluctuation on Latvian Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freimanis, A.; Paeglı¯tis, A.

    2015-11-01

    Average annual daily traffic and average annual truck traffic are two most used metrics for road management decisions. They are calculated from data gathered by continuous counting stations embedded in road pavement, manual counting sessions or mobile counting devices. Last two usually do not last longer than a couple of weeks so the information gathered is influenced by yearly traffic fluctuations. Data containing a total of 8,186,871 vehicles or 1989 days from 4 WIM stations installed on highways in Latvia were used in this study. Each of the files was supposed to contain data from only 1 day and additional data were deleted. No other data cleaning steps were performed, which increased the number of vehicles as counting systems sometimes split vehicles into two. Weekly traffic and weekly truck traffic was normalized against respective average values. Each weekly value was then plotted against its number in a year for better visual perception. Weekly traffic amplitudes were used to assess differences between different locations and standard deviations for fluctuation comparison of truck and regular traffic at the same location. Results show that truck traffic fluctuates more than regular traffic during a year, especially around holidays. Differences between counting locations were larger for regular traffic than truck traffic. These results show that average annual daily traffic could be influenced more if short term counting results are adjusted by factors derived from unsuitable continuous counting stations, but truck traffic is more influenced by the time of year in which counting is done.

  19. Basic Course in Highway Traffic Records; Course Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The twelve-part course is structured on a modular basis to allow the various topical areas and units of instruction to satisfy differing training requirements of state and local agencies which vary from state to state. It is specifically designed to provide guidence to state highway safety program management personnel, traffic records…

  20. 23 CFR 500.204 - TMS components for highway traffic data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false TMS components for highway traffic data. 500.204 Section 500.204 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT AND MONITORING SYSTEMS Traffic Monitoring System § 500.204 TMS...

  1. Highway traffic noise prediction based on GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianghua; Qin, Qiming

    2014-05-01

    Before building a new road, we need to predict the traffic noise generated by vehicles. Traditional traffic noise prediction methods are based on certain locations and they are not only time-consuming, high cost, but also cannot be visualized. Geographical Information System (GIS) can not only solve the problem of manual data processing, but also can get noise values at any point. The paper selected a road segment from Wenxi to Heyang. According to the geographical overview of the study area and the comparison between several models, we combine the JTG B03-2006 model and the HJ2.4-2009 model to predict the traffic noise depending on the circumstances. Finally, we interpolate the noise values at each prediction point and then generate contours of noise. By overlaying the village data on the noise contour layer, we can get the thematic maps. The use of GIS for road traffic noise prediction greatly facilitates the decision-makers because of GIS spatial analysis function and visualization capabilities. We can clearly see the districts where noise are excessive, and thus it becomes convenient to optimize the road line and take noise reduction measures such as installing sound barriers and relocating villages and so on.

  2. 49 CFR 234.261 - Highway traffic signal pre-emption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Highway traffic signal pre-emption. 234.261....261 Highway traffic signal pre-emption. Highway traffic signal pre-emption interconnections, for which... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION...

  3. 49 CFR 234.261 - Highway traffic signal pre-emption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Highway traffic signal pre-emption. 234.261....261 Highway traffic signal pre-emption. Highway traffic signal pre-emption interconnections, for which... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION...

  4. 49 CFR 234.261 - Highway traffic signal pre-emption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Highway traffic signal pre-emption. 234.261... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.261 Highway traffic signal pre-emption. Highway traffic signal pre-emption interconnections, for which a railroad has maintenance...

  5. 49 CFR 234.261 - Highway traffic signal pre-emption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Highway traffic signal pre-emption. 234.261... Maintenance, Inspection, and Testing Inspections and Tests § 234.261 Highway traffic signal pre-emption. Highway traffic signal pre-emption interconnections, for which a railroad has maintenance...

  6. 49 CFR 234.261 - Highway traffic signal pre-emption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Highway traffic signal pre-emption. 234.261....261 Highway traffic signal pre-emption. Highway traffic signal pre-emption interconnections, for which... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING SIGNAL SYSTEMS, STATE ACTION...

  7. Simple cellular automaton model for traffic breakdown, highway capacity, and synchronized flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2011-10-01

    We present a simple cellular automaton (CA) model for two-lane roads explaining the physics of traffic breakdown, highway capacity, and synchronized flow. The model consists of the rules “acceleration,” “deceleration,” “randomization,” and “motion” of the Nagel-Schreckenberg CA model as well as “overacceleration through lane changing to the faster lane,” “comparison of vehicle gap with the synchronization gap,” and “speed adaptation within the synchronization gap” of Kerner's three-phase traffic theory. We show that these few rules of the CA model can appropriately simulate fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown and highway capacity found in traffic data measured over years in different countries, like characteristics of synchronized flow, the existence of the spontaneous and induced breakdowns at the same bottleneck, and associated probabilistic features of traffic breakdown and highway capacity. Single-vehicle data derived in model simulations show that synchronized flow first occurs and then self-maintains due to a spatiotemporal competition between speed adaptation to a slower speed of the preceding vehicle and passing of this slower vehicle. We find that the application of simple dependences of randomization probability and synchronization gap on driving situation allows us to explain the physics of moving synchronized flow patterns and the pinch effect in synchronized flow as observed in real traffic data.

  8. Assessment of Traffic Noise on Highway Passing from Urban Agglomeration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijay, Ritesh; Kori, Chandan; Kumar, Manoj; Chakrabarti, T.; Gupta, Rajesh

    2014-09-01

    Assessment of traffic noise pollution in developing countries is complex due to heterogeneity in traffic conditions like traffic volume, road width, honking, etc. To analyze the impact of such variables, a research study was carried out on a national highway passing from an urban agglomeration. Traffic volume and noise levels (L10, Lmin, Lmax, Leq and L90) were measured during morning and evening peak hours. Contribution of noise by individual vehicle was estimated using passenger car noise unit. Extent of noise pollution and impact of noisy vehicles were estimated using noise pollution level and traffic noise index, respectively. Noise levels were observed to be above the prescribed Indian and International standards. As per audio spectrum analysis of traffic noise, honking contributed an additional 3-4 dB(A) noise. Based on data analysis, a positive relationship was observed between noise levels and honking while negative correlation was observed between noise levels and road width. The study suggests that proper monitoring and analysis of traffic data is required for better planning of noise abatement measures.

  9. 49 CFR 1.94 - The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.94 The National Highway Traffic Safety... State efforts in such areas as occupant protection, impaired and distracted driving, traffic safety...

  10. 49 CFR 1.94 - The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration... DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Operating Administrations § 1.94 The National Highway Traffic Safety... State efforts in such areas as occupant protection, impaired and distracted driving, traffic safety...

  11. 49 CFR 1.50 - Delegation to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delegation to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator. 1.50 Section 1.50 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation ORGANIZATION AND DELEGATION OF POWERS AND DUTIES Delegations § 1.50 Delegation to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administrator. The National...

  12. The Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination (TrAD) Protocol for both Urban and Highway Scenarios.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Hou, Kun Mean; Zhou, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic cost of road crashes and injuries is estimated to be US$518 billion per year and the annual congestion cost in France is estimated to be €5.9 billion. Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs) are one solution to improve transport features such as traffic safety, traffic jam and infotainment on wheels, where a great number of event-driven messages need to be disseminated in a timely way in a region of interest. In comparison with traditional wireless networks, VANETs have to consider the highly dynamic network topology and lossy links due to node mobility. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the keystone of VANETs. According to our survey, most of the proposed IVC protocols focus on either highway or urban scenarios, but not on both. Furthermore, too few protocols, considering both scenarios, can achieve high performance. In this paper, an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol which takes into account road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios will be presented. TrAD has double broadcast suppression techniques and is designed to adapt efficiently to the irregular road topology. The performance of the TrAD protocol was evaluated quantitatively by means of realistic simulations taking into account different real road maps, traffic routes and vehicular densities. The obtained simulation results show that TrAD is more efficient in terms of packet delivery ratio, number of transmissions and delay in comparison with the performance of three well-known reference protocols. Moreover, TrAD can also tolerate a reasonable degree of GPS drift and still achieve efficient data dissemination. PMID:27338393

  13. The Traffic Adaptive Data Dissemination (TrAD) Protocol for both Urban and Highway Scenarios

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Bin; Hou, Kun Mean; Zhou, Haiying

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide economic cost of road crashes and injuries is estimated to be US$518 billion per year and the annual congestion cost in France is estimated to be €5.9 billion. Vehicular Ad hoc Networks (VANETs) are one solution to improve transport features such as traffic safety, traffic jam and infotainment on wheels, where a great number of event-driven messages need to be disseminated in a timely way in a region of interest. In comparison with traditional wireless networks, VANETs have to consider the highly dynamic network topology and lossy links due to node mobility. Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) protocols are the keystone of VANETs. According to our survey, most of the proposed IVC protocols focus on either highway or urban scenarios, but not on both. Furthermore, too few protocols, considering both scenarios, can achieve high performance. In this paper, an infrastructure-less Traffic Adaptive data Dissemination (TrAD) protocol which takes into account road traffic and network traffic status for both highway and urban scenarios will be presented. TrAD has double broadcast suppression techniques and is designed to adapt efficiently to the irregular road topology. The performance of the TrAD protocol was evaluated quantitatively by means of realistic simulations taking into account different real road maps, traffic routes and vehicular densities. The obtained simulation results show that TrAD is more efficient in terms of packet delivery ratio, number of transmissions and delay in comparison with the performance of three well-known reference protocols. Moreover, TrAD can also tolerate a reasonable degree of GPS drift and still achieve efficient data dissemination. PMID:27338393

  14. The research of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianping; Zhang, Tiejun; Wan, Jiaonan; Zhang, Juwen; Wang, Rui

    For the rigorous traffic safety issues resulting from rapid transportation development, as well as the more and more attention paid to the traffic accidents dynamic analysis and pre-alarm methods, combined with the practical needs of the highway safety management, this paper summarizes the experience of traffic safety pre-alarm research both in domestic and abroad, designs the frame of highway traffic accident management and pre-alarm system from the function and software engineering requirement, and refines kernel modules such as accident prone section judgement, traffic safety pre-alarm analysis and perfecting safety measures analysis, in order to guide the exploitation and application of the system.

  15. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L.; Rickert, M.

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Highway Car Traffic as a Complex System: The Physicist's Point of View

    SciTech Connect

    Boccara, Nino

    2005-04-20

    A simple cellular automaton model of highway car traffic flow will be presented. This system exhibits a second-order phase transition between the free-moving phase and the jammed phase. Using concepts borrowed from the theory of phase transitions in statistical physics, it can be shown that random braking is the symmetry-breaking field conjugate to the order parameter. For a given value of the speed limit, it is then possible to determine the values of the usual critical exponents using computer simulations. These numerical results can also be obtained within the framework of an approximate technique going beyond the mean-field approximation. It can be shown that the critical exponents satisfy a scaling relation, which can be derived assuming that the order parameter is a generalized homogeneous function in the vicinity of the phase transition point.

  17. Hunting at the highway: traffic noise reduces foraging efficiency in acoustic predators.

    PubMed

    Siemers, Björn M; Schaub, Andrea

    2011-06-01

    Noise pollution from human traffic networks and industrial activity impacts vast areas of our planet. While anthropogenic noise effects on animal communication are well documented, we have very limited understanding of noise impact on more complex ecosystem processes, such as predator-prey interactions, albeit urgently needed to devise mitigation measures. Here, we show that traffic noise decreases the foraging efficiency of an acoustic predator, the greater mouse-eared bat (Myotis myotis). These bats feed on large, ground-running arthropods that they find by listening to their faint rustling sounds. We measured the bats' foraging performance on a continuous scale of acoustically simulated highway distances in a behavioural experiment, designed to rule out confounding factors such as general noise avoidance. Successful foraging bouts decreased and search time drastically increased with proximity to the highway. At 7.5 m to the road, search time was increased by a factor of five. From this increase, we predict a 25-fold decrease in surveyed ground area and thus in foraging efficiency for a wild bat. As most of the bats' prey are predators themselves, the noise impact on the bats' foraging performance will have complex effects on the food web and ultimately on the ecosystem stability. Similar scenarios apply to other ecologically important and highly protected acoustic predators, e.g. owls. Our study provides the empirical basis for quantitative predictions of anthropogenic noise impacts on ecosystem processes. It highlights that an understanding of the effects of noise emissions and other forms of 'sensory pollution' are crucially important for the assessment of environmental impact of human activities. PMID:21084347

  18. 75 FR 39820 - Procedures for Abatement of Highway Traffic Noise and Construction Noise

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-13

    ... Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) on September 17, 2009 (74 FR 47762). This final rule amends sections 772.1, 772... position that since the metric used to assess highway traffic noise levels is the A-weighted decibel, that.... Many of the comments recommended the definition be deleted because the metric is obsolete....

  19. The physics of empirical nuclei for spontaneous traffic breakdown in free flow at highway bottlenecks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Koller, Micha; Klenov, Sergey L.; Rehborn, Hubert; Leibel, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Based on an empirical study of real field traffic data measured in 1996-2014 through road detectors installed on German freeways, we reveal physical features of empirical nuclei for spontaneous traffic breakdown in free flow at highway bottlenecks. A microscopic stochastic three-phase traffic model of the nucleation of spontaneous traffic breakdown presented in the article explains the empirical findings. It turns out that in the most cases a nucleus for the breakdown occurs through an interaction of one of waves in free flow with an empirical permanent speed disturbance localized at a highway bottleneck. The wave is a localized structure in free flow, in which the total flow rate is larger and the speed averaged across the highway is smaller than outside the wave. The waves in free flow appear due to oscillations in the percentage of slow vehicles; these waves propagate with the average speed of slow vehicles in free flow. Any of the empirical waves exhibits a two-dimensional asymmetric spatiotemporal structure: Wave's characteristics are different in different highway lanes.

  20. Effect of desired speed variability on highway traffic flow.

    PubMed

    Lipshtat, Azi

    2009-06-01

    Traffic flow is a function of many natural, environmental, and human factors. Not only that weather and road condition can vary, but drivers' decisions and policies also can affect the flow. Here we analyze the effect of distribution of desired speeds. We show that a broader distribution can reduce the flow efficiency and increase congestions. Since different drivers react differently to changes in weather or road conditions, such a change leads to a change in desired speed distribution as well. As a result, nonintuitive changes in traffic flow may occur. Besides providing insight and analyzing the underlying mechanism of a collective phenomenon, this example sheds light on a fundamental aspect of computational modeling. Although "mean-field" models that deal with average values only and ignore variability are simpler and easier to analyze, they can very easily turn into oversimplifications and miss relevant qualitative phenomena. PMID:19658567

  1. Alternative method of highway traffic safety analysis for developing countries using delphi technique and Bayesian network.

    PubMed

    Mbakwe, Anthony C; Saka, Anthony A; Choi, Keechoo; Lee, Young-Jae

    2016-08-01

    Highway traffic accidents all over the world result in more than 1.3 million fatalities annually. An alarming number of these fatalities occurs in developing countries. There are many risk factors that are associated with frequent accidents, heavy loss of lives, and property damage in developing countries. Unfortunately, poor record keeping practices are very difficult obstacle to overcome in striving to obtain a near accurate casualty and safety data. In light of the fact that there are numerous accident causes, any attempts to curb the escalating death and injury rates in developing countries must include the identification of the primary accident causes. This paper, therefore, seeks to show that the Delphi Technique is a suitable alternative method that can be exploited in generating highway traffic accident data through which the major accident causes can be identified. In order to authenticate the technique used, Korea, a country that underwent similar problems when it was in its early stages of development in addition to the availability of excellent highway safety records in its database, is chosen and utilized for this purpose. Validation of the methodology confirms the technique is suitable for application in developing countries. Furthermore, the Delphi Technique, in combination with the Bayesian Network Model, is utilized in modeling highway traffic accidents and forecasting accident rates in the countries of research. PMID:27183516

  2. PM10 source apportionment in a Swiss Alpine valley impacted by highway traffic.

    PubMed

    Ducret-Stich, Regina E; Tsai, Ming-Yi; Thimmaiah, Devraj; Künzli, Nino; Hopke, Philip K; Phuleria, Harish C

    2013-09-01

    Although trans-Alpine highway traffic exhaust is one of the major sources of air pollution along the highway valleys of the Alpine regions, little is known about its contribution to residential exposure and impact on respiratory health. In this paper, source-specific contributions to particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter < 10 μm (PM10) and their spatio-temporal distribution were determined for later use in a pediatric asthma panel study in an Alpine village. PM10 sources were identified by positive matrix factorization using chemical trace elements, elemental, and organic carbon from daily PM10 filters collected between November 2007 and June 2009 at seven locations within the village. Of the nine sources identified, four were directly road traffic-related: traffic exhaust, road dust, tire and brake wear, and road salt contributing 16 %, 8 %, 1 %, and 2 % to annual PM10 concentrations, respectively. They showed a clear dependence with distance to highway. Additional contributions were identified from secondary particles (27 %), biomass burning (18 %), railway (11 %), and mineral dust including a local construction site (13 %). Comparing these source contributions with known source-specific biomarkers (e.g., levoglucosan, nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) showed high agreement with biomass burning, moderate with secondary particles (in winter), and lowest agreement with traffic exhaust. PMID:23608980

  3. Highway traffic segmentation using super-resolution and Gaussian mixture model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousef, Amr Hussein; Flora, Jeff; Iftekharuddin, Khan

    2013-09-01

    One benefit of employing computer vision techniques to extract individual vehicles from a highway traffic scene is the abundance of networked, traffic surveillance cameras that may be leveraged as the input video. However, the acquisition sensors that are monitoring the highway traffic will have very limited quality. Additionally, video streams are heavily compressed, causing noise and, in some cases, visible artifacts to be introduced into the video. Further challenges are presented by external environmental and weather conditions, such as rain, fog, and snow, that cause video blurring or noise. The resulting output of a segmentation algorithm yields poorer results, with many vehicles undetected or partially detected. Our goal is to extract individual vehicles from a highway traffic scenes using super-resolution and the utilization of Gaussian mixture model algorithm (GMM). We used a speeded-up enhanced stochastic Wiener filter for SR reconstruction and restoration. It can be used to remove artifacts and enhance the visual quality of the reconstructed images and can be implemented efficiently in the frequency domain. The filter derivation depends on the continuous-discrete-continuous (CDC) model that represents most of the degradations encountered during the image-gathering and image-display processes. Then, we use GMM followed by the clustering of individual vehicles. Individual vehicles are detected from the segmented scene through the use of a series of morphological operations, followed by two-dimensional connected component labeling. We evaluate our hybrid approach quantitatively in the segmentation of the extracted vehicles.

  4. Using mobile monitoring to visualise diurnal variation of traffic pollutants across two near-highway neighbourhoods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattinson, Woodrow; Longley, Ian; Kingham, Simon

    2014-09-01

    It is widely accepted that concentrations of primary traffic pollutants can vary substantially across relatively small urban areas. Fixed-site monitors have been shown to be largely inadequate for representing concentrations at nearby locations, resulting in the increasing use of spatial modelling or mobile sampling methods to achieve spatial saturation. In this study, we employ the use of a simple bicycle to sample concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs), carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM10) at two small areas (<2.5 km2) in South Auckland, New Zealand. Portable instruments were mounted inside a custom-built casing at the front of the bicycle and every street within each study area was sampled in a grid-like fashion, at four times of day (07:00, 12:00, 17:00 and 22:00). Each area has a six-lane highway running through its centre and the core aim was to visualise and describe spatial variability of pollutant levels about the highway, main arterials and quieter streets, at periods of contrasting meteorological and traffic conditions. A total of 20 sampling runs in each area (five at each of the four timings) were conducted. Meteorological data were logged continuously at background sites within each study area. Results show that the influence of highway traffic (UFPs, CO) was strongest during the mornings and late evenings when wind speeds were low, while for the midday and afternoon timings, concentrations were highest at the arterial and shopping zones. Concentrations of PM10 appeared to be strongest in the residential areas during mornings and late evenings, suggesting an influence of wood burning for home heating. For all timings combined, for all three pollutants, it appears the arterial roads featuring shops and numerous intersections with traffic lights, had a stronger influence on concentrations than the busier but more free-flowing highways. This study provides not only an insight into microspatial hotspot variation across suburbs, but

  5. Software for Simulating Air Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Bilimoria, Karl; Grabbe, Shon; Chatterji, Gano; Sheth, Kapil; Mulfinger, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    Future Air Traffic Management Concepts Evaluation Tool (FACET) is a system of software for performing computational simulations for evaluating advanced concepts of advanced air-traffic management. FACET includes a program that generates a graphical user interface plus programs and databases that implement computational models of weather, airspace, airports, navigation aids, aircraft performance, and aircraft trajectories. Examples of concepts studied by use of FACET include aircraft self-separation for free flight; prediction of air-traffic-controller workload; decision support for direct routing; integration of spacecraft-launch operations into the U.S. national airspace system; and traffic- flow-management using rerouting, metering, and ground delays. Aircraft can be modeled as flying along either flight-plan routes or great-circle routes as they climb, cruise, and descend according to their individual performance models. The FACET software is modular and is written in the Java and C programming languages. The architecture of FACET strikes a balance between flexibility and fidelity; as a consequence, FACET can be used to model systemwide airspace operations over the contiguous U.S., involving as many as 10,000 aircraft, all on a single desktop or laptop computer running any of a variety of operating systems. Two notable applications of FACET include: (1) reroute conformance monitoring algorithms that have been implemented in one of the Federal Aviation Administration s nationally deployed, real-time, operational systems; and (2) the licensing and integration of FACET with the commercially available Flight Explorer, which is an Internet- based, real-time flight-tracking system.

  6. Pollination of lark daisy on roadsides declines as traffic speed increases along an Amazonian highway.

    PubMed

    Dargas, J H F; Chaves, S R; Fischer, E

    2016-05-01

    Ecological disturbances caused by roadways have previously been reported, but traffic speed has not been addressed. We investigate effects of traffic speed on pollination of Centratherum punctatum (Asteraceae) along an Amazonian highway roadside. We hypothesised that frequency of flower visitors, duration of single visits and pollen deposition on stigmas will vary negatively as traffic speed increases. After measuring vehicle velocities, we classified three road sections as low-, mid- and high-velocity traffic. The main pollinator bee, Augochlora sp., visited C. punctatum inflorescences with decreasing frequency from low- to high-velocity roadside sections, whereas the nectar thief butterflies did the opposite. Duration of single visits by bees and butterflies was shorter, and arrival of pollen on C. punctatum stigmas was lower, in high- than in low-velocity roadside. Air turbulence due to passing vehicles increases with velocity and disturbed the flower visitors. Overall, results support that traffic velocity negatively affects foraging of flower visitors and the pollination of C. punctatum on roadsides. PMID:26809110

  7. Simulation of traffic control signal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, P. J.; Concannon, P. A.; Ricci, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development and testing of control strategies for networks of urban traffic signal systems by simulation. Simulation is an inexpensive and timely method for evaluating the effect of these traffic control strategies since traffic phenomena are too complex to be defined by analytical models and since a controlled experiment may be hazardous, expensive, and slow in producing meaningful results. This paper describes the application of an urban traffic corridor program, to evaluate the effectiveness of different traffic control strategies for the Massachusetts Avenue TOPICS Project.

  8. Microscopic theory of spatial-temporal congested traffic patterns at highway bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L

    2003-09-01

    A microscopic theory of spatial-temporal congested traffic patterns at highway bottlenecks due to on-ramps, merge bottlenecks (a reduction of highway lanes), and off-ramps is presented. The basic postulate of three-phase traffic theory is used, which claims that homogeneous (in space and time) model solutions (steady states) of synchronized flow cover a two dimensional region in the flow-density plane [B. S. Kerner, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 3797 (1998); Trans. Res. Rec. 1678, 160 (1999)]. Phase transitions leading to diverse congested patterns, pattern evolution, and pattern nonlinear features have been found. Diagrams of congested patterns, i.e., regions of the pattern emergence dependent on traffic demand, have been derived. Diverse effects of metastability with respect to the pattern formation have been found. The microscopic theory allows us to explain the main empirical pattern features at on-ramps and off-ramps which have recently been found [B. S. Kerner, Phys. Rev. E 65, 046138 (2002)]. (i) Rather than moving jams, synchronized flow first occurs at bottlenecks if the flow rate is slowly increasing. Wide moving jams can spontaneously occur only in synchronized flow. (ii) General patterns (GP) and synchronized flow patterns (SP) can spontaneously emerge at the bottlenecks. There can be the widening SP (WSP), the moving SP (MSP), and the localized SP. (iii) At on-ramps cases of "weak" and "strong" congestion should be distinguished. In contrast to weak congestion, under strong congestion the flow rate in synchronized flow in GP reaches a limit flow rate, the frequency of the moving jam emergence reaches a maximum, i.e., the GP characteristics under strong congestion do not depend on traffic demand. (iv) At the off-ramp GP with weak congestion occur. (v) A study of the pattern formation on a highway with two bottlenecks shows that diverse expanded patterns can occur, which cover both bottlenecks. SP first emerged at the downstream bottleneck can be caught at the

  9. A queuing model for road traffic simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Guerrouahane, N.; Aissani, D.; Bouallouche-Medjkoune, L.; Farhi, N.

    2015-03-10

    We present in this article a stochastic queuing model for the raod traffic. The model is based on the M/G/c/c state dependent queuing model, and is inspired from the deterministic Godunov scheme for the road traffic simulation. We first propose a variant of M/G/c/c state dependent model that works with density-flow fundamental diagrams rather than density-speed relationships. We then extend this model in order to consider upstream traffic demand as well as downstream traffic supply. Finally, we show how to model a whole raod by concatenating raod sections as in the deterministic Godunov scheme.

  10. Simulating effects of highway embankments on estuarine circulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, Jonathan K.; Schaffranek, Raymond W.; Baltzer, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    A two-dimensional depth-averaged, finite-difference, numerical model was used to simulate tidal circulation and mass transport in the Port Royal Sound. South Carolina, estuarine system. The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the utility of the Surface-Water. Integrated. Flow and Transport model (SWIFT2D) for evaluating changes in circulation patterns and mass transport caused by highway-crossing embankments. A model of subregion of Port Royal Sound including the highway crossings and having a grid size of 61 m (200ft) was derived from a 183-m (600-ft) model of the entire Port Royal Sound estuarine system. The 183-m model was used to compute boundary-value data for the 61-m submodel, which was then used to simulate flow conditions with and without the highway embankments in place. The numerical simulations show that, with the highway embankment in place, mass transport between the Broad River and Battery Creek is reduced and mass transport between the Beaufort River and Battery Creek is increased. The net result is that mass transport into and out of upper Battery Creek is reduced. The presence of the embankments also alters circulation patterns within Battery Creek.

  11. Reducing Traffic Congestions by Introducing CACC-Vehicles on a Multi-Lane Highway Using Agent-Based Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaout, Georges M.; Bowling, Shannon R.

    2011-01-01

    Traffic congestion is an ongoing problem of great interest to researchers from different areas in academia. With the emerging technology for inter-vehicle communication, vehicles have the ability to exchange information with predecessors by wireless communication. In this paper, we present an agent-based model of traffic congestion and examine the impact of having CACC (Cooperative Adaptive Cruise Control) embedded vehicle(s) on a highway system consisting of 4 traffic lanes without overtaking. In our model, CACC vehicles adapt their acceleration/deceleration according to vehicle-to-vehicle inter-communication. We analyze the average speed of the cars, the shockwaves, and the evolution of traffic congestion throughout the lifecycle of the model. The study identifies how CACC vehicles affect the dynamics of traffic flow on a complex network and reduce the oscillatory behavior (stop and go) resulting from the acceleration/deceleration of the vehicles.

  12. Traffic flow theory and traffic flow simulation models. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    ;Contents: Comparison of Simulation Modules of TRANSYT and INTEGRATION Models; Evaluation of SCATSIM-RTA Adaptive Traffic Network Simulation Model; Comparison NETSIM, NETFLO I, and NETFLO II Traffic Simulation Models for Fixed-Time Signal Control; Traffic Flow Simulation Through Parallel Processing; Cluster Analysis as Tool in Traffic Engineering; Traffic Platoon Dispersion Modeling on Arterial Streets; Hybrid Model for Estimating Permitted Left-Turn Saturations Flow Rate; and Passing Sight Distance and Overtaking Dilemma on Two-Lane Roads.

  13. Simulation Study of Traffic Accidents in Bidirectional Traffic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, Najem

    Conditions for the occurrence of bidirectional collisions are developed based on the Simon-Gutowitz bidirectional traffic model. Three types of dangerous situations can occur in this model. We analyze those corresponding to head-on collision; rear-end collision and lane-changing collision. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we compute the probability of the occurrence of these collisions for different values of the oncoming cars' density. It is found that the risk of collisions is important when the density of cars in one lane is small and that of the other lane is high enough. The influence of different proportions of heavy vehicles is also studied. We found that heavy vehicles cause an important reduction of traffic flow on the home lane and provoke an increase of the risk of car accidents.

  14. Terminal area air traffic control simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    To study the impact of advanced aeronautical technologies on operations to and from terminal airports, a computer model of air traffic movements was developed. The advantages of fast-time simulation are discussed, and the arrival scheduling and flight simulation are described. A New York area study, user's guide, and programmer's guide are included.

  15. Hopf bifurcation analysis for a dissipative system with asymmetric interaction: Analytical explanation of a specific property of highway traffic.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Yasuyuki; Saito, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    A dissipative system with asymmetric interaction, the optimal velocity model, shows a Hopf bifurcation concerned with the transition from a homogeneous motion to the formation of a moving cluster, such as the emergence of a traffic jam. We investigate the properties of Hopf bifurcation depending on the particle density, using the dynamical system for the traveling cluster solution of the continuum system derived from the original discrete system of particles. The Hopf bifurcation is revealed as a subcritical one, and the property explains well the specific phenomena in highway traffic: the metastability of jamming transition and the hysteresis effect in the relation of car density and flow rate. PMID:26871081

  16. Hopf bifurcation analysis for a dissipative system with asymmetric interaction: Analytical explanation of a specific property of highway traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Yasuyuki; Saito, Satoshi; Ishiwata, Ryosuke; Sugiyama, Yuki

    2016-01-01

    A dissipative system with asymmetric interaction, the optimal velocity model, shows a Hopf bifurcation concerned with the transition from a homogeneous motion to the formation of a moving cluster, such as the emergence of a traffic jam. We investigate the properties of Hopf bifurcation depending on the particle density, using the dynamical system for the traveling cluster solution of the continuum system derived from the original discrete system of particles. The Hopf bifurcation is revealed as a subcritical one, and the property explains well the specific phenomena in highway traffic: the metastability of jamming transition and the hysteresis effect in the relation of car density and flow rate.

  17. Computationally Lightweight Air-Traffic-Control Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    An algorithm for computationally lightweight simulation of automated air traffic control (ATC) at a busy airport has been derived. The algorithm is expected to serve as the basis for development of software that would be incorporated into flight-simulator software, the ATC component of which is not yet capable of handling realistic airport loads. Software based on this algorithm could also be incorporated into other computer programs that simulate a variety of scenarios for purposes of training or amusement.

  18. Chemical and physical characterization of traffic particles in four different highway environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enroth, Joonas; Saarikoski, Sanna; Niemi, Jarkko; Kousa, Anu; Ježek, Irena; Močnik, Griša; Carbone, Samara; Kuuluvainen, Heino; Rönkkö, Topi; Hillamo, Risto; Pirjola, Liisa

    2016-05-01

    Traffic-related pollution is a major concern in urban areas due to its deleterious effects on human health. The characteristics of the traffic emissions on four highway environments in the Helsinki metropolitan area were measured with a mobile laboratory, equipped with state-of-the-art instrumentation. Concentration gradients were observed for all traffic-related pollutants, particle number (CN), particulate mass (PM1), black carbon (BC), organics, and nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2). Flow dynamics in different environments appeared to be an important factor for the dilution of the pollutants. For example, the half-decay distances for the traffic-related CN concentrations varied from 8 to 83 m at different sites. The PM1 emissions from traffic mostly consisted of organics and BC. At the most open site, the ratio of organics to BC increased with distance to the highway, indicating condensation of volatile and semi-volatile organics on BC particles. These condensed organics were shown to be hydrocarbons as the fraction of hydrocarbon fragments in organics increased. Regarding the CN size distributions, particle growth during the dilution was not observed; however the mass size distributions measured with a soot particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SP-AMS), showed a visible shift of the mode, detected at ˜ 100 nm at the roadside, to a larger size when the distance to the roadside increased. The fleet average emission factors appeared to be lower for the CN and higher for the NO2 than ten years ago. The reason is likely to be the increased fraction of light-duty (LD) diesel vehicles in the past ten years. The fraction of heavy-duty (HD) traffic, although constituting less than 10 % of the total traffic flow, was found to have a large impact on the emissions.

  19. Spatial and temporal differences in traffic-related air pollution in three urban neighborhoods near an interstate highway.

    PubMed

    Patton, Allison P; Perkins, Jessica; Zamore, Wig; Levy, Jonathan I; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L

    2014-12-01

    Relatively few studies have characterized differences in intra- and inter-neighborhood traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) concentrations and distance-decay gradients in along an urban highway for the purposes of exposure assessment. The goal of this work was to determine the extent to which intra- and inter-neighborhood differences in TRAP concentrations can be explained by traffic and meteorology in three pairs of neighborhoods along Interstate 93 (I-93) in the metropolitan Boston area (USA). We measured distance-decay gradients of seven TRAPs (PNC, pPAH, NO, NOX, BC, CO, PM2.5) in near-highway (<400 m) and background areas (>1 km) in Somerville, Dorchester/South Boston, Chinatown and Malden to determine whether (1) spatial patterns in concentrations and inter-pollutant correlations differ between neighborhoods, and (2) variation within and between neighborhoods can be explained by traffic and meteorology. The neighborhoods ranged in area from 0.5 to 2.3 km(2). Mobile monitoring was performed over the course of one year in each pair of neighborhoods (one pair of neighborhoods per year in three successive years; 35-47 days of monitoring in each neighborhood). Pollutant levels generally increased with highway proximity, consistent with I-93 being a major source of TRAP; however, the slope and extent of the distance-decay gradients varied by neighborhood as well as by pollutant, season and time of day. Correlations among pollutants differed between neighborhoods (e.g., ρ = 0.35-0.80 between PNC and NOX and ρ = 0.11-0.60 between PNC and BC) and were generally lower in Dorchester/South Boston than in the other neighborhoods. We found that the generalizability of near-road gradients and near-highway/urban background contrasts was limited for near-highway neighborhoods in a metropolitan area with substantial local street traffic. Our findings illustrate the importance of measuring gradients of multiple pollutants under different ambient conditions in individual near-highway

  20. Spatial and temporal differences in traffic-related air pollution in three urban neighborhoods near an interstate highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Allison P.; Perkins, Jessica; Zamore, Wig; Levy, Jonathan I.; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2014-12-01

    Relatively few studies have characterized differences in intra- and inter-neighborhood traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) concentrations and distance-decay gradients in neighborhoods along an urban highway for the purposes of exposure assessment. The goal of this work was to determine the extent to which intra- and inter-neighborhood differences in TRAP concentrations can be explained by traffic and meteorology in three pairs of neighborhoods along Interstate 93 (I-93) in the metropolitan Boston area (USA). We measured distance-decay gradients of seven TRAPs (PNC, pPAH, NO, NOX, BC, CO, PM2.5) in near-highway (<400 m) and background areas (>1 km) in Somerville, Dorchester/South Boston, Chinatown and Malden to determine whether (1) spatial patterns in concentrations and inter-pollutant correlations differ between neighborhoods, and (2) variation within and between neighborhoods can be explained by traffic and meteorology. The neighborhoods ranged in area from 0.5 to 2.3 km2. Mobile monitoring was performed over the course of one year in each pair of neighborhoods (one pair of neighborhoods per year in three successive years; 35-47 days of monitoring in each neighborhood). Pollutant levels generally increased with highway proximity, consistent with I-93 being a major source of TRAP; however, the slope and extent of the distance-decay gradients varied by neighborhood as well as by pollutant, season and time of day. Spearman correlations among pollutants differed between neighborhoods (e.g., ρ = 0.35-0.80 between PNC and NOX and ρ = 0.11-0.60 between PNC and BC) and were generally lower in Dorchester/South Boston than in the other neighborhoods. We found that the generalizability of near-road gradients and near-highway/urban background contrasts was limited for near-highway neighborhoods in a metropolitan area with substantial local street traffic. Our findings illustrate the importance of measuring gradients of multiple pollutants under different ambient

  1. Spatial and temporal differences in traffic-related air pollution in three urban neighborhoods near an interstate highway

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Allison P.; Perkins, Jessica; Zamore, Wig; Levy, Jonathan I.; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2014-01-01

    Relatively few studies have characterized differences in intra- and inter-neighborhood traffic-related air pollutant (TRAP) concentrations and distance-decay gradients in along an urban highway for the purposes of exposure assessment. The goal of this work was to determine the extent to which intra- and inter-neighborhood differences in TRAP concentrations can be explained by traffic and meteorology in three pairs of neighborhoods along Interstate 93 (I-93) in the metropolitan Boston area (USA). We measured distance-decay gradients of seven TRAPs (PNC, pPAH, NO, NOX, BC, CO, PM2.5) in near-highway (<400 m) and background areas (>1 km) in Somerville, Dorchester/South Boston, Chinatown and Malden to determine whether (1) spatial patterns in concentrations and inter-pollutant correlations differ between neighborhoods, and (2) variation within and between neighborhoods can be explained by traffic and meteorology. The neighborhoods ranged in area from 0.5 to 2.3 km2. Mobile monitoring was performed over the course of one year in each pair of neighborhoods (one pair of neighborhoods per year in three successive years; 35-47 days of monitoring in each neighborhood). Pollutant levels generally increased with highway proximity, consistent with I-93 being a major source of TRAP; however, the slope and extent of the distance-decay gradients varied by neighborhood as well as by pollutant, season and time of day. Correlations among pollutants differed between neighborhoods (e.g., ρ = 0.35-0.80 between PNC and NOX and ρ = 0.11-0.60 between PNC and BC) and were generally lower in Dorchester/South Boston than in the other neighborhoods. We found that the generalizability of near-road gradients and near-highway/urban background contrasts was limited for near-highway neighborhoods in a metropolitan area with substantial local street traffic. Our findings illustrate the importance of measuring gradients of multiple pollutants under different ambient conditions in individual near-highway

  2. Empirical macroscopic features of spatial-temporal traffic patterns at highway bottlenecks.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S

    2002-04-01

    Results of an empirical study of congested patterns measured during 1995-2001 at German highways are presented. Based on this study, various types of congested patterns at on and off ramps have been identified, their macroscopic spatial-temporal features have been derived, and an evolution of those patterns and transformations between different types of the patterns over time has been found out. It has been found that at an isolated bottleneck (a bottleneck that is far enough from other effective bottlenecks) either the general pattern (GP) or the synchronized flow pattern (SP) can be formed. In GP, synchronized flow occurs and wide moving jams spontaneously emerge in that synchronized flow. In SP, no wide moving jams emerge, i.e., SP consists of synchronized flow only. An evolution of GP into SP when the flow rate to the on ramp decreases has been found and investigated. Spatial-temporal features of complex patterns that occur if two or more effective bottlenecks exist on a highway have been found out. In particular, the expanded pattern where synchronized flow covers two or more effective bottlenecks can be formed. It has been found that the spatial-temporal structure of congested patterns possesses predictable, i.e., characteristic, unique, and reproducible features, for example, the most probable types of patterns that are formed at a given bottleneck. According to the empirical investigations the cases of the weak and the strong congestion should be distinguished. In contrast to the weak congestion, the strong congestion possesses the following characteristic features: (i) the flow rate in synchronized flow is self-maintaining near a limit flow rate; (ii) the mean width of the region of synchronized flow in GP does not depend on traffic demand; (iii) there is a correlation between the parameters of synchronized flow and wide moving jams: the higher the flow rate out from a wide moving jam is, the higher is the limit flow rate in the synchronized flow. The

  3. Investigating risk factors of traffic casualties at private highway-railroad grade crossings in the United States.

    PubMed

    Haleem, Kirolos

    2016-10-01

    Private highway-railroad grade crossings (HRGCs) are intersections of highways and railroads on roadways that are not maintained by a public authority. Since no public authority maintains private HRGCs, fatal and injury crashes at these locations are of concern. However, no study has been conducted at private HRGCs to identify the safety issues that might exist and how to alleviate them. This study identifies the significant predictors of traffic casualties (including both injuries and fatalities) at private HRGCs in the U.S. using six years of nationwide crashes from 2009 to 2014. Two levels of injury severity were considered, injury (including fatalities and injuries) and no injury. The study investigates multiple predictors, e.g., temporal crash characteristics, geometry, railroad, traffic, vehicle, and environment. The study applies both the mixed logit and binary logit models. The mixed logit model was found to outperform the binary logit model. The mixed logit model revealed that drivers who did not stop, railroad equipment that struck highway users, higher train speeds, non-presence of advance warning signs, concrete road surface type, and cloudy weather were associated with an increase in injuries and fatalities. For example, a one-mile-per-hour higher train speed increases the probability of fatality by 22%. On the contrary, male drivers, PM peak periods, and presence of warning devices at both approaches were associated with a fatality reduction. Potential strategies are recommended to alleviate injuries and fatalities at private HRGCs. PMID:27474873

  4. Metropolitan Road Traffic Simulation on FPGAs.

    SciTech Connect

    Tripp J. L.; Mortveit, H. S.; Hansson, A. A.; Gokhale, M.

    2005-01-01

    This work demonstrates that road traffic simulation of entire metropolitan areas is possible with reconfigurable supercomputing that combines 64-bit microprocessors and FPGAs in a high bandwidth, low latency interconnect. Previously, traffic simulation on FPGAs was limited to very short road segments or required a very large number of FPGAs. Our data streaming approach overcomes scaling issues associated with direct implementations and still allows for high-level parallelism by dividing the data sets between hardware and software across the reconfigurable supercomputer. Using one FPGA on the Cray XD1 supercomputer, we are able to achieve a 34.4 x speed up over the AMD microprocessor. System integration issues must be optimized to exploit this speedup in the overall simulation.

  5. Low Earth Orbit satellite traffic simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoelzel, John

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a significant tool for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) capacity analysis, needed to support marketing, economic, and design analysis, known as a Satellite Traffic Simulator (STS). LEO satellites typically use multiple beams to help achieve the desired communication capacity, but the traffic demand in these beams in usually not uniform. Simulations of dynamic, average, and peak expected demand per beam is a very critical part of the marketing, economic, and design analysis necessary to field a viable LEO system. An STS is described in this paper which can simulate voice, data and FAX traffic carried by LEO satellite beams and Earth Station Gateways. It is applicable world-wide for any LEO satellite constellations operating over any regions. For aeronautical applications to LEO satellites. the anticipates aeronautical traffic (Erlangs for each hour of the day to be simulated) is prepared for geographically defined 'area targets' (each major operational region for the respective aircraft), and used as input to the STS. The STS was designed by Constellations Communications Inc. (CCI) and E-Systems for usage in Brazil in accordance with an ESCA/INPE Statement Of Work, and developed by Analytical Graphics Inc. (AGI) to execute on top of its Satellite Tool Kit (STK) commercial software. The STS simulates constellations of LEO satellite orbits, with input of traffic intensity (Erlangs) for each hour of the day generated from area targets (such as Brazilian States). accumulated in custom LEO satellite beams, and then accumulated in Earth Station Gateways. The STS is a very general simulator which can accommodate: many forms of orbital element and Walker Constellation input; simple beams or any user defined custom beams; and any location of Gateways. The paper describes some of these features, including Manual Mode dynamic graphical display of communication links, to illustrate which Gateway links are accessible and which links are not, at each 'step' of the

  6. Influences of traffic volumes and wind speeds on ambient ultrafine particle levels—Observations at a highway electronic toll collection (ETC) lane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Li, Yi-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    The levels of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and their size distributions on a highway electronic toll collection (ETC) lane were measured from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. The hourly UFP levels measured at the highway ETC lane were 1.3 × 10 4-1.9 × 10 5 particles cm -3 (mean = 9.4 × 10 4 particles cm -3). Compared with urban UFP levels, average UFP levels at the highway ETC lane were about 5-10 times higher than those previously measured in urban areas, indicating that a considerable amount of UFPs were exhausted from vehicles. At the highway ETC lane, the average UFP number size distribution had a dominant mode at about 10 nm and a minor mode at about 33 nm. Measurement results indicate that nucleation mode particles remained at relatively high levels compared to Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles at the highway ETC lane. This study identifies the impacts of traffic volumes and wind speeds on ambient UFP levels. Measurement results show that the elevated UFP levels resulting from traffic volume decreased exponentially as wind speed increased on the highway when wind speed was <2.0 m s -1. However, the elevated UFP levels resulting from traffic volume increased slightly when wind speed was >2.0 m s -1 due to local turbulent mixing causes UFPs at high wind speeds. According to measurement results, high levels of UFP were observed at low wind speeds and under high traffic volumes.

  7. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  8. Spontaneous phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow in traffic on a single-lane highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Cheng-Jie; Wang, Wei; Jiang, Rui; Zhang, H. M.; Wang, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Traffic flow complexity comes from the car-following and lane-changing behavior. Based on empirical data for individual vehicle speeds and time headways measured on a single-lane highway section, we have studied the traffic flow properties induced by pure car-following behavior. We have found that a spontaneous sudden drop in velocity could happen in a platoon of vehicles when the velocity of the leading vehicle is quite high (˜70 km/h). In contrast, when the velocity of the leading vehicle in a platoon slows down, such a spontaneous sudden drop of velocity has not been observed. Our finding indicates that traffic breakdown on a single-lane road might be a phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow (F→S transition). We have found that the flow rate within the emergent synchronized flow can be either smaller or larger than the flow rate in the free flow within which the synchronized flow propagates. Our empirical findings support Kerner's three-phase theory in which traffic breakdown is associated with an F→S transition.

  9. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion.

    PubMed

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination. PMID:26491711

  10. Traffic and Driving Simulator Based on Architecture of Interactive Motion

    PubMed Central

    Paz, Alexander; Veeramisti, Naveen; Khaddar, Romesh; de la Fuente-Mella, Hanns; Modorcea, Luiza

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an architecture for an interactive motion-based traffic simulation environment. In order to enhance modeling realism involving actual human beings, the proposed architecture integrates multiple types of simulation, including: (i) motion-based driving simulation, (ii) pedestrian simulation, (iii) motorcycling and bicycling simulation, and (iv) traffic flow simulation. The architecture has been designed to enable the simulation of the entire network; as a result, the actual driver, pedestrian, and bike rider can navigate anywhere in the system. In addition, the background traffic interacts with the actual human beings. This is accomplished by using a hybrid mesomicroscopic traffic flow simulation modeling approach. The mesoscopic traffic flow simulation model loads the results of a user equilibrium traffic assignment solution and propagates the corresponding traffic through the entire system. The microscopic traffic flow simulation model provides background traffic around the vicinities where actual human beings are navigating the system. The two traffic flow simulation models interact continuously to update system conditions based on the interactions between actual humans and the fully simulated entities. Implementation efforts are currently in progress and some preliminary tests of individual components have been conducted. The implementation of the proposed architecture faces significant challenges ranging from multiplatform and multilanguage integration to multievent communication and coordination. PMID:26491711

  11. Boundary Layer Model for Air Pollutant Concentrations Due to Highway Traffic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ragland, Kenneth W.; Peirce, J. Jeffrey

    1975-01-01

    A numerical solution of the three-dimensional steady-state diffusion equation for a finite width line source is presented. The wind speed and eddy diffusivity as a function of height above the roadway are obtained. Normalized ground level and elevated concentrations near a highway are obtained for winds perpendicular, parallel, and at 45 degrees.…

  12. Computers in Traffic Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, O. P.

    1983-01-01

    Traffic education covers basic road skills, legal/insurance aspects, highway code, accident causation/prevention, and vehicle maintenance. Microcomputer applications to traffic education are outlined, followed by a selected example of programs currently available (focusing on drill/practice, simulation, problem-solving, data manipulation, games,…

  13. Microscopic theory of traffic-flow instability governing traffic breakdown at highway bottlenecks: Growing wave of increase in speed in synchronized flow.

    PubMed

    Kerner, Boris S

    2015-12-01

    We have revealed a growing local speed wave of increase in speed that can randomly occur in synchronized flow (S) at a highway bottleneck. The development of such a traffic flow instability leads to free flow (F) at the bottleneck; therefore, we call this instability an S→F instability. Whereas the S→F instability leads to a local increase in speed (growing acceleration wave), in contrast, the classical traffic flow instability introduced in the 1950s-1960s and incorporated later in a huge number of traffic flow models leads to a growing wave of a local decrease in speed (growing deceleration wave). We have found that the S→F instability can occur only if there is a finite time delay in driver overacceleration. The initial speed disturbance of increase in speed (called "speed peak") that initiates the S→F instability occurs usually at the downstream front of synchronized flow at the bottleneck. There can be many speed peaks with random amplitudes that occur randomly over time. It has been found that the S→F instability exhibits a nucleation nature: Only when a speed peak amplitude is large enough can the S→F instability occur; in contrast, speed peaks of smaller amplitudes cause dissolving speed waves of a local increase in speed (dissolving acceleration waves) in synchronized flow. We have found that the S→F instability governs traffic breakdown-a phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow (F→S transition) at the bottleneck: The nucleation nature of the S→F instability explains the metastability of free flow with respect to an F→S transition at the bottleneck. PMID:26764764

  14. Microscopic theory of traffic-flow instability governing traffic breakdown at highway bottlenecks: Growing wave of increase in speed in synchronized flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-12-01

    We have revealed a growing local speed wave of increase in speed that can randomly occur in synchronized flow (S) at a highway bottleneck. The development of such a traffic flow instability leads to free flow (F) at the bottleneck; therefore, we call this instability an S →F instability. Whereas the S →F instability leads to a local increase in speed (growing acceleration wave), in contrast, the classical traffic flow instability introduced in the 1950s-1960s and incorporated later in a huge number of traffic flow models leads to a growing wave of a local decrease in speed (growing deceleration wave). We have found that the S →F instability can occur only if there is a finite time delay in driver overacceleration. The initial speed disturbance of increase in speed (called "speed peak") that initiates the S →F instability occurs usually at the downstream front of synchronized flow at the bottleneck. There can be many speed peaks with random amplitudes that occur randomly over time. It has been found that the S →F instability exhibits a nucleation nature: Only when a speed peak amplitude is large enough can the S →F instability occur; in contrast, speed peaks of smaller amplitudes cause dissolving speed waves of a local increase in speed (dissolving acceleration waves) in synchronized flow. We have found that the S →F instability governs traffic breakdown—a phase transition from free flow to synchronized flow (F →S transition) at the bottleneck: The nucleation nature of the S →F instability explains the metastability of free flow with respect to an F →S transition at the bottleneck.

  15. Assessment of palladium footprint from road traffic in two highway environments.

    PubMed

    Clément, N; Muresan, B; Hedde, M; François, D

    2015-12-01

    Palladium (Pd) is an emerging eco-toxic pollutant from vehicle catalytic converters, emitted worldwide for more than two decades. Nowadays, the spatial extent of Pd fallout is growing along roads, but its subsequent fate in neighboring terrestrial ecosystems has not been extensively addressed yet. Two sites representative of contrasted natural environments (field, forest) but located under similar ambient conditions were selected to isolate and analyze the specific impact of vehicular Pd, along highway A71, France. Pd impregnation was assessed along 200-m-long transects perpendicular to the highway. Contents were measured in soils, earthworms, plant communities of the right of way (ROW), and the neighboring field (crop weeds), as well as in a moss, and bramble and ivy leaves in the forest. The direct impact of Pd fallouts appears to be confined in the grassy verge of the highway: ROW soils ([Pd] = 52-65 ng g(-1)), earthworms ([Pd] = 18-38 ng g(-1)), and plant community ([Pd] = 10-23 ng g(-1)). Pd footprint is pointed out by the accumulation index calculated for earthworms and plant communities even though transfer coefficients indicate the absence of bioaccumulation (TCs < 1). An indirect longer range transfer of Pd is identified, induced by hydric transport of organic matter. PMID:26298342

  16. Numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, G.; Lyrintzis, A.S.; Michalopoulos, P.G.

    1997-11-01

    A new high-order continuum model is presented in this paper. This high-order model exhibits smooth solutions rather than discontinuities, is able to describe the amplification of small disturbances on heavy traffic, and allows fluctuations of speed around the equilibrium values. Furthermore, unlike some earlier high-order models, it does not result in negative speeds at the tail of congested regions and disturbance propagation speeds greater than the flow speed. The model takes into account the relaxation time as a function of density and, in the equilibrium limit, it is consistent with the simple continuum model. A Riemann-problem-based numerical method is proposed for the solution of the new high-order model. Modeling of interrupted flow behavior such as merging, diverging, and weaving is also investigated. Based on the new high order model, the proposed numerical method and the modeling of interrupted flow, a versatile code is developed for the numerical simulation of freeway traffic flow that includes several freeway geometries. The authors compare the high-order model with the simple continuum model and the proposed numerical method with the Lax method based on 30-s and 5-min field data. The model is tested in interrupted flow situations (e.g., pipeline, merging, diverging, and weaving areas). A comparison of numerical results with limited field data shows that the high-order model performs better than the simple continuum model and describes better than a previously proposed method.

  17. 78 FR 26847 - Including Specific Pavement Types in Federal-aid Highway Traffic Noise Analyses

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... data from three pavement types: dense-graded asphaltic concrete (DGAC), open-graded asphaltic concrete (OGAC), and Portland cement concrete (PCC). Prediction of future noise levels is based on the ``average... to consider a wider range of asphaltic concrete and PCC pavements within the agency's traffic...

  18. Improving Highway Safety Manpower: Traffic Engineering Technician Project at Lansing Community College. Final Report, Phase I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Phase I of this project was conducted to pilot test an associate degree program for the preparation of traffic safety technicians. Previously developed curriculum materials were revised by an advisory committee in accordance with the level of expertise and sophistication of the 27 students enrolled in the 2-year program and to meet the needs of…

  19. Simulating traffic flow with Lotus 1-2-3

    SciTech Connect

    Snelting, D.T.

    1986-07-01

    This article discusses the use of spreadsheet software in simulating traffic flow on an approach to a pretimed signalized intersection. Such a simulation model would serve the following purposes: 1. It could help traffic engineers realize the types of applications that are possible with spreadsheets or expand their current thinking in this area. 2. It should provide traffic engineers and transportation planners with a relatively simple tool for obtaining a ''feel'' for traffic flow characteristics. 3. Delay and stopping data generated from the model could be used to verify other research data and actual field data.

  20. Simulation laboratory for evaluating dynamic traffic management systems

    SciTech Connect

    Ban-Akiva, M.E.; Mishalani, R.G.; Yang, Q.; Koutsopoulos, H.N.

    1997-08-01

    This paper presents a simulation laboratory for performance evaluation and design refinement of dynamic traffic management systems. The laboratory consists of four integrated components: (1) a traffic management simulator, which mimics the generation of route guidance and operations of traffic signals and signs; (2) a traffic flow simulator, which models individual vehicle movements and drivers` route choice decisions in the presence of real-time traffic information; (3) a surveillance system module, which collects real-time traffic data from sensors and probe vehicles in the simulated network; and (4) a control device module, which implements control strategies and route guidance generated by the traffic management system under evaluation. The simulation laboratory has been implemented in C++ using object-oriented programming and a distributed environment. It features a graphical user interface that allows users to visualize the simulation process, including animation of vehicle movements, state of surveillance sensors, traffic signals, signs, and so on. This modeling system provides a unique tool for evaluating integrated ATIS and ATMS applications in a computer-based laboratory environment.

  1. Examining Road Traffic Mortality Status in China: A Simulation Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwebel, David C.; Li, Li; Hu, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Background Data from the Chinese police service suggest substantial reductions in road traffic injuries since 2002, but critics have questioned the accuracy of those data, especially considering conflicting data reported by the health department. Methods To address the gap between police and health department data and to determine which may be more accurate, we conducted a simulation study based on the modified Smeed equation, which delineates a non-linear relation between road traffic mortality and the level of motorization in a country or region. Our goal was to simulate trends in road traffic mortality in China and compare performances in road traffic safety management between China and 13 other countries. Results Chinese police data indicate a peak in road traffic mortalities in 2002 and a significant and a gradual decrease in population-based road traffic mortality since 2002. Health department data show the road traffic mortality peaked in 2012. In addition, police data suggest China’s road traffic mortality peaked at a much lower motorization level (0.061 motor vehicles per person) in 2002, followed by a reduction in mortality to a level comparable to that of developed countries. Simulation results based on health department data suggest high road traffic mortality, with a mortality peak in 2012 at a moderate motorization level (0.174 motor vehicles per person). Comparisons to the other 13 countries suggest the health data from China may be more valid than the police data. Conclusion Our simulation data indicate China is still at a stage of high road traffic mortality, as suggested by health data, rather than a stage of low road traffic mortality, as suggested by police data. More efforts are needed to integrate safety into road design, improve road traffic management, improve data quality, and alter unsafe behaviors of pedestrians, drivers and passengers in China. PMID:27071008

  2. Transforming GIS data into functional road models for large-scale traffic simulation.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, David; Sewall, Jason; Lin, Ming C

    2012-06-01

    There exists a vast amount of geographic information system (GIS) data that model road networks around the world as polylines with attributes. In this form, the data are insufficient for applications such as simulation and 3D visualization-tools which will grow in power and demand as sensor data become more pervasive and as governments try to optimize their existing physical infrastructure. In this paper, we propose an efficient method for enhancing a road map from a GIS database to create a geometrically and topologically consistent 3D model to be used in real-time traffic simulation, interactive visualization of virtual worlds, and autonomous vehicle navigation. The resulting representation provides important road features for traffic simulations, including ramps, highways, overpasses, legal merge zones, and intersections with arbitrary states, and it is independent of the simulation methodologies. We test the 3D models of road networks generated by our algorithm on real-time traffic simulation using both macroscopic and microscopic techniques. PMID:21690653

  3. Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference: Support the Highway to Space Through Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecher, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Institute of Environmental Sciences Fifteenth Space Simulation Conference, Support the Highway to Space Through Testing, provided participants a forum to acquire and exchange information on the state-of-the-art in space simulation, test technology, thermal simulation and protection, contamination, and techniques of test measurements.

  4. Traffic scenario generation technique for piloted simulation studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1985-01-01

    Piloted simulation studies of cockpit traffic display concepts require the development of representative traffic scenarios. With the exception of specific aircraft interaction issues, most research questions can be addressed using traffic scenarios consisting of prerecorded aircraft movements merged together to form a desired traffic pattern. Prerecorded traffic scenarios have distinct research advantages, allowing control of traffic encounters with repeatability of scenarios between different test subjects. A technique is described for generation of prerecorded jet transport traffic scenarios suitable for use in piloted simulation studies. Individual flight profiles for the aircraft in the scenario are created interactively with a computer program designed specifically for this purpose. The profiles are then time-correlated and merged into a complete scenario. This technique was used to create traffic scenarios for the Denver, Colorado area with operations centered at Stapleton International Airport. Traffic scenarios for other areas may also be created using this technique, with appropriate modifications made to the navigation fix locations contained in the flight profile generation program.

  5. Lightweight simulation of air traffic control using simple temporal networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Russell

    2005-01-01

    We provide a formulation of the air traffic control problem and a solver for this problem that makes use of temporal constraint networks and simple geometric reasoning. We provide results showing that this approach is practical for realistic simulated problems.

  6. Structural monitoring of a highway bridge using passive noise recordings from street traffic.

    PubMed

    Salvermoser, Johannes; Hadziioannou, Céline; Stähler, Simon C

    2015-12-01

    Structural damage on bridges presents a hazard to public safety and can lead to fatalities. This article contributes to the development of an alternative monitoring system for civil structures, based on passive measurements of seismic elastic waves. Cross-correlations of traffic noise recorded at geophone receiver pairs were found to be sufficiently stable for comparison and sensitive to velocity changes in the medium. As such velocity variations could be caused by damage, their detection would be valuable in structural health monitoring systems. A method, originally introduced for seismological applications and named Passive Image Interferometry, was used to quantify small velocity fluctuations in the medium and thereby observe structural changes. Evaluation of more than 2 months of continuous geophone recordings at a reinforced concrete bridge yielded velocity variations Δv/v in the range of -1.5% to +2.1%. The observed fluctuations correlate with associated temperature time series with a striking resemblance which is remarkable for two completely independent data sets. Using a linear regression approach, a relationship between temperature and velocity variations of on average 0.064% °C(-1) can be identified. This value corresponds well to other studies on concrete structures. PMID:26723341

  7. Traffic simulations on parallel computers using domain decomposition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hanebutte, U.R.; Tentner, A.M.

    1995-12-31

    Large scale simulations of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) can only be achieved by using the computing resources offered by parallel computing architectures. Domain decomposition techniques are proposed which allow the performance of traffic simulations with the standard simulation package TRAF-NETSIM on a 128 nodes IBM SPx parallel supercomputer as well as on a cluster of SUN workstations. Whilst this particular parallel implementation is based on NETSIM, a microscopic traffic simulation model, the presented strategy is applicable to a broad class of traffic simulations. An outer iteration loop must be introduced in order to converge to a global solution. A performance study that utilizes a scalable test network that consist of square-grids is presented, which addresses the performance penalty introduced by the additional iteration loop.

  8. Simulating Timescale Dynamics of Network Traffic Using Homogeneous Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Jian; Mills, Kevin L.

    2006-01-01

    Simulating and understanding traffic dynamics in large networks are difficult and challenging due to the complexity of such networks and the limitations inherent in simulation modeling. Typically, simulation models used to study traffic dynamics include substantial detail representing protocol mechanisms across several layers of functionality. Such models must be restricted in space and time in order to be computationally tractable. We propose an alternative simulation approach that uses homogeneous modeling with an increased level of abstraction, in order to explore networks at larger space-time scales than otherwise feasible and to develop intuition and insight about the space-time dynamics of large networks. To illustrate the utility of our approach, we examine some current understandings of the timescale dynamics of network traffic, and we discuss some speculative results obtained with homogeneous modeling. Using a wavelet-based technique, we show correlation structures, and changes in correlation structures, of network traffic under variations in traffic sources, transport mechanisms, and network structure. Our simulation results justify further investigation of our approach, which might benefit from cross-verifications against more detailed simulation models. PMID:27274931

  9. Evaluation of Intersection Traffic Control Measures through Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaithambi, Gowri; Sivanandan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling traffic flow is stochastic in nature due to randomness in variables such as vehicle arrivals and speeds. Due to this and due to complex vehicular interactions and their manoeuvres, it is extremely difficult to model the traffic flow through analytical methods. To study this type of complex traffic system and vehicle interactions, simulation is considered as an effective tool. Application of homogeneous traffic models to heterogeneous traffic may not be able to capture the complex manoeuvres and interactions in such flows. Hence, a microscopic simulation model for heterogeneous traffic is developed using object oriented concepts. This simulation model acts as a tool for evaluating various control measures at signalized intersections. The present study focuses on the evaluation of Right Turn Lane (RTL) and Channelised Left Turn Lane (CLTL). A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate RTL and CLTL by varying the approach volumes, turn proportions and turn lane lengths. RTL is found to be advantageous only up to certain approach volumes and right-turn proportions, beyond which it is counter-productive. CLTL is found to be advantageous for lower approach volumes for all turn proportions, signifying the benefits of CLTL. It is counter-productive for higher approach volume and lower turn proportions. This study pinpoints the break-even points for various scenarios. The developed simulation model can be used as an appropriate intersection lane control tool for enhancing the efficiency of flow at intersections. This model can also be employed for scenario analysis and can be valuable to field traffic engineers in implementing vehicle-type based and lane-based traffic control measures.

  10. Urban traffic-network performance: flow theory and simulation experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Performance models for urban street networks were developed to describe the response of a traffic network to given travel-demand levels. The three basic traffic flow variables, speed, flow, and concentration, are defined at the network level, and three model systems are proposed. Each system consists of a series of interrelated, consistent functions between the three basic traffic-flow variables as well as the fraction of stopped vehicles in the network. These models are subsequently compared with the results of microscopic simulation of a small test network. The sensitivity of one of the model systems to a variety of network features was also explored. Three categories of features were considered, with the specific features tested listed in parentheses: network topology (block length and street width), traffic control (traffic signal coordination), and traffic characteristics (level of inter-vehicular interaction). Finally, a fundamental issue concerning the estimation of two network-level parameters (from a nonlinear relation in the two-fluid theory) was examined. The principal concern was that of comparability of these parameters when estimated with information from a single vehicle (or small group of vehicles), as done in conjunction with previous field studies, and when estimated with network-level information (i.e., all the vehicles), as is possible with simulation.

  11. Analyzing the influence of median cross-section design on highway safety using vehicle dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Stine, Jason S; Hamblin, Bridget C; Brennan, Sean N; Donnell, Eric T

    2010-11-01

    Although vehicle dynamics simulations have long been used in vehicle design and crash reconstruction, their use for highway design is rare. This paper investigates the safety of highway medians through iterative simulations of off-road median encroachments. The commercially available software CarSim was used to simulate over one hundred thousand encroachments, representing the entire passenger vehicle fleet and a wide range of encroachment angles, departure speeds, steering inputs, and braking inputs. Each individual simulation output was then weighted using data from previous studies to reflect the probability of each specific accident scenario occurring in a real-life median encroachment. Results of this analysis illustrate the relative influence of median cross-section geometry on the resulting accident outcomes. The simulations indicate that the overall safety of a highway median depends on the occurrence of both vehicle rollover and median crossover events, and the cross-section shape, slope, and width are all shown to greatly affect each of these incidents. An evaluation of the simulation results was conducted with vehicle trajectories from previous experimental crash tests. Further assessment of the aggregate simulation results to actual crash data was achieved through comparison with several databases of crash statistics. Both efforts showed a strong agreement between the simulations and the real-life crash data. PMID:20728628

  12. Increasing Intelligence in Inter-Vehicle Communications to Reduce Traffic Congestions: Experiments in Urban and Highway Environments

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Geraldo P. R.; Guidoni, Daniel L.; Pessin, Gustavo; Villas, Leandro A.; Ueyama, Jó

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) rely on Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) to streamline the operation of vehicles by managing vehicle traffic, assisting drivers with safety and sharing information, as well as providing appropriate services for passengers. Traffic congestion is an urban mobility problem, which causes stress to drivers and economic losses. In this context, this work proposes a solution for the detection, dissemination and control of congested roads based on inter-vehicle communication, called INCIDEnT. The main goal of the proposed solution is to reduce the average trip time, CO emissions and fuel consumption by allowing motorists to avoid congested roads. The simulation results show that our proposed solution leads to short delays and a low overhead. Moreover, it is efficient with regard to the coverage of the event and the distance to which the information can be propagated. The findings of the investigation show that the proposed solution leads to (i) high hit rate in the classification of the level of congestion, (ii) a reduction in average trip time, (iii) a reduction in fuel consumption, and (iv) reduced CO emissions PMID:27526048

  13. Increasing Intelligence in Inter-Vehicle Communications to Reduce Traffic Congestions: Experiments in Urban and Highway Environments.

    PubMed

    Meneguette, Rodolfo I; Filho, Geraldo P R; Guidoni, Daniel L; Pessin, Gustavo; Villas, Leandro A; Ueyama, Jó

    2016-01-01

    Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) rely on Inter-Vehicle Communication (IVC) to streamline the operation of vehicles by managing vehicle traffic, assisting drivers with safety and sharing information, as well as providing appropriate services for passengers. Traffic congestion is an urban mobility problem, which causes stress to drivers and economic losses. In this context, this work proposes a solution for the detection, dissemination and control of congested roads based on inter-vehicle communication, called INCIDEnT. The main goal of the proposed solution is to reduce the average trip time, CO emissions and fuel consumption by allowing motorists to avoid congested roads. The simulation results show that our proposed solution leads to short delays and a low overhead. Moreover, it is efficient with regard to the coverage of the event and the distance to which the information can be propagated. The findings of the investigation show that the proposed solution leads to (i) high hit rate in the classification of the level of congestion, (ii) a reduction in average trip time, (iii) a reduction in fuel consumption, and (iv) reduced CO emissions. PMID:27526048

  14. Exact-Differential Large-Scale Traffic Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanai, Masatoshi; Suzumura, Toyotaro; Theodoropoulos, Georgios; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing large-scale traffics by simulation needs repeating execution many times with various patterns of scenarios or parameters. Such repeating execution brings about big redundancy because the change from a prior scenario to a later scenario is very minor in most cases, for example, blocking only one of roads or changing the speed limit of several roads. In this paper, we propose a new redundancy reduction technique, called exact-differential simulation, which enables to simulate only changing scenarios in later execution while keeping exactly same results as in the case of whole simulation. The paper consists of two main efforts: (i) a key idea and algorithm of the exact-differential simulation, (ii) a method to build large-scale traffic simulation on the top of the exact-differential simulation. In experiments of Tokyo traffic simulation, the exact-differential simulation shows 7.26 times as much elapsed time improvement in average and 2.26 times improvement even in the worst case as the whole simulation.

  15. The use of speech technology in air traffic control simulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. A.; Hobbs, G. R.; Howes, J. R.; Cope, N.

    The advantages of applying speech technology to air traffic control (ATC) simulators are discussed with emphasis placed on the simulation of the pilot end of the pilot-controller dialog. Speech I/O in an ATC simulator is described as well as technology capability, and research on an electronic blip driver. It is found that the system is easier to use and performs better for less experienced controllers.

  16. Mobile monitoring of particle number concentration and other traffic-related air pollutants in a near-highway neighborhood over the course of a year

    PubMed Central

    Padró-Martínez, Luz T.; Patton, Allison P.; Trull, Jeffrey B.; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2012-01-01

    Accurate quantification of exposures to traffic-related air pollution in near-highway neighborhoods is challenging due to the high degree of spatial and temporal variation of pollutant levels. The objective of this study was to measure air pollutant levels in a near-highway urban area over a wide range of traffic and meteorological conditions using a mobile monitoring platform. The study was performed in a 2.3-km2 area in Somerville, Massachusetts (USA), near Interstate I-93, a highway that carries 150,000 vehicles per day. The mobile platform was equipped with rapid-response instruments and was driven repeatedly along a 15.4-km route on 55 days between September 2009 and August 2010. Monitoring was performed in 4–6-hour shifts in the morning, afternoon and evening on both weekdays and weekends in winter, spring, summer and fall. Measurements were made of particle number concentration (PNC; 4–3,000 nm), particle size distribution, fine particle mass (PM2.5), particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (pPAH), black carbon (BC), carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO and NOx). The highest pollutant concentrations were measured within 0–50 m of I-93 with distance-decay gradients varying depending on traffic and meteorology. The most pronounced variations were observed for PNC. Annual median PNC 0–50 m from I-93 was two-fold higher compared to the background area (>1 km from I-93). In general, PNC levels were highest in winter and lowest in summer and fall, higher on weekdays and Saturdays compared to Sundays, and higher during morning rush hour compared to later in the day. Similar spatial and temporal trends were observed for NO, CO and BC, but not for PM2.5. Spatial variations in PNC distance-decay gradients were non-uniform largely due to contributions from local street traffic. Hour-to-hour, day-to-day and season-to-season variations in PNC were of the same magnitude as spatial variations. Datasets containing fine-scale temporal and spatial

  17. Cellular automata simulation of traffic including cars and bicycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasic, Jelena; Ruskin, Heather J.

    2012-04-01

    As 'greening' of all aspects of human activity becomes mainstream, transportation science is also increasingly focused around sustainability. Modal co-existence between motorised and non-motorised traffic on urban networks is, in this context, of particular interest for traffic flow modelling. The main modelling problems here are posed by the heterogeneity of vehicles, including size and dynamics, and by the complex interactions at intersections. Herein we address these with a novel technique, based on one-dimensional cellular automata components, for modelling network infrastructure and its occupancy by vehicles. We use this modelling approach, together with a corresponding vehicle behaviour model, to simulate combined car and bicycle traffic for two elemental scenarios-examples of components that would be used in the building of an arbitrary network. Results of simulations performed on these scenarios, (i) a stretch of road and (ii) an intersection causing conflict between cars and bicycles sharing a lane, are presented and analysed.

  18. Temporal variation of traffic on highways and the development of accurate temporal allocation factors for air pollution analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart; Cook, Richard; Justin, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Traffic activity encompasses the number, mix, speed and acceleration of vehicles on roadways. The temporal pattern and variation of traffic activity reflects vehicle use, congestion and safety issues, and it represents a major influence on emissions and concentrations of traffic-related air pollutants. Accurate characterization of vehicle flows is critical in analyzing and modeling urban and local-scale pollutants, especially in near-road environments and traffic corridors. This study describes methods to improve the characterization of temporal variation of traffic activity. Annual, monthly, daily and hourly temporal allocation factors (TAFs), which describe the expected temporal variation in traffic activity, were developed using four years of hourly traffic activity data recorded at 14 continuous counting stations across the Detroit, Michigan, U.S. region. Five sites also provided vehicle classification. TAF-based models provide a simple means to apportion annual average estimates of traffic volume to hourly estimates. The analysis shows the need to separate TAFs for total and commercial vehicles, and weekdays, Saturdays, Sundays and observed holidays. Using either site-specific or urban-wide TAFs, nearly all of the variation in historical traffic activity at the street scale could be explained; unexplained variation was attributed to adverse weather, traffic accidents and construction. The methods and results presented in this paper can improve air quality dispersion modeling of mobile sources, and can be used to evaluate and model temporal variation in ambient air quality monitoring data and exposure estimates.

  19. Temporal variation of traffic on highways and the development of accurate temporal allocation factors for air pollution analyses

    PubMed Central

    Batterman, Stuart; Cook, Richard; Justin, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Traffic activity encompasses the number, mix, speed and acceleration of vehicles on roadways. The temporal pattern and variation of traffic activity reflects vehicle use, congestion and safety issues, and it represents a major influence on emissions and concentrations of traffic-related air pollutants. Accurate characterization of vehicle flows is critical in analyzing and modeling urban and local-scale pollutants, especially in near-road environments and traffic corridors. This study describes methods to improve the characterization of temporal variation of traffic activity. Annual, monthly, daily and hourly temporal allocation factors (TAFs), which describe the expected temporal variation in traffic activity, were developed using four years of hourly traffic activity data recorded at 14 continuous counting stations across the Detroit, Michigan, U.S. region. Five sites also provided vehicle classification. TAF-based models provide a simple means to apportion annual average estimates of traffic volume to hourly estimates. The analysis shows the need to separate TAFs for total and commercial vehicles, and weekdays, Saturdays, Sundays and observed holidays. Using either site-specific or urban-wide TAFs, nearly all of the variation in historical traffic activity at the street scale could be explained; unexplained variation was attributed to adverse weather, traffic accidents and construction. The methods and results presented in this paper can improve air quality dispersion modeling of mobile sources, and can be used to evaluate and model temporal variation in ambient air quality monitoring data and exposure estimates. PMID:25844042

  20. Simulating Human Cognition in the Domain of Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Michael; Johnston, James C.; Null, Cynthia H. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Experiments intended to assess performance in human-machine interactions are often prohibitively expensive, unethical or otherwise impractical to run. Approximations of experimental results can be obtained, in principle, by simulating the behavior of subjects using computer models of human mental behavior. Computer simulation technology has been developed for this purpose. Our goal is to produce a cognitive model suitable to guide the simulation machinery and enable it to closely approximate a human subject's performance in experimental conditions. The described model is designed to simulate a variety of cognitive behaviors involved in routine air traffic control. As the model is elaborated, our ability to predict the effects of novel circumstances on controller error rates and other performance characteristics should increase. This will enable the system to project the impact of proposed changes to air traffic control procedures and equipment on controller performance.

  1. Traffic-related heavy metals uptake by wild plants grow along two main highways in Hunan Province, China: effects of soil factors, accumulation ability, and biological indication potential.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Yunbo; Dai, Qingyun; Jiang, Kang; Zhu, Yun; Xu, Bibo; Peng, Chuan; Wang, Tengfei; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-07-01

    This study was performed to investigate pollution of traffic-related heavy metals (HMs-Zn, Pb, Cu, Cr, and Cd) in roadside soils and their uptake by wild plants growing along highways in Hunan Province, China. For this, we analyzed the concentration and chemical fractionation of HMs in soils and plants. Soil samples were collected with different depths in the profile and different distances from highway edge. And leaves and barks of six high-frequency plants were collected. Results of the modified European Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) showed that the mobile fraction of these HMs was in the order of Cd > Pb > Zn > Cu > Cr. A high percentage of the mobile fraction indicates Cd, Pb, and Zn were labile and available for uptake by wild plants. The total concentration and values of risk assessment code (RAC) showed that Cd was the main risk factor, which were in the range high to very high risk. The accumulation ability of HMs in plants was evaluated by the biological accumulation factor (BAF) and the metal accumulation index (MAI), and the results showed that all those plant species have good phyto-extraction ability, while accumulation capacity for most HMs plants tissues was bark > leaf. The highest MAI value (5.99) in Cinnamomum camphora (L) Presl indicates the potential for bio-monitoring and a good choice for planting along highways where there is contamination with HMs. PMID:27026539

  2. Governors Highway Safety Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... occupant protection, impaired driving, and speeding. GHSA provides leadership and advocacy for the states and territories to improve traffic safety , influence national policy , enhance program management and promote best practices . What's New National Highway ...

  3. Identification of traffic-related metals and the effects of different environments on their enrichment in roadside soils along the Qinghai-Tibet highway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Wang, Zhaofeng; Zhang, Yili; Ding, Mingjun; Li, Lanhui

    2015-07-15

    The road transportation could affect roadside soils environment detrimentally, including heavy metal enrichment. In order to identify and evaluate the enrichment of heavy metals resulted from road transportation on the Tibetan Plateau, the 11 heavy metals (V, Cr, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Rb, Pb and Tl) in the topsoil (0-10 cm depth) from four sites along the Qinghai-Tibet highway were discussed in this study. Our results indicate that heavy metals such as Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb are related to road transportation. The content of most of these heavy metals in roadside soils decreased exponentially with the distance from the road, as did some of the Nemero Synthesis Indexes (PN values). The contamination factor for the traffic-related metals ranged from 0.56 (no pollution) to 5.67 (considerable pollution) and the Nemero Synthesis Indexes of these heavy metals ranged from 0.80 (no pollution) to 4.49 (severe pollution). Cd was of priority concern as it had the highest contamination factor. The highest PN value for these traffic-related heavy metals was found in soils at site TTH (alpine steppe). Although transportation contributed to the high contents of these traffic-related metals in roadside environments, regional differences such as wind and the terrain also had significant relationship with their enrichment in these roadside soils. The roadside distance at which there is a potential risk to livestock and wildlife from the contamination of soils by heavy metals should be determined scientifically along the Qinghai-Tibet highway, based on the different natural environments found in the region. PMID:25835375

  4. A dynamic traffic simulator for roads affected by natural hasards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, J.; Jaboyedoff, M.; Derron, M.-H.

    2012-04-01

    This work focuses on the issue of natural hazards threatening roads. Nowadays, risk estimations of rock falls or landslides affecting whole sections of road are generally quite accurate and under relatively good control. Mitigation measures provide intervention means to reduce the hazards along roads. However, as classical models of risk calculation on communication routes do not take into account the dynamic traffic parameters, little is known on the way of reducing the risk at road level. It is not known precisely what really happens on the road when an event occurs and how vehicles interact. A dynamic traffic simulator in development provides information on factors having an impact on the risk level related to the road. Variables such as visibility, curvature radius of turns or vehicle type were included in the model. Varying these variables within dynamic traffic simulations can suggest solutions to minimize the risks for road users. These simulations can provide answers to various questions, such as: does speed have a significant impact on the risk incurred by drivers? Is it possible to significantly reduce the risk with appropriate speeds? The simulation is performed with the MATLAB © software. The model is yet to be calibrated and validated through in situ tests.

  5. Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, George; Boisvert, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This document is the final report for the project entitled "Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software." This report consists of 17 sections which document the results of the several subtasks of this effort. The Probabilistic NAS Platform (PNP) is an air operations simulation platform developed and maintained by the Saab Sensis Corporation. The improvements made to the PNP simulation include the following: an airborne distributed separation assurance capability, a required time of arrival assignment and conformance capability, and a tactical and strategic weather avoidance capability.

  6. Parallel Vehicular Traffic Simulation using Reverse Computation-based Optimistic Execution

    SciTech Connect

    Yoginath, Srikanth B; Perumalla, Kalyan S

    2008-01-01

    Vehicular traffic simulations are useful in applications such as emergency management and homeland security planning tools. High speed of traffic simulations translates directly to speed of response and level of resilience in those applications. Here, a parallel traffic simulation approach is presented that is aimed at reducing the time for simulating emergency vehicular traffic scenarios. Three unique aspects of this effort are: (1) exploration of optimistic simulation applied to vehicular traffic simulation (2) addressing reverse computation challenges specific to optimistic vehicular traffic simulation (3) achieving absolute (as opposed to self-relative) speedup with a sequential speed equal to that of a fast, de facto standard sequential simulator for emergency traffic. The design and development of the parallel simulation system is presented, along with a performance study that demonstrates excellent sequential performance as well as parallel performance.

  7. Generic vehicle speed models based on traffic simulation: Development and application

    SciTech Connect

    Margiotta, R.; Cohen, H.; Elkins, G.; Rathi, A.; Venigalla, M.

    1994-12-15

    This paper summarizes the findings of a research project to develop new methods of estimating speeds for inclusion in the Highway Performance Monitoring System (HPMS) Analytical Process. The paper focuses on the effects of traffic conditions excluding incidents (recurring congestion) on daily average ed and excess fuel consumption. A review of the literature revealed that many techniques have been used to predict speeds as a function of congestion but most fail to address the effects of queuing. However, the method of Dowling and Skabardonis avoids this limitation and was adapted to the research. The methodology used the FRESIM and NETSIM microscopic traffic simulation models to develop uncongested speed functions and as a calibration base for the congested flow functions. The chief contributions of the new speed models are the simplicity of application and their explicit accounting for the effects of queuing. Specific enhancements include: (1) the inclusion of a queue discharge rate for freeways; (2) use of newly defined uncongested flow speed functions; (3) use of generic temporal distributions that account for peak spreading; and (4) a final model form that allows incorporation of other factors that influence speed, such as grades and curves. The main limitation of the new speed models is the fact that they are based on simulation results and not on field observations. They also do not account for the effect of incidents on speed. While appropriate for estimating average national conditions, the use of fixed temporal distributions may not be suitable for analyzing specific facilities, depending on observed traffic patterns. Finally, it is recommended that these and all future speed models be validated against field data where incidents can be adequately identified in the data.

  8. Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhup, D. K.; Shrestha, C. L.; Sharma, R. K.

    2007-07-01

    Cellular radio systems accommodate a large number of users with a limited radio spectrum. The concept of trunking allows a large number of users to share the relatively small number of channels in a cell by providing access to each user, on demand, from a pool of available channels. Traffic engineering deals with provisioning of communication circuits in a given area for a number of subscribers with a required grade of service. Traffic in any cell depends upon the number of users, the average request rate and average call duration. Certain number of channels is required for the required GOS. To design an optimum capacity cellular system, traffic behavior on that system is important. The number of channel required can be estimated by using Erlang formula and Erlang table. Erlang table is not always useful to calculate the probability of blocking in various complex scenarios such as channel borrowing strategies. When the total number of channel available in a given cell are divided to serve partly for newly generated calls and partly for handover calls, and if they use dynamic channel assignment strategies like channel borrowing, then the probability of blocking can't be calculated from Erlang table. Simulation model of the behavior help us to determine the blocking and the channel utilization while using various channel assignment strategies. The title "Study and Simulation of Traffic Behavior in Cellular Network" entail the study of the blocking probability of traffic in cellular network for static channel assignment strategies and dynamic channel borrowing strategies through MATLAB programming language and graphic user interface (GUI). The result shows that the dynamic scheme can perform better than static maximizing the overall utilization of the circuits and minimizing the overall blocking.

  9. A long-term suspended solids runoff simulation in a highway drainage system.

    PubMed

    Aryal, R K; Jinadasa, H K P K; Furumai, H; Nakajima, F

    2005-01-01

    A long-term monitoring investigation was carried out in a highway drainage system in Winterthur, Switzerland. Several runoff quality and quantity simulations were carried out using the distributed model 'InfoWorks-CS'. Serial rainfall monitoring data was used for investigation of SS runoff behavior from the highway. Under continuous rainfall conditions, the quantity simulation showed a good agreement with the measured hydrograph. However, in some cases where rainfall was not continuous, overestimation of the peak height was found at the later stage after the end of the rainfall. It was believed that the initial/depression loss on the road surface was recovered during the halting period of rainfall. The consideration of regenerated depression loss significantly improved runoff simulation results in the on-and-off type rainfall events. A single event quality simulation underestimated the SS load in light rainfall events. One of the reasons was possibly inadequate consideration of pipe sediment conditions. A long term simulation was carried out to establish the initial condition of surface and pipe sediment for the target event. The newly simulated pollutograph gave a good agreement with the measured one. It revealed that it was essential to consider appropriateness of the initial condition of pipe sediment as well as surface sediment. PMID:16248192

  10. A Cooperative Human-Adaptive Traffic Simulation (CHATS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Charles T.; Ballin, Mark G.

    1999-01-01

    NASA is considering the development of a Cooperative Human-Adaptive Traffic Simulation (CHATS), to examine and evaluate performance of the National Airspace System (NAS) as the aviation community moves toward free flight. CHATS will be specifically oriented toward simulating strategic decision-making by airspace users and by the service provider s traffic management personnel, within the context of different airspace and rules assumptions. It will use human teams to represent these interests and make decisions, and will rely on computer modeling and simulation to calculate the impacts of these decisions. The simulation objectives will be to examine: 1. evolution of airspace users and the service provider s strategies, through adaptation to new operational environments; 2. air carriers competitive and cooperative behavior; 3. expected benefits to airspace users and the service provider as compared to the current NAS; 4. operational limitations of free flight concepts due to congestion and safety concerns. This paper describes an operational concept for CHATS, and presents a high-level functional design which would utilize a combination of existing and new models and simulation capabilities.

  11. 23 CFR 772.11 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts. 772.11 Section 772.11 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.11 Analysis of traffic noise impacts. (a) The highway agency...

  12. 23 CFR 772.11 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts. 772.11 Section 772.11 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.11 Analysis of traffic noise impacts. (a) The highway agency...

  13. IMPROVEMENT OF BUSINESS EFFICIENCY USING A MULTI-AGENT SIMULATION FOR HIGHWAY PATROL ON URBAN EXPRESSWAY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Taro; Taniguchi, Eiichi; Yamada, Tadashi

    In Japan, the network of urban expressway has been expanding with the development of urban areas. However, the patrol systems in the urban expressway has not been operated on the basis of scientific evidence, but of conformity and experience. It is therefore crucial to efficiently operate such systems, not only to facilitate the rapid recovery of decreased expressway functionality, but also to acquire the income that supports the operation of privatized expressway companies. Therefore, we develop a multiagent simulation model consisting of the decision-making of four agents, including expressway company, highway patol company, road network users and road authority. These agents determines their schemes depending on their profit obtained. Results of the simulation identyfies the schemes that could offer the profits to the expressway companies in terms of the convenience of the users and the improvement of their operation.

  14. Simulation study of traffic-sensor noise effects on utilization of traffic situation display for self-spacing task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. H.; Moen, G. C.

    1983-01-01

    The effect of traffic sensor noise on the ability of a pilot to perform an intrail spacing task was determined. The tests were conducted in a fixed base cockpit simulator configured as a current generation transport aircraft, with an electronic traffic display provided in the weather radarscope location. The true positions of the traffic were perturbed in both relative range and azimuth by random errors to simulate traffic sensor noise associated with an onboard sensor. The evaluation task involved simulated instrument approaches into a terminal area while maintaining self separation on a lead aircraft. Separation performance data and pilot subjective ratings and comments were obtained. The results of the separation data indicate that displayed traffic position errors, having standard deviation values up to 0.3-n.mi. range and 8 deg azimuth, had negligible effect on the spacing performance achieved by the pilots. Speed profiles of the lead aircraft, display of the lead aircraft groundspeed, and individual pilot techniques were found to significantly affect the mean spacing performance.

  15. Implementing and Simulating Dynamic Traffic Assignment with Intelligent Transportation Systems in Cube Avenue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foytik, Peter; Robinson, Mike

    2010-01-01

    As urban populations and traffic congestion levels increase, effective use of information and communication tools and intelligent transportation systems as becoming increasingly important in order to maximize the efficiency of transportation networks. The appropriate placement and employment of these tools within a network is critical to their effectiveness. This presentation proposes and demonstrates the use of a commercial transportation simulation tool to simulate dynamic traffic assignment and rerouting to model route modifications as a result of traffic information.

  16. Simulation of traffic flow and control using conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.; Kelsey, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the graphical simulation of a traffic environment. The environment includes streets leading to an intersection, the intersection, vehicle traffic, and signal lights in the intersection controlled by different methods. The simulation allows for the study of parameters affecting traffic environments and the study of different control strategies for traffic signal lights, including conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive control methods. Realistic traffic environments are simulated including a cross intersection, with one or more lanes of traffic in each direction, with and without turn lanes. Vehicle traffic patterns are a mixture of cars going straight and making right or left turns. The free velocities of vehicles follow a normal distribution with a mean of the posted'' speed limit. Actual velocities depend on such factors as the proximity and velocity of surrounding traffic, approaches to intersections, and human response time. The simulation proves the be a useful tool for evaluating controller methods. Preliminary results show that larger quantities of traffic are handled'' by fuzzy control methods then by conventional control methods. Also, the average time spent waiting in traffic decreases with the use of fuzzy control versus conventional control.

  17. Simulation of traffic flow and control using conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bisset, K.R.; Kelsey, R.L.

    1992-06-01

    This paper describes the graphical simulation of a traffic environment. The environment includes streets leading to an intersection, the intersection, vehicle traffic, and signal lights in the intersection controlled by different methods. The simulation allows for the study of parameters affecting traffic environments and the study of different control strategies for traffic signal lights, including conventional, fuzzy, and adaptive control methods. Realistic traffic environments are simulated including a cross intersection, with one or more lanes of traffic in each direction, with and without turn lanes. Vehicle traffic patterns are a mixture of cars going straight and making right or left turns. The free velocities of vehicles follow a normal distribution with a mean of the ``posted`` speed limit. Actual velocities depend on such factors as the proximity and velocity of surrounding traffic, approaches to intersections, and human response time. The simulation proves the be a useful tool for evaluating controller methods. Preliminary results show that larger quantities of traffic are ``handled`` by fuzzy control methods then by conventional control methods. Also, the average time spent waiting in traffic decreases with the use of fuzzy control versus conventional control.

  18. Hydrological modeling using high resolution dem to level control on highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbulut, Zeynep; Cömert, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    Floods are natural disasters that must be managed, controlled and taken precautions before it happens considering the damage they inflicted to environment and human lives. As to highways, the main vein of urban life flow, must be taken into consideration as a different entity that affected by excessive rainfalls and floods. Due to inadequate drainage that allow rainfall to form water ponds on highways cause vehicles to lose control and that lead vehicles to have traffic accidents. To reduce the traffic accidents caused by ponding waters on highways we need to know area of inundation and water depths. In this context we used FLO-2D Basic Model (2009) to hydrological modeling of Black Sea Coastal Highway with meteorological and hydrological data using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). In this study, ponding areas on highways determined by simulating the rainfall with a high resolution DEM that can represent the actual road surface correctly. With this information, General Directorate of Highways (GDH) in Turkey can adjust the cross-sectional and longitudinal slope or build better and bigger drainage structures where water accumulated to prevent ponding. With the results obtained from Hydrological Model, GDH can rapidly control highways conformity to regulations before highways come into service. Also these ponding areas acquired by reveals where to prioritize in flood risk managements. Key Words: Area of Inundation, Digital Elevation Model, FLO-2D, Hydrological Modeling, Highway, Rainfall-Runoff Simulation, Water Depth.

  19. Rock fall analysis of slope along state highway in Uttarakhand Himalaya, India using numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishal, V.; Phophliya, M. K.; Purohit, R.

    2014-12-01

    With almost 1% of the reported accidents being associated with slope stability problems, landslides and rock fall have been responsible for nearly 25% of fatalities in hill slopes and surface mines over past few decades. Morpho-dynamic terrain of Himalaya is continually facing challenges in stability of rock/slopes, which are aggravated due to increased disturbance level in rock/soil mass due to human intervention. The lithological and structural variations, orientations and patterns of different water bodies and vegetation are varied along the slopes which indicate site-specific studies of rock fall prone areas in Uttarakhand. Lack of sufficient knowledge and understanding of the phenomenon, frequent occurrences of rock fall along state and national highways, the consequent inconveniences and loss of lives highlight the importance of addressing the subject on a priority basis. Rock fall simulation of the hill cut face along state highway in India was performed to replicate the effects of the falling rock blocks in the valley. The energy, velocity, bounce height and the trajectory of possible rock failures were determined. The slopes were optimised with respect to the intermediate benches to reduce the impact of falling rock blocks on the adjoining road. It was observed that introducing benches near the top did not reduce the impact of falling boulders much, however, the number of rocks crossing the ditch was less. On the contrary, benches at intermediate height reduced the energy of falling blocks but could not restrict the blocks to cross over the ditch on to the road. An optimisation of the angle of inclination of the ditch angle was also carried out. A ditch angle of 15o could restrict the passage of boulders from ditch over to the adjoining road. The study will be very useful for safe design of structures for prevention and mitigation of hazards due to rock failures along these slopes.

  20. A Fast-Time Simulation Tool for Analysis of Airport Arrival Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz; Meyn, Larry A.; Neuman, Frank

    2004-01-01

    The basic objective of arrival sequencing in air traffic control automation is to match traffic demand and airport capacity while minimizing delays. The performance of an automated arrival scheduling system, such as the Traffic Management Advisor developed by NASA for the FAA, can be studied by a fast-time simulation that does not involve running expensive and time-consuming real-time simulations. The fast-time simulation models runway configurations, the characteristics of arrival traffic, deviations from predicted arrival times, as well as the arrival sequencing and scheduling algorithm. This report reviews the development of the fast-time simulation method used originally by NASA in the design of the sequencing and scheduling algorithm for the Traffic Management Advisor. The utility of this method of simulation is demonstrated by examining the effect on delays of altering arrival schedules at a hub airport.

  1. A Multi-Operator Simulation for Investigation of Distributed Air Traffic Management Concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Mark E.; Ballin, Mark G.; Sakosky, John S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper discusses the current development of an air traffic operations simulation that supports feasibility research for advanced air traffic management concepts. The Air Traffic Operations Simulation (ATOS) supports the research of future concepts that provide a much greater role for the flight crew in traffic management decision-making. ATOS provides representations of the future communications, navigation, and surveillance (CNS) infrastructure, a future flight deck systems architecture, and advanced crew interfaces. ATOS also provides a platform for the development of advanced flight guidance and decision support systems that may be required for autonomous operations.

  2. Simulation of three lanes one-way freeway in low visibility weather by possible traffic accidents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Ming-bao; Zheng, Sha-sha; Cai, Zhang-hui

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate the traffic impact of low visibility weather on a freeway including the fraction of real vehicle rear-end accidents and road traffic capacity. Based on symmetric two-lane Nagel-Schreckenberg (STNS) model, a cellular automaton model of three-lane freeway mainline with the real occurrence of rear-end accidents in low visibility weather, which considers delayed reaction time and deceleration restriction, was established with access to real-time traffic information of intelligent transportation system (ITS). The characteristics of traffic flow in different visibility weather were discussed via the simulation experiments. The results indicate that incoming flow control (decreasing upstream traffic volume) and inputting variable speed limits (VSL) signal are effective in accident reducing and road actual traffic volume's enhancing. According to different visibility and traffic demand the appropriate control strategies should be adopted in order to not only decrease the probability of vehicle accidents but also avoid congestion.

  3. Percolation properties in a traffic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feilong; Li, Daqing; Xu, Xiaoyun; Wu, Ruoqian; Havlin, Shlomo

    2015-11-01

    As a dynamical complex system, traffic is characterized by a transition from free flow to congestions, which is mostly studied in highways. However, despite its importance in developing congestion mitigation strategies, the understanding of this common traffic phenomenon in a city scale is still missing. An open question is how the traffic in the network collapses from a global efficient traffic to isolated local flows in small clusters, i.e. the question of traffic percolation. Here we study the traffic percolation properties on a lattice by simulation of an agent-based model for traffic. A critical traffic volume in this model distinguishes the free state from the congested state of traffic. Our results show that the threshold of traffic percolation decreases with increasing traffic volume and reaches a minimum value at the critical traffic volume. We show that this minimal threshold is the result of longest spatial correlation between traffic flows at the critical traffic volume. These findings may help to develop congestion mitigation strategies in a network view.

  4. DEM simulation for landslide process and barrier dam formation on the mountainous highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei-Kai; Lee, Ching-Fang; Wei, Lun-Wei; Chou, Hsien-Ter; Chu, Sheng-Shin

    2013-04-01

    A barrier dam induced by landslide in Hanyuan, Sichuan, China occurred on August 6th, 2009. An approximately 9x106 m3 sliding mass dumped rapidly into the Dadu River and buried the new highway S306. After the major landslide, the large-scale debris mass caused the secondary shallow avalanche at the opposite bank and even formed a barrier dam with a length of 100 m and a height of 40 m crossing the Dadu River. The corresponding backwater effect submerged the upstream village over 10 km. This study adopts DEM simulation to examine the dynamic landslide process and understand the triggering mechanism of barrier dam. Based on the numerical investigation, the results showed that the sliding behavior can be classified into three stages: first initial stage with high potential energy, primary sliding with fast velocity, and final stage of impacting river channel. In addition, the energy balance principle for dynamic landslide is also verified with the DEM simulation. With respect to the consideration of hazard managements, one hopes the result can assist engineers to evaluate dangerous potential region and plan protecting construction on the steep mountainous area. Keywords:Landslide, barrier dam, DEM, dynamic process, backwater.

  5. Improving traffic noise simulations using space syntax: preliminary results from two roadway systems.

    PubMed

    M Dzhambov, Angel; D Dimitrova, Donka; H Turnovska, Tanya

    2014-09-01

    Noise pollution is one of the four major pollutions in the world. In order to implement adequate strategies for noise control, assessment of traffic-generated noise is essential in city planning and management. The aim of this study was to determine whether space syntax could improve the predictive power of noise simulation. This paper reports a record linkage study which combined a documentary method with space syntax analysis. It analyses data about traffic flow as well as field-measured and computer-simulated traffic noise in two Bulgarian agglomerations. Our findings suggest that space syntax might have a potential in predicting traffic noise exposure by improving models for noise simulations using specialised software or actual traffic counts. The scientific attention might need to be directed towards space syntax in order to study its further application in current models and algorithms for noise prediction. PMID:25222575

  6. Enhanced TCAS 2/CDTI traffic Sensor digital simulation model and program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goka, T.

    1984-01-01

    Digital simulation models of enhanced TCAS 2/CDTI traffic sensors are developed, based on actual or projected operational and performance characteristics. Two enhanced Traffic (or Threat) Alert and Collision Avoidance Systems are considered. A digital simulation program is developed in FORTRAN. The program contains an executive with a semireal time batch processing capability. The simulation program can be interfaced with other modules with a minimum requirement. Both the traffic sensor and CAS logic modules are validated by means of extensive simulation runs. Selected validation cases are discussed in detail, and capabilities and limitations of the actual and simulated systems are noted. The TCAS systems are not specifically intended for Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) applications. These systems are sufficiently general to allow implementation of CDTI functions within the real systems' constraints.

  7. Traffic Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mestech's X-15 "Eye in the Sky," a traffic monitoring system, incorporates NASA imaging and robotic vision technology. A camera or "sensor box" is mounted in a housing. The sensor detects vehicles approaching an intersection and sends the information to a computer, which controls the traffic light according to the traffic rate. Jet Propulsion Laboratory technical support packages aided in the company's development of the system. The X-15's "smart highway" can also be used to count vehicles on a highway and compute the number in each lane and their speeds, important information for freeway control engineers. Additional applications are in airport and railroad operations. The system is intended to replace loop-type traffic detectors.

  8. 23 CFR 1200.40 - Expiration of the Highway Safety Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Highway Safety Plan shall expire on the last day of the fiscal year. (b) Except as provided in paragraph... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expiration of the Highway Safety Plan. 1200.40 Section 1200.40 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  9. 23 CFR 1200.40 - Expiration of the Highway Safety Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Highway Safety Plan shall expire on the last day of the fiscal year. (b) Except as provided in paragraph... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expiration of the Highway Safety Plan. 1200.40 Section 1200.40 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  10. Synchronized flow in oversaturated city traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.; Klenov, Sergey L.; Hermanns, Gerhard; Hemmerle, Peter; Rehborn, Hubert; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Based on numerical simulations with a stochastic three-phase traffic flow model, we reveal that moving queues (moving jams) in oversaturated city traffic dissolve at some distance upstream of the traffic signal while transforming into synchronized flow. It is found that, as in highway traffic [Kerner, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.85.036110 85, 036110 (2012)], such a jam-absorption effect in city traffic is explained by a strong driver's speed adaptation: Time headways (space gaps) between vehicles increase upstream of a moving queue (moving jam), resulting in moving queue dissolution. It turns out that at given traffic signal parameters, the stronger the speed adaptation effect, the shorter the mean distance between the signal location and the road location at which moving queues dissolve fully and oversaturated traffic consists of synchronized flow only. A comparison of the synchronized flow in city traffic found in this Brief Report with synchronized flow in highway traffic is made.

  11. Design of an air traffic computer simulation system to support investigation of civil tiltrotor aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ralph V.

    1992-01-01

    This research project addresses the need to provide an efficient and safe mechanism to investigate the effects and requirements of the tiltrotor aircraft's commercial operations on air transportation infrastructures, particularly air traffic control. The mechanism of choice is computer simulation. Unfortunately, the fundamental paradigms of the current air traffic control simulation models do not directly support the broad range of operational options and environments necessary to study tiltrotor operations. Modification of current air traffic simulation models to meet these requirements does not appear viable given the range and complexity of issues needing resolution. As a result, the investigation of systemic, infrastructure issues surrounding the effects of tiltrotor commercial operations requires new approaches to simulation modeling. These models should be based on perspectives and ideas closer to those associated with tiltrotor air traffic operations.

  12. 23 CFR 772.11 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts. 772.11 Section 772.11... PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.11 Analysis of traffic noise impacts. (a) The highway agency shall determine and analyze expected traffic noise impacts. (1)...

  13. An Application of Traffic Measurements to Route Planning for Traffic Flow Simulation in MATSim

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciejewski, Michał

    The paper presents MATSim Junction Turning Ratios Route Planner (JTRRouter) that enables to generate route plans for vehicles on the basis of traffic measurements conducted at intersections. The authors described a general design, functionality, and requirements of JTRRouter, and then presented a sketch of the route planning algorithm and discussed its computational complexity. In order to illustrate the most essential capabilities of the module, an example of route planning for a fragment of a real urban network was presented.

  14. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... inches Enter height(feet) Enter height(inches) Safer Car NHTSA 5-Star Safety Rating Be prepared when ... Your Air Bag? Rescuing toddler locked in hot car TireWise: Life of a Tire Latest from the ...

  15. Development of a Prototype Automation Simulation Scenario Generator for Air Traffic Management Software Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khambatta, Cyrus F.

    2007-01-01

    A technique for automated development of scenarios for use in the Multi-Center Traffic Management Advisor (McTMA) software simulations is described. The resulting software is designed and implemented to automate the generation of simulation scenarios with the intent of reducing the time it currently takes using an observational approach. The software program is effective in achieving this goal. The scenarios created for use in the McTMA simulations are based on data taken from data files from the McTMA system, and were manually edited before incorporation into the simulations to ensure accuracy. Despite the software s overall favorable performance, several key software issues are identified. Proposed solutions to these issues are discussed. Future enhancements to the scenario generator software may address the limitations identified in this paper.

  16. Traffic Emissions of Radical Precursors and Related Species as Observed and Modeled at an Urban Highway Junction in Houston/Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappenglück, Bernhard; Lubertino, Graciela

    2016-04-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) and formaldehyde (HCHO) are important precursors for radicals and are believed to favor ozone formation significantly. Traffic emissions data for both compounds is scarce. Here we report results from continuous ambient air measurements of HONO, HCHO, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NO/NO2/NOx), and peroxyacyl nitrates (PANs) taken at an Highway Junction in Houston/Texas from July 15 - October 15, 2009. The observational data was compared to emission estimates from currently available mobile emissions models (MOBILE6; MOVES). Observations indicated a molar CO versus NOx ratio of 6.01±0.15 (r2 = 0.91), which is in agreement with other field studies. Both, MOBILE6 and MOVES, overestimate this emission ratio by 92% and 24%, respectively. For HCHO/CO an overall slope of 3.14±0.14 g HCHO / kg CO was observed. While MOBILE6 largely underestimates this ratio by 77%, MOVES calculates somewhat higher HCHO/CO ratios (1.87) than MOBILE6, but is still significantly lower than the observed ratio. MOVES shows high HCHO/CO ratios during the early morning hours due to heavy duty diesel off-network emissions. The differences of the modeled CO/NOx and HCHO/CO ratios are largely due to higher NOx and HCHO emissions in MOVES (30% and 57%, respectively, increased from MOBILE6 for 2009), as CO emissions were about the same in both models. The observed HONO/NOx emission ratio is around 0.017±0.0009 kg HONO / kg NOx which is twice as high as in MOVES. The observed NO2/NOx emission ratio is around 0.16±0.01 kg NO2 / kg NOx, which is a bit more than 50% higher than in MOVES. MOVES overestimates the CO/CO2 emission ratio by a factor of 3 compared with the observations, which is 0.0033±0.0002 kg CO / kg CO2. This as well as CO/NOx overestimation is coming from light duty gasoline vehicles.

  17. Designing Scenarios for Controller-in-the-Loop Air Traffic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupfer, Michael; Mercer, Joey S.; Cabrall, Christopher; Callantine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Well prepared traffic scenarios contribute greatly to the success of controller-in-the-loop simulations. This paper describes each stage in the design process of realistic scenarios based on real-world traffic, to be used in the Airspace Operations Laboratory for simulations within the Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration 1 effort. The steps from the initial analysis of real-world traffic, to the editing of individual aircraft records in the scenario file, until the final testing of the scenarios before the simulation conduct, are all described. The iterative nature of the design process and the various efforts necessary to reach the required fidelity, as well as the applied design strategies, challenges, and tools used during this process are also discussed.

  18. Hydrologic Analysis and Two-Dimensional Simulation of Flow at State Highway 17 crossing the Gasconade River near Waynesville, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey determined hydrologic and hydraulic parameters for the Gasconade River at the site of a proposed bridge replacement and highway realignment of State Highway 17 near Waynesville, Missouri. Information from a discontinued streamflow-gaging station on the Gasconade River near Waynesville was used to determine streamflow statistics for analysis of the 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods at the site. Analysis of the streamflow-gaging stations on the Gasconade River upstream and downstream from Waynesville indicate that flood peaks attenuate between the upstream gaging station near Hazelgreen and the Waynesville gaging station, such that the peak discharge observed on the Gasconade River near Waynesville will be equal to or only slightly greater (7 percent or less) than that observed near Hazelgreen. A flood event occurred on the Gasconade River in March 2008, and a flood measurement was obtained near the peak at State Highway 17. The elevation of high-water marks from that event indicated it was the highest measured flood on record with a measured discharge of 95,400 cubic feet per second, and a water-surface elevation of 766.18 feet near the location of the Waynesville gaging station. The measurements obtained for the March flood resulted in a shift of the original stage-discharge relation for the Waynesville gaging station, and the streamflow statistics were modified based on the new data. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow model was used to simulate flow conditions on the Gasconade River in the vicinity of State Highway 17. A model was developed that represents existing (2008) conditions on State Highway 17 (the 'model of existing conditions'), and was calibrated to the floods of March 20, 2008, December 4, 1982, and April 14, 1945. Modifications were made to the model of existing conditions to create a model that represents conditions along the same reach of the Gasconade

  19. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A concept for aiding air traffic controllers in efficiently spacing traffic and meeting scheduled arrival times at a metering fix was developed and tested in a real time simulation. The automation aid, referred to as the ground based 4-D descent advisor (DA), is based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. The DA generates suggested clearances, including both top-of-descent-point and speed-profile data, for one or more aircraft in order to achieve specific time or distance separation objectives. The DA algorithm is used by the air traffic controller to resolve conflicts and issue advisories to arrival aircraft. A joint simulation was conducted using a piloted simulator and an advanced concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the DA automation aid from both the pilot's and the air traffic controller's perspectives. The results of the piloted simulation are examined. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller issued descent advisories along standard curved path arrival routes, and were able to achieve an arrival time precision of + or - 20 sec at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in further enhancements of the algorithm to improve the predictive accuracy. Evaluations by pilots indicate general support for the concept and provide specific recommendations for improvement.

  20. Development of simulation techniques suitable for the analysis of air traffic control situations and instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    A terminal area simulation is described which permits analysis and synthesis of current and advanced air traffic management system configurations including ground and airborne instrumentation and new and modified aircraft characteristics. Ground elements in the simulation include navigation aids, surveillance radars, communication links, air-route structuring, ATC procedures, airport geometries and runway handling constraints. Airborne elements include traffic samples with individual aircraft performance and operating characteristics and aircraft navigation equipment. The simulation also contains algorithms for conflict detection, conflict resolution, sequencing and pilot-controller data links. The simulation model is used to determine the sensitivities of terminal area traffic flow, safety and congestion to aircraft performance characteristics, avionics systems, and other ATC elements.

  1. Microscale traffic simulation and emission estimation in a heavily trafficked roundabout in Madrid (Spain).

    PubMed

    Quaassdorff, Christina; Borge, Rafael; Pérez, Javier; Lumbreras, Julio; de la Paz, David; de Andrés, Juan Manuel

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of emissions from vehicle operations in a domain of 300m×300m covering a complex urban roundabout with high traffic density in Madrid. Micro-level simulation was successfully applied to estimate the emissions on a scale of meters. Two programs were used: i) VISSIM to simulate the traffic on the square and to compute velocity-time profiles; and ii) VERSIT+micro through ENVIVER that uses VISSIM outputs to compute the related emissions at vehicle level. Data collection was achieved by a measurement campaign obtaining empirical data of vehicle flows and traffic intensities. Twelve simulations of different traffic situations (scenarios) were conducted, representing different hours from several days in a week and the corresponding NOX and PM10 emissions were estimated. The results show a general reduction on average speeds for higher intensities due to braking-acceleration patterns that contribute to increase the average emission factor and, therefore, the total emissions in the domain, especially on weekdays. The emissions are clearly related to traffic volume, although maximum emission scenario does not correspond to the highest traffic intensity due to congestion and variations in fleet composition throughout the day. These results evidence the potential that local measures aimed at alleviating congestion may have in urban areas to reduce emissions. In general, scenario-averaged emission factors estimated with the VISSIM-VERSIT+micro modelling system fitted well those from the average-speed model COPERT, used as a preliminary validation of the results. The largest deviations between these two models occur in those scenarios with more congestion. The design and resolution of the microscale modelling system allow to reflect the impact of actual traffic conditions on driving patterns and related emissions, making it useful for the design of mitigation measures for specific traffic hot-spots. PMID:27232968

  2. Improving Highway Safety Manpower: Traffic Engineering Technician Project at Longview Community College and Community College of Denver. Phase 2. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korim, Andrew S.

    In Phase 2, materials on traffic accident investigation were introduced into the curriculum to determine the appropriateness of such materials in preparing traffic engineering technicians. This report gives findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on the testing efforts. The primary conclusion is that the curriculum being tested was…

  3. Jet transport flight operations using cockpit display of traffic information during instrument meteorological conditions: Simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Wells, Douglas C.

    1986-01-01

    A simulation study was undertaken to evaluate flight operations using cockpit display of traffic information (CDTI) in a conventional jet transport aircraft. Eight two-person airline flight crews participated as test subjects flying simulated terminal area approach and departure operations under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC). A fixed-base cockpit simulator configured with a full complement of conventional electromechanical instrumentation to permit full workload operations was utilized. Traffic information was displayed on a color cathode-ray tube (CRT) mounted above the throttle quadrant in the typical weather radar location. A transparent touchpanel overlay was utilized for pilot interface with the display. Air traffic control (ATC) simulation included an experienced controller and full partyline radio environment for evaluation of pilot-controlled self-separation and traffic situation monitoring tasks. Results of the study revealed the CDTI to be well received by the test subjects as a useful system which could be incorporated into an existing jet transport cockpit. Crew coordination and consistent operating procedures were identified as important considerations in operational implementation of traffic displays. Cockpit workload was increased with active CDTI tasks. However, all test subjects rated the increase to be acceptable.

  4. Design of an air traffic computer simulation system to support investigation of civil tiltrotor aircraft operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Ralph V.

    1993-01-01

    The TATSS Project's goal was to develop a design for computer software that would support the attainment of the following objectives for the air traffic simulation model: (1) Full freedom of movement for each aircraft object in the simulation model. Each aircraft object may follow any designated flight plan or flight path necessary as required by the experiment under consideration. (2) Object position precision up to +/- 3 meters vertically and +/- 15 meters horizontally. (3) Aircraft maneuvering in three space with the object position precision identified above. (4) Air traffic control operations and procedures. (5) Radar, communication, navaid, and landing aid performance. (6) Weather. (7) Ground obstructions and terrain. (8) Detection and recording of separation violations. (9) Measures of performance including deviations from flight plans, air space violations, air traffic control messages per aircraft, and traditional temporal based measures.

  5. Risk assessment on an Argentinean road with a dynamic traffic simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voumard, Jérémie; Baumann, Valérie; Jaboyedoff, Michel; Derron, Marc-Henri; Penna, Ivanna

    2014-05-01

    The National Route 7 in Argentina is one of the most important corridors crossing the Andean Cordillera. It concentrates most of the traffic related to the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR), it also connects Mendoza city (the fourth most populated in Argentina) with Santiago de Chile (the Chile capital city), and is used by tourists to access to the Aconcagua National park, Puente del Inca natural monument, skiing resorts, and to local displacements for the villages along the Mendoza valley. The road crosses the Andes through the Mendoza river valley at an elevation between 2'000 and 3'000 m. The traffic (2500 vehicles/day) is composed of motorcycles, cars and pickup trucks, trucks without trailer, buses, and semi-trailer trucks. Debris flows developed along tributaries of the Mendoza River, and due to remobilization of talus materials, impact frequently the road, causing traffic disruptions, bridges damages, etc. Rock falls detached from highly fractured outcrops also impact frequently the road, causing sometimes casualties. The aim of this study is to evaluate risk along sections of the National Road 7 develop along the Mendoza river, using a dynamic traffic simulator based on MATLAB© routine. The dynamic traffic simulator developed for natural hazards events on roads consider different scenarios based on traffic speeds, vehicle types, interactions types, road properties and natural processes. Here we show that vehicle types and traffic variations may influence the risk estimation. The analyzed risk on several critical sections of the National Route 7 demonstrates that risk may significantly increase: 1) on sinuous sections, steep sections and because of road conditions changes (exit of tunnel, bridges, road width, etc.) because of decreasing vehicle speed, particularly with semi-trailer trucks; 2) when an event, such a debris flow, occurs and generates a vehicle tailback increasing their duration presence in the risk area.

  6. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM.

    PubMed

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose. PMID:26731745

  7. Integration of Linear Dynamic Emission and Climate Models with Air Traffic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sridhar, Banavar; Ng, Hok K.; Chen, Neil Y.

    2012-01-01

    Future air traffic management systems are required to balance the conflicting objectives of maximizing safety and efficiency of traffic flows while minimizing the climate impact of aviation emissions and contrails. Integrating emission and climate models together with air traffic simulations improve the understanding of the complex interaction between the physical climate system, carbon and other greenhouse gas emissions and aviation activity. This paper integrates a national-level air traffic simulation and optimization capability with simple climate models and carbon cycle models, and climate metrics to assess the impact of aviation on climate. The capability can be used to make trade-offs between extra fuel cost and reduction in global surface temperature change. The parameters in the simulation can be used to evaluate the effect of various uncertainties in emission models and contrails and the impact of different decision horizons. Alternatively, the optimization results from the simulation can be used as inputs to other tools that monetize global climate impacts like the FAA s Aviation Environmental Portfolio Management Tool for Impacts.

  8. Platoon Interactions and Real-World Traffic Simulation and Validation Based on the LWR-IM

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Kok Mun; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2016-01-01

    Platoon based traffic flow models form the underlying theoretical framework in traffic simulation tools. They are essentially important in facilitating efficient performance calculation and evaluation in urban traffic networks. For this purpose, a new platoon-based macroscopic model called the LWR-IM has been developed in [1]. Preliminary analytical validation conducted previously has proven the feasibility of the model. In this paper, the LWR-IM is further enhanced with algorithms that describe platoon interactions in urban arterials. The LWR-IM and the proposed platoon interaction algorithms are implemented in the real-world class I and class II urban arterials. Another purpose of the work is to perform quantitative validation to investigate the validity and ability of the LWR-IM and its underlying algorithms to describe platoon interactions and simulate performance indices that closely resemble the real traffic situations. The quantitative validation of the LWR-IM is achieved by performing a two-sampled t-test on queues simulated by the LWR-IM and real queues observed at these real-world locations. The results reveal insignificant differences of simulated queues with real queues where the p-values produced concluded that the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. Thus, the quantitative validation further proved the validity of the LWR-IM and the embedded platoon interactions algorithm for the intended purpose. PMID:26731745

  9. In-Trail Procedure Air Traffic Control Procedures Validation Simulation Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartrand, Ryan C.; Hewitt, Katrin P.; Sweeney, Peter B.; Graff, Thomas J.; Jones, Kenneth M.

    2012-01-01

    In August 2007, Airservices Australia (Airservices) and the United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) conducted a validation experiment of the air traffic control (ATC) procedures associated with the Automatic Dependant Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) In-Trail Procedure (ITP). ITP is an Airborne Traffic Situation Awareness (ATSA) application designed for near-term use in procedural airspace in which ADS-B data are used to facilitate climb and descent maneuvers. NASA and Airservices conducted the experiment in Airservices simulator in Melbourne, Australia. Twelve current operational air traffic controllers participated in the experiment, which identified aspects of the ITP that could be improved (mainly in the communication and controller approval process). Results showed that controllers viewed the ITP as valid and acceptable. This paper describes the experiment design and results.

  10. Parallel traffic flow simulation of freeway networks: Phase 2. Final report 1994--1995

    SciTech Connect

    Chronopoulos, A.

    1997-07-01

    Explicit and implicit numerical methods for solving simple macroscopic traffic flow continuum models have been studied and efficiently implemented in traffic simulation codes in the past. The authors have already studied and implemented explicit methods for solving the high-order flow conservation traffic model. Implicit methods allow much larger time step size than explicit methods, for the same accuracy. However, at each time step a nonlinear system must be solved. They use the Newton method coupled with a linear iterative (Orthomin). They accelerate the convergence of Orthomin with parallel incomplete LU factorization preconditionings. The authors implemented this implicit method on a 16 processor nCUBE2 parallel computer and obtained significant execution time speedup.

  11. Neural network system for traffic flow management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilmore, John F.; Elibiary, Khalid J.; Petersson, L. E. Rickard

    1992-09-01

    Atlanta will be the home of several special events during the next five years ranging from the 1996 Olympics to the 1994 Super Bowl. When combined with the existing special events (Braves, Falcons, and Hawks games, concerts, festivals, etc.), the need to effectively manage traffic flow from surface streets to interstate highways is apparent. This paper describes a system for traffic event response and management for intelligent navigation utilizing signals (TERMINUS) developed at Georgia Tech for adaptively managing special event traffic flows in the Atlanta, Georgia area. TERMINUS (the original name given Atlanta, Georgia based upon its role as a rail line terminating center) is an intelligent surface street signal control system designed to manage traffic flow in Metro Atlanta. The system consists of three components. The first is a traffic simulation of the downtown Atlanta area around Fulton County Stadium that models the flow of traffic when a stadium event lets out. Parameters for the surrounding area include modeling for events during various times of day (such as rush hour). The second component is a computer graphics interface with the simulation that shows the traffic flows achieved based upon intelligent control system execution. The final component is the intelligent control system that manages surface street light signals based upon feedback from control sensors that dynamically adapt the intelligent controller's decision making process. The intelligent controller is a neural network model that allows TERMINUS to control the configuration of surface street signals to optimize the flow of traffic away from special events.

  12. Piloted simulation of a ground-based time-control concept for air traffic control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.; Green, Steven M.

    1989-01-01

    A joint simulation was carried out using a piloted simulator and an advanced-concept air traffic control simulation to study the acceptability and accuracy of the ground-based four-dimensional descent advisor (DA), an automation aid based on accurate models of aircraft performance and weather conditions. In the piloted simulation, airline crews executed controller-issued descent advisories along standard curved-path arrival routes and were able to achieve an arrival-time precision of plus or minus 20 s at the metering fix. An analysis of errors generated in turns resulted in a further enhancement of the DA algorithm.

  13. Designing Scenarios for Controller-in-the-Loop Air Traffic Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kupfer, Michael; Mercer, Joey; Cabrall, Chris; Homola, Jeff; Callantine, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Within the Human Factors Division at NASA Ames Research Center the Airspace Operations Laboratory (AOL) is developing advanced automation concepts that help to transform the National Airspace System into NextGen, the Next Generation Air Transportation System. High-fidelity human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations are used as a means to investigate and develop roles, responsibilities, support tools, and requirements for human operators and automation. This paper describes the traffic scenario design process and strategies as used by AOL researchers. Details are presented on building scenarios for specific simulation objectives using various design strategies. A focus is set on creating scenarios based on recorded real world traffic for terminal-area simulations.

  14. Integration of real-time air pollution parameters into the decision making process regarding highway construction work zone traffic flow. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Fatagoma, O.; Premo, T.; Jacko, R.B.

    1998-05-15

    The main objective of this research is to develop a real-time modal exhaust emission concentration model for light and medium duty vehicles using real-time emission concentration, traffic, and meteorological data. The data were collected during the Purdue Vehicle Emission Monitoring and Modeling Project (PVEMP) field experiments conducted in the spring and summer 1997 on the Borman Expressway. The implementation of the model and the results of the project integrate air quality as another parameter in the traffic flow improvement of the Borman Expressway, especially in construction zones. This paper presents the results of the monitoring program, the data reduction and analysis effort, the development of the real-time modal exhaust emission concentration model, and the implementation suggestions of the research.

  15. Simulation studies of STOL airplane operations in metropolitan downtown and airport air traffic control environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, R. H.; Mclaughlin, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    The operating problems and equipment requirements for STOL airplanes in terminal area operations in simulated air traffic control (ATC) environments were studied. These studies consisted of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) arrivals and departures in the New York area to and from a downtown STOL port, STOL runways at John F. Kennedy International Airport, or STOL runways at a hypothetical international airport. The studies were accomplished in real time by using a STOL airplane flight simulator. An experimental powered lift STOL airplane and two in-service airplanes having high aerodynamic lift (i.e., STOL) capability were used in the simulations.

  16. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-2: Effects of Communications Delays and Winds in Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Communications Delays and Winds on Air Traffic Controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth East-side airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from self-separation algorithms displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Simulation System. Winds tested did not affect the acceptability ratings. Communications delays tested included 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS.

  17. Urban traffic simulated from the dual representation: Flow, crisis and congestion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Mao-Bin; Jiang, Rui; Wang, Ruili; Wu, Qing-Song

    2009-05-01

    We propose a traffic simulation model for urban system based on the dual graph representation of a urban road network and with a random entering vehicle rate. To avoid the shortcoming of “Space Syntax” of ignoring the road's metric distance, we consider both the motion of the vehicles along roads and the navigation of the vehicles in the network. Simulations have shown some basic properties of urban traffic system, such as flux fluctuation, crisis and dissipation, phase transition from a free flow to jams, overall capacity, the distribution of traveling time, and the fundamental diagram. The system's behavior greatly depends on the topology of the transportation network. A well-planned lattice grid can keep more vehicles travelling. The critical entering vehicle rate is much greater in lattice grid than in a self-organized network. The vehicles have to travel longer time in a self-organized urban system due to the navigation cost.

  18. ADS-B within a Multi-Aircraft Simulation for Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Palmer, Michael T.; Chung, William W.; Loveness, Ghyrn W.

    2004-01-01

    Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) is an enabling technology for NASA s Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM) concept. DAG-TM has the goal of significantly increasing capacity within the National Airspace System, while maintaining or improving safety. Under DAG-TM, aircraft exchange state and intent information over ADS-B with other aircraft and ground stations. This information supports various surveillance functions including conflict detection and resolution, scheduling, and conformance monitoring. To conduct more rigorous concept feasibility studies, NASA Langley Research Center s PC-based Air Traffic Operations Simulation models a 1090 MHz ADS-B communication structure, based on industry standards for message content, range, and reception probability. The current ADS-B model reflects a mature operating environment and message interference effects are limited to Mode S transponder replies and ADS-B squitters. This model was recently evaluated in a Joint DAG-TM Air/Ground Coordination Experiment with NASA Ames Research Center. Message probability of reception vs. range was lower at higher traffic levels. The highest message collision probability occurred near the meter fix serving as the confluence for two arrival streams. Even the highest traffic level encountered in the experiment was significantly less than the industry standard "LA Basin 2020" scenario. Future studies will account for Mode A and C message interference (a major effect in several industry studies) and will include Mode A and C aircraft in the simulation, thereby increasing the total traffic level. These changes will support ongoing enhancements to separation assurance functions that focus on accommodating longer ADS-B information update intervals.

  19. [Dynamic road vehicle emission inventory simulation study based on real time traffic information].

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng; Liu, Juan; Chen, Chang-Hong; Zhang, Jian; Liu, Deng-Guo; Zhu, Jing-Yu; Huang, Wei-Ming; Chao, Yuan

    2012-11-01

    The vehicle activity survey, including traffic flow distribution, driving condition, and vehicle technologies, were conducted in Shanghai. The databases of vehicle flow, VSP distribution and vehicle categories were established according to the surveyed data. Based on this, a dynamic vehicle emission inventory simulation method was designed by using the real time traffic information data, such as traffic flow and average speed. Some roads in Shanghai city were selected to conduct the hourly vehicle emission simulation as a case study. The survey results show that light duty passenger car and taxi are major vehicles on the roads of Shanghai city, accounting for 48% - 72% and 15% - 43% of the total flow in each hour, respectively. VSP distribution has a good relationship with the average speed. The peak of VSP distribution tends to move to high load section and become lower with the increase of average speed. Vehicles achieved Euro 2 and Euro 3 standards are majorities of current vehicle population in Shanghai. Based on the calibration of vehicle travel mileage data, the proportions of Euro 2 and Euro 3 standard vehicles take up 11% - 70% and 17% - 51% in the real-world situation, respectively. The emission simulation results indicate that the ratios of emission peak and valley for the pollutants of CO, VOC, NO(x) and PM are 3.7, 4.6, 9.6 and 19.8, respectively. CO and VOC emissions mainly come from light-duty passenger car and taxi, which has a good relationship with the traffic flow. NO(x) and PM emissions are mainly from heavy-duty bus and public buses and mainly concentrate in the morning and evening peak hours. The established dynamic vehicle emission simulation method can reflect the change of actual road emission and output high emission road sectors and hours in real time. The method can provide an important technical means and decision-making basis for transportation environment management. PMID:23323399

  20. Emotional states of drivers and the impact on speed, acceleration and traffic violations - a simulator study.

    PubMed

    Roidl, Ernst; Frehse, Berit; Höger, Rainer

    2014-09-01

    Maladjusted driving, such as aggressive driving and delayed reactions, is seen as one cause of traffic accidents. Such behavioural patterns could be influenced by strong emotions in the driver. The causes of emotions in traffic are divided into two distinct classes: personal factors and properties of the specific driving situation. In traffic situations, various appraisal factors are responsible for the nature and intensity of experienced emotions. These include whether another driver was accountable, whether goals were blocked and whether progress and safety were affected. In a simulator study, seventy-nine participants took part in four traffic situations which each elicited a different emotion. Each situation had critical elements (e.g. slow car, obstacle on the street) based on combinations of the appraisal factors. Driving parameters such as velocity, acceleration, and speeding, together with the experienced emotions, were recorded. Results indicate that anger leads to stronger acceleration and higher speeds even for 2 km beyond the emotion-eliciting event. Anxiety and contempt yielded similar but weaker effects, yet showed the same negative and dangerous driving pattern as anger. Fright correlated with stronger braking momentum and lower speeds directly after the critical event. PMID:24836476

  1. Traffic congestion forecasting model for the INFORM System. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, A.; Mughabghab, S.; Stock, D.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes a computerized traffic forecasting model, developed by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for a portion of the Long Island INFORM Traffic Corridor. The model has gone through a testing phase, and currently is able to make accurate traffic predictions up to one hour forward in time. The model will eventually take on-line traffic data from the INFORM system roadway sensors and make projections as to future traffic patterns, thus allowing operators at the New York State Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) INFORM Traffic Management Center to more optimally manage traffic. It can also form the basis of a travel information system. The BNL computer model developed for this project is called ATOP for Advanced Traffic Occupancy Prediction. The various modules of the ATOP computer code are currently written in Fortran and run on PC computers (pentium machine) faster than real time for the section of the INFORM corridor under study. The following summarizes the various routines currently contained in the ATOP code: Statistical forecasting of traffic flow and occupancy using historical data for similar days and time (long term knowledge), and the recent information from the past hour (short term knowledge). Estimation of the empirical relationships between traffic flow and occupancy using long and short term information. Mechanistic interpolation using macroscopic traffic models and based on the traffic flow and occupancy forecasted (item-1), and the empirical relationships (item-2) for the specific highway configuration at the time of simulation (construction, lane closure, etc.). Statistical routine for detection and classification of anomalies and their impact on the highway capacity which are fed back to previous items.

  2. The smart highway project: Smart highways, smart vehicles, smart engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethtel, Ray D.

    1996-01-01

    The Smart Highway project is a six mile, limited access roadway being built between Interstate 81 and Blacksburg, Virginia. The initial construction segment will be two miles long and is designed to serve as a test bed and test track for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) research. The Center for Transportation Research (CTR) at Virginia Tech is developing three evaluation tools for its ITS research including DYNAVIMTS (a software framework), and the FLASH Lab (a 1/15th scale model highway and vehicle system). The Smart Highway rounds out the Center's evaluation methodology by allowing full scale operational tests, evaluations, and research under both experimental and conventional traffic conditions. Currently under development is a concept for a fully automated highway using a 'Cooperative Infrastructure Managed System' which involves ultra wide band communication beacons installed in the infrastructure with appropriate sensors, receivers and processors on board the vehicles. The project is part of the research program funded by the National Automated Highway System Consortium. The CTR hopes to develop the automated concept to prototype status by 1997. Other smart transportation and smart engineering concepts are proposed. This presentation will address the goals and objectives of the Smart Highway project, overview its status and importance to the region, and identify some of the transportation technology now under development and planned in the future.

  3. Enhanced Turbulent Mixing on Highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, M.; Staebler, R. M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Traffic emissions have a substantial effect on air quality and turbulence affects how these emissions mix with the surrounding air. In July and August of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada) as part of the ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways). The aim of this project was to study and parameterize the turbulent mixing of traffic emissions on highways as a function of traffic density, speed, and vehicle type. The mobile station CRUISER (Canadian Regional and Urban Investigation System for Environmental Research) was equipped with two sonic anemometers, an air flow probe (AIMMS-20), inertial motion sensing, GPS, video recording equipment, and various particle and gas measurement instrumentation. This allowed in-situ turbulence measurements while driving on the highway with traffic. These measurements differ from previous studies in that turbulence can be measured in realistic conditions, while traffic densities, vehicle types, and vehicle to measurement distances can be extracted from video recording by automated video processing software. Although the turbulent motion of air is often measured from aircraft and ship-based instrumentation, the analysis and interpretation of sonic anemometer measurements from a highway-speed vehicle, moving over uneven and often bumpy terrain presents a very different challenge. Various analytical approaches to process these measurements will be compared and the development of the video processing software to determine vehicle size and following distance will be discussed. Results will be presented which demonstrate a strong dependence of turbulent energy on vehicle type, speed, and following distance.

  4. 23 CFR Appendix B to Part 1200 - Highway Safety Program Cost Summary (HS-217)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Summary required to be submitted under 23 CFR 1200.11(e). For subsequent submissions, the amounts in this... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Highway Safety Program Cost Summary (HS-217) B Appendix B to Part 1200 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL...

  5. 23 CFR Appendix B to Part 1200 - HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM COST SUMMARY (HS-217)

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Summary required to be submitted under 23 CFR 1200.11(e). For subsequent submissions, the amounts in this... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false HIGHWAY SAFETY PROGRAM COST SUMMARY (HS-217) B APPENDIX B TO PART 1200 Highways NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION AND FEDERAL...

  6. Minimizing the disruptive effects of prospective memory in simulated air traffic control.

    PubMed

    Loft, Shayne; Smith, Rebekah E; Remington, Roger W

    2013-09-01

    Prospective memory refers to remembering to perform an intended action in the future. Failures of prospective memory can occur in air traffic control. In two experiments, we examined the utility of external aids for facilitating air traffic management in a simulated air traffic control task with prospective memory requirements. Participants accepted and handed-off aircraft and detected aircraft conflicts. The prospective memory task involved remembering to deviate from a routine operating procedure when accepting target aircraft. External aids that contained details of the prospective memory task appeared and flashed when target aircraft needed acceptance. In Experiment 1, external aids presented either adjacent or nonadjacent to each of the 20 target aircraft presented over the 40-min test phase reduced prospective memory error by 11% compared with a condition without external aids. In Experiment 2, only a single target aircraft was presented a significant time (39-42 min) after presentation of the prospective memory instruction, and the external aids reduced prospective memory error by 34%. In both experiments, costs to the efficiency of nonprospective memory air traffic management (nontarget aircraft acceptance response time, conflict detection response time) were reduced by nonadjacent aids compared with no aids or adjacent aids. In contrast, in both experiments, the efficiency of the prospective memory air traffic management (target aircraft acceptance response time) was facilitated by adjacent aids compared with nonadjacent aids. Together, these findings have potential implications for the design of automated alerting systems to maximize multitask performance in work settings where operators monitor and control demanding perceptual displays. PMID:24059825

  7. Minimizing the Disruptive Effects of Prospective Memory in Simulated Air Traffic Control

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Shayne; Smith, Rebekah E.; Remington, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Prospective memory refers to remembering to perform an intended action in the future. Failures of prospective memory can occur in air traffic control. In two experiments, we examined the utility of external aids for facilitating air traffic management in a simulated air traffic control task with prospective memory requirements. Participants accepted and handed-off aircraft and detected aircraft conflicts. The prospective memory task involved remembering to deviate from a routine operating procedure when accepting target aircraft. External aids that contained details of the prospective memory task appeared and flashed when target aircraft needed acceptance. In Experiment 1, external aids presented either adjacent or non-adjacent to each of the 20 target aircraft presented over the 40min test phase reduced prospective memory error by 11% compared to a condition without external aids. In Experiment 2, only a single target aircraft was presented a significant time (39min–42min) after presentation of the prospective memory instruction, and the external aids reduced prospective memory error by 34%. In both experiments, costs to the efficiency of non-prospective memory air traffic management (non-target aircraft acceptance response time, conflict detection response time) were reduced by non-adjacent aids compared to no aids or adjacent aids. In contrast, in both experiments, the efficiency of the prospective memory air traffic management (target aircraft acceptance response time) was facilitated by adjacent aids compared to non-adjacent aids. Together, these findings have potential implications for the design of automated alerting systems to maximize multi-task performance in work settings where operators monitor and control demanding perceptual displays. PMID:24059825

  8. Simulator of Road Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danišovič, Peter; Schlosser, František; Šrámek, Juraj; Rázga, Martin

    2015-05-01

    A Tunnel Traffic & Operation Simulator is a device of the Centre of Transport Research at the University of Žilina. The Simulator allows managing technological equipment of virtual two-tube highway tunnel, which is interconnected with simulation of vehicle traffic in tunnel. Changes of the traffic-operation states and other equipment are reflecting at the simulated traffic, as well as simulations of various emergency events in traffic initiate changes in tunnel detecting and measuring devices. It is thus possible to simulate emergency states, which can be affected by various faults of technology as well as by climatic conditions. The solutions can be found in irreplaceable experiences of Slovak road tunnel operators, changes of trafficoperation states, visualizations of operator technological display screens, technological devices labelling in order to increase operational safety of road tunnels.

  9. Information Presentation and Control in a Modern Air Traffic Control Tower Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.; Doubek, Sharon; Rabin, Boris; Harke, Stanton

    1996-01-01

    The proper presentation and management of information in America's largest and busiest (Level V) air traffic control towers calls for an in-depth understanding of many different human-computer considerations: user interface design for graphical, radar, and text; manual and automated data input hardware; information/display output technology; reconfigurable workstations; workload assessment; and many other related subjects. This paper discusses these subjects in the context of the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) currently under construction at NASA's Ames Research Center, a full scale, multi-manned, air traffic control simulator which will provide the "look and feel" of an actual airport tower cab. Special emphasis will be given to the human-computer interfaces required for the different kinds of information displayed at the various controller and supervisory positions and to the computer-aided design (CAD) and other analytic, computer-based tools used to develop the facility.

  10. Self-organized criticality and 1/f noise in traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Paczuski, M.; Nagel, K.

    1995-12-31

    Phantom traffic jams may emerge ``out of nowhere`` from small fluctuations rather than being triggered by large, exceptional events. We show how phantom jams arise in a model of single lane highway traffic, which mimics human driving behavior. Surprisingly, the optimal state of highest efficiency, with the largest throughput, is a critical state with traffic jams of all sizes. We demonstrate that open systems self-organize to the most efficient state. In the model we study, this critical state is a percolation transition for the phantom traffic jams. At criticality, the individual jams have a complicated fractal structure where cars follow an intermittent stop and go pattern. We analytically derive the form of the corresponding power spectrum to be 1/f{sup {alpha}} with {alpha} = 1 exactly. This theoretical prediction agrees with our numerical simulations and with observations of 1/f noise in real traffic.

  11. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Sheng; Zheng, Jian-Long; Chen, Zeng-Shun; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade's soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1) the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2) the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3) the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade's temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors. PMID:27294935

  12. Field Measurements and Numerical Simulations of Temperature and Moisture in Highway Engineering Using a Frequency Domain Reflectometry Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yong-Sheng; Zheng, Jian-Long; Chen, Zeng-Shun; Zhang, Jun-Hui; Li, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic pioneering study on the use of agricultural-purpose frequency domain reflectometry (FDR) sensors to monitor temperature and moisture of a subgrade in highway extension and reconstruction engineering. The principle of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors and the process for embedding this kind of sensors for subgrade engineering purposes are introduced. Based on field measured weather data, a numerical analysis model for temperature and moisture content in the subgrade’s soil is built. Comparisons of the temperature and moisture data obtained from numerical simulation and FDR-based measurements are conducted. The results show that: (1) the embedding method and process, data acquisition, and remote transmission presented are reasonable; (2) the temperature and moisture changes are coordinated with the atmospheric environment and they are also in close agreement with numerical calculations; (3) the change laws of both are consistent at positions where the subgrade is compacted uniformly. These results suggest that the data measured by the agricultural-purpose FDR sensors are reliable. The findings of this paper enable a new and effective real-time monitoring method for a subgrade’s temperature and moisture changes, and thus broaden the application of agricultural-purpose FDR sensors. PMID:27294935

  13. Economical Video Monitoring of Traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houser, B. C.; Paine, G.; Rubenstein, L. D.; Parham, O. Bruce, Jr.; Graves, W.; Bradley, C.

    1986-01-01

    Data compression allows video signals to be transmitted economically on telephone circuits. Telephone lines transmit television signals to remote traffic-control center. Lines also carry command signals from center to TV camera and compressor at highway site. Video system with television cameras positioned at critical points on highways allows traffic controllers to determine visually, almost immediately, exact cause of traffic-flow disruption; e.g., accidents, breakdowns, or spills, almost immediately. Controllers can then dispatch appropriate emergency services and alert motorists to minimize traffic backups.

  14. Traffic signal design and simulation for vulnerable road users safety and bus preemption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Huang, Hsieh-Chu

    2015-01-01

    Mostly, pedestrian car accidents occurred at a signalized interaction is because pedestrians cannot across the intersection safely within the green light. From the viewpoint of pedestrian, there might have two reasons. The first one is pedestrians cannot speed up to across the intersection, such as the elders. The other reason is pedestrians do not sense that the signal phase is going to change and their right-of-way is going to be lost. Developing signal logic to protect pedestrian, who is crossing an intersection is the first purpose of this study. In addition, to improve the reliability and reduce delay of public transportation service is the second purpose. Therefore, bus preemption is also considered in the designed signal logic. In this study, the traffic data of the intersection of Chong-Qing North Road and Min-Zu West Road, Taipei, Taiwan, is employed to calibrate and validate the signal logic by simulation. VISSIM 5.20, which is a microscopic traffic simulation software, is employed to simulate the signal logic. From the simulated results, the signal logic presented in this study can protect pedestrians crossing the intersection successfully. The design of bus preemption can reduce the average delay. However, the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal will influence the average delay of cars largely. Thus, whether applying the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal logic to an intersection or not should be evaluated carefully.

  15. Traffic signal design and simulation for vulnerable road users safety and bus preemption

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Huang, Hsieh-Chu

    2015-01-22

    Mostly, pedestrian car accidents occurred at a signalized interaction is because pedestrians cannot across the intersection safely within the green light. From the viewpoint of pedestrian, there might have two reasons. The first one is pedestrians cannot speed up to across the intersection, such as the elders. The other reason is pedestrians do not sense that the signal phase is going to change and their right-of-way is going to be lost. Developing signal logic to protect pedestrian, who is crossing an intersection is the first purpose of this study. In addition, to improve the reliability and reduce delay of public transportation service is the second purpose. Therefore, bus preemption is also considered in the designed signal logic. In this study, the traffic data of the intersection of Chong-Qing North Road and Min-Zu West Road, Taipei, Taiwan, is employed to calibrate and validate the signal logic by simulation. VISSIM 5.20, which is a microscopic traffic simulation software, is employed to simulate the signal logic. From the simulated results, the signal logic presented in this study can protect pedestrians crossing the intersection successfully. The design of bus preemption can reduce the average delay. However, the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal will influence the average delay of cars largely. Thus, whether applying the pedestrian safety and bus preemption signal logic to an intersection or not should be evaluated carefully.

  16. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures... AND ENVIRONMENT PROCEDURES FOR ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.9 Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures. (a) The highway agency shall determine...

  17. Long-term trends in United States highway emissions, ambient concentrations, and in-vehicle exposure to carbon monoxide in traffic.

    PubMed

    Flachsbart, P G

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews 16 published studies conducted between 1965 and 1992 of in-vehicle exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) in traffic on urban roadways in the United States. Analysis of these studies shows a downward trend in CO exposure, which corresponds to similar trends for CO in motor vehicle emission factors and ambient concentrations. The analysis demonstrates that emission controls on motor vehicles sold in the United States have been very effective in reducing commuter CO exposure. It is recommended that future studies of this kind be done routinely in cities nationwide to provide a more robust database for accurate estimates of commuter exposure. Such studies should relate human exposure measurements to estimates of emissions at study sites to document the progress of motor vehicle emission control programs. In addition, future studies should use standard protocols to enable comparisons of results in time and space. Previous studies have shown that typical in-vehicle exposures vary by study approach (direct versus indirect), city, season, roadway type and location, travel mode, and vehicular ventilation. Future studies should carefully account for these factors. PMID:8938245

  18. Simulating deforestation and carbon loss in Amazonia: impacts in Brazil's Roraima state from reconstructing Highway BR-319 (Manaus-Porto Velho).

    PubMed

    Barni, Paulo Eduardo; Fearnside, Philip Martin; Graça, Paulo Maurício Lima de Alencastro

    2015-02-01

    Reconstruction of Highway BR-319 (Manaus-Porto Velho) would allow for access from the "arc of deforestation" in the southern part of Brazil's Amazon region to vast blocks of forests in central and northern Amazonia. Building roads is known to be a major driver of deforestation, allowing entry of squatters, and other actors. Rather than deforestation along the highway route, here we consider the road's potential for stimulating deforestation in a separate location, approximately 550 km north of BR-319's endpoint in Manaus. Reconstructing BR-319 has great potential impact to start a new wave of migration to this remote region. The southern portion of the state of Roraima, the focus of our study, is already connected to Manaus by Highway BR-174. We modeled deforestation in southern Roraima and simulated carbon emissions between 2007 and 2030 under four scenarios. Simulations used the AGROECO model in DINAMICA-EGO © software. Two scenarios were considered with reconstruction of BR-319 and two without this road connection. For each of the two possibilities regarding BR-319, simulations were developed for (1) a "conservation" (CONSERV) scenario that assumes the creation of a series of protected areas, and (2) a "business-as-usual" (BAU) scenario that assumes no additional protected areas. Results show that by 2030, with BR-319 rebuilt, deforestation carbon emissions would increase between 19% (CONSERV) and 42% (BAU) over and above those corresponding to no-road scenarios. PMID:25472831

  19. Simulating Deforestation and Carbon Loss in Amazonia: Impacts in Brazil's Roraima State from Reconstructing Highway BR-319 (Manaus-Porto Velho)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, Paulo Eduardo; Fearnside, Philip Martin; Graça, Paulo Maurício Lima de Alencastro

    2015-02-01

    Reconstruction of Highway BR-319 (Manaus-Porto Velho) would allow for access from the "arc of deforestation" in the southern part of Brazil's Amazon region to vast blocks of forests in central and northern Amazonia. Building roads is known to be a major driver of deforestation, allowing entry of squatters, and other actors. Rather than deforestation along the highway route, here we consider the road's potential for stimulating deforestation in a separate location, approximately 550 km north of BR-319's endpoint in Manaus. Reconstructing BR-319 has great potential impact to start a new wave of migration to this remote region. The southern portion of the state of Roraima, the focus of our study, is already connected to Manaus by Highway BR-174. We modeled deforestation in southern Roraima and simulated carbon emissions between 2007 and 2030 under four scenarios. Simulations used the AGROECO model in DINAMICA-EGO software. Two scenarios were considered with reconstruction of BR-319 and two without this road connection. For each of the two possibilities regarding BR-319, simulations were developed for (1) a "conservation" (CONSERV) scenario that assumes the creation of a series of protected areas, and (2) a "business-as-usual" (BAU) scenario that assumes no additional protected areas. Results show that by 2030, with BR-319 rebuilt, deforestation carbon emissions would increase between 19 % (CONSERV) and 42 % (BAU) over and above those corresponding to no-road scenarios.

  20. A digital simulation of message traffic for natural disaster warning communications satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hein, G. F.; Stevenson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Various types of weather communications are required to alert industries and the general public about the impending occurrence of tornados, hurricanes, snowstorms, floods, etc. A natural disaster warning satellite system has been proposed for meeting the communications requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Message traffic for a communications satellite was simulated with a digital computer in order to determine the number of communications channels to meet system requirements. Poisson inputs are used for arrivals and an exponential distribution is used for service.

  1. Simulation of the introduction of new technologies in air traffic management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yliniemi, Logan; Agogino, Adrian K.; Tumer, Kagan

    2015-07-01

    Accurate simulation of the effects of integrating new technologies into a complex system is critical to the modernisation of large infrastructure problems. This is especially true in the modernisation of our antiquated air traffic system, where there exist many layers of interacting procedures, controls, and automation all designed to cooperate with human operators. Additions of even simple new technologies may result in unexpected emergent behaviour due to complex human/machine interactions. One approach is to create high-fidelity human models coming from the field of human factors that can simulate a rich set of behaviours. However, such models are difficult to produce, especially to show unexpected emergent behaviour coming from many human operators interacting simultaneously within a complex system. Instead, we introduce an alternate approach. Instead of engineering complex human models, we directly model the emergent behaviour with relatively simple goal-directed agents. In this model, each autonomous agent in a system pursues individual goals, and the high-level behaviour of the system emerges from the interactions, foreseen or unforeseen, between the agents/actors. We show that this method is capable of reflecting the integration of new technologies in a historical case, and apply the same methodology for a possible future technology. Finally, we show how these high-level simulated behaviours compare to actual deployed air traffic control mechanisms in use today.

  2. Controlling Air Traffic (Simulated) in the Presence of Automation (CATS PAu) 1995: A Study of Measurement Techniques for Situation Awareness in Air Traffic Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, Jennifer R.

    1995-01-01

    As automated systems proliferate in aviation systems, human operators are taking on less and less of an active role in the jobs they once performed, often reducing what should be important jobs to tasks barely more complex than monitoring machines. When operators are forced into these roles, they risk slipping into hazardous states of awareness, which can lead to reduced skills, lack of vigilance, and the inability to react quickly and competently when there is a machine failure. Using Air Traffic Control (ATC) as a model, the present study developed tools for conducting tests focusing on levels of automation as they relate to situation awareness. Subjects participated in a two-and-a-half hour experiment that consisted of a training period followed by a simulation of air traffic control similar to the system presently used by the FAA, then an additional simulation employing automated assistance. Through an iterative design process utilizing numerous revisions and three experimental sessions, several measures for situational awareness in a simulated Air Traffic Control System were developed and are prepared for use in future experiments.

  3. Polymer delineation system. [Patent application: traffic lane lines

    DOEpatents

    Woolman, S.; Steinberg, M.

    1975-06-24

    A delineation system (traffic lane lines) for highways is described in which polymerizable substances are applied to existing or newly prepared highway pavements. The substances would contain a suitable pigment and may incorporate reflective elements.

  4. Physics of Traffic Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. C.

    2015-03-01

    The Texas A&M Transportation Institute estimated that traffic congestion cost the United States 121 billion in 2011 (the latest data available). The cost is due to wasted time and fuel. In addition to accidents and road construction, factors contributing to congestion include large demand, instability of high-density free flow and selfish behavior of drivers, which produces self-organized traffic bottlenecks. Extensive data collected on instrumented highways in various countries have led to a better understanding of traffic dynamics. From these measurements, Boris Kerner and colleagues developed a new theory called three-phase theory. They identified three major phases of flow observed in the data: free flow, synchronous flow and wide moving jams. The intermediate phase is called synchronous because vehicles in different lanes tend to have similar velocities. This congested phase, characterized by lower velocities yet modestly high throughput, frequently occurs near on-ramps and lane reductions. At present there are only two widely used methods of congestion mitigation: ramp metering and the display of current travel-time information to drivers. To find more effective methods to reduce congestion, researchers perform large-scale simulations using models based on the new theories. An algorithm has been proposed to realize Wardrop equilibria with real-time route information. Such equilibria have equal travel time on alternative routes between a given origin and destination. An active area of current research is the dynamics of connected vehicles, which communicate wirelessly with other vehicles and the surrounding infrastructure. These systems show great promise for improving traffic flow and safety.

  5. Simulation of traffic flow during emergency evacuations: A microcomputer based modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Rathi, A.K.; Solanki, R.S.

    1993-09-01

    Evacuation is one of the major and often preferred protective action options available for emergency management in times of threat to the general public. One of the key factors used in evaluating the effectiveness of evacuation as a protective action option is the estimate of time required for evacuation. The time required for evacuation is the time associated with clearing an area at risk to areas far enough away to be considered safe. Computer simulation models of traffic flow are used to estimate the time it takes to evacuate or ``clear`` an at-risk region by means of vehicular evacuation. This paper provides a brief description of the Oak Ridge Evacuation Modeling System (OREMS), a prototype under development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. OREMS consists of a set of computer programs and models which can be used to simulate traffic flow during regional population evacuations and to develop evacuation plans for different events and scenarios (e.g. good vs. bad weather and nighttime vs. daytime evacuations) for user-defined spatial boundaries.

  6. 78 FR 36132 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... January 11, 2013, the FHWA published a Request for Comments at 78 FR 2347 (Docket ID: FHWA-2012-0118...; Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notification; response to comments. SUMMARY: The Manual on Uniform Traffic...

  7. Air Traffic Controller Performance and Acceptability of Multiple UAS in a Simulated NAS Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Kim-Phuong L.; Strybel, Thomas; Chiappe, Dan; Morales, Greg; Battiste, Vernol; Shively, Robert Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that air traffic controllers (ATCos) rated UAS pilot verbal response latencies as acceptable when a 1.5 s delay was added to the UAS pilot responses, but a 5 s delay was rated as mostly unacceptable. In the present study we determined whether a 1.5 s added delay in the UAS pilots' verbal communications would affect ATCos interactions with UAS and other conventional aircraft when the number and speed of the UAS were manipulated. Eight radar-certified ATCos participated in this simulation. The ATCos managed a medium altitude sector containing arrival aircraft, en route aircraft, and one to four UAS. The UAS were conducting a surveillance mission and flew at either a "slow" or "fast" speed. We measured both UAS and conventional pilots' verbal communication latencies, and obtained ATCos' acceptability ratings for these latencies. Although the UAS pilot response latencies were longer than those of conventional pilots, the ATCos rated UAS pilot verbal communication latencies to be as acceptable as those of conventional pilots. Because the overall traffic load within the sector was held constant, ATCos only performed slightly worse when multiple UAS were in their sector compared to when only one UAS was in the sector. Implications of these findings for UAS integration in the NAS are discussed.

  8. Pseudo Aircraft Systems - A multi-aircraft simulation system for air traffic control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weske, Reid A.; Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    Pseudo Aircraft Systems (PAS) is a computerized flight dynamics and piloting system designed to provide a high fidelity multi-aircraft real-time simulation environment to support Air Traffic Control research. PAS is composed of three major software components that run on a network of computer workstations. Functionality is distributed among these components to allow the system to execute fast enough to support real-time operation. PAS workstations are linked by an Ethernet Local Area Network, and standard UNIX socket protocol is used for data transfer. Each component of PAS is controlled and operated using a custom designed Graphical User Interface. Each of these is composed of multiple windows, and many of the windows and sub-windows are used in several of the components. Aircraft models and piloting logic are sophisticated and realistic and provide complex maneuvering and navigational capabilities. PAS will continually be enhanced with new features and improved capabilities to support ongoing and future Air Traffic Control system development.

  9. 77 FR 37093 - Amendments to Highway Safety Program Guidelines

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...Section 402 of title 23 of the United States Code requires the Secretary of Transportation to promulgate uniform guidelines for State highway safety programs. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is seeking comments on proposed amendments to five (5) guidelines and one (1) new guideline that reflect program methodologies and approaches that have proven to be successful......

  10. Suitability of Synthetic Driving Profiles from Traffic Micro-Simulation for Real-World Energy Analysis: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Yunfei; Wood, Eric; Burton, Evan; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-14

    A shift towards increased levels of driving automation is generally expected to result in improved safety and traffic congestion outcomes. However, little empirical data exists to estimate the impact that automated driving could have on energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In the absence of empirical data on differences between drive cycles from present day vehicles (primarily operated by humans) and future vehicles (partially or fully operated by computers) one approach is to model both situations over identical traffic conditions. Such an exercise requires traffic micro-simulation to not only accurately model vehicle operation under high levels of automation, but also (and potentially more challenging) vehicle operation under present day human drivers. This work seeks to quantify the ability of a commercial traffic micro-simulation program to accurately model real-world drive cycles in vehicles operated primarily by humans in terms of driving speed, acceleration, and simulated fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from models of freeway and arterial facilities near Atlanta, Georgia, are compared to empirical data collected from real-world drivers on the same facilities. Empirical and synthetic drive cycles are then simulated in a powertrain efficiency model to enable comparison on the basis of fuel economy. Synthetic profiles from traffic micro-simulation were found to exhibit low levels of transient behavior relative to the empirical data. Even with these differences, the synthetic and empirical data in this study agree well in terms of driving speed and simulated fuel economy. The differences in transient behavior between simulated and empirical data suggest that larger stochastic contributions in traffic micro-simulation (relative to those present in the traffic micro-simulation tool used in this study) are required to fully capture the arbitrary elements of human driving. Interestingly, the lack of stochastic contributions from models of human drivers

  11. Simulation evaluation of TIMER, a time-based, terminal air traffic, flow-management concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Capron, William R.

    1989-01-01

    A description of a time-based, extended terminal area ATC concept called Traffic Intelligence for the Management of Efficient Runway scheduling (TIMER) and the results of a fast-time evaluation are presented. The TIMER concept is intended to bridge the gap between today's ATC system and a future automated time-based ATC system. The TIMER concept integrates en route metering, fuel-efficient cruise and profile descents, terminal time-based sequencing and spacing together with computer-generated controller aids, to improve delivery precision for fuller use of runway capacity. Simulation results identify and show the effects and interactions of such key variables as horizon of control location, delivery time error at both the metering fix and runway threshold, aircraft separation requirements, delay discounting, wind, aircraft heading and speed errors, and knowledge of final approach speed.

  12. New Algorithms for Computing the Time-to-Collision in Freeway Traffic Simulation Models

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jia; List, George F.; Guo, Xiucheng

    2014-01-01

    Ways to estimate the time-to-collision are explored. In the context of traffic simulation models, classical lane-based notions of vehicle location are relaxed and new, fast, and efficient algorithms are examined. With trajectory conflicts being the main focus, computational procedures are explored which use a two-dimensional coordinate system to track the vehicle trajectories and assess conflicts. Vector-based kinematic variables are used to support the calculations. Algorithms based on boxes, circles, and ellipses are considered. Their performance is evaluated in the context of computational complexity and solution time. Results from these analyses suggest promise for effective and efficient analyses. A combined computation process is found to be very effective. PMID:25628650

  13. 32 CFR 634.24 - Traffic planning and codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engineering representatives from adjacent civil communities must be consulted to ensure the installation plan... and minor routes, location of traffic control devices, and conditions requiring engineering or... Engineering Agency (SDDCTEA) will help installation commanders solve complex highway traffic...

  14. Analysis of road traffic obstructions caused by the central European flood in June 2013 in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessel, Tina

    2014-05-01

    The flood in June 2013 caused in Germany severe damage to infrastructure and has had a great impact on transportation. Traffic was disrupted in the interregional transportation network including federal highways and long distance railways. Researchers from the Center for Disaster Management and Risk Reduction Technology (CEDIM) aim to develop rapid assessment tools which allow a science based estimation of disaster impacts. This is part of a larger project called Forensic Disaster Analysis (FDA). During the flood event, the CEDIM FDA group on transportation disruptions monitored and recorded traffic reports in Germany to obtain accurate information on road traffic obstructions due to the flood. A rapid initial evaluation of the data was carried out for federal and interstate highways on a district level for the period of May 31 till June 4 2013. In this evaluation, the causes and types of traffic obstruction, as well as the number and duration of flood-caused disruptions are considered. In the evaluated time period of five days, an amount of more than 4,800 hours of flood-related traffic obstructions could be observed in a total of 89 districts. Major traffic disruptions were located in the districts along the Mulde and in the foothills of the Alps. This first initial evaluation will be followed by a detailed statistical analysis including all data collected during the flood event. To assess the impacts of the flood on traffic, a simple traffic simulation considering the disruptions will be carried out using a gravity model.

  15. Interstate Highway Interchanges Reshape Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Henry E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Highway interchanges offer rural counties practically ready-made sites for development, but some interchanges offer better development opportunities than others. A study of a Kentucky interchange identified seven factors that make a difference in development, including traffic volume, distance to an urban area, ruggedness of terrain, and sale of…

  16. Virginia's traffic management system

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J.; Marber, S. )

    1992-07-01

    This paper reports that Northern Virginia, like most other urban areas, faces the challenge of moving more and more vehicles on roads that are already overloaded. Traffic in Northern Virginia is continually increasing, but the development surrounding Interstate 395, 495, and 66 makes little room available for roadway expansion. Even if land were unlimited, the strict requirement of the Clean Air Act make building roads difficult. This paper reports that ensuring the most efficient use of the interstate highways is the goal of the Virginia Department of Transportation's (VDOT's) traffic management system (TMS). TMS is a computerized highway surveillance and control system that monitors 30 interstate miles on I-395, I-495, and I-66. The system helps squeeze the most use from these interstates by detecting and helping clear accidents or disabled vehicles and by smoothing traffic flow. TMS spots and helps clear an average of two incidents a day and prevents accidents caused by erratic traffic flow from ramps onto the main line. For motorists, these TMS functions translate into decreased travel time, vehicle operating costs, and air pollution. VDOT's TMS is the foundation for the intelligent vehicle-highway systems of tomorrow. It employs several elements that work together to improve traffic flow.

  17. The comfortable driving model revisited: traffic phases and phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knorr, Florian; Schreckenberg, Michael

    2013-07-01

    We study the spatiotemporal patterns resulting from different boundary conditions for a microscopic traffic model and contrast them with empirical results. By evaluating the time series of local measurements, the local traffic states are assigned to the different traffic phases of Kerner’s three-phase traffic theory. For this classification we use the rule-based FOTO-method, which provides ‘hard’ rules for this assignment. Using this approach, our analysis shows that the model is indeed able to reproduce three qualitatively different traffic phases: free flow (F), synchronized traffic (S), and wide moving jams (J). In addition, we investigate the likelihood of transitions between the three traffic phases. We show that a transition from free flow to a wide moving jam often involves an intermediate transition: first from free flow to synchronized flow and then from synchronized flow to a wide moving jam. This is supported by the fact that the so-called F → S transition (from free flow to synchronized traffic) is much more likely than a direct F → J transition. The model under consideration has a functional relationship between traffic flow and traffic density. The fundamental hypothesis of the three-phase traffic theory, however, postulates that the steady states of synchronized flow occupy a two-dimensional region in the flow-density plane. Due to the obvious discrepancy between the model investigated here and the postulate of the three-phase traffic theory, the good agreement that we found could not be expected. For a more detailed analysis, we also studied vehicle dynamics at a microscopic level and provide a comparison of real detector data with simulated data of the identical highway segment.

  18. Simulation Gaming: An Effective Strategy for Creating Appropriate Traffic Safety Behaviors in Five-Year-Old Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renaud, Lise; Stolovitch, Harold

    1988-01-01

    Describes study conducted in Montreal which used simulation games to determine the effect of role play, group dynamics, behavior modeling, and training on the attitudes and behavior of five-year-old pedestrians with respect to traffic safety rules. Hypotheses tested are presented and treatments for the experimental and control groups are…

  19. Uses of recycled rubber tires in highways: A synthesis of highway practice. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Epps, J.A.; Mason, L.S.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis on the use of recycled rubber tires in highways will be of interest to administrators and policymakers; pavement, materials, geotechnical, environmental, and traffic operations engineers; and research engineers involved with highway design and construction issues. Information is provided on the uses of rubber tires in asphalt paving materials as well as other uses, such as on fills and embankments, for erosion control and on railroad grade crossings. Specifically, information is included which identifies the highway agencies using or implementing applications for recycled rubber tires and defines the design parameters, technical and construction limitations, performance, costs, benefits, environmental limitations, specifications, and availability. This synthesis of information defines the use of recycled rubber tires in highways and is based on a review of nearly 500 references and on information recorded from state highway agency responses to a 1991 survey of practice.

  20. 78 FR 53497 - Uniform Procedures for State Highway Safety Grant Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... seq.), on January 23, 2013 (78 FR 4986), the agency published a notice in the Federal Register... AGENCY: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, DOT. ACTION: Request for public comment on... information on the highway safety planning process, performance plan, highway safety strategies and...

  1. Evolutionary Agent-Based Simulation of the Introduction of New Technologies in Air Traffic Management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yliniemi, Logan; Agogino, Adrian K.; Tumer, Kagan

    2014-01-01

    Accurate simulation of the effects of integrating new technologies into a complex system is critical to the modernization of our antiquated air traffic system, where there exist many layers of interacting procedures, controls, and automation all designed to cooperate with human operators. Additions of even simple new technologies may result in unexpected emergent behavior due to complex human/ machine interactions. One approach is to create high-fidelity human models coming from the field of human factors that can simulate a rich set of behaviors. However, such models are difficult to produce, especially to show unexpected emergent behavior coming from many human operators interacting simultaneously within a complex system. Instead of engineering complex human models, we directly model the emergent behavior by evolving goal directed agents, representing human users. Using evolution we can predict how the agent representing the human user reacts given his/her goals. In this paradigm, each autonomous agent in a system pursues individual goals, and the behavior of the system emerges from the interactions, foreseen or unforeseen, between the agents/actors. We show that this method reflects the integration of new technologies in a historical case, and apply the same methodology for a possible future technology.

  2. Complexity Analysis of Traffic in Corridors-in-the-Sky

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xue, Min; Zelinski, Shannon Jean

    2010-01-01

    The corridors-in-the-sky concept imitates the highway system in ground transportation. The benefit expected from a corridor relies on its capability of handling high density traffic with negligible controller workload, the acceptance of extra fuel or distance, and the complexity reduction in underlying sectors. This work evaluates a selected corridor from these perspectives through simulations. To examine traffic inside the corridor, a corridor traffic simulation tool that can resolve conflicts is developed using C language. Prescribed conflict resolution maneuvers mimic corridor users behaviors and conflict resolution counts measure complexity. Different lane options and operational policies are proposed to examine their impacts on complexity. Fuel consumption is calculated and compared for corridor traffic. On the other hand, to investigate the complexity of non-corridor traffic in underlying sectors, the existing Airspace Concept Evaluation System tool is utilized along with the Automated Airspace Concept tool. The number of conflict resolutions is examined and treated as the complexity measurement. The results show heavy traffic can be managed with low complexity for a historical traffic schedule simulated with appropriate operational policies and lane options. For instance, with 608 flights and peak aircraft count of 100, only 84 actions need to be taken in a 24-hour period to resolve the conflicts for an 8-lane corridor. Compared with the fuel consumptions with great circle trajectories, the simulation of corridor traffic shows that the total extra fuel for corridor flights is 26,373 gallons, or 2.76%, which is 0.38% less than flying filed flight plans. Without taking climb and descent portions of corridor traffic, the complexity of underlying sectors is reduced by 17.71%. However the climb and descent portions will eliminate the reduction and the overall complexity of sectors is actually increased by 9.14%.

  3. Impact of updated traffic emissions on HONO mixing ratios simulated for urban site in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, B. H.; Choi, Y.; Li, X.; Alvarez, S.; Lefer, B.

    2014-08-01

    Recent measurements in Houston show that HONO traffic emissions are 1.7% of NOx emissions which is about twice the previously estimated value of 0.8% based on tunnel measurements in 2001. The 0.8% value is widely used to estimate mobile emissions of HONO for air quality modeling applications. This study applies the newly estimated HONO/NOx ratio in the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system and estimates the impact of higher HONO traffic emissions on its mixing ratios. Since applied emission inventory resulted in overestimates of NOx mixing ratios and because HONO emissions and chemical formation depends on the magnitude of NOx, thus, before proceeding with HONO emission modifications emissions of NOx were adjusted to reflect current emission trends. The modeled mixing ratios of NOx were evaluated against measured data from a number of sites in the Houston area. Overall, the NOx mean value dropped from 11.11 ppbv in the base case to 7.59 ppbv in the NOx adjusted case becoming much closer to the observed mean of 7.76 ppbv. The Index of Agreement (IOA) is improved in the reduced NOx case (0.71 vs. 0.75) and the Absolute Mean Error (AME) is lowered from 6.76 to 4.94. The modeled mixing ratios of HONO were evaluated against the actual observed values attained at the Moody Tower in Houston. The model could not reproduce the morning HONO peaks when the low HONO/NOx ratio of 0.008 was used to estimate HONO emissions. Doubling HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in higher mixing ratios, the mean value increased from 0.30 to 0.41 ppbv becoming closer to the observed mean concentrations of 0.69 but still low; AME was slightly reduced from 0.46 to 0.43. IOA for simulation that used the 2001 emission values is 0.63 while for simulation with higher HONO emission it increased to 0.70. Increased HONO emissions impacted OH mixing ratio, up to about 6% increase was found during morning and mid-day hours. The impact on ozone is marginal. This study results sheds light on the

  4. Impact of updated traffic emissions on HONO mixing ratios simulated for urban site in Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czader, B. H.; Choi, Y.; Li, X.; Alvarez, S.; Lefer, B.

    2015-02-01

    Recent measurements in Houston show that HONO traffic emissions are 1.7% of NOx emissions, which is about twice the previously estimated value of 0.8% based on tunnel measurements in 2001. The 0.8% value is widely used to estimate mobile emissions of HONO for air quality modeling applications. This study applies the newly estimated HONO / NOx ratio in the WRF-SMOKE-CMAQ modeling system and estimates the impact of higher HONO traffic emissions on its mixing ratios. Since applied emission inventory resulted in overestimates of NOx mixing ratios and because HONO emissions and chemical formation depend on the magnitude of NOx, thus, before proceeding with HONO emission modifications emissions of NOx were adjusted to reflect current emission trends. The modeled mixing ratios of NOx were evaluated against measured data from a number of sites in the Houston area. Overall, the NOx mean value dropped from 11.11 ppbv in the base case to 7.59 ppbv in the NOx-adjusted case becoming much closer to the observed mean of 7.76 ppbv. The index of agreement (IOA) is improved in the reduced NOx case (0.71 vs. 0.75) and the absolute mean error (AME) is lowered from 6.76 to 4.94. The modeled mixing ratios of HONO were evaluated against the actual observed values attained at the Moody Tower in Houston. The model could not reproduce the morning HONO peaks when the low HONO / NOx ratio of 0.008 was used to estimate HONO emissions. Doubling HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in higher mixing ratios, and the mean value increased from 0.30 to 0.41 ppbv becoming closer to the observed mean concentrations of 0.69 but still low; AME was slightly reduced from 0.46 to 0.43. IOA for simulation that used the 2001 emission values is 0.63 while for simulation with higher HONO emission it increased to 0.70. Increased HONO emissions from mobile sources resulted in a 14% increase in OH during morning time at the location of the Moody Tower and 3% when averaged over an urban area. The increase

  5. HOV on the information highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Sick of rush-hour traffic jams? Tired of bottlenecks that keep you from getting where you want to go? Frustrated by sluggish drivers who tie you up on your way to work? The National Science Foundation (NSF) is hoping to put scientists back in the fast lane—of the Internet, that is.The recent boom in the popularity of the Internet has brought traffic on some parts of the information highway to a crawl. Since all packets of information sent across the Internet are treated equally, e-mail love letters and playful web browsing can interfere with scientific data transfers and high-performance on-line experiments and conferences.

  6. Traffic congestion and dispersion in Hurricane evacuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Katsunori; Nagatani, Takashi; Hanaura, Hirotoshi

    2007-03-01

    We study the traffic congestion and dispersion of vehicles occurring on a single lane highway in Hurricane evacuation. The traffic congestion depends on both sensitivity and speed of the leading vehicle. When the leading vehicle moves with low speed, the vehicular traffic exhibits the stop and go-wave (oscillating congested traffic) for low sensitivity, while the traffic results in the homogeneous congested traffic for high sensitivity. The traffic dispersion is measured by the time difference between the leading and rear vehicles. The time difference fluctuates highly for the oscillating congestion traffic, while it keeps a constant value for the homogeneous congested traffic. The traffic states in Hurricane evacuation is connected to the phase diagram of conventional traffic.

  7. 78 FR 2347 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-11

    ...The Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) is incorporated in our regulations, approved by the Federal Highway Administration, and recognized as the national standard for traffic control devices used on all streets, highways, bikeways, and private roads open to public travel. Consistent with Executive Order 13563, and in particular its emphasis on burden-reduction and on......

  8. Prospective memory in an air traffic control simulation: External aids that signal when to act

    PubMed Central

    Loft, Shayne; Smith, Rebekah E.; Bhaskara, Adella

    2011-01-01

    At work and in our personal life we often need to remember to perform intended actions at some point in the future, referred to as Prospective Memory. Individuals sometimes forget to perform intentions in safety-critical work contexts. Holding intentions can also interfere with ongoing tasks. We applied theories and methods from the experimental literature to test the effectiveness of external aids in reducing prospective memory error and costs to ongoing tasks in an air traffic control simulation. Participants were trained to accept and hand-off aircraft, and to detect aircraft conflicts. For the prospective memory task participants were required to substitute alternative actions for routine actions when accepting target aircraft. Across two experiments, external display aids were provided that presented the details of target aircraft and associated intended actions. We predicted that aids would only be effective if they provided information that was diagnostic of target occurrence and in this study we examined the utility of aids that directly cued participants when to allocate attention to the prospective memory task. When aids were set to flash when the prospective memory target aircraft needed to be accepted, prospective memory error and costs to ongoing tasks of aircraft acceptance and conflict detection were reduced. In contrast, aids that did not alert participants specifically when the target aircraft were present provided no advantage compared to when no aids we used. These findings have practical implications for the potential relative utility of automated external aids for occupations where individuals monitor multi-item dynamic displays. PMID:21443381

  9. A Simulated Environment Experiment on Annoyance Due to Combined Road Traffic and Industrial Noises

    PubMed Central

    Marquis-Favre, Catherine; Morel, Julien

    2015-01-01

    Total annoyance due to combined noises is still difficult to predict adequately. This scientific gap is an obstacle for noise action planning, especially in urban areas where inhabitants are usually exposed to high noise levels from multiple sources. In this context, this work aims to highlight potential to enhance the prediction of total annoyance. The work is based on a simulated environment experiment where participants performed activities in a living room while exposed to combined road traffic and industrial noises. The first objective of the experiment presented in this paper was to gain further understanding of the effects on annoyance of some acoustical factors, non-acoustical factors and potential interactions between the combined noise sources. The second one was to assess total annoyance models constructed from the data collected during the experiment and tested using data gathered in situ. The results obtained in this work highlighted the superiority of perceptual models. In particular, perceptual models with an interaction term seemed to be the best predictors for the two combined noise sources under study, even with high differences in sound pressure level. Thus, these results reinforced the need to focus on perceptual models and to improve the prediction of partial annoyances. PMID:26197326

  10. A Simulated Environment Experiment on Annoyance Due to Combined Road Traffic and Industrial Noises.

    PubMed

    Marquis-Favre, Catherine; Morel, Julien

    2015-07-01

    Total annoyance due to combined noises is still difficult to predict adequately. This scientific gap is an obstacle for noise action planning, especially in urban areas where inhabitants are usually exposed to high noise levels from multiple sources. In this context, this work aims to highlight potential to enhance the prediction of total annoyance. The work is based on a simulated environment experiment where participants performed activities in a living room while exposed to combined road traffic and industrial noises. The first objective of the experiment presented in this paper was to gain further understanding of the effects on annoyance of some acoustical factors, non-acoustical factors and potential interactions between the combined noise sources. The second one was to assess total annoyance models constructed from the data collected during the experiment and tested using data gathered in situ. The results obtained in this work highlighted the superiority of perceptual models. In particular, perceptual models with an interaction term seemed to be the best predictors for the two combined noise sources under study, even with high differences in sound pressure level. Thus, these results reinforced the need to focus on perceptual models and to improve the prediction of partial annoyances. PMID:26197326

  11. Information Highway's Educator's Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Richard; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes construction of the information highway and some of the current players. Alternative uses of the information highway being developed by several private companies are described. The impact of the information highway on education and how it will be delivered to all grades and ages are considered. (Contains two references.) (KRN)

  12. 23 CFR Appendix C to Part 1200 - ASSURANCES FOR TEEN TRAFFIC SAFETY PROGRAM

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ASSURANCES FOR TEEN TRAFFIC SAFETY PROGRAM C APPENDIX C... STATE HIGHWAY SAFETY GRANT PROGRAMS Pt. 1200, App. C APPENDIX C TO PART 1200—ASSURANCES FOR TEEN TRAFFIC SAFETY PROGRAM State: Fiscal Year: The State has elected to implement a Teen Traffic Safety...

  13. 23 CFR Appendix C to Part 1200 - Assurances for Teen Traffic Safety Program

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Assurances for Teen Traffic Safety Program C Appendix C... STATE HIGHWAY SAFETY GRANT PROGRAMS Pt. 1200, App. C Appendix C to Part 1200—Assurances for Teen Traffic Safety Program State: Fiscal Year: The State has elected to implement a Teen Traffic Safety...

  14. Spontaneous density fluctuations in granular flow and traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Hans J.

    It is known that spontaneous density waves appear in granular material flowing through pipes or hoppers. A similar phenomenon is known from traffic jams on highways. Using numerical simulations we show that several types of waves exist and find that the density fluctuations follow a power law spectrum. We also investigate one-dimensional traffic models. If positions and velocities are continuous variables the model shows self-organized criticality driven by the slowest car. Lattice gas and lattice Boltzmann models reproduce the experimentally observed effects. Density waves are spontaneously generated when the viscosity has a non-linear dependence on density or shear rate as it is the case in traffic or granular flow.

  15. Near real-time traffic routing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Chaowei (Inventor); Cao, Ying (Inventor); Xie, Jibo (Inventor); Zhou, Bin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A near real-time physical transportation network routing system comprising: a traffic simulation computing grid and a dynamic traffic routing service computing grid. The traffic simulator produces traffic network travel time predictions for a physical transportation network using a traffic simulation model and common input data. The physical transportation network is divided into a multiple sections. Each section has a primary zone and a buffer zone. The traffic simulation computing grid includes multiple of traffic simulation computing nodes. The common input data includes static network characteristics, an origin-destination data table, dynamic traffic information data and historical traffic data. The dynamic traffic routing service computing grid includes multiple dynamic traffic routing computing nodes and generates traffic route(s) using the traffic network travel time predictions.

  16. Older People's Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments.

    PubMed

    Kahlert, Daniela; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-08-01

    Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people's motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people's perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is 'typical' for a German city. In version 'A,' the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version 'B', cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects' ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version 'B' compared to version 'A'. Cohen's d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people's walking behavior. PMID:26308026

  17. Older People’s Perceptions of Pedestrian Friendliness and Traffic Safety: An Experiment Using Computer-Simulated Walking Environments

    PubMed Central

    Kahlert, Daniela; Schlicht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness are considered to be important conditions for older people’s motivation to walk through their environment. This study uses an experimental study design with computer-simulated living environments to investigate the effect of micro-scale environmental factors (parking spaces and green verges with trees) on older people’s perceptions of both motivational antecedents (dependent variables). Seventy-four consecutively recruited older people were randomly assigned watching one of two scenarios (independent variable) on a computer screen. The scenarios simulated a stroll on a sidewalk, as it is ‘typical’ for a German city. In version ‘A,’ the subjects take a fictive walk on a sidewalk where a number of cars are parked partially on it. In version ‘B’, cars are in parking spaces separated from the sidewalk by grass verges and trees. Subjects assessed their impressions of both dependent variables. A multivariate analysis of covariance showed that subjects’ ratings on perceived traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness were higher for Version ‘B’ compared to version ‘A’. Cohen’s d indicates medium (d = 0.73) and large (d = 1.23) effect sizes for traffic safety and pedestrian friendliness, respectively. The study suggests that elements of the built environment might affect motivational antecedents of older people’s walking behavior. PMID:26308026

  18. Case Study: Influences of Uncertainties and Traffic Scenario Difficulties in a Human-in-the-Loop Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, Nancy; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeffrey; Morey, Susan; Prevot, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of how factors such as wind prediction errors and metering delays can influence controller performance and workload in Human-In-The-Loop simulations. Retired air traffic controllers worked two arrival sectors adjacent to the terminal area. The main tasks were to provide safe air traffic operations and deliver the aircraft to the metering fix within +/- 25 seconds of the scheduled arrival time with the help of provided decision support tools. Analyses explore the potential impact of metering delays and system uncertainties on controller workload and performance. The results suggest that trajectory prediction uncertainties impact safety performance, while metering fix accuracy and workload appear subject to the scenario difficulty.

  19. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  20. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  1. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  2. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  3. 23 CFR 661.49 - Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., and Toll Road IRR bridges? 661.49 Section 661.49 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS INDIAN RESERVATION ROAD BRIDGE PROGRAM § 661.49 Can IRRBP funds be spent on Interstate, State Highway, and Toll Road IRR bridges? Yes....

  4. Simulation study of World Wide Web traffic over the ATM ABR service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandalore, Bobby; Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar; Jain, Raj; Goyal, Rohit; Fahmy, Sonia

    1998-10-01

    Asynchronous transfer-mode (ATM) is the technology chosen for implementing the broadband integrated services digital network. The performance of internet protocols over ATM is an extremely important research area. As web traffic forms a major portion of the Internet traffic, we model WWW servers and clients running over an ATM network using the available bit rate (ABR) service. The WWW servers are modeled using a variant of the SPECweb96 benchmark, while the WWW clients are based on a model proposed. The traffic generated is typically bursty, having active and idle transmission periods. A timeout occurs after a certain idle interval. During idle periods, the underlying TCP congestion windows remain large until the timer expires. This raises the possibility of large queues at the switches, if the source rates ar not controlled by ABR. We study this problem and show that ABR scales well to a large number of bursty TCP sources in the system.

  5. Women Traffic Officer Project. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of California Highway Patrol, Sacramento, CA.

    To determine the feasibility of employing women as state traffic officers (STOs), the California Highway Patrol (CHP) conducted a two-year study. The CHP employed forty-one women and forty-two men as traffic officers and gave them the standard sixteen-week training given all new officers. After graduation, the officers were assigned to highway…

  6. Automated Air Traffic Control Operations with Weather and Time-Constraints: A First Look at (Simulated) Far-Term Control Room Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Homola, Jeffrey R.; Martin, Lynne H.; Mercer, Joey S.; Cabrall, Christopher C.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we discuss results from a recent high fidelity simulation of air traffic control operations with automated separation assurance in the presence of weather and time-constraints. We report findings from a human-in-the-loop study conducted in the Airspace Operations Laboratory (AOL) at the NASA Ames Research Center. During four afternoons in early 2010, fifteen active and recently retired air traffic controllers and supervisors controlled high levels of traffic in a highly automated environment during three-hour long scenarios, For each scenario, twelve air traffic controllers operated eight sector positions in two air traffic control areas and were supervised by three front line managers, Controllers worked one-hour shifts, were relieved by other controllers, took a 3D-minute break, and worked another one-hour shift. On average, twice today's traffic density was simulated with more than 2200 aircraft per traffic scenario. The scenarios were designed to create peaks and valleys in traffic density, growing and decaying convective weather areas, and expose controllers to heavy and light metering conditions. This design enabled an initial look at a broad spectrum of workload, challenge, boredom, and fatigue in an otherwise uncharted territory of future operations. In this paper we report human/system integration aspects, safety and efficiency results as well as airspace throughput, workload, and operational acceptability. We conclude that, with further refinements. air traffic control operations with ground-based automated separation assurance can be an effective and acceptable means to routinely provide very high traffic throughput in the en route airspace.

  7. UAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study. 2; Evaluating Detect and Avoid Technology and Communication Delays in Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; Ghatas, Rania W.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of communications delays and winds on air traffic controller ratings of acceptability of horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) and manned aircraft in a simulation of the Dallas-Ft. Worth (DFW) airspace. Fourteen encounters per hour were staged in the presence of moderate background traffic. Seven recently retired controllers with experience at DFW served as subjects. Guidance provided to the UAS pilots for maintaining a given HMD was provided by information from Detect and Avoid (DAA) self-separation algorithms (Stratway+) displayed on the Multi-Aircraft Control System. This guidance consisted of amber "bands" on the heading scale of the UAS navigation display indicating headings that would result in a loss of well clear between the UAS and nearby traffic. Winds tested were successfully handled by the DAA algorithms and did not affect the controller acceptability ratings of the HMDs. Voice communications delays for the UAS were also tested and included one-way delay times of 0, 400, 1200, and 1800 msec. For longer communications delays, there were changes in strategy and communications flow that were observed and reported by the controllers. The aim of this work is to provide useful information for guiding future rules and regulations applicable to flying UAS in the NAS. Information from this study will also be of value to the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics (RTCA) Special Committee 228 - Minimum Performance Standards for UAS.

  8. Highways and Population Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Paul R.; Chi, Guangqing

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we return to an issue often discussed in the literature regarding the relationship between highway expansion and population change. Typically it simply is assumed that this relationship is well established and understood. We argue, following a thorough review of the relevant literature, that the notion that highway expansion leads to…

  9. Highway Safety, Manpower, and Training: A Report on Highway Safety, Manpower, and Training Needed to Implement National Highway Safety Bureau Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Safety Council, Chicago, IL. Traffic Education and Training Committee.

    This paper was developed by the Liaison Subcommittee of the Traffic Educational and Training Committee to: (1) delineate highway safety manpower and training problems, (2) propose activities to meet these problems, and (3) develop a proposed course of action to initate the activities. Included are: (1) a discussion of areas where manpower…

  10. Turbulent Dispersion of Traffic Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; Gordon, M.; Liggio, J.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Brook, J.; Wentzell, J. J.; Gong, S.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Emissions from the transportation sector are a significant source of air pollution. Ongoing efforts to reduce the impacts require tools to provide guidance on policies regarding fuels, vehicle types and traffic control. The air quality models currently used to predict the effectiveness of policies typically treat traffic emissions as a source uniformly distributed across the surface of a model grid. In reality, emissions occur along lines above the surface, in an initially highly concentrated form, and are immediately mixed by traffic-enhanced turbulence. Differences between model and reality in terms of both chemistry and dispersion are to be expected. The ALMITEE (Advancing Local-scale Modeling through Inclusion of Transportation Emission Experiments) subproject FEVER (Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways), conducted on multi-lane highways in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010, included measurements to quantify the evolution and dispersion of traffic emissions. Continuous micro-meteorological data (heat and momentum fluxes, temperature, humidity and incoming solar radiation) were collected 10m from the road, next to a traffic camera used to determine traffic density, composition and speed. Sonic anemometers and an aircraft turbulence probe mounted on a mobile lab provided measurements of turbulent dispersion both directly in traffic on the highway as well as on perpendicular side roads, as a function of distance from the highway. The mobile lab was equipped with instruments to characterize the aerosol size and mass distributions, aerosol composition including black carbon content, NO, NO2, CO2, CO, SO2 and VOCs at high time resolution. Preliminary results on the consequences of turbulent dispersion of traffic emissions levels under a variety of conditions will be disseminated.

  11. AAA: Road Debris a Mounting Danger on U.S. Highways

    MedlinePlus

    ... Highways Crashes involving objects that have fallen from vehicles up 40 percent since 2001 To use the ... the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety. Crashes involving vehicle-related debris are up 40 percent since the ...

  12. RELATIVE TOXICITY OF SIZE-FRACTIONATED PARTICULATE MATTER OBTAINED AT DIFFERENT DISTANCES FROM A HIGHWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiological studies have reported an association between proximity to highway traffic and increased respiratory symptoms. This study was initiated to determine the contribution of ambient particulate matter (PM) to these observed effects. Ambient PM was collected for 2 weeks ...

  13. Traffic accidents on a single-lane road with multi-slowdown sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xingli; Kuang, Hua; Fan, Yanhong; Zhang, Guoxin

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, an extended cellular automaton model is proposed to simulate the complex characteristics of traffic flow and the probability of the occurrence of traffic accidents by considering the modified conditions for determining whether traffic accidents happen and the effect of multi-slowdown sections on a highway. The simulation results show that the multi-slowdown sections can lead to multiphase coexistences (i.e. free flow phase, congestion phase and saturation phase) in traffic system. The fundamental diagram shows that the number of slowdown section does not influence the mean velocity and the mean flow under the periodic boundary condition, but the existence of slowdown sections can effectively reduce the occurrence of traffic accident. In particular, it is found that the probability of car accidents to occur is the largest at the joint of the normal-speed section and slowdown section, and the underlying mechanism is analyzed. In addition, to design the appropriate limited speed and reduce the differences between the normal speed and limited speed will alleviate traffic congestion and reduce the occurrence of traffic accidents obviously.

  14. Simulation evaluation of combined 4D RNAV and airborne traffic situation displays and procedures applied to terminal aerial maneuvers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Athans, M.; Connelly, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Simulation scenarios were developed in which subject pilots must simultaneously follow a 3D terminal airspace structure and arrive at fixed waypoints within the structure precisely at pre-scheduled times in the presence of a full range of wind conditions aloft, and monitor nearby traffic on an airborne traffic situation display, especially during merging and spacing operations, and detect blunders and resolve conflicts in a safe manner. Open-loop simulator tests of the single-stage 4D RNAV algorithm indicate that a descending pilot can comply quite closely with an assigned time of arrival at a 3D waypoint simply by tracking a pre-calculated speed profile. Initial experiments show that the aircraft arrives at the 3D waypoint within a few seconds of the anticipated time. The presence of headwinds or tailwinds does not affect the arrival time error as long as the wind is accurately modeled in the descent algorithm. Results all but quarantee that a 5 second standard deviation in arrival time error can be realized in closed-loop descents at very moderate pilot workload levels.

  15. The 'go-between' study: a simulation study comparing the 'Traffic Lights' and 'SBAR' tools as a means of communication between anaesthetic staff.

    PubMed

    MacDougall-Davis, S R; Kettley, L; Cook, T M

    2016-07-01

    Communicating non-urgent, urgent and frank emergency requests for assistance between anaesthetists in theatre often requires a 'go-between' - frequently a non-anaesthetic healthcare professional - to transmit information. We compared the currently recommended situation, background, assessment, recommendation (SBAR) tool with a newly devised Traffic Lights tool ('red alert', 'amber assist' and 'green query') in a simulation study to assess communication quality using 12 validated clinical scenarios of varying urgency. Compared to SBAR, Traffic Lights was used more consistently ('very clear' or 'clear' Traffic Lights 94% vs SBAR 69%); transferred information better (two or three pieces of information correctly transferred Traffic Lights 85%, SBAR 44%; and was judged to lead to greater clarity (all p < 0.0001). Message delivery time was significantly reduced (Traffic Lights 20.5 s vs SBAR 45.5 s, median (95% CI) difference 25 (19-30) s, p < 0.001). Users rated the Traffic Lights system as significantly more useful than SBAR, with 96% of participants preferring the Traffic Lights tool. Results were independent of go-between training. We recommend the adoption of this communication tool as standard practice for anaesthetic teams. PMID:27080525

  16. Triggering factor evolution and dynamic process simulation of the Formosa Highway dip-slope failure, northern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Mei-Jen; Chiang, Yi-Lin; Chang, Ho-Shyang; Chang, Kuo-Jen

    2013-04-01

    Taiwan, due to the high seismicity and high annual rainfall, numerous landslides triggered every year and severe impacts affect the island. Accordingly, if the new-built construction does not take into account this threaten, tremendous disasters will occur. On April 25th 2010, Formosa Freeway dip-slope failure caused four deaths, resulted from artificial slope cutting and rock-bot supporting system weakening. This research integrates high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) and numerical simulation to evaluate the triggering mechanism and dynamic process of the landslide. First of all, to access the landslide geometry, the morphology of the event before and after landslide is constructed from high resolution DTM by means of aerial photos. The slid and the deposit volumes of the landslide are thus estimated accordingly. Only part of the surface of separation between slide block and slide slope is exposed. Based on the exposed planar strata/sliding surface, situated on the upper part of the slope, by means of extrapolating part of the plane to mimic the entire slide surface. From DTMs, the slide block is approximately 0.15 million cubic meters. The extrapolated planar surface serves as sliding surface for the numerical models. For numerical model preparation, the particle clusters produced by isotropic stress and the porosity are take into account. To ensure the production range should cover the entire slid mass from the source area, the particle clusters represent the slid block is been rotated, scaled and translated to the source area. Then, part of the particles are been eliminated if it is situated outside the upper and lower surface from the DTM before and after landslide. According to the geological map, the model of the particles to mimic the slide block can be divided into two parts: 1) the underneath interbedded sandstone and shale which may soften by water 2) the supposed upper layer composed of sandstone. Furthermore, set up a layer of particles to

  17. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  18. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  19. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  20. 23 CFR 630.1110 - Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. 630... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Temporary Traffic Control Devices § 630.1110 Maintenance of temporary traffic control devices. To provide for the continued effectiveness of...

  1. Games for Traffic Education: An Experimental Study of a Game-Based Driving Simulator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Backlund, Per; Engstrom, Henrik; Johannesson, Mikael; Lebram, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors report on the construction and evaluation of a game-based driving simulator using a real car as a joystick. The simulator is constructed from off-the-shelf hardware and the simulation runs on open-source software. The feasibility of the simulator as a learning tool has been experimentally evaluated. Results are…

  2. National Highway Planning Network

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-02-02

    NHPN, the National Highway Planning Network, is a database of major highways in the continental United States that is used for national-level analyses of highway transportation issues that require use of a network, such as studies of highway performance, network design, social and environmental impacts of transportation, vehicle routing and scheduling, and mapping. The network is based on a set of roadways digitized by the U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) from the 1980 National Atlasmore » and has been enhanced with additional roads, attribute detail, and topological error corrections to produce a true analytic network. All data have been derived from or checked against information obtained from state and Federal governmental agencies. Two files comprise this network: one describing links and the other nodes. This release, NHPN1.0, contains 44,960 links and 28,512 nodes representing approximately 380,000 miles of roadway.« less

  3. Program of Instruction for Highway Collision Investigation Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell Aeronautical Lab., Inc., Buffalo, NY.

    This program of instruction, reviewed and accepted by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, was prepared for Multidisciplinary Accident Investigation teams and others. It is intended to provide background information, a working knowledge of all of the pertinent factors, investigative techniques, tools, data requirements, and field…

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, THERMAL AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES: Multiple car-following model of traffic flow and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guang-Han; Sun, Di-Hua

    2009-12-01

    On the basis of the full velocity difference (FVD) model, an improved multiple car-following (MCF) model is proposed by taking into account multiple information inputs from preceding vehicles. The linear stability condition of the model is obtained by using the linear stability theory. Through nonlinear analysis, a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation is constructed and solved. The traffic jam can thus be described by the kink-antikink soliton solution for the mKdV equation. The improvement of this new model over the previous ones lies in the fact that it not only theoretically retains many strong points of the previous ones, but also performs more realistically than others in the dynamical evolution of congestion. Furthermore, numerical simulation of traffic dynamics shows that the proposed model can avoid the disadvantage of negative velocity that occurs at small sensitivity coefficients λ in the FVD model by adjusting the information on the multiple leading vehicles. No collision occurs and no unrealistic deceleration appears in the improved model.

  5. Short Course in Highway Lighting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Highway Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    This course guide in highway lighting includes an overview of trends in highway lighting, illustrated information on three light sources for today's luminaires, a reference guide to lamp classification, specifications for highway lighting equipment, and instructions for calculating appropriate use. Maintenance notes on highway illumination and…

  6. Performance of various input-buffered and output-buffered ATM switch design principles under bursty traffic: Simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Soung C.

    1994-02-01

    This paper investigates the packet loss probabilities of several alternative input-buffered and output-buffered switch designs with finite amounts of buffer space. The effects of bursty traffic, modeled by geometrically distributed active and idle periods, are explored. Methods for improving switch performance are classified, and their effectiveness for dealing with bursty traffic discussed. This work indicates that bursty traffic can degrade switch performance significantly and that it is difficult to alleviate the performance degradation by merely restricting the offered traffic load. Unless buffers are shared, or very large buffers provided, strategies that improve throughput under uniform random traffic are not very effective under bursty traffic. For input-buffered switches, our investigation suggests that the specific contention resolution scheme we use is a more important performance factor under bursty traffic than it is under uniform random traffic.

  7. Integration of Weather Data into Airspace and Traffic Operations Simulation (ATOS) for Trajectory- Based Operations Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Mark; Boisvert, Ben; Escala, Diego

    2009-01-01

    Explicit integration of aviation weather forecasts with the National Airspace System (NAS) structure is needed to improve the development and execution of operationally effective weather impact mitigation plans and has become increasingly important due to NAS congestion and associated increases in delay. This article considers several contemporary weather-air traffic management (ATM) integration applications: the use of probabilistic forecasts of visibility at San Francisco, the Route Availability Planning Tool to facilitate departures from the New York airports during thunderstorms, the estimation of en route capacity in convective weather, and the application of mixed-integer optimization techniques to air traffic management when the en route and terminal capacities are varying with time because of convective weather impacts. Our operational experience at San Francisco and New York coupled with very promising initial results of traffic flow optimizations suggests that weather-ATM integrated systems warrant significant research and development investment. However, they will need to be refined through rapid prototyping at facilities with supportive operational users We have discussed key elements of an emerging aviation weather research area: the explicit integration of aviation weather forecasts with NAS structure to improve the effectiveness and timeliness of weather impact mitigation plans. Our insights are based on operational experiences with Lincoln Laboratory-developed integrated weather sensing and processing systems, and derivative early prototypes of explicit ATM decision support tools such as the RAPT in New York City. The technical components of this effort involve improving meteorological forecast skill, tailoring the forecast outputs to the problem of estimating airspace impacts, developing models to quantify airspace impacts, and prototyping automated tools that assist in the development of objective broad-area ATM strategies, given probabilistic

  8. 32 CFR 634.24 - Traffic planning and codes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... enforcement officer, engineer, safety officer, and other concerned staff agencies. Highway engineering representatives from adjacent civil communities must be consulted to ensure the installation plan is compatible... and minor routes, location of traffic control devices, and conditions requiring engineering...

  9. 23 CFR 772.9 - Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures... Analysis of traffic noise impacts and abatement measures. (a) The highway agency shall determine and..., giving weight to the benefits and cost of abatement, and to the overall social, economic...

  10. Impact of Distracted Driving on Safety and Traffic Flow

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinos, Despina; Jones, Jennifer L.; Garner, Annie A.; Griffin, Russell; Franklin, Crystal A.; Ball, David; Welburn, Sharon C.; Ball, Karlene K.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Fine, Philip R.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have documented a link between distracted driving and diminished safety; however, an association between distracted driving and traffic congestion has not been investigated in depth. The present study examined the behavior of teens and young adults operating a driving simulator while engaged in various distractions (i.e., cell phone, texting, and undistracted) and driving conditions (i.e., free flow, stable flow, and oversaturation). Seventy five participants 16 to 25 years of age (split into 2 groups: novice drivers and young adults) drove a STISIM simulator three times, each time with one of three randomly presented distractions. Each drive was designed to represent daytime scenery on a 4 lane divided roadway and included three equal roadway portions representing Levels of Service (LOS) A, C, and E as defined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual. Participants also completed questionnaires documenting demographics and driving history. Both safety and traffic flow related driving outcomes were considered. A Repeated Measures Multivariate Analysis of Variance was employed to analyze continuous outcome variables and a Generalized Estimate Equation (GEE) poisson model was used to analyze count variables. Results revealed that, in general more lane deviations and crashes occurred during texting. Distraction (in most cases, text messaging) had a significantly negative impact on traffic flow, such that participants exhibited greater fluctuation in speed, changed lanes significantly fewer times, and took longer to complete the scenario. In turn, more simulated vehicles passed the participant drivers while they were texting or talking on a cell phone than while undistracted. The results indicate that distracted driving, particularly texting, may lead to reduced safety and traffic flow, thus having a negative impact on traffic operations. No significant differences were detected between age groups, suggesting that all drivers, regardless of age, may drive in a manner

  11. Impact of distracted driving on safety and traffic flow.

    PubMed

    Stavrinos, Despina; Jones, Jennifer L; Garner, Annie A; Griffin, Russell; Franklin, Crystal A; Ball, David; Welburn, Sharon C; Ball, Karlene K; Sisiopiku, Virginia P; Fine, Philip R

    2013-12-01

    Studies have documented a link between distracted driving and diminished safety; however, an association between distracted driving and traffic congestion has not been investigated in depth. The present study examined the behavior of teens and young adults operating a driving simulator while engaged in various distractions (i.e., cell phone, texting, and undistracted) and driving conditions (i.e., free flow, stable flow, and oversaturation). Seventy five participants 16-25 years of age (split into 2 groups: novice drivers and young adults) drove a STISIM simulator three times, each time with one of three randomly presented distractions. Each drive was designed to represent daytime scenery on a 4 lane divided roadway and included three equal roadway portions representing Levels of Service (LOS) A, C, and E as defined in the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual. Participants also completed questionnaires documenting demographics and driving history. Both safety and traffic flow related driving outcomes were considered. A Repeated Measures Multivariate Analysis of Variance was employed to analyze continuous outcome variables and a Generalized Estimate Equation (GEE) Poisson model was used to analyze count variables. Results revealed that, in general more lane deviations and crashes occurred during texting. Distraction (in most cases, text messaging) had a significantly negative impact on traffic flow, such that participants exhibited greater fluctuation in speed, changed lanes significantly fewer times, and took longer to complete the scenario. In turn, more simulated vehicles passed the participant drivers while they were texting or talking on a cell phone than while undistracted. The results indicate that distracted driving, particularly texting, may lead to reduced safety and traffic flow, thus having a negative impact on traffic operations. No significant differences were detected between age groups, suggesting that all drivers, regardless of age, may drive in a manner

  12. Acoustical scale modeling of roadway traffic noise

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, G.S.

    1980-03-01

    During the planning and design of any federally assisted highway project, noise levels must be predicted for the highway in its operational mode. The use of an acoustical scale modeling technique to predict roadway traffic noise is described. Literature pertaining to acoustical scale modeling of outdoor noise propagation, particularly roadway noise, is reviewed. Field and laboratory measurements validated the predictions of the acoustical scale modeling technique. (1 photo)

  13. Trunk Highway 169: Dynamic ramp metering evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Peak period travel demand has exceed unmanaged road capacity on most of Twin Cities metropolitan area freeways for more than two decades. During this time, the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MN/DOT) has developed and implemented its freeway traffic management system (FTMS). MN/DOT continues to expand the FTMS, which includes ramp metering as one component. This report documents the impact of dynamic ramp metering on Trunk Highway 169 (TH 16) from Minnetonka Boulevard in Minnetonka to 77th Avenue in Brooklyn Park. The study examines changes in traffic performance with regard to traffic flow, congestion levels, travel times, and accident rates before and after implementation of dynamic ramp metering.

  14. Cellular automata model for traffic flow with safe driving conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    María, Elena Lárraga; Luis, Alvarez-Icaza

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a recently introduced cellular automata (CA) model is used for a statistical analysis of the inner microscopic structure of synchronized traffic flow. The analysis focuses on the formation and dissolution of clusters or platoons of vehicles, as the mechanism that causes the presence of this synchronized traffic state with a high flow. This platoon formation is one of the most interesting phenomena observed in traffic flows and plays an important role both in manual and automated highway systems (AHS). Simulation results, obtained from a single-lane system under periodic boundary conditions indicate that in the density region where the synchronized state is observed, most vehicles travel together in platoons with approximately the same speed and small spatial distances. The examination of velocity variations and individual vehicle gaps shows that the flow corresponding to the synchronized state is stable, safe and highly correlated. Moreover, results indicate that the observed platoon formation in real traffic is reproduced in simulations by the relation between vehicle headway and velocity that is embedded in the dynamics definition of the CA model.

  15. Analysis of traffic congestion induced by the work zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fei, L.; Zhu, H. B.; Han, X. L.

    2016-05-01

    Based on the cellular automata model, a meticulous two-lane cellular automata model is proposed, in which the driving behavior difference and the difference of vehicles' accelerations between the moving state and the starting state are taken into account. Furthermore the vehicles' motion is refined by using the small cell of one meter long. Then accompanied by coming up with a traffic management measure, a two-lane highway traffic model containing a work zone is presented, in which the road is divided into normal area, merging area and work zone. The vehicles in different areas move forward according to different lane changing rules and position updating rules. After simulation it is found that when the density is small the cluster length in front of the work zone increases with the decrease of the merging probability. Then the suitable merging length and the appropriate speed limit value are recommended. The simulation result in the form of the speed-flow diagram is in good agreement with the empirical data. It indicates that the presented model is efficient and can partially reflect the real traffic. The results may be meaningful for traffic optimization and road construction management.

  16. Isochrones as Indicators of the Influence of Traffic in Public Health: A Visual Simulation Application in Ávila, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Otamendi, F. Javier; García-Heredia, David

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that excessive rescue times after traffic accidents negatively affect the health of those injured. There is a need to quantitatively measure the impact of unexpected events like ambulance availability, weather, floating population and congestion in those rescue times. A family of indicators based on isochrones is disguised and proposed to understand the risk of the whole population as the probability of not being assisted on time. Indicators of health risk for local towns are also defined. The indicators are calculated using a simulation model and visualized in web format. The framework of analysis is validated using Ávila (Spain) and the problem of the optimal deployment of ambulances as a test-bench. PMID:26473894

  17. Isochrones as Indicators of the Influence of Traffic in Public Health: A Visual Simulation Application in Ávila, Spain.

    PubMed

    Otamendi, F Javier; García-Heredia, David

    2015-10-01

    It is well known that excessive rescue times after traffic accidents negatively affect the health of those injured. There is a need to quantitatively measure the impact of unexpected events like ambulance availability, weather, floating population and congestion in those rescue times. A family of indicators based on isochrones is disguised and proposed to understand the risk of the whole population as the probability of not being assisted on time. Indicators of health risk for local towns are also defined. The indicators are calculated using a simulation model and visualized in web format. The framework of analysis is validated using Ávila (Spain) and the problem of the optimal deployment of ambulances as a test-bench. PMID:26473894

  18. The effect of different delineator post configurations on driver speed in night-time traffic: a driving simulator study.

    PubMed

    Nygårdhs, Sara; Lundkvist, Sven-Olof; Andersson, Jan; Dahlbäck, Nils

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate how different delineator post configurations affect driver speed in night-time traffic. In addition, the potential speed effect of introducing a secondary task was investigated. The study was carried out in a car simulator on a road stretch including straight road sections as well as curves with different radii. Fourteen drivers participated in the study and the results show that absence of delineator posts leads to reduced speed. However, provided that there are delineator posts continuously present along the road, the overall driver speed is basically the same, regardless of the spacing between the delineator posts. The results also imply that to reduce driver speed in curves with small radius, using more compact spacing of posts in these curves as compared to in curves with a larger radius, could be a potential strategy. Additionally, the speed reducing effect of a secondary task was only prevailing where the task was initiated. PMID:25118126

  19. Traffic flow theory and characteristics

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, E.; Pagitsas, E.; Shin, B.T.; Maze, T.H.; Hurley, J.W. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Estimation of turning flows from automatic counts; a probabilistic model of gap acceptance behavior; sensitivity of fuel-consumption and delay values from traffic simulation; traffic data acquisition from small-format photography; decentralized control of congested street networks; improved estimation of traffic flow for real-time control; Maxband, a program for setting signals on arteries and triangular networks are discussed.

  20. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Passenger Safety, Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains eight lessons for use in grade 2. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for highway users,…

  1. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Bicycle Safety, Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains ten lessons on bicycles for use in grade 2. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for highway users,…

  2. The green highway forum

    SciTech Connect

    2006-07-01

    In late 2004, as part of American Coal Ash Association's (ACAA) strategic planning process, a plan was approved by its Board of Directors implementing a 'green highways' concept which emphasized use of coal combustion products (CCPs) in highways in a variety of ways including being used alone, in combination with other forms of CCPs, and combined with non ash materials. The incentives behind the developed concept were the derived advantages from beneficial technical economic and environmental impacts. Although the primary use of fly ash is concrete, other forms of CCPs could be considered for more non-traditional highway applications. For example, these might include soils stabilization, binders for in-place pavement recycling, use in flowable fills, aggregates, source materials for structural fills and embankments, components in manufactured soils, and for granular base courses beneath pavements. At this same time, unknown to ACCA, EPA Region 3 in Philadelphia was working with the Wetlands and Watershed Work Group, a non-profit organization involved in wetlands policy and management along with the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) on their own Green Highways initiative. These groups were planning a conference, the 'Green Highway Forum'. This was held in College Park, Maryland at the University of Maryland, Nov 8-10 2005. At the conference a draft 'roadmap' was presented as a guide to executive level participants bringing the diverse viewpoints of many agencies and interest groups together. Ten guiding principals were considered. The 'Green Highways' is a new effort to recognize the 'greenness' of many projects already completed and those to be initiated. 2 photos.

  3. Application of the mechanical perturbation produced by traffic as a new approach of nonlinear acoustic technique for detecting microcracks in the concrete: A laboratory simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradi-Marani, F.; Kodjo, S. A.; Rivard, P.; Lamarche, C. P.

    2012-05-01

    Very few nonlinear acoustics techniques are currently applied on real structures because their large scale implementation is difficult. Recently, a new method based on nonlinear acoustics has been proposed at the Université de Sherbrooke for the characterization of the damage associated with Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR). This method consists in quantifying the influence of an external mechanical disturbance on the propagation of a continual ultrasonic wave that probes the material. In this method, the mechanical perturbation produced by an impact causes sudden opening of microcracks and, consequently, the velocity of the probe ultrasonic wave is suddenly reduced. Then it slowly and gradually returns to its initial level as the microcracks are closing. The objective of this study is: using waves generated by traffics in infrastructures in order to monitor microdefects due to damage mechanisms like ASR. This type of mechanical disturbance (by traffic loadings) is used as a source of low frequency-high amplitude waves for opening/closing of the microdefects in the bulk of concrete. This paper presents a laboratory set-up made of three large deep concrete slabs used to study the nonlinear behavior of concrete using the disturbance caused by simulated traffic. The traffic is simulated with a controlled high accuracy jack to produce a wave similar to that produced by traffic. Results obtained from this study will be used in the future to design an in-situ protocol for assessing ASR-affected structures.

  4. The realistic consideration of human factors in model based simulation tools for the air traffic control domain.

    PubMed

    Duca, Gabriella; Attaianese, Erminia

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Air Traffic Management (ATM) concepts related to automation, airspace organization and operational procedures are driven by the overall goal to increase ATM system performance. Independently on the nature and/or impact of envisaged changes (e.g. from a short term procedure adjustment to a very long term operational concept or aid tools completion), the preliminary assessment of possible gains in airspace/airport capacity, safety and cost-effectiveness is done by running Model Based Simulations (MBSs, also known as Fast Time Simulations - FTS). Being a not human-in-the-loop technique, the reliability of a MBS results depend on the accuracy and significance of modeled human factors. Despite that, it can be observed in the practice that modeling tools commonly assume a generalized standardization of human behaviors and tasks and consider a very few range of work environment factors that, in the reality, affect the actual human-system performance. The present paper is aimed at opening a discussion about the possibility to keep task description and related weight at a high/general level, suitable for an efficient use of MBSs and, at the same time, increasing simulations reliability adopting some adjustment coming from the elaboration of further variables related to the human aspects of controllers workload. PMID:22316714

  5. Life cycle optimisation for highway best management practices.

    PubMed

    Lee, J G; Heaney, J P; Rapp, D N; Pack, C A

    2006-01-01

    Highway runoff can cause a number of water quantity and quality problems. Stormwater management systems for highways have been developed based on a fast drainage for large storm situations. Non-point source pollution from highway runoff is a growing water quality concern. Stormwater quality control needs to be integrated into highway drainage design and operation to reduce the stormwater impacts on the receiving water. A continuous simulation/optimisation model for analysing integrated highway best management practices (BMPs) is presented. This model can evaluate the life cycle performance of infiltration and/or storage oriented highway BMPs. It can be directly integrated with spreadsheet optimisation tools to find the least cost options for implementing BMPs throughout a specified life cycle. PMID:17120683

  6. Cellular automata model simulating traffic car accidents in the on-ramp system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, using Nagel-Schreckenberg model we study the on-ramp system under the expanded open boundary condition. The phase diagram of the two-lane on-ramp system is computed. It is found that the expanded left boundary insertion strategy enhances the flow in the on-ramp lane. Furthermore, we have studied the probability of the occurrence of car accidents. We distinguish two types of car accidents: the accident at the on-ramp site (Prc) and the rear-end accident in the main road (Pac). It is shown that car accidents at the on-ramp site are more likely to occur when traffic is free on road A. However, the rear-end accidents begin to occur above a critical injecting rate αc1. The influence of the on-ramp length (LB) and position (xC0) on the car accidents probabilities is studied. We found that large LB or xC0 causes an important decrease of the probability Prc. However, only large xC0 provokes an increase of the probability Pac. The effect of the stochastic randomization is also computed.

  7. Simulation study of satisfaction rate in the mixed traffic flow with open boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bentaleb, Khalid; Lakouari, Noureddine; Ez-Zahraouy, Hamid; Benyoussef, Abdelilah

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we propose a single-lane cellular automata (CA) traffic model which takes into account the disorder in the length and the maximal speed of the vehicles (i.e. slow and fast) to study the satisfaction rate of the fast vehicles (i.e. the number of vehicles that run with their desired speed) with open boundary conditions in the case of a chain of one entry; where α is the injecting rate of vehicles independent of their nature and β is the extracting rate. The slow vehicles are injected with the conditional probability αs, where 0≤αs=χα≤α and χ is the concentration of the slow vehicles. It is found that for the low value of the injecting rate α and for the high extraction rate β, the satisfaction rate takes higher values. It also depends on the concentration of the slow vehicles injected on the road. Furthermore, we have shown that, in the case when α=β, the satisfaction rate undergoes a transition from the maximal value to the minimal one and it takes a value near to zero in the case of α>β. We have also found that the satisfaction rate depends strongly on the probability of overtaking, also the phase diagrams (α,β) are established for the different values of the slow vehicles concentrations χ.

  8. [Emission Characteristics of Vehicle Exhaust in Beijing Based on Actual Traffic Flow Information].

    PubMed

    Fan, Shou-bin; Tian, Ling-di; Zhang, Dong-xu; Qu, Song

    2015-08-01

    The basic data of traffic volume, vehicle type constitute and speed on road networks in Beijing was obtained fly modei simulation and field survey. Based on actual traffic flow information and. emission factors data with temporal and spatial distribution features, emission inventory of motor vehicle exhaust in Beijing was built on the ArcGIS platform, meanwhile, the actual road emission characteristics and spatial distribution of the pollutant emissions were analyzed. The results showed that the proportion of passenger car was higher than 89% on each type of road in the urban, and the proportion of passenger car was the highest in suburban roads as well while the pickup truck, medium truck, heavy truck, motorbus, tractor and motorcycle also occupied a certain proportion. There was a positive correlation between the pollutant emission intensity and traffic volume, and the emission intensity was generally higher in daytime than nighttime, but the diurnal variation trend of PM emission was not clear for suburban roads and the emission intensity was higher in nighttime than daytime for highway. The emission intensities in urban area, south, southeast and northeast areas near urban were higher than those in the western and northern mountainous areas with lower density of road network. The ring roads in urban and highways in suburban had higher emission intensity because of the heavy traffic volume. PMID:26592000

  9. A Stellar Highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rijsdijk, Case

    2015-10-01

    Thomas Henderson, at the Royal Observatory of the Cape, was the first person to measure the distance to a star in 1834. Robert Innes, at the Union Observatory in Johannesburg, discovered that Proxima Centauri was the nearest star to the Sun in 1915. The idea of marking the 100th anniversary of the discovery of Proxima Centauri in 2015 led to the development of a Stellar Highway, similar to the well-known scale models of the Solar System or Planetary Highways, but showing the scaled distance between stars.

  10. Assessment of highway pavements using GPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Loizos, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Highway infrastructure is a prerequisite for a functioning economy and social life. Highways, often prone to congestion and disruption, are one of the aspects of a modern transport network that require maximum efficiency if an integrated transport network, and sustainable mobility, is to be achieved. Assessing the condition of highway structures, to plan subsequent maintenance, is essential to allow the long-term functioning of a road network. Optimizing the methods used for such assessment will lead to better information being obtained about the road and underlying ground conditions. The condition of highway structures will be affected by a number of factors, including the properties of the highway pavement, the supporting sub-base and the subgrade (natural ground), and the ability to obtain good information about the entire road structure, from pavement to subgrade, allows appropriate maintenance programs to be planned. The maintenance of highway pavements causes considerable cost and in many cases obstruction to traffic flow. In this situation, methods that provide information on the present condition of pavement structure non-destructively and economically are of great interest. It has been shown that Ground-Penetrating-Radar (GPR), which is a Non Destructive Technique (NDT), can deliver information that is useful for the planning of pavement maintenance activities. More specifically GPR is used by pavement engineers in order to determine physical properties and characteristics of the pavement structure, information that is valuable for the assessment of pavement condition. This work gives an overview on the practical application of GPR using examples from highway asphalt pavements monitoring. The presented individual applications of GPR pavement diagnostics concern structure homogeneity, thickness of pavement layers, dielectric properties of asphalt materials etc. It is worthwhile mentioning that a number of applications are standard procedures, either

  11. Accident prediction model for public highway-rail grade crossings.

    PubMed

    Lu, Pan; Tolliver, Denver

    2016-05-01

    Considerable research has focused on roadway accident frequency analysis, but relatively little research has examined safety evaluation at highway-rail grade crossings. Highway-rail grade crossings are critical spatial locations of utmost importance for transportation safety because traffic crashes at highway-rail grade crossings are often catastrophic with serious consequences. The Poisson regression model has been employed to analyze vehicle accident frequency as a good starting point for many years. The most commonly applied variations of Poisson including negative binomial, and zero-inflated Poisson. These models are used to deal with common crash data issues such as over-dispersion (sample variance is larger than the sample mean) and preponderance of zeros (low sample mean and small sample size). On rare occasions traffic crash data have been shown to be under-dispersed (sample variance is smaller than the sample mean) and traditional distributions such as Poisson or negative binomial cannot handle under-dispersion well. The objective of this study is to investigate and compare various alternate highway-rail grade crossing accident frequency models that can handle the under-dispersion issue. The contributions of the paper are two-fold: (1) application of probability models to deal with under-dispersion issues and (2) obtain insights regarding to vehicle crashes at public highway-rail grade crossings. PMID:26922288

  12. 49 CFR 27.75 - Federal Highway Administration-highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Federal Highway Administration-highways. 27.75 Section 27.75 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.75 Federal...

  13. 49 CFR 27.75 - Federal Highway Administration-highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Federal Highway Administration-highways. 27.75 Section 27.75 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.75 Federal...

  14. 49 CFR 27.75 - Federal Highway Administration-highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Federal Highway Administration-highways. 27.75 Section 27.75 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.75 Federal...

  15. 49 CFR 27.75 - Federal Highway Administration-highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Federal Highway Administration-highways. 27.75 Section 27.75 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.75 Federal...

  16. 49 CFR 27.75 - Federal Highway Administration-highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Federal Highway Administration-highways. 27.75 Section 27.75 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF... Specific Operating Administration Programs: Airports, Railroads, and Highways § 27.75 Federal...

  17. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of one-dimensional and two-dimensional traffic flows: Comparison of two look-ahead rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Timofeyev, Ilya

    2014-05-01

    We employ an efficient list-based kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method to study traffic flow models on one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) lattices based on the exclusion principle and Arrhenius microscopic dynamics. This model implements stochastic rules for cars' movements based on the configuration of the traffic ahead of each car. In particular, we compare two different look-ahead rules: one is based on the distance from the car under consideration to the car in front of it, and the other one is based on the density of cars ahead. The 1D numerical results of these two rules suggest different coarse-grained macroscopic limits in the form of integro-differential Burgers equations. The 2D results of both rules exhibit a sharp phase transition from freely flowing to fully jammed, as a function of the initial density of cars. However, the look-ahead rule based on the density of the traffic produces more realistic results. The KMC simulations reported in this paper are compared with those from other well-known traffic flow models and the corresponding empirical results from real traffic.

  18. The Carrot Highway [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyss, Ron

    "The Carrot Highway" is a 40-minute award-winning videotape that takes viewers on a whirlwind tour around the world to tell the story of the carrot. This videotape reveals the carrot in all its glory by cleverly integrating live-action, music, animation, videotape footage, and games. Viewers travel with a troupe of animated carrot characters to…

  19. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic skills, this curriculum guide for grade 6 deals with the how and why of traffic safety. Based on the introduction to highway safety rules and laws that students have learned in grades K through 3, the program for grades 4 through…

  20. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Grade 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic skills, this curriculum guide for grade 4 deals with the how and why of traffic safety. Based on the introduction to highway safety rules and laws that students have mastered in grades K through 3, the program for grades 4 through…

  1. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Grade 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic skills, this curriculum guide for grade 5 deals with the how and why of traffic safety. Based on the introduction to highway safety rules and laws that students have mastered in grades K through 3, the program for grades 4 through…

  2. Simulation of the enhanced traffic alert and collision avoidance system (TCAS 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojas, R. G.; Burnside, W. D.; Law, P.; Grandchamp, B.

    1985-01-01

    The OSU aircraft code is used to analyze and simulate the TCAS 2 circular array which is mounted on the fuselage of a Boeing 737 aircraft. It is shown that the sum and difference patterns radiated by the circular array are distorted by the various structures of the aircraft, i.e., wings, tail, etc. Furthermore, monopulse curves are calculated and plotted for several beam positions and THETA angles. As expected, the worst cases of distortion occur when the beams are pointed toward the tail of the aircraft.

  3. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt..., Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction...

  4. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt..., Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction...

  5. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt..., Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction...

  6. 23 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Additional Required Contract Provisions, Appalachian... AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS REQUIRED CONTRACT PROVISIONS Federal-Aid Contracts (Appalachian Contracts) Pt..., Appalachian Development Highway System and Local Access Roads Contracts Other Than Construction...

  7. Reducing prospective memory error and costs in simulated air traffic control: External aids, extending practice, and removing perceived memory requirements.

    PubMed

    Loft, Shayne; Chapman, Melissa; Smith, Rebekah E

    2016-09-01

    In air traffic control (ATC), forgetting to perform deferred actions-prospective memory (PM) errors-can have severe consequences. PM demands can also interfere with ongoing tasks (costs). We examined the extent to which PM errors and costs were reduced in simulated ATC by providing extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with extended practice, or by providing external aids combined with instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. Participants accepted/handed-off aircraft and detected conflicts. For the PM task, participants were required to substitute alternative actions for routine actions when accepting aircraft. In Experiment 1, when no aids were provided, PM errors and costs were not reduced by practice. When aids were provided, costs observed early in practice were eliminated with practice, but residual PM errors remained. Experiment 2 provided more limited practice with aids, but instructions that did not frame the PM task as a "memory" task led to high PM accuracy without costs. Attention-allocation policies that participants set based on expected PM demands were modified as individuals were increasingly exposed to reliable aids, or were given instructions that removed perceived memory requirements. These findings have implications for the design of aids for individuals who monitor multi-item dynamic displays. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27608067

  8. Piloted simulation of an air-ground profile negotiation process in a time-based Air Traffic Control environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David H.; Green, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    Historically, development of airborne flight management systems (FMS) and ground-based air traffic control (ATC) systems has tended to focus on different objectives with little consideration for operational integration. A joint program, between NASA's Ames Research Center (Ames) and Langley Research Center (Langley), is underway to investigate the issues of, and develop systems for, the integration of ATC and airborne automation systems. A simulation study was conducted to evaluate a profile negotiation process (PNP) between the Center/TRACON Automation System (CTAS) and an aircraft equipped with a four-dimensional flight management system (4D FMS). Prototype procedures were developed to support the functional implementation of this process. The PNP was designed to provide an arrival trajectory solution which satisfies the separation requirements of ATC while remaining as close as possible to the aircraft's preferred trajectory. Results from the experiment indicate the potential for successful incorporation of aircraft-preferred arrival trajectories in the CTAS automation environment. Fuel savings on the order of 2 percent to 8 percent, compared to fuel required for the baseline CTAS arrival speed strategy, were achieved in the test scenarios. The data link procedures and clearances developed for this experiment, while providing the necessary functionality, were found to be operationally unacceptable to the pilots. In particular, additional pilot control and understanding of the proposed aircraft-preferred trajectory, and a simplified clearance procedure were cited as necessary for operational implementation of the concept.

  9. DISPERSION OF POLLUTANTS NEAR HIGHWAYS. DATA ANALYSIS AND MODEL EVALUATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The validity of various assumptions underlying mathematical modeling of pollutant dispersion near at-grade highways was examined and the simulation capability of various dispersion models determined. The data base generated during the Long Island Dispersion Experiment is used to ...

  10. Integration of modal vehicle emission models with the TRANSIMS traffic simulation module

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.D.

    1997-04-01

    TRANSIMS is a set of integrated analytical and simulation models and supporting data bases. The TRANSIMS methods deal with individual behavioral units and proceed through several steps to estimate travel. TRANSIMS predicts trips for individual households, residents and vehicles rather than for zonal aggregations of households. TRANSIMS also predicts the movement of individual freight loads. A regional microsimulation executes the generated trips on the transportation network, modeling the individual vehicle interactions and predicting the transportation system performance. The purpose of the TRANSIMS environmental module is to translate traveler behavior into consequent air quality, energy consumption, and carbon dioxide emissions. There are four major tasks required to translate traveler behavior into environmental consequences: (1) estimate the emissions, (2) describe the atmospheric conditions into which the contaminants are emitted, (3) describe the local transport and dispersion, and (4) describe the chemical reactions that occur during transport and dispersion of the contaminants.

  11. Simulation study of traffic car accidents at a single lane roundabout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echab, H.; Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, using the Nagel-Schreckenberg model, we numerically investigate the probability Pac of entering/circulating car accidents to occur at single-lane roundabout under the expanded open boundary. The roundabout consists of N on-ramps (respectively, off-ramps). The boundary is controlled by the injecting rates α1,α2 and the extracting rate β. The simulation results show that, depending on the injecting rates, the car accidents are more likely to happen when the capacity of the rotary is set to its maximum. Moreover, we found that the large values of rotary size L and the probability of preferential Pexit are reliable to improve safety and reduce accidents. However, the usage of indicator, the increase of β and/or N provokes an increase of car accident probability.

  12. Cooperative Car-Following Model of Traffic Flow and Numerical Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, You-Jun; Zhang, Hai-Lin; He, Li

    2012-10-01

    Based on the impact of a desired following speed and safe distance on driving behaviour, we establish a cooperative car-following model (CCFM). The dynamics analysis results indicate that no unrealistic deceleration or collision occurs in the CCFM. Also, this model can describe the kinetic property in the processes of starting and braking. In addition, evolution of a small perturbation can be reproduced in a numerical simulation. Compared to the full velocity difference model (FVDM), the CCFM has a wider range of stability and a much smaller blocking region width. Meanwhile, the CCFM averts negative velocity, and is accordingly advanced compared with the comprehensive optimal velocity model (COVM). Moreover, the CCFM describes the deceleration process more smoothly than both the FVDM and COVM.

  13. Neural network approach to classification of traffic flow states

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, H.; Qiao, F.

    1998-11-01

    The classification of traffic flow states in China has traditionally been based on the Highway Capacity Manual, published in the United States. Because traffic conditions are generally different from country to country, though, it is important to develop a practical and useful classification method applicable to Chinese highway traffic. In view of the difficulty and complexity of a mathematical and physical realization, modern pattern recognition methods are considered practical in fulfilling this goal. This study applies a self-organizing neural network pattern recognition method to classify highway traffic states into some distinctive cluster centers. A small scale test with actual data is conducted, and the method is found to be potentially applicable in practice.

  14. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 1: Methodology, summary and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are described in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent when conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume II contains the appendices referenced in Volume I, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  15. Pilots' use of a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier operations. Volume 2: Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Billings, Charles E.; Scott, Barry C.; Tuttell, Robert J.; Olsen, M. Christine; Kozon, Thomas E.

    1989-01-01

    Pilots' use of and responses to a traffic alert and collision-avoidance system (TCAS 2) in simulated air carrier line operations are discribed in Volume 1. TCAS 2 monitors the positions of nearby aircraft by means of transponder interrogation, and it commands a climb or descent which conflicting aircraft are projected to reach an unsafe closest point-of-approach within 20 to 25 seconds. A different level of information about the location of other air traffic was presented to each of three groups of flight crews during their execution of eight simulated air carrier flights. A fourth group of pilots flew the same segments without TCAS 2 equipment. Traffic conflicts were generated at intervals during the flights; many of the conflict aircraft were visible to the flight crews. The TCAS equipment successfully ameliorated the seriousness of all conflicts; three of four non-TCAS crews had hazardous encounters. Response times to TCAS maneuver commands did not differ as a function of the amount of information provided, nor did response accuracy. Differences in flight experience did not appear to contribute to the small performance differences observed. Pilots used the displays of conflicting traffic to maneuver to avoid unseen traffic before maneuver advisories were issued by the TCAS equipment. The results indicate: (1) that pilots utilize TCAS effectively within the response times allocated by the TCAS logic, and (2) that TCAS 2 is an effective collision avoidance device. Volume 2 contains the appendices referenced in Volume 1, providing details of the experiment and the results, and the text of two reports written in support of the program.

  16. Wireless monitoring of highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Richard; Hayes-Gill, Barrie; Crowe, John A.; Armitage, Robert; Rodgers, Dale; Hendroff, Adrian

    1999-05-01

    Electronic hardware has been developed to telemetrically transmit temperature and strain measurements from within a public highway in the UK. These measurements provide an important health check for monitoring fatigue damage in pavements. Previous attempts at measuring strain and temperature have required lengths of cable to be installed in the highway. The installation of these cables is both expensive and damaging to the pavement and provides potentially unreliable electrical connections. The new systems consist of a retrofitted instrumented asphalt core which is bonded into the pavement structure. The core contains all the electronics necessary to record two temperatures and two strains. An analogue front end provides signal conditioning which is digitized and passed to microcontroller for endcoding. From there the data is transmitted via a low power radio link to a receiver and data logger positioned by the side of the road. The system has an in-situ operating life of 6 months on AA alkaline batteries. Results are presented of power management and fault tolerant radio protocol techniques, long term temperature variations, dynamic strain measurements within the highway, and RF transmission capabilities through a layer of asphalt.

  17. A superstatistical model of vehicular traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosun, Caglar; Ozdemir, Serhan

    2016-02-01

    In the analysis of vehicular traffic flow, a myriad of techniques have been implemented. In this study, superstatistics is used in modeling the traffic flow on a highway segment. Traffic variables such as vehicular speeds, volume, and headway were collected for three days. For the superstatistical approach, at least two distinct time scales must exist, so that a superposition of nonequilibrium systems assumption could hold. When the slow dynamics of the vehicle speeds exhibit a Gaussian distribution in between the fluctuations of the system at large, one speaks of a relaxation to a local equilibrium. These Gaussian distributions are found with corresponding standard deviations 1 /√{ β }. This translates into a series of fluctuating beta values, hence the statistics of statistics, superstatistics. The traffic flow model has generated an inverse temperature parameter (beta) distribution as well as the speed distribution. This beta distribution has shown that the fluctuations in beta are distributed with respect to a chi-square distribution. It must be mentioned that two distinct Tsallis q values are specified: one is time-dependent and the other is independent. A ramification of these q values is that the highway segment and the traffic flow generate separate characteristics. This highway segment in question is not only nonadditive in nature, but a nonequilibrium driven system, with frequent relaxations to a Gaussian.

  18. Stochastic Model of Traffic Jam and Traffic Signal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Ji-Sun; Cui, Cheng-You; Lee, Tae-Hong; Lee, Hee-Hyol

    Traffic signal control is an effective method to solve the traffic jam. and forecasting traffic density has been known as an important part of the Intelligent Transportation System (ITS). The several methods of the traffic signal control are known such as random walk method, Neuron Network method, Bayesian Network method, and so on. In this paper, we propose a new method of a traffic signal control using a predicted distribution of traffic jam based on a Dynamic Bayesian Network model. First, a forecasting model to predict a probabilistic distribution of the traffic jam during each period of traffic lights is built. As the forecasting model, the Dynamic Bayesian Network is used to predict the probabilistic distribution of a density of the traffic jam. According to measurement of two crossing points for each cycle, the inflow and outflow of each direction and the number of standing vehicles at former cycle are obtained. The number of standing vehicle at k-th cycle will be calculated synchronously. Next, the probabilistic distribution of the density of standing vehicle in each cycle will be predicted using the Dynamic Bayesian Network constructed for the traffic jam. And then a control rule to adjust the split and the cycle to increase the probability between a lower limit and ceiling of the standing vehicles is deduced. As the results of the simulation using the actual traffic data of Kitakyushu city, the effectiveness of the method is shown.

  19. Potential Impacts of Highway Median Barriers on Wildlife: State of the Practice and Gap Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevenger, Anthony P.; Kociolek, Angela V.

    2013-11-01

    Median barriers separate lanes of traffic moving in opposite directions on multilane highways. Such traffic safety devices can reduce head-on collisions but also have the potential to reduce landscape permeability by impeding wildlife movements across highways. Median barriers may also increase the risk of wildlife-vehicle collisions if an animal becomes trapped or confused amid barriers searching for a place to cross. A 2002 Transportation Research Board report highlighted the need to better understand the potential impacts of highway median barriers on wildlife. This lack of information can cause significant project delays and increase transportation project costs. This study represents the first attempt in North America to bring together information about highway median and roadside barriers and wildlife and provide preliminary guidelines to balance the needs of motorist safety and wildlife movements.

  20. Evaluation of a simulation-based surrogate safety metric.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chen; Stamatiadis, Nikiforos

    2014-10-01

    The development of surrogate safety measures is essential due to the problems of availability and quality of historical crash data. The Aggregate Conflict Propensity Metric (ACPM) is a surrogate metric recently proposed and it is based on conflict studies and traffic simulations. ACPM is expected to be capable of assessing the relative safety levels of traffic facilities and/or treatments in order to help traffic engineers to select appropriate treatments based on traffic safety estimates. This paper presents three experimental tests conducted to evaluate the reliability of ACPM. In each test, ACPM is compared to a traditional conflict indicator in terms of identifying and ranking safety of traffic conditions under various traffic volumes based on traffic simulations. ACPM shows its strength and reliability in all three tests, as it provides results highly consistent with the Highway Safety Manual. The experimental tests indicate that ACPM is a promising surrogate safety measure that can appropriately identify relative safety among traffic treatments and/or facilities and provide traffic engineers with useful information on potential safety impact. PMID:24892875

  1. Effect of chronic nonmalignant pain on highway driving performance.

    PubMed

    Veldhuijzen, D S; van Wijck, A J M; Wille, F; Verster, J C; Kenemans, J L; Kalkman, C J; Olivier, B; Volkerts, E R

    2006-05-01

    Most pain patients are treated in an outpatient setting and are engaged in daily activities including driving. Since several studies showed that cognitive functioning may be impaired in chronic nonmalignant pain, the question arises whether or not chronic nonmalignant pain affects driving performance. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to determine the effects of chronic nonmalignant pain on actual highway driving performance during normal traffic. Fourteen patients with chronic nonmalignant pain and 14 healthy controls, matched on age, educational level, and driving experience, participated in the study. Participants performed a standardized on-the-road driving test during normal traffic, on a primary highway. The primary parameter of the driving test is the Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP). In addition, driving-related skills (tracking, divided attention, and memory) were examined in the laboratory. Subjective assessments, such as pain intensity, and subjective driving quality, were rated on visual analogue scales. The results demonstrated that a subset of chronic nonmalignant pain patients had SDLPs that were higher than the matched healthy controls, indicating worse highway driving performance. Overall, there was a statistically significant difference in highway driving performance between the groups. Further, chronic nonmalignant pain patients rated their subjective driving quality to be normal, although their ratings were significantly lower than those of the healthy controls. No significant effects were found on the laboratory tests. PMID:16495013

  2. Avionic Pictorial Tunnel-/Pathway-/Highway-In-The-Sky Workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Russell V. (Compiler)

    2003-01-01

    In 1994-96, Langley Research Center held a series of interactive workshops investigating highway-in-the-sky concepts, which enable precise flight path control. These workshops brought together government and industry display designers and pilots to discuss and fly various concepts in an iterative manner. The primary emphasis of the first workshops was the utility and usability of pathways and the pros and cons of various features available. The final workshops were focused on the specific applications to the eXternal Visibility System (XVS) of the NASA High-speed Research Program, which was concerned with replacement of the forward windows in a High-speed Civil Transport with electronic displays and high resolution video cameras to enable a "No-Droop" configuration. The primary concerns in the XVS application were the prevention of display clutter and obscuration of hazards, as the camera image was the primary means of traffic separation in clear visibility conditions. These concerns were not so prominent in the first workshops, which assumed a Synthetic Vision System application in which hazard locations are known and obscuration is handled easily. The resulting consensus concept has been used since in simulation and flight test activities of many Government programs. and other concepts have been influenced by the workshop discussions.

  3. Highways of hope

    SciTech Connect

    2007-08-15

    It is hoped that through public-private partnerships between Alpha Natural Resources and Pioneer Group and Virginia Department of Transportation, and between one of these coal companies and Buchanan County, Virginia, Industrial Development Authority a four-lane 'highway of hope' between Lovers Gap and Poplar Gap will be paved and a ridge top connector route will eventually be completed to Bull Gap where it will intersect with the Coalfields Expressway and US 460. The town of Grundy is also looking into strip mining coal from beneath the small mountaintop airport at Lovers Gap and turning it into a regional airport. The article discusses these plans. 4 photos.

  4. Ground-based time-guidance algorithm for control of airplanes in a time-metered air traffic control environment: A piloted simulation study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, C. E.; Imbert, N.

    1986-01-01

    The rapidly increasing costs of flight operations and the requirement for increased fuel conservation have made it necessary to develop more efficient ways to operate airplanes and to control air traffic for arrivals and departures to the terminal area. One concept of controlling arrival traffic through time metering has been jointly studied and evaluated by NASA and ONERA/CERT in piloted simulation tests. From time errors attained at checkpoints, airspeed and heading commands issued by air traffic control were computed by a time-guidance algorithm for the pilot to follow that would cause the airplane to cross a metering fix at a preassigned time. These tests resulted in the simulated airplane crossing a metering fix with a mean time error of 1.0 sec and a standard deviation of 16.7 sec when the time-metering algorithm was used. With mismodeled winds representing the unknown in wind-aloft forecasts and modeling form, the mean time error attained when crossing the metering fix was increased and the standard deviation remained approximately the same. The subject pilots reported that the airspeed and heading commands computed in the guidance concept were easy to follow and did not increase their work load above normal levels.

  5. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with the TEB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2016-02-01

    Snowfall forecasts help winter maintenance of road networks, ensure better coordination between services, cost control, and a reduction in environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icers. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavements, forecasting the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Weather outstations are used along these networks to identify changes in pavement status, and to make forecasts by analyzing the data they provide. Physical numerical models provide such forecasts, and require an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with two approaches to evaluate traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the effect of traffic on RST increase with respect to non-circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with the forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  6. Accounting for anthropic energy flux of traffic in winter urban road surface temperature simulations with TEB model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, A.; Marchetti, M.; Bouilloud, L.; Martin, E.; Bues, M.; Chancibaut, K.

    2015-06-01

    A forecast of the snowfall helps winter coordination operating services, reducing the cost of the maintenance actions, and the environmental impacts caused by an inappropriate use of de-icing. In order to determine the possible accumulation of snow on pavement, the forecast of the road surface temperature (RST) is mandatory. Physical numerical models provide such forecast, and do need an accurate description of the infrastructure along with meteorological parameters. The objective of this study was to build a reliable urban RST forecast with a detailed integration of traffic in the Town Energy Balance (TEB) numerical model for winter maintenance. The study first consisted in generating a physical and consistent description of traffic in the model with all the energy interactions, with two approaches to evaluate the traffic incidence on RST. Experiments were then conducted to measure the traffic effect on RST increase with respect to non circulated areas. These field data were then used for comparison with forecast provided by this traffic-implemented TEB version.

  7. Complexity of spatiotemporal traffic phenomena in flow of identical drivers: Explanation based on fundamental hypothesis of three-phase theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2012-03-01

    Based on numerical simulations of a stochastic three-phase traffic flow model, we reveal the physics of the fundamental hypothesis of three-phase theory that, in contrast with a fundamental diagram of classical traffic flow theories, postulates the existence of a two-dimensional (2D) region of steady states of synchronized flow where a driver makes an arbitrary choice of a space gap (time headway) to the preceding vehicle. We find that macroscopic and microscopic spatiotemporal effects of the entire complexity of traffic congestion observed up to now in real measured traffic data can be explained by simulations of traffic flow consisting of identical drivers and vehicles, if a microscopic model used in these simulations incorporates the fundamental hypothesis of three-phase theory. It is shown that the driver's choice of space gaps within the 2D region of synchronized flow associated with the fundamental hypothesis of three-phase theory can qualitatively change types of congested patterns that can emerge at a highway bottleneck. In particular, if drivers choose long enough spaces gaps associated with the fundamental hypothesis, then general patterns, which consist of synchronized flow and wide moving jams, do not emerge independent of the flow rates and bottleneck characteristics: Even at a heavy bottleneck leading to a very low speed within congested patterns, only synchronized flow patterns occur in which no wide moving jams emerge spontaneously.

  8. Assessing Biological Effects from Highway-Runoff Constituents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buckler, Denny R.; Granato, Gregory E.

    1999-01-01

    the local ecosystem were reviewed to provide information on (1) the suitability of the existing data for a quantitative national synthesis, (2) the methods available to study the effects of highway runoff on local ecosystems, and (3) the potential for adverse effects on the roadside environment and receiving waters. Although many biological studies have been done, the use of different methods and a general lack of sufficient documentation precludes a quantitative national synthesis on the basis of the existing data. The Federal Highway Administration, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Intergovernmental Task Force on Monitoring Water Quality, and the National Resources Conservation Service all have developed and documented methods for assessing the effects of contaminants on ecosystems in receiving waters. These published methods can be used to formulate a set of protocols to provide consistent information from highway-runoff studies. Review of the literature indicates (qualitatively) that highway runoff (even from highways with high traffic volume) may not usually be acutely toxic. Tissue analysis and community assessments, however, indicate effects from highway- runoff sediments near discharge points (even from sites near highways with relatively low traffic volumes). At many sites, elevated concentrations of highway-runoff constituents were measured in tissues of species associated with aquatic sediments. Community assessments also indicate decreases in the diversity and productivity of aquatic ecosystems at some sites receiving highway runoff. These results are not definitive, however, and depend on many site-specific criteria that were not sufficiently documented in most of the studies reviewed.

  9. Delivery performance of conventional aircraft by terminal-area, time-based air traffic control: A real-time simulation evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Credeur, Leonard; Houck, Jacob A.; Capron, William R.; Lohr, Gary W.

    1990-01-01

    A description and results are presented of a study to measure the performance and reaction of airline flight crews, in a full workload DC-9 cockpit, flying in a real-time simulation of an air traffic control (ATC) concept called Traffic Intelligence for the Management of Efficient Runway-scheduling (TIMER). Experimental objectives were to verify earlier fast-time TIMER time-delivery precision results and obtain data for the validation or refinement of existing computer models of pilot/airborne performance. Experimental data indicated a runway threshold, interarrival-time-error standard deviation in the range of 10.4 to 14.1 seconds. Other real-time system performance parameters measured include approach speeds, response time to controller turn instructions, bank angles employed, and ATC controller message delivery-time errors.

  10. High-resolution simulation of link-level vehicle emissions and concentrations for air pollutants in a traffic-populated eastern Asian city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shaojun; Wu, Ye; Huang, Ruikun; Wang, Jiandong; Yan, Han; Zheng, Yali; Hao, Jiming

    2016-08-01

    Vehicle emissions containing air pollutants created substantial environmental impacts on air quality for many traffic-populated cities in eastern Asia. A high-resolution emission inventory is a useful tool compared with traditional tools (e.g. registration data-based approach) to accurately evaluate real-world traffic dynamics and their environmental burden. In this study, Macau, one of the most populated cities in the world, is selected to demonstrate a high-resolution simulation of vehicular emissions and their contribution to air pollutant concentrations by coupling multimodels. First, traffic volumes by vehicle category on 47 typical roads were investigated during weekdays in 2010 and further applied in a networking demand simulation with the TransCAD model to establish hourly profiles of link-level vehicle counts. Local vehicle driving speed and vehicle age distribution data were also collected in Macau. Second, based on a localized vehicle emission model (e.g. the emission factor model for the Beijing vehicle fleet - Macau, EMBEV-Macau), this study established a link-based vehicle emission inventory in Macau with high resolution meshed in a temporal and spatial framework. Furthermore, we employed the AERMOD (AMS/EPA Regulatory Model) model to map concentrations of CO and primary PM2.5 contributed by local vehicle emissions during weekdays in November 2010. This study has discerned the strong impact of traffic flow dynamics on the temporal and spatial patterns of vehicle emissions, such as a geographic discrepancy of spatial allocation up to 26 % between THC and PM2.5 emissions owing to spatially heterogeneous vehicle-use intensity between motorcycles and diesel fleets. We also identified that the estimated CO2 emissions from gasoline vehicles agreed well with the statistical fuel consumption in Macau. Therefore, this paper provides a case study and a solid framework for developing high-resolution environment assessment tools for other vehicle-populated cities

  11. Roadmap to quieter highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbisier, Christopher

    2005-09-01

    Research in Europe, as documented by an FHWA/AASHTO European Scan Tour held in May 2004, and recent activity in Arizona and California, has fostered much interest in ``quiet pavements.'' On September 14-16, 2004, an FHWA sponsored Roadmap to Quieter Highways workshop was held at Purdue University. Participants were from the disciplines of pavement, safety, and noise from FHWA, State departments of transportation, industry (paving associations, general contractors, tire, and vehicle manufacturers), and academia. After several breakout sessions in the areas of policy, construction, maintenance, analysis (measurement and prediction), research, and design, the group had identified the knowledge gaps and developed a plan to fill those gaps. Several activities have been implemented based on the Roadmap to Quieter Highways. An Expert Task Group was formed to provide a draft provisional standard for the measurement methodologies, e.g., source, wayside, pavement absorption. A Tire/Pavement 101 workshop is being developed to educate pavement practitioners in noise concepts and noise practitioners in pavement concepts. A Tire/Pavement Noise clearinghouse is being developed as a one-stop location for all current tire/pavement noise or quiet pavement activities. Several research studies have been started and a second workshop will be held in 2006 to assess progress of the Roadmap.

  12. Temporary Losses of Highway Capacity and Impacts on Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, S.M.

    2002-07-31

    Traffic congestion and its impacts significantly affect the nation's economic performance and the public's quality of life. In most urban areas, travel demand routinely exceeds highway capacity during peak periods. In addition, events such as crashes, vehicle breakdowns, work zones, adverse weather, and suboptimal signal timing cause temporary capacity losses, often worsening the conditions on already congested highway networks. The impacts of these temporary capacity losses include delay, reduced mobility, and reduced reliability of the highway system. They can also cause drivers to re-route or reschedule trips. Prior to this study, no nationwide estimates of temporary losses of highway capacity had been made by type of capacity-reducing event. Such information is vital to formulating sound public policies for the highway infrastructure and its operation. This study is an initial attempt to provide nationwide estimates of the capacity losses and delay caused by temporary capacity-reducing events. The objective of this study was to develop and implement methods for producing national-level estimates of the loss of capacity on the nation's highway facilities due to temporary phenomena as well as estimates of the impacts of such losses. The estimates produced by this study roughly indicate the magnitude of problems that are likely be addressed by the Congress during the next re-authorization of the Surface Transportation Programs. The scope of the study includes all urban and rural freeways and principal arterials in the nation's highway system for 1999. Specifically, this study attempts to quantify the extent of temporary capacity losses due to crashes, breakdowns, work zones, weather, and sub-optimal signal timing. These events can cause impacts such as capacity reduction, delays, trip rescheduling, rerouting, reduced mobility, and reduced reliability. This study focuses on the reduction of capacity and resulting delays caused by the temporary events mentioned

  13. Road traffic injuries in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Deysi Yasmin; Fernández, Francisco José; Acero Velásquez, Hugo

    2003-01-01

    Road traffic injuries are a leading public health problem in Colombia. Pedestrians are the most vulnerable road users, especially in the main urban centers of Bogotá, Medellin and Cali. Data analyzed in this report include official statistics from the National Police and the National Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences for 1996-2000, and results of a study conducted at the National University of Colombia in 2000. Methods from the Highway Capacity Manual were used for determining physical and technical variables, and a Geographical Information System tool was used for the location and spatial analysis of the road traffic crashes. Pedestrians accounted for close to 32% of injuries and 40% of the deaths from road traffic crashes. The problem of road traffic crashes existed predominately in urban areas. In the main urban centers, pedestrians constituted nearly 68% of road traffic crash victims. The high level of risky road use behaviors demonstrated by pedestrians and drivers, and inadequate infrastructure for safe mobility of pedestrians in some sections of the road network were the main contributing factors. Major improvements were achieved in Bogotá following enhancements to the municipal transport system and other policies introduced since 1995. In conclusion, policies and programs for improving road safety, in particular pedestrian safety, and strengthening urban planning are top priority. PMID:12772483

  14. Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance system

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    Traffic management can be thought of as a stochastic queuing process where the serving time at one of its control points is dynamically linked to the global traffic pattern, which is, in turn, dynamically linked to the control point. For this closed-loop system to be effective, the traffic management system must sense and interpret a large spatial projection of data originating from multiple sensor suites. This concept is the basis for the development of a Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) system. This paper presents the results of a study by Oak Ridge National Laboratory to define the operational specifications and characteristics, to determine the constraints, and to examine the state of technology of a TFWAS system in terms of traffic management and control. In doing so, the functions and attributes of a TFWAS system are mapped into an operational structure consistent with the Intelligent Vehicle Highway System (IVHS) concept and the existing highway infrastructure. This mapping includes identifying candidate sensor suites and establishing criteria, requirements, and performance measures by which these systems can be graded in their ability and practicality to meet the operational requirements of a TFWAS system. In light of this, issues such as system integration, applicable technologies, impact on traffic management and control, and public acceptance are addressed.

  15. Long-path measurements of pollutants and micrometeorology over Highway 401 in Toronto

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staebler, R. M.; You, Y.; Mittermeier, R. L.; Moussa, S.; Liggio, J.; Su, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Highway traffic emissions are an important source of air pollution, especially in urban areas. Traffic-related pollution has been linked to a number of adverse health effects, such as respiratory problems, cancer, heart failure, and a general increase in mortality. Determining the pollutants involved and quantifying their emission rates is paramount in developing high resolution air quality models to predict future developments with some confidence. Highway 401, as it passes through Toronto, is the world's busiest highway with a typical traffic volume of over 450,000 vehicles per day. In July 2015, three weeks of measurements were conducted over the 401 with an open-path FTIR (Fourier Transform infra-red) spectrometer in parallel with a scintillometer, integrating a variety of gas concentrations as well as turbulence parameters over a 310m path length. Relationships between traffic volume, micrometeorological conditions and the build-up and venting of pollutants on the highway are analyzed and quantified, demonstrating the role of stratification and turbulence in the accumulation and dispersal of traffic emissions. The feasibility of deriving emission rates by combining the micrometeorological data from the scintillometer with the gas concentrations from the FTIR using an inverse dispersion approach is investigated. The suitability of this novel approach for long-term monitoring of emissions is discussed. The findings will be compared with output from a high-resolution air quality model (GEM-MACH) to aid future improvements in the sub-grid parameterization of pollutant dispersion.

  16. Characterization and prediction of highway runoff constituent event mean concentration.

    PubMed

    Kayhanian, M; Suverkropp, C; Ruby, A; Tsay, K

    2007-10-01

    constituent EMCs. Parameters found to have significant impacts on highway runoff constituent EMCs include: total event rainfall (TER); cumulative seasonal rainfall (CSR); antecedent dry period (ADP); contributing drainage area (DA); and annual average daily traffic (AADT). Surrounding land use and geographic regions were also determined to have a significant impact on runoff quality. The MLR model was also used to predict constituent EMCs. Model performance determined by comparing predicted and measured values showed good agreement for most constituents. PMID:17161904

  17. Response of benthic macroinvertebrate communities to highway construction in an Appalachian watershed

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedrick, Lara B.; Welsh, S.A.; Anderson, James T.; Lin, L.-S.; Chen, Y.; Wei, X.

    2010-01-01

    Highway construction in mountainous areas can result in sedimentation of streams, negatively impacting stream habitat, water quality, and biotic communities. We assessed the impacts of construction of a segment of Corridor H, a four-lane highway, in the Lost River watershed, West Virginia, by monitoring benthic macroinvertebrate communities and water quality, before, during, and after highway construction and prior to highway use at upstream and downstream sites from 1997 through 2007. Data analysis of temporal impacts of highway construction followed a Before-After-Control-Impact (BACI) study design. Highway construction impacts included an increase in stream sedimentation during the construction phase. This was indicated by an increase in turbidity and total suspended solids. Benthic macroinvertebrate metrics indicated a community more tolerant during and after construction than in the period before construction. The percent of Chironomidae and the Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI) increased, while percent of Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, and Trichoptera (EPT) decreased. Our 10-year study addressed short-term impacts of highway construction and found that impacts were relatively minimal. A recovery of the number of EPT taxa collected after construction indicated that the benthic macroinvertebrate community may be recovering from impacts of highway construction. However, this study only addressed a period of 3 years before, 3 years during, and 4 years post construction. Inferences cannot be made concerning the long-term impacts of the highway, highway traffic, runoff, and other factors associated with highway use. Continual monitoring of the watershed is necessary to determine if the highway has a continual impact on stream habitat, water quality, and biotic integrity. ?? 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. The Classroom Traffic Jam

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Arthur W.

    1977-01-01

    The importance of energy conservation is developed in this simulation. Children draw an automobile and then are asked to drive it through the classroom roadways. When a traffic jam results, students offer ways to eliminate it. The importance of mass transportation and car pools is stressed by the teacher. (MA)

  19. Surface Traffic Management Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jung, Yoo Chul

    2012-01-01

    This presentation discusses an overview of the surface traffic management research conducted by NASA Ames. The concept and human-in-the-loop simulation of the Spot and Runway Departure Advisor (SARDA), an integrated decision support tool for the tower controllers and airline ramp operators, is also discussed.

  20. 78 FR 9771 - Federal Highway Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-11

    ... Federal Highway Administration Notice of Final Federal Agency Action on Proposed Transportation Project in Illinois and Indiana AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of limitation on..., Federal Highway Administration, 3250 Executive Park Drive, Springfield, Illinois 62703, Phone: (217)...

  1. 75 FR 19670 - Marine Highway Projects

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime Administration Marine Highway Projects ACTION: Solicitation of applications for Marine highway projects. SUMMARY: The Department of Transportation is soliciting applications for Marine Highway...

  2. UAS in the NAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-1: The Effects of Horizontal Miss Distances on Simulated UAS and Manned Aircraft Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghatas, Rania W.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined air traffic controller acceptability ratings based on the effects of differing horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft. In a simulation of the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) East-side airspace, the CAS-1 experiment at NASA Langley Research Center enlisted fourteen recently retired DFW air traffic controllers to rate well-clear volumes based on differing HMDs that ranged from 0.5 NM to 3.0 NM. The controllers were tasked with rating these HMDs from "too small" to "too excessive" on a defined, 1-5, scale and whether these distances caused any disruptions to the controller and/or to the surrounding traffic flow. Results of the study indicated a clear favoring towards a particular HMD range. Controller workload was also measured. Data from this experiment and subsequent experiments will play a crucial role in the FAA's establishment of rules, regulations, and procedures to safely and efficiently integrate UAS into the NAS.

  3. Quality of stormwater runoff discharged from Massachusetts highways, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with U.S. Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration and the Massachusetts Department of Transportation, conducted a field study from September 2005 through September 2007 to characterize the quality of highway runoff for a wide range of constituents. The highways studied had annual average daily traffic (AADT) volumes from about 3,000 to more than 190,000 vehicles per day. Highway-monitoring stations were installed at 12 locations in Massachusetts on 8 highways. The 12 monitoring stations were subdivided into 4 primary, 4 secondary, and 4 test stations. Each site contained a 100-percent impervious drainage area that included two or more catch basins sharing a common outflow pipe. Paired primary and secondary stations were located within a few miles of each other on a limited-access section of the same highway. Most of the data were collected at the primary and secondary stations, which were located on four principal highways (Route 119, Route 2, Interstate 495, and Interstate 95). The secondary stations were operated simultaneously with the primary stations for at least a year. Data from the four test stations (Route 8, Interstate 195, Interstate 190, and Interstate 93) were used to determine the transferability of the data collected from the principal highways to other highways characterized by different construction techniques, land use, and geography. Automatic-monitoring techniques were used to collect composite samples of highway runoff and make continuous measurements of several physical characteristics. Flowweighted samples of highway runoff were collected automatically during approximately 140 rain and mixed rain, sleet, and snowstorms. These samples were analyzed for physical characteristics and concentrations of 6 dissolved major ions, total nutrients, 8 total-recoverable metals, suspended sediment, and 85 semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), which include priority polyaromatic

  4. Highway Traffic Accident Investigation and Reporting: Student Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daugherty, Ronald D.; And Others

    This study guide for students in a basic training program for accident investigation is intended for use with lesson plans for the instructor and a manual for administrators and planners, available as VT 019 457 and VT 019 455, respectively. As part of a curriculum package developed by the Center for Vocational and Technical Education after a…

  5. Algorithm and data support of traffic congestion forecasting in the controlled transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, S. V.

    2015-06-01

    The topicality of problem of the traffic congestion forecasting in the logistic systems of product movement highways is considered. The concepts: the controlled territory, the highway occupancy by vehicles, the parking and the controlled territory are introduced. Technical realizabilityof organizing the necessary flow of information on the state of the transport system for its regulation has been marked. Sequence of practical implementation of the solution is given. An algorithm for predicting traffic congestion in the controlled transport system is suggested.

  6. Clustering and maximal flow in vehicular traffic through a sequence of traffic lights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2007-04-01

    We study the maximal current (maximum traffic capacity) of vehicular traffic through a sequence of traffic lights on a highway, where all signals turn on and off synchronously. The dynamical model of vehicular traffic controlled by signals is expressed in terms of a nonlinear map, where the excluded-volume effect is taken into account. The dynamical behaviors of vehicles are clarified by analyzing traffic patterns. The clustering of vehicles varies with the cycle time of signals. The maximum current is closely connected to vehicular clustering. Clustering of vehicles is controlled by varying both split and cycle time of signals. The dependence of the maximal current on both split and cycle time is derived.

  7. Simulation of Water-Surface Elevations and Velocity Distributions at the U.S. Highway 13 Bridge over the Tar River at Greenville, North Carolina, Using One- and Two-Dimensional Steady-State Hydraulic Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Chad R.

    2007-01-01

    The use of one-dimensional hydraulic models currently is the standard method for estimating velocity fields through a bridge opening for scour computations and habitat assessment. Flood-flow contraction through bridge openings, however, is hydrodynamically two dimensional and often three dimensional. Although there is awareness of the utility of two-dimensional models to predict the complex hydraulic conditions at bridge structures, little guidance is available to indicate whether a one- or two-dimensional model will accurately estimate the hydraulic conditions at a bridge site. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Carolina Department of Transportation, initiated a study in 2004 to compare one- and two-dimensional model results with field measurements at complex riverine and tidal bridges in North Carolina to evaluate the ability of each model to represent field conditions. The field data consisted of discharge and depth-averaged velocity profiles measured with an acoustic Doppler current profiler and surveyed water-surface profiles for two high-flow conditions. For the initial study site (U.S. Highway 13 over the Tar River at Greenville, North Carolina), the water-surface elevations and velocity distributions simulated by the one- and two-dimensional models showed appreciable disparity in the highly sinuous reach upstream from the U.S. Highway 13 bridge. Based on the available data from U.S. Geological Survey streamgaging stations and acoustic Doppler current profiler velocity data, the two-dimensional model more accurately simulated the water-surface elevations and the velocity distributions in the study reach, and contracted-flow magnitudes and direction through the bridge opening. To further compare the results of the one- and two-dimensional models, estimated hydraulic parameters (flow depths, velocities, attack angles, blocked flow width) for measured high-flow conditions were used to predict scour depths at the U.S. Highway 13 bridge by

  8. Logical and physical simulation of heavy vehicle automation: a case study of the Lincoln Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audenaerd, Laurence

    1998-01-01

    Rising with the expansion of today's transportation systems are needs for new techniques to handle the increasing demand load. This includes the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to incorporate modern technology into creating flexible transportation systems which react more efficiently to traffic problems. A particular focus is the creation of an Automated Highway System (AHS) to combine advanced sensing and communication technologies to create highly efficient computer-controlled traffic flow. At present, many complex dimensions of automated highway development remain difficult to mange. To develop an evolutionary step toward an automated highway, increasing traffic flow in a highly controlled environment is essential. The Lincoln Tunnel, a Hudson River crossing between New York City and New Jersey, represents a major artery to thousands of commuters living in New Jersey. The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, the governing authority of the Lincoln Tunnel, has dedicated certain priority lanes for bus traffic to streamline traffic flow and create a reward process for mass transit commuters. It is possible to increase flow efficiency using existing technology to control vehicle motion through this corridor. This paper provides a description of physical simulation testing the feasibility of automating lanes for bus flow on this roadway.

  9. Intelligent Highway System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Under contract to the Texas Department of Transportation, AlliedSignal Technical Services developed the Transportation Guidance System (TransGuide) used in San Antonio, Texas. The system monitors the passage of traffic over the sensors embedded in the roadways and detects incidents. Control center operators are alerted to the occurrence of an accident and the area of the occurrence is highlighted on a map display. TransGuide incorporates technology AlliedSignal developed under various contracts to NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, including the design of ground control centers.

  10. Congestion on Multilane Highways

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.M.; Klar, A.; Rascle, M.

    2002-07-01

    We present a new model for traffic on a multilane freeway (with n lanes). Our basic descriptors are the car density {rho} (in cars/mile) taken across all lanes in the freeway and the average car velocity u (in miles/hour). In this paper we present a model which incorporates both equilibrium curves and a simple switching mechanism which allows cars to transit from one equilibrium curve to the other. This switching mechanism, when combined with the continuity equation, produces relaxation or self-excited oscillations in the system and these oscillations are what interests us here.

  11. Determining the drivers' acceptance of EFTCD in highway work zones.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yong; Li, Yingfeng

    2011-05-01

    Traffic safety is a major concern in the temporary one-lane, two-way highway work zones due to the increasing of construction and maintenance operations. To prevent rear-end crashes and to mitigate the severity of these crashes caused by the inattentive driving, the utilization of the Emergency Flasher Traffic Control Device (EFTCD) was under consideration by government agencies, in addition to existing temporary traffic control devices installed in the one-lane, two-way highway work zones. The EFTCD was a newly proposed traffic warning device implemented through the use of vehicles' hazard warning flashers. The primary objective of the research project was to investigate the drivers' acceptance of the proposed EFTCD by measuring the mean speed changes of vehicles with and without EFTCD and by evaluating the drivers' opinions of the EFTCD using the survey method. Field experimental results revealed that the EFTCD effectively reduced the mean vehicle speeds in the upstream of two work zones. A slow speed is more likely to reduce the severity of a crash in work zones. In addition, survey results indicated that 60% of the drivers thought the EFTCD signified a need for speed reduction and 82% of drivers recommended the implementation of the EFTCD in one-lane, two-way work zones. These results provide the necessary scientific justifications for the government agencies to decide if the EFTCD should be implemented in the one-lane, two-way highway work zones to prevent rear-end crashes and to mitigate the severity of these crashes. PMID:21376864

  12. State Traffic Data: Traffic Safety Facts, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Statistics and Analysis (NHTSA), Washington, DC.

    This brief provides statistical information on U.S. traffic accidents delineated by state. A map details the 2001 traffic fatalities by state and the percent change from 2000. Data tables include: (1) traffic fatalities and fatality rates, 2001; (2) traffic fatalities and percent change, 1975-2001; (3) alcohol involvement in fatal traffic crashes,…

  13. Modeling spatial variations of black carbon particles in an urban highway-buildings environment

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zheming; Wang, Yan; Patel, Molini; Kinney, Patrick; Chrillrud, Steven; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    Highway-building environments are prevalent in metropolitan areas. This paper presents our findings in investigating pollutant transport in a highway-building environment by combing field measurement and numerical simulations. We employ and improve the Comprehensive Turbulent Aerosol Dynamics and Gas Chemistry (CTAG) model to simulate the spatial variations of black carbon (BC) concentrations near highway I-87 and an urban school in the South Bronx, New York. The results of CTAG simulations are evaluated against and agree adequately with the measurements of wind speed, wind directions and BC concentrations. Our analysis suggests that the BC concentration at the measurement point of the urban school could decrease by 43–54% if roadside buildings were absent. Furthermore, we characterize two generalized conditions in a highway-building environment, i.e., highway-building canyon and highway viaduct-building. The former refers to the canyon between solid highway embankment and roadside buildings, where the spatial profiles of BC depend on the equivalent canyon aspect ratio and flow recirculation. The latter refers to the area between a highway viaduct (i.e., elevated highway with open space underneath) and roadside buildings, where strong flow recirculation is absent and the spatial profiles of BC are determined by the relative heights of the highway and buildings. The two configurations may occur at different locations or in the same location with different wind directions when highway geometry is complex. Our study demonstrates the importance of incorporating highway-building interaction into the assessment of human exposure to near-road air pollution. It also calls for active roles of building and highway designs in mitigating near-road exposure of urban population. PMID:22084971

  14. Analytical Solution of Traffic Cellular Automata Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Shih-Ching; Hsu, Chia-Hung

    2009-08-01

    Complex traffic system seems to be simulated successfully by cellular automaton (CA) models. Various models are developed to understand single-lane traffic, multilane traffic, lane-changing behavior and network traffic situations. However, the result of CA simulation can only be obtained after massive microscopic computation. Although, the mean field theory (MFT) has been studied to be the approximation of CA model, the MFT can only applied to the simple CA rules or small value of parameters. In this study, we simulate traffic flow by the NaSch model under different combination of parameters, which are maximal speed, dawdling probability and density. After that, the position of critical density, the slope of free-flow and congested regime are observed and modeled due to the simulated data. Finally, the coefficients of the model will be calibrated by the simulated data and the analytical solution of traffic CA is obtained.

  15. Highway accident severities and the mixed logit model: an exploratory empirical analysis.

    PubMed

    Milton, John C; Shankar, Venky N; Mannering, Fred L

    2008-01-01

    Many transportation agencies use accident frequencies, and statistical models of accidents frequencies, as a basis for prioritizing highway safety improvements. However, the use of accident severities in safety programming has been often been limited to the locational assessment of accident fatalities, with little or no emphasis being placed on the full severity distribution of accidents (property damage only, possible injury, injury)-which is needed to fully assess the benefits of competing safety-improvement projects. In this paper we demonstrate a modeling approach that can be used to better understand the injury-severity distributions of accidents on highway segments, and the effect that traffic, highway and weather characteristics have on these distributions. The approach we use allows for the possibility that estimated model parameters can vary randomly across roadway segments to account for unobserved effects potentially relating to roadway characteristics, environmental factors, and driver behavior. Using highway-injury data from Washington State, a mixed (random parameters) logit model is estimated. Estimation findings indicate that volume-related variables such as average daily traffic per lane, average daily truck traffic, truck percentage, interchanges per mile and weather effects such as snowfall are best modeled as random-parameters-while roadway characteristics such as the number of horizontal curves, number of grade breaks per mile and pavement friction are best modeled as fixed parameters. Our results show that the mixed logit model has considerable promise as a methodological tool in highway safety programming. PMID:18215557

  16. Rehabilitating asphalt highways

    SciTech Connect

    Butalia, T.S.

    2007-07-01

    Coal fly ash has been used on two Ohio full-depth reclamation projects in Delaware and Warren. The object of the project carried out with the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Geodetic Science at Ohio State University is to demonstrate the effective use of Class fly ash in combination with lime or lime kiln dust in the full depth reclamation of asphalt pavements. The article describes the mixes used for the highway reconstruction of part of Section Line Road Delaware County and of a road in Warren County. During construction the pavement sections were instrumented with several structural and environmental monitoring devices and data is being collected on a quarterly basis. Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) tests to measure load defection behaviour, resilient of pavement layers and soil and base structural layer coefficient are being carried out twice a year. It was shown that use of fly ash increased the elastic modulus of base layers. This article first appeared in the Feb/May 2007 issue of Asphalt Contractor. 4 photos.

  17. 25 CFR 170.141 - What Federal funds are available for a tribe's highway safety activities?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); (g) Indian Highway Safety Program 25 CFR... program funds under 23 U.S.C. 405; (d) Alcohol traffic safety program funds under 23 U.S.C. 408;...

  18. CARBON MONOXIDE EXPOSURES INSIDE AN AUTOMOBILE TRAVELING ON AN URBAN ARTERIAL HIGHWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon monoxide (CO) exposures were measured inside a motor vehicle during 88 standardized drives on a major urban arterial highway, El Camino Real (traffic volume of 30,500-45,000 vehicles per day), over a 13-1/2 month period. n each trip (lasting between 31 and 61 minutes), the...

  19. Longitudinal occupancy of controlled access right-of-way by utilities. A synthesis of highway practice

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    This synthesis will be of interest to transportation agency administrators, design engineers, maintenance engineers and maintenance staff, traffic engineers, and safety officials. It will also provide useful information to the utilities and telecommunications industries. Information is presented on the state transportation agencies` policies, practices, and experience associated with occupancy of the rights-of-way on controlled- (or Limited-) access highways.

  20. Methodology and Significance of Studies of Atmospheric Deposition in Highway Runoff

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, John A.; Rice, Karen C.; Willoughby, Timothy C.

    2001-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition and the processes that are involved in causing and altering atmospheric deposition in relation to highway surfaces and runoff were evaluated nationwide. Wet deposition is more easily monitored than dry deposition, and data on wet deposition are available for major elements and water properties (constituents affecting acid deposition) from the inter-agency National Atmospheric Deposition Program/ National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). Many trace constituents (metals and organic compounds) of interest in highway runoff loads, however, are not included in the NADP/NTN. Dry deposition, which constitutes a large part of total atmospheric deposition for many constituents in highway runoff loads, is difficult to monitor accurately. Dry-deposition rates are not widely available. Many of the highway-runoff investigations that have addressed atmospheric-deposition sources have had flawed investigative designs or problems with methodology. Some results may be incorrect because of reliance on time-aggregated data collected during a period of changing atmospheric emissions. None of the investigations used methods that could accurately quantify the part of highway runoff load that can be attributed to ambient atmospheric deposition. Lack of information about accurate ambient deposition rates and runoff loads was part of the problem. Samples collected to compute the rates and loads were collected without clean-sampling methods or sampler protocols, and without quality-assurance procedures that could validate the data. Massbudget calculations comparing deposition and runoff did not consider loss of deposited material during on-highway processing. Loss of deposited particles from highway travel lanes could be large, as has been determined in labeled particle studies, because of resuspension caused by turbulence from passing traffic. Although a cause of resuspension of large particles, traffic turbulence may increase the rate of deposition for small particles and

  1. Education for Highway Engineering and Highway Transport. Bulletin, 1920, No. 42

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Education, Department of the Interior, 1921

    1921-01-01

    On May 14-15, in Washington, a Conference on Education for Highway Engineering and Highway Transport was held. This was attended by about 75 highway engineers, deans and supervisors of engineering in colleges, universities, and technical schools, National, State, and County highway commissioners, and men interested in highway and automotive…

  2. a Study of City Traffic in Afternoon Rush Hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ávalos, Edgar; Huang, D. W.; Huang, W. N.

    2013-06-01

    The traffic of vehicles from downtown to suburban areas is investigated numerically. We propose a cellular automaton to simulate the traffic of vehicles within a city regulated by traffic lights. Both traffic flow and travel time are presented and we discuss some strategies to optimize these quantities.

  3. Spreading of Traffic Jam in a Traffic Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1993-04-01

    A cellular automaton (CA) model is presented to simulate the traffic jam induced by a traffic accident. The spreading of jamming cars induced by a car crash is investigated by computer simulation. An analogy is proposed between the crystal growth and the traffic-jam spreading. The scaling behavior of the traffic-jam spreading is studied. It is shown that the number N of jamming cars scales as N≈t2.34± 0.03 for p above the dynamical jamming transition pc{=}0.35 and N≈t1.07 below pc where t is the time and p is the density of cars. The time constant ts, which is the time required for all cars to stop, scales as ts≈p-1.07± 0.03 for p

  4. Design of highway landslide warning and emergency response systems based on UAV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yujie; Yi, Shen; Li, Zongyu; Shao, Shegang; Qin, Xiaochun

    2010-09-01

    Landslide is one of the serious geological disasters that bring serious impact on transportation construction and highway traffics. It is critical to improve the level of warning and emergency response to the highway landslide. Based on the application of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV), the highway landslide warning and emergency response system is developed in this paper. The system consists of two main components, including landslide warning sub-system and the UAV emergency response sub-system. The establishment of this system will contribute to: 1) improving the warning and monitoring of highway landslide; 2) quickly understanding the situation of landslide disaster, and therefore helping the policy-makers with emergency rescue, disaster assessment, and reconstruction; and 3) using it as a research platform for large-scale landslides, debris flow monitoring and warning, and other emergency relief work.

  5. Long-range correlation analysis of urban traffic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Peng; Wang, Jun-Feng; Tang, Tie-Qiao; Zhao, Shu-Long

    2010-08-01

    This paper investigates urban traffic data by analysing the long-range correlation with detrended fluctuation analysis. Through a large number of real data collected by the travel time detection system in Beijing, the variation of flow in different time periods and intersections is studied. According to the long-range correlation in different time scales, it mainly discusses the effect of intersection location in road net, people activity customs and special traffic controls on urban traffic flow. As demonstrated by the obtained results, the urban traffic flow represents three-phase characters similar to highway traffic. Moreover, compared by the two groups of data obtained before and after the special traffic restrictions (vehicles with special numbered plates only run in a special workday) enforcement, it indicates that the rules not only reduce the flow but also avoid irregular fluctuation.

  6. Crash Injury Management: Emergency Medical Services for Traffic Law Enforcement Officers. Student Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    To assist in the continuing efforts to improve the safety of the motorist on the nation's highways and roads, this student guide provides a standardized approach for first responders to traffic accidents to learn emergency medical care. Training is provided in all aspects of emergency medical care required at the scene of a traffic accident.…

  7. Traffic Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Intelligent Vision Systems, Inc. (InVision) needed image acquisition technology that was reliable in bad weather for its TDS-200 Traffic Detection System. InVision researchers used information from NASA Tech Briefs and assistance from Johnson Space Center to finish the system. The NASA technology used was developed for Earth-observing imaging satellites: charge coupled devices, in which silicon chips convert light directly into electronic or digital images. The TDS-200 consists of sensors mounted above traffic on poles or span wires, enabling two sensors to view an intersection; a "swing and sway" feature to compensate for movement of the sensors; a combination of electronic shutter and gain control; and sensor output to an image digital signal processor, still frame video and optionally live video.

  8. Artificial ultra-fine aerosol tracers for highway transect studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Thomas A.; Barnes, David E.; Wuest, Leann; Gribble, David; Buscho, David; Miller, Roger S.; De la Croix, Camille

    2016-07-01

    The persistent evidence of health impacts of roadway aerosols requires extensive information for urban planning to avoid putting populations at risk, especially in-fill projects. The required information must cover both highway aerosol sources as well as transport into residential areas under a variety of roadway configurations, traffic conditions, downwind vegetation, and meteorology. Such studies are difficult and expensive to do, but were easier in the past when there was a robust fine aerosol tracer uniquely tied to traffic - lead. In this report we propose and test a modern alternative, highway safety flare aerosols. Roadway safety flares on vehicles in traffic can provide very fine and ultra-fine aerosols of unique composition that can be detected quantitatively far downwind of roadways due to a lack of upwind interferences. The collection method uses inexpensive portable aerosol collection hardware and x-ray analysis protocols. The time required for each transect is typically 1 h. Side by side tests showed precision at ± 4%. We have evaluated this technique both by aerosol removal in vegetation in a wind tunnel and by tracking aerosols downwind of freeways as a function of season, highway configuration and vegetation coverage. The results show that sound walls for at-grade freeways cause freeway pollution to extend much farther downwind than standard models predict. The elevated or fill section freeway on a berm projected essentially undiluted roadway aerosols at distances well beyond 325 m, deep into residential neighborhoods. Canopy vegetation with roughly 70% cover reduced very fine and ultra-fine aerosols by up to a factor of 2 at distances up to 200 m downwind.

  9. The Stability of Multi-modal Traffic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Ling-Hui; Sun, Hui-Jun; Zhu, Cheng-Juan; Wu, Jian-Jun; Jia, Bin

    2013-07-01

    There is an explicit and implicit assumption in multimodal traffic equilibrium models, that is, if the equilibrium exists, then it will also occur. The assumption is very idealized; in fact, it may be shown that the quite contrary could happen, because in multimodal traffic network, especially in mixed traffic conditions the interaction among traffic modes is asymmetric and the asymmetric interaction may result in the instability of traffic system. In this paper, to study the stability of multimodal traffic system, we respectively present the travel cost function in mixed traffic conditions and in traffic network with dedicated bus lanes. Based on a day-to-day dynamical model, we study the evolution of daily route choice of travelers in multimodal traffic network using 10000 random initial values for different cases. From the results of simulation, it can be concluded that the asymmetric interaction between the cars and buses in mixed traffic conditions can lead the traffic system to instability when traffic demand is larger. We also study the effect of travelers' perception error on the stability of multimodal traffic network. Although the larger perception error can alleviate the effect of interaction between cars and buses and improve the stability of traffic system in mixed traffic conditions, the traffic system also become instable when the traffic demand is larger than a number. For all cases simulated in this study, with the same parameters, traffic system with dedicated bus lane has better stability for traffic demand than that in mixed traffic conditions. We also find that the network with dedicated bus lane has higher portion of travelers by bus than it of mixed traffic network. So it can be concluded that building dedicated bus lane can improve the stability of traffic system and attract more travelers to choose bus reducing the traffic congestion.

  10. Using Visual Range Data For Highway Operations In Blowing Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabler, Ronald D.

    1983-09-01

    This paper describes characteristics of visual range attenuation in blowing snow in rela-tion to motorist vision. Visual range V is related to wind speed U according to V = A U-5 with the A coefficient changing in response to snow availability. A lower limit for visual range is described with A = 1.1.108 m6.s-5 An operational monitoring system used on Interstate Highway 80 in Wyoming demonstrates how real-time computer analysis of photometric data can be used to determine the A value, interpret visual range in terms of vehicle operation, and provide automated traffic operations decisions.

  11. Floodflow characteristics of Filbin Creek at proposed interstate highway 526, north Charleston, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bohman, L.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study to determine the impact of two alternative construction plans for proposed interchange between the existing Interstate Highway 26 and Interstate Highway 526 in the Filbin Creek drainage basin near North Charleston, South Carolina was performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Carolina Department of Highways and Public Transportation. A computerized reservoir routing technique was used to route synthetic flood hydrographs through the basin system. Simulation results indicate that the new roadway will cause little or no change in water-surface elevations downstream of Interstate Highway 26. Upstream of Interstate Highway 26, approximately 0.5 foot of backwater will be created by either alternative during a 100-year flood as a result of the Interstate Highway 526 embankments and structures. (USGS)

  12. Dynamic traffic grooming with multigranularity traffic in WDM optical mesh networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jun; Zeng, Qingji; Liu, Jimin; Xiao, Pengcheng; Liu, Hua; Xiao, Shilin

    2004-04-01

    In this paper, a traffic-grooming problem for multi-granularity traffic of SDH/SONET in WDM grooming mesh networks is investigated. We propose a path select routing algorithm to solve this problem. The performances of this traffic grooming path select routing algorithm are evaluated in WDM grooming networks. Finally, we presented and compared the simulation results of this algorithm in dynamic traffic grooming WDM mesh networks with that of other algorithms.

  13. 23 CFR 470.107 - Federal-aid highway systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Federal-aid highway systems. 470.107 Section 470.107 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.107 Federal-aid highway systems. (a) Interstate System. (1) The Dwight...

  14. 23 CFR 470.107 - Federal-aid highway systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Federal-aid highway systems. 470.107 Section 470.107 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.107 Federal-aid highway systems. (a) Interstate System. (1) The Dwight...

  15. 23 CFR 470.107 - Federal-aid highway systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Federal-aid highway systems. 470.107 Section 470.107 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.107 Federal-aid highway systems. (a) Interstate System. (1) The Dwight...

  16. 23 CFR 470.107 - Federal-aid highway systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Federal-aid highway systems. 470.107 Section 470.107 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.107 Federal-aid highway systems. (a) Interstate System. (1) The Dwight...

  17. 23 CFR 470.107 - Federal-aid highway systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Federal-aid highway systems. 470.107 Section 470.107 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND RESEARCH HIGHWAY SYSTEMS Federal-aid Highway Systems § 470.107 Federal-aid highway systems. (a) Interstate System. (1) The Dwight...

  18. Estimation of ultrafine particle concentrations at near-highway residences using data from local and central monitors

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christina H.; Brugge, Doug; Williams, Paige; Mittleman, Murray; Durant, John L.; Spengler, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFP; aerodynamic diameter < 0.1 micrometers) are a ubiquitous exposure in the urban environment and are elevated near highways. Most epidemiological studies of UFP health effects use central site monitoring data, which may misclassify exposure. Our aims were to: (1) examine the relationship between distant and proximate monitoring sites and their ability to predict hourly UFP concentration measured at residences in an urban community with a major interstate highway and; (2) determine if meteorology and proximity to traffic improve explanatory power. Short-term (1 – 3 weeks) residential monitoring of UFP concentration was conducted at 18 homes. Long-term monitoring was conducted at two near-highway monitoring sites and a central site. We created models of outdoor residential UFP concentration based on concentrations at the near-highway site, at the central site, at both sites together and without fixed sites. UFP concentration at residential sites was more highly correlated with those at a near-highway site than a central site. In regression models of each site alone, a 10% increase in UFP concentration at a near-highway site was associated with a 6% (95% CI: 6%, 7%) increase at residences while a 10% increase in UFP concentration at the central site was associated with a 3% (95% CI: 2%, 3%) increase at residences. A model including both sites showed minimal change in the magnitude of the association between the near-highway site and the residences, but the estimated association with UFP concentration at the central site was substantially attenuated. These associations remained after adjustment for other significant predictors of residential UFP concentration, including distance from highway, wind speed, wind direction, highway traffic volume and precipitation. The use of a central site as an estimate of personal exposure for populations near local emissions of traffic-related air pollutants may result in exposure misclassification. PMID

  19. Bicycles in Traffic. A North Carolina Driver Education Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Carolina Univ., Greenville, NC.

    This unit is designed to provide driver educators with information for teaching automobile drivers about the traffic-mix problem between bicycles and motor vehicles on roadways. The purpose of the unit is to improve the safety of bicyclists on North Carolina highways and help to decrease the number of bicycle deaths and injuries caused by traffic…

  20. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Pedestrian Safety, Grade 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains eight lessons on pedestrian safety for use in grade 2. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for…

  1. 23 CFR 772.17 - Traffic noise prediction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... publications are incorporated by reference in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51 and are on file... “FHWA Traffic Noise Model” Report No. FHWA-PD-96-010, including Revision No. 1, dated April 14, 2004, or... Federal Highway Administration, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE., Washington, DC 20590, as provided in 49...

  2. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-3. Pedestrian Safety, Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains nine lessons on pedestrian safety for use in grade 3. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for…

  3. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Grade 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide for grade 8 deals with risk acceptance and the use of the decision-making process in risk situations. (Based on the introduction to highway safety rules and laws that students have mastered in…

  4. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Grade 7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide for grade 7 deals with risk and choosing the safest action. (Based on the introduction to highway safety rules and laws that students have mastered in grades K through 3, the program for grades…

  5. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Passenger Safety, Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains four lessons and an appendix of school bus safety tips for use in grade 3. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing…

  6. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Bicycle Safety, Grade 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide for grade 3 contains seven lessons on bicycles and an appendix on conducting a bicycle rodeo. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing…

  7. Performance Based Traffic Safety Education Course. Two-Phase Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Board of Education, Olympia.

    This course for high school highway traffic safety education is intended to help students learn to make good driving decisions. It consists of twenty-one modules--ten sequenced, two not in specific sequence but intended to be completed in the earlier part of the course, and nine non-sequenced modules. Each module begins with an outline providing…

  8. Analyzing freeway traffic under congestion: Traffic dynamics approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, D.H.; Drew, D.R.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents an analysis of freeway traffic flows under congestion based on the principle of traffic dynamics, using the example of recurring congestion. Queuing and discharging mechanisms are analyzed using the fundamental concept of conservation of vehicles. These analysis results are applied for reviewing the two conventional macroscopic analysis tools, deterministic queuing analysis and shock-wave analysis. Comparative study results have demonstrated that (1) the two methods are fundamentally different from the traffic modeling point of view; (2) deterministic queuing analysis always underestimates the overall magnitude of delays compared to shock-wave analysis; and (3) the area between the demand and the capacity curves in a queuing diagram is analytically equivalent to total vehicle-hours of travel in congestion as opposed to the widely accepted total vehicle-hours of delay. The study results imply that the guidelines of the 1994 Highway Capacity Manual may result in the underestimation of congestion-related statistics. For the purposes of illustration and verification, a numerical example problem is provided.

  9. Air quality variability near a highway in a complex urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Richard W.; Heist, David; Isakov, Vlad; Perry, Steven; Hagler, Gayle S. W.; Kimbrough, Sue; Shores, Richard; Black, Kevin; Brixey, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    In response to growing public health concerns regarding elevated air pollutant exposures and adverse human health effects for near-road populations, a study was conducted to assess how complex urban roadway configurations affect local-scale air quality. This study combined fixed-site and mobile air quality measurements with laboratory wind tunnel experiments to examine how the transport and dispersion of traffic-emitted pollutants varies with changing roadway configuration, notably with at-grade and cut section designs. Results of the study indicated that short-term maximum concentrations occurred with measurements made along at-grade locations, however, average concentrations tended to be higher at the top of the cut section compared with the at-grade location, most often occurring during lower air pollutant events. Wind flow and NO2/NOx ratios indicated that the cut section moderated peak concentrations through increased transport and dispersion, as well as reducing the influence of turbulence from vehicle activity near the road. The at-grade locations also experienced a higher impact from primary vehicle emissions than those measurements made at similar distances along a cut section. Mobile monitoring suggested that these peak concentrations quickly conformed to concentration levels measured near cut sections within 50-100 m of the source highway. Wind tunnel simulations of the study site with and without the cut section present indicated that the cut section reduced the concentrations of primary emitted vehicle pollutants by 15-25 percent for receptors located approximately 20 m from the highway. The wind tunnel simulations also revealed that buildings and other urban features influenced local-scale pollutant transport and need to be considered when evaluating near-road air quality.

  10. 76 FR 46213 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... compromised based on engineering judgment or engineering study.'' \\1\\ 74 FR 66732, December 16, 2009. This... numbered accordingly. \\2\\ 75 FR 20935, April 22, 2010. This Federal Register notice can be viewed at the... Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways; Revision AGENCY:...

  11. 75 FR 20935 - National Standards for Traffic Control Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... Printing Office's Web page at: http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara . Background On December 21, 2007, at 72 FR... retroreflectivity final rule was published in the Federal Register at 72 FR 72574 on December 21, 2007, and can be... Devices; the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices for Streets and Highways; Maintaining...

  12. Traffic congestion classification using motion vector statistical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riaz, Amina; Khan, Shoab A.

    2013-12-01

    Due to the rapid increase in population, one of the major problems faced by the urban areas is traffic congestion. In this paper we propose a method for classifying highway traffic congestion using motion vector statistical properties. Motion vectors are estimated using pyramidal Kanada-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) tracker algorithm. Then motion vector features are extracted and are used to classify the traffic patterns into three categories: light, medium and heavy. Classification using neural network, on publicly available dataset, shows an accuracy of 95.28%, with robustness to environmental conditions such as variable luminance. Our system provides a more accurate solution to the problem as compared to the systems previously proposed.

  13. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2013-11-01

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliably used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that the generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular (fixed or stochastic) value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of the traffic and transportation theory, we discuss the three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  14. Criticism of generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2015-03-10

    It is explained why the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown (a transition from free flow to congested traffic) should be the empirical basis for any traffic and transportation theory that can be reliable used for control and optimization in traffic networks. It is shown that generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory are not consistent with the set of the fundamental empirical features of traffic breakdown at a highway bottleneck. To these fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory belong (i) Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) theory, (ii) the General Motors (GM) model class (for example, Herman, Gazis et al. GM model, Gipps’s model, Payne’s model, Newell’s optimal velocity (OV) model, Wiedemann’s model, Bando et al. OV model, Treiber’s IDM, Krauß’s model), (iii) the understanding of highway capacity as a particular stochastic value, and (iv) principles for traffic and transportation network optimization and control (for example, Wardrop’s user equilibrium (UE) and system optimum (SO) principles). Alternatively to these generally accepted fundamentals and methodologies of traffic and transportation theory, we discuss three-phase traffic theory as the basis for traffic flow modeling as well as briefly consider the network breakdown minimization (BM) principle for the optimization of traffic and transportation networks with road bottlenecks.

  15. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aviation Systems Division at the NASA Ames Research Center conducts leading edge research in air traffic management concepts and technologies. This overview will present concepts and simulation results for research in traffic flow management, safe and efficient airport surface operations, super density terminal area operations, separation assurance and system wide modeling and simulation. A brief review of the ongoing air traffic management technology demonstration (ATD-1) will also be presented. A panel discussion, with Mr. Davis serving as a panelist, on air traffic research will follow the briefing.

  16. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, road traffic accidents and driving simulator performance: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Antonopoulos, Constantine N; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Daskalopoulou, Styliani S; Petridou, Eleni Th

    2011-10-01

    We used meta-analysis to synthesize current evidence regarding the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on road traffic accidents in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) as well as on their performance in driving simulator. The primary outcomes were real accidents, near miss accidents, and accident-related events in the driving simulator. Pooled odds ratios (ORs), incidence rate ratios (IRRs) and standardized mean differences (SMDs) were appropriately calculated through fixed or random effects models after assessing between-study heterogeneity. Furthermore, risk differences (RDs) and numbers needed to treat (NNTs) were estimated for real and near miss accidents. Meta-regression analysis was performed to examine the effect of moderator variables and publication bias was also evaluated. Ten studies on real accidents (1221 patients), five studies on near miss accidents (769 patients) and six studies on the performance in driving simulator (110 patients) were included. A statistically significant reduction in real accidents (OR=0.21, 95% CI=0.12-0.35, random effects model; IRR=0.45, 95% CI=0.34-0.59, fixed effects model) and near miss accidents (OR=0.09, 95% CI=0.04-0.21, random effects model; IRR=0.23, 95% CI=0.08-0.67, random effects model) was observed. Likewise, a significant reduction in accident-related events was observed in the driving simulator (SMD=-1.20, 95% CI=-1.75 to -0.64, random effects). The RD for real accidents was -0.22 (95% CI=-0.32 to -0.13, random effects), with NNT equal to five patients (95% CI=3-8), whereas for near miss accidents the RD was -0.47 (95% CI=-0.69 to -0.25, random effects), with NNT equal to two patients (95% CI=1-4). For near miss accidents, meta-regression analysis suggested that nCPAP seemed more effective among patients entering the studies with higher baseline accident rates. In conclusion, all three meta-analyses demonstrated a sizeable protective effect of nCPAP on road traffic accidents, both

  17. Influence of the traffic interruption probability on traffic stability in lattice model for two-lane freeway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Guanghan; Liu, Changqing; Tuo, Manxian

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a new lattice model is proposed with the traffic interruption probability term in two-lane traffic system. The linear stability condition and the mKdV equation are derived from linear stability analysis and nonlinear analysis by introducing the traffic interruption probability of optimal current for two-lane traffic freeway, respectively. Numerical simulation shows that the traffic interruption probability corresponding to high reaction coefficient can efficiently improve the stability of two-lane traffic flow as traffic interruption occurs with lane changing.

  18. Optimizing traffic lights in a cellular automaton model for city traffic.

    PubMed

    Brockfeld, E; Barlovic, R; Schadschneider, A; Schreckenberg, M

    2001-11-01

    We study the impact of global traffic light control strategies in a recently proposed cellular automaton model for vehicular traffic in city networks. The model combines basic ideas of the Biham-Middleton-Levine model for city traffic and the Nagel-Schreckenberg model for highway traffic. The city network has a simple square lattice geometry. All streets and intersections are treated equally, i.e., there are no dominant streets. Starting from a simple synchronized strategy, we show that the capacity of the network strongly depends on the cycle times of the traffic lights. Moreover, we point out that the optimal time periods are determined by the geometric characteristics of the network, i.e., the distance between the intersections. In the case of synchronized traffic lights, the derivation of the optimal cycle times in the network can be reduced to a simpler problem, the flow optimization of a single street with one traffic light operating as a bottleneck. In order to obtain an enhanced throughput in the model, improved global strategies are tested, e.g., green wave and random switching strategies, which lead to surprising results. PMID:11736039

  19. A game theory model of urban public traffic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, B. B.; Chang, H.; Chen, Y.-Z.; He, D. R.

    2007-06-01

    We have studied urban public traffic networks from the viewpoint of complex networks and game theory. Firstly, we have empirically investigated an urban public traffic network in Beijing in 2003, and obtained its statistical properties. Then a simplified game theory model is proposed for simulating the evolution of the traffic network. The basic idea is that three network manipulators, passengers, an urban public traffic company, and a government traffic management agency, play games in a network evolution process. Each manipulator tries to build the traffic lines to magnify its “benefit”. Simulation results show a good qualitative agreement with the empirical results.

  20. Source attributions of heavy metals in rice plant along highway in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinfei; Wang, Yinxi; Zhao, Jian; Zhu, Liqun; Bian, Xinmin; Zhang, Weijian

    2011-01-01

    Air and soil pollution from traffic has been considered as a critical issue to crop production and food safety, however, few efforts have been paid on distinguish the source origin of traffic-related contaminants in rice plant along highway. Therefore, we investigated metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu) concentrations and stable Pb isotope ratios in rice plants exposed and unexposed to highway traffic pollution in Eastern China in 2008. Significant differences in metals concentrations between the exposed and unexposed plants existed in leaf for Pb, Cd and Zn, in stem only for Zn, and in grain for Pb and Cd. About 46% of Pb and 41% of Cd in the grain were attributed to the foliar uptake from atmosphere, and there were no obvious contribution of atmosphere to the accumulations of Cr, Zn and Cu in grain. Except for Zn, all of the heavy metals in stem were attributed to the root uptake from soil, although significant accumulations of Pb and Cd from atmosphere existed in leaf. This indicated that different processes existed in the subsequent translocation of foliar-absorbed heavy metals between rice organs. The distinct separation of stable Pb isotope ratios among rice grain, leaf, stem, soil and vehicle exhaust further provided evidences on the different pathways of heavy metal accumulation in rice plant. These results suggested that further more attentions should be paid to the atmospheric deposition of heavy metals from traffic emission when plan crop layout for food safety along highway. PMID:22125909

  1. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 8: Alcohol in Relation to Highway Safety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 8 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) concentrates on alcohol in relation to highway safety. The purpose and objectives of the alcohol program are outlined. Federal authority in the area of highway safety and general policies regarding…

  2. Highway Safety Program Manual: Volume 12: Highway Design, Construction and Maintenance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    Volume 12 of the 19-volume Highway Safety Program Manual (which provides guidance to State and local governments on preferred highway safety practices) focuses on highway design, construction and maintenance. The purpose and specific objectives of such a program are described. Federal authority in the area of highway safety and policies regarding…

  3. Reducing traffic noise with quieter pavements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donavan, Paul

    2005-09-01

    In recent years, interest has increased in the use of pavement type to reduce traffic noise. This has been driven by public concern over noise from freeways and state transportation agencies' interest in using pavement instead of sound walls to mitigate traffic noise. Beginnings of the recent interest go back to 1998 with the formation of the Institute for Safe, Quiet & Durable Highways at Purdue University and the initiation long-term research by the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans) on the effectiveness of quieter pavements. In 2002, the State of Arizona announced plans to overlay 115 miles of concrete freeway in the greater Phoenix area with a quieter asphalt rubber surface. This turned into the first Quiet Pavement Pilot Program in partnership between Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) and the Arizona Department of Transportation. Since that time, the FHWA in cooperation with the American Association of State Highway Transportation Agencies conducted a fact finding ``Scan'' tour in Europe to evaluate their quiet pavement technology and policy. This was followed by the first comparative tire/pavement noise testing in the US and Europe using the same procedures and test tires. The results, issues, and future directions surrounding these activities will be discussed.

  4. Bifurcation analysis of a speed gradient continuum traffic flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ai, Wen-Huan; Shi, Zhong-Ke; Liu, Da-Wei

    2015-11-01

    A bifurcation analysis approach is presented based on the macroscopic traffic flow model. This method can be used to describe and predict the nonlinear traffic phenomena on the highway from a system global stability perspective. Based on a recently proposed speed gradient continuum traffic flow model, the types and stabilities of the equilibrium solutions are discussed and the existence of Hopf bifurcation and saddle-node bifurcation is proved. Then various bifurcations such as Hopf bifurcation, saddle-node bifurcation, Limit Point bifurcation of cycles, Cusp bifurcation and Bogdanov-Takens bifurcation are found and the traffic flow behaviors at some of them are analyzed. When the Hopf bifurcation is selected as the starting point of density temporal evolution, it may help to explain the stop-and-go traffic phenomena.

  5. The seismic traffic footprint: Tracking trains, aircraft, and cars seismically

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Nima; Gerstoft, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Although naturally occurring vibrations have proven useful to probe the subsurface, the vibrations caused by traffic have not been explored much. Such data, however, are less sensitive to weather and low visibility compared to some common out-of-road traffic sensing systems. We study traffic-generated seismic noise measured by an array of 5200 geophones that covered a 7 × 10 km area in Long Beach (California, USA) with a receiver spacing of 100 m. This allows us to look into urban vibrations below the resolution of a typical city block. The spatiotemporal structure of the anthropogenic seismic noise intensity reveals the Blue Line Metro train activity, departing and landing aircraft in Long Beach Airport and their acceleration, and gives clues about traffic movement along the I-405 highway at night. As low-cost, stand-alone seismic sensors are becoming more common, these findings indicate that seismic data may be useful for traffic monitoring.

  6. The effects of roadside structures on the transport and dispersion of ultrafine particles from highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowker, George E.; Baldauf, Richard; Isakov, Vlad; Khlystov, Andrey; Petersen, William

    Understanding local-scale transport and dispersion of pollutants emitted from traffic sources is important for urban planning and air quality assessments. Predicting pollutant concentration patterns in complex environments depends on accurate representations of local features (e.g., noise barriers, trees, buildings) affecting near-field air flows. This study examined the effects of roadside barriers on the flow patterns and dispersion of pollutants from a high-traffic highway in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. The effects of the structures were analyzed using the Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) model, an empirically based diagnostic tool which simulates fine-scale wind field and dispersion patterns around obstacles. Model simulations were compared with the spatial distributions of ultrafine particles (UFP) from vehicular emissions measured using a passenger van equipped with a Differential Mobility Analyzer/Condensation Particle Counter. The field site allowed for an evaluation of pollutant concentrations in open terrain, with a noise barrier present near the road, and with a noise barrier and vegetation present near the road. Results indicated that air pollutant concentrations near the road were generally higher in open terrain situations with no barriers present; however, concentrations for this case decreased faster with distance than when roadside barriers were present. The presence of a noise barrier and vegetation resulted in the lowest downwind pollutant concentrations, indicating that the plume under this condition was relatively uniform and vertically well-mixed. Comparison of the QUIC model with the mobile UFP measurements indicated that QUIC reasonably represented pollutant transport and dispersion for each of the study configurations.

  7. Scheduling logic for Miles-In-Trail traffic management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Synnestvedt, Robert G.; Swenson, Harry; Erzberger, Heinz

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents an algorithm which can be used for scheduling arrival air traffic in an Air Route Traffic Control Center (ARTCC or Center) entering a Terminal Radar Approach Control (TRACON) Facility . The algorithm aids a Traffic Management Coordinator (TMC) in deciding how to restrict traffic while the traffic expected to arrive in the TRACON exceeds the TRACON capacity. The restrictions employed fall under the category of Miles-in-Trail, one of two principal traffic separation techniques used in scheduling arrival traffic . The algorithm calculates aircraft separations for each stream of aircraft destined to the TRACON. The calculations depend upon TRACON characteristics, TMC preferences, and other parameters adapted to the specific needs of scheduling traffic in a Center. Some preliminary results of traffic simulations scheduled by this algorithm are presented, and conclusions are drawn as to the effectiveness of using this algorithm in different traffic scenarios.

  8. Dynamics of traffic flow with real-time traffic information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoya, Yasushi

    2004-01-01

    We studied dynamics of traffic flow with real-time information provided. Provision of the real-time traffic information based on advancements in telecommunication technology is expected to facilitate the efficient utilization of available road capacity. This system has a potentiality of not only engineering for road usage but also the science of complexity series. In the system, the information plays a role of feedback connecting microscopic and macroscopic phenomena beyond the hierarchical structure of statistical physics. In this paper, we tried to clarify how the information works in a network of traffic flow from the perspective of statistical physics. The dynamical feature of the traffic flow is abstracted by a contrastive study between the nonequilibrium statistical physics and a computer simulation based on cellular automaton. We found that the information disrupts the local equilibrium of traffic flow by a characteristic dissipation process due to interaction between the information and individual vehicles. The dissipative structure was observed in the time evolution of traffic flow driven far from equilibrium as a consequence of the breakdown of the local-equilibrium hypothesis.

  9. A summary of state laws regulating youth operating farm tractors on highways.

    PubMed

    Doty, B C; Marlenga, B

    2006-02-01

    Driving farm tractors on highways is hazardous for youth due to the large speed differential between motor vehicles and agricultural vehicles, as well as recent increases in traffic volume on many rural roads. In 1994, the state of Wisconsin enacted legislation requiring youth who operate farm tractors on highways to complete a tractor and machinery certification course. We were interested in finding out whether other states have similar requirements. The purpose of this project was to collect and summarize state laws regulating youth who operate farm tractors on highways in the U.S. A systematic method was used that included an initial Lexis-Nexis database search followed by internet searches in combination with follow-up email and telephone communications when missing or unclear results were obtained. The findings show that 14 states have legislation addressing youth who operate farm tractors on highways. The content of these statutes varies, but includes driver's license or educational requirements, as well as regulations concerning the ages, locations, and/or times of day when youth may drive farm machinery on highways. This compilation of state laws will be useful information for agricultural safety professionals in designing effective outreach programs. A synthesis of the findings may also lead to the development of model legislation or inform future research efforts aimed at preventing youth farm tractor crashes on highways. PMID:16536173

  10. Temporal and Spatial Variations of Particulate Emissions on Major Highways in Southern California: Lagrangian Approach Using Mobile Monitoring System.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, H.; Grady, M.; Pham, L.

    2014-12-01

    In 2010 CARB reported 9,000 people in California die prematurely each year as a result of exposure to particulate emissions. Public's exposure to particulate emissions is known to be highest on highway during daily commute. Total particle concentrations vary temporarily and spatially due to many reasons including particle nucleation, traffic, and meteorological conditions. The stationary ambient monitoring sites are too sparsely located to measure these variations on highway. Also, emissions from highways can be included in the emission inventory which can improve modeler capability to predict at much finer scale. Emissions from highways are vary temporally and spatially. This study used a mobile platform to measure total particle number, total particle surface area and average particle diameter in Lagrangian approach. The study will report occurrence and frequency of hot spots for particle nucleation on highway and temporal/ spatial variations of particle concentrations on highway. This will enable better assessment of public's exposure to particulate emissions on highway by transportation and propose a methodology how to obtain emission inventory for major highways.

  11. The Physics of Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, L. Craig

    2006-03-01

    Congestion in freeway traffic is an example of self-organization in the language of complexity theory. Nonequilibrium, first-order phase transitions from free flow cause complex spatiotemporal patterns. Two distinct phases of congestion are observed in empirical traffic data--wide moving jams and synchronous flow. Wide moving jams are characterized by stopped or slowly moving vehicles within the jammed region, which widens and moves upstream at 15-20 km/h. Above a critical density of vehicles, a sudden decrease in the velocity of a lead vehicle can initiate a transition from metastable states to this phase. Human behaviors, especially delayed reactions, are implicated in the formation of jams. The synchronous flow phase results from a bottleneck such as an on-ramp. Thus, in contrast to a jam, the downstream front is pinned at a fixed location. The name of the phase comes from the equilibration (or synchronization) of speed and flow rate across all lanes caused by frequent vehicle lane changes. Synchronous flow occurs when the mainline flow and the rate of merging from an on-ramp are sufficiently large. Large-scale simulations using car-following models reproduce the physical phenomena occurring in traffic and suggest methods to improve flow and mediate congestion.

  12. Variability in continuous traffic monitoring data

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, T.; Hu, P.S.; Young, J.

    1996-07-01

    Each state in the United States can be viewed as a universe of road segments. For each road segment in each state, it is desired to know various traffic characteristics based on count data, classification count data, and weigh-in-motion data. These data are absolutely essential for highway design, maintenance, safety, and planning. Given no cost constraints, each road segment would be continuously monitored every day of the year. However, in practice, a few road segments are monitored continuously every day of the year to produce annual characteristics of traffic flow. The remaining road segments are monitored for one or two days each year, and this resulting data are `adjusted` (using factors based on data collected from the continuously monitored road segments) to produce estimates of annual characteristics. With this general approach, each state strives to provide estimates of annual characteristics for each road segment within its jurisdiction. In 1985, the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) published the Traffic Monitoring Guide to assist states in achieving this end. As with almost any data collection effort, the monitoring data suffers from errors from many sources. In this paper, we report some empirical findings in a research project sponsored by the FHWA. This research project studied the variability in the traffic data from the continuously monitored road segments from state(s) and, the extent to which this variability is transferred to and affects the precision of the data produced from the road segments which are monitored only one or two days each year. The ultimate hope is that states will eventually be able to not only publish an estimate of a characteristic such as Average Annual Daily Traffic (AADT) for each road segment, but also that each estimate will be accompanied by a statement expressing how good the estimate is in terms of its estimated variability or precision, which will likely be expressed as a coefficient of variation.

  13. Dynamic traffic assignment on parallel computers

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Frye, R.; Jakob, R.; Rickert, M.; Stretz, P.

    1998-12-01

    The authors describe part of the current framework of the TRANSIMS traffic research project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. It includes parallel implementations of a route planner and a microscopic traffic simulation model. They present performance figures and results of an offline load-balancing scheme used in one of the iterative re-planning runs required for dynamic route assignment.

  14. An analysis of pileup accidents in highway systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jau-Yang; Lai, Wun-Cing

    2016-02-01

    Pileup accident is a multi-vehicle collision occurring in the lane and producing by successive following vehicles. It is a special collision on highway. The probability of the occurrence of pileup accident is lower than that of the other accidents in highway systems. However, the pileup accident leads to injuries and damages which are often serious. In this paper, we analyze the occurrence of pileup accidents by considering the three types of dangerous collisions in highway systems. We evaluate those corresponding to rear-end collision, lane-changing collision, and double lane-changing collision. We simulate four road driving strategies to investigate the relationships between different vehicle collisions and pileup accidents. In accordance with the simulation and analysis, it is shown that the double lane-changing collisions result in an increase of the occurrence of pileup accidents. Additionally, we found that the probability of the occurrence of pileup accidents can be reduced when the speeds of vehicles are suitably constrained in highway systems.

  15. Jamitons: Phantom Traffic Jams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowszun, Jorj

    2013-01-01

    Traffic on motorways can slow down for no apparent reason. Sudden changes in speed by one or two drivers can create a chain reaction that causes a traffic jam for the vehicles that are following. This kind of phantom traffic jam is called a "jamiton" and the article discusses some of the ways in which traffic engineers produce…

  16. Traffic Flow Management Wrap-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grabbe, Shon

    2011-01-01

    Traffic Flow Management involves the scheduling and routing of air traffic subject to airport and airspace capacity constraints, and the efficient use of available airspace. Significant challenges in this area include: (1) weather integration and forecasting, (2) accounting for user preferences in the Traffic Flow Management decision making process, and (3) understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of air traffic on the environment. To address these challenges, researchers in the Traffic Flow Management area are developing modeling, simulation and optimization techniques to route and schedule air traffic flights and flows while accommodating user preferences, accounting for system uncertainties and considering the environmental impacts of aviation. This presentation will highlight some of the major challenges facing researchers in this domain, while also showcasing recent innovations designed to address these challenges.

  17. Short-term variation in near-highway air pollutant gradients on a winter morning

    PubMed Central

    Durant, J. L.; Ash, C. A.; Wood, E. C.; Herndon, S. C.; Jayne, J. T.; Knighton, W. B.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Trull, J. B.; Brugge, D.; Zamore, W.; Kolb, C. E.

    2011-01-01

    Quantification of exposure to traffic-related air pollutants near highways is hampered by incomplete knowledge of the scales of temporal variation of pollutant gradients. The goal of this study was to characterize short-term temporal variation of vehicular pollutant gradients within 200–400 m of a major highway (>150 000 vehicles/d). Monitoring was done near Interstate 93 in Somerville (Massachusetts) from 06:00 to 11:00 on 16 January 2008 using a mobile monitoring platform equipped with instruments that measured ultrafine and fine particles (6–1000 nm, particle number concentration (PNC)); particle-phase (>30 nm) NO3−, SO42−, and organic compounds; volatile organic compounds (VOCs); and CO2, NO, NO2, and O3. We observed rapid changes in pollutant gradients due to variations in highway traffic flow rate, wind speed, and surface boundary layer height. Before sunrise and peak traffic flow rates, downwind concentrations of particles, CO2, NO, and NO2 were highest within 100–250 m of the highway. After sunrise pollutant levels declined sharply (e.g., PNC and NO were more than halved) and the gradients became less pronounced as wind speed increased and the surface boundary layer rose allowing mixing with cleaner air aloft. The levels of aromatic VOCs and NO3−, SO42− and organic aerosols were generally low throughout the morning, and their spatial and temporal variations were less pronounced compared to PNC and NO. O3 levels increased throughout the morning due to mixing with O3-enriched air aloft and were generally lowest near the highway reflecting reaction with NO. There was little if any evolution in the size distribution of 6–225 nm particles with distance from the highway. These results suggest that to improve the accuracy of exposure estimates to near-highway pollutants, short-term (e.g., hourly) temporal variations in pollutant gradients must be measured to reflect changes in traffic patterns and local meteorology. PMID:22427751

  18. Potential crash reduction benefits of shoulder rumble strips in two-lane rural highways.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mubassira; Abdel-Rahim, Ahmed; Williams, Christopher J

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the findings from a study aimed at examining the effectiveness of shoulder rumble strips in reducing run-off-the-road (ROR) crashes on two-lane rural highways using the empirical Bayes (EB) before-and-after analysis method. Specifically, the study analyzed the effects of traffic volume, roadway geometry and paved right shoulder width on the effectiveness of shoulder rumble strips. The results of this study demonstrate the safety benefits of shoulder rumble strips in reducing the ROR crashes on two-lane rural highways using the state of Idaho 2001-2009 crash data. This study revealed a 14% reduction in all ROR crashes after the installation of shoulder rumble strips on 178.63miles of two-lane rural highways in Idaho. The results indicate that shoulder rumble strips were most effective on roads with relatively moderate curvature and right paved shoulder width of 3 feet and more. PMID:25460089

  19. Visual tracking strategies for intelligent vehicle highway systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Christopher E.; Papanikolopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Brandt, Scott A.; Richards, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The complexity and congestion of current transportation systems often produce traffic situations that jeopardize the safety of the people involved. These situations vary from maintaining a safe distance behind a leading vehicle to safely allowing a pedestrian to cross a busy street. Environmental sensing plays a critical role in virtually all of these situations. Of the sensors available, vision sensors provide information that is richer and more complete than other sensors, making them a logical choice for a multisensor transportation system. In this paper we present robust techniques for intelligent vehicle-highway applications where computer vision plays a crucial role. In particular, we demonstrate that the controlled active vision framework can be utilized to provide a visual sensing modality to a traffic advisory system in order to increase the overall safety margin in a variety of common traffic situations. We have selected two application examples, vehicle tracking and pedestrian tracking, to demonstrate that the framework can provide precisely the type of information required to effectively manage the given situation.

  20. Childhood cancer and residential exposure to highways: a nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Spycher, Ben D; Feller, Martin; Röösli, Martin; Ammann, Roland A; Diezi, Manuel; Egger, Matthias; Kuehni, Claudia E

    2015-12-01

    Children living near highways are exposed to higher concentrations of traffic-related carcinogenic pollutants. Several studies reported an increased risk of childhood cancer associated with traffic exposure, but the published evidence is inconclusive. We investigated whether cancer risk is associated with proximity of residence to highways in a nation-wide cohort study including all children aged <16 years from Swiss national censuses in 1990 and 2000. Cancer incidence was investigated in time to event analyses (1990-2008) using Cox proportional hazards models and incidence density analyses (1985-2008) using Poisson regression. Adjustments were made for socio-economic factors, ionising background radiation and electromagnetic fields. In time to event analysis based on 532 cases the adjusted hazard ratio for leukaemia comparing children living <100 m from a highway with unexposed children (≥500 m) was 1.43 (95 % CI 0.79, 2.61). Results were similar in incidence density analysis including 1367 leukaemia cases (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 1.57; 95 % CI 1.09, 2.25). Associations were similar for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (IRR 1.64; 95 % CI 1.10, 2.43) and stronger for leukaemia in children aged <5 years (IRR 1.92; 95 % CI 1.22, 3.04). Little evidence of association was found for other tumours. Our study suggests that young children living close to highways are at increased risk of developing leukaemia. PMID:26520639

  1. An hourly regression model for ultrafine particles in a near-highway urban area

    PubMed Central

    Patton, Allison P.; Collins, Caitlin; Naumova, Elena N.; Zamore, Wig; Brugge, Doug; Durant, John L.

    2015-01-01

    Estimating ultrafine particle number concentrations (PNC) near highways for exposure assessment in chronic health studies requires models capable of capturing PNC spatial and temporal variations over the course of a full year. The objectives of this work were to describe the relationship between near-highway PNC and potential predictors, and to build and validate hourly log-linear regression models. PNC was measured near Interstate 93 (I-93) in Somerville, MA (USA) using a mobile monitoring platform driven for 234 hours on 43 days between August 2009 and September 2010. Compared to urban background, PNC levels were consistently elevated within 100–200 m of I-93, with gradients impacted by meteorological and traffic conditions. Temporal and spatial variables including wind speed and direction, temperature, highway traffic, and distance to I-93 and major roads contributed significantly to the full regression model. Cross-validated model R2 values ranged from 0.38–0.47, with higher values achieved (0.43–0.53) when short-duration PNC spikes were removed. The model predicts highest PNC near major roads and on cold days with low wind speeds. The model allows estimation of hourly ambient PNC at 20-m resolution in a near-highway neighborhood. PMID:24559198

  2. Traffic jam induced by a crosscut road in a traffic-flow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi; Seno, Tadachika

    1994-06-01

    A deterministic cellular automaton model is presented to simulate the traffic jam induced by a crosscut road in a two-dimensional traffic flow. The effect of a crosscut road on the traffic flow is investigated by the use of a computer simulation. The traffic jam appears when a shock (discontinuous interface of different car densities) is formed. The condition for shock formation is derived for car densities p y and p x of the crosscut road and its crossing streets. The phase diagram and the dependence of the traffic flow on the car densities are shown. Also, we study the shock structure and the scaling of its width. The width Δ w of the shock scales with the system size L as Δ w ≈ L{1}/{2}. We present a self-consistent mean-field theory for the traffic flow.

  3. Traffic Flow Management and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph Lucio

    2014-01-01

    This talk will present an overview of Traffic Flow Management (TFM) research at NASA Ames Research Center. Dr. Rios will focus on his work developing a large-scale, parallel approach to solving traffic flow management problems in the national airspace. In support of this talk, Dr. Rios will provide some background on operational aspects of TFM as well a discussion of some of the tools needed to perform such work including a high-fidelity airspace simulator. Current, on-going research related to TFM data services in the national airspace system and general aviation will also be presented.

  4. Tiering strategic environmental assessment and project environmental impact assessment in highway planning in Sao Paulo, Brazil

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Luis E. Silva-Sanchez, Solange S.

    2008-10-15

    Constructing highways in dense urban areas is always a challenge. In Sao Paulo Metropolitan Region, heavy truck traffic contributes to clog streets and expressways alike. As part of the traffic neither originates nor head to the region, a peripheral highway has been proposed to reduce traffic problems. This project, called Rodoanel, is an expressway approximately 175 km long. The fact that the projected south and north sections would cross catchments that supply most of the metropolis water demand was strongly disputed and made the environmental permitting process particularly difficult. The agency in charge commissioned a strategic environmental assessment (SEA) of a revamped project, and called it the Rodoanel Programme. However, the SEA report failed to satisfactorily take account of significant strategic issues. Among these, the highway potential effect of inducing urban sprawl over water protection zones is the most critical issue, as it emerged later as a hurdle to project licensing. Conclusion is that, particularly where no agreed-upon framework for SEA exists, when vertical tiering with downstream project EIA is sought, then a careful scoping of strategic issues is more than necessary. If an agreement on 'what is strategic' is not reached and not recognized by influential stakeholders, then the unsettled conflicts will be transferred to project EIA. In such a context, SEA will have added another loop to the usually long road to project approval.

  5. Evolution of aerosol downwind of a major highway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liggio, J.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Sjostedt, S. J.; Gordon, M.; Makar, P.; Mihele, C.; Evans, G. J.; Jeong, C.; Wentzell, J. J.; Lu, G.; Lee, P.

    2010-12-01

    Primary aerosol from traffic emissions can have a considerable impact local and regional scale air quality. In order to assess the effect of these emissions and of future emissions scenarios, air quality models are required which utilize emissions representative of real world conditions. Often, the emissions processing systems which provide emissions input for the air quality models rely on laboratory testing of individual vehicles under non-ambient conditions. However, on the sub-grid scale particle evolution may lead to changes in the primary emitted size distribution and gas-particle partitioning that are not properly considered when the emissions are ‘instantly mixed’ within the grid volume. The affect of this modeling convention on model results is not well understood. In particular, changes in organic gas/particle partitioning may result in particle evaporation or condensation onto pre-existing aerosol. The result is a change in the particle distribution and/or an increase in the organic mass available for subsequent gas-phase oxidation. These effects may be missing from air-quality models, and a careful analysis of field data is necessary to quantify their impact. A study of the sub-grid evolution of aerosols (FEVER; Fast Evolution of Vehicle Emissions from Roadways) was conducted in the Toronto area in the summer of 2010. The study included mobile measurements of particle size distributions with a Fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS), aerosol composition with an Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), black carbon (SP2, PA, LII), VOCs (PTR-MS) and other trace gases. The mobile laboratory was used to measure the concentration gradient of the emissions at perpendicular distances from the highway as well as the physical and chemical evolution of the aerosol. Stationary sites at perpendicular distances and upwind from the highway also monitored the particle size distribution. In addition, sonic anemometers mounted on the mobile lab provided measurements of

  6. Highway Repair: A New Silicosis Threat

    PubMed Central

    Valiante, David J.; Schill, Donald P.; Rosenman, Kenneth D.; Socie, Edward

    2004-01-01

    Objectives. We describe an emerging public health concern regarding silicosis in the fast-growing highway repair industry. Methods. We examined highway construction trends, silicosis surveillance case data, and environmental exposure data to evaluate the risk of silicosis among highway repair workers. We reviewed silicosis case data from the construction industry in 3 states that have silicosis registries, and we conducted environmental monitoring for silica at highway repair work sites. Results. Our findings indicate that a large population of highway workers is at risk of developing silicosis from exposure to crystalline silica. Conclusions. Exposure control methods, medical screenings, protective health standards, and safety-related contract language are necessary for preventing future occupational disease problems among highway repair workers. PMID:15117715

  7. Urban daytime traffic noise prediction models.

    PubMed

    da Paz, Elaine Carvalho; Zannin, Paulo Henrique Trombetta

    2010-04-01

    An evaluation was made of the acoustic environment generated by an urban highway using in situ measurements. Based on the data collected, a mathematical model was designed for the main sound levels (L (eq), L (10), L (50), and L (90)) as a function of the correlation between sound levels and between the equivalent sound pressure level and traffic variables. Four valid groups of mathematical models were generated to calculate daytime sound levels, which were statistically validated. It was found that the new models can be considered as accurate as other models presented in the literature to assess and predict daytime traffic noise, and that they stand out and differ from the existing models described in the literature thanks to two characteristics, namely, their linearity and the application of class intervals. PMID:19353296

  8. Heading South on 'Erebus Highway'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity is currently traveling southward over a pavement of outcrop dubbed the 'Erebus Highway.' 'Erebus Crater,' the rover's next target, lies less than 100 meters (328 feet) south of its current position. This view is a mosaic produced from from frames taken by the rover's navigation camera during Opportunity's 582nd martian day, or sol (Sept. 13, 2005). It shows fractured blocks of ancient sedimentary rock separated by recent sand dunes. Mars Exploration Rover team scientists are investigating both the composition of the rocks and the processes by which the distinctive fracture pattern arose.

  9. Weight Control for Highway Trucking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    LODEC, Inc. scales use load cell technology, a spinoff from aerospace technology, in manufacturing electronic axle scales for weighing trucks and trailers to insure that they are within legal highway limits. The scales trace their origin to the space program of the 1960's when ELDEC Corporation, then LODEC parent company, acquired advanced electronic technology as a subcontractor on such projects as Apollo and Saturn launch vehicles. LODEC scales come in both permanent and portable versions with accuracy of within one percent and frequently better.

  10. Enskog-like kinetic models for vehicular traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Klar, A.; Wegener, R.

    1997-04-01

    In the present paper a general criticism of kinetic equations for vehicular traffic is given. The necessity of introducing an Enskog-type correction into these equations is shown. An Enskog-like kinetic traffic flow equation is presented and fluid dynamic equations are derived. This derivation yields new coefficients for the standard fluid dynamic equations of vehicular traffic. Numerical simulations for inhomogeneous traffic flow situations are shown together with a comparison between kinetic and fluid dynamics models.

  11. Capacity-constrained traffic assignment in networks with residual queues

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, W.H.K.; Zhang, Y.

    2000-04-01

    This paper proposes a capacity-constrained traffic assignment model for strategic transport planning in which the steady-state user equilibrium principle is extended for road networks with residual queues. Therefore, the road-exit capacity and the queuing effects can be incorporated into the strategic transport model for traffic forecasting. The proposed model is applicable to the congested network particularly when the traffic demands exceeds the capacity of the network during the peak period. An efficient solution method is proposed for solving the steady-state traffic assignment problem with residual queues. Then a simple numerical example is employed to demonstrate the application of the proposed model and solution method, while an example of a medium-sized arterial highway network in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is used to test the applicability of the proposed solution to real problems.

  12. Modeling multi-scale aerosol dynamics and micro-environmental air quality near a large highway intersection using the CTAG model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan Jason; Nguyen, Monica T; Steffens, Jonathan T; Tong, Zheming; Wang, Yungang; Hopke, Philip K; Zhang, K Max

    2013-01-15

    A new methodology, referred to as the multi-scale structure, integrates "tailpipe-to-road" (i.e., on-road domain) and "road-to-ambient" (i.e., near-road domain) simulations to elucidate the environmental impacts of particulate emissions from traffic sources. The multi-scale structure is implemented in the CTAG model to 1) generate process-based on-road emission rates of ultrafine particles (UFPs) by explicitly simulating the effects of exhaust properties, traffic conditions, and meteorological conditions and 2) to characterize the impacts of traffic-related emissions on micro-environmental air quality near a highway intersection in Rochester, NY. The performance of CTAG, evaluated against with the field measurements, shows adequate agreement in capturing the dispersion of carbon monoxide (CO) and the number concentrations of UFPs in the near road micro-environment. As a proof-of-concept case study, we also apply CTAG to separate the relative impacts of the shutdown of a large coal-fired power plant (CFPP) and the adoption of the ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) on UFP concentrations in the intersection micro-environment. Although CTAG is still computationally expensive compared to the widely-used parameterized dispersion models, it has the potential to advance our capability to predict the impacts of UFP emissions and spatial/temporal variations of air pollutants in complex environments. Furthermore, for the on-road simulations, CTAG can serve as a process-based emission model; Combining the on-road and near-road simulations, CTAG becomes a "plume-in-grid" model for mobile emissions. The processed emission profiles can potentially improve regional air quality and climate predictions accordingly. PMID:23202383

  13. Traffic Safety Education Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    This guide, intended for administrators, curriculum developers, and teachers, provides outlines and suggestions for strategies and materials needed to achieve the goals and objectives of the safety education program. The guide covers the following topics: a broad examination of the highway system; the responsibilities highway users have toward…

  14. Evaluating near highway air pollutant levels and estimating emission factors: Case study of Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Nayeb Yazdi, Mohammad; Delavarrafiee, Maryam; Arhami, Mohammad

    2015-12-15

    A field sampling campaign was implemented to evaluate the variation in air pollutants levels near a highway in Tehran, Iran (Hemmat highway). The field measurements were used to estimate road link-based emission factors for average vehicle fleet. These factors were compared with results of an in tunnel measurement campaign (in Resalat tunnel). Roadside and in-tunnel measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and size-fractionated particulate matter (PM) were conducted during the field campaign. The concentration gradient diagrams showed exponential decay, which represented a substantial decay, more than 50-80%, in air pollutants level in a distance between 100 and 150meters (m) of the highway. The changes in particle size distribution by distancing from highway were also captured and evaluated. The results showed particle size distribution shifted to larger size particles by distancing from highway. The empirical emission factors were obtained by using the roadside and in tunnel measurements with a hypothetical box model, floating machine model, CALINE4, CT-EMFAC or COPERT. Average CO emission factors were estimated to be in a range of 4 to 12g/km, and those of PM10 were 0.1 to 0.2g/km, depending on traffic conditions. Variations of these emission factors under real working condition with speeds were determined. PMID:26318222

  15. 23 CFR 470.113 - National Highway System procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... for system actions on the National Highway System shall include a route description, a statement of... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false National Highway System procedures. 470.113 Section 470.113 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND...

  16. 23 CFR 470.113 - National Highway System procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... for system actions on the National Highway System shall include a route description, a statement of... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false National Highway System procedures. 470.113 Section 470.113 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND...

  17. 23 CFR 470.113 - National Highway System procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... for system actions on the National Highway System shall include a route description, a statement of... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false National Highway System procedures. 470.113 Section 470.113 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND...

  18. 23 CFR 470.113 - National Highway System procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for system actions on the National Highway System shall include a route description, a statement of... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false National Highway System procedures. 470.113 Section 470.113 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND...

  19. 23 CFR 470.113 - National Highway System procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... for system actions on the National Highway System shall include a route description, a statement of... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false National Highway System procedures. 470.113 Section 470.113 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION PLANNING AND...

  20. 23 CFR 1.28 - Diversion of highway revenues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diversion of highway revenues. 1.28 Section 1.28 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GENERAL MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION GENERAL § 1.28 Diversion of highway revenues. (a) Reduction in apportionment. If the Secretary shall...

  1. Traffic control devices, visibility, and railroad grade crossings. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers contained in this volume are primarily from the 74th Annual Meeting of the Transportation Research Board and the Symposium for Improving Visibility for the Night Traveler, which was held in May 1994 in Washington, D.C. They concern traffic signs and signals, highway visibility, and rail-highway grade crossing safety and research, addressing some of the problems and issues facing urban engineers as they grapple with the ever more complex traffic system. Readers with a specific interest in traffic control devices will find papers related to effective uses of variable message signs, comprehension of various types of traffic control devices and their effects on driver behavior, pedestrian crosswalk time requirements, and empirical analysis of two-way stop-controlled intersections. Readers with an interest in delineation and illumination will find papers on minimum retroreflectivity requirements, pavement marking visibility and detectability, curve delineation, traffic sign reading distances at night, and apparent nighttime color of pavement marking products. Closing out this Record are papers addressing the application of GIS to rail-highway crossing safety and the accuracy of U.S. Department of Transportation rail-highway grade crossing accident prediction models.

  2. Landslides along Highways: GIS-based Inventory and Planning Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, Ann-Kathrin; Klose, Martin; Damm, Bodo

    2015-04-01

    Highways rank as critical transportation infrastructures that are at risk of landslides in many areas worldwide (e.g., Hungr et al., 1999; Bhandary et al., 2013). Safe and affordable operations of traffic routes constitute the two main criteria for transportation planning in landslide-prone terrain. A right balancing of these often conflicting priorities requires profound knowledge of landslide locations across highway networks and the costs caused by landslides in the past (e.g., Saha et al., 2005). Much of the direct costs affecting transportation departments relate to capital investments for landslide repair or mitigation and operational expenditures in connection with maintenance works. A systematic collection and inventory of such data sets combined with an acquisition of hazard information on vulnerable road sections is still rarely the case in engineering practice. This is despite significant cost impacts and budgetary burdens, especially in peripheral mountain areas where financial resources are naturally limited (e.g., Klose et al., 2014). The present contribution introduces a regional inventory of landslides along highways in the Harz Mountains, NW Germany. As subset of a landslide database for the entire country, this focused GIS-based inventory has been compiled in close collaboration with the Lower Saxony Department of Transportation. The inventory includes data sets gathered by archive studies and relies on high-quality information sources such as maintenance protocols, geotechnical reports, and documents from tendering, controlling, and accounting. A mapping tool in ArcGIS format is used to specify and visualize road sections affected by landslides. This spatial information on hazard exposure is complemented by narrative risk profiles for landslide sites showing a long history of damage events. By summarizing the occurrence dates of landslides, the associated damages, and the types and costs of repair or prevention, such risk profiles are useful to

  3. Concept definition of traffic flow wide-area surveillance

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.

    1994-07-01

    Traffic management can be thought of as a stochastic queuing process where the serving time at one of its control points is dynamically linked to the global traffic pattern, which is, in turn, dynamically linked to the control point. For this closed-loop system to be effective, the traffic management system must sense and interpret large spatial projections of data originating from multiple sensor suites. The intent of the Wide-Area Surveillance (WAS) Project is to build upon this concept and define the operational specifications and characteristics of a Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) system in terms of traffic management and control. In doing so, the functional capabilities of a TFWAS will be mapped onto an operational profile that is consistent with the Federal Highway Administration`s Intelligent Vehicle Highway System. This document provides the underlying foundation of this work by offering a concept definition for the TFWAS system. It concentrates on answering the question: ``What is the system?`` In doing so, the report develops a hierarchy of specialized definitions.

  4. Chain-reaction crash on a highway in high visibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    We study the chain-reaction crash (multiple-vehicle collision) in high-visibility condition on a highway. In the traffic situation, drivers control their vehicles by both gear-changing and braking. Drivers change the gears according to the headway and brake according to taillights of the forward vehicle. We investigate whether or not the first collision induces the chain-reaction crash numerically. It is shown that dynamic transitions occur from no collisions, through a single collision, to multiple collisions with decreasing the headway. Also, we find that the dynamic transition occurs from the finite chain reaction to the infinite chain reaction when the headway is less than the critical value. We compare the multiple-vehicle collisions in high-visibility with that in low-visibility. We derive the transition points and the region maps for the chain-reaction crash in high visibility.

  5. Highway noise barrier perceived benefit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. N.; Osman, M. M.

    1980-05-01

    A laboratory experiment was performed in which 82 subjects judged the benefit of a noise barrier by listening to tape recordings of before-barrier and after-barrier traffic noise. These perceived benefit judgments were related by regression analysis to the barrier attenuation, the before-barrier traffic sound level, and a music background level, all of which were varied over the course of the experiment. Prediction equations were developed for barrier benefit in terms of these sound levels, their purpose being to provide a model for barrier benefit that can be used in barrier site selection and design. An unexpected finding was that barrier benefit was highest when before-barrier sound levels were lowest: i.e., subjects preferred a noise barrier that solved a moderate noise problem over an equally-attenuating barrier that only partially solved a more severe noise problem.

  6. Traffic Flow Density Distribution Based on FEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jing; Cui, Jianming

    In analysis of normal traffic flow, it usually uses the static or dynamic model to numerical analyze based on fluid mechanics. However, in such handling process, the problem of massive modeling and data handling exist, and the accuracy is not high. Finite Element Method (FEM) is a production which is developed from the combination of a modern mathematics, mathematics and computer technology, and it has been widely applied in various domain such as engineering. Based on existing theory of traffic flow, ITS and the development of FEM, a simulation theory of the FEM that solves the problems existing in traffic flow is put forward. Based on this theory, using the existing Finite Element Analysis (FEA) software, the traffic flow is simulated analyzed with fluid mechanics and the dynamics. Massive data processing problem of manually modeling and numerical analysis is solved, and the authenticity of simulation is enhanced.

  7. HIGHWAY 3. 1: An enhanced HIGHWAY routing model: Program description, methodology, and revised user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, P.E.; Joy, D.S. ); Clarke, D.B.; Jacobi, J.M. . Transportation Center)

    1993-03-01

    The HIGHWAY program provides a flexible tool for predicting highway routes for transporting radioactive materials in the United States. The HIGHWAY data base is essentially a computerized road atlas that currently describes over 240,000 miles of highways. Complete descriptions of all Interstate System and most US highways (except those that parallel a nearby Interstate highway) are included in the data base. Many of the principal state highways and a number of local and county highways are also identified. The data base also includes locations of nuclear facilities and major airports. Several different types of routes may be calculated, depending on a set of user-supplied constraints. Routes are calculated by minimizing the total impedance between the origin and the destination. Basically, the impedance is defined as a function of distance and driving time along a particular highway segment. Several routing constraints can be imposed during the calculations. One of the special features of the HIGHWAY model is its ability to calculate routes that maximize use of Interstate System highways. This feature allows the user to predict routes for shipments of radioactive materials that conform to the US Department of Transportation routing regulations. Other features of the model include the ability to predict routes that bypass a specific state, city, town, or highway segment. Two special features have been incorporated in HIGHWAY, version 3.1. The first is the ability to automatically calculate alternative routes. Frequently, there are a number of routes between the source and destination that vary slightly in distance and estimated driving time. The HIGHWAY program offers a selection of different but nearly equal routes. The second special feature is the capability to calculate route-specific population density statistics. The population density distribution is calculated for each highway segment in the route and is reported on a state-by-state basis.

  8. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. PMID:26922287

  9. Accident prediction model for railway-highway interfaces.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jutaek; Washington, Simon P; Nam, Doohee

    2006-03-01

    Considerable past research has explored relationships between vehicle accidents and geometric design and operation of road sections, but relatively little research has examined factors that contribute to accidents at railway-highway crossings. Between 1998 and 2002 in Korea, about 95% of railway accidents occurred at highway-rail grade crossings, resulting in 402 accidents, of which about 20% resulted in fatalities. These statistics suggest that efforts to reduce crashes at these locations may significantly reduce crash costs. The objective of this paper is to examine factors associated with railroad crossing crashes. Various statistical models are used to examine the relationships between crossing accidents and features of crossings. The paper also compares accident models developed in the United States and the safety effects of crossing elements obtained using Korea data. Crashes were observed to increase with total traffic volume and average daily train volumes. The proximity of crossings to commercial areas and the distance of the train detector from crossings are associated with larger numbers of accidents, as is the time duration between the activation of warning signals and gates. The unique contributions of the paper are the application of the gamma probability model to deal with underdispersion and the insights obtained regarding railroad crossing related vehicle crashes. PMID:16297846

  10. Modeling operating weight and axle weight distributions for highway vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, D.L.; Liang, J.C.

    1988-07-01

    The estimation of highway cost responsibility requires detailed information on vehicle operating weights and axle weights by type of vehicle. Typically, 10--20 vehicle types must be cross-classified by 10--20 registered weight classes and again by 20 or more operating weight categories, resulting in 100--400 relative frequencies to be determined for each vehicle type. For each of these, gross operating weight must be distributed to each axle or axle unit. Given the rarity of many of the heaviest vehicle types, direct estimation of these frequencies and axle weights from traffic classification count statistics and truck weight data may exceed the reliability of even the largest (e.g., 250,000 record) data sources. An alternative is to estimate statistical models of operating weight distributions as functions of registered weight, and models of axle weight shares as functions of operating weight. This paper describes the estimation of such functions using the multinomial logit model (a log-linear model) and the implementation of the modeling framework as a PC-based FORTRAN program. Areas for further research include the addition of highway class and region as explanatory variables in operating weight distribution models, and the development of theory for including registration costs and costs of operating overweight in the modeling framework. 14 refs., 45 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. 76 FR 6690 - Highway Systems; Technical Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... CFR 470. In its final rule published in the Federal Register on June 19, 1997, at 62 FR 33355, the... Federal Highway Administration 23 CFR Part 470 RIN 2125-AF35 Highway Systems; Technical Correction.... SUMMARY: This rule makes a technical correction to the regulations that govern the designation of...

  12. 32 CFR 644.421 - Highway purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration, Department of Transportation, on behalf of a particular state can be and... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Highway purposes. 644.421 Section 644.421... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.421...

  13. 32 CFR 644.421 - Highway purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration, Department of Transportation, on behalf of a particular state can be and... 32 National Defense 4 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Highway purposes. 644.421 Section 644.421... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.421...

  14. 32 CFR 644.421 - Highway purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration, Department of Transportation, on behalf of a particular state can be and... 32 National Defense 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Highway purposes. 644.421 Section 644.421... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.421...

  15. 32 CFR 644.421 - Highway purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration, Department of Transportation, on behalf of a particular state can be and... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Highway purposes. 644.421 Section 644.421... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.421...

  16. 32 CFR 644.421 - Highway purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Federal Highway Administration, Department of Transportation, on behalf of a particular state can be and... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Highway purposes. 644.421 Section 644.421... ESTATE HANDBOOK Disposal Disposal of Fee-Owned Real Property and Easement Interests § 644.421...

  17. 75 FR 18095 - America's Marine Highway Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Procedures of the Department (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979). It is also not considered a major rule for... Maritime Administration 46 CFR Part 393 RIN 2133-AB70 America's Marine Highway Program AGENCY: Maritime... Transportation published an interim final rule that established America's Marine Highway Program, under which...

  18. The Information Highway as Revolution or Evolution?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esrock, Stuart L.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that society is more likely in the midst of an information evolution, rather than a revolution. Uses new media technology and forecasting literatures as a framework to evaluate current technology developments and public discussion about the information highway. Compares the hopeful rhetoric that surrounds the information highway to…

  19. 25 CFR 169.28 - Public highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Public highways. 169.28 Section 169.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.28 Public... for authority to open public highways across tribal and individually owned lands in accordance...

  20. 25 CFR 169.28 - Public highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Public highways. 169.28 Section 169.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.28 Public... for authority to open public highways across tribal and individually owned lands in accordance...

  1. 25 CFR 169.28 - Public highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Public highways. 169.28 Section 169.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.28 Public... for authority to open public highways across tribal and individually owned lands in accordance...

  2. 25 CFR 169.28 - Public highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Public highways. 169.28 Section 169.28 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.28 Public... for authority to open public highways across tribal and individually owned lands in accordance...

  3. Evaluation and analysis of noise levels at traffic intersections of Nagpur city, India.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Popat, Rishabh; Pisode, Mayur; Sharma, Asheesh; Manoj, Kumar; Chakrabarti, T; Gupta, Rajesh

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to monitor and assess the noise levels at traffic intersections in Napgur city under heterogenic traffic activities. For this, traffic volume and noise level were measured at intersections on highways, major roads andring road during morning and evening peak hours. Traffic volume was categorized in light, medium and heavy vehicles while noise levels were measured for Lmin, Lmax, Leq , L10 and L90. Equivalent noise was observed in the range of 71.3 to 79.3 dB(A) at the traffic intersections. Due to heterogenic traffic conditions and activities at the intersection like honking, idling, gear noise, bearing noise, breaking noise, tyre-road noise and exhaust noise, no correlation was established between traffic volume and observed noise levels except West High Court road. A strong correlation was found at West High Court road due to controlled traffic flow and less impact of heavy vehicles. Impact of noisy vehicles on general traffic was also assessed at the traffic intersections based on noise pollution levels and traffic noise index. The study suggests that control measures are required at the traffic intersections to minimize noise pollution levels. PMID:25464696

  4. Evaluation and analysis of noise levels at traffic intersections of Nagpur city, India.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ritesh; Popat, Rishabh; Pisode, Mayur; Sharma, Asheesh; Manoj, Kumar; Chakrabarti, T; Gupta, Rajesh

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to monitor and assess the noise levels at traffic intersections in Napgur city under heterogenic traffic activities. For this, traffic volume and noise level were measured at intersections on highways, major roads andring road during morning and evening peak hours. Traffic volume was categorized in light, medium and heavy vehicles while noise levels were measured for Lmin, Lmax, Leq , L10 and L90. Equivalent noise was observed in the range of 71.3 to 79.3 dB(A) at the traffic intersections. Due to heterogenic traffic conditions and activities at the intersection like honking, idling, gear noise, bearing noise, breaking noise, tyre-road noise and exhaust noise, no correlation was established between traffic volume and observed noise levels except West High Court road. A strong correlation was found at West High Court road due to controlled traffic flow and less impact of heavy vehicles. Impact of noisy vehicles on general traffic was also assessed at the traffic intersections based on noise pollution levels and traffic noise index. The study suggests that control measures are required at the traffic intersections to minimize noise pollution levels. PMID:25508327

  5. Traffic Flow Estimates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Vincent G.

    1981-01-01

    Two examples are given of ways traffic engineers estimate traffic flow. The first, Floating Car Method, involves some basic ideas and the notion of relative velocity. The second, Maximum Traffic Flow, is viewed to involve simple applications of calculus. The material provides insight into specialized applications of mathematics. (MP)

  6. Physics of traffic gridlock in a city

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerner, Boris S.

    2011-10-01

    Based on simulations of stochastic three-phase and two-phase traffic flow models, we reveal that at a signalized city intersection under small link inflow rates at which a vehicle queue developed during the red phase of the light signal dissolves fully during the green phase, i.e., no traffic gridlock should be expected, nevertheless, spontaneous traffic breakdown with subsequent city gridlock occurs with some probability after a random time delay. In most cases, this traffic breakdown is initiated by a phase transition from free flow to a synchronized flow occurring upstream of the queue at the light signal. The probability of traffic breakdown at the light signal is an increasing function of the link inflow rate and duration of the red phase of the light signal.

  7. Distributed traffic signal control using fuzzy logic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    We present a distributed approach to traffic signal control, where the signal timing parameters at a given intersection are adjusted as functions of the local traffic condition and of the signal timing parameters at adjacent intersections. Thus, the signal timing parameters evolve dynamically using only local information to improve traffic flow. This distributed approach provides for a fault-tolerant, highly responsive traffic management system. The signal timing at an intersection is defined by three parameters: cycle time, phase split, and offset. We use fuzzy decision rules to adjust these three parameters based only on local information. The amount of change in the timing parameters during each cycle is limited to a small fraction of the current parameters to ensure smooth transition. We show the effectiveness of this method through simulation of the traffic flow in a network of controlled intersections.

  8. 49 CFR 1.84 - The Federal Highway Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... environment. (e) Surveying and constructing forest highway system roads, defense highways and access roads... on the U.S. economy by encouraging domestic manufacturing on highway projects through the...

  9. 49 CFR 1.84 - The Federal Highway Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... environment. (e) Surveying and constructing forest highway system roads, defense highways and access roads... on the U.S. economy by encouraging domestic manufacturing on highway projects through the...

  10. No evidence of a threshold in traffic volume affecting road-kill mortality at a large spatio-temporal scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grilo, Clara; Ferreira, Flavio Zanchetta; Revilla, Eloy

    2015-11-15

    Previous studies have found that the relationship between wildlife road mortality and traffic volume follows a threshold effect on low traffic volume roads. We aimed at evaluating the response of several species to increasing traffic intensity on highways over a large geographic area and temporal period. We used data of four terrestrial vertebrate species with different biological and ecological features known by their high road-kill rates: the barn owl (Tyto alba), hedgehog (Erinaceus europaeus), red fox (Vulpes vulpes) and European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus). Additionally, we checked whether road-kill likelihood varies when traffic patterns depart from the average. We used annual average daily traffic (AADT) and road-kill records observed along 1000 km of highways in Portugal over seven consecutive years (2003–2009). We fitted candidate models using Generalized Linear Models with a binomial distribution through a sample unit of 1 km segments to describe the effect of traffic on the probability of finding at least one victim in each segment during the study. We also assigned for each road-kill record the traffic of that day and the AADT on that year to test for differences using Paired Student's t-test. Mortality risk declined significantly with traffic volume but varied among species: the probability of finding road-killed red foxes and rabbits occurs up to moderate traffic volumes (< 20,000 AADT) whereas barn owls and hedgehogs occurred up to higher traffic volumes (40,000 AADT). Perception of risk may explain differences in responses towards high traffic highway segments. Road-kill rates did not vary significantly when traffic intensity departed from the average. In summary, we did not find evidence of traffic thresholds for the analysed species and traffic intensities. We suggest mitigation measures to reduce mortality be applied in particular on low traffic roads (< 5000 AADT) while additional measures to reduce barrier effects should take into account

  11. Forecasting urban highway travel for year 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Miaou, Shaw-Pin . Transportation Center); Rathi, A.K.; Southworth, F.; Greene, D.L. )

    1990-08-01

    As part of a study aimed at estimating suburban highway needs for year 2005, models were developed for forecasting daily vehicle miles of travel (DVMT) for urban areas and its distribution by highway functional class, urban location, and urban area size. A regression model combining both time series and cross-sectional data is used to establish the relationship between the per capita DVMT of 339 urban areas in the United States and a set of explanatory variables including real income, employment, number of persons per household, number of driver licenses per 1000 persons, a variable representing highway supply deficiency, and a time variable. The dynamic shift over time in share of travel between urban locations and highway functional classes as urban areas grow in size is represented by conditional logit models. This paper presents the major findings from the forecasting and distribution models for urban highway travel in year 2005. 30 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Characteristics of vehicular traffic flow at a roundabout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim Fouladvand, M.; Sadjadi, Zeinab; Reza Shaebani, M.

    2004-10-01

    We construct a stochastic cellular automata model for the description of vehicular traffic at a roundabout designed at the intersection of two perpendicular streets. The vehicular traffic is controlled by a self-organized scheme in which traffic lights are absent. This controlling method incorporates a yield-at-entry strategy for the approaching vehicles to the circulating traffic flow in the roundabout. Vehicular dynamics is simulated and the delay experienced by the traffic at each individual street is evaluated. We discuss the impact of the geometrical properties of the roundabout on the total delay. We compare our results with traffic-light signalization schemes, and obtain the critical traffic volume over which the intersection is optimally controlled through traffic-light signalization schemes.

  13. Traffic placement policies for a multi-band network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maly, Kurt J.; Foudriat, E. C.; Game, David; Mukkamala, R.; Overstreet, C. Michael

    1990-01-01

    Recently protocols were introduced that enable the integration of synchronous traffic (voice or video) and asynchronous traffic (data) and extend the size of local area networks without loss in speed or capacity. One of these is DRAMA, a multiband protocol based on broadband technology. It provides dynamic allocation of bandwidth among clusters of nodes in the total network. A number of traffic placement policies for such networks are proposed and evaluated. Metrics used for performance evaluation include average network access delay, degree of fairness of access among the nodes, and network throughput. The feasibility of the DRAMA protocol is established through simulation studies. DRAMA provides effective integration of synchronous and asychronous traffic due to its ability to separate traffic types. Under the suggested traffic placement policies, the DRAMA protocol is shown to handle diverse loads, mixes of traffic types, and numbers of nodes, as well as modifications to the network structure and momentary traffic overloads.

  14. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ishak, Sherif

    2016-03-01

    There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]). A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone. PMID:26937456

  15. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones

    PubMed Central

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H.; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ishak, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]). A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone. PMID:26937456

  16. Modeling Application Traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aktas, Ismet; King, Thomas; Mengi, Cem

    Communication networks require a deep understanding of the source of generated traffic, i.e., the application. A multitude number of applications exist that generate different types of traffic, for example web, peer-to-peer, voice, and video traffic. Within the scope of performance analysis of protocols for communication networks, modeling and generating of such traffic is essential to achieve accurate and credible results. This requires that the most relevant aspects are captured by analyzing the traffic and subsequently properly represented in the application model.

  17. Isotopic signatures of traffic-emitted CO and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popa, Maria Elena; Pathirana, Supun; Vollmer, Martin K.; Jordan, Armin; Rothe, Michael; Brand, Willi A.; Röckmann, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    Traffic is one of the main sources of CO2 and CO in highly populated regions like Western Europe. 13C and 18O isotopic signatures of traffic-emitted CO2 and CO were determined form air samples collected in the Islisberg highway tunnel (Switzerland), during a measurement and sampling campaign in 2011. The goal of the campaign was to characterize traffic emissions of the present west European vehicle fleet, at integrated fleet level. The isotopic composition of traffic CO2 reflects on average the isotopic composition of the fuel (13C) and of atmospheric oxygen (18O), although the 18O values are quite variable. In contrast, the isotopic values of CO show that significant fractionation takes place during CO formation (18O) and during the subsequent, partial CO destruction in the catalytic converter (13C). The 13C is enriched by 3 ‰ compared to the 13C in the fuel burnt, while the 18O is depleted by 7 ‰ compared to the 18O in atmospheric oxygen. We compute a kinetic isotope effect for 13C during CO destruction of 2.5 ± 0.7 ‰. The average 18O in traffic CO is 17 ‰ (VSMOW), similar to the biomass burning signature previously determined in Switzerland and Europe (e.g. Saurer et al., 2009). Thus, in the conditions represented by our study (Swiss fleet, highway driving conditions), the traffic and biomass burning CO emissions cannot be distinguished anymore based on 18O signature alone. References Saurer, M., Prévôt, A. S. H., Dommen, J., Sandradewi, J., Baltensperger, U., and Siegwolf, R. T. W.: The influence of traffic and wood combustion on the stable isotopic composition of carbon monoxide, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 9, 3147-3161, doi:10.5194/acp-9-3147-2009, 2009.

  18. Integrated traffic system

    SciTech Connect

    Creighton, H. ); Allen, R.; Stewart, S.; Hayto, S. )

    1990-11-01

    The traffic congestion on our roads today is becoming a critical problem. There is increased fuel consumption as cars wait along poorly timed arterials. Safety is threatened as poor traffic flow leads to collisions. This paper reports that Transport Canada and the Ministry of Transportation Ontario has developed an integrated traffic system (ITS). The system is designed to enable the optimization of traffic flow on existing roadways. The ITS system contains a data-base management system for traffic data (including accidents, roadway volumes, and signal timing details) and links this data base to the traffic analysis programs. This will ease the data management situation within the municipalities and standardize the traffic operations and reduce duplication of computerization development efforts.

  19. Inter-Individual Variability of Stone Marten Behavioral Responses to a Highway

    PubMed Central

    Ascensão, Fernando; Grilo, Clara; LaPoint, Scott; Tracey, Jeff; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Santos-Reis, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to reduce the negative impacts of roads on wildlife may be hindered if individuals within the population vary widely in their responses to roads and mitigation strategies ignore this variability. This knowledge is particularly important for medium-sized carnivores as they are vulnerable to road mortality, while also known to use available road passages (e.g., drainage culverts) for safely crossing highways. Our goal in this study was to assess whether this apparently contradictory pattern of high road-kill numbers associated with a regular use of road passages is attributable to the variation in behavioral responses toward the highway between individuals. We investigated the responses of seven radio-tracked stone martens (Martes foina) to a highway by measuring their utilization distribution, response turning angles and highway crossing patterns. We compared the observed responses to simulated movement parameterized by the observed space use and movement characteristics of each individual, but naïve to the presence of the highway. Our results suggested that martens demonstrate a diversity of responses to the highway, including attraction, indifference, or avoidance. Martens also varied in their highway crossing patterns, with some crossing repeatedly at the same location (often coincident with highway passages). We suspect that the response variability derives from the individual's familiarity of the landscape, including their awareness of highway passage locations. Because of these variable yet potentially attributable responses, we support the use of exclusionary fencing to guide transient (e.g., dispersers) individuals to existing passages to reduce the road-kill risk. PMID:25072639

  20. Intelligent advisory speed limit dedication in highway using VANET.

    PubMed

    Jalooli, Ali; Shaghaghi, Erfan; Jabbarpour, Mohammad Reza; Noor, Rafidah Md; Yeo, Hwasoo; Jung, Jason J

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSLs) as a mean for enhancing road traffic safety are studied for decades to modify the speed limit based on the prevailing road circumstances. In this study the pros and cons of VSL systems and their effects on traffic controlling efficiency are summarized. Despite the potential effectiveness of utilizing VSLs, we have witnessed that the effectiveness of this system is impacted by factors such as VSL control strategy used and the level of driver compliance. Hence, the proposed approach called Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication (IASLD) as the novel VSL control strategy which considers the driver compliance aims to improve the traffic flow and occupancy of vehicles in addition to amelioration of vehicle's travel times. The IASLD provides the advisory speed limit for each vehicle exclusively based on the vehicle's characteristics including the vehicle type, size, and safety capabilities as well as traffic and weather conditions. The proposed approach takes advantage of vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) to accelerate its performance, in the way that simulation results demonstrate the reduction of incident detection time up to 31.2% in comparison with traditional VSL strategy. The simulation results similarly indicate the improvement of traffic flow efficiency, occupancy, and travel time in different conditions. PMID:24999493

  1. Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication in Highway Using VANET

    PubMed Central

    Md Noor, Rafidah; Yeo, Hwasoo; Jung, Jason J.

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed limits (VSLs) as a mean for enhancing road traffic safety are studied for decades to modify the speed limit based on the prevailing road circumstances. In this study the pros and cons of VSL systems and their effects on traffic controlling efficiency are summarized. Despite the potential effectiveness of utilizing VSLs, we have witnessed that the effectiveness of this system is impacted by factors such as VSL control strategy used and the level of driver compliance. Hence, the proposed approach called Intelligent Advisory Speed Limit Dedication (IASLD) as the novel VSL control strategy which considers the driver compliance aims to improve the traffic flow and occupancy of vehicles in addition to amelioration of vehicle's travel times. The IASLD provides the advisory speed limit for each vehicle exclusively based on the vehicle's characteristics including the vehicle type, size, and safety capabilities as well as traffic and weather conditions. The proposed approach takes advantage of vehicular ad hoc network (VANET) to accelerate its performance, in the way that simulation results demonstrate the reduction of incident detection time up to 31.2% in comparison with traditional VSL strategy. The simulation results similarly indicate the improvement of traffic flow efficiency, occupancy, and travel time in different conditions. PMID:24999493

  2. Multiple logistic regression model of signalling practices of drivers on urban highways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puan, Othman Che; Ibrahim, Muttaka Na'iya; Zakaria, Rozana

    2015-05-01

    Giving signal is a way of informing other road users, especially to the conflicting drivers, the intention of a driver to change his/her movement course. Other users are exposed to hazard situation and risks of accident if the driver who changes his/her course failed to give signal as required. This paper describes the application of logistic regression model for the analysis of driver's signalling practices on multilane highways based on possible factors affecting driver's decision such as driver's gender, vehicle's type, vehicle's speed and traffic flow intensity. Data pertaining to the analysis of such factors were collected manually. More than 2000 drivers who have performed a lane changing manoeuvre while driving on two sections of multilane highways were observed. Finding from the study shows that relatively a large proportion of drivers failed to give any signals when changing lane. The result of the analysis indicates that although the proportion of the drivers who failed to provide signal prior to lane changing manoeuvre is high, the degree of compliances of the female drivers is better than the male drivers. A binary logistic model was developed to represent the probability of a driver to provide signal indication prior to lane changing manoeuvre. The model indicates that driver's gender, type of vehicle's driven, speed of vehicle and traffic volume influence the driver's decision to provide a signal indication prior to a lane changing manoeuvre on a multilane urban highway. In terms of types of vehicles driven, about 97% of motorcyclists failed to comply with the signal indication requirement. The proportion of non-compliance drivers under stable traffic flow conditions is much higher than when the flow is relatively heavy. This is consistent with the data which indicates a high degree of non-compliances when the average speed of the traffic stream is relatively high.

  3. Assessment of heavy metals contamination in roadside topsoil along Qinghai-Tibetan highway, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, C.; Zhang, F.; Yan, X.; Gao, D.

    2012-12-01

    With the rapid development of road construction and increase of vehicles on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau over last few decades, traffic source heavy metals have been continuously emitted into roadside soils and caused a growing concern on potential pollution of soils. In this study, a soil survey was conducted along the Qinghai-Tibet highway (Xining-Maduo-Budongquan-Naqu-Lhasa), China, to investigate the status and influence factors of heavy metals (Cu, Cd, Pb and Zn) in roadside topsoil. A total of 32 sampling sites, 144 topsoil (0~2 cm) samples were collected at different distances to the highway edge (0 m, 10 m, 30 m, 50 m and 100m). Vehicle volume, soil types and road types have significantly impacts on concentrations of the four heavy metals. On the whole, heavy metal concentrations were higher in Budongquan-Naqu-Lhasa (BNL) segment with higher traffic volume than Xining-Maduo-Budongquan (XMB) segment with lower traffic volume. The heavy metals concentrations also show higher levels for asphalt roads than gravel roads, and a sequence of severely degraded meadow soil (MS) > slightly degraded MS > desert soil > non-degraded MS. Besides, concentrations of all the four heavy metals show exponentially decreasing relationships with roadside distances. Compared to the background values of heavy metals in the soils of Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, traffic source heavy metals pollution only exists within 10 m to the road edge in most segments. However, the maximum polluted distance can reach 30 m along the TMP segment. It should be noted that heavy metals pollution was more harmful to this high-altitude segment with fragile ecology. Keywords: Heavy Metal (Cu, Cd, Pb, Zn); Roadside soil; Qinghai-Tibet highway; Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  4. Kinetic model for dilute traffic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balouchi, Ashkan; Browne, Dana A.

    The flow of traffic represents a many-particle non-equilibrium problem with important practical consequences. Traffic behavior has been studied using a variety of approaches, including fluid dynamics models, Boltzmann equation, and recently cellular automata (CA). The CA model for traffic flow that Nagel and Schreckenberg (NS) introduced can successfully mimic many of the known features of the traffic flow. We show that in the dilute limit of the NS model, where vehicles exhibit free flow, cars show significant nearest neighbor correlation primarily via a short-range repulsion. introduce an approximate analytic model to describe this dilute limit. We show that the distribution of the distance between consecutive vehicles obeys a drift-diffusion equation. We compared this model with direct simulations. The steady state solution and relaxation of this model agrees well with direct simulations. We explore how this model breaks down as the transition to jams occurs.

  5. Can Simulator Immersion Change Cognitive Style? Results from a Cross-Sectional Study of Field-Dependence--Independence in Air Traffic Control Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Eck, Richard N.; Fu, Hongxia; Drechsel, Paul V. J.

    2015-01-01

    Air traffic control (ATC) operations are critical to the U.S. aviation infrastructure, making ATC training a critical area of study. Because ATC performance is heavily dependent on visual processing, it is important to understand how to screen for or promote relevant visual processing abilities. While conventional wisdom has maintained that such…

  6. Application of multi-temporal landform analysis in landslide susceptibility assessment for mountainous highway - a case study in southeastern Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu-Xuan, Jian; Wei-Kai, Huang; Po-Shen, Lin

    2016-04-01

    This study divided a coastal mountainous highway into small sections with slope unit, plot the multi-temporal landslide inventories, and analyze the relationships between the revegetation areas of the existing landslide and newly activated landslide to calculate landslide status Index (LSI). The RI represents the multi-temporal status of landslide status in each slope unit; three statuses and their representing colors were defined in this study. Red representing slope unit with continuously landslides, yellow for those with previous landslide but stable and revegetating, green are those without landslides. The regression lines became one of the parameters in establishing landslide status map. The study area, 407K to 439K of Provincial Highway No. 9, located in southeastern Taiwan and is the most important transport corridor connecting southern Taiwan and the east coast. In 2009 this mountainous highway was hit by Typhoon Morakot and several landslides, debris slides were triggered in the study area. The debris blocked the traffic and residential communities alone the highway became isolated. To this date some section of the highway still suffer from landslide hazard and transportation had to be temporarily interrupted during some occasions. The landslide status map of this transport corridor was established combining the result of field investigation, remote sensing interpretation, and the regression lines of LSI. The preliminary result shows that out of the 258 slope units, 13 (5%) showing continuous landslides, 44 (17%) became stable and revegetating. The result of this study could provide better information for mountainous highway safety management.

  7. Road traffic impact on urban water quality: a step towards integrated traffic, air and stormwater modelling.

    PubMed

    Fallah Shorshani, Masoud; Bonhomme, Céline; Petrucci, Guido; André, Michel; Seigneur, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Methods for simulating air pollution due to road traffic and the associated effects on stormwater runoff quality in an urban environment are examined with particular emphasis on the integration of the various simulation models into a consistent modelling chain. To that end, the models for traffic, pollutant emissions, atmospheric dispersion and deposition, and stormwater contamination are reviewed. The present study focuses on the implementation of a modelling chain for an actual urban case study, which is the contamination of water runoff by cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) in the Grigny urban catchment near Paris, France. First, traffic emissions are calculated with traffic inputs using the COPERT4 methodology. Next, the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants is simulated with the Polyphemus line source model and pollutant deposition fluxes in different subcatchment areas are calculated. Finally, the SWMM water quantity and quality model is used to estimate the concentrations of pollutants in stormwater runoff. The simulation results are compared to mass flow rates and concentrations of Cd, Pb and Zn measured at the catchment outlet. The contribution of local traffic to stormwater contamination is estimated to be significant for Pb and, to a lesser extent, for Zn and Cd; however, Pb is most likely overestimated due to outdated emissions factors. The results demonstrate the importance of treating distributed traffic emissions from major roadways explicitly since the impact of these sources on concentrations in the catchment outlet is underestimated when those traffic emissions are spatially averaged over the catchment area. PMID:24288064

  8. Simplified cellular automaton model for city traffic

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, P.M.; Nagel, K. |

    1998-08-01

    We systematically investigate the effect of blockage sites in a cellular automaton model for traffic flow. Different scheduling schemes for the blockage sites are considered. None of them returns a linear relationship between the fraction of {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} time and the throughput. We use this information for a fast implementation of a simulation of traffic in Dallas. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Description of the National Highway Planning Network

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, B.E.

    1990-09-01

    The National Highway Planning Network is a data base of major highways in the continental United States. It is a foundation for analytic studies of highway performance, for vehicle routing and scheduling problems, and for mapping purposes. The network is based on a set of roadways digitized from the National Atlas by the US Geological Survey. It has been enhanced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory by adding additional roads and attribute detail and correcting topological errors to produce a true analytic network. This documentation is intended primarily to assist users of this data base by describing its structure, data elements, and development.

  10. Assessment of the energy impacts of improving highway-infrastructure materials

    SciTech Connect

    Stammer, R.E. Jr.; Stodolsky, F.

    1995-04-01

    Argonne National Laboratory has conducted a study to ascertain the relative importance of improved highway materials compared to vehicle energy consumption on US energy consumption. Energy savings through an improved highway infrastructure can occur in at least three ways. First, replacing aged and failing materials with improved and advanced materials can produce energy ``use`` savings. Second, advances in materials science can yield energy efficiency gains in the production of infrastructure materials. Third, using new or improved transportation-infrastructure materials that have longer service life reduces the energy expended in producing replacement materials and installing or repairing facilities. The Argonne study finds that energy savings from highway materials improvements are on the order of 0.1 {times} 10{sup 12} to 2.1 {times} 10{sup 12} Btu. This savings is relatively small compared with energy savings from improvements in vehicle fuel economy. Several infrastructure improvement scenarios were examined, with results that were highly dependent on the assumptions. Reducing traffic congestion, particularly in high-traffic-volume locations, produces major energy savings compared with the other scenarios.

  11. Particulate Matter Exposure in a Police Station Located near a Highway

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Hsu, Chin-Kai; Wang, Chia C.; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Mei-Ru; Lin, Ming-Yeng

    2015-01-01

    People living or working near roadways have experienced an increase in cardiovascular or respiratory diseases due to vehicle emissions. Very few studies have focused on the PM exposure of highway police officers, particularly for the number concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles (UFP). This study evaluated exposure concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in the Sinying police station near a highway located in Tainan, Taiwan, under different traffic volumes, traffic types, and shift times. We focused on periods when the wind blew from the highway toward the police station and when the wind speed was greater than or equal to 0.5 m/s. PM2.5, UFP, and PM-PAHs concentrations in the police station and an upwind reference station were measured. Results indicate that PM2.5, UFP, and PM-PAHs concentrations in the police station can be on average 1.13, 2.17, and 5.81 times more than the upwind reference station concentrations, respectively. The highest exposure level for PM2.5 and UFP was observed during the 12:00 PM–4:00 PM shift while the highest PAHs concentration was found in the 4:00 AM–8:00 AM shift. Thus, special attention needs to be given to protect police officers from exposure to high PM concentration. PMID:26580641

  12. Particulate Matter Exposure in a Police Station Located near a Highway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Cheng; Hsu, Chin-Kai; Wang, Chia C; Tsai, Perng-Jy; Wang, Chun-Yuan; Chen, Mei-Ru; Lin, Ming-Yeng

    2015-11-01

    People living or working near roadways have experienced an increase in cardiovascular or respiratory diseases due to vehicle emissions. Very few studies have focused on the PM exposure of highway police officers, particularly for the number concentration and size distribution of ultrafine particles (UFP). This study evaluated exposure concentrations of particulate matter (PM) in the Sinying police station near a highway located in Tainan, Taiwan, under different traffic volumes, traffic types, and shift times. We focused on periods when the wind blew from the highway toward the police station and when the wind speed was greater than or equal to 0.5 m/s. PM2.5, UFP, and PM-PAHs concentrations in the police station and an upwind reference station were measured. Results indicate that PM2.5, UFP, and PM-PAHs concentrations in the police station can be on average 1.13, 2.17, and 5.81 times more than the upwind reference station concentrations, respectively. The highest exposure level for PM2.5 and UFP was observed during the 12:00 PM-4:00 PM shift while the highest PAHs concentration was found in the 4:00 AM-8:00 AM shift. Thus, special attention needs to be given to protect police officers from exposure to high PM concentration. PMID:26580641

  13. Lead concentrations in bullfrog Rana catesbeiana and green frog R. clamitans tadpoles inhabiting highway drainages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdsall, C.W.; Grue, C.E.; Anderson, A.

    1986-01-01

    Lead concentrations were determined in sediment and tadpoles of bullfrogs Rana catesbeiana and green frogs R. clamitans from drainages along highways with different daily average traffic volumes (range, 4272 to I08,800 vehicles day-I) and from ponds >0.4 km from the nearest highway. Lead concentrations (mg kg--I dry weight) in sediment (7-8 to 940) were usually greater (4-5 times) than those in the tadpoles (bullfrog, 0,07 to 270; green frog, 0,90 to 240 mg kg-I). Lead concentrations in sediment (r =0.63) and in both species of tadpoles (bullfrog, r = 0.69; green frog, r = 0.57) were positively correlated with average daily traffic volume. Lead concentrations in both species of tadpoles (bullfrog, r = (). 76: green frog, r = 0.75) were also positively correlated with lead concentrations in sediment. At sites where both bullfrog and green frog tadpoles were collected. lead concentrations in the two species were closely related (r = 0.84). Lead concentrations in tadpoles living near highways may contribute to the elevated lead levels reported in wildlife that are potential tadpole predators. Dietary lead concentrations similar to those in our tadpoles have been associated with physiological and reproductive effects in some species of birds and mammals. However, additional data are needed to determine the hazards to predators of lead concentrations in tadpoles.

  14. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Passenger Safety, Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains nine lessons for use in kindergarten and grade 1. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing communication methods for highway…

  15. Crash Injury Management: Emergency Medical Services for Traffic Law Enforcement Officers. Instructor's Lesson Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    To assist in the continuing efforts to improve the safety of the motorist on the nation's highways and roads, this instructor's guide provides a standardized approach for providing training in emergency medical care for first responders to traffic accidents. The objective of the course is to provide training in all aspects of emergency medical…

  16. A Report on Traffic Safety and Montana's Children. 1999 Montana Special Report No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies--The Montana Coalition, Helena.

    This brief Kids Count report looks at major problems, available data, and some solutions for Montana's children as passengers in and drivers of vehicles on Montana's roads and highways. The report also presents information about adults' roles and responsibilities for preventing traffic accidents and protecting children. Facts presented in the…

  17. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Pedestrian Safety, Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains thirteen lessons on pedestrian safety for use in kindergarten and grade 1. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing…

  18. The Role of the Community College in Developing Traffic Specialists and Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bishop, Richard; Sheehe, Gordon

    The technical, professional, and administrative aspects of the operation and administration of the nation's highway transportation system currently involves more than one-half million persons, and the need for traffic specialists and technicians is exceeding the available supply. The community college must play an increasing role in (1) training…

  19. Determining contamination level of heavy metals in road dust from busy traffic areas with different characteristics.

    PubMed

    Duong, Trang T T; Lee, Byeong-Kyu

    2011-03-01

    This study identified the levels and sources of heavy metal contamination in road dust from busy traffic areas in a typical industrial city in Korea. This study compared the total concentrations, as determined by aqua regia digestions and atomic absorption spectroscopy, of cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), lead (Pb), zinc (Zn) and nickel (Ni) in the road dust from areas with different characteristics such as traffic rotaries, downtown areas, circulation roads, and asphalt and concrete highways. The contamination levels of the heavy metals in the road dust were evaluated using the contamination factor and the degree of contamination. The contamination levels of the heavy metals in the road dust were highly dependent on traffic volume and atmospheric dispersion from traffic rotaries. Industrial emissions and the frequency of brake use and vehicles coming to a complete stop were additional factors that affected the contamination levels in downtown areas. The concrete highway had higher contamination levels of the heavy metals than the asphalt highway. Vehicle speed was also a strong contributing factor to the degree of contamination of heavy metals in the road dust from the circulation roads and highways. PMID:20937547

  20. 75 FR 74128 - Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Compliance Dates

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... agencies. \\1\\ 74 FR 66732, December 16, 2009. \\2\\ 65 FR 78923, December 18, 2000. \\3\\ 68 FR 65496, November 20, 2003. \\4\\ 72 FR 72574, December 21, 2007. Purpose of This Notice The FHWA is interested in... Federal Highway Administration Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) Compliance Dates...

  1. Arizona Traffic Safety Education, K-8. Bicycle Safety, Grades K-1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mesa Public Schools, AZ.

    One in a series designed to assist Arizona elementary and junior high school teachers in developing children's traffic safety skills, this curriculum guide contains nine lessons on sidewalk vehicles and bicycles for use in kindergarten and grade 1. Introductory information provided for the teacher includes basic highway safety concepts, stressing…

  2. Effectiveness of highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt, Route 25, southeastern Massachusetts; description of study area, data collection programs, and methodology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Church, P.E.; Armstrong, D.S.; Granato, G.E.; Stone, V.J.; Smith, K.P.; Provencher, P.L.

    1996-01-01

    Four test sites along a 7-mile section of Route 25 in southeastern Massachusetts, each representing a specific highway-drainage system, were instrumented to determine the effectiveness of the drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt. One of the systems discharges highway runoff onsite through local drainpipes. The other systems use trunkline drainpipes through which runoff from highway surfaces, shoulders, and median strips is diverted and discharged into either a local stream or a coastal waterway. Route 25 was completed and opened to traffic in the summer of 1987. Road salt was first applied to the highway in the winter of 1987-88. The study area is on a thick outwash plain composed primarily of sand and gravel. Water-table depths range from 15 to 60 feet below land surface at the four test sites. Ground-water flow is in a general southerly direction, approximately perpendicular to the highway. Streamflow in the study area is controlled primarily by ground-water discharge. Background concentrations of dissolved chloride, sodium, and calcium-the primary constituents of road salt-are similar in ground water and surface water and range from 5 to 20, 5 to 10, and 1 to 5 milligrams per liter, respectively. Data-collection programs were developed for monitoring the application of road salt to the highway, the quantity of road-salt water entering the ground water, diverted through the highway-drainage systems, and entering a local stream. The Massachusetts Highway Department monitored road salt applied to the highway and reported these data to the U.S. Geological Survey. The U.S. Geological Survey designed and operated the ground-water, highway- drainage, and surface-water data-collection programs. A road-salt budget will be calculated for each test site so that the effectiveness of the different highway-drainage systems in preventing contamination of ground water by road salt can be determined.

  3. 25 CFR 169.28 - Public highways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... road and must submit a map of definite location on tracing linen showing the width of the proposed road... for public highway rights-of-way over and across roadless and wild areas shall be considered...

  4. Design of highway embankments using tire chips

    SciTech Connect

    Bosscher, P.J.; Edil, T.B.; Kuraoka, S.

    1997-04-01

    This paper describes research undertaken to develop design procedures for using shredded scrap tires as a lightweight fill material in highway construction. The benefits of using scrap tires are particularly enhanced if they can be used to replace virgin construction materials made from nonrenewable resources. This paper addresses the use of tire chips as a highway embankment material. Design parameters for embankments constructed using discarded shredded tires are presented based on laboratory model studies, numerical analyses, and field performance of test fills. The conclusions of this report support the use of tire chips as an environmentally acceptable lightweight fill in highway applications if properly confined. Recommendations for design procedures and construction specifications for the use of tire chips in highway fills are provided.

  5. Voyager 1 Explores the "Magnetic Highway"

    NASA Video Gallery

    This set of animations show NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft exploring a new region in our solar system called the "magnetic highway." In this region, the sun's magnetic field lines are connected to int...

  6. Speed limit and ramp meter control for traffic flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatin, Paola; Göttlich, Simone; Kolb, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    The control of traffic flow can be related to different applications. In this work, a method to manage variable speed limits combined with coordinated ramp metering within the framework of the Lighthill-Whitham-Richards (LWR) network model is introduced. Following a 'first-discretize-then-optimize' approach, the first order optimality system is derived and the switch of speeds at certain fixed points in time is explained, together with the boundary control for the ramp metering. Sequential quadratic programming methods are used to solve the control problem numerically. For application purposes, experimental setups are presented wherein variable speed limits are used as a traffic guidance system to avoid traffic jams on highway interchanges and on-ramps.

  7. Highway crash rates and age-related driver limitations: Literature review and evaluation of data bases

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, P.S.; Young, J.R.; Lu, An

    1993-08-01

    American society is undergoing a major demographic transformation that is resulting in a larger proportion of older individuals in the population. Moreover, recent travel surveys show that an increasing number of older individuals are licensed to drive and that they drive more than their same age cohort a decade ago. However, they continue to take shorter trips than younger drivers and they avoid driving during congested hours. This recent demographic transformation in our society, the graying of America, coupled with the increasing mobility of the older population impose a serious highway safety issue that cannot be overlooked. Some of the major concerns are the identification of ``high-risk`` older drivers and the establishment of licensing guidelines and procedures that are based on conclusive scientific evidence. Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL) objectives in this project can be characterized by the following tasks: Review and evaluate the 1980 American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) licensing guidelines. Determine whether the license restriction recommended in the 1980 AAMVA and NHTSA guidelines was based on scientific evidence or on judgement of medical advisors. Identify in the scientific literature any medical conditions which are found to be highly associated with highway crashes, and which are not mentioned in the 1980 guidelines. Summarize States` current licensing practices for drivers with age-related physical and mental limitations. Identify potential data sources to establish conclusive evidence on age-related functional impairments and highway crashes.

  8. Evolution of Traffic Jam in Traffic Flow Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Minoru; Ishibashi, Yoshihiro

    1993-11-01

    Traffic flow is simulated in a three-state cellular automaton model. In a two-dimensional cell without a crashed car, the ensemble average of the velocity of the cars is enhanced by the self-organization in the low-density phase of cars. In the high-density phase above p{=}0.5 of car density, the velocity is decreased and the system then degenerates into a global jamming phase in which all cars are stopped. A crashed car provides the seed of a jamming cluster, which grows into a global traffic jam even in the low-density phase. The growth of the jamming cluster is studied, and the time dependence of the number of jamming cars and the scaling law for the cell sizes are discussed.

  9. 23 CFR 200.9 - State highway agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., CFR part 21 (Department of Transportation Regulations for the implementation of Title VI of the Civil... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false State highway agency responsibilities. 200.9 Section 200.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE...

  10. 23 CFR 200.9 - State highway agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., CFR part 21 (Department of Transportation Regulations for the implementation of Title VI of the Civil... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false State highway agency responsibilities. 200.9 Section 200.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE...

  11. 23 CFR 200.9 - State highway agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., CFR part 21 (Department of Transportation Regulations for the implementation of Title VI of the Civil... 23 Highways 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false State highway agency responsibilities. 200.9 Section 200.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE...

  12. 23 CFR 200.9 - State highway agency responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., CFR part 21 (Department of Transportation Regulations for the implementation of Title VI of the Civil... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false State highway agency responsibilities. 200.9 Section 200.9 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION CIVIL RIGHTS TITLE...

  13. Regional analyses of highway energy use

    SciTech Connect

    Kulp, G.; Greene, D.L.; Walton, G.H.; Collins, M.J.; Shonka, D.B.; Blue, J.L.

    1980-04-01

    Regional variation among selected factors affecting energy use in highway transportation is described and analyzed. Highway vehicle use accounts for about 95% of all motor gasoline used and a substantial portion of the diesel fuel consumed in the US. For the purposes of analysis, highway energy use can be divided into three sectoral users: household, commercial, and government. Chapter 1, Nonhighway Use of Gasoline, covers agriculture, marine, aviation, industrial and commercial, construction, snowmobiles, and motorcycles. Chapter 2, Topics in Commercial Highway Energy Use, includes the following: Commercial Use of Gasoline in Highway Transportation, Automotive Fleets and Electric Vehicle Applicability; Local and Short-Haul Commercial Trucking; Intercity Trucking; and Intracity Bus Service. Chapter 3, Selected Characteristics of Highway Energy Use by the Household Sector, includes sections entitled: Regional Gasoline Use; Ownership of New and Used Vehicles; Fuel Efficiencies and Market Shares of New Vehicle Registrations; Regional Trends in Import Passenger Car Sales and in Light Truck and Van Sales; Regional Variations in Recreational Vehicle Shipments and in Gasoline Consumption, 1977; Regional Patterns of Motorcycle and Moped Use; and An Analysis of the Differences in Carpooling Across Metropolitan Areas.

  14. Concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll collection booth and exposure implications for toll collectors.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Cheng-Hsiung; Huang, Hsiao-Lin; Tsai, Chuen-Jinn

    2010-12-15

    Research regarding the magnitude of ultrafine particle levels at highway toll stations is limited. This study measured ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at a highway toll station from October 30 to November 1 and November 5 to November 6, 2008. A scanning mobility particle sizer was used to measure ultrafine particle concentrations at a ticket/cash tollbooth. Levels of hourly average ultrafine particles at the tollbooth were about 3-6 times higher than those in urban backgrounds, indicating that a considerable amount of ultrafine particles are exhausted from passing vehicles. A bi-modal size distribution pattern with a dominant mode at about <6 nm and a minor mode at about 40 nm was observed at the tollbooth. The high amounts of nanoparticles in this study can be attributed to gas-to-particle reactions in fresh fumes emitted directly from vehicles. The influences of traffic volume, wind speed, and relative humidity on ultrafine particle concentrations were also determined. High ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles existed under low wind speed, low relative humidity, and high traffic volume. Although different factors account for high ambient concentrations of ultrafine particles at the tollbooth, measurements indicate that toll collectors who work close to traffic emission sources have a high exposure risk. PMID:21071066

  15. Traffic Experiment Reveals the Nature of Car-Following

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Rui; Hu, Mao-Bin; Zhang, H. M.; Gao, Zi-You; Jia, Bin; Wu, Qing-Song; Wang, Bing; Yang, Ming

    2014-01-01

    As a typical self-driven many-particle system far from equilibrium, traffic flow exhibits diverse fascinating non-equilibrium phenomena, most of which are closely related to traffic flow stability and specifically the growth/dissipation pattern of disturbances. However, the traffic theories have been controversial due to a lack of precise traffic data. We have studied traffic flow from a new perspective by carrying out large-scale car-following experiment on an open road section, which overcomes the intrinsic deficiency of empirical observations. The experiment has shown clearly the nature of car-following, which runs against the traditional traffic flow theory. Simulations show that by removing the fundamental notion in the traditional car-following models and allowing the traffic state to span a two-dimensional region in velocity-spacing plane, the growth pattern of disturbances has changed qualitatively and becomes qualitatively or even quantitatively in consistent with that observed in the experiment. PMID:24740284

  16. Traffic flow theory and characteristics with applications for intelligent transportation system technologies. Transportation research record

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    ;Contents: Another Look at A Priori Relationship Among Traffic Flow Characteristics; Description of Macroscopic Relationships Among Traffic Flow Variables Using Neural Network Models; Microscopic Modeling of Traffic Within Freeway Lanes; Statistical Analysis of Day-to-Day Variations in Real-Time Traffic Flow Data; Statistical Analysis and Validation of Multipopulation Traffic Simulation Experiments; Event-Based Short-Term Traffic Flow Prediction Model; Estimating Intersection Turning Movement Proportions from Less-Than-Complete Sets of Traffic Counts; Arterial Incident Detection Integrating Data from Multiple Sources; and Driver Deceleration Behavior on a Freeway in New Zealand.

  17. Traffic flow behavior at a single lane roundabout as compared to traffic circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakouari, N.; Ez-Zahraouy, H.; Benyoussef, A.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a stochastic Cellular Automata (CA) model to study traffic flow at a single-lane urban roundabout (resp. traffic circle) of N entry points (resp. exit points), the entry points are controlled by rates α1 and α2 while the removal rates from the exit points are denoted by β. The traffic is controlled by a self-organized scheme. Based on computer simulation, density profiles, global density and current are calculated in terms of rates. Furthermore, the phase diagrams for roundabout as well as traffic circle are constructed. It has turned out that the phase diagrams consist essentially of two phases namely free flow and jamming. It is noted that the typology of the phase diagrams of the roundabout is not similar to it in the traffic circle. Furthermore, we have compared the performance of the two systems in terms of the geometrical properties and the number of entry points.

  18. Expanding metropolitan highways: Implications for air quality and energy use. Special report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-11-01

    This study is focused on the effects of investment in highway capacity on air quality and energy use in metropolitan areas. Its primary audience is metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs), state officials, legislators, and courts with oversight responsibilities. The purpose of this study is to review the current state of knowledge, evaluate the scientific evidence, and narrow the areas of disagreement about the impacts of highway capacity additions on traffic flow characteristics, travel demand, land use, vehicle emissions, air quality, and energy use. The state of modeling practice is also examined to assess the reliability of forecasting tools available to planning agencies; research, modeling improvements, and data collection are recommended to help narrow the gap between regulatory requirements and analytic capabilities.

  19. Traffic jam dynamics in stochastic cellular automata

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K. |; Schreckenberg, M.

    1995-09-01

    Simple models for particles hopping on a grid (cellular automata) are used to simulate (single lane) traffic flow. Despite their simplicity, these models are astonishingly realistic in reproducing start-stop-waves and realistic fundamental diagrams. One can use these models to investigate traffic phenomena near maximum flow. A so-called phase transition at average maximum flow is visible in the life-times of jams. The resulting dynamic picture is consistent with recent fluid-dynamical results by Kuehne/Kerner/Konhaeuser, and with Treiterer`s hysteresis description. This places CA models between car-following models and fluid-dynamical models for traffic flow. CA models are tested in projects in Los Alamos (USA) and in NRW (Germany) for large scale microsimulations of network traffic.

  20. Collection and evaluation of modal traffic data for determination of vehicle emission rates under certain driving conditions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, L.

    1997-08-01

    This report presents a research effort for collecting the on-road vehicle emission data, developing the ONROAD emission estimation model and evaluating existing emission estimation models including the emission factor models MOBILE and EMFAC. The on-road emission data were collected from highway locations in Houston using a Remote Emission Sensor (RES) called Smog Dog, which was developed by the Santa Barbara Research Center (SBRC). The SMOG DOG is used to collect the emission concentrations of CO, HC, and NO{sub x}, as well as to simultaneously record a vehicle`s instantaneous speed value and acceleration/deceleration rates while its emission is detected. During the emission data collection, the ambient temperature and humidity were periodically recorded. The collected emission data are used to develop the ONROAD emission estimation model, which consists of a series of emission estimation equations. In these emission estimation equations, the emission rates are made functions of a vehicle`s instantaneous speed, acceleration/deceleration rate, ambient temperature and humidity. The emission factors that are derived from MOBILE and EMFAC are compared with the collected on-road emission data by emulating the standard FTP driving cycles using the ONROAD emission rates. Efforts are also made to compare the emission estimates in traffic simulation models with the on-road emission data. It is found that traffic simulation models considerably underestimate the on-road emissions, and thus these models are not recommended for use in performing any field vehicle emission analysis.