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Sample records for hip spacer implantation

  1. Preventing mechanical complications of hip spacer implantation: technical tips and pearls.

    PubMed

    Barreira, Pedro; Leite, Pedro; Neves, Pedro; Soares, Daniel; Sousa, Ricardo

    2015-06-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection is a frequent complication after total hip replacement. Two-stage exchange with the use of a temporary cement spacer is commonplace. Several complications are possible with its use. In addition to infection persistence, mechanical complications such as dislocation or fractures are among the most common. Several risk factors can and should be addressed during first stage or spacer implantation surgery in order to minimize complications. Technical aspects as well as practical tips and pearls to overcome common nuisances such as spacer instability or femoral and acetabular bone loss will be discussed. PMID:26280978

  2. Hip Implant Systems

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Devices Products and Medical Procedures Implants and Prosthetics Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin ... devices available with different bearing surfaces. These are: Metal-on-Polyethylene: The ball is made of metal ...

  3. Two-Stage Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty for Periprosthetic Infections Using Antibiotic-Impregnated Cement Spacers of Various Types and Materials

    PubMed Central

    Takahira, Naonobu; Moriya, Mitsutoshi; Yamamoto, Takeaki; Minegishi, Yojiro; Sakai, Rina; Itoman, Moritoshi; Takaso, Masashi

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers of various types and materials have been used in the treatment of periprosthetic hip infections. We developed a handmade spacer by using polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and/or ?-tricalcium phosphate (?-TCP). In this study, we retrospectively reviewed the surgical outcomes in 36 consecutive patients treated with 2-stage revision total hip arthroplasty by using our antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers. We aimed to analyze the infection control and reinfection rates after revision surgery. Moreover, we analyzed the possible predictors of postoperative reinfection. After exclusion of 1 patient who died immediately after the first-stage surgery, infection was controlled in 33 of the 36 hips (success rate, 91.7%). Two of these 33 hips underwent resection arthroplasty. Of the 36 hips that had been treated with the antibiotic-cement spacer, 31 hips (86.1%) were eligible for the second-stage prosthesis re-implantation. The 31 protocol hip joints of patients followed up for >6 months (mean, 48.6 months). Ten of these 31 hips (32.3%) became reinfected. No possible predictor examined differed significantly between the reinfection-positive and reinfection-negative groups. However, spacers consisting of PMMA cement alone were associated with the highest risk of reinfection. Therefore, ?-TCP-containing antibiotic-impregnated hip cement spacers might decrease the reinfection rate in patients undergoing re-implantation. PMID:24381509

  4. Burnishing Techniques Strengthen Hip Implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In the late 1990s, Lambda Research Inc., of Cincinnati, Ohio, received Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn Research Center to demonstrate low plasticity burnishing (LPB) on metal engine components. By producing a thermally stable deep layer of compressive residual stress, LPB significantly strengthened turbine alloys. After Lambda patented the process, the Federal Aviation Administration accepted LPB for repair and alteration of commercial aircraft components, the U.S. Department of Energy found LPB suitable for treating nuclear waste containers at Yucca Mountain. Data from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration confirmed LPB to completely eliminate the occurrence of fretting fatigue failures in modular hip implants.

  5. A Hip Implant Energy Harvester

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pancharoen, K.; Zhu, D.; Beeby, S. P.

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a kinetic energy harvester designed to be embedded in a hip implant which aims to operate at a low frequency associated with body motion of patients. The prototype is designed based on the constrained volume available in a hip prosthesis and the challenge is to harvest energy from low frequency movements (< 1 Hz) which is an average frequency during free walking of a patient. The concept of magnetic-force-driven energy harvesting is applied to this prototype considering the hip movements during routine activities of patients. The magnetic field within the harvester was simulated using COMSOL. The simulated resonant frequency was around 30 Hz and the voltage induced in a coil was predicted to be 47.8 mV. A prototype of the energy harvester was fabricated and tested. A maximum open circuit voltage of 39.43 mV was obtained and the resonant frequency of 28 Hz was observed. Moreover, the power output of 0.96 ?W was achieved with an optimum resistive load of 250?.

  6. Hip Implant Modified To Increase Probability Of Retention

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canabal, Francisco, III

    1995-01-01

    Modification in design of hip implant proposed to increase likelihood of retention of implant in femur after hip-repair surgery. Decreases likelihood of patient distress and expense associated with repetition of surgery after failed implant procedure. Intended to provide more favorable flow of cement used to bind implant in proximal extreme end of femur, reducing structural flaws causing early failure of implant/femur joint.

  7. Information for Patients Who Have Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Metal Hip Implants Information for Patients Who Have Metal-on-Metal Hip Implants Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... How do I know if I have a metal-on-metal hip implant? Patients are usually told ...

  8. Navigated cup implantation in hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Many studies have suggested that navigation-based implantation can improve cup positioning in total hip arthroplasty (THA). We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to compile the best available evidence, and to overcome potential shortcomings because of small sample sizes in individual studies. Methods The search strategy covered the major medical databases from January 1976 through August 2007, as well as various publishers' databases. The internal validity of individual studies was evaluated independently by 3 reviewers. We used random-effects modeling to obtain mean differences in cup angulation and relative risk (RR) of cup positioning outside Lewinnek's safe zone. Results Of 363 citations originally identified, 5 trials of moderate methodology enrolling a total of 400 patients were included in the analysis. Mean cup inclination and anteversion were not statistically significantly different between the conventional groups and the navigated groups. Navigation reduced the variability in cup positioning and the risk of placing the acetabular component beyond the safe zone (RR = 0.21, CI: 0.13–0.32). Interpretation Based on the current literature, navigation is a reliable tool to optimize cup placement, and to minimize outliers. However, long-term outcomes and cost utility analyses are needed before conclusive statements can be drawn about the value of routine navigation in THA. PMID:19916685

  9. Muscle atrophy and metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Berber, Reshid; Khoo, Michael; Cook, Erica; Guppy, Andrew; Hua, Jia; Miles, Jonathan; Carrington, Richard; Skinner, John; Hart, Alister

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Muscle atrophy is seen in patients with metal-on-metal (MOM) hip implants, probably because of inflammatory destruction of the musculo-tendon junction. However, like pseudotumors, it is unclear when atrophy occurs and whether it progresses with time. Our objective was to determine whether muscle atrophy associated with MOM hip implants progresses with time. Patients and methods We retrospectively reviewed 74 hips in 56 patients (32 of them women) using serial MRI. Median age was 59 (23–83) years. The median time post-implantation was 83 (35–142) months, and the median interval between scans was 11 months. Hip muscles were scored using the Pfirrmann system. The mean scores for muscle atrophy were compared between the first and second MRI scans. Blood cobalt and chromium concentrations were determined. Results The median blood cobalt was 6.84 (0.24–90) ppb and median chromium level was 4.42 (0.20–45) ppb. The median Oxford hip score was 34 (5–48). The change in the gluteus minimus mean atrophy score between first and second MRI was 0.12 (p = 0.002). Mean change in the gluteus medius posterior portion (unaffected by surgical approach) was 0.08 (p = 0.01) and mean change in the inferior portion was 0.10 (p = 0.05). Mean pseudotumor grade increased by 0.18 (p = 0.02). Interpretation Worsening muscle atrophy and worsening pseudotumor grade occur over a 1-year period in a substantial proportion of patients with MOM hip implants. Serial MRI helps to identify those patients who are at risk of developing worsening soft-tissue pathology. These patients should be considered for revision surgery before irreversible muscle destruction occurs. PMID:25588091

  10. Optimal design of composite hip implants using NASA technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Saravanos, D. A.; Davy, D. T.; Waters, S. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using an adaptation of NASA software, we have investigated the use of numerical optimization techniques for the shape and material optimization of fiber composite hip implants. The original NASA inhouse codes, were originally developed for the optimization of aerospace structures. The adapted code, which was called OPORIM, couples numerical optimization algorithms with finite element analysis and composite laminate theory to perform design optimization using both shape and material design variables. The external and internal geometry of the implant and the surrounding bone is described with quintic spline curves. This geometric representation is then used to create an equivalent 2-D finite element model of the structure. Using laminate theory and the 3-D geometric information, equivalent stiffnesses are generated for each element of the 2-D finite element model, so that the 3-D stiffness of the structure can be approximated. The geometric information to construct the model of the femur was obtained from a CT scan. A variety of test cases were examined, incorporating several implant constructions and design variable sets. Typically the code was able to produce optimized shape and/or material parameters which substantially reduced stress concentrations in the bone adjacent of the implant. The results indicate that this technology can provide meaningful insight into the design of fiber composite hip implants.

  11. Management of periprosthetic joint infection after total hip arthroplasty using a custom made articulating spacer (CUMARS); the Exeter experience.

    PubMed

    Tsung, Jason D; Rohrsheim, James A L; Whitehouse, Sarah L; Wilson, Matthew J; Howell, Jonathan R

    2014-09-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) after THA is a major complication with an incidence of 1%-3%. We report our experiences with a technique using a custom-made articulating spacer (CUMARS) at the first of two-stage treatment for PJI. This technique uses widely available all-polyethylene acetabular components and the Exeter Universal stem, fixed using antibiotic loaded acrylic cement. Seventy-six hips were treated for PJI using this technique. Performed as the first of a two-stage procedure, good functional results were commonly seen, leading to postponing second stage indefinitely with retention of the CUMARS prosthesis in 34 patients. The CUMARS technique presents an alternative to conventional spacers, using readily available components that are well tolerated, allowing weight bearing and mobility, and achieving comparable eradication rates. PMID:24851790

  12. Iodine-Supported Hip Implants: Short Term Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Kabata, Tamon; Maeda, Toru; Kajino, Yoshitomo; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Takashi; Takagi, Tomoharu; Ohmori, Takaaki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new povidone iodine coating technology for titanium hip implants and performed a clinical trial to assess its usefulness in suppressing postoperative infection. Results indicate that iodine-supported titanium has favorable antibacterial activity, biocompatibility, and no cytotoxicity. Thirty joints in 28 patients were treated using iodine-supported implants. Fourteen joints were revision total hip arthroplasty (THA) after periprosthetic infection, 13 were primary THA for immunosuppressive conditions or pyogenic arthritis, and 3 were conversions from hemiarthroplasty to THA for immunosuppressive conditions. Two examinations were conducted sequentially until final follow-up: white blood cell (WBC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured pre- and postoperatively and thyroid hormone levels in the blood were examined. The mean follow-up period was 33 months (14–78). There were no signs of infection in any patient at the last follow-up. WBC and CRP levels returned to normal within several weeks. No abnormalities of thyroid gland function were detected. Loosening of the implants did not occur in any patient. Excellent bone ingrowth and ongrowth were found around prostheses. No cytotoxicity or adverse effects were detected. These results suggest that iodine-supported THA implants can be highly effective in preventing and treating postoperative infections. PMID:26583103

  13. The lubrication performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic hip implant under starved conditions

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Qingen; Wang, Jing; Yang, Peiran; Jin, Zhongmin; Fisher, John

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication plays an important role in the clinical performance of the ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) hip implant in terms of reducing wear and avoiding squeaking. All the previous lubrication analyses of CoC hip implants assumed that synovial fluid was sufficiently supplied to the contact area. The aim of this study was to investigate the lubrication performance of the CoC hip implant under starved conditions. A starved lubrication model was presented for the CoC hip implant. The model was solved using multi-grid techniques. Results showed that the fluid film thickness of the CoC hip implant was affected by fluid supply conditions: with the increase in the supplied fluid layer, the lubrication film thickness approached to that of the fully blooded solution; when the available fluid layer reduced to some level, the fluid film thickness considerably decreased with the supplying condition. The above finding provides new insights into the lubrication performance of hip implants. PMID:26114217

  14. High-Tech Hip Implant for Wireless Temperature Measurements In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bergmann, Georg; Graichen, Friedmar; Dymke, Jörn; Rohlmann, Antonius; Duda, Georg N.; Damm, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    When walking long distances, hip prostheses heat up due to friction. The influence of articulating materials and lubricating properties of synovia on the final temperatures, as well as any potential biological consequences, are unknown. Such knowledge is essential for optimizing implant materials, identifying patients who are possibly at risk of implant loosening, and proving the concepts of current joint simulators. An instrumented hip implant with telemetric data transfer was developed to measure the implant temperatures in vivo. A clinical study with 100 patients is planned to measure the implant temperatures for different combinations of head and cup materials during walking. This study will answer the question of whether patients with synovia with poor lubricating properties may be at risk for thermally induced bone necrosis and subsequent implant failure. The study will also deliver the different friction properties of various implant materials and prove the significance of wear simulator tests. A clinically successful titanium hip endoprosthesis was modified to house the electronics inside its hollow neck. The electronics are powered by an external induction coil fixed around the joint. A temperature sensor inside the implant triggers a timer circuit, which produces an inductive pulse train with temperature-dependent intervals. This signal is detected by a giant magnetoresistive sensor fixed near the external energy coil. The implant temperature is measured with an accuracy of 0.1°C in a range between 20°C and 58°C and at a sampling rate of 2–10 Hz. This rate could be considerably increased for measuring other data, such as implant strain or vibration. The employed technique of transmitting data from inside of a closed titanium implant by low frequency magnetic pulses eliminates the need to use an electrical feedthrough and an antenna outside of the implant. It enables the design of mechanically safe and simple instrumented implants. PMID:22927973

  15. Sheep Hip Arthroplasty Model of Failed Implant Osseointegration

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsen, Thomas; Kold, Søren; Baas, Jørgen; Søballe, Kjeld; Rahbek, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Early secure stability of an implant is important for long-term survival. We examined whether micromotion of implants consistently would induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane and thereby prevent osseointegration. One micromotion implant was inserted into one of the medial femoral condyles in ten sheep. The micromotion device consists of an anchor bearing a PMMA implant and a PE plug. During each gait cycle the PE plug will make the PMMA implant axially piston 0.5 mm. After 12 weeks of observation the bone specimens were harvested and a post-mortem control implant was inserted into the contra-lateral medial femoral condyle. Histomorphometrical evaluation showed that the surface on the implant observed for 12 weeks was covered by fibrous tissue. The control implants were covered by lamellar bone. No difference was found with respect to the volume fraction of lamellar bone in a 1 mm zone around the implants. This study indicates that implant micromotion is sufficient to induce bone resorption and formation of a fibrous membrane. PMID:26664497

  16. Treatment of proximal femur infections with antibiotic-loaded cement spacers

    PubMed Central

    Kelm, J.; Bohrer, P.; Schmitt, E.; Anagnostakos, K.

    2009-01-01

    In case of periprosthetic hip infections the implantation of antibiotic-loaded PMMA spacers is accepted for an adequate treatment option. Although their indication for the treatment of destructive, bacterial infections of the proximal femur would make sense, literature data are scarce. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of antibiotic-impregnated spacers in the treatment of proximal femur infections. In 10 consecutive patients (5 M/ 5 F, mean age 66 y.) with bacterial proximal femur infections, a femoral head/neck resection was prospectively performed with a subsequent implantation of an antibiotic-loaded spacer. The joint-specific outcome was evaluated by the Merle d´Aubigne and the Mayo hip score, the general outcome by SF-36. The time periods were divided into “infection situation”, “between stages” and meanly 1 year “after prosthesis implantation”. The spacers were meanly implanted over 90 [155-744] days. In all cases an infection eradication could be achieved. After infection eradication, a prosthesis implantation was performed in 8 cases. The general scores showed significant increases at each time period. With regard to the dimension “pain”, both scores demonstrated a significant increase between “infection situation” and “between stages”, but no significance between “between stages” and “after prosthesis implantation”. Spacers could be indicated in the treatment of proximal femur infections. Besides an infection eradication, a pain reduction is also possible. PMID:19841730

  17. Precaution, governance and the failure of medical implants: the ASR((TM)) hip in the UK.

    PubMed

    Wienroth, Matthias; McCormack, Pauline; Joyce, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Hip implants have provided life-changing treatment, reducing pain and improving the mobility and independence of patients. Success has encouraged manufacturers to innovate and amend designs, engendering patient hopes in these devices. However, failures of medical implants do occur. The failure rate of the Articular Surface Replacement metal-on-metal hip system, implanted almost 100,000 times world-wide, has re-opened debate about appropriate and timely implant governance. As commercial interests, patient hopes, and devices' governance converge in a socio-technical crisis, we analyse the responses of relevant governance stakeholders in the United Kingdom between 2007 and 2014. We argue that there has been a systemic failure of the governance system entrusted with the safety of patients fitted with medical implants. Commercial considerations of medical implants and the status quo of medical implant governance have been given priority over patient safety despite the availability of significant failure data in an example of uncertainty about what constitutes appropriate precautionary action. PMID:26573983

  18. Effect of friction and clearance on kinematics and contact mechanics of dual mobility hip implant.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yongchang; Chai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Wang, Manyi; Jin, Zhongmin

    2016-01-01

    The dual mobility hip implant has been introduced recently and increasingly used in total hip replacement to maintain the stability and reduce the risk of post-surgery dislocation. However, the kinematics and contact mechanisms of dual mobility hip implants have not been investigated in detail in the literature. Therefore, finite element method was adopted in this study to investigate dynamics and contact mechanics of a typical metal-on-polymer dual mobility hip implant under different friction coefficient ratios between the inner and the outer articulations and clearances/interferences between the ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene liner and the metal back shell. A critical ratio of friction coefficients between the two pairs of contact interfaces was found to mainly determine the rotating surfaces. Furthermore, an initial clearance between the liner and the back shell facilitated the rotation of the liner while an initial interference prevented such a motion at the outer articulating interface. In addition, the contact area and the sliding distance at the outer articulating surface were markedly greater than those at the inner cup-head interface, potentially leading to extensive wear at the outer surface of the liner. PMID:26586527

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging on disc degeneration changes after implantation of an interspinous spacer and fusion of the adjacent segment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaokang; Liu, Yingjie; Lian, Xiaofeng; Xu, Jianguang

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the changes of the lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) after the implantation of interspinous device and the fusion of the adjacent segment. A total of 62 consecutive patients suffering L5/S1 lumbar disc herniation (LDH) with concomitant disc space narrowing or low-grade instability up to 5 mm translational slip in L5/S1 level were treated with lumbar interbody fusion (LIF) via posterior approach. Thirty-four of these patients (Coflex group) received an additional implantation of the interspinous spacer device (Coflex™) in the level L4/L5, while the rest of 28 patients (fusion group) underwent the fusion surgery alone. Clinical and radiographic examinations were performed at pre- and postoperative visits to compare the clinical outcomes and the changes of the L4/L5 vertebral disc degeneration on MRI in both Coflex and fusion group. Although both Coflex and fusion group showed improvements of the clinical outcomes assessed by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) after surgery, patients in Coflex group had more significant amelioration (P < 0.05) compared to fusion group. During follow up, the postoperative disc degeneration changes in Coflex group assessed by the relative signal intensity (RSI) differed from those in fusion group (P < 0.05). The supplemental implantation of Coflex™ after the fusion surgery could delay the disc degeneration of the adjacent segment. PMID:26131210

  20. Optical measurement system for preparation and after-OP-check of a hip joint endoprothetic implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschke, R.; Lempe, B.; Taudt, Ch.; Rudek, F.; Baselt, T.; Basan, F.; Grunert, R.; Hartmann, P.

    2014-02-01

    With 332,000 operations carried out every year, the implantation of an artificial hip joint is one of the most common surgical operations performed in the US. According to prognosis which takes the demographical change into account, the number of these operations will increase in the coming years. One of the essential requirements is the perfect reconstruction of the biomechanical functions, especially the knowledge about the center of the hip rotation and the length of the leg. Based on this information it is possible to ensure the right position of the newly set leg during surgery. The aim of this work is to present and evaluate an optical measurement method in order to gather information about the center of the hip joint and the leg length. An appropriate laboratory setup has been designed and implemented in order to evaluate two different approaches: a structured light-method consisting of a DLP-Beamer or a laser source which projects defined patterns onto the patient and a marker-based system. Together with this both methods are combined with custom software to determine the hip joint center and the leg length with an accuracy of around +/- 0.2 inches. The clinical use of the tested approaches would give the surgeon the opportunity to reset the implant-parameters in the course of the surgery. In this way subsequent illnesses such as scoliotic pelvis can be prevented.

  1. Supplemental Information spacer spacer

    E-print Network

    Lim, Wendell

    Supplemental Information cas9 repeat spacer spacer dsDNA Transcription DNA scanning CRISPRcas1 cas2RNA) and the host RNase III. After cleavage, one single protein, Cas9, recognizes and binds to the cleaved form of the crRNA. Cas9 guides crRNA to DNA and scans the DNA molecule. The complex is stabilized by basepairing

  2. Good short-term outcome of primary total hip arthroplasty with cementless bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Cementless total hip arthroplasty is currently favored by many orthopedic surgeons. The design of the porous surface is critically important for long-term fixation. We examined the clinical and radiographic outcome of the cementless titanium hip implant with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 109 hips (92 patients) that had undergone primary cementless total hip arthroplasty with bioactive glass ceramic bottom-coated implants. The mean follow-up period was 7 (3–9) years. Hip joint function was evaluated with the Merle d’Aubigné and Postel hip score, and radiographic changes were determined from anteroposterior radiographs. Results The mean hip score improved from 9.7 preoperatively to 17 at the final follow-up. The overall survival rate was 100% at 9 years, when radiographic loosening or revision for any reason was used as the endpoint. 3 stems in 2 patients subsided more than 3 mm vertically within 1 year after implantation. Radiographs of the interface of the stem and femur were all classified as bone ingrowth fixation. Conclusions The short-term results of this study show good outcome for cementless implants with a bottom coating of apatite-wollastonite containing bioactive glass ceramic. PMID:23043270

  3. Two-stage revision of implant-associated infections after total hip and knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ellenrieder, Martin; Lenz, Robert; Haenle, Maximilian; Bader, Rainer; Mittelmeier, Wolfram

    2011-01-01

    Septic loosening of total hip and knee endoprostheses gains an increasing proportion of revision arthroplasties. Operative revisions of infected endoprostheses are mentally and physically wearing for the patient, challenging for the surgeon and a significant economic burden for healthcare systems. In cases of early infection within the first three weeks after implantation a one-stage revision with leaving the implant in place is widely accepted. The recommendations for the management of late infections vary by far. One-stage revisions as well as two-stage or multiple revision schedules have been reported to be successful in over 90% of all cases for certain patient collectives. But implant associated infection still remains a severe complication. Moreover, the management of late endoprosthetic infection requires specific logistics, sufficient and standardized treatment protocol, qualified manpower as well as an efficient quality management. With regard to the literature and experience of specialized orthopaedic surgeons from several university and regional hospitals we modified a commonly used treatment protocol for two-stage revision of infected total hip and knee endoprostheses. In addition to the achievement of maximum survival rate of the revision implants an optimisation of the functional outcome of the affected artificial joint is aimed for. PMID:22242098

  4. Revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification: implications for use of Unique Device Identification 2012 AAHKS member survey results.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Natalia A; Jehn, Megan; York, Sally; Davis, Charles M

    2014-02-01

    FDA's Unique Device Identification (UDI) Rule will mandate manufacturers to assign unique identifiers to their marketed devices. UDI use is expected to improve implant documentation and identification. A 2012 American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons membership survey explored revision total hip and knee arthroplasty implant identification processes. 87% of surgeons reported regularly using at least 3 methods to identify failed implants pre-operatively. Median surgeon identification time was 20 min; median staff time was 30 min. 10% of implants could not be identified pre-operatively. 2% could not be identified intra-operatively. UDI in TJA registry and UDI in EMR were indicated practices to best support implant identification and save time. FDA's UDI rule sets the foundation for UDI use in patient care settings as standard practice for implant documentation. PMID:23890830

  5. Implant Optimisation for Primary Hip Replacement in Patients over 60 Years with Osteoarthritis: A Cohort Study of Clinical Outcomes and Implant Costs Using Data from England and Wales

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Simon S.; Mason, James; Baker, Paul N.; Gregg, Paul J.; Deehan, David J.; Reed, Mike R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hip replacement is one of the most commonly performed surgical procedures worldwide; hundreds of implant configurations provide options for femoral head size, joint surface material and fixation method with dramatically varying costs. Robust comparative evidence to inform the choice of implant is needed. This retrospective cohort study uses linked national databases from England and Wales to determine the optimal type of replacement for patients over 60 years undergoing hip replacement for osteoarthritis. Methods and Findings Implants included were the commonest brand from each of the four types of replacement (cemented, cementless, hybrid and resurfacing); the reference prosthesis was the cemented hip procedure. Patient reported outcome scores (PROMs), costs and risk of repeat (revision) surgery were examined. Multivariable analyses included analysis of covariance to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score, OHS, and EQ5D index) (9159 linked episodes) and competing risks modelling of implant survival (79,775 procedures). Cost of implants and ancillary equipment were obtained from National Health Service procurement data. Results EQ5D score improvements (at 6 months) were similar for all hip replacement types. In females, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless hip prostheses (hazard ratio, HR = 2.22, p<0.001), when compared to the reference hip. Although improvement in OHS was statistically higher (22.1 versus 20.5, p<0.001) for cementless implants, this small difference is unlikely to be clinically important. In males, revision risk was significantly higher in cementless (HR = 1.95, p = 0.003) and resurfacing implants, HR = 3.46, p<0.001), with no differences in OHS. Material costs were lowest with the reference implant (cemented, range £1103 to £1524) and highest with cementless implants (£1928 to £4285). Limitations include the design of the study, which is intrinsically vulnerable to omitted variables, a paucity of long-term implant survival data (reflecting the duration of data collection), the possibility of revision under-reporting, response bias within PROMs data, and issues associated with current outcome scoring systems, which may not accurately reflect level of improvement in some patients. Conclusions Cement fixation, using a polyethylene cup and a standard sized head offers good outcomes, with the lowest risks and at the lowest costs. The most commonly used cementless and resurfacing implants were associated with higher risk of revision and were more costly, while perceptions of improved function and longevity were unsupported. PMID:26561859

  6. Simulation of the mechanical behavior of a HIP implant. Implant fixed to bone by cementation under arbitrary load

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldani, C. R.; Dominguez, A. A.

    2007-11-01

    In a previous work a finite elements model was constructed to simulate a fatigue assay according to the norm IRAM 9422-3. Three materials were studied, two of them are the most used in this type of implant (Stainless steel 3161 and alloy T16A14V) and the third was a new developed titanium alloy (Ti35Nb7Zr5Ta). Static loads were applied to the model according to the highest requirements of the norm and the stress - strain distribution were determined. In this study a simplified analysis of the material's fatigue was done according to the previous work. The best behavior of the titanium alloys vs. the stainless steel was evident. With the objective of studying the behavior of both: the implant and the femur bone, new finite elements models were realized, in which the presence of the bone was considered. Inside the bone, the femoral component of the implant was placed in a similar way of a cemented prosthesis in a total hip arthroplasty. The advantage of the titanium implant related to the stainless steel one, was very clear.

  7. Factors affecting the cement penetration of a hip resurfacing implant: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Howald, R; Kesteris, U; Klabunde, R; Krevolin, J

    2006-01-01

    An understanding of how the cementing technique influences cement penetration is important for surgeons to plan and conduct hip resurfacing procedures. Therefore the aim of this study is to determine the influence of the following parameters on cement penetration: use of pulse lavage, type of cement, and the standing period of the cement. Nine fresh frozen paired whole cadaver femora were used to investigate cement penetration. The femora were divided into three paired groups: (A) compared the use of pulse lavage to no pulse lavage, (B) compared two low viscosity bone cements SULCEM-3 (Zimmer GmbH, Switzerland) and Surgical Simplex (Stryker Orthopaedics, USA), and (C) compared bone cement viscosities using standing times of 1.5 min. and 3 min. The Durom Hip Resurfacing implant (Zimmer GmbH, Switzerland) was used in all groups. A single slice was taken out of the center of each head. Cement penetration ratio (penetration area divided by the bone area enclosed by implant) and mean cement penetration depth were measured. Cement penetration is increased using pulse lavage, and has the tendency to increase with increasing the cement standing time from 1.5 to 3 min. No difference in cement penetration was found when different cement brands of comparable viscosity were used. PMID:19219834

  8. Nuclear microbeam analysis of wear particles in tissue surrounding failed hip joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grime, G. W.; Triffitt, J. T.; Williamson, M. C.; Athanasou, N. A.

    1994-05-01

    Particulate wear debris from hip joint replacements is an important factor in determining the response of the surrounding tissue to the implants. Failed replacement joints are surrounded by a layer of fibrous tissue showing an inflammatory response to the wear debris. This reaction leads to bone resorption and the eventual failure of the prosthesis. In preliminary experiments the Oxford scanning proton microprobe has been used to study the composition of wear particles in the membranes surrounding failed implants constructed from Ti/V/Al alloy. The membranes were observed to contain 1-10 ?m particles with major constituents from the alloy and also from the cement and polyethylene used in the fitting and construction of the implant. Histological staining shows that these particles are associated with areas of high macrophage activity. Individual PIXE analysis of the metal particles indicates that two populations (high Ti/low Al and low Ti/high Al) may be present. These observations will provide further information on the mechanisms of implant degradation.

  9. Comparison and Combination of Dual-Energy- and Iterative-Based Metal Artefact Reduction on Hip Prosthesis and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Bongers, Malte N.; Schabel, Christoph; Thomas, Christoph; Raupach, Rainer; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare and combine dual-energy based and iterative metal artefact reduction on hip prosthesis and dental implants in CT. Material and Methods A total of 46 patients (women:50%,mean age:63±15years) with dental implants or hip prostheses (n = 30/20) were included and examined with a second-generation Dual Source Scanner. 120kV equivalent mixed-images were derived from reconstructions of the 100/Sn140kV source images using no metal artefact reduction (NOMAR) and iterative metal artefact reduction (IMAR). We then generated monoenergetic extrapolations at 130keV from source images without IMAR (DEMAR) or from source images with IMAR, (IMAR+DEMAR). The degree of metal artefact was quantified for NOMAR, IMAR, DEMAR and IMAR+DEMAR using a Fourier-based method and subjectively rated on a five point Likert scale by two independent readers. Results In subjects with hip prosthesis, DEMAR and IMAR resulted in significantly reduced artefacts compared to standard reconstructions (33% vs. 56%; for DEMAR and IMAR; respectively, p<0.005), but the degree of artefact reduction was significantly higher for IMAR (all p<0.005). In contrast, in subjects with dental implants only IMAR showed a significant reduction of artefacts whereas DEMAR did not (71%, vs. 8% p<0.01 and p = 0.1; respectively). Furthermore, the combination of IMAR with DEMAR resulted in additionally reduced artefacts (Hip prosthesis: 47%, dental implants 18%; both p<0.0001). Conclusion IMAR allows for significantly higher reduction of metal artefacts caused by hip prostheses and dental implants, compared to a dual energy based method. The combination of DE-source images with IMAR and subsequent monoenergetic extrapolation provides an incremental benefit compared to both single methods. PMID:26600188

  10. Whole-mount specimens in the analysis of en bloc samples obtained from revisions of resurfacing hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Stogiannidis, Ioannis; Puolakka, Timo; Pajamäki, Jorma; Moilanen, Teemu

    2010-01-01

    Background Modern metal-on-metal hip resurfacing implants are being increasingly used for young and active patients, although the long-term outcome and failure mechanisms of these implants are still unknown. In this consecutive revision case series, early failures of femoral implants (at < 4 years) were studied. Methods 3 revisions were done due to a fracture of the femoral neck and 1 due to loosening and varus position of the femoral component. Femoral heads were removed en bloc 2–46 months after the primary operation, embedded in methylmethacrylate, sectioned, stained, and analyzed as whole-mount specimens in 4 55–62-year-old patients with osteoarthritis. Results Histopathology was characterized by new but also partly healed trabecular microfractures, bone demineralization, cysts, metallosis, and abnormal formation of new woven bone. All samples displayed signs of notching, osteoporosis, and aseptic necrosis, which seemed to have been the main reason for the subsequent development and symptoms of the patients and revision operations of the hips. Interpretation Based on these early revision cases, it appears that aseptic necrosis is a common cause of early loosening of resurfacing hip implants. PMID:20367416

  11. Primary stability of a PGLA/Polydioxanone membrane for potential autologous chondrocyte implantation in the hip joint. A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Andrea; Bistolfi, Alessandro; Crova, Maurizio; Massazza, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to evaluate the primary stability of a membrane ?(resorbable polyglactin-910/poly-p-dioxanone) for autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) inserted by press-fit into defects in the femoral head and acetabulum. The stability of the membrane was evaluated after implantation in a cartilage defect on both sides of the joint in 12 hips in six cadavers. The hip was manually put through a full range of motion for 50 cycles after each lesion had been created and filled, starting with the acetabulum.?The implanted membranes showed stability in 83.3% of the acetabular defects and in 33.3% of the femoral defects after the 50 cycles. After an additional 50 cycles the acetabular membrane showed stability in a total of eight (67%) out of 12 acetabular lesions.?The results indicate that this membrane tissue is potentially stable in cartilage defects of the acetabulum, which may have clinical applications in autologous chondrocyte implantation. PMID:23760749

  12. IN VIVO SEVERE CORROSION AND HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF RETRIEVED MODULAR BODY TITANIUM ALLOY HIP-IMPLANTS

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Danieli C.; Urban, Robert M.; Jacobs, Joshua J.; Gilbert, Jeremy L.

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction (XRD) and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  13. In vivo severe corrosion and hydrogen embrittlement of retrieved modular body titanium alloy hip-implants.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Danieli C; Urban, Robert M; Jacobs, Joshua J; Gilbert, Jeremy L

    2009-01-01

    Titanium alloys are widely used in total-joint replacements due to a combination of outstanding mechanical properties, biocompatibility, passivity, and corrosion resistance. Nevertheless, retrieval studies have pointed out that these materials can be subjected to localized or general corrosion in modular interfaces when mechanical abrasion of the oxide film (fretting) occurs. Modularity adds large crevice environments, which are subject to micromotion between contacting interfaces and differential aeration of the surface. Titanium alloys are also known to be susceptible to hydrogen absorption, which can induce precipitation of hydrides and subsequent brittle failure. In this work, the surface of three designs of retrieved hip-implants with Ti-6Al-4V/Ti-6Al-4V modular taper interfaces in the stem were investigated for evidence of severe corrosion and precipitation of brittle hydrides during fretting-crevice corrosion in the modular connections. The devices were retrieved from patients and studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and chemical analysis. The surface qualitative investigation revealed severe corrosion attack in the mating interfaces with evidence of etching, pitting, delamination, and surface cracking. In vivo hydrogen embrittlement was shown to be a mechanism of degradation in modular connections resulting from electrochemical reactions induced in the crevice environment of the tapers during fretting-crevice corrosion. PMID:18683224

  14. Superelastic Orthopedic Implant Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Eric; Devaney, Robert; Palmer, Matthew; Kramer, Joshua; El Khaja, Ragheb; Fonte, Matthew

    2014-07-01

    The demand for hip and knee replacement surgery is substantial and growing. Unfortunately, most joint replacement surgeries will fail within 10-25 years, thereby requiring an arduous, painful, and expensive revision surgery. To address this issue, a novel orthopedic implant coating material ("eXalt") has been developed. eXalt is comprised of super elastic nitinol wire that is knit into a three-dimensional spacer fabric structure. eXalt expands in vivo to conform to the implantation site and is porous to allow for bone ingrowth. The safety and efficacy of eXalt were evaluated through structural analysis, mechanical testing, and a rabbit implantation model. The results demonstrate that eXalt meets or exceeds the performance of current coating technologies with reduced micromotion, improved osseointegration, and stronger implant fixation in vivo.

  15. Are Preformed Articulating Spacers Superior To Surgeon-Made Articulating Spacers in the Treatment Of PJI in THA? A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Citak, Mustafa; Masri, Bassam A.; Springer, Bryan; Argenson, Jean-Noel; Kendoff, Daniel O.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Antibiotic-loaded cement spacers are typically manufactured by surgeons in the operating room. However, if the infecting organism is known preoperatively, the cement spacer can be fabricated (Spacer-G® or the InterSpace® Hip) in advance. It is unclear if preformed hip spacers are superior to surgeon-made hip spacers in the treatment of periprosthetic joint infection following primary THA. Methods: A literature review of the peer-reviewed literature indexed by MEDLINE and Embase was performed to identify studies reporting the outcomes of preformed and surgeon-made hip spacers in the treatment of infection following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). A total of 43 articles met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis to compare the reinfection rate, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and spacer complication rates between surgeon-made and preformed hip spacers. Results and Interpretation: The analyzed studies included a total number of 1631 infected THA cases (n=1027 surgeonmade; n=604 preformed spacers). We found similar reinfection rates (6.0% surgeon-made, and 5.5% preformed spacers) and similar mean HHS at latest follow-up after reimplantation (HHS=84.3 surgeon-made, and HHS=81.8 preformed spacers) between both groups. However, patients treated with a surgeon-made articulating spacer had a higher spacer fracture rate compared to preformed articulating spacer. The use of preformed articulating spacers in the treatment of infected THA is not superior to surgeon-made articulating spacers regarding infection control and functional outcomes. However, the use of surgeon-made antibiotic spacers increased the risk of spacer fracture. PMID:26473023

  16. No association between serum metal ions and implant fixation in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Søballe, Kjeld; Jakobsen, Stig Storgaard; Lorenzen, Nina Dyrberg; Mechlenburg, Inger; Stilling, Maiken

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanism of failure of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been related to a high rate of metal wear debris, which is partly generated from the head-trunnion interface. However, it is not known whether implant fixation is affected by metal wear debris. Patients and methods 49 cases of MoM THA in 41 patients (10 women) with a mean age of 52 (28–68) years were followed with stereoradiographs after surgery and at 1, 2, and 5 years to analyze implant migration by radiostereometric analysis (RSA). Patients also participated in a 5- to 7-year follow-up with measurement of serum metal ions, questionnaires (Oxford hip score (OHS) and Harris hip score (HHS)), and measurement of cup and stem positions and systemic bone mineral density. Results At 1–2 years, mean total translation (TT) was 0.04 mm (95% CI: –0.07 to 0.14; p = 0.5) for the stems; at 2–5 years, mean TT was 0.13 mm (95% CI: –0.25 to –0.01; p = 0.03), but within the precision limit of the method. For the cups, there was no statistically significant TT or total rotation (TR) at 1–2 and 2–5 years. At 2–5 years, we found 4 cups and 5 stems with TT migrations exceeding the precision limit of the method. There was an association between cup migration and total OHS < 40 (4 patients, 4 hips; p = 0.04), but there were no statistically significant associations between cup or stem migration and T-scores < –1 (n = 10), cup and stem positions, or elevated serum metal ion levels (> 7µg/L (4 patients, 6 hips)). Interpretation Most cups and stems were well-fixed at 1–5 years. However, at 2–5 years, 4 cups and 5 stems had TT migrations above the precision limits, but these patients had serum metal ion levels similar to those of patients without measurable migrations, and they were pain-free. Patients with serum metal ion levels > 7 µg/L had migrations similar to those in patients with serum metal ion levels < 7 µg/L. Metal wear debris does not appear to influence the fixation of hip components in large-head MoM articulations at medium-term follow-up. PMID:24847790

  17. A modified porous tantalum implant technique for osteonecrosis of the femoral head: survivorship analysis and prognostic factors for radiographic progression and conversion to total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaosheng; Su, Xiuyun; Zhou, Shiguo; Wang, Lei; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Shubin

    2015-01-01

    Tantalum rod implant following core decompression is reported to be effective in early stage of osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH). The purpose of this study was to assess the survivorship and prognostic factors for radiographic progression and conversion to total hip arthroplasty (THA) after treatment with a modified tantalum implant technology. 59 consecutive hips (45 patients) in whom ONFH was treated with core decompression, impaction bone grafting of 2 mm-composite bone filling material, and insertion of a porous tantalum implant. 57 hips (44 patients, mean age 43 years, range 21 to 70 years) with Steinberg Stage I-IVA ONFH were available for follow-up at a mean of 44.8 months (rang, 11 to 62 months). Outcome measures included HHS (Harris Hip Score), radiographic outcome, and survivorship analysis with reversion to THA. Radiographic progression occurred in 17 hips (17/57, 29.82%). 11 hips (11/57, 19.30%) were converted to THA. The overall survival rate was 72.49% at 60 months post-operatively. After logistic regression analysis, corticosteroid use and bone marrow edema were found to be predictors of radiographic progression. The Cox proportional-hazard model revealed that bone marrow edema was an independent prognostic factor for conversion to THA. This modified technology may make patients avoid the use of corticosteroid, especially those without bone marrow edema, and obtains encouraging survival rates and a delay in or prevention of THA. PMID:25932121

  18. Analysis of contact mechanics in McKee-farrar metal-on-metal hip implants.

    PubMed

    Yew, A; Jagatia, M; Ensaff, H; Jin, Z M

    2003-01-01

    Contact mechanics analysis for a typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant was carried out in this study. The finite element method was used to predict the contact area and the contact pressure distribution at the bearing surfaces. The study investigated the effects of the cement and underlying bone, the geometrical parameters such as the radial clearance between the acetabular cup and the femoral head, and the acetabular cup thickness, as well as other geometrical features on the acetabular cup such as lip and studs. For all the cases considered, the predicted contact pressure distribution was found to be significantly different from that based upon the classical Hertz contact theory, with the maximum value being away from the centre of the contact region. The lip on the cup was found to have a negligible effect on the predicted contact pressure distribution. The presence of the studs on the outside of the cup caused a significant increase in the local contact pressure distribution, and a slight decrease in the contact region. Reasonably good agreement of the predicted contact pressure distribution was found between a three-dimensional anatomical model and a simple two-dimensional axisymmetric model. The interfacial boundary condition between the acetabular cup and the underlying cement, modelled as perfectly fixed or perfectly unbonded, had a negligible effect on the predicted contact parameters. For a given radial clearance of 0.079 mm, the decrease in the thickness of the acetabular cup from 4.5 to 1.5 mm resulted in an increase in the contact half angle from 15 degrees to 26 degrees, and a decrease in the maximum contact pressure from 55 to 20 MPa. For a given acetabular cup thickness of 1.5 mm, a decrease in the radial clearance from 0.158 to 0.0395 mm led to an increase in the contact half-angle from 20 degrees to 30 degrees, and a decrease in the maximum contact pressure from 30 to 10 MPa. For zero clearance, although the contact pressure was significantly reduced over most of the contact area, the whole acetabular cup came into contact with the femoral head, leading to stress concentration at the edge of the cup. Design optimization of the geometrical parameters, in terms of the acetabular cup thickness and the radial clearance, is important, not only to minimize the contact stress at the bearing surfaces, but also to avoid equatorial and edge contact. PMID:14558645

  19. Bisphosphonate Use and Risk of Implant Revision after Total Hip/Knee Arthroplasty: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Songsong; Yi, Chengqing; Krettek, Christian; Jagodzinski, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several studies investigated the association between bisphosphonate use and the risk of implant revision after total hip or knee arthroplasty (THA or TKA); However, the findings were inconsistent. We performed this meta-analysis to evaluate the overall relative risk of such an event. Methods We searched the PubMed, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases to identify relevant publications on April 22, 2015. To calculate the pooled risk ratios (RRs) with 95% confidential intervals (CIs), a fixed- or random-effects model was applied based on the heterogeneity across studies. Results Three cohort studies and one case-control study were included in this meta-analysis. Compared with the bisphosphonate nonusers, the patients who used bisphosphonates for a long period of time had a significantly decreased risk of implant revision after THA/TKA (summary adjusted RR = 0.48, 95% CI: 0.38–0.61), and the summary adjusted RRs for the users who underwent THA and those who underwent TKA were 0.47 (95% CI: 0.36–0.61) and 0.45 (95% CI: 0.21–0.95), respectively. Conclusions Long-term use of bisphosphonates is correlated with a significantly decreased risk of implant revision after THA/TKA. However, due to limited number of the included studies, the findings of the present study should be treated with caution. More well-designed studies are required to further confirm our findings. PMID:26444555

  20. Clinical usefulness of blood metal measurements to assess the failure of metal-on-metal hip implants

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Barry; Hart, Alister

    2012-01-01

    In April 2010, a Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency safety alert concerning all metal-on-metal (MOM) hip replacements recommended measuring chromium and cobalt concentrations when managing patients with painful prostheses. The need for this review is illustrated by the recent surge in requests for these blood tests from orthopaedic surgeons following this alert. The aim is to provide guidance to laboratories in assessing these requests and advising clinicians on interpretation. First, we summarize the basic terminology regarding the types of hip replacements, with emphasis on the MOM type. Second, we describe the clinical concerns over implant-derived wear debris in the local tissues and distant sites. Analytical aspects of the measurement of the relevant metal ions and what factors affect the levels measured are discussed. The application of inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry techniques to the measurement of these metals is considered in detail. The biological effects of metal wear products are summarized with local toxicity and systemic biological effects considered, including carcinogenicity, genotoxicity and systemic toxicity. Clinical cases are used to illustrate pertinent points. PMID:22155921

  1. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip...

  2. Modular titanium alloy neck adapter failures in hip replacement - failure mode analysis and influence of implant material

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Modular neck adapters for hip arthroplasty stems allow the surgeon to modify CCD angle, offset and femoral anteversion intraoperatively. Fretting or crevice corrosion may lead to failure of such a modular device due to high loads or surface contamination inside the modular coupling. Unfortunately we have experienced such a failure of implants and now report our clinical experience with the failures in order to advance orthopaedic material research and joint replacement surgery. The failed neck adapters were implanted between August 2004 and November 2006 a total of about 5000 devices. After this period, the titanium neck adapters were replaced by adapters out of cobalt-chromium. Until the end of 2008 in total 1.4% (n = 68) of the implanted titanium alloy neck adapters failed with an average time of 2.0 years (0.7 to 4.0 years) postoperatively. All, but one, patients were male, their average age being 57.4 years (36 to 75 years) and the average weight 102.3 kg (75 to 130 kg). The failures of neck adapters were divided into 66% with small CCD of 130° and 60% with head lengths of L or larger. Assuming an average time to failure of 2.8 years, the cumulative failure rate was calculated with 2.4%. Methods A series of adapter failures of titanium alloy modular neck adapters in combination with a titanium alloy modular short hip stem was investigated. For patients having received this particular implant combination risk factors were identified which were associated with the occurence of implant failure. A Kaplan-Meier survival-failure-analysis was conducted. The retrieved implants were analysed using microscopic and chemical methods. Modes of failure were simulated in biomechanical tests. Comparative tests included modular neck adapters made of titanium alloy and cobalt chrome alloy material. Results Retrieval examinations and biomechanical simulation revealed that primary micromotions initiated fretting within the modular tapered neck connection. A continuous abrasion and repassivation process with a subsequent cold welding at the titanium alloy modular interface. Surface layers of 10 - 30 ?m titanium oxide were observed. Surface cracks caused by fretting or fretting corrosion finally lead to fatigue fracture of the titanium alloy modular neck adapters. Neck adapters made of cobalt chrome alloy show significantly reduced micromotions especially in case of contaminated cone connection. With a cobalt-chromium neck the micromotions can be reduced by a factor of 3 compared to the titanium neck. The incidence of fretting corrosion was also substantially lower with the cobalt-chromium neck configuration. Conclusions Failure of modular titanium alloy neck adapters can be initiated by surface micromotions due to surface contamination or highly loaded implant components. In the present study, the patients at risk were men with an average weight over 100 kg. Modular cobalt chrome neck adapters provide higher safety compared to titanium alloy material. PMID:20047653

  3. A Randomised Multi-centre Study to Compare the Long-term Performance of the Future Hip to 3 Other Implants in Primary Total Hip Replacement

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-09-01

    Osteoarthritis; Post-traumatic Arthritis; Collagen Disorders; Avascular Necrosis; Traumatic Femoral Fractures; Nonunion of Femoral Fractures; Congenital Hip Dysplasia; Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis; Perthes Disease

  4. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Curulla, M. V.; Brayman, K. W.; Matzner, B.; Price, T. F.; Qurnell, F. D.

    1985-10-01

    A spacer for use in a fuel assembly of a nuclear reactor having thin, full-height divider members, slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops and wherein the total amount of spacer material, the amount of high neutron cross section material, the projected area of the spacer structure and changes in cross section area of the spacer structure are minimized whereby neutron absorption by the spacer and coolant flow resistance through the spacer are minimized.

  5. Effects of CoCr metal wear debris generated from metal-on-metal hip implants and Co ions on human monocyte-like U937 cells.

    PubMed

    Posada, Olga M; Tate, Rothwelle J; Grant, M Helen

    2015-03-01

    Hip resurfacing with cobalt-chromium (CoCr) alloy was developed as a surgical alternative to total hip replacement. However, the biological effects of nanoparticles generated by wear at the metal-on-metal articulating surfaces has limited the success of such implants. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of the combined exposure to CoCr nanoparticles and cobalt ions released from a resurfacing implant on monocytes (U937 cells) and whether these resulted in morphology changes, proliferation alterations, toxicity and cytokine release. The interaction between prior exposure to Co ions and the cellular response to nanoparticulate debris was determined to simulate the situation in patients with metal-on-metal implants receiving a second implant. Effects on U937 cells were mainly seen after 120h of treatment. Prior exposure to Co ions increased the toxic effects induced by the debris, and by Co ions themselves, suggesting the potential for interaction in vivo. Increased TNF-? secretion by resting cells exposed to nanoparticles could contribute to osteolysis processes in vivo, while increased IFN-? production by activated cells could represent cellular protection against tissue damage. Data suggest that interactions between Co ions and CoCr nanoparticles would occur in vivo, and could threaten the survival of a CoCr metal implant. PMID:25433333

  6. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3360 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip...cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted to replace a portion of the hip joint. This...

  7. Influence of design parameters on cup-stem orientations for impingement free RoM in hip implants.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dishita; Goswami, Tarun

    2012-06-01

    This study was conducted to study the influence of design parameters namely; the head/neck ratio (R), neck-shaft angle (NSA), oscillation angle (OsA) and stem offset (S?) on cup-stem orientations namely; the cup inclination (CI), cup anteversion (CA) and stem antetorsion (SA). R is often linked to influence NSA, OsA and impingement. An effort has been made to analyze range of motion (RoM) with NSA greater than 135° and R lower than 2.3 that may produce impingement. This study attempted to answer the following assumptions whether (a) implants with higher H-N ratio can achieve higher oscillations and higher stem antetorsion, (b) stems with higher neck shaft angle can achieve higher cup anteversion with lower stem offset and stem antetorsion, (c) stem with higher offsets can achieve lower cup anteversion with higher stem antetorsion, and (d) lower cup anteversion can be achieved when stem antetorsion is higher. A theoretical and a simulated method were implemented to anaylze RoM until impingement between cup and neck occurred. Cup abduction and anterior opening were held constant for this study. Multivariate prediction models were developed to predict optimal cup-stem orientations for the chosen design parameters of 12 hip implants. Optimal design parameters to achieve an impingement free RoM were as follows: NSA=139.25°, R=3.08, OsA=119.83°, S?=34.45mm, CA(predicted)=16.26°, CI(predicted)=42.77° and SA(predicted)=30.37°, respectively. Multivariate models may be further developed for use in surgery planning to achieve optimal component placement. PMID:21978913

  8. Pore Geometry Optimization of Titanium (Ti6Al4V) Alloy, for Its Application in the Fabrication of Customized Hip Implants

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sandipan; Panda, Debojyoti; Khutia, Niloy; Chowdhury, Amit Roy

    2014-01-01

    The present study investigates the mechanical response of representative volume elements of porous Ti-6Al-4V alloy, to arrive at a desired range of pore geometries that would optimize the reduction in stiffness necessary for biocompatibility with the stress concentration arising around the pore periphery, under physiological loading conditions with respect to orthopedic hip implants. A comparative study of the two is performed with the aid of a newly defined optimizing parameter called pore efficiency that takes into consideration both the stiffness quantity and the stress localization around pores. To perform a detailed analysis of the response of the porous structure over the entire spectrum of loading conditions that a hip implant is subjected to in vivo, the mechanical responses of 3D finite element models of cubic and rectangular parallelepiped geometries, with porosities varying over a range of 10% to 60%, are simulated under representative compressive, flexural as well as combined loading conditions. The results that are obtained are used to suggest a range of pore diameters that lower the effective stiffness and modulus of the implant to around 60% of the stiffness and modulus of dense solid implants while keeping the stress levels within permissible limits. PMID:25400663

  9. Arthroscopic Fixation of Cell Free Polymer-Based Cartilage Implants with a Bioinspired Polymer Surface on the Hip Joint: A Cadaveric Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Lahner, Matthias; Duif, Christian; Ficklscherer, Andreas; Kaps, Christian; Kalwa, Lukas; Seidl, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the adhesion capacity of a polyglycolic acid- (PGA-) hyaluronan scaffold with a structural modification based on a planar polymer (PM) surface in a cadaver cartilage defect model. Two cadaver specimens were used to serially test multiple chondral matrices. In a cadaver hip model, cell free polymer-based cartilage implants with a planar bioinspired PM surface (PGA-PM-scaffolds) were implanted arthroscopically on 10?mm?×?15?mm full-thickness femoral hip cartilage lesions. Unprocessed cartilage implants without a bioinspired PM surface were used as control group. The cartilage implants were fixed without and with the use of fibrin glue on femoral hip cartilage defects. After 50 movement cycles and removal of the distraction, a rearthroscopy was performed to assess the outline attachment and integrity of the scaffold. The fixation techniques without and with fibrin fixation showed marginal differences for outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation after 50 cycles. The PGA-PM-scaffolds with fibrin fixation achieved a higher score in terms of the attachment, integrity, and endpoint fixation than the PGA-scaffold on the cartilage defect. Relating to the outline attachment, area coverage, scaffold integrity, and endpoint fixation, the fixation with PGA-PM-scaffolds accomplished significantly better results compared to the PGA-scaffolds (P = 0.03752, P = 0.03078, P = 0.00512, P = 0.00512). PGA-PM-scaffolds demonstrate increased observed initial fixation strength in cadaver femoral head defects relative to PGA-scaffold, particularly when fibrin glue is used for fixation. PMID:25247185

  10. Metal Ion Concentrations in Body Fluids after Implantation of Hip Replacements with Metal-on-Metal Bearing – Systematic Review of Clinical and Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Albrecht; Hannemann, Franziska; Lützner, Jörg; Seidler, Andreas; Drexler, Hans; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Schmitt, Jochen

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The use of metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) increased in the last decades. A release of metal products (i.e. particles, ions, metallo-organic compounds) in these implants may cause local and/or systemic adverse reactions. Metal ion concentrations in body fluids are surrogate measures of metal exposure. Objective To systematically summarize and critically appraise published studies concerning metal ion concentrations after MoM THA. Methods Systematic review of clinical trials (RCTs) and epidemiological studies with assessment of metal ion levels (cobalt, chromium, titanium, nickel, molybdenum) in body fluids after implantation of metalliferous hip replacements. Systematic search in PubMed and Embase in January 2012 supplemented by hand search. Standardized abstraction of pre- and postoperative metal ion concentrations stratified by type of bearing (primary explanatory factor), patient characteristics as well as study quality characteristics (secondary explanatory factors). Results Overall, 104 studies (11 RCTs, 93 epidemiological studies) totaling 9.957 patients with measurement of metal ions in body fluids were identified and analyzed. Consistently, median metal ion concentrations were persistently elevated after implantation of MoM-bearings in all investigated mediums (whole blood, serum, plasma, erythrocytes, urine) irrespective of patient characteristics and study characteristics. In several studies very high serum cobalt concentrations above 50 µg/L were measured (detection limit typically 0.3 µg/L). Highest metal ion concentrations were observed after treatment with stemmed large-head MoM-implants and hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Discussion Due to the risk of local and systemic accumulation of metallic products after treatment with MoM-bearing, risk and benefits should be carefully balanced preoperatively. The authors support a proposed „time out“ for stemmed large-head MoM-THA and recommend a restricted indication for hip resurfacing arthroplasty. Patients with implanted MoM-bearing should receive regular and standardized monitoring of metal ion concentrations. Further research is indicated especially with regard to potential systemic reactions due to accumulation of metal products. PMID:23950923

  11. The accuracy of Acuros XB algorithm for radiation beams traversing a metallic hip implant - comparison with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations.

    PubMed

    Ojala, Jarkko; Kapanen, Mika; Sipilä, Petri; Hyödynmaa, Simo; Pitkänen, Maunu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the clinical benefit of the improved accuracy of the Acuros XB (AXB) algorithm, implemented in a commercial radiotherapy treatment planning system (TPS), Varian Eclipse, was demonstrated with beams traversing a high-Z material. This is also the first study assessing the accuracy of the AXB algorithm applying volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique compared to full Monte Carlo (MC) simulations. In the first phase the AXB algorithm was benchmarked against point dosimetry, film dosimetry, and full MC calculation in a water-filled anthropometric phantom with a unilateral hip implant. Also the validity of the full MC calculation used as reference method was demonstrated. The dose calculations were performed both in original computed tomography (CT) dataset, which included artifacts, and in corrected CT dataset, where constant Hounsfield unit (HU) value assignment for all the materials was made. In the second phase, a clinical treatment plan was prepared for a prostate cancer patient with a unilateral hip implant. The plan applied a hybrid VMAT technique that included partial arcs that avoided passing through the implant and static beams traversing the implant. Ultimately, the AXB-calculated dose distribution was compared to the recalculation by the full MC simulation to assess the accuracy of the AXB algorithm in clinical setting. A recalculation with the anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) was also performed to quantify the benefit of the improved dose calculation accuracy of type 'c' algorithm (AXB) over type 'b' algorithm (AAA). The agreement between the AXB algorithm and the full MC model was very good inside and in the vicinity of the implant and elsewhere, which verifies the accuracy of the AXB algorithm for patient plans with beams traversing through high-Z material, whereas the AAA produced larger discrepancies. PMID:25207577

  12. A simple fully integrated contact-coupled wear prediction for ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene hip implants.

    PubMed

    Kang, L; Galvin, A L; Jin, Z M; Fisher, J

    2006-01-01

    A fully coupled contact and wear model was developed in the present study for hip implants employing an ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) cup in combination with a metallic or ceramic femoral head. A simple elasticity equation based on the concept of constrained column model was employed to solve the contact mechanics between the acetabular cup and the femoral head under the three-dimensional physiological loading condition. The wear model was based on the classical Archard-Lancaster equation in common with all other studies reported in the literature. The fully coupled contact and wear model was applied to both conventional and cross-linked UHMWPE cups under a wide range of design parameters such as the clearance and the femoral head radius. The predicted linear and volumetric wear as well as their rates for conventional UHMWPE cups were found to be in good agreement with those obtained from a similar analysis by Maxian but using the finite element method for the contact mechanics analysis. The predicted maximum contact pressure was found to decrease rapidly within the first 10(6) cycles, and below the limit to cause plastic deformation within the UHMWPE cup with a nominal radial clearance of 0.2 mm. The effect of the clearance between the head and the cup on the predicted wear was found to be negligible. For the cross-linked UHMWPE cup with relatively large diameters up to 48 mm and a fixed outside diameter of 50 mm, the predicted wear, which was found to increase with increasing femoral head radius, remained small owing to the small wear factor associated with these materials. Furthermore, if the head diameter increases beyond 42 mm, a rapid increase in the contact pressure was predicted, owing to the decrease in the wall thickness of the cross-linked UHMWPE cup. PMID:16459444

  13. Radiographic identification of loose bodies in the traumatized hip joint

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, R.A.; Schobert, W.E.; Pais, M.J.; Ahmed, M.; Wilson, W.J.; Farjalla, G.L.; Imray, T.J.

    1982-12-01

    Acrylic spacers and cubes of cortical bone of known dimensions were placed in predetermined locations in cadaver hip joints, which were then studied with plain radiography and linear, hypocycloidal, and computed tomography (CT). Joint space widening was not measurable on plain radiographs of the pelvis when 2-mm spacers were placed anywhere within the hip joint. When 4-mm spacers were used, widening measured 2 mm in the axis of measurement corresponding to the location of the spacer. Linear tomography did not permit identification of the 2-mm cubes; however, hypocycloidal tomography and CT consistently showed them anywhere within the hip joint. Radiation dose and clinical recommendations are discussed.

  14. Hip Microfracture

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Kevin C.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Microfracture is a marrow-stimulating technique used in the hip to treat cartilage defects associated with femoro-acetabular impingement, instability, or traumatic hip injury. These defects have a low probability of healing spontaneously and therefore often require surgical intervention. Originally adapted from the knee, microfracture is part of a spectrum of cartilage repair options that include palliative procedures such as debridement and lavage, reparative procedures such as marrow-stimulating techniques (abrasion arthroplasty and microfracture), and restorative procedures such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and osteochondral allograft/autografts. The basic indications for microfracture of the hip include focal and contained lesions typically less than 4 cm in diameter, full-thickness (Outerbridge grade IV) defects in weightbearing areas, unstable lesions with intact subchondral bone, and focal lesions without evidence of surrounding chondromalacia. Although not extensively studied in the hip, there are some small clinical series with promising early outcomes. Although the widespread use of microfracture in the hip is hindered by difficulties in identifying lesions on preoperative imaging and instrumentation to circumvent the femoral head, this technique continues to gain acceptance as an initial treatment for small, focal cartilage defects. PMID:26069544

  15. Metal-on-Metal Hip Prostheses and Systemic Health: A Cross-Sectional Association Study 8 Years after Implantation

    PubMed Central

    Prentice, Jennifer R.; Clark, Matthew J.; Hoggard, Nigel; Morton, Allison C.; Tooth, Claire; Paley, Martyn N.; Stockley, Ian; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Wilkinson, J. Mark

    2013-01-01

    There is public concern over the long term systemic health effects of metal released from hip replacement prostheses that use large-diameter metal-on-metal bearings. However, to date there has been no systematic study to determine which organs may be at risk, or the magnitude of any effect. We undertook a detailed cross-sectional health screen at a mean of 8 years after surgery in 35 asymptomatic patients who had previously received a metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MoMHR) versus 35 individually age and sex matched asymptomatic patients who had received a conventional hip replacement. Total body bone mineral density was 5% higher (mean difference 0.05 g/cm2, P?=?0.02) and bone turnover was 14% lower (TRAP 5b, mean difference ?0.56IU/L, P?=?0.006; osteocalcin, mean difference ?3.08 ng/mL, P?=?0.03) in the hip resurfacing versus conventional hip replacement group. Cardiac ejection fraction was 7% lower (mean absolute difference ?5%, P?=?0.04) and left ventricular end-diastolic diameter was 6% larger (mean difference 2.7 mm, P?=?0.007) in the hip resurfacing group versus those patients who received a conventional hip replacement. The urinary fractional excretion of metal was low (cobalt 5%, chromium 1.5%) in patients with MoMHR, but creatinine clearance was normal. Diuretic prescription was associated with a 40% increase in the fractional excretion of chromium (mean difference 0.5%, P?=?0.03). There was no evidence of difference in neuropsychological, renal tubular, hepatic or endocrine function between groups (P>0.05). Our findings of differences in bone and cardiac function between patient groups suggest that chronic exposure to low elevated metal concentrations in patients with well-functioning MoMHR prostheses may have systemic effects. Long-term epidemiological studies in patients with well-functioning metal on metal hip prostheses should include musculoskeletal and cardiac endpoints to quantitate the risk of clinical disease. PMID:23762480

  16. Preliminary Results of Implantation in Animal Model and Osteoblast Culture Evaluation of Prototypes of Biomimetic Multispiked Connecting Scaffold for Noncemented Stemless Resurfacing Hip Arthroplasty Endoprostheses

    PubMed Central

    Uklejewski, Ryszard; Rogala, Piotr; Winiecki, Mariusz; K?dzia, Andrzej; Ruszkowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    We present the new fixation method for RHA (resurfacing hip arthroplasty) endoprostheses by means of the biomimetic multispiked connecting scaffold (MSC-Scaffold). Such connecting scaffold can generate new type of RHA endoprostheses, that is stemless and fixed entirely without cement. The preprototypes of this MSC-Scaffold were manufactured with modern additive laser additive technology (SLM). The pilot surgical implantations in animal model (two laboratory swine) of MSC-Scaffold preprototypes have showed after two months neither implant loosening, migration, and nor other early complications. From the results of performed histopathological evaluation of the periscaffold spikes bone tissue and 10-day culture of human osteoblasts (NHOst) we can conclude that (1) the scaffolding effect was obtained and (2) to improve the osseointegration of the scaffold spikes, their material surface should be physicochemically modified (e.g., with hydroxyapatite). Some histopathological findings in the periscaffold domain near the MSC-Scaffold spikes bases (fibrous connective tissue and metallic particles near the MSC-Scaffold spikes bases edges) prompt considering the necessity to optimize the design of the MSC-Scaffold in the regions of its interspike space near the spikes bases edges, to provide more room for new bone formation in this region and for indispensable post-processing (glass pearl blasting) after the SLM manufacturing. PMID:23984397

  17. Infectious prosthetic hip joint loosening: bacterial species involved in its aetiology and their antibiotic resistance profiles against antibiotics recommended for the therapy of implant-associated infections.

    PubMed

    Bogut, Agnieszka; Nied?wiadek, Justyna; Strzelec-Nowak, Dagmara; Blacha, Jan; Mazurkiewicz, Tomasz; Marczy?ski, Wojciech; Kozio?-Montewka, Maria

    2014-04-01

    Reliable microbiological diagnosis along with surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy are key elements in the management of prosthetic-joint infections (PJIs). The purpose of this study was to characterize antibiotic resistance profiles of bacteria involved in the aetiology of PJIs. A total of 33 bacterial isolates cultured from 31 patients undergoing exchange of total hip prostheses were analyzed. The diagnostic approach toward isolation of prosthesis- associated microorganisms included sonication of retrieved implants and conventional cultures of periprosthetic tissues and synovial fluid. The in vitro resistance profiles of bacterial isolates were determined in relation to antibiotics recommended for the therapy of PJIs using the disc diffusion method, E-tests(®) and broth microdilution system. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CNS) were predominant microorganisms followed by Staphylococcus aureus, Enterobacter cloacae, Streptococcus mitis, and Propionibacterium acnes. Twenty out of 30 and 12 out of 30 staphylococcal isolates were methicillin- and multi-drug resistant, respectively. Only two isolates were rifampicinresistant. All staphylococci were susceptible to glycopeptides and linezolid. This paper stresses the pathogenic role of staphylococci in patients suffering from implant loosening and reports high methicillin- and multidrug-resistance rates in these bacteria. Hence, antimicrobial susceptibility tests of individual bacterial isolates must always be performed to guide selection of the optimal therapeutic option. PMID:24858648

  18. Impaction grafting in the femur in cementless modular revision total hip arthroplasty: a descriptive outcome analysis of 243 cases with the MRP-TITAN revision implant

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We present a descriptive and retrospective analysis of revision total hip arthroplasties (THA) using the MRP-TITAN stem (Peter Brehm, Weisendorf, GER) with distal diaphyseal fixation and metaphyseal defect augmentation. Our hypothesis was that the metaphyseal defect augmentation (Impaction Bone Grafting) improves the stem survival. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the aggregated and anonymized data of 243 femoral stem revisions. 68 patients with 70 implants (28.8%) received an allograft augmentation for metaphyseal defects; 165 patients with 173 implants (71.2%) did not, and served as controls. The mean follow-up was 4.4?±?1.8 years (range, 2.1–9.6 years). There were no significant differences (p?>?0.05) between the study and control group regarding age, body mass index (BMI), femoral defects (types I-III as described by Paprosky), and preoperative Harris Hip Score (HHS). Postoperative clinical function was evaluated using the HHS. Postoperative radiologic examination evaluated implant stability, axial implant migration, signs of implant loosening, periprosthetic radiolucencies, as well as bone regeneration and resorption. Results There were comparable rates of intraoperative and postoperative complications in the study and control groups (p?>?0.05). Clinical function, expressed as the increase in the postoperative HHS over the preoperative score, showed significantly greater improvement in the group with Impaction Bone Grafting (35.6?±?14.3 vs. 30.8?±?15.8; p???0.05). The study group showed better outcome especially for larger defects (types II C and III as described by Paprosky) and stem diameters???17 mm. The two groups did not show significant differences in the rate of aseptic loosening (1.4% vs. 2.9%) and the rate of revisions (8.6% vs. 11%). The Kaplan-Meier survival for the MRP-TITAN stem in both groups together was 93.8% after 8.8 years. [Study group 95.7% after 8.54 years ; control group 93.1% after 8.7 years]. Radiologic evaluation showed no significant change in axial implant migration (4.3% vs. 9.3%; p?=?0.19) but a significant reduction in proximal stress shielding (5.7% vs. 17.9%; p?

  19. Wear Particles Derived from Metal Hip Implants Induce the Generation of Multinucleated Giant Cells in a 3-Dimensional Peripheral Tissue-Equivalent Model

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debargh K.; Potnis, Pushya A.; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1–5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which heralds metal on metal hip failures. PMID:25894745

  20. Wear particles derived from metal hip implants induce the generation of multinucleated giant cells in a 3-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debargh K; Potnis, Pushya A; Rhodes, Kelly; Wood, Steven C

    2015-01-01

    Multinucleate giant cells (MGCs) are formed by the fusion of 5 to 15 monocytes or macrophages. MGCs can be generated by hip implants at the site where the metal surface of the device is in close contact with tissue. MGCs play a critical role in the inflammatory processes associated with adverse events such as aseptic loosening of the prosthetic joints and bone degeneration process called osteolysis. Upon interaction with metal wear particles, endothelial cells upregulate pro-inflammatory cytokines and other factors that enhance a localized immune response. However, the role of endothelial cells in the generation of MGCs has not been completely investigated. We developed a three-dimensional peripheral tissue-equivalent model (PTE) consisting of collagen gel, supporting a monolayer of endothelial cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) on top, which mimics peripheral tissue under normal physiological conditions. The cultures were incubated for 14 days with Cobalt chromium alloy (CoCr ASTM F75, 1-5 micron) wear particles. PBMC were allowed to transit the endothelium and harvested cells were analyzed for MGC generation via flow cytometry. An increase in forward scatter (cell size) and in the propidium iodide (PI) uptake (DNA intercalating dye) was used to identify MGCs. Our results show that endothelial cells induce the generation of MGCs to a level 4 fold higher in 3-dimentional PTE system as compared to traditional 2-dimensional culture plates. Further characterization of MGCs showed upregulated expression of tartrate resistant alkaline phosphatase (TRAP) and dendritic cell specific transmembrane protein, (DC-STAMP), which are markers of bone degrading cells called osteoclasts. In sum, we have established a robust and relevant model to examine MGC and osteoclast formation in a tissue like environment using flow cytometry and RT-PCR. With endothelial cells help, we observed a consistent generation of metal wear particle- induced MGCs, which heralds metal on metal hip failures. PMID:25894745

  1. Cementless Hydroxyapatite Coated Hip Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil-Albarova, Jorge; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Ibarz, Elena; Gabarre, Sergio; Más, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    More than twenty years ago, hydroxyapatite (HA), calcium phosphate ceramics, was introduced as a coating for cementless hip prostheses. The choice of this ceramic is due to its composition being similar to organic apatite bone crystals. This ceramic is biocompatible, bioactive, and osteoconductive. These qualities facilitate the primary stability and osseointegration of implants. Our surgical experience includes the implantation of more than 4,000 cementless hydroxyapatite coated hip prostheses since 1990. The models implanted are coated with HA in the acetabulum and in the metaphyseal area of the stem. The results corresponding to survival and stability of implants were very satisfactory in the long-term. From our experience, HA-coated hip implants are a reliable alternative which can achieve long term survival, provided that certain requirements are met: good design selection, sound choice of bearing surfaces based on patient life expectancy, meticulous surgical technique, and indications based on adequate bone quality. PMID:25802848

  2. Hip pain

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or around the hip joint. You may not feel pain from your hip directly over the hip area. ... your provider will ask questions about: Where you feel the pain When and how the pain started Things that ...

  3. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... replacement is an operation in which a damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint. ... are many medical conditions that can damage the hip joint. Reasons for Hip Replacement Click for more information ...

  4. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... surgeon removes damaged cartilage and bone from your hip joint and replaces them with new, man-made parts. A hip replacement can Relieve pain Help your hip joint work better Improve walking and other movements The ...

  5. Nuclear fuel assembly spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Matzner, B.; Curulla, M. V.; Horn, V. M.; Price, J. F.

    1985-04-02

    In a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor a fuel element spacer formed of an array of laterally positioned cojoined tubular ferrules each providing a passage for one of the fuel elements, the elements being laterally supported in the ferrules between slender spring members and laterally oriented rigid stops.

  6. Hip, hip, hooray!

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    X-rays are best known for showing where bones have fractured, but researchers can also use X-rays to investigate why bones break, which could lead to treatments that reduce the number of elderly people who suffer broken hips. PMID:23538735

  7. Hip Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hip joint are removed and replaced with new, artificial parts. These artificial parts are called the prosthesis. The goals of ... less active and put less stress on the artificial hip than do younger people. In more recent ...

  8. Primary total hip arthroplasty with a spongy metal surface acetabular component for hip dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Takigami, Iori; Ito, Yoshiki; Matsumoto, Kazu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Terabayashi, Nobuo; Shimizu, Katsuji

    2013-01-01

    We evaluated the clinical and radiographic results of primary total hip arthroplasty for 81 dysplastic hips (71 patients) using cementless Spongiosa Metal II cups (ESKA Implants, Lübeck, Germany). The mean follow-up period was 6.4 years (minimum 5 years), and the preoperative mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association hip score had improved from 45.2 to 87.4 points at the latest follow-up. The radiographic outcome was no aseptic loosening in all 81 hips. The hip center was located significantly more superior than in the contralateral normal hip in 45 patients, but the difference was less than 10 mm; however, there was no significant difference in the lateral position of the hip center. The use of a Spongiosa Metal II cup for dysplastic hips provided satisfactory 5- to 10-year clinical and radiographic results. PMID:22682038

  9. The use of spacers (static and mobile) in infection knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Mazzucchelli, Luca; Rosso, Federica; Marmotti, Antongiulio; Bonasia, Davide Edoardo; Bruzzone, Matteo; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Revision total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is the treatment of choice in patients with periprosthetic joint infection. It may be performed in either a single stage or two stages. In the latter option, between stages, an antibiotic-loaded spacer may be used to maintain a certain amount of joint stability and mobility after the infected implant is removed, adding an intra-articular concentration of antibiotics. There are two types of antibiotic-loaded cement spacers: static and dynamic. Static spacers basically create a temporary arthrodesis with antibiotic-loaded cement and usually are handmade within the surgical field. Dynamic spacers can be created intraoperatively by using different tools or may be prepackaged by the manufacturer; they allow range of motion between stages. In this article, the authors review the indications, surgical techniques, and results for static and dynamic spacers in two-stage revision TKA. PMID:26395472

  10. Recent Patents and Designs on Hip Replacement Prostheses

    PubMed Central

    Derar, H; Shahinpoor, M

    2015-01-01

    Hip replacement surgery has gone through tremendous evolution since the first procedure in 1840. In the past five decades the advances that have been made in technology, advanced and smart materials innovations, surgical techniques, robotic surgery and methods of fixations and sterilization, facilitated hip implants that undergo multiple design revolutions seeking the least problematic implants and a longer survivorship. Hip surgery has become a solution for many in need of hip joint remedy and replacement across the globe. Nevertheless, there are still long-term problems that are essential to search and resolve to find the optimum implant. This paper reviews several recent patents on hip replacement surgery. The patents present various designs of prostheses, different materials as well as methods of fixation. Each of the patents presents a new design as a solution to different issues ranging from the longevity of the hip prostheses to discomfort and inconvenience experienced by patients in the long-term. PMID:25893020

  11. Total hip arthroplasty for surgical management of advanced tuberculous hip arthritis: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi Ming; Chin, Pak Lin

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) arthritis of the hip is a debilitating disease that often results in severe cartilage destruction and degeneration of the hip. In advanced cases, arthrodesis of the hip confers benefits to the young, high-demand and active patient. However, many of these patients go on to develop degenerative arthritis of the spine, ipsilateral knee and contralateral hip, necessitating the need for a conversion to total hip arthroplasty. Conversion of a previously fused hip to a total hip arthroplasty presents as a surgical challenge due to altered anatomy, muscle atrophy, previous surgery and implants, neighbouring joint arthritis and limb length discrepancy. We report a case of advanced TB arthritis of the hip joint in a middle-aged Singaporean Chinese gentleman with a significant past medical history of miliary tuberculosis and previous hip arthrodesis. Considerations in pre-operative planning, surgical approaches and potential pitfalls are discussed and the operative technique utilized and post-operative rehabilitative regime of this patient is described. This case highlights the necessity of pre-operative planning and the operative technique used in the conversion of a previous hip arthrodesis to a total hip arthroplasty in a case of TB hip arthritis. PMID:25793173

  12. Cement augmentation of the acetabulum for revision total hip arthroplasty for infection.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Benedict A; Kuchinad, R; Garbedian, S; Backstein, D; Gross, A E; Safir, O A

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotic-loaded cement spacers in first-stage revision hip arthroplasty for infection are associated with a high dislocation and fracture rate. This technical note describes a novel surgical technique, utilizing screws and cement, improving acetabular coverage and reducing the risk of mechanical failure. Fifteen infected hip prostheses underwent removal, cement acetabular augmentation and insertion of a femoral cement spacer. Eleven hips had successful infection eradication and subsequently underwent a second stage revision procedure a mean duration of 15 weeks (9-48) after the first stage. No dislocations or fractures of the cement spacers were observed. This technique affords the potential to reduce the duration of time cement spacers remaining in situ, provides enhanced mechanical stability and improved antibiotic elution through cement-on-cement articulation. PMID:25532622

  13. Review on squeaking hips

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Yadin David; Munir, Selin; Donohoo, Shane; Walter, William Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    Squeaking is a well-recognized complication for hard-on-hard bearings. The nature of squeaking is not yet completely understood however it is considered a multifactorial phenomenon. Patient, implant, and surgical factors play a role in squeaking. It is believed that mechanisms damaging the fluid film lubrication in which these bearings function optimally have a critical role. Such mechanisms include edge loading, stripe wear, impingement, third body particles and ceramic fracture. The resonance of metallic parts can produce noise in the human audible range hence the implant metallurgic composition and design may play a role. Implant positioning can facilitate impingement and edge loading enhancing the occurrence of squeaking. The recent introduction of large heads (> 36 mm) 4th generation ceramic-on-ceramic bearing may accentuate the conditions facilitating noise formation; however the current literature is insufficient. Clinically, squeaking may manifest in extreme hip positions or during normal gait cycle however it is rarely associated with pain. Evaluations of patients with squeaking include clinical and radiographic assessments. Computer tomography is recommended as it can better reveal ceramic breakage and implant malposition. The treatments for most squeaking patients include reassurance and activity modification. However for some, noise can be a problem, requiring further surgical intervention. In the occurrence of ceramic fracture, implant failure, extreme components malposition, instability and impingement, surgery should be advised. This review will aim to discuss the current literature regarding squeaking. PMID:26601063

  14. Biotribology of artificial hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Di Puccio, Francesca; Mattei, Lorenza

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthroplasty can be considered one of the major successes of orthopedic surgery, with more than 350000 replacements performed every year in the United States with a constantly increasing rate. The main limitations to the lifespan of these devices are due to tribological aspects, in particular the wear of mating surfaces, which implies a loss of matter and modification of surface geometry. However, wear is a complex phenomenon, also involving lubrication and friction. The present paper deals with the tribological performance of hip implants and is organized in to three main sections. Firstly, the basic elements of tribology are presented, from contact mechanics of ball-in-socket joints to ultra high molecular weight polyethylene wear laws. Some fundamental equations are also reported, with the aim of providing the reader with some simple tools for tribological investigations. In the second section, the focus moves to artificial hip joints, defining materials and geometrical properties and discussing their friction, lubrication and wear characteristics. In particular, the features of different couplings, from metal-on-plastic to metal-on-metal and ceramic-on-ceramic, are discussed as well as the role of the head radius and clearance. How friction, lubrication and wear are interconnected and most of all how they are specific for each loading and kinematic condition is highlighted. Thus, the significant differences in patients and their lifestyles account for the high dispersion of clinical data. Furthermore, such consideration has raised a new discussion on the most suitable in vitro tests for hip implants as simplified gait cycles can be too far from effective implant working conditions. In the third section, the trends of hip implants in the years from 2003 to 2012 provided by the National Joint Registry of England, Wales and Northern Ireland are summarized and commented on in a discussion. PMID:25621213

  15. Hip arthroscopy?

    PubMed Central

    de Amorim Cabrita, Henrique Antônio Berwanger; de Castro Trindade, Christiano Augusto; de Campos Gurgel, Henrique Melo; Leal, Rafael Demura; de Souza Marques, Ricardo da Fonseca

    2014-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a safe method for treating a variety of pathological conditions that were unknown until a decade ago. Femoroacetabular impingement is the commonest of these pathological conditions and the one with the best results when treated early on. The instruments and surgical technique for hip arthroscopy continue to evolve. New indications for hip arthroscopy has been studied as the ligamentum teres injuries, capsular repair in instabilities, dissection of the sciatic nerve and repair of gluteal muscles tears (injuries to the hip rotator cuff), although still with debatable reproducibility. The complication rate is low, and ever-better results with fewer complications should be expected with the progression of the learning curve. PMID:26229924

  16. Hip Revision

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    ... going to initially look at Scott's preoperative x-rays and just kind of describe the situation that ... to that time. Here's Scott's initial preoperative x-ray, where we see a hybrid hip arthroplasty with ...

  17. Indications and results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    McMinn, D. J. W.; Ziaee, H.; Pradhan, C.

    2010-01-01

    The best indication for hip resurfacing is a young active patient with severe hip arthritis, good hip morphology and reasonable bone quality. With revision of either component for any reason as the endpoint, there were 68 revisions in our series of 3,095 consecutive Birmingham Hip Resurfacings (BHR) (1997–2009), including all diagnoses in all ages. This equates to a revision rate of 2.2% and survivorships of 99, 97 and 96% at five, ten and 13 years, respectively. In patients under 55 years with osteoarthritis, the survivorship is 99 and 98% at ten and 13 years. These results provide medium-term evidence that BHR when performed well in properly selected patients offers excellent outcomes and implant survivorship. Small changes to implant materials and design can affect joint function and survivorship significantly as seen from the withdrawal of certain resurfacing devices recently from clinical use. The clinical history of one device cannot be extrapolated to other devices. PMID:21079954

  18. Fungal Periprosthetic Joint Infection of the Hip: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schoof, Benjamin; Jakobs, Oliver; Schmidl, Stefan; Klatte, Till Orla; Frommelt, Lars; Gehrke, Thorsten; Gebauer, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication of total joint arthroplasty with an incidence of approximately 1%. Due to the high risk of persisting infection, successful treatment of fungal PJI is challenging. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the current management of fungal PJI of the hip and, by systematically reviewing the cases published so far, to further improve the medical treatment of this serious complication of total hip arthroplasty. Thus, we conducted a systematic review of the available literature concerning fungal PJI in total hip arthroplasty, including 45 cases of fungal PJI. At the moment a two-stage revision procedure is favorable and there is an ongoing discussion on the therapeutic effect of antifungal drug loaded cement spacers on fungal periprosthetic infections of the hip. Due to the fact that there is rare experience with it, there is urgent need to establish guidelines for the treatment of fungal infections of total hip arthroplasty. PMID:25874063

  19. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained... Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  4. 21 CFR 888.3310 - Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or... Hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint metal/polymer constrained cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be implanted...

  5. Generator stator core vent duct spacer posts

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, John Wesley (Schenectady, NY); Tong, Wei (Clifton Park, NY)

    2003-06-24

    Generator stator cores are constructed by stacking many layers of magnetic laminations. Ventilation ducts may be inserted between these layers by inserting spacers into the core stack. The ventilation ducts allow for the passage of cooling gas through the core during operation. The spacers or spacer posts are positioned between groups of the magnetic laminations to define the ventilation ducts. The spacer posts are secured with longitudinal axes thereof substantially parallel to the core axis. With this structure, core tightness can be assured while maximizing ventilation duct cross section for gas flow and minimizing magnetic loss in the spacers.

  6. Results of hip resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Favetti, Fabio; Casella, Filippo; Papalia, Matteo; Panegrossi, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Background The renewed popularity of resurfacing hip arthroplasty in the last 10 years has generated a remarkable quantity of scientific contributions based on mid- and short-term follow-up. More than one paper has reported a consistent early revision rate as a consequence of biological or biomechanical failure. Two major complications are commonly described with resurfacing implants: avascular necrosis and femoral-neck fracture. A close relationship between these two events has been suggested, but not firmly demonstrated, whereas cementing technique seems to be better understood as potential cause of failure. Methods We performed an in vitro study in which four different resurfacing implants were evaluated with a simulated femoral head, two types of cement, (low and high viscosity) and two cementing techniques: direct (cement apposition directly on the femoral head) and indirect (cement poured into the femoral component). Results High-viscosity cement showed homogeneous distribution over the entire femoral head. Low-viscosity cement showed a massive polar concentration with insufficient, if not absent, distribution in the equatorial zone. Conclusion Polar cement concentration could be a risk factor for early implant failure due to two effects on the femoral head: biological (excessive local exothermic reaction could cause osteocyte necrosis) and biomechanical (which could lead to uneven load distribution on the femoral head). PMID:21234563

  7. Efficacy of hip resurfacing arthroplasty: 6 year results from an international multisurgeon prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Aulakh, Tajeshwar S; Jayasekera, Narlaka; Singh, Rohit; Patel, Amit; Roulahamin, Nick; Kuiper, Jan H; Richardson, James B

    2015-06-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing is undertaken worldwide. This procedure helps preserve femoral bone stock and allows patients to return to high activity sports. Most outcome studies are individual surgeon case series from single centers where the results and outcomes are evaluated by the same surgeon. One method of increasing the external validity of a follow-up study is to have a multi-centre study design with independent assessment of the outcomes. We present an independent assessment of eleven year follow-up of hip resurfacing outcomes from an international hip resurfacing register. The purpose of this study was to assess: Implant survival at maximum follow-up for revision due to any reason, implant survival at maximum follow-up for revision due to major causes of failure, hip function following hip resurfacing and factors affecting hip function, effect of gender and age on hip function and implant survival, effect of femoral component size on hip function and implant survival. 4535 patients (5000 hips) entered into the registry during 1997-2002 were studied. In summary, at a maximum follow-up of 11 years hip resurfacing has a good implant survival of 96.2% and excellent post-operative function. This is excellent given the international and multisurgeon nature of this cohort where majority of the surgeons were in their learning curve. PMID:26280956

  8. Effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, DONG; NONG, LU-MING; DU, RUI; GAO, GONG-MING; JIANG, YU-QING; XU, NAN-WEI

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the early effects of interspinous spacers on lumbar degenerative disease. The clinical outcomes of 23 patients with lumbar degenerative disease, treated using interspinous spacer implantation alone or combined with posterior lumbar fusion, were retrospectively studied and assessed with a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Pre-operative and post-operative interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were determined. The early effects and complications associated with the interspinous spacers were recorded. The surgical procedures performed with the in-space treatment were easy and minimally invasive. The VAS scores and ODI were improved post-operatively compared with pre-operatively. Significant changes in the interspinous distance, disc space height, foraminal width and height and segmental lordosis were noted. In-space treatment for degenerative lumbar disease is easy and safe, with good early effects. The in-space system provides an alternative treatment for lumbar degenerative disease. PMID:23407682

  9. Three-dimensional bone-implant movements in trochanteric hip fractures: Precision and accuracy of radiostereometric analysis in a phantom model.

    PubMed

    Bojan, Alicja J; Bragdon, Charles; Jönsson, Anders; Ekholm, Carl; Kärrholm, Johan

    2015-05-01

    The accuracy and precision of RSA were evaluated in the experimental study of screw cut-out complication after fixation of trochanteric fractures. A plastic bone model of a two-part trochanteric fracture was constructed with a Gamma nail implant incorporating RSA markers. The femoral head fragment was attached to a separate rotational table and the femoral shaft was mounted on the micrometer. Three main motions were simulated: Femoral head translation and rotation along the axis of the lag screw and fracture fragment translation along anatomical axes. Accuracy and precision were determined according to ISO 16,087 and ASTM standard F2385-04. Translations along the lag screw axis were measured with a precision within ?±0.14?mm and an accuracy within?±0.03?mm. With simultaneous translations along all three anatomical axes, lowest precision was measured for the x-axis (±0.29, 0.07?mm, respectively), but improved when analyzed as a vector (±0.08, 0.03?mm). The precision and accuracy of femoral head rotations were within 0.5° and 0.18°, respectively. The resolution of the RSA method tested in this model was high, though it varied depending on the type of analyzed motion. This information is valuable when selecting and interpreting outcome parameters evaluating implant migration and osteosynthesis stability in future clinical RSA studies. PMID:25640537

  10. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this review was to assess the safety and effectiveness of metal on metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty for young patients compared with that of total hip replacement (THR) in the same population. Clinical Need Total hip replacement has proved to be very effective for late middle-aged and elderly patients with severe degenerative diseases of the hips. As indications for THR began to include younger patients and those with a more active life style, the longevity of the implant became a concern. Evidence suggests that these patients experience relatively higher rates of early implant failure and the need for revision. The Swedish hip registry, for example, has demonstrated a survival rate in excess of 80% at 20 years for those aged over 65 years, whereas this figure was 33% by 16 years in those aged under 55 years. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a bone-conserving alternative to THR that restores normal joint biomechanics and load transfer. The technique has been used around the world for more than 10 years, specifically in the United Kingdom and other European countries. The Technology Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative procedure to conventional THR in younger patients. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is less invasive than THR and addresses the problem of preserving femoral bone stock at the initial operation. This means that future hip revisions are possible with THR if the initial MOM arthroplasty becomes less effective with time in these younger patients. The procedure involves the removal and replacement of the surface of the femoral head with a hollow metal hemisphere, which fits into a metal acetabular cup. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is a technically more demanding procedure than is conventional THR. In hip resurfacing, the femoral head is retained, which makes it much more difficult to access the acetabular cup. However, hip resurfacing arthroplasty has several advantages over a conventional THR with a small (28 mm) ball. First, the large femoral head reduces the chance of dislocation, so that rates of dislocation are less than those with conventional THR. Second, the range of motion with hip resurfacing arthroplasty is higher than that achieved with conventional THR. A variety of MOM hip resurfacing implants are used in clinical practice. Six MOM hip resurfacing implants have been issued licences in Canada. Review Strategy A search of electronic bibliographies (OVID Medline, Medline In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Embase, Cochrane CENTRAL and DSR, INAHTA) was undertaken to identify evidence published from Jan 1, 1997 to October 27, 2005. The search was limited to English-language articles and human studies. The literature search yielded 245 citations. Of these, 11 met inclusion criteria (9 for effectiveness, 2 for safety). The result of the only reported randomized controlled trial on MOM hip resurfacing arthroplasty could not be included in this assessment, because it used a cemented acetabular component, whereas in the new generation of implants, a cementless acetabular component is used. After omitting this publication, only case series remained. Summary of Findings   Health Outcomes The Harris hip score and SF-12 are 2 measures commonly used to report health outcomes in MOM hip resurfacing arthroplasty studies. Other scales used are the Oxford hip score and the University of California Los Angeles hip score. The case series showed that the mean revision rate of MOM hip resurfacing arthroplasty is 1.5% and the incidence of femoral neck fracture is 0.67%. Across all studies, 2 cases of osteonecrosis were reported. Four studies reported improvement in Harris hip scores. However, only 1 study reported a statistically significant improvement. Three studies reported improvement in SF-12 scores, of which 2 reported a significant improvement. One study reported significant improvement in UCLA hip score. Two studies reported postoperative Oxford hip scores, but no preoperative values were reported. None of the reviewed studies r

  11. Prospective Study Comparing Functional Outcomes and Revision Rates Between Hip Resurfacing and Total Hip Arthroplasty: Preliminary Results for 2 Years

    PubMed Central

    Pailhé, Régis; Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Sharma, Akash; Lafontan, Valérie; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Chiron, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is a need of independent prospective studies about modern generation of hip resurfacing implants. The aim of this propective observational study was to compare the functional outcomes and revision rates with hip resurfacing arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty and to present the preliminary results at 2 years. Patients included were recruited prospectively in the Partial Pelvic Replacement Hip Project by a single surgeon between January 2007 and January 2010. Patients were assessed with the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Postel-Merle d’Aubigné (MDA) score and Devane Score. The end point of the study was reoperation for any cause related to the prosthesis. At a mean follow up of 38.6 months there were a total of 142 patients with hip resurfacing (group 1) [100 Durom® (Zimmer Inc., Warsaw, IN, USA) and 42 Birmingham Hip Resurfacing® (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA)] and 278 patients with total hip arthroplasty (group 2). The results showed significantly greater gain of HHS, MDA and Devane score with hip resurfacing procedures. However, considering all the complications, the rate was significantly higher in group 16.4% vs 1.79% in group 2 (P<0.0001). In group 1 we observed 6 complications only concerned males with Durom® implants. The follow up of this cohort is still on going and may deliver more information on the evolution of these results in time. PMID:24191180

  12. Prospective study comparing functional outcomes and revision rates between hip resurfacing and total hip arthroplasty: preliminary results for 2 years.

    PubMed

    Pailhé, Régis; Reina, Nicolas; Cavaignac, Etienne; Sharma, Akash; Lafontan, Valérie; Laffosse, Jean-Michel; Chiron, Philippe

    2013-01-01

    There is a need of independent prospective studies about modern generation of hip resurfacing implants. The aim of this propective observational study was to compare the functional outcomes and revision rates with hip resurfacing arthroplasty and total hip arthroplasty and to present the preliminary results at 2 years. Patients included were recruited prospectively in the Partial Pelvic Replacement Hip Project by a single surgeon between January 2007 and January 2010. Patients were assessed with the Harris Hip Score (HHS) and Postel-Merle d'Aubigné (MDA) score and Devane Score. The end point of the study was reoperation for any cause related to the prosthesis. At a mean follow up of 38.6 months there were a total of 142 patients with hip resurfacing (group 1) [100 Durom(®) (Zimmer Inc., Warsaw, IN, USA) and 42 Birmingham Hip Resurfacing(®) (Smith & Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA)] and 278 patients with total hip arthroplasty (group 2). The results showed significantly greater gain of HHS, MDA and Devane score with hip resurfacing procedures. However, considering all the complications, the rate was significantly higher in group 16.4% vs 1.79% in group 2 (P<0.0001). In group 1 we observed 6 complications only concerned males with Durom(®) implants. The follow up of this cohort is still on going and may deliver more information on the evolution of these results in time. PMID:24191180

  13. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3390 Hip joint...is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace the head and neck of...with bone cement (§ 888.3027) or implanted by impaction. (b)...

  14. Total hip replacement for arthritis following tuberculosis of hip

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vijay; Garg, Bhavuk; Malhotra, Rajesh

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To present the results of total hip arthroplasty (THA) for post tubercular arthritis of the hip joint. METHODS: Sixty-five patients (45 male, 20 female) with previously treated tuberculosis of the hip joint underwent cementless THA for post tubercular arthritis. The average age at the time of THA was 48 years (range 29 to 65 years). Erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein, chest X-ray and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging were done preoperatively to confirm resolution of the disease and to rule out any residual disease. Intra-operative samples were taken for microbiological examination, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and histological examination. Patients were started on anti-tubercular drugs one week before the operation and continued for 6 mo post operatively. The patients were followed up clinically using the Harris hip score as well as radiologically for any loosening of the implants, osteolysis and any recurrence of tuberculosis. Any complications especially the recurrence of the infection was also recorded. RESULTS: The mean interval from completion of antitubercular therapy for tuberculosis to surgery was 4.2 years (range, 2-6 years). Preoperatively, 17 patients had ankylosis whereas 48 patients had functional but painful range of motion. The mean surgical time was 97 min (range, 65-125) whereas the mean blood loss was 600 mL (range, 400-900 mL). The average follow up was 8.3 years (range 6-11 years). The average Harris Hip score improved from 27 preoperatively to 91 at the final follow up. Seventeen patients had acetabular protrusion which was managed with impaction grafting and cementless acetabular cup. The bone graft had consolidated in all these 17 patients at the follow up. Two patients developed discharging sinuses at 9 and 11 mo postoperatively respectively. The discharge tested positive for tuberculosis on the PCR. Both these patients were put on antitubercular therapy for another year. Both of them recovered and had no evidence of any loosening or osteolysis on X-rays. There were no other complications recorded. CONCLUSION: Total hip replacement restores good function to patients suffering from post tubercular arthritis of the hip. PMID:26396940

  15. Novel Highly Porous Metal Technology in Artificial Hip and Knee Replacement: Processing Methodologies and Clinical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muth, John; Poggie, Matthew; Kulesha, Gene; Michael Meneghini, R.

    2013-02-01

    Hip and knee replacement can dramatically improve a patient's quality of life through pain relief and restored function. Fixation of hip and knee replacement implants to bone is critical to the success of the procedure. A variety of roughened surfaces and three-dimensional porous surfaces have been used to enhance biological fixation on orthopedic implants. Recently, highly porous metals have emerged as versatile biomaterials that may enhance fixation to bone and are suitable to a number of applications in hip and knee replacement surgery. This article provides an overview of several processes used to create these implant surfaces.

  16. Current role of spacers for prostate cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Pinkawa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Radiotherapy is an established curative treatment method for prostate cancer. Optimal tumor control rates can only be achieved with high local doses, associated with a considerable risk of rectal toxicity. Apart from already widely adapted technical advances, as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, the application of spacers placed between the prostate and rectum has been increasingly used in the last years. Biodegradable spacers, including hydrogel, hyaluronic acid, collagen or an implantable balloon, can be injected or inserted in a short procedure under transrectal ultrasound guidance via a transperineal approach. A distance of about 1.0-1.5 cm is usually achieved between the rectum and prostate, excluding the rectal wall from the high isodoses. Several studies have shown well tolerated injection procedures and treatments. Apart from considerable reduction of rectal irradiation, a prospective randomized trial demonstrated a reduction of rectal toxicity after hydrogel injection in men undergoing prostate image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The results are encouraging for continuing evaluation in dose escalation, hypofractionation, stereotactic radiotherapy or re-irradiation trials in the future. PMID:26677428

  17. Current role of spacers for prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Pinkawa, Michael

    2015-12-10

    Radiotherapy is an established curative treatment method for prostate cancer. Optimal tumor control rates can only be achieved with high local doses, associated with a considerable risk of rectal toxicity. Apart from already widely adapted technical advances, as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, the application of spacers placed between the prostate and rectum has been increasingly used in the last years. Biodegradable spacers, including hydrogel, hyaluronic acid, collagen or an implantable balloon, can be injected or inserted in a short procedure under transrectal ultrasound guidance via a transperineal approach. A distance of about 1.0-1.5 cm is usually achieved between the rectum and prostate, excluding the rectal wall from the high isodoses. Several studies have shown well tolerated injection procedures and treatments. Apart from considerable reduction of rectal irradiation, a prospective randomized trial demonstrated a reduction of rectal toxicity after hydrogel injection in men undergoing prostate image-guided intensity-modulated radiation therapy. The results are encouraging for continuing evaluation in dose escalation, hypofractionation, stereotactic radiotherapy or re-irradiation trials in the future. PMID:26677428

  18. Spacer-Based Macroarrays for CRISPR Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Mokrousov, Igor; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Macroarray-based analysis is a powerful and economic format to study variations in "clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)" loci in bacteria. To date, it was used almost exclusively for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and was named spoligotyping (spacer oligonucleotides typing). Here, we describe the pipeline of this approach that includes search of loci and selection of spacers, preparation of the membrane with immobilized probes and spoligotyping itself (PCR and reverse hybridization). PMID:25981469

  19. Hip replacement - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or part of your hip joint with an artificial joint. This artificial joint is called a prosthesis. ... be careful that you do not dislocate your artificial hip, especially in the first few months after ...

  20. Hip joint injection

    MedlinePLUS

    ... injection is a shot of medicine into the hip joint. The medicine helps relieve pain and inflammation. It ... often caused by: Bursitis Arthritis Injury to the hip joint or surrounding area Overuse or strain from running ...

  1. Hot Topics in Biomechanics: Hip Fracture Fixation.

    PubMed

    Olson, Steven A; Schemitsch, Geoffrey; Morwood, Michael; Schemitsch, Emil; Russell, Thomas A; Latta, Loren L

    2015-12-01

    Geriatric hip fractures continue to increase in frequency as the population ages, and intertrochanteric femur fractures are a significant part of these injuries. Plate fixation for intertrochanteric fractures of the proximal femur has been in use for many years, and application of the sliding hip screw has also been a mainstay of treatment. Recent data suggest there may be a benefit to using implants that add rotational stability to the proximal intertrochanteric fragment. Although preliminary data are promising, there is need for improved investigation to demonstrate the benefit of these new implant designs. In this era of increasing emphasis on cost, quality, and value, better data are needed to help clinicians determine the best therapy for their patients. PMID:26584258

  2. Bursitis of the Hip

    MedlinePLUS

    ... long-lasting). Symptoms What are the symptoms of hip bursitis? Symptoms include joint pain and tenderness, swelling and warmth around the ... losing weight can help reduce pressure on your joints, including the hips. Building strength in your hips with an approved ...

  3. Total Hip Joint Replacement Biotelemetry System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boreham, J. F.; Postal, R. B.; Luntz, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    The development of a biotelemetry system that is hermetically sealed within a total hip replacement implant is reported. The telemetry system transmits six channels of stress data to reconstruct the major forces acting on the neck of the prosthesis and uses an induction power coupling technique to eliminate the need for internal batteries. The activities associated with the telemetry microminiaturization, data recovery console, hardware fabrications, power induction systems, electrical and mechanical testing and hermetic sealing test results are discussed.

  4. 21 CFR 888.3340 - Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3340 Hip joint metal/composite semi-constrained...semi-constrained cemented prosthesis is a two-part device intended to be implanted to replace a hip joint. The device limits...

  5. The ribosomal gene spacer region in archaebacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achenbach-Richter, L.; Woese, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    Sequences for the spacer regions that separate the 16S and 23S ribosomal RNA genes have been determined for four more (strategically placed) archaebacteria. These confirm the general rule that methanogens and extreme halophiles have spacers that contain a single tRNAala gene, while tRNA genes are not found in the spacer region of the true extreme thermophiles. The present study also shows that the spacer regions from the sulfate reducing Archaeglobus and the extreme thermophile Thermococcus (both of which cluster phylogenetically with the methanogens and extreme halophiles) contain each a tRNAala gene. Thus, not only all methanogens and extreme halophiles show this characteristic, but all organisms on the "methanogen branch" of the archaebacterial tree appear to do so. The finding of a tRNA gene in the spacer region of the extreme thermophile Thermococcus celer is the first known phenotypic property that links this organism with its phylogenetic counterparts, the methanogens, rather than with its phenotypic counterparts, the sulfur-dependent extreme thermophiles.

  6. Metal-on-Metal Hip Resurfacing Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sehatzadeh, S; Kaulback, K; Levin, L

    2012-01-01

    Background Metal-on-metal (MOM) hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is in clinical use as an appropriate alternative to total hip arthroplasty in young patients. In this technique, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the acetabulum. Objectives The primary objective of this analysis was to compare the revision rates of MOM HRA using different implants with the benchmark set by the National Institute of Clinical Excellence (NICE). The secondary objective of this analysis was to review the literature regarding adverse biological effects associated with implant material. Review Methods A literature search was performed on February 13, 2012, to identify studies published from January 1, 2009, to February 13, 2012. Results The revision rates for MOM HRA using 6 different implants were reviewed. The revision rates for MOM HRA with 3 implants met the NICE criteria, i.e., a revision rate of 10% or less at 10 years. Two implants had short-term follow-ups and MOM HRA with one of the implants failed to meet the NICE criteria. Adverse tissue reactions resulting in failure of the implants have been reported by several studies. With a better understanding of the factors that influence the wear rate of the implants, adverse tissue reactions and subsequent implant failure can be minimized. Many authors have suggested that patient selection and surgical technique affect the wear rate and the risk of tissue reactions. The biological effects of high metal ion levels in the blood and urine of patients with MOM HRA implants are not known. Studies have shown an increase in chromosomal aberrations in patients with MOM articulations, but the clinical implications and long-term consequences of this increase are still unknown. Epidemiological studies have shown that patients with MOM HRA implants did not have an overall increase in mortality or risk of cancer. There is insufficient clinical data to confirm the teratogenicity of MOM implants in humans. Conclusions Metal-on-metal HRA can be beneficial for appropriately selected patients, provided the surgeon has the surgical skills required for performing this procedure. Plain Language Summary There are many young patients with hip diseases who need to have hip replacement surgery. Although a traditional hip replacement is an acceptable procedure for these patients, some surgeons prefer using a newer technique in young patients called hip resurfacing. In this technique, instead of removing the head of the femoral bone, a metal cap is placed on the femoral head to cover the damaged surface of the bone and a metal cup is placed in the hip socket, similar to the cups used in traditional hip replacement. The analysis of the revision rates (i.e., how soon and in how many patients the surgery needs to be redone) and safety of resurfacing implants showed that generally these implants can last 10 years or more for the majority of young people. Good outcomes can be expected when skilled surgeons perform the surgery in properly selected patients. However, since these implants are made of metal (cobalt and chromium alloy), there is concern about excess metal debris production due to friction between the 2 metal components leading to high levels of metal ions in the blood and urine of patients. The production of metal debris may result in inflammation in the joint or development of a benign soft tissue mass leading to implant failure. However, it has been shown that this risk can be reduced by proper positioning of the implant and the careful selection of patients for this procedure. Little is known about the long-term biological effects of high levels of metal ions in the blood and urine of patients who have received metal implants. There is concern about potential increases in the risk of cancer and the risk of fetal abnormalities, but these effects have not been established yet. However, since cobalt and chromium can pass the placental barrier, implants that are not metal-on-metal are recommended for women at childbearing ages if they

  7. Evaluation of the unstable total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, William G; McAuley, James P

    2004-01-01

    Despite advances in total hip arthroplasty, dislocation persists as a troublesome complication for orthopaedic surgeons to manage, second only to prosthetic loosening as a cause of revision. Although this complication has received considerable attention, evaluation and treatment of the unstable total hip arthroplasty remain poorly understood. Therefore, it is important to evaluate such factors as underlying patient comorbidities, the direction of dislocation, soft-tissue tension, surgical technique, implant design, and component position. For recurrent hip instability, a careful history to determine the mechanism of dislocation is necessary, and a review of preoperative imaging studies can help clarify whether gross component malpositioning is present. Examination under anesthesia and intraoperative inspection are also important. Taking the hip through a full range of motion while directly visualizing the anatomy can help diagnose component-to-component impingement, inadequate offset soft-tissue tension, extra-articular impingement, and other possible contributing factors. Even when a seemingly obvious cause of dislocation, such as component malposition, is diagnosed, surgical results have been somewhat disappointing. Therefore, surgical planning should include all possible revision options, and the temptation to find the quick fix should be resisted. Patients should be extensively counseled regarding realistic expectations both before primary hip arthroplasty and in the face of a revision surgery for recurrent dislocations because long-term results are less than optimal. PMID:15116602

  8. Metal-on-Metal Total Hip Arthroplasty: Patient Evaluation and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Bolognesi, Michael P; Ledford, Cameron K

    2015-12-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip articulations were thought to represent a biologic and biomechanically favorable alternative to conventional metal-on-polyethylene total hip arthroplasty implants. However, concerns emerged when registry data reported significantly higher failure rates associated with MoM implants compared with other contemporary hip implants. These high implant failure rates have been attributed to the release of metal particles into the periprosthetic space, creating macroscopic necrosis; corrosive osteolysis; large, sterile hip effusions; and periprosthetic solid and cystic masses (ie, pseudotumors)-a spectrum of findings termed adverse reaction to metal debris. A thorough clinical history and physical examination, along with laboratory data and imaging surveillance of these patients, is critical for appropriate diagnosis and treatment. The decision to perform revision hip arthroplasty of a metal-on-metal implant is multifactorial and should be based on documented, objective clinical indications. A systematic and objective approach to this evaluation and treatment is essential to optimize the care of patients who undergo total hip arthroplasty with MoM implants. PMID:26493972

  9. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is claimed to allow higher activity levels and to give better quality of life than total hip arthroplasty. In this literature review, we assessed the therapeutic value of hip resurfacing arthroplasty as measured by functional outcome. Methods An extensive literature search was performed using the PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane databases. Results 9 patient series, 1 case-control study, and 1 randomized controlled trial (RCT) were included. Clinically and statistically significant improvement in sporting activity and hip scores were found in 10 studies. Interpretation Studies with low levels of evidence have shown improvement in various different hip scores and one RCT showed better outcomes with hip resurfacing arthroplasty. There is no high-level evidence to prove that there is improved clinical outcome using hip resurfacing arthroplasty. More randomized research needs to be done. PMID:20860440

  10. Hip pain in the young, active patient: surgical strategies.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Michael R; Erickson, Jill A; McCarthy, Joseph C; Mont, Michael A; Mulkey, Patrick; Peters, Christopher L; Pivec, Robert; Austin, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Hip disorders in young patients likely exist as a spectrum of prearthritic and arthritic conditions. With the increasing recognition of these disorders, surgical options are being popularized and more patients are being treated at a younger age. Hip surgeons must develop a careful set of evidenced-based indications and follow surgical outcomes in a rigorous, scientific manner. Hip arthroscopy can be used to successfully treat some hip disorders, including labral tears, with or without femoroacetabular impingement, resulting in mechanical symptoms. Long-term outcomes after arthroscopy are determined by the condition of the cartilage at the time of surgery. Patients with preoperative radiographic evidence of moderate to severe arthritis have poor outcomes when treated with arthroscopy. Open joint preservation procedures (including periacetabular osteotomy and surgical hip dislocation with osteochondroplasty) can be done in the absence of substantial arthritis to treat hip dysplasia, femoroacetabular impingement, and related conditions. The results of these procedures are good in appropriately selected patients at short-term to midterm follow-ups. In the presence of severe arthritis, joint replacement is the treatment of choice. Total hip arthroplasty using uncemented acetabular and femoral fixation provides reliable osseointegration; however, long-term results in young patients have historically been compromised by bearing surface wear, osteolysis, and component loosening. Contemporary, highly cross-linked polyethylene and ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have durable results, low complication rates, and offer the potential of long-term survivorship in this high-demand population. In general, metal-on-metal implants have higher complication rates versus other bearing surface options and should be avoided. The best results of hip resurfacing are seen in men younger than 55 years with large femoral head sizes. Although implant survivorship is comparable to that of total hip arthroplasty, the sequelae of metal wear debris continue to cause concern. PMID:24720303

  11. Breast Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ALCL) in women with breast implants. Outline the regulatory history of breast implants in the United States. ... Freedom of Information Requests More in Breast Implants Regulatory History of Breast Implants in the U.S. Saline- ...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3360 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3360 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3360 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3360 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. 888.3370 Section...3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. 888.3370 Section...3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. 888.3370 Section...3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. 888.3370 Section...3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. 888.3370 Section...3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis is a device...

  1. Separator-spacer for electrochemical systems

    DOEpatents

    Grimes, Patrick G. (Westfield, NJ); Einstein, Harry (Springfield, NJ); Newby, Kenneth R. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Bellows, Richard J. (Westfield, NJ)

    1983-08-02

    An electrochemical cell construction features a novel co-extruded plastic electrode in an interleaved construction with a novel integral separator-spacer. Also featured is a leak and impact resistant construction for preventing the spill of corrosive materials in the event of rupture.

  2. Hip fracture - discharge

    MedlinePLUS

    Inter-trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Subtrochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Femoral neck fracture repair - discharge; Trochanteric fracture repair - discharge; Hip pinning surgery - ...

  3. Hip joint replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... made joint. The artificial joint is called a prosthesis . ... thromboembolic disease in patients undergoing elective hip and knee arthopolasty: Evidence-based guideline and evidence report. American ...

  4. Adverse reaction to metal debris after Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Junnila, Mika; Seppänen, Matti; Mokka, Jari; Virolainen, Petri; Pölönen, Tuukka; Vahlberg, Tero; Mattila, Kimmo; Tuominen, Esa K J; Rantakokko, Juho; Äärimaa, Ville; Itälä, Ari; Mäkelä, Keijo T

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Concern has emerged about local soft-tissue reactions after hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA). The Birmingham Hip Resurfacing (BHR) was the most commonly used HRA device at our institution. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors for adverse reaction to metal debris (ARMD) with this device. Patients and methods From 2003 to 2011, BHR was the most commonly used HRA device at our institution, with 249 implantations. We included 32 patients (24 of them men) who were operated with a BHR HRA during the period April 2004 to March 2007 (42 hips; 31 in men). The mean age of the patients was 59 (26–77) years. These patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), serum metal ion measurements, the Oxford hip score questionnaire, and physical examination. The prevalence of ARMD was recorded, and risk factors for ARMD were assessed using logistic regression models. The mean follow-up time was 6.7 (2.4–8.8) years. Results 6 patients had a definite ARMD (involving 9 of the 42 hips). 8 other patients (8 hips) had a probable ARMD. Thus, there was definite or probable ARMD in 17 of the 42 hips. 4 of 42 hips were revised for ARMD. Gender, bilateral metal-on-metal hip replacement and head size were not factors associated with ARMD. Interpretation We found that HRA with the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing may be more dangerous than previously believed. We advise systematic follow-up of these patients using metal ion levels, MRI/ultrasound, and patient-reported outcome measures. PMID:25582189

  5. Numerical optimization of composite hip endoprostheses under different loading conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blake, T. A.; Davy, D. T.; Saravanos, D. A.; Hopkins, D. A.

    1992-01-01

    The optimization of composite hip implants was investigated. Emphasis was placed on the effect of shape and material tailoring of the implant to improve the implant-bone interaction. A variety of loading conditions were investigated to better understand the relationship between loading and optimization outcome. Comparisons of the initial and optimal models with more complex 3D finite element models were performed. The results indicate that design improvements made using this method result in similar improvements in the 3D models. Although the optimization outcomes were significantly affected by the choice of loading conditions, certain trends were observed that were independent of the applied loading.

  6. Honeycomb spacer crush stength test results

    SciTech Connect

    Leader, D.R.

    1993-09-15

    This report discusses aluminum honeycomb spacers, which are used as an energy absorbent material in shipping packages for off site shipment of radioactive materials and which were ordered in two crush strengths, 1,000 psi and 2,000 psi for use in drop tests requested by the Packaging and Transportation group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the group as part of the shipping container rectification process. Both the vendor and the SRTC Materials Laboratory performed crush strength measurements on test samples made from the material used to fabricate the actual spacers. The measurements of crush strength made in the SRTC Materials Laboratory are within 100 psi of the measurements made by the manufacturer for all samples tested and all test measurements are within 10% of the specified crush strength, which is acceptable to the P&T group for the planned tests.

  7. Heterogeneous diversity of spacers within CRISPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deem, Michael; He, Jiankui

    2011-03-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of anti-viral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face. 1) J. He and M. W. Deem, Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 (2010) 128102

  8. Tube support grid and spacer therefor

    DOEpatents

    Ringsmuth, Richard J. (Solano Beach, CA); Kaufman, Jay S. (Del Mar, CA)

    1986-01-01

    A tube support grid and spacers therefor provide radially inward preloading of heat exchange tubes to minimize stress upon base welds due to differential thermal expansion. The grid comprises a concentric series of rings and spacers with opposing concave sides for conforming to the tubes and V-shaped ends to provide resilient flexibility. The flexibility aids in assembly and in transmitting seismic vibrations from the tubes to a shroud. The tube support grid may be assembled in place to achieve the desired inwardly radial preloading of the heat exchange tubes. Tab and slot assembly further minimizes stresses in the system. The radii of the grid rings may be preselected to effect the desired radially inward preloading.

  9. Hip Offset in Total Hip Arthroplasty: Quantitative Measurement with Navigation

    PubMed Central

    Dastane, Manish; Tarwala, Rupesh; Wan, Zhinian

    2010-01-01

    Background Offset in THA correlates to abductor muscle function, wear, and impingement. Femoral offset after THA is not independent of the cup center of rotation (COR) so hip offset, a combination of femoral offset and change in hip COR, becomes the important measurement. Questions/purposes We therefore asked whether hip offset in arthritic hips would correlate with cup COR; whether offset could always be balanced within 6 mm of contralateral normal hips; and whether hip length could also be kept within 6 mm. Methods We compared hip offset of arthritic and contralateral normal hips on radiographs in 82 patients (82 hips) who had THA. We used computer navigation in all patients with the aim of reconstructing the hip offset and to compare hip offset change to the quantitative change of the hip COR. Results The preoperative radiographic change to equalize the offset ranged from ?12 to +21 mm (mean, 1.5); postoperatively the change was 1.4 ± 6.4 mm and was within ± 6 mm in 78 of 82 hips. As COR displaced superiorly from 3 to 6+ mm the offset had to be substantially increased. Only with COR 0–3 mm superior and 0–5 mm medial was offset always within 5 mm. Conclusions Hip offset reconstruction was directly related to the position of the hip COR, and navigation allowed quantitative control of offset and hip length. PMID:20844997

  10. Hip fracture surgery

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the bone to die. Injury to nerves or blood vessels. Parts of the hip bone may not join together at all or in the correct position. Blood clots in the legs or lungs. Mental confusion ( dementia ). Older adults who fracture a hip may already ...

  11. Cochlear Implants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Catherine; Scott, Larry

    This brochure explains what a cochlear implant is, lists the types of individuals with deafness who may be helped by a cochlear implant, describes the process of evaluating people for cochlear implants, discusses the surgical process for implanting the aid, traces the path of sound through the cochlear implant to the brain, notes the costs of…

  12. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  13. Formed HIP Can Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Kester Diederik

    2015-07-27

    The intent of this report is to document a procedure used at LANL for HIP bonding aluminum cladding to U-10Mo fuel foils using a formed HIP can for the Domestic Reactor Conversion program in the NNSA Office of Material, Management and Minimization, and provide some details that may not have been published elsewhere. The HIP process is based on the procedures that have been used to develop the formed HIP can process, including the baseline process developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The HIP bonding cladding process development is summarized in the listed references. Further iterations with Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) to refine the process to meet production and facility requirements is expected.

  14. Hip resurfacing: not your average hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Siverling, Scott; Felix, Ioonna; Chow, S Betty; Niedbala, Elizabeth; Su, Edwin P

    2012-03-01

    Hip resurfacing (HR) has become a widely used surgical intervention for younger patients requiring hip joint arthroplasty. While case reports have been published describing rehabilitation programs following HR, there has yet to be established rehabilitation guidelines. Through experience and clinical reasoning, the following guidelines have been developed based on the patients at the Hospital for Special Surgery. The demographics of the typical HR patient, along with the surgical process are described. Current published literature reporting rehabilitation for patients with arthritic hip pathologies has been incorporated into the guidelines and is presented. The guidelines are divided into three phases, with goals for each phase explained. A progression through phases by way of reaching certain milestones and goals is advocated. PMID:22231958

  15. [Osteosynthesis and simultaneous anchorage of a plastic hip cup in an unstable acetabulum (author' transl)].

    PubMed

    Weigand, H; Ritter, G; Schweikert, C H

    1978-08-11

    Attempts at total hip replacement in the presence of unstable acetabula--which may be caused by a recent fracture or pseudarthrosis--are doomed to failure if conventional implantation technics are used. Such attempts lead inevitably to a rapid loosening of the cup. This article describes a newly developed implant which simultaneously re-establishes acetabular stability while solidly anchoring the cup. Use of this implant contributes to early patient mobilization and undisturbed healing of fractures and pseudarthroses. PMID:727910

  16. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arts A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense ... that can answer questions and provide printed or electronic information on cochlear implants: Cochlear implants Assistive technology ...

  17. Hip Replacement - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Hip Replacement (Arabic) ??????? Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Total Hip Replacement Potpuna zamjena kuka - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (????) Total Hip Replacement ?????? - ???? ( ...

  18. The Result of Revision Total Hip Arthroplasty in Patients with Metallosis Following a Catastrophic Failure of a Polyethylene Liner

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hong Suk; Lee, Young-Kyun; Koo, Kyung-Hoi; Yoon, Kang Sup; Kim, Hee Joong

    2015-01-01

    Background Wear cannot be completely prevented after total hip arthroplasty. If severe polyethylene (PE) liner wear develops, the so-called catastrophic failure occurs and metallosis develops. We postulated that longevity of the new implant may be affected after revision surgery for metallosis following a catastrophic failure of a PE liner due to the substantial amount of PE wear particles and infiltration of the metal particles in this catastrophic condition. Methods Twenty-three hips of 23 patients were identified because they showed metallosis during revision total hip arthroplasties performed in Seoul National University Hospital between January 1996 and August 2004. They were followed for at least 6.5 years after the index revision total hip arthroplasty. The clinical and radiological results of revision total hip arthroplasties in these patients were evaluated. Results The median Harris hip score increased from 60 points before revision total hip arthroplasties to 90 points at the final follow-up. Osteolysis was detected at an average of 9.3 years after revision total hip arthroplasties in 13 hips and acetabular cup loosening at average 9.8 years after revision total hip arthroplasties in 9 hips. With radiographic evidence of osteolysis and loosening as the end points, the 15-year survival rates were 28.2% and 56.0%, respectively. Conclusions The survival rate of revision total hip arthroplasty in patients with metallosis following a catastrophic failure of a PE liner was low. PMID:25729518

  19. SU-E-J-230: Effect of Metal Hip Prosthesis On the Accuracy of Electromagnetic Localization and Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, W; Merrick, G; Kurko, B; Bittner, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the effect of metal hip prosthesis on the ability to track and localize electromagnetic transponders. Methods: Three Calypso transponders were implanted into two prostate phantoms. The geometric center of the transponders were identified on computed tomography and set as the isocenter. With the phantom stationary on the treatment table and the tracking array 14-cm above the isocenter, data was acquired by the Calypso system at 10 Hz to establish the uncertainty in measurements. Transponder positional data was acquired with unilateral hip prostheses of different metallic compositions and then with bilateral hips placed at variable separation from the phantom. Results: Regardless of hip prosthesis composition, the average vector displacement in the presence of a unilateral prosthesis was < 0.5 mm. The greatest contribution to overall vector displacement occurred in the lateral dimension. With bilateral hip prosthesis, the average vector displacement was 0.3 mm. The displacement in the lateral dimension was markedly reduced compared with a unilateral hip, suggesting that there was a countervailing effect with bilateral hip prosthesis. The greatest average vector displacement was 0.6 mm and occurred when bilateral hip prostheses were placed within 4 cm of the detector array. Conclusion: Unilateral and bilateral hip prostheses did not have any meaningful effect on the ability to accurately track electromagnetic transponders implanted in a prostate phantom. At clinically realistic distances between the hip and detection array, the average tracking error is negligible.

  20. Bearing surfaces in hip replacement – Evolution and likely future

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Narinder; Arora, Gen N.C.; Datta, Barun

    2014-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty has evolved from the first total hip arthroplasty in 1938, through the revolutionization of hip arthroplasty by principles of low friction arthroplasty introduced by Sir John Charnley in 1960s to the present state of the art implants and techniques. The main concern regarding failure of total hip arthroplasty has been the biological response to particulate polyethylene debris generated by conventional metal on polyethylene bearing surfaces leading to osteolysis and aseptic loosening of the prosthesis. Therefore, recent research has been focussing on alternative bearing surfaces to reduce the particulate debris generated. These bearing surfaces include ceramic-polyethylene, metal–metal as well as ceramic–ceramic articulations and have demonstrated lesser friction rates as well as significantly lower wear rates as compared to widely used metal on polyethylene surfaces. Clinical experience until now has shown that metal on metal articulations have significant safety concerns whereas metal-on-highly crosslinked polyethylene, ceramic on ceramic and ceramic on highly crosslinked polyethylene articulations have shown encouraging results to hold promise for wider use in younger and more active patients. This review article discusses positives and drawbacks of various bearing surfaces in current clinical use in total hip arthroplasty as well as briefly explores the newer technologies on the horizon which may even further decrease wear and improve total hip arthroplasty survivorship. PMID:25382913

  1. Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... ankle pump exercises, and early mobilization. Leg-length Inequality Sometimes after a hip replacement, one leg may ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 12 ) AAOS does ...

  2. Ultrasound: Infant Hip

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hip area, and images are recorded on a computer. The black-and-white images show the internal ... the images can be seen clearly on the computer screen. A technician (sonographer) trained in ultrasound imaging ...

  3. Hip flexor strain - aftercare

    MedlinePLUS

    ... the hip flexors. Runners, people who do martial arts, and football, soccer, and hockey players are more ... kidney disease, or have had stomach ulcers or internal bleeding in the past. Do not take more ...

  4. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Chim-anage, P.; Kashiwagi, Y.; Magae, Y.; Ohta, T.; Sasaki, T.

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated Ch-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. 10 references.

  5. Properties of cellulase immobilized on agarose gel with spacer.

    PubMed

    Chim-Anage, P; Kashiwagi, Y; Magae, Y; Ohta, T; Sasaki, T

    1986-12-01

    Cellulase produced by fungus Trichoderma viride was immobilized on agarose beads (Sepharose 4B) activated by cyanogen bromide and also on activated agarose beads that contained spacer arm (activated CH-Sepharose 4B and Affi-Gel 15). The CMCase activity retained by immobilized cellulase on activated Sepharose containing the spacer tended to be higher than that immobilized without spacer, although the extent of protein immobilization was lower. Also, the higher substrate specificity for cellulase immobilized on beads with spacer was obtained for cellobiose, acid-swollen cellulose, or cellulose powder. The hydrolysis product from their substrates was mainly glucose. PMID:18555305

  6. Fixation using alternative implants for the treatment of hip fractures (FAITH): design and rationale for a multi-centre randomized trial comparing sliding hip screws and cancellous screws on revision surgery rates and quality of life in the treatment of femoral neck fractures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hip fractures are a common type of fragility fracture that afflict 293,000 Americans (over 5,000 per week) and 35,000 Canadians (over 670 per week) annually. Despite the large population impact the optimal fixation technique for low energy femoral neck fractures remains controversial. The primary objective of the FAITH study is to assess the impact of cancellous screw fixation versus sliding hip screws on rates of revision surgery at 24 months in individuals with femoral neck fractures. The secondary objective is to determine the impact on health-related quality of life, functional outcomes, health state utilities, fracture healing, mortality and fracture-related adverse events. Methods/Design FAITH is a multi-centre, multi-national randomized controlled trial utilizing minimization to determine patient allocation. Surgeons in North America, Europe, Australia, and Asia will recruit a total of at least 1,000 patients with low-energy femoral neck fractures. Using central randomization, patients will be allocated to receive surgical treatment with cancellous screws or a sliding hip screw. Patient outcomes will be assessed at one week (baseline), 10 weeks, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months post initial fixation. We will independently adjudicate revision surgery and complications within 24 months of the initial fixation. Outcome analysis will be performed using a Cox proportional hazards model and likelihood ratio test. Discussion This study represents major international efforts to definitively resolve the treatment of low-energy femoral neck fractures. This trial will not only change current Orthopaedic practice, but will also set a benchmark for the conduct of future Orthopaedic trials. Trial registration The FAITH trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (Identifier NCT00761813). PMID:24965132

  7. Exchange of Spacer Regions between Rrna Operons in Escherichia Coli

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, S.; Hill, C. W.

    1990-01-01

    The Escherichia coli rRNA operons each have one of two types of spacer separating the 16S and 23S coding regions. The spacers of four operons encode tRNA(Glu2) and the other three encode both tRNA(Ile) and tRNA(Ala 1 B). We have prepared a series of mutants in which the spacer region of a particular rrn operon has been replaced by the opposite type. Included among these were a mutant retaining only a single copy of the tRNA(Glu2) spacer (at rrnG) and another retaining only a single copy of the tRNA(Ile)-tRNA(Ala 1 B) spacer (at rrnA). While both mutants grew more slowly than controls, the mutant deficient in tRNA(Glu2) spacers was more severely affected. At a frequency of 6 X 10(-5), these mutants phenotypically reverted to faster growing types by increasing the copy number of the deficient spacer. In most of these phenotypic revertants, the deficient spacer type appeared in a rrn operon which previously contained the surplus type, bringing the ratio of spacer types closer to normal. In a few cases, these spacer changes were accompanied by an inversion of the chromosomal material between the donor and recipient rrn operons. Two examples of inversion of one-half of the E. coli chromosome between rrnG and rrnH were observed. The correlation of spacer change with inversion indicated that, in these particular cases, the change was due to an intrachromatid gene conversion event accompanied by a reciprocal crossover rather than reciprocal exchange between sister chromatids. PMID:2168847

  8. Evidence of MRSE on a gentamicin and vancomycin impregnated polymethyl-methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement spacer after two-stage exchange arthroplasty due to periprosthetic joint infection of the knee

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Periprosthetic joint infections (PJI) are often treated by two stage exchange with the use of an antibiotic impregnated spacer. Most of the two-stage exchange algorithms recommend the implantation of an antibiotic-impregnated spacer during the first stage for a period of 2–24 weeks before reimplantation of the new prosthesis. For the spacer to have a therapeutic effect, the local antibiotic concentration must be greater than the minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) against the pathogens causing the PJI. It must remain so for the entire spacer period, otherwise recurrence of infection or resistances might occur. The question as to whether a sufficient concentration of antibiotics in vivo is reached for the entire spacer period has not been answered satisfactorily. Case presentation We here present a case of a histologically confirmed chronic PJI 20 month after primary arthroplasty. The primary knee arthroplasty was performed due to osteoarthritis of the joint. Initial assessment did not detect a causative pathogen, and two stage exchange with a vancomycin-gentamycin impregnated spacer was performed. At the time of reimplantation, sonication of the explanted spacer revealed a multi-resistant strain of staphylococcus epidermidis on the device and in the joint. Adaption of the therapy and prolonged treatment successfully eradicated the infection. Conclusion According to the authors’ knowledge, the case presented here confirms for the first time the surface contamination (proven through sonication) of a vancomycin-/gentamicin- impregnated Vancogenx®-spacer with a MRSE after ten weeks of implantation. This case study demonstrates the difficulties still associated with the diagnostics of PJI and the published different two stage treatment regimes with the use of antibiotic impregnated spacers. PMID:24641471

  9. Management of the 'young' patient with hip disease.

    PubMed

    Ritterman, Scott A; Rubin, Lee E

    2013-03-01

    Although hip arthritis typically affects older patients, there is a rapidly growing population of "young" patients experiencing debilitating symptoms from hip disease. Most commonly, osteoarthritis and avascular necrosis affect this population, but a variety of other primary structural and metabolic causes can also occur. The expectations of these younger patients are often distinct from geriatric patients, and the challenges in optimizing their care are unique in this demanding population. Selection of the implant, bearing surface, and surgical technique can all impact the success and longevity of total hip replacement. A consideration for respecting the native bone stock is an important consideration that can potentially reduce some of the future challenges of revision arthroplasty in this young population. PMID:23641435

  10. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis...3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis... A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. ...Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. ...hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented...

  12. Improvement of inhaler efficacy by home-made spacer.

    PubMed

    Sritara, P; Janvitayanuchit, S

    1993-12-01

    The delivery of aerosol from a metered dose inhaler (MDI) was reported to be more efficient with a spacer. Hence, a home-made spacer modified from a 950 ml low cost plastic bottle, was compared with a MDI and with a 750 ml imported spacer (Nebuhaler). On three consecutive days, at the same time of day, 20 adult patients with chronic asthma inhaled two puffs of terbutaline sulphate (0.5 mg), delivered from MDI alone, MDI with a 750 ml Nebuhlaer and MDI with a home-made spacer. The following measurements were made: forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC) and pulse rate. These measurements were carried out immediately before and at 5, 20, 60 min after inhalation of terbutaline. FEV1 was significantly increased (P < 0.05) at 5, 20 and 60 min after administration of terbutaline with MDI via either spacers than with MDI alone but no significant difference was observed between Nebuhaler and the home-made spacer. FVC and pulse rate showed no significant change with each method of administration. In conclusion, terbutaline delivered by MDI and home-made spacer was more effective in bronchodilatation than by MDI alone and was just as effective as MDI and Nebuhaler. The home-made spacer therefore offers a simple, inexpensive and more effective method for delivering aerosol drug. PMID:7798822

  13. Pattern Alteration: Protruding Hip Bone 

    E-print Network

    2006-08-04

    People with very thin figures typically have to alter their clothing for protruding hip bones. This is because diagonal wrinkles radiate from the hip bones. This well-illustrated publication shows how to correct this problem in pants and skirts....

  14. Hip joint replacement - series (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... hip socket. The socket is usually made of metal. A liner that fits inside the socket. It ... usually plastic, but some surgeons use ceramic and metal. The liner allows the hip to move smoothly. ...

  15. Short term results of cementless total hip arthroplasty in sicklers

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Yash; Sharma, Mrinal; Bharti, Bhupendra; Bahl, Vibhu; Bohra, Ishwar; Goswani, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell (SC) disease leading to endarteritis induces skeletal changes in the form of osteitis, sclerosis of femoral canal and osteonecrosis of the femoral head. All these make total hip arthroplasty (THA) difficult and prolonged. There is increased risk of infection, SC crisis and increased complication rate. Our paper aims to highlight preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative hurdles encountered in performing THA in sicklers and the short term outcome using cementless implants. Materials and Methods: Thirty-nine patients with SC disease, who had osteonecrosis of the femoral head, were operated between 2007 and 2011. The mean age of patients was 22 years (range 13–49 years). There were twenty eight females and 11 males. Bilateral cementless total hip replacement (THR) was performed in 11 patients (22 hips) and in the rest unilateral (28 hips). Preoperative and postoperative modified Harris hip score was evaluated. The average followup was 3.8 years (range 2-6 years). Results: The average operating time was 96 min (range 88–148 min). The average blood loss was 880 ml (range 650–1200 ml). The average intraoperative blood transfused was 2.3 units (range 2–5 units). All patients showed an improvement in Harris hip score from 42 points preoperatively to 92 points at latest followup. Intraoperatively, one patient had a periprosthetic fracture. Six patients developed acute SC crisis and were managed in intensive care unit. Three patients developed wound hematoma. Three patients developed limb length discrepancy less than 1 cm. None had early or late dislocations, infection, heterotopic ossification, sciatic nerve palsy and aseptic loosening. Conclusion: THA in sicklers involves considerable challenge for the orthopedic surgeon. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach involving the anesthetist, hematologist and the orthopedic surgeon. Contrary to previous reports, THA in sicklers now has a predictable outcome especially with the use of cementless implants. PMID:26229167

  16. Impingement in Total Hip Replacement: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D.; Callaghan, John J.

    2009-01-01

    The occurrence of total hip impingement, whether or not accompanied by frank dislocation, holds substantial untoward clinical consequences, especially as less-forgiving advanced bearing implant designs come into ever more widespread use. Biomechanical aspects of impingement and dislocation have historically received relatively little scientific attention, although that situation is now rapidly changing. The present article reviews contemporary laboratory and clinical research on the impingement/dislocation phenomena, focusing particularly on how implant design variables, surgical implantation factors and patient activity each act individually and in concert to pose impingement and dislocation challenges. In recent years, several powerful new research methodologies have emerged that have greatly expanded the scope for clinical translation of systematic laboratory study. Transferring the findings from such research into yet better implant designs, and even better surgical procedures, offers encouragement that the clinical impact of this troublesome complication can be further reduced. PMID:19956356

  17. Nucleotide sequence of a complete ribosomal spacer of D. melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Simeone, A; La Volpe, A; Boncinelli, E

    1985-01-01

    We determined the nucleotide sequence of a D. melanogaster ribosomal DNA spacer. Sequences of various portions of different cloned ribosomal spacers have been previously reported. We extend the analysis to cover the entire nontranscribed and external transcribed regions. Comparison to other cloned ribosomal DNA gene units of this species confirms a conserved general organization of the ribosomal spacer through different size classes. D. melanogaster ribosomal gene units interrupted by insertions are known to be transcribed at a much lower level than the continuous gene units. Nonetheless previous sequence analysis of a region around the transcription initiation site did not reveal significant differences in rDNA genes with and without insertions. We extend such analysis to cover the last two promoter duplications in the spacer and the entire external transcribed spacer up to the 5' cleavage site of the 18S rRNA. Images PMID:3923435

  18. Hip resurfacing: a large, US single-surgeon series.

    PubMed

    Brooks, P J

    2016-01-01

    Hip resurfacing has been proposed as an alternative to traditional total hip arthroplasty in young, active patients. Much has been learned following the introduction of metal-on-metal resurfacing devices in the 1990s. The triad of a well-designed device, implanted accurately, in the correct patient has never been more critical than with these implants. Following Food and Drug Administration approval in 2006, we studied the safety and effectiveness of one hip resurfacing device (Birmingham Hip Resurfacing) at our hospital in a large, single-surgeon series. We report our early to mid-term results in 1333 cases followed for a mean of 4.3 years (2 to 5.7) using a prospective, observational registry. The mean patient age was 53.1 years (12 to 84); 70% were male and 91% had osteoarthritis. Complications were few, including no dislocations, no femoral component loosening, two femoral neck fractures (0.15%), one socket loosening (0.08%), three deep infections (0.23%), and three cases of metallosis (0.23%). There were no destructive pseudotumours. Overall survivorship at up to 5.7 years was 99.2%. Aseptic survivorship in males under the age of 50 was 100%. We believe this is the largest United States series of a single surgeon using a single resurfacing system. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2016;98-B (1 Suppl A):10-13. PMID:26733633

  19. Revision in Cemented and Cementless Infected Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Cherubino, Paolo; Puricelli, Marco; D’Angelo, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Infection is a frequent cause of failure after joint replacement surgery. The infection rate after total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been reduced to 1-2% in the last years. However, it still represents a challenging problem for the orthopedic surgeon. Difficulty of therapeutic approach, and poor functional outcomes together with length of treatment and overall cost are the main burden of this issue. Even the diagnosis of an infected hip could be challenging although it is the first step of an accurate treatment. At the end, many cases require removing the implants. Afterwards, the treatment strategy varies according to authors with three different procedures: no re-implantation, immediate placement of new implants or a two-stage surgery re-implantation. Based on the most recently systematic review there is no suggestion that one- or two-stage revision methods have different re-infection outcomes. The two-stage implant-exchange protocol remains the gold standard. It is considered as the most efficacious clinical approach for the treatment of periprosthetic infection, especially in patients with sinus tracts, swelling, extended abscess formation in depth and infection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA), and other multidrug-resistant bacteria as reported in recent consensus documents. PMID:23898351

  20. Use of Cemented Spacer with a Handmade Stem to Treat Acute Periprosthetic Tibial Fracture Infection: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Font-Vizcarra, LluÍs; Izquierdo, Oscar; GarcÍa-NuÑo, Laura; GonzÁlez, Araceli; Diaz-Brito, VicenÇ; Castellanos, Juan

    2014-01-01

    We report an 85-year-old woman with dementia and dependent for normal life activities who was admitted due to a left periprosthetic tibial fracture. The tibial component was replaced by one with a long stem and she was discharged. Four weeks after the intervention the patient was re-admitted due to an acute prosthetic joint infection. All the components were removed and a bone-cement spacer with a handmade stem with a metal core was implanted. Radiological signs of fracture consolidation were observed after 3 months of follow-up. Due to the previous health status of the patient, it was decided to keep the spacer as a definitive treatment. After 24 months, the patient was able to sit without pain and to stand up with help using a knee brace. There were no radiological or clinical signs of infection. PMID:24551027

  1. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    A cochlear implant is a small, complex electronic device that can help to provide a sense of sound. People who are ... of-hearing can get help from them. The implant consists of two parts. One part sits on ...

  2. Cochlear implant

    MedlinePLUS

    ... antenna. This part of the implant receives the sound, converts the sound into an electrical signal, and sends it to ... implants allow deaf people to receive and process sounds and speech. However, it is important to understand ...

  3. Spacer effect on nanostructures and self-assembly in organogels via some bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, Tifeng; Gao, Fengqing; Zhang, Qingrui; Zhou, Jingxin; Gao, Faming

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, new bolaform cholesteryl imide derivatives with different spacers were designed and synthesized. Their gelation behaviors in 23 solvents were investigated, and some of them were found to be low molecular mass organic gelators. The experimental results indicated that these as-formed organogels can be regulated by changing the flexible/rigid segments in spacers and organic solvents. Suitable combination of flexible/rigid segments in molecular spacers in the present cholesteryl gelators is favorable for the gelation of organic solvents. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy observations revealed that the gelator molecules self-assemble into different aggregates, from wrinkle and belt to fiber with the change of spacers and solvents. Spectral studies indicated that there existed different H-bond formations between imide groups and assembly modes, depending on the substituent spacers in molecular skeletons. The present work may give some insight into the design and character of new organogelators and soft materials with special molecular structures.

  4. Early Attempts at Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo F; Morcuende, Jose A

    2005-01-01

    Over the last three centuries, treatment of hip arthritides has evolved from rudimentary surgery to modern total hip arthroplasty (THA), which is considered one of the most successful surgical interventions ever developed. We here review the history of the early hip arthroplasty procedures for hip arthritis that preceded Charley total hip arthroplasty. An evaluation of such past enterprises is relevant, and reminds us of the ephemeral nature of human industriousness, and how medical research and procedures are not isolated developments, but correlate to the social, economical, and cultural framework of their time. PMID:16089067

  5. Outcome of primary resurfacing hip replacement: evaluation of risk factors for early revision

    PubMed Central

    Prosser, Gareth H; Yates, Piers J; Wood, David J; de Steiger, Richard N; Miller, Lisa N

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose The outcome of modern resurfacing remains to be determined. The Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry (AOANJRR) started collection of data on hip resurfacing at a time when modern resurfacing was started in Australia. The rate of resurfacing has been higher in Australia than in many other countries. As a result, the AOANJRR has one of the largest series of resurfacing procedures. This study was undertaken to determine the results of this series and the risk factors associated with revision. Patients and methods Data from the AOANJRR were used to analyze the survivorship of 12,093 primary resurfacing hip replacements reported to the Joint Replacement Registry between September 1999 and December 2008. This was compared to the results of primary conventional total hip replacement reported during the same period. The Kaplan-Meier method and proportional hazards models were used to determine risk factors such as age, sex, femoral component size, primary diagnosis, and implant design. Results Female patients had a higher revision rate than males; however, after adjusting for head size, the revision rates were similar. Prostheses with head sizes of less than 50 mm had a higher revision rate than those with head sizes of 50 mm or more. At 8 years, the cumulative per cent revision of hip resurfacing was 5.3 (4.6–6.2), as compared to 4.0 (3.8–4.2) for total hip replacement. However, in osteoarthritis patients aged less than 55 years with head sizes of 50 mm or more, the 7-year cumulative per cent revision for hip resurfacing was 3.0 (2.2–4.2). Also, hips with dysplasia and some implant designs had an increased risk of revision. Interpretation Risk factors for revision of resurfacing were older patients, smaller femoral head size, patients with developmental dysplasia, and certain implant designs. These results highlight the importance of patient and prosthesis selection in optimizing the outcome of hip resurfacing. PMID:20180719

  6. Cementless total hip replacement for severe developmental dysplasia of the hip: our experience in Crowe's group IV.

    PubMed

    Imarisio, Daniele; Trecci, Andrea; Sabatini, Luigi; Uslenghi, Marco; Leone, Calogero; Scagnelli, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Total hip replacement in developmental dysplasia of the hip grade IV of Crowe's classification presents some difficulties. In this study, we present our results of the treatment for this pathology, also describing the surgical techniques used and the complication we had. In this paper, 18 total hip replacements in developmental dysplasia of the hip Crowe IV were studied clinically and radiologically before and after surgery, with a mean follow-up of 4.2 years (min: 1 year). The average Harris Hip Score improved from 52 to 89. The average leg lengthening was 36 mm. When a subtrochanteric shortening osteotomy was performed, the healing occurred in all cases, in an average time of 5.3 months. At now, the implant survivorship is 100% (no revision required). The techniques and principles described in this paper allow to achieve good results in this surgery. An accurate preoperative evaluation and the availability of specific materials are also important steps. The subtrochanteric shortening is a safe procedure to avoid neurovascular injuries. PMID:23065630

  7. INL HIP Plate Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    B. H. Park; C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue

    2010-02-01

    This document outlines the process used to bond monolithic fuel plates by Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP). This method was developed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. These foils have been used in a number of irradiation experiments in support of the United States Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program.

  8. Aseptic hip pneumarthrosis following modular total hip arthroplasty: a potential mimic of hip infection.

    PubMed

    Morag, Yoav; Yablon, Corrie M; Weber, Alexander E; Brandon, Catherine; Blaha, David J

    2015-04-01

    Pneumarthrosis following total hip arthroplasty accompanied by acute hip symptoms is a potentially ominous finding suggesting infection with gas-forming bacteria, a medical emergency. We describe a case of a 61-year-old male presenting to the Emergency Department 43 months following a titanium/titanium (Ti/Ti) modular neck-stem total hip arthroplasty (MTHA) (Wright Medical Systems, Arlington, Tennessee) with acute presentation of hip symptoms and joint gas on radiographs proven to be aseptic hip pneumarthrosis. We review the imaging features of aseptic hip pneumarthrosis following MTHA which have not been elaborated on previously and suggest a less aggressive workup in select cases. We believe emergency radiologists should be aware of this unusual complication as it may mimic a septic hip which may entail an unnecessarily aggressive workup. PMID:25491939

  9. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  10. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  16. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  17. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  18. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  19. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3360 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or... Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a device intended to be...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  2. Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 37253731 Anterior hip joint force increases with hip extension, decreased gluteal

    E-print Network

    Moran, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Journal of Biomechanics 40 (2007) 3725­3731 Anterior hip joint force increases with hip extension Abnormal or excessive force on the anterior hip joint may cause anterior hip pain, subtle hip instability and a tear of the acetabular labrum. We propose that both the pattern of muscle force and hip joint position

  3. 21 CFR 888.3370 - Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3370 Hip joint (hemi-hip) acetabular metal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint (hemi-hip)...

  4. Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Jing; Min, Li; Xiang, Zhou; Huang, Fuguo; Tu, Chongqi; Zhang, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the curative effect of Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer for infected tibial nonunion with bone defect. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the outcomes of 58 patients with infected tibial nonunion from January 2008 to March 2011 at our institution. Patients were treated with complete debridement, radical sequestrectomy, antibiotic cement spacer implantation, bone transport using the Ilizarov external fixator, and soft tissue reconstruction. Clinical efficacy was assessed using Paley’s grading system and patient satisfaction at the last follow-up. Results: Follow-up ranged from 24 to 63 months (average, 31.6 months). Mean size of the tibial defect was 9.2 cm (range, 6-15 cm). The soft tissue defect was closed successfully in all cases. Patients eventually achieved union with a mean bone union index of 1.2 months/cm at an average of 10.6 months (range, 8-31 months). In terms of Paley grade, 30 patients had excellent results, 23 good, and 5 fair. Functional results were excellent in 28 patients, good in 18, and fair in 12. Thirty-five patients felt extremely satisfied, 18 satisfied, and 5 acceptable with the functional outcome. Complications included pin site infection in 18 cases, limb length discrepancy less than 1.5 cm in 10, knee stiffness in 5, equinus deformity in 4, infectious recurrence in 1 and pin breakage in 1. There was no refracture at the reconstruction site. Conclusion: Ilizarov bone transport combined with antibiotic cement spacer is a versatile and effective method for treatment of infected tibial nonunion. PMID:26309700

  5. Two-Stage Revision Using a Modified Articulating Spacer in Infected Total Knee Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young Soo; Cho, Chul Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Sohn, Eun Seok; Kim, Beom Soo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate clinical results of two-stage revision using a modified articulating spacer for treatment of infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 20 cases treated by two-stage revision arthroplasty using a modified articulating spacer under the diagnosis of infected TKA from January 2006 to December 2011. The mean follow-up period was 22.3 months. The first operation consisted of debridement after removal of the prosthesis, reinsertion of the femoral component after autoclaving, and implantation of antibiotic-loaded cement with a new polyethylene in the proximal tibia. Results The mean period between the primary TKA and the first stage operation was 39 months and between the first stage operation and the revision arthroplasty was 3.3 months. The average range of motion (ROM) increased from 69.8° preoperatively to 102.8° postoperatively (p<0.001). The mean Knee Society knee score increased from 33.8 points to 85.3 points (p<0.001). The mean Knee Society function score increased from 35 points to 87.5 points (p<0.001). The mean Hospital for Special Surgery score increased from 57.6 points preoperatively to 82.6 points postoperatively (p<0.001). Two cases (10%) were re-infected after the revision arthroplasty. Conclusions Two-stage revision arthroplasty using an articulating cement spacer can be an effective therapy not only for the treatment of an infected TKA but also for recovery of knee ROM and function. PMID:24368995

  6. [Computer-assisted surgery for hip endoprosthesis].

    PubMed

    Börner, M; Lahmer, A; Wiesel, U

    1999-06-01

    The use of computer-controlled robots for implanting cement-free prostheses requires exact preoperative planning on a three-dimensional graphics computer (ORTHODOC). For the first time ever, it has been possible to implement the three-dimensional plan using a computer-controlled robot working on patients. We assume that the considerably improved bone contact provided by the high-precision reaming process--an thus high primary stability--will lead to better incorporation in the bone. In experiments on dogs, in which cement-free hips had been implanted using computer-assisted robots, the animals showed much earlier and more uniform weight-bearing on the affected extremity than animals in a control group that had received conventional implants. In histological therms, the precise fit obtained by the ROBOCOC was accompanied by primary angiogenic healing patterns that all demonstrated labels during the first four weeks. The manually reamed comparators showed more pronounced fissure and defect healing, the healing patterns was irregular, and turnover activity was demonstrate. PMID:10432568

  7. Wear of metal-on-metal hip bearings: metallurgical considerations after hip simulator studies.

    PubMed

    Affatato, Saverio; Traina, Francesco; Ruggeri, Oddone; Toni, Aldo

    2011-12-01

    Metal-on-metal hip-bearing components with different percentages of carbon content (low and high carbon) were tested in 6 different configurations using a hip joint simulator. The aim of this study was to characterize metallurgical and tribological events occurring at the articulating surfaces of these articulations. Also, ion release was evaluated and correlated with wear. After the test, for the high-carbon components, carbides were observed below the matrix surface. In the low-carbon content components, most carbides were "carbide-free", while a minority were worn below the matrix surface with increased test cycles. In the cast alloy components, some carbides were pulled out resulting in micropits. Scanning microscope electron characterization of the tested specimens showed scratches and holes. The surface showed a dominant severe wear mechanism due to third-body particles. A greater amount of ions was released in the lubricant used during the wear test for the smaller diameter compared with the bigger one. This study showed that the metallurgical and tribological events taking place at the articulating surfaces of metal-metal hip implants are numerous and complex. The surface morphology after the test showed the effect of more critical working conditions with smaller diameters. PMID:22198601

  8. Drug-eluting nasal implants: formulation, characterization, clinical applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Ankit; Anand, Utkarshini; Ugwu, Malachy C; Feridooni, Tiam; Massoud, Emad; Agu, Remigius U

    2014-01-01

    Chronic inflammation and infection of the nasal sinuses, also referred to as Chronic Rhinosinusitis (CRS), severely affects patients' quality of life. Adhesions, ostial stenosis, infection and inflammation relapses complicate chronic sinusitis treatment strategies. Drug-eluting stents, packings or implants have been suggested as reasonable alternatives for addressing these concerns. This article reviewed potential drug candidates for nasal implants, formulation methods/optimization and characterization methods. Clinical applications and important considerations were also addressed. Clinically-approved implants (Propel™ implant, the Relieva stratus™ MicroFlow spacer, and the Sinu-Foam™ spacer) for CRS treatment was an important focus. The advantages and limitations, as well as future considerations, challenges and the need for additional research in the field of nasal drug implant development, were discussed. PMID:24871904

  9. Stress shielding effects of two prosthetic groups after total hip joint simulation replacement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study aims to compare the stress shielding effects of implantable anatomical and traditional prostheses after in vitro total hip joint replacement simulation. The study serves as a biomechanical basis for novel artificial prostheses and for clinical hip joint replacements. Methods Sixteen femoral specimens from adult male corpses were randomly divided into two groups: the traditional prosthesis group implanted into femur specimens using simulated total hip joint replacement (n = 8) and the femoral neck-preserved anatomical prosthesis implantation group that used a collum femoris preserving stem/trabeculae oriented pattern (CFP/TOP) acetabular cup (n = 8). The strain values in the two groups before and after prosthesis implantation were measured at different test points using electric resistance strain gauges. The stress shielding rate was calculated according to the related formula. Results The results showed that the rates of proximal femoral stress shielding were significantly higher at test points 1–10 in the traditional femoral prosthesis transplantation group than in the anatomical prosthesis group (p < 0.05). Conclusions There were different effects of stress shielding between the anatomical and traditional prostheses. Retained femoral anatomical implants should reduce stress shielding and increase the stability of anatomical prosthesis implants. PMID:25174846

  10. Evolution in hip resurfacing design and contemporary experience with an uncemented device.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Robert F

    2011-05-01

    The concepts of surface replacement of the hip and metal-on-metal articulation date back to the 1930s, and recent hip resurfacing designs have been more successful than their predecessors. Experience with the Cormet device followed initial collaboration with Mr. Derek McMinn. Both hybrid implants (a cementless cup and a cemented head) and entirely cementless implants, inserted with use of a variety of surgical approaches, yielded good results, with the cementless option increasing in popularity. The indications for hip resurfacing have become better understood, with the procedure considered most suitable for young and middle-aged males with a high activity profile. In addition, revision surgery, if necessary, has been associated in most cases with bone and soft-tissue conservation. Caution should be exercised when treating small individuals (especially females) and individuals with accompanying diagnoses other than osteoarthritis (such as hip dysplasia), for whom other bone-conserving options may be more appropriate to avoid an adverse reaction to metal debris. Correct implant placement during hip resurfacing is of critical importance. PMID:21543695

  11. Spacer process and alignment assessment for SADP process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lattard, L.; McCallum, M.; Morton, R.; Fujiwara, T.; Makino, K.; Tokui, A.; Takahashi, N.; Sasamoto, S.

    2012-03-01

    Self Aligned Double Patterning (SADP) is now widely accepted as a viable technology for the further extension of 193nm immersion lithography towards the 22nm /18nm technology nodes. SADP was primary introduced for the manufacturing of flash memory due to its 1D design geometry. However, SADP is now becoming a main stream technology for advanced technology nodes for logic product. SADP results in alignment marks with reduced image contrast after completion of spacer patterning. Consequently there is an elevated risk that the alignment performance of the cut lithography layer on the spacer [1] may be negatively impacted. Initial studies indicate that it may be necessary to consider new mark designs. In this paper, we will evaluate different types of SADP processes with the alignment system of the Nikon S620D and S621D immersion scanner. We will discuss the performances and the differences observed due to the SADP materials. Included in this study is an intensive characterization of the morphology of the spacer after SADP process. We will use for this a 3D-AFM from Insight, and characterize the spacer profile of the spacer. Using a standard AFM microscope, we can characterize the surface roughness in the inner and the outer part of the wafer. The self aligned spacer process results in asymmetric spacers. Two types of surface (inside and outside) of the spacer are formed. The impact of this asymmetry is also assessed. The roughness difference, between the two parts, will play an important roll in the alignment contrast.

  12. 10-year experience with short stem total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    von Lewinski, Gabriela; Floerkemeier, Thilo

    2015-03-01

    Since 1998, short stem total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been performed at the authors' institution. Currently, 30% of THAs are performed with short stems. This article reports on complications that required revision of a short stem THA. Between September 2005 and February 2012, a total of 1953 Metha short stem THAs were performed; of these, 38 required revision due to mechanical complications. In 12 cases, the modular titanium neck adapter failed. In 19 cases, aseptic implant loosening occurred; of these, 11 cases were due to major stem subsidence. In 2 cases, via falsa (cortical penetration) implantation occurred. In 5 cases, periprosthetic fractures led to revision. This corresponds to an aseptic total revision rate of 1.3% for 26 short stems and 1.9% including the cases of all 38 documented revision cases. Thirty-four cases were revised with cementless standard hip stems, 2 cases were revised with short stems, and 2 cases were revised with long revision stems. Undersizing was analyzed in 58% of aseptic revisions. Fifty-four percent of revisions were performed in male patients - 23% with osteonecrosis of the femoral head, and 7% with short hip stems positioned in varus in coxa vara deformities. Seventy-two percent of revisions after marked early stem subsidence and position change into valgus were performed in female patients. Dysplastic hips with coxa valga did not show elevated revision rates. No revisions were performed for dislocation or femoral thigh pain. Short stem THA with the Metha implant is a bone-preserving option for various indications in select patient groups. PMID:25826634

  13. Review of quality of x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Khan, Faiz; Ahmad, Tayyab; Condon, Finbarr; Lenehan, Brian

    2015-03-01

    Digital templating of x-rays for total hip arthroplasty is used routinely for pre-operative planning. This is to assure that appropriately sized implants are selected to replicate patient's hip biomechanics. Multiple studies have shown that templating does not always correspond to the final implants used. The aim of this study was to assess the suitability of the x-rays taken pre-operatively for templating for total hip arthroplasty. We undertook a review of a series of pre-operative templating pelvis x-rays in 100 consecutive patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty. These x-rays were compared against set criteria to determine their suitability for use for templating. We determined that six x-rays met the criteria whereas ninety four x-rays did not meet the criteria for suitable x-rays. Twenty patients had repeat x-rays. The reasons for unsuitability were inadequate opposite femur (66%), absence or incomplete template (54%), inadequate femur length (47%), external rotation (39%), absence of opposite hip (4%). The twenty repeated x-rays were also reviewed for the same parameters and two (10%) satisfied the established criteria. It is imperative that x-rays for templating for total hip arthroplasty are done to a strict standard to obtain an x-ray that is appropriate for templating and there is minimal exposure of the patient to irradiation. PMID:26280858

  14. Nuclear reactor spacer grid and ductless core component

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to a nuclear reactor spacer grid member for use in a liquid cooled nuclear reactor and to a ductless core component employing a plurality of these spacer grid members. The spacer grid member is of the egg-shell type and is constructed so that the walls of the cell members of the grid member are formed of a single thickness of metal to avoid tolerance problems. Within each cell member is a hydraulic spring which laterally constrains the nuclear material bearing rod which passes through each cell member against a hardstop in response to coolant flow through the cell member. This hydraulic spring is also suitable for use in a water cooled nuclear reactor. A core component constructed of, among other components, a plurality of these spacer grid members, avoids the use of a full length duct by providing spacer sleeves about the sodium tubes passing through the spacer grid members at locations between the grid members, thereby maintaining a predetermined space between adjacent grid members.

  15. Implantable Microimagers

    PubMed Central

    Ng, David C.; Tokuda, Takashi; Shiosaka, Sadao; Tano, Yasuo; Ohta, Jun

    2008-01-01

    Implantable devices such as cardiac pacemakers, drug-delivery systems, and defibrillators have had a tremendous impact on the quality of live for many disabled people. To date, many devices have been developed for implantation into various parts of the human body. In this paper, we focus on devices implanted in the head. In particular, we describe the technologies necessary to create implantable microimagers. Design, fabrication, and implementation issues are discussed vis-à-vis two examples of implantable microimagers; the retinal prosthesis and in vivo neuro-microimager. Testing of these devices in animals verify the use of the microimagers in the implanted state. We believe that further advancement of these devices will lead to the development of a new method for medical and scientific applications.

  16. Preventive implantations.

    PubMed

    Denissen, H W; Kalk, W

    1991-02-01

    Preventive implantology is concerned with the preservation of the alveolar ridge of the (edentulous) jaw. Maintaining the volume of the alveolar ridge is a major problem in the prevention of oral disease. Loss of teeth and tooth roots leads to resorption of residual ridges. This being so, it is a logical approach to substitute artificial analogues for lost tooth roots. Hydroxyapatite implants have been studied as submerged tooth root substitutes and shown to maintain the bulk of the alveolar ridge. A drawback of the implants is that the ridge maintenance depends solely on the physical presence of the hydroxyapatite implants. No physiological influence on bone preservation can be attributed to the implants. However, long term research indicates that 75 per cent of the implants survive under full lower dentures and 100 per cent of the implants under fixed partial dentures. PMID:1848531

  17. Radionuclide imaging in hip abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Gaucher, A; Colomb, J N; Naoun, A; Pourel, J; Robert, J; Faure, G; Netter, P

    1980-05-01

    The uptake of Tc-99m-diphosphonate was studied topographically and quantitatively on 258 diseased hips. For many diseased hips, bone scintigraphy provides items of information that complement the clinical, radiological, and biological data, with which it should always be compared. The localization, extent, and intensity of the uptake differ greatly according to the hip disorder studied, and depend not only on the cause of the lesion but also on its stage of evolution. Bone scintigraphy can shed light on the etiologic diagnosis of a painful hip at the beginning of its evolution, before definite roentgenographic signs appear, thanks to some very precise characteristics of the uptake, this is the case for transient osteoporosis of the hip, aseptic osteonecrosis, Legg-Perthes disease, early arthritis of the hip joint, and stress fractures of the femoral neck or of the pubic rami. PMID:7371348

  18. High Productivity Implantation ''PARTIAL IMPLANT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hino, Masayoshi; Miyamoto, Naoki; Sakai, Shigeki; Matsumoto, Takao

    2008-11-03

    The patterned ion implantation 'PARTIAL IMPLANT' has been developed as a productivity improvement tool. The Partial Implant can form several different ion dose areas on the wafer surface by controlling the speed of wafer moving and the stepwise rotation of twist axis. The Partial Implant system contains two implant methods. One method is 'DIVIDE PARTIAL IMPLANT', that is aimed at reducing the consumption of the wafer. The Divide Partial Implant evenly divides dose area on one wafer surface into two or three different dose part. Any dose can be selected in each area. So the consumption of the wafer for experimental implantation can be reduced. The second method is 'RING PARTIAL IMPLANT' that is aimed at improving yield by correcting electrical characteristic of devices. The Ring Partial Implant can form concentric ion dose areas. The dose of wafer external area can be selected to be within plus or minus 30% of dose of wafer central area. So the electrical characteristic of devices can be corrected by controlling dose at edge side on the wafer.

  19. Towards Verified and Validated FE Simulations of a Femur with a Cemented Hip Prosthesis

    E-print Network

    Yosibash, Zohar

    Towards Verified and Validated FE Simulations of a Femur with a Cemented Hip Prosthesis Zohar at the neck. The head and neck were removed and the femur was implanted with a cemented prosthesis. The fixed femur was CT-scanned and loaded through the prosthesis so that strains and displacements were measured

  20. Graphitic Tribological Layers in Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Y.; Pourzal, R.; Wimmer, M. A.; Jacobs, J. J.; Fischer, A.; Marks, L. D.

    2011-12-01

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, and when nonoperative methods have failed, a prosthetic implant is a cost-effective and clinically successful treatment. Metal-on-metal replacements are an attractive implant technology, a lower-wear alternative to metal-on-polyethylene devices. Relatively little is known about how sliding occurs in these implants, except that proteins play a critical role and that there is a tribological layer on the metal surface. We report evidence for graphitic material in the tribological layer in metal-on-metal hip replacements retrieved from patients. As graphite is a solid lubricant, its presence helps to explain why these components exhibit low wear and suggests methods of improving their performance; simultaneously, this raises the issue of the physiological effects of graphitic wear debris.

  1. Graphitic tribological layers in metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Liao, Y; Pourzal, R; Wimmer, M A; Jacobs, J J; Fischer, A; Marks, L D

    2011-12-23

    Arthritis is a leading cause of disability, and when nonoperative methods have failed, a prosthetic implant is a cost-effective and clinically successful treatment. Metal-on-metal replacements are an attractive implant technology, a lower-wear alternative to metal-on-polyethylene devices. Relatively little is known about how sliding occurs in these implants, except that proteins play a critical role and that there is a tribological layer on the metal surface. We report evidence for graphitic material in the tribological layer in metal-on-metal hip replacements retrieved from patients. As graphite is a solid lubricant, its presence helps to explain why these components exhibit low wear and suggests methods of improving their performance; simultaneously, this raises the issue of the physiological effects of graphitic wear debris. PMID:22194573

  2. A randomised controlled trial of total hip arthroplasty versus resurfacing arthroplasty in the treatment of young patients with arthritis of the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hip replacement (arthroplasty) surgery is a highly successful treatment for patients with severe symptomatic arthritis of the hip joint. For older patients, several designs of Total Hip Arthroplasty have shown excellent results in terms of both function and value for money. However, in younger more active patients, there is approximately a 50% failure rate at 25 years for traditional implants. Hip resurfacing is a relatively new arthroplasty technique. In a recent review of the literature on resurfacing arthroplasty it was concluded that the short-term functional results appear promising but some potential early disadvantages were identified, including the risk of femoral neck fracture and collapse of the head of the femur. The aim of the current study is to assess whether there is a difference in functional hip scores at one year post-operation between Total Hip Arthroplasty and Resurfacing Arthroplasty. Secondary aims include assessment of complication rates for both procedures as well cost effectiveness. Methods/design All patients medically fit for surgery and deemed suitable for a resurfacing arthroplasty are eligible to take part in this study. A randomisation sequence will be produced and administered independently. After consenting, all patients will be clinically reviewed and hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed through questionnaires. The allocated surgery will then be performed with the preferred technique of the surgeon. Six weeks post-operation hip function will be assessed and complications recorded. Three, six and 12 months post-operation hip function, quality of life and physical activity level will be assessed. Additional information about patients' out-of-pocket expenses will also be collected. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN33354155 UKCLRN portfolio ID 4093 PMID:20074324

  3. The impact of proximal femoral morphology on failure strength with a mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Michael; Al Saied, Mohamed; Morison, Zachary; Sellan, Michael; Waddell, James P; Schemitsch, Emil H

    2014-12-01

    Mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty is a conservative alternative to conventional total hip replacement and addresses proximal fixation challenges in patients not suitable for hip resurfacing. It is unclear whether proximal femoral morphology impacts the ultimate failure load of mid-head resection implanted femurs, thus the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of native neck-shaft angle (NSA) and coronal implant alignment on proximal femoral strength. In total, 36 synthetic femurs with two different proximal femoral morphologies were utilized in this study. Of them, 18 femurs with a varus NSA of 120° and 18 femurs with a valgus NSA of 135° were each implanted with a mid-head resection prosthesis. Femurs within the two different femoral morphology groups were divided into three equal coronal implant alignment groups: 10° valgus, 10° varus or neutral alignment. Prepared femurs were tested for stiffness and to failure in axial compression. There was no significant difference in stiffness nor failure load between femurs implanted with valgus-, varus- or neutrally aligned implants in femurs with a NSA of 120° (p = 0.396, p = 0.111, respectively). Femurs implanted in valgus orientation were significantly stiffer and failed at significantly higher loads than those implanted in varus alignment in femurs with a NSA of 135° (p = 0.001, p = 0.007, respectively). A mid-head resection short-stem hip arthroplasty seems less sensitive to clinically relevant variations of coronal implant alignment and may be more forgiving upon implantation in some femoral morphologies, however, a relative valgus component alignment is recommended. PMID:25515228

  4. Posterior Mini-Incision With Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Nine to Ten Year Follow Up Study.

    PubMed

    Yukizawa, Yohei; Dorr, Lawrence D; Ward, Jeri A; Wan, Zhinian

    2016-01-01

    The question has been raised as to whether small incision surgery will compromise long term results of total hip arthroplasty. We report nine to ten years' outcome with posterior mini-incision. Radiographs were measured for component position, polyethylene wear, fixation, and osteolysis. Sixty-two of the original 86 patients (76 of 100 hips) were alive and available for study with 17 patients deceased (with known results) and seven (8%) lost to follow-up. The result was rated as excellent in 70 of 75 remaining hips (93%). Eighty-nine of 93 hips (96%) with known results had the original implants. Radiographically, wear was a mean 0.015 ± 0.009 mm/year, and no hip had impending failure. There were four revisions, 2 for dislocation, 1 for fracture, and 1 for loose cup. PMID:26271541

  5. Computed tomography in evaluation of revision hip arthroplasty outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kochman, Andrzej; Morawska-Kochman, Monika; Guzi?ski, Maciej; Drobniewski, Marek; Sibi?ski, Marcin; Synder, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Background. This study aimed to assess contact between Recon Shell reinforcement cages used in revision hip arthroplasty and the bony base. Radiographic examinations were performed with the use of multi-energy computed tomography. Material and methods. We tentatively assess the fixation of Burch-Schneider reinforcement cages (Recon Shell made by Aesculap company) implanted in 10 patients, using two methods of evaluation. An analysis of dual energy CT scans enabled us to assess contact between the reinforcement cages and the bony base. Results. The two methods of evaluation produced different results. The evaluation method based on the division of the acetabular component into a weight-bearing zone and a non-weight-bearing zone (accounting for screw fixation) showed lack of support in the weight-bearing zone in 6 out of 10 cases and direct contact with the implant bed in only one case. The assessment of contact at anchorage holes of reinforcement cages fixed at primary procedures revealed no such support in only one case and the presence of direct contact in 5 cases. There was no correlation between the radiological outcomes and clinical results based on the Harris Hip Score. Conclusions. 1. Multi-energy computed tomography (MARS) is useful in evaluating results of revision hip allo-plasty. 2. The introduction of new imaging techniques for the evaluation of revision procedures demonstrates a need for new, unified methods of outcome assessment adjusted to the characteristics of a particular procedure. PMID:25406920

  6. The cement spacer with multiple indentations: increasing antibiotic elution using a cement spacer 'teabag'.

    PubMed

    Salih, S; Paskins, A; Nichol, T; Smith, T; Hamer, A

    2015-11-01

    We investigated whether the indentation of bone cement spacers used in revision of infected joint arthroplasty with a MacDonald dissector increased the elution of antibiotic in vitro. A total of 24 cement discs containing either 0.17 g (0.88% w/w), 0.25 g (1.41% w/w), or 0.33 g (1.75% w/w) gentamicin of constant size were made. Of these, 12 were indented with the dissector. Each disc was immersed in ammonium acetate buffer in a sealed container, and fluid from each container was sampled at zero, one, three, six, 24, 48 and 72 hours and at one, and two weeks. The concentration of gentamicin in the fluid was analysed using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. The fluid sampled at 72 hours from the indented discs containing 0.17 g gentamicin (0.88% w/w) contained a mean of 113 mcg/ml (90.12 to 143.5) compared with 44.5 mcg/ml (44.02 to 44.90) in the fluid sampled from the plain discs (p = 0.012). In discs containing 0.33 g gentamicin (1.75% w/w), the concentration eluted from the indented discs at 72 hours was a mean of 316 mcg/ml (223 to 421) compared with a mean of 118 mcg/ml (100 to 140) from the plain discs (p < 0.001). At two weeks, these significant differences persisted. At nine weeks the indented discs eluted a greater concentration for all gentamicin doses, but the difference was only significant for the discs containing 0.17 g (0.88% w/w, p = 0.006). However if the area under the curve is taken as a measure of the total antibiotic eluted, the indented discs eluted more gentamicin than the plain discs for the 0.17 g (0.88% w/w, p = 0.031), the 0.25 g (1.41% w/w, p < 0.001) and the 0.33 g (1.75% w/w, p < 0.001) discs. When preparing antibiotic spacers for use in staged revision arthroplasty surgery we recommend indenting the spacer with a MacDonald dissector to increase the elution of antibiotic. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2015;97-B:1519-24. PMID:26530655

  7. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the S-ROM-A Prosthesis for Anatomically Difficult Asian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hozumi, Akira; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Tsuru, Nobuhisa; Miyamoto, Chikara; Maeda, Jyunichiro; Chiba, Ko; Goto, Hisataka; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The S-ROM-A prosthesis has been designed for the Asian proximal femur with a small deformed shape and narrow canal. In this study, the clinical and radiological results using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Japanese patients with severe deformity due to dysplasia and excessive posterior pelvic tilt were examined. Methods. 94 hips were followed up for a mean of 55 months, with a mean age at surgery of 61 years. The primary diagnoses were 94 coxarthritis cases, including 51 dysplasia and 37 primary OA, 1 avascular necrosis, 2 traumatic arthritis, and 3 Perthes disease. Thirty-one hips had been treated with osteotomy of the hip joints. Preoperative intramedullary canal shapes were stovepipe in 23 hips, normal in 51 hips, and champagne-flute in 5 hips. The maximum pelvic inclination angle was 56°. Results. The mean JOA score improved from 46 points preoperatively to 80 points at final follow-up. On radiological evaluation of the fixation of the implants according to the Engh classification, 92 (97%) hips were classified as “bone ingrown fixation.” Conclusion. In primary THA, using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Asian patients with proximal femoral deformity, even after osteotomy and with posterior pelvic tilt, provided good short- to midterm results. PMID:26582575

  8. Theoretical and practical aspects in total uncemented hip arthroplasty by using short femoral stem prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Moga, M; Pogarasteanu, ME; Barbilian, A

    2015-01-01

    Hip arthrosis, primary or secondary, is an osteoarthritic degenerative process that affects the hip joint. Primary hip arthrosis has an unknown etiology, and secondary hip arthrosis has well defined causes; of these causes, some are known to lead to arthrosis of the hip in the young age patient. The surgical treatment aims either to preserve the patient’s hip joint, or to replace the joint. The most commonly used procedure at this time is the total hip arthroplasty. The femoral component may have a short or a long stem. The short femoral stem prosthesis is usually impacted by using a unique technique and unique instruments, according to the manufacturer’s specifications. There are several models of short stem femoral prosthesis, but no matter which one is chosen, the surgical indication, the surgical technique and a well-conducted recovery program are important. The choosing of each arthroplastic implant must be made with care, taking into consideration the patient’s benefit, his expectations, and also the surgeon’s experience. PMID:26103643

  9. Total Hip Arthroplasty Using the S-ROM-A Prosthesis for Anatomically Difficult Asian Patients.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Akira; Kobayashi, Kyousuke; Tsuru, Nobuhisa; Miyamoto, Chikara; Maeda, Jyunichiro; Chiba, Ko; Goto, Hisataka; Osaki, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Background. The S-ROM-A prosthesis has been designed for the Asian proximal femur with a small deformed shape and narrow canal. In this study, the clinical and radiological results using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Japanese patients with severe deformity due to dysplasia and excessive posterior pelvic tilt were examined. Methods. 94 hips were followed up for a mean of 55 months, with a mean age at surgery of 61 years. The primary diagnoses were 94 coxarthritis cases, including 51 dysplasia and 37 primary OA, 1 avascular necrosis, 2 traumatic arthritis, and 3 Perthes disease. Thirty-one hips had been treated with osteotomy of the hip joints. Preoperative intramedullary canal shapes were stovepipe in 23 hips, normal in 51 hips, and champagne-flute in 5 hips. The maximum pelvic inclination angle was 56°. Results. The mean JOA score improved from 46 points preoperatively to 80 points at final follow-up. On radiological evaluation of the fixation of the implants according to the Engh classification, 92 (97%) hips were classified as "bone ingrown fixation." Conclusion. In primary THA, using the S-ROM-A prosthesis for Asian patients with proximal femoral deformity, even after osteotomy and with posterior pelvic tilt, provided good short- to midterm results. PMID:26582575

  10. CoCrMo Metal-on-Metal Hip Replacements

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in-vivo and in-vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  11. CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Liao, Yifeng; Hoffman, Emily; Wimmer, Markus; Fischer, Alfons; Jacobs, Joshua; Marks, Laurence

    2013-01-21

    After the rapid growth in the use of CoCrMo metal-on-metal hip replacements since the second generation was introduced circa 1990, metal-on-metal hip replacements have experienced a sharp decline in the last two years due to biocompatibility issues related to wear and corrosion products. Despite some excellent clinical results, the release of wear and corrosion debris and the adverse response of local tissues have been of great concern. There are many unknowns regarding how CoCrMo metal bearings interact with the human body. This perspective article is intended to outline some recent progresses in understanding wear and corrosion of metal-on-metal hip replacement both in vivo and in vitro. The materials, mechanical deformation, corrosion, wear-assisted corrosion, and wear products will be discussed. Possible adverse health effects caused by wear products will be briefly addressed, as well as some of the many open questions such as the detailed chemistry of corrosion, tribochemical reactions and the formation of graphitic layers. Nowadays we design almost routinely for high performance materials and lubricants for automobiles; humans are at least as important. It is worth remembering that a hip implant is often the difference between walking and leading a relatively normal life, and a wheelchair. PMID:23196425

  12. Total Hip and Knee Replacement in the Mature Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Bloomfield, Michael R.; Hozack, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Total hip replacement and total knee replacement are among the most successful and common surgical procedures in orthopaedics. These operations were traditionally reserved for older, sedentary patients. However, these are now being increasingly performed in patients expecting to return to athletic activities. Evidence Acquisition: The peer-reviewed medical literature was searched via PubMed from the years 2000 to 2013. Those studies pertinent to modern hip and knee replacement in an athletic population were selected for inclusion. Study Design: Literature review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: There is a lack of high-quality evidence in the peer-reviewed literature relating to the replacement of hips and knees in younger athletic patients. Although many patients undergoing joint replacement are active in recreational activities, a minority engage in high-impact sports. Following surgery, overall activities tend to increase, but high-demand athletic activities may be limited by pain, functional outcome, or activity restrictions imposed by health care providers. Conclusion: Patients receiving hip and knee replacements should be counseled in that returning to high-impact and repetitive-loading athletic activities after surgery may shorten the life span of their implant. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): C. PMID:24427446

  13. Fabricating specialised orthopaedic implants using additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, Paul

    2014-03-01

    It has been hypothesised that AM is ideal for patient specific orthopaedic implants such as those used in bone cancer treatment, that can rapidly build structures such as lattices for bone and tissues to in-grow, that would be impossible using current conventional subtractive manufacturing techniques. The aim of this study was to describe the adoption of AM (direct metal laser sintering and electron beam melting) into the design manufacturing and post-manufacturing processes and the early clinical use. Prior to the clinical use of AM implants, extensive metallurgical and mechanical testing of both laser and electron beam fabrications were undertaken. Concurrently, post-manufacturing processes evaluated included hipping, cleaning and coating treatments. The first clinical application of a titanium alloy mega-implant was undertaken in November 2010. A 3D model of the pelvic wing implant was designed from CT scans. Novel key features included extensive lattice structures at the bone interfaces and integral flanges to fix the implant to the bone. The pelvic device was implanted with the aid of navigation and to date the patient remains active. A further 18 patient specific mega-implants have now been implanted. The early use of this advanced manufacturing route for patient specific implants has been very encouraging enabling the engineer to produce more advanced and anatomical conforming implants. However, there are a new set of design, manufacturing and regulatory challenges that require addressing to permit this technique to be used more widely. This technology is changing the design and manufacturing paradigm for the fabrication of specialised orthopaedic implants.

  14. Impact of spacer thickness on biofouling in forward osmosis.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Bucs, Sz S; Li, Z; AbuGhdeeb, M; Amy, G; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-06-15

    Forward osmosis (FO) indirect desalination systems integrate wastewater recovery with seawater desalination. Niche applications for FO systems have been reported recently, due to the demonstrated advantages compared to conventional high-pressure membrane processes such as nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO). Among them, wastewater recovery has been identified to be particularly suitable for practical applications. However, biofouling in FO membranes has rarely been studied in applications involving wastewater effluents. Feed spacers separating the membrane sheets in cross-flow systems play an important role in biofilm formation. The objective of this study was to determine the influence of feed spacer thickness (28, 31 and 46 mil) on biofouling development and membrane performance in a FO system, using identical cross-flow cells in parallel studies. Flux development, biomass accumulation, fouling localization and composition were determined and analyzed. For all spacer thicknesses, operated at the same feed flow and the same run time, the same amount of biomass was found, while the flux reduction decreased with thicker spacers. These observations are in good agreement with biofouling studies for RO systems, considering the key differences between FO and RO. Our findings contradict previous cross-flow studies on particulate/colloidal fouling, where higher cross-flow velocities improved system performance. Thicker spacers reduced the impact of biofouling on FO membrane flux. PMID:24726992

  15. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S.; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J. Brouns, Stan J.; Severin, Andrew J.; Sashital, Dipali G.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR–Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring ‘spacer’ sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid ‘primed’ adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR–Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed ‘naïve’ adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  16. CRISPR interference and priming varies with individual spacer sequences.

    PubMed

    Xue, Chaoyou; Seetharam, Arun S; Musharova, Olga; Severinov, Konstantin; J Brouns, Stan J; Severin, Andrew J; Sashital, Dipali G

    2015-12-15

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats-CRISPR associated) systems allow bacteria to adapt to infection by acquiring 'spacer' sequences from invader DNA into genomic CRISPR loci. Cas proteins use RNAs derived from these loci to target cognate sequences for destruction through CRISPR interference. Mutations in the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) and seed regions block interference but promote rapid 'primed' adaptation. Here, we use multiple spacer sequences to reexamine the PAM and seed sequence requirements for interference and priming in the Escherichia coli Type I-E CRISPR-Cas system. Surprisingly, CRISPR interference is far more tolerant of mutations in the seed and the PAM than previously reported, and this mutational tolerance, as well as priming activity, is highly dependent on spacer sequence. We identify a large number of functional PAMs that can promote interference, priming or both activities, depending on the associated spacer sequence. Functional PAMs are preferentially acquired during unprimed 'naïve' adaptation, leading to a rapid priming response following infection. Our results provide numerous insights into the importance of both spacer and target sequences for interference and priming, and reveal that priming is a major pathway for adaptation during initial infection. PMID:26586800

  17. Hip-Hop Education Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Marcella Runell

    2009-01-01

    Hip-hop music and culture are often cited as being public pedagogy, meaning the music itself has intrinsic educational value. Non-profit organizations and individual educators have graciously taken the lead in utilizing hip-hop to educate. As the academy continues to debate its effectiveness, teachers and community organizers are moving forward.…

  18. Modular cementless cup for total hip arthroplasty: results at 4-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bistolfi, Alessandro; Massazza, Giuseppe; Rosso, Federica; Ventura, Stefano; Lagalla, Francesco; Crova, Maurizio

    2012-08-01

    The aim is to perform the assessment of a modular cementless acetabular cup with a tapered internal design for all bearing couplings. In 190 unselected consecutive patients, 207 total hip arthroplasties were implanted. The implants were clinically and radiographically evaluated. Follow-up was 49.7 ± 8.1 months. The average Harris hip score improved from 55.5 ± 5.7 to 94.7 ± 3.4 (P < 0.05). All cups were well-positioned and stable. The Kaplan-Maier cumulative survivorship was 98.5 ± 0.8%. No significant differences have been noted in dividing patients according to the different liner materials (P < 0.005). The study, whose rationale is the novelty of this kind of implant, suggests the efficacy of the Delta-PF acetabular cup. PMID:22223107

  19. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  20. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  1. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  2. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  3. 21 CFR 888.3400 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing... HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 888.3400 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metallic resurfacing prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral...

  4. Surgical management of recurrent dislocation after total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Charissoux, J-L; Asloum, Y; Marcheix, P-S

    2014-02-01

    Dislocation is a major complication of total hip arthroplasty (THA), whose frequency has been unaffected by improvements in surgical techniques and implants. The dislocation rate depends on multiple factors related to the patient, hip disease, and surgical procedure and is therefore also dependent on the surgeon. The many published studies on THA dislocation, its causes, and its treatment have produced conflicting results. The objective of this work is to review the management of THA dislocation, which is a severe event for both the patient and the surgeon. This lecture starts with a brief review of data on THA dislocation rates and the many factors that influence them. Emphasis is then put on the evaluation for a cause and, more specifically, on the challenges raised by detecting suboptimal cup position. Next, reported techniques for treating THA dislocation and the outcomes of each are discussed. Finally, a management strategy for patients selected for revision surgery is suggested. PMID:24434366

  5. Investigating stress shielding spanned by biomimetic polymer-composite vs. metallic hip stem: A computational study using mechano-biochemical model.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Samiezadeh, Saeid; Klika, Václav; Bougherara, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic bone loss in response to total hip arthroplasty is a serious complication compromising patient's life quality as it may cause the premature failure of the implant. Stress shielding as a result of an uneven load sharing between the hip implant and the bone is a key factor leading to bone density decrease. A number of composite hip implants have been designed so far to improve load sharing characteristics. However, they have rarely been investigated from the bone remodeling point of view to predict a long-term response. This is the first study that employed a mechano-biochemical model, which considers the coupling effect between mechanical loading and bone biochemistry, to investigate bone remodeling after composite hip implantation. In this study, periprosthetic bone remodeling in the presence of Carbon fiber polyamide 12 (CF/PA12), CoCrMo and Ti alloy implants was predicted and compared. Our findings revealed that the most significant periprosthetic bone loss in response to metallic implants occurs in Gruen zone 7 (-43% with CoCrMo; -35% with Ti) and 6 (-40% with CoCrMo; -29% with Ti), while zone 4 has the lowest bone density decrease with all three implants (-9%). Also, the results showed that in terms of bone remodeling, the composite hip implant is more advantageous over the metallic ones as it provides a more uniform density change across the bone and induces less stress shielding which consequently results in a lower post-operative bone loss (-9% with CF/PA12 implant compared to -27% and -21% with CoCrMo and Ti alloy implants, respectively). PMID:25460403

  6. Wheeze in childhood: is the spacer good enough?

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Veena; Rajendra, Barathi; How, Choon How; Ang, Seng Bin

    2014-01-01

    Max was treated with SABA using an MDI and spacer with facemask and responded well to the initial treatment. You explained to the parents that nebulisers are neither required nor recommended in the treatment of wheezing in their child’s situation. You advised the parents on the proper technique of MDI use with spacer and facemask, as well as care of the equipment. You also gave them a clearly written action plan regarding the efficient management of the next episode of wheeze with MDI and spacer. You further explained the side effects of oral bronchodilators and nebulisers, and why you refrained from using them. Max was given a follow-up appointment to assess his progress, and his parents were advised on the situations when they should go to a doctor or the emergency department. PMID:25631964

  7. Functional motion simulation of the hip joint

    E-print Network

    Bartz, Dirk

    1 Functional motion simulation of the hip joint Prof. Nadia Magnenat-Thalmann MIRALab University of the hip joint Approach: Acetabular rim syndrom · Early diagnostic of abnormal impingements · Surgery of the hip joint Clinical objective Tutorial 6Eurographics 2004 Functional motion simulation of the hip joint

  8. Neuroblastoma: a differential diagnosis of irritable hip.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Arvind; Gossain, Sunita R

    2006-10-01

    We present a case report concerning a neuroblastoma of the hip that presented as an irritable hip in a 33-month-old girl. In patients presenting with an irritable hip, neuroblastoma is suggested by anaemia and can be missed with an ultrasound of the hip. PMID:17152435

  9. [Sport activity after hip and knee arthroplasty].

    PubMed

    Keren, Amit; Berkovich, Yaron; Berkovitch, Yaron; Soudry, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Joint arthroplasty is one of the commonest surgical procedures in orthopedic surgery. In recent years there was an increase in the number of procedures, patient satisfaction and implant survival. Originally, these operations were designed for old patients in order to relieve pain and to enable ambulation. Over the past few years, these operations have become common in younger patients which desire to return to activity, including sports activities. The importance of physical activity is a well known fact. In recent years it became clear that with the proper physical activity the outcomes of the operations are better. There are several types of arthroplasty. Many factors influence the outcome of the operation apart from the post-surgery physical activity. These factors include patient factors, surgical technique and type of arthroplasty. This review summarizes the recommendations for sports activities after hip and knee arthroplasties. These activities are evaluated according to surgeons' recommendations, stress applied on the implant and long term outcomes. The recommended sports activities after joint arthroplasties are walking, swimming and cycling. Soccer, basketball and jogging are not advised. Tennis, downhill skiing and horse riding are recommended with previous experience. There are many more sports activities that patients can participate in, and it is important that the patient discuss the different options prior to the operation. Since these operations are so common, many non-orthopedic physicians encounter these patients in their practice. They should be acquainted with the recommendations for sports activities and encourage them. PMID:24416822

  10. Impingement and Dislocation in Total HIP Arthroplasty: Mechanisms and Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Thomas D; Elkins, Jacob M; Pedersen, Douglas R; Callaghan, John J

    2014-01-01

    In contemporary total hip arthroplasty, instability has been a complication in approximately 2% to 5% of primary surgeries and 5% to 10% of revisions. Due to the reduction in the incidence of wear-induced osteolysis that has been achieved over the last decade, instability now stands as the single most common reason for revision surgery. Moreover, even without frank dislocation, impingement and subluxation are implicated in a set of new concerns arising with advanced bearings, associated with the relatively unforgiving nature of many of those designs. Against that backdrop, the biomechanical factors responsible for impingement, subluxation, and dislocation remain under-investigated relative to their burden of morbidity. This manuscript outlines a 15-year program of laboratory and clinical research undertaken to improve the scientific basis for understanding total hip impingement and dislocation. The broad theme has been to systematically evaluate the role of surgical factors, implant design factors, and patient factors in predisposing total hip constructs to impinge, sublux, and/or dislocate. Because this class of adverse biomechanical events had not lent itself well to study with existing approaches, it was necessary to develop (and validate) a series of new research methodologies, relying heavily on advanced finite element formulations. Specific areas of focus have included identifying the biomechanical challenges posed by dislocation-prone patient activities, quantifying design parameter effects and component surgical positioning effects for conventional metal-on-polyethylene implant constructs, and the impingement/dislocation behavior of non-conventional constructs, quantifying the stabilizing role of the hip capsule (and of surgical repairs of capsule defects), and systematically studying impingement and edge loading of hard-on-hard bearings, fracture of ceramic liners, confounding effects of patient obesity, and subluxation-mediated worsening of third body particle challenge. PMID:25328453

  11. Lifestyle and health-related quality of life in Asian patients with total hip arthroplasties.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kimie; Xia, Zhenlan; Liu, Xueqin; Mawatari, Masaaki; Makimoto, Kiyoko

    2014-09-01

    Total hip arthroplasty reduces pain and restores physical function in patients with hip joint problems. This study examined lifestyle and health-related quality of life before and after total hip arthroplasty in Japanese and Chinese patients. Two hospitals in China recruited 120 patients and 120 Japanese patients matched by age and operative status were drawn from a prospective cohort database. Oxford Hip Score, EuroQol, and characteristics of Asian lifestyle and attitudes toward the operation were assessed. There were no differences between patients from the two countries in quality-of-life-scale scores: postoperative patients had significantly better quality-of-life scores than preoperative patients in both countries. In China, patients who reported that living at home was inconvenient had significantly worse Oxford Hip Scores than those who did not. Mean scores for anxiety items concerning possible dislocation and durability of the implant were significantly higher in Japanese than in Chinese subjects. Our findings suggest that providing information about housing conditions and lifestyles would result in improved quality of life and reduced anxiety in patients with implanted joints. PMID:24845456

  12. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or after the patient developed language skills The motivation of the patient and his or her family ... from a cochlear implant and will have the motivation to participate in the process. It is important ...

  13. Dental Implants

    MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

    Dental Implants A fuller, more complete smile is within reach. The following information is designed to provide helpful facts so you ... found in nature. What Happens When You Lose a Tooth? When you lose a tooth, especially a ...

  14. Cochlear Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... under the skin behind the ear, connected to electrodes that are inserted inside the cochlea. An external ... stimulator then sends the signals to the implanted electrodes in the cochlea. The electrodes? signals stimulate the ...

  15. Association of hip pain with radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis: diagnostic test study

    PubMed Central

    Nevitt, Michael C; Niu, Jingbo; Clancy, Mary M; Lane, Nancy E; Link, Thomas M; Vlad, Steven; Tolstykh, Irina; Jungmann, Pia M.; Felson, David T; Guermazi, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Study question Is there concordance between hip pain and radiographic hip osteoarthritis? Methods In this diagnostic test study, pelvic radiographs were assessed for hip osteoarthritis in two cohorts: the Framingham Osteoarthritis Study (community of Framingham, Massachusetts) and the Osteoarthritis Initiative (a multicenter longitudinal cohort study of osteoarthritis in the United States). Using visual representation of the hip joint, participants reported whether they had hip pain on most days and the location of the pain: anterior, groin, lateral, buttocks, or low back. In the Framingham study, participants with hip pain were also examined for hip pain with internal rotation. The authors analysed the agreement between radiographic hip osteoarthritis and hip pain, and for those with hip pain suggestive of hip osteoarthritis they calculated the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of radiographs as the diagnostic test. Study answer and limitations In the Framingham study (n=946), only 15.6% of hips in patients with frequent hip pain showed radiographic evidence of hip osteoarthritis, and 20.7% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 36.7%, specificity 90.5%, positive predictive value 6.0%, and negative predictive value 98.9%. Results did not differ much for hip pain at other locations or for painful internal rotation. In the Osteoarthritis Initiative study (n=4366), only 9.1% of hips in patients with frequent pain showed radiographic hip osteoarthritis, and 23.8% of hips with radiographic hip osteoarthritis were frequently painful. The sensitivity of definite radiographic hip osteoarthritis for hip pain localised to the groin was 16.5%, specificity 94.0%, positive predictive value 7.1%, and negative predictive value 97.6%. Results also did not differ much for hip pain at other locations. What this study adds Hip pain was not present in many hips with radiographic osteoarthritis, and many hips with pain did not show radiographic hip osteoarthritis. Most older participants with a high suspicion for clinical hip osteoarthritis (groin or anterior pain and/or painful internal rotation) did not have radiographic hip osteoarthritis, suggesting that in many cases, hip osteoarthritis might be missed if diagnosticians relied solely on hip radiographs. Funding, competing interests, data sharing See the full paper on thebmj.com for funding. The authors have no competing interests. Additional data are available from bevochan@bu.edu. PMID:26631296

  16. Monte Carlo calculations of the impact of a hip prosthesis on the dose distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffard, Edwige; Gschwind, Régine; Makovicka, Libor; David, Céline

    2006-09-01

    Because of the ageing of the population, an increasing number of patients with hip prostheses are undergoing pelvic irradiation. Treatment planning systems (TPS) currently available are not always able to accurately predict the dose distribution around such implants. In fact, only Monte Carlo simulation has the ability to precisely calculate the impact of a hip prosthesis during radiotherapeutic treatment. Monte Carlo phantoms were developed to evaluate the dose perturbations during pelvic irradiation. A first model, constructed with the DOSXYZnrc usercode, was elaborated to determine the dose increase at the tissue-metal interface as well as the impact of the material coating the prosthesis. Next, CT-based phantoms were prepared, using the usercode CTCreate, to estimate the influence of the geometry and the composition of such implants on the beam attenuation. Thanks to a program that we developed, the study was carried out with CT-based phantoms containing a hip prosthesis without metal artefacts. Therefore, anthropomorphic phantoms allowed better definition of both patient anatomy and the hip prosthesis in order to better reproduce the clinical conditions of pelvic irradiation. The Monte Carlo results revealed the impact of certain coatings such as PMMA on dose enhancement at the tissue-metal interface. Monte Carlo calculations in CT-based phantoms highlighted the marked influence of the implant's composition, its geometry as well as its position within the beam on dose distribution.

  17. A novel murine model of established Staphylococcal bone infection in the presence of a fracture fixation plate to study therapies utilizing antibiotic-laden spacers after revision surgery.

    PubMed

    Inzana, Jason A; Schwarz, Edward M; Kates, Stephen L; Awad, Hani A

    2015-03-01

    Mice are the small animal model of choice in biomedical research due to the low cost and availability of genetically engineered lines. However, the devices utilized in current mouse models of implant-associated bone infection have been limited to intramedullary or trans-cortical pins, which are not amenable to treatments involving extensive debridement of a full-thickness bone loss and placement of a segmental antibiotic spacer. To overcome these limitations, we developed a clinically faithful model that utilizes a locking fracture fixation plate to enable debridement of an infected segmental bone defect (full-thickness osteotomy) during a revision surgery, and investigated the therapeutic effects of placing an antibiotic-laden spacer in the segmental bone defect. To first determine the ideal time point for revision following infection, a 0.7 mm osteotomy in the femoral mid-shaft was stabilized with a radiolucent PEEK fixation plate. The defect was inoculated with bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, and the infection was monitored over 14 days by bioluminescent imaging (BLI). Osteolysis and reactive bone formation were assessed by X-ray and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). The active bacterial infection peaked by 5 days post-inoculation, however the stability of the implant fixation became compromised by 10-14 days post-inoculation due to osteolysis around the screws. Thus, day 7 was defined as the ideal time point to perform the revision surgery. During the revision surgery, the infected tissue was debrided and the osteotomy was widened to 3mm to place a poly-methyl methacrylate spacer, with or without vancomycin. Half of the groups also received systemic vancomycin for the remaining 21 days of the study. The viable bacteria remaining at the end of the study were measured using colony forming unit assays. Volumetric bone changes (osteolysis and reactive bone formation) were directly measured using micro-CT image analysis. Mice that were treated with local or systemic vancomycin did not display gross pathology at the end of the study. While localized vancomycin delivery alone tended to decrease the bacterial burden and osteolysis, these effects were only significant when combined with systemic antibiotic therapy. This novel mouse model replicates key features of implant-associated osteomyelitis that make treatment extremely difficult, such as biofilm formation and osteolysis, and imitates the clinical practice of placing an antibiotic-laden spacer after infected tissue debridement. In addition, the model demonstrates the limitations of current PMMA spacers and could be an invaluable tool for evaluating alternative antimicrobial treatments for implant-associated bone infection. PMID:25459073

  18. [Cochlear implants].

    PubMed

    Gersdorff, M

    1997-01-01

    Cochlear implants aim at the rehabilitation of profound bilateral deafness. The cochlear implant is a prosthesis made out of surgically implanted cochlear electrodes connected to an external vocal processor. The external acoustic signals are converted into electrical signals coded by the vocal processor. They are then sent out, by a transcutaneous mode, to an internal receptor. This receptor transmits the information to the intracochlear electrodes. Initially, the cochlear implantation was recommended to patients totally deaf following a trauma, a degenerative disease of the inner ear, a meningitis or the use of ototoxic drugs. These patients could not gain from conventional hearing aids and were condemned to silence. More recently, the authors have been impressed by spectacular results with patients having lost their hearing during adulthood (postlingual). The challenge here is quite different, as its aim is to open up--and not to reopen--a child to a sensation that he has never perceived before. This allows the child to develop a coding, a recognition of the acoustic message. The first results are very encouraging. Scientifically, the implantation is also a research tool in various fields: surgical, neurophysiological, neuropsychological, speech therapy, social and cultural. The cochlear implant is an "avant-garde" project. It has changed our approach to profound deafness. It represents the only hope for the profoundly deaf person to reach a satisfactory rehabilitation and social integration. PMID:9532864

  19. Study of hip joint dislocation after total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Kengo; Shishido, Takaaki; Katori, Yoichi; Mizoue, Tatsuro; Shirasu, Hideo; Nunoda, Daisuke

    2005-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to identify the factors responsible for hip joint dislocation after total hip arthroplasty, laying emphasis on analysis of the background variables of the patients. Of the 317 hips included in the study, ten (3.2%) dislocated. Only the anteversion angle of the cup differed significantly between the dislocation group and the dislocation-free group. The safe zone of the anteversion angle seems to be between 20 and 30 degrees. but it is also essential to set the antetorsion angle of the stem to match the shape of individual bones to create a more stable hip joint. This safe zone may be expanded by the additive effect of antetorsion angle of the stem. PMID:16344996

  20. Hip resurfacing arthroplasty: short-term survivorship of 4,401 hips from the Finnish Arthroplasty Register

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Population-based registry data from the Nordic Arthroplasty Register Association (NARA) and from the National Joint Register of England and Wales have revealed that the outcome after hip resurfacing arthroplasty (HRA) is inferior to that of conventional total hip arthroplasty (THA). We analyzed the short-term survival of 4,401 HRAs in the Finnish Arthroplasty Register. Methods We compared the revision risk of the 4,401 HRAs from the Register to that of 48,409 THAs performed during the same time period. The median follow-up time was 3.5 (0–9) years for HRAs and 3.9 (0–9) years for THAs. Results There was no statistically significant difference in revision risk between HRAs and THAs (RR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.78–1.10). Female patients had about double the revision risk of male patients (RR = 2.0, CI: 1.4–2.7). Hospitals that had performed 100 or more HRA procedures had a lower revision risk than those with less than 100 HRAs (RR = 0.6, CI: 0.4–0.9). Articular Surface Replacement (ASR, DePuy) had inferior outcome with higher revision risk than the Birmingham Hip Resurfacing implant (BHR, Smith & Nephew), the reference implant (RR = 1.8, CI: 1.2–2.7). Interpretation We found that HRA had comparable short-term survivorship to THA at a nationwide level. Implant design had an influence on revision rates. ASR had higher revision risk. Low hospital procedure volume worsened the outcome of HRA. Female patients had twice the revision risk of male patients. PMID:22616745

  1. Filter holder assembly having extended collar spacer ring

    DOEpatents

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburgh, PA); Bruck, Gerald J. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A filter holder assembly is provided that utilizes a fail-safe regenerator unit with an annular spacer ring having an extended metal collar for containment and positioning of a compliant ceramic gasket used in the assembly. The filter holder assembly is disclosed for use with advanced composite, filament wound, and metal candle filters.

  2. Favorable outcome of a total hip arthroplasty with insufficient bone coverage of the roof reinforcement ring

    PubMed Central

    Judas, Fernando M.; Lucas, Francisco M.; Fonseca, Ruben L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Total hip arthroplasty in patients with developmental dysplasia of the hip can be a complex procedure due to acetabular and proximal femoral deformities. Presentation of case A 59-year-old male patient underwent a total hip arthroplasty for the treatment of end-stage dysplastic osteoarthritis. A roof reinforcement ring, a cemented polyethylene cup, and a cementless stem were used. A portion of the superior rim of the ring was uncovered by the host bone. Morsellized autogenous femoral-head graft was impacted to fill the space between the superior rim of the ring and the superior part of the dysplastic acetabulum. At the follow-up after 5-years, the patient had no complaints and was very satisfied with the operation result. The hip radiograph revealed no signs of instability of the acetabular component, and no bone graft resorption. Discussion Favorable results were described using metal rings and conical femoral stems for the treatment of the developmental dysplasia of the hip. The superior rim of the metal ring should be against host bone for 60% of its support. Despite the suboptimal implantation of the ring compromising, apparently, mechanical stability of the arthroplasty, the outcome was favorable. Conclusion This result can be supported by the good fixation of the metal ring to the pelvis with screws, the adequate orientation of both components of the total hip arthroplasty, and the bone graft incorporation. PMID:26453941

  3. Fracture After Total Hip Replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... er Total Hip Replacement cont. • Dislocation • Limb length inequality • Poor fracture healing • Repeat fracture • Lack of in- ... Surgeons (AAOS). To learn more about your orthopaedic health, please visit orthoinfo.org. Page ( 5 ) AAOS does ...

  4. Effects of spacer length and terminal group on the crystallization and morphology of biscarbamates: a longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperature.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mostofa Kamal; Sundararajan, Pudupadi R

    2013-05-01

    The effects of alkyl side chain and spacer lengths and the type of terminal group on the morphology and crystallization of a homologous series of biscarbamates (model compounds for polyurethanes) were investigated. Biscarbamates were synthesized with alkyl side chains of various lengths ranging from C4 to C18 and an alkyl spacer group with 12 CH2 units (C12 spacer) between the two hydrogen bonding motifs. The crystallization and morphological features are compared with the previously studied biscarbamates with a C6 spacer. As a token example, we also studied a biscarbamate molecule in which the terminal methyl group was replaced by a phenyl group. We stress four important conclusions of the study: (1) A number of studies in the literature found that the longer alkyl spacers reduced the thermal transition temperatures of the molecules, and such behavior was attributed to an increase in the flexibility of the alkyl spacer. However, the results of the present study are to the contrary. With the biscarbamates studied here, the hydrogen-bonding groups on both sides of the C12 spacer act as "anchors", and the longer spacer does not reduce the melting temperatures compared with those with the C6 spacer. (2) The melt viscosity measurements show shear-thinning behavior, which has been mostly observed with polysaccharides and hydrogen-bonded polymers. (3) Avrami analysis shows a two-stage crystallization, which is not commonly observed in organic small molecule systems. (4) The phenyl end group does not add another self-assembly code in terms of ?-stacking but acts as a defect. While formation of crystals was observed for biscarbamates with short alkyl side chains with a C6 spacer, an increase in spacer length to C12 induces spherulitic morphology. Although the overall sizes of the spherulites are the same for both spacers, the rate of spherulite growth was higher and the crystallization rate was lower with the C12 spacer compared with the C6 spacer. In contrast with the biscarbamates containing C6 spacer previously studied, we find that among the biscarbamates with 12 CH2 units in the spacer the C12-C12 molecule shows the minimum spherulite size, spherulite growth rate, and rate of crystallization. The infrared frequency shifts of the N-H group due to hydrogen bonding were used to calculate the N···O hydrogen-bonding distance and found to be close to the value observed in the crystal structure of the biscarbamate with a C6 spacer and C10 alkyl side chain. PMID:23586599

  5. Current possibilities for hip arthroplasty???

    PubMed Central

    Polesello, Giancarlo Cavalli; Pereira Guimarães, Rodrigo; Ricioli Júnior, Walter; Keiske Ono, Nelson; Kiyoshi Honda, Emerson; Cavalheiro de Queiroz, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Hip arthroscopy has been popularized over the last decade and, with technical advances regarding imaging diagnostics, understanding of the physiopathology or surgical techniques, several applications have been described. Both arthroscopy for intra-articular conditions and endoscopy for extra-articular procedures can be used in diagnosing or treating different conditions. This updated article has the objective of presenting the various current possibilities for hip arthroscopy. PMID:26229784

  6. [Transesophageal 2-dimensional echocardiography in hip endoprostheses].

    PubMed

    Heinrich, H; Kremer, P; Winter, H; Wörsdorfer, O; Ahnefeld, F W

    1985-03-01

    Previous studies indicate that during total hip replacement intraoperative pulmonary embolization of air and medullary bone marrow occurs. This was based on histological examination of lung tissue obtained during animal investigations and postmortem in human tissue. In vivo proof of this embolization has not as yet been found because of the methodological problems involved. Using transoesophageal two-dimensional echocardiography continuously direct imaging of the right atrium and the right ventricle can be carried out and the embolization thus visualized. In a prospective randomized study in 26 patients having to undergo total hip replacement operation the right atrium and right ventricle were continuously scanned. Endexpiratory CO2-partial pressure was simultaneously recorded. A venting hole in the femur is said to prevent the pressure rising in the medullary space and therefore prevents embolization. In 13 patients therefore, a 4.5 mm lateral drill hole 4 cm distal the tip of the prosthesis was made in order to vent the medullary space. Transoesophageal two-dimensional echocardiography revealed air bubbles in 12 of 13 patients in the control group during implantation of the femoral prosthesis. This is significantly different to the group of vented patients where bubbles were only seen in 4 cases (p less than 0.01). Emboli were visible in 8 patients in the control group in contrast to only 2 cases in the vented group (p less than 0.05). The endexpiratory CO2-pressure of the control group fell from 35 mmHg to 33 mm Hg (Median, p less than 0.001). The CO2 of the vented patients remained constant.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3993898

  7. Have cementless and resurfacing components improved the medium-term results of hip replacement for patients under 60 years of age?

    PubMed Central

    Mason, James; Baker, Paul; Gregg, Paul J; Porter, Martyn; Deehan, David J; Reed, Mike R

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose The optimal hip replacement for young patients remains unknown. We compared patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs), revision risk, and implant costs over a range of hip replacements. Methods We included hip replacements for osteoarthritis in patients under 60 years of age performed between 2003 and 2010 using the commonest brand of cemented, cementless, hybrid, or resurfacing prosthesis (11,622 women and 13,087 men). The reference implant comprised a cemented stem with a conventional polyethylene cemented cup and a standard-sized head (28- or 32-mm). Differences in implant survival were assessed using competing-risks models, adjusted for known prognostic influences. Analysis of covariance was used to assess improvement in PROMs (Oxford hip score (OHS) and EQ5D index) in 2014 linked procedures. Results In males, PROMs and implant survival were similar across all types of implants. In females, revision was statistically significantly higher in hard-bearing and/or small-stem cementless implants (hazard ratio (HR) = 4) and resurfacings (small head sizes (< 48 mm): HR = 6; large head sizes (? 48 mm): HR = 5) when compared to the reference cemented implant. In component combinations with equivalent survival, women reported significantly greater improvements in OHS with hybrid implants (22, p = 0.006) and cementless implants (21, p = 0.03) (reference, 18), but similar EQ5D index. For men and women, National Health Service (NHS) costs were lowest with the reference implant and highest with a hard-bearing cementless replacement. Interpretation In young women, hybrids offer a balance of good early functional improvement and low revision risk. Fully cementless and resurfacing components are more costly and do not provide any additional benefit for younger patients. PMID:25285617

  8. Basic Science Considerations in Primary Total Hip Replacement Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Saqeb B; Dunlop, Douglas G; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Naqvi, Syed G; Gangoo, Shafat; Salih, Saif

    2010-01-01

    Total Hip Replacement is one of the most common operations performed in the developed world today. An increasingly ageing population means that the numbers of people undergoing this operation is set to rise. There are a numerous number of prosthesis on the market and it is often difficult to choose between them. It is therefore necessary to have a good understanding of the basic scientific principles in Total Hip Replacement and the evidence base underpinning them. This paper reviews the relevant anatomical and biomechanical principles in THA. It goes on to elaborate on the structural properties of materials used in modern implants and looks at the evidence base for different types of fixation including cemented and uncemented components. Modern bearing surfaces are discussed in addition to the scientific basis of various surface engineering modifications in THA prostheses. The basic science considerations in component alignment and abductor tension are also discussed. A brief discussion on modular and custom designs of THR is also included. This article reviews basic science concepts and the rationale underpinning the use of the femoral and acetabular component in total hip replacement. PMID:20582240

  9. Improved SB2 orbits for HIP 12081 and HIP 87895

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halbwachs, J.-L.; Arenou, F.; Guillout, P.; Pourbaix, D.; Tal-Or, L.; Famaey, B.; Lebreton, Y.; Mazeh, T.

    2013-11-01

    We are observing a selection of about 70 double-lined binaries (SB2s) with the T193/SOPHIE in order to improve their orbital elements. Our goal is to obtain the masses of the components with a 1 % accuracy when the astrometric observations of Gaia are available. After 6 semesters of observations, the two best observed stars are HIP 12081 and HIP 87895. These stars are used to verify that the 1 % accuracy could really be obtained at the end of the programme. The radial velocities of their components were derived using the TODMOR algorithm, and their orbital elements were calculated. It appears that the minimum masses of the components of HIP 12081 are already both obtained with an accuracy around 0.5 %. For HIP 87895, the relative precisions of the minimum masses of the primary and of the secondary component are 2.7 and 1.5 %, respectively, but they were obtained from only 9 spectra and they should be improved once more observations have been obtained. Ancient interferometric observations of HIP 87895 are also taken into account and the actual masses of the components are derived. Although these measurements are far from being as accurate as those expected from Gaia, the relative errors of the masses are only 2.6 and 1.5 % respectively. We thus conclude that our programme would lead to masses with the announced accuracy if the observations are continued.

  10. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  11. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  12. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer... § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis is a...

  13. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  14. 21 CFR 888.3390 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer cemented or uncemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer...Prosthetic Devices § 888.3390 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) metal/polymer...prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip)...

  15. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing... Devices § 888.3380 Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. (a) Identification. A hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis is a...

  16. Effect of position and alteration in synergist muscle force contribution on hip forces when performing hip strengthening

    E-print Network

    Moran, Daniel

    Abstract Background--Understanding the magnitude and direction of joint forces generated by hip. The purpose of this study was to evaluate hip joint forces created across a range of hip flexion and extension--A musculoskeletal model was used to estimate hip joint forces during simulated prone hip extension and supine hip

  17. Failure of a novel ceramic-on-ceramic hip resurfacing prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Matharu, Gulraj S; Daniel, Joseph; Ziaee, Hena; McMinn, Derek J W

    2015-03-01

    We report the early failure of five ceramic-on-ceramic hip resurfacings (CoCHRs). The ceramic used for the acetabular liner was a novel ceramic-composite (two thirds polyurethane and one third alumina ceramic). All cases were revised for increasing metal ion levels (blood cobalt 3.93-208.0 ?g/l and chromium 1.57-17.5 ?g/l) due to ceramic liner fracture and/or accelerated wear of the ceramic femoral head coating. Patients underwent bearing exchange and revision using primary hip arthroplasty implants at a mean of 3.0 years following CoCHR. Intraoperatively all patients had metallosis. At 1 to 2 years of follow-up blood metal ions normalized with no complications. We do not recommend this particular type of ceramic-on-ceramic bearing for hip resurfacing. PMID:25453631

  18. A finite element method comparison of wear in two metal-on-metal total hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, F; Hoglievina, M; Fancellu, G; Martinelli, B

    2006-11-01

    The contact mechanics of two metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip prostheses was studied by means of the finite element method (FEM). The purpose of the work was to compare two total hip replacements (Durom and Metasul) with regard to the amount of wear debris released. Wear on the bearing surfaces was evaluated following Reye hypotheses from the pressure distribution, computed by means of three-dimensional FEM models; an approximate analytical model based on Hertz contact theory has also been developed and discussed. The results show that in the dry friction condition the Durom joint releases almost twice as much wear volume as produced by the Metasul joint. Therefore, while Durom implants can improve hip stability by increasing the prosthetic impingement-free range of motion (PIF-ROM), Metasul prostheses can be a valuable solution whenever wear represents a critical choice factor. PMID:17236520

  19. Increased antibiotic release and equivalent biomechanics of a spacer cement without hard radio contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bitsch, R G; Kretzer, J P; Vogt, S; Büchner, H; Thomsen, M N; Lehner, B

    2015-10-01

    We compared a novel calcium carbonate spacer cement (Copal® spacem) to well-established bone cements. Electron microscopic structure and elution properties of the antibiotics ofloxacin, vancomycin, clindamycin, and gentamicin were examined. A knee wear simulator model for articulating cement spacers was established. Mechanical tests for bending strength, flexural modulus, and compressive and fatigue strength were performed. The electron microscopic analysis showed a microporous structure of the spacer cement, and this promoted a significantly higher and longer antibiotic elution. All spacer cement specimens released the antibiotics for a period of up to 50days with the exception of the vancomycin loading. The spacer cement showed significantly less wear scars and fulfilled the ISO 5833 requirements. The newly developed spacer cement is a hydrophilic antibiotic carrier with an increased release. Cement without hard radio contrast agents can improve tribological behaviour of spacers, and this may reduce reactive wear particles and abrasive bone defects. PMID:26219491

  20. 21M.775 Hip Hop, Spring 2003

    E-print Network

    DeFrantz, Thomas

    Subject explores the political and aesthetic foundations of hip hop. Students trace the musical, corporeal, visual, spoken word, and literary manifestations of hip hop over its thirty year presence in the American cultural ...

  1. Method of using a spacer for well control fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Drake, E.N.; Tsao, Y.H.

    1984-05-01

    A spacer comprising the water-in-oil emulsion portion of a shear-thickening well control fluid is used to separate drilling mud from the shear-thickening fluid in the drill pipe in the well bore to avoid premature thickening of the shear thickening fluid in the drill pipe. The shear-thickening well control fluid comprises a water-in-oil emulsion in which is dispersed granular particles of hydratable, water expandable clay.

  2. [Ceramic-on-ceramic bearings in total hip arthroplasty (THA)].

    PubMed

    Sentürk, U; Perka, C

    2015-04-01

    The main reason for total hip arthroplasty (THA) revision is the wear-related aseptic loosening. Younger and active patients after total joint replacement create high demands, in particular, on the bearings. The progress, especially for alumina ceramic-on-ceramic bearings and mixed ceramics have solved many problems of the past and lead to good in vitro results. Modern ceramics (alumina or mixed ceramics containing alumina) are extremely hard, scratch-resistant, biocompatible, offer a low coefficient of friction, superior lubrication and have the lowest wear rates in comparison to all other bearings in THA. The disadvantage of ceramic is the risk of material failure, i.e., of ceramic fracture. The new generation of mixed ceramics (delta ceramic), has reduced the risk of head fractures to 0.03-0.05?%, but the risk for liner fractures remains unchanged at about 0.02?%. Assuming a non-impinging component implantation, ceramic-on-ceramic bearings have substantial advantages over all other bearings in THA. Due to the superior hardness, ceramic bearings produce less third body wear and are virtually impervious to damage from instruments during the implantation process. A specific complication for ceramic-on-ceramic bearings is "squeaking". The high rate of reported squeaking (0.45 to 10.7?%) highlights the importance of precise implant positioning and the stem and patient selection. With precise implant positioning this problem is rare with many implant designs and without clinical relevance. The improved tribology and the presumable resulting implant longevity make ceramic-on-ceramic the bearing of choice for young and active patients. PMID:25874400

  3. Structural design feasibility study of Space Station long spacer truss

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armand, Sasan C.; Funk, Gregory P.; Dohogne, Caroline A.

    1994-01-01

    The structural design and configuration feasibility of the long spacer truss assembly that will be used as part of the Space Station Freedom is the focus of this study. The structural analysis discussed herein is derived from the transient loading events presented in the Space Transportation System Interface Control Document (STS ICD). The transient loading events are liftoff, landing, and emergency landing loads. Quasi-static loading events were neglected in this study since the magnitude of the quasi-static acceleration factors is lower than that of the transient acceleration factors. Structural analysis of the proposed configuration of the long spacer truss with four longerons indicated that negative safety margins are possible. As a result, configuration changes were proposed. The primary configuration change suggested was to increase the number of truss longerons to six. The six-longeron truss appears to be a more promising structure than the four-longeron truss because it offers a positive margin of safety and more volume in its second bay (BAY2). This additional volume can be used for resupply of some of the orbital replacement units (such as a battery box). Note that the design effort on the long spacer truss has not fully begun and that calculations and reports of the negative safety margins are, to date, based on concept only.

  4. Analysis of contact mechanics in ceramic-on-ceramic hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Mak, M M; Jin, Z M

    2002-01-01

    The contact mechanics in ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants has been analysed in this study using the finite element method. Only the ideal conditions where the contact occurs within the acetabular cup were considered. It has been shown that the contact pressure distribution and the contact area at the main articulating bearing surfaces depend largely on design parameters such as the radial clearance between the femoral head and the acetabular cup, as well as the thickness of the ceramic insert. For the ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants used in clinics today, with a minimum 5-mm-thick ceramic insert, it has been shown that the radius of the contact area between the femoral head and the acetabular cup is relatively small compared with that of the femoral head and the ceramic insert thickness. Consequently, Hertz contact theory can be used to estimate the contact parameters such as the maximum contact pressure and the contact area. PMID:12206519

  5. How Do Metal Ion Levels Change over Time in Hip Resurfacing Patients? A Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Savarino, Lucia; Cadossi, Matteo; Chiarello, Eugenio; Fotia, Caterina; Greco, Michelina; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOM-HR) is offered as an alternative to traditional hip arthroplasty for young, active adults with advanced osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, concerns remain regarding wear and corrosion of the bearing surfaces and the resulting increase in metal ion levels. We evaluated three cohorts of patients with Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) at an average follow-up of 2, 5, and 9 years. We asked whether there would be differences in ion levels between the cohorts and inside the gender. Nineteen patients were prospectively analyzed. The correlation with clinical-radiographic data was also performed. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium and cobalt levels demonstrated a tendency to decrease over time. Such tendency was present only in females. An inverse correlation between chromium, implant size, and Harris hip score was present at short term; it disappeared over time together with the decreased ion levels. The prospective analysis showed that, although metal ion levels remained fairly constant within each patient, there was a relatively large variation between subjects, so mean data in this scenario must be interpreted with caution. The chronic high exposure should be carefully considered during implant selection, particularly in young subjects, and a stricter monitoring is mandatory. PMID:25580456

  6. How do metal ion levels change over time in hip resurfacing patients? A cohort study.

    PubMed

    Savarino, Lucia; Cadossi, Matteo; Chiarello, Eugenio; Fotia, Caterina; Greco, Michelina; Baldini, Nicola; Giannini, Sandro

    2014-01-01

    Metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOM-HR) is offered as an alternative to traditional hip arthroplasty for young, active adults with advanced osteoarthritis. Nevertheless, concerns remain regarding wear and corrosion of the bearing surfaces and the resulting increase in metal ion levels. We evaluated three cohorts of patients with Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) at an average follow-up of 2, 5, and 9 years. We asked whether there would be differences in ion levels between the cohorts and inside the gender. Nineteen patients were prospectively analyzed. The correlation with clinical-radiographic data was also performed. Chromium, cobalt, nickel, and molybdenum concentrations were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Chromium and cobalt levels demonstrated a tendency to decrease over time. Such tendency was present only in females. An inverse correlation between chromium, implant size, and Harris hip score was present at short term; it disappeared over time together with the decreased ion levels. The prospective analysis showed that, although metal ion levels remained fairly constant within each patient, there was a relatively large variation between subjects, so mean data in this scenario must be interpreted with caution. The chronic high exposure should be carefully considered during implant selection, particularly in young subjects, and a stricter monitoring is mandatory. PMID:25580456

  7. Supercapsular percutaneously-assisted total hip arthroplasty: radiographic outcomes and surgical technique

    PubMed Central

    Della Torre, Paul K.; Fitch, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Background The supercapsular percutaneously-assisted total hip (SuperPATH®) approach for total hip arthroplasty (THA) was developed to promote early mobilization and greater range of motion, physiologic gait kinematics and improved pain control. The superpath approach is a hybrid of the Superior Capsulotomy (SuperCap®) approach and the percutaneously assisted total hip (PATH®) technique. Methods Postoperative radiographs of 66 consecutive patients from the first 100 patients who underwent the SuperPATH approach were analysed by an independent third party for component position and seating, femoral offset and leg length. A detailed description of preoperative and postoperative preparation, soft tissue dissection, preparation of the femoral canal and acetabulum, and implant positioning is also provided with figures to illustrate. Results All components in this case series were well seated and position deemed optimal. Leg lengths were measured to within 5 mm of the contralateral side and mean acetabular abduction angle was 40.13° (SD 6.30°). Conclusions Through preservation of the external rotators, hip capsule, and abductor integrity, the SuperPATH approach for THA maximally preserves the surrounding soft tissue envelope. Implant position was optimal within the ‘learning curve’ of the first 100 cases for described THA safe zones. Long term outcome data for the SuperPATH approach are being collected as part of an ongoing study to compare to favourable short and mid-term results. PMID:26366397

  8. Hip-Hop and the Academic Canon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abe, Daudi

    2009-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the hip-hop movement has risen from the margins to become the preeminent force in US popular culture. In more recent times academics have begun to harness the power of hip-hop culture and use it as a means of infusing transformative knowledge into the mainstream academic discourse. On many college campuses, hip-hop's…

  9. Alternative process for thin layer etching: Application to nitride spacer etching stopping on silicon germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Posseme, N. Pollet, O.; Barnola, S.

    2014-08-04

    Silicon nitride spacer etching realization is considered today as one of the most challenging of the etch process for the new devices realization. For this step, the atomic etch precision to stop on silicon or silicon germanium with a perfect anisotropy (no foot formation) is required. The situation is that none of the current plasma technologies can meet all these requirements. To overcome these issues and meet the highly complex requirements imposed by device fabrication processes, we recently proposed an alternative etching process to the current plasma etch chemistries. This process is based on thin film modification by light ions implantation followed by a selective removal of the modified layer with respect to the non-modified material. In this Letter, we demonstrate the benefit of this alternative etch method in term of film damage control (silicon germanium recess obtained is less than 6?A), anisotropy (no foot formation), and its compatibility with other integration steps like epitaxial. The etch mechanisms of this approach are also addressed.

  10. Atomic Layer Deposition of SiN for spacer applications in high-end logic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, F.; Triyoso, D. H.; Hussain, I.; Mutas, S.; Bernhardt, H.

    2012-12-01

    Continuous down scaling of transistor size resulted in introduction of high-k material to replace the conventional gate oxide. High-k Metal Gate implementation brings new challenges to the subsequent processing steps of the device. Both oxide ingress and removal of the HKMG stack during later cleaning steps must strictly be avoided. We have developed and optimized an ALD SiN encapsulation liner which protects the HKMG stack and also serves as a robust spacer for subsequent ion implantation. SiN was chosen because of its oxide-blocking characteristics and its durability in diluted hydrofluoric acid. We developed sophisticated ALD processes using ionized ammonia radicals and dichloro-silane. This ALD process has several advantages compared to conventional LPCVD or PECVD processes: Superior thickness control and uniformity, excellent step coverage and no loading effects. In addition, process temperature could be reduced to 500°C, which is shown to be critical for protecting the HKMG stack. Further reduction in process temperature to 400°C is also demonstrated using a novel precursor.

  11. The clinical and radiological outcomes of hip resurfacing versus total hip arthroplasty: a meta-analysis and systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Hip resurfacing (HRS) procedures have gained increasing popularity for younger, higher-demand patients with degenerative hip pathologies. However, with concerns regarding revision rates and possible adverse metal hypersensitivity reactions with metal-on-metal articulations, some authors have questioned the hypothesized superiority of hip resurfacing over total hip arthroplasty (THA). In this meta-analysis, we compared the clinical and radiological outcomes and complication rates of these 2 procedures. Methods A systematic review was undertaken of all published (Medline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE) and unpublished or gray literature research databases up to January 2010. Clinical and radiological outcomes as well as complications of HRS were compared to those of THA using risk ratio, mean difference, and standardized mean difference statistics. Studies were critically appraised using the CASP appraisal tool. Results 46 studies were identified from 1,124 citations. These included 3,799 HRSs and 3,282 THAs. On meta-analysis, functional outcomes for subjects following HRS were better than or the same as for subjects with a THA, but there were statistically significantly greater incidences of heterotopic ossification, aseptic loosening, and revision surgery with HRS compared to THA. The evidence base showed a number of methodological inadequacies such as the limited use of power calculations and poor or absent blinding of both patients and assessors, possibly giving rise to assessor bias. Interpretation On the basis of the current evidence base, HRS may have better functional outcomes than THA, but the increased risks of heterotopic ossification, aseptic loosening, and revision surgery following HRS indicate that THA is superior in terms of implant survival. PMID:21067432

  12. Implant survivorship analysis after minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion using the iFuse Implant System®

    PubMed Central

    Cher, Daniel J; Reckling, W Carlton; Capobianco, Robyn A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Surgical revision rate is a key outcome with all permanent implants. The iFuse Implant System® is a permanent implant used to perform minimally invasive sacroiliac joint fusion. The purpose of this study is to determine the surgical revision rate after sacroiliac joint fusion surgery with this system. Methods Using two internal sources of information, revision surgeries were identified and linked to index surgeries. The likelihood of revision surgery was calculated using the Kaplan–Meier life table approach. Predictors of revision were explored. Results Four-year survivorship free from implant revision was 96.46%. Revision rate did not differ by sex and was lower for age >65. In all, 24% of revisions occurred within the first 30 days after surgery; 63.5% occurred within year 1. Implant survivorship has improved annually since the device was introduced in 2009. Conclusion The survivorship rate with this implant is high and improving; the rate is somewhat higher than total hip replacement but lower than that of lumbar spine procedures. PMID:26648762

  13. [Hip arthroscopy for femoroacetabular impingement].

    PubMed

    Wettstein, M; Dienst, M

    2006-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is likely one of the main causes for osteoarthritis in young adults. Surgical treatment has until now been performed via open dislocation of the hip joint. With respect to its invasive nature and long rehabilitation, arthroscopic techniques have become established in recent years. The following article presents the latest developments in hip arthroscopy for FAI with a detailed description of technical aspects, pitfalls, and limitations. Hip arthroscopy is performed in the standard fashion with and without traction for arthroscopy of the central and peripheral compartments. Under traction, the anterosuperior cartilage and adjacent base of the acetabular labrum have to be inspected for frequent lesions such as cartilage flap tears and delaminations of the cartilage from the subchondral bone. An ossified labrum can be trimmed back with a burr. Currently, techniques are being developed for temporary detachment of the labrum, trimming of the acetabular rim, and refixation of the labrum with suture anchors. Without traction, femoroacetabular impingement has to be confirmed arthroscopically under flexion, internal rotation, and adduction of the hip. With respect to the frequent loss of internal rotation, the zona orbicularis and the iliofemoral ligament are released and removed if needed. The anterolateral bump of the head-neck junction is trimmed back for restoration of a more physiological head-neck offset. Postoperatively, continuous passive motion is important to prevent adhesions between the bleeding bone of the head-neck junction and the articular capsule. Weight bearing as tolerated is allowed if no treatment of cartilage defects or refixation of the acetabular labrum was performed. The early results after hip arthroscopy for FAI are very promising. Arthroscopic techniques will upstage open exposures of the hip joint for the treatment of FAI. PMID:16322968

  14. Microscopical analysis of synovial fluid wear debris from failing CoCr hip prostheses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, M. B.; Brown, A. P.; Cox, A.; Curry, A.; Denton, J.

    2010-07-01

    Metal on metal hip joint prostheses are now commonly implanted in patients with hip problems. Although hip replacements largely go ahead problem free, some complications can arise such as infection immediately after surgery and aseptic necrosis caused by vascular complications due to surgery. A recent observation that has been made at Manchester is that some Cobalt Chromium (CoCr) implants are causing chronic pain, with the source being as yet unidentified. This form of replacement failure is independent of surgeon or hospital and so some underlying body/implant interface process is thought to be the problem. When the synovial fluid from a failed joint is examined particles of metal (wear debris) can be found. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used to look at fixed and sectioned samples of the synovial fluid and this has identified fine (< 100 nm) metal and metal oxide particles within the fluid. TEM EDX and Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy (EELS) have been employed to examine the composition of the particles, showing them to be chromium rich. This gives rise to concern that the failure mechanism may be associated with the debris.

  15. Clinical and radiological outcome of the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head using the osteonecrosis intervention implant.

    PubMed

    Floerkemeier, Thilo; Thorey, Fritz; Daentzer, Dorothea; Lerch, Matthias; Klages, Phillip; Windhagen, Henning; von Lewinski, Gabriela

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological outcome of the treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head by implantation of an osteonecrosis intervention rod. In this retrospective study the follow-up of 19 patients with 23 osteonecrotic femoral heads treated with implantation of an osteonecrosis intervention implant was assessed. From 19 patients with 23 necrotic femoral heads, there were 13 cases in which a total hip replacement was necessary. This implies a survival rate of 44% after implantation of an osteonecrosis intervention rod after a mean follow-up of 1.45 years. The outcome after core decompression combined with the insertion of a tantalum osteonecrosis intervention implant did not show superior results compared to core decompression alone. This is in contrast to existing studies. In addition, this study showed that in cases of total hip replacement, no problems appeared during explantation of the tantalum rod. PMID:20119747

  16. Effect of n-implantation on the corrosive-wear properties of surgical Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Beardsley, G.M.; Buchanan, R.A.; Bacon, R.K.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of N-ion implantation on the corrosive-wear properties of Ti-6Al-4V, an alloy used for construction of the femoral component of artificial hip joints in humans, were tested. In corrosive-wear tests designed to simulate pertinent hip-joint parameters, electrochemical corrosion currents were measured for cylindrical samples in saline electrolyte in an arrangement which allowed the samples to be rotated between loaded polyethylene pads simultaneously with the current measurement. To further quantify material removal, Zr markers were ion-implanted into some samples so that, by use of Rutherford backscattering, material removal could be detected by changes in position of the marker relative to the surface. Corrosion currents were greatly reduced by implantation of approximately 20 at. % N, but even implantation of the Zr markers also reduced corrosion currents. The marker experiments confirmed the low rate of material removal for the implanted samples. 10 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  17. The chemical form of metallic debris in tissues surrounding metal-on-metal hips with unexplained failure.

    PubMed

    Hart, Alister J; Quinn, Paul D; Sampson, Barry; Sandison, Ann; Atkinson, Kirk D; Skinner, John A; Powell, Jonathan J; Mosselmans, J Fred W

    2010-11-01

    Implant-derived material from metal-on-metal (MOM) hip arthroplasties may be responsible for an unexplained tissue inflammatory response. The chemical form of the metal species in the tissues is predominantly chromium (Cr), but the currently used techniques have not been able to determine whether this is Cr(III) phosphate or Cr(III) oxide. The analytical challenge must overcome the fact that the metal in the tissues is at a relatively low concentration and tissue preparation or the microscopy beam used can affect the results. Microfocus X-ray spectroscopy using a synchrotron beam is useful in addressing both these issues. Using this technique we compared tissue from failed MOM hips with: (1) tissue from metal-on-polyethylene (MOP) hips; (2) chemical standards; (3) metal discs cut from MOM hips. The most abundant implant-related species in all MOM hip tissues contained Cr. Comparison with standards revealed the chemical form was Cr(III) phosphate, which did not vary with manufacturer type (four types analysed) or level of blood metal ions. Cobalt (Co) and molybdenum (Mo) were occasionally present in areas of high Cr. Co was normally found in a metallic state in the tissue, while Mo was found in an oxidized state. The variety of metallic species may have arisen from corrosion, wear or a combination of both. No evidence of Cr(VI) was seen in the tissues examined. PMID:20541630

  18. Frontal plane kinematics of the hip during running: Are they related to hip anatomy and strength?

    PubMed

    Baggaley, Michael; Noehren, Brian; Clasey, Jody L; Shapiro, Robert; Pohl, Michael B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive hip adduction has been associated with a number of lower extremity overuse running injuries. The excessive motion has been suggested to be the result of reduced strength of the hip abductor musculature. Hip anatomical alignment has been postulated to influence hip abduction (HABD) strength and thus may impact hip adduction during running. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between hip anatomy, HABD strength, and frontal plane kinematics during running. Peak isometric HABD strength, 3D lower extremity kinematics during running, femoral neck-shaft angle (NSA), and pelvis width-femur length (PW-FL) ratio were recorded for 25 female subjects. Pearson correlations (p<0.05) were performed between variables. A fair relationship was observed between femoral NSA and HABD strength (r=-0.47, p=0.02) where an increased NSA was associated with reduced HABD strength. No relationship was observed between HABD strength and hip adduction during running. None of the anatomical measurements, NSA or PW-FL, were associated with hip adduction during running. Deviations in the femoral NSA have a limited ability to influence peak isometric hip abduction strength or frontal plane hip kinematics during running. Hip abduction strength does also not appear to be linked with changes in hip kinematics. These findings in healthy individuals question whether excessive hip adduction typically seen in female runners with overuse injuries is caused by deviations in hip abduction strength or anatomical structure. PMID:26364243

  19. Techniques and Results for Open Hip Preservation

    PubMed Central

    Levy, David M.; Hellman, Michael D.; Haughom, Bryan; Stover, Michael D.; Nho, Shane J.

    2015-01-01

    While hip arthroscopy grows in popularity, there are still many circumstances under which open hip preservation is the most appropriately indicated. This article specifically reviews open hip preservation procedures for a variety of hip conditions. Femoral acetabular impingement may be corrected using an open surgical hip dislocation. Acetabular dysplasia may be corrected using a periacetabular osteotomy. Acetabular protrusio may require surgical hip dislocation with rim trimming and a possible valgus intertrochanteric osteotomy. Legg–Calve–Perthes disease produces complex deformities that may be better served with osteotomies of the proximal femur and/or acetabulum. Chronic slipped capital femoral epiphysis may also benefit from a surgical hip dislocation and/or proximal femoral osteotomy. PMID:26649292

  20. Empirical and Computational Pressure Drop Correlations for Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Spacer Grids

    SciTech Connect

    In, Wang Kee; Oh, Dong Seok; Chun, Tae Hyun

    2002-07-15

    Empirical and computational pressure drop correlations were developed to accurately estimate the pressure drop at the fuel spacer grid in a pressurized water reactor. The empirical correlation uses the balance of hydraulic forces acting on the spacer grid. The amount of pressure drop is assumed to depend largely on the reduction of the flow cross section, the flow constriction in the spacer region, and the frictional loss. The grid form drag due to the relative plugging and the flow constriction by the grid components were found to be the primary factors of the total pressure drop. The computational correlation combines the pressure drop due to flow blockage by the spacer grid and the pressure drop calculated by dynamics analysis. The pressure loss coefficients from the empirical correlation agree well with the measured ones for the spacer grids with and without the mixing vane. The computational correlation overpredicts the pressure loss coefficients for the spacer grid with the mixing vane.

  1. What Is a Hip Replacement?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... much lower than they used to be. Will Exercise Help After a Total Hip Replacement? Exercise can reduce joint pain and stiffness. It can ... move the joint). Most physical therapists begin with exercises that: Increase range of motion Make muscles strong. ...

  2. Transient Synovitis of the Hip

    MedlinePLUS

    ... have this condition want to lie on their back with the knee on the side that hurts bent and turned out with their ... exact cause of transient synovitis of the hip. It might be caused by a virus or it might be from an allergic reaction ...

  3. Hip-Hop Pop Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talley, Clarence, Sr.

    2011-01-01

    Art has a way of helping students better understand and appreciate the world around them, particularly the things that are most important to them. Hip hop is one of those generational genres that capture the attention of young students like few other things do. Drawing on this genre to get students to create art is an excellent way to demonstrate…

  4. Hip: Anatomy and US technique

    PubMed Central

    Molini, L.; Precerutti, M.; Gervasio, A.; Draghi, F.; Bianchi, S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasound (US) has always had a relatively limited role in the evaluation of the hip due to the deep location of this joint. However, many hip diseases are well detectable at US, but before approaching such a study it is necessary to be thoroughly familiar with the normal anatomy and related US images. The study technique is particularly important as optimization of various parameters is required, such as probe frequency, focalization, positioning of the probe, etc. Also the patient’s position is important, as it varies according to the area requiring examination. For the study of the anterior structures, the patient should be in the supine position; for the medial structures, the leg should be abducted and rotated outward with the knee flexed; for the lateral structures, the patient should be in the controlateral decubitus position; for the posterior structures the patient must be in the prone position. US study of the hip includes assessment of the soft tissues, tendons, ligaments and muscles, and also of the bone structures, joint space and serous bursae. The purpose of this article is to review the normal anatomy of the hip as well as the US anatomy of this joint. PMID:23397030

  5. Pattern Alteration: Even Hip Circumference 

    E-print Network

    2006-08-04

    When a garment is too tight in the hip area, crosswise wrinkles form above the hipline in front and in back. The garment also may cup under the seat area. When it's too loose, vertical folds fall from the waist to the hem in front and in back...

  6. Trapped charge-induced field distortion on GIS spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Boggs, S.A.; Wang, Y.

    1995-07-01

    Operation of GIS disconnectors can leave a dc voltage (electric field) on the switchgear which can cause charging of spacer surfaces. Analysis indicates that the surface charge density is related to the voltage-induced field. The charge distribution is likely to take the form of a strip, with a sharp termination of the charge density at one end which can result in a substantial field enhancement which adds to the field induced by the disconnector upon closing and increases the probability of a surface flashover when the disconnector is closed. This may explain failures in some early 550 kV disconnector designs.

  7. Efficient synthesis of phenylene-ethynylene rods and their use as rigid spacers in divalent inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Pertici, Francesca; Varga, Norbert; van Duijn, Arnoud; Rey-Carrizo, Matias; Bernardi, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of phenylene-ethynylene rods and their use as rigid spacers is described. Alternation of a Sonogashira reaction and silyl group cleavage was used to obtain rigid spacers with even and odd numbers of phenylene units. Preliminary applications of these rods in divalent systems are shown. Inhibition studies with Pseudomonas Aeruginosa lectin LecA showed that the rigid spacer proved greatly beneficial for the inhibitory potency. PMID:23400701

  8. Comparison of migration behavior between single and dual lag screw implants for intertrochanteric fracture fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kouvidis, George K; Sommers, Mark B; Giannoudis, Peter V; Katonis, Pavlos G; Bottlang, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background Lag screw cut-out failure following fixation of unstable intertrochanteric fractures in osteoporotic bone remains an unsolved challenge. This study tested if resistance to cut-out failure can be improved by using a dual lag screw implant in place of a single lag screw implant. Migration behavior and cut-out resistance of a single and a dual lag screw implant were comparatively evaluated in surrogate specimens using an established laboratory model of hip screw cut-out failure. Methods Five dual lag screw implants (Endovis, Citieffe) and five single lag screw implants (DHS, Synthes) were tested in the Hip Implant Performance Simulator (HIPS) of the Legacy Biomechanics Laboratory. This model simulated osteoporotic bone, an unstable fracture, and biaxial rocking motion representative of hip loading during normal gait. All constructs were loaded up to 20,000 cycles of 1.45 kN peak magnitude under biaxial rocking motion. The migration kinematics was continuously monitored with 6-degrees of freedom motion tracking system and the number of cycles to implant cut-out was recorded. Results The dual lag screw implant exhibited significantly less migration and sustained more loading cycles in comparison to the DHS single lag screw. All DHS constructs failed before 20,000 cycles, on average at 6,638 ± 2,837 cycles either by cut-out or permanent screw bending. At failure, DHS constructs exhibited 10.8 ± 2.3° varus collapse and 15.5 ± 9.5° rotation around the lag screw axis. Four out of five dual screws constructs sustained 20,000 loading cycles. One dual screw specimens sustained cut-out by medial migration of the distal screw after 10,054 cycles. At test end, varus collapse and neck rotation in dual screws implants advanced to 3.7 ± 1.7° and 1.6 ± 1.0°, respectively. Conclusion The single and double lag screw implants demonstrated a significantly different migration resistance in surrogate specimens under gait loading simulation with the HIPS model. In this model, the double screw construct provided significantly greater resistance against varus collapse and neck rotation in comparison to a standard DHS lag screw implant. PMID:19450283

  9. Total hip arthroplasty with a collarless, tapered, fiber metal proximally coated femoral stem: minimum 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Klein, Gregg R; Levine, Harlan B; Nafash, Susan C; Lamothe, Helena C; Hartzband, Mark A

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the midterm results, osteointegration potential, and implant-related complications of a cementless, collarless, proximally coated, distally tapered femoral hip prosthesis. The clinical and radiographic results for 129 hips in 116 patients after total hip arthroplasty with a Fiber Metal Taper (Zimmer, Inc ,Warsaw, Ind) femoral stem are reported. One hundred twenty-two (95%) hips were available for the minimum of 5 years clinical and radiographic follow-up. The mean duration of follow-up was 81 months (range, 60-104 months). The mean Harris hip score improved from 44 to 92 at the most recent follow-up. All femoral components were clinically stable with radiographic evidence of bone ingrowth. There has been no evidence of subsidence greater than 2 mm, no significant thigh pain, and no femoral revisions for any reason. Total hip arthroplasty with the Fiber Metal Taper stem demonstrates good clinical and radiographic results at midterm follow-up. PMID:18555647

  10. Optical inspection system for implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denkena, Berend; Acker, Wolfram

    2006-04-01

    Hip and knee prostheses are complex products with high quality standards. The aim is to reproduce the behavior of a natural joint. This can be achieved by using a hard and a soft component. The research project "Optical Geometry Acquisition of Medical Implants and Prostheses", short "OptiGIP", explores methods for an automated quality assurance included in the production chain of these components. The approach is divided in two sections, a three dimensional and a two dimensional measurement technique. First a stripe projection method is used to produce a three dimensional model of the component. This model can be used to verify the geometry of the component. Furthermore it enables a new examination method, the Model-Based RSA, which is used to explore the effect of loosening. A late loosening of the components within the bones is the most important quality criterion for a successful implantation. The second part of described measurement method aims at a reduction of an early loosening of the prosthesis. Even very small scratches on the prosthesis's surface can have an impact on an early loosening because of friction between the soft and hard surface. Scratches produce bigger particles of the soft component than an undamaged surface would do. Recent research activities show that these bigger particles have an influence on an early loosening mechanism. The two-dimensional measurement checks the quality of the surface of the hard component of the implant. The approach is to use an extended dark field method. The prosthesis is illuminated from various angles producing a sequence of images. These images are filtered to distinguish between reflections from scratches and direct reflections. A combination of the filtered images shows the scratches.

  11. Metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty - five- to 11-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nikolaou, Vassilios S; Petit, Alain; Debiparshad, Kevin; Huk, Olga L; Zukor, David J; Antoniou, John

    2011-01-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) total hip arthroplasty (THA) has been introduced in an attempt to reduce the wear rate and the consequent osteolysis around implants. The aim of this study was to present the intermediate to long-term clinical and radiological outcomes and to investigate the metal ion levels in the blood of patients who had undergone primary uncemented MoM THA in our institution. Between July 1997 and November 2003, 166 patients (193 hips), with a mean age of 50 years (range, 18-65 years), underwent primary MoM THA. Clinical data, radiographs, and blood samples were obtained at regular follow-up visits. Cobalt (Co), chromium (Cr), and molybdenum (Mo) ions were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) from the patient's whole blood. All patients were prospectively followed for a minimum of 5 years (mean, 7 years; range, 5-11 years). The mean Harris hip score (HHS) and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) activity score at the latest follow-up was 88 ± 11 and 7 ± 1.8 points, respectively. Thirteen hips have been revised. Ten acetabular components had early failure, due to factory manufacturing problems. All other implants have been found stable, with no signs of aseptic loosening. The probability of survival at 11 years, if the hips that were revised due to manufacturing problems were excluded, was 98.4%. The Co and Cr metal ion levels, after increasing significantly during the first 4 to 5 years post-surgery, remained stable, with a tendency to decrease thereafter, but not significantly. During the same follow-up period, Mo ion levels remained stable. In this 5-to-11 year follow-up study of MoM THA patients, excellent survivorship, with low complications rates, was found. Results of longer follow-up studies are necessary to clarify the possible long-term effects of metal ion release. PMID:22035490

  12. Results of Birmingham hip resurfacing at 12 to 15 years: a single-surgeon series.

    PubMed

    Daniel, J; Pradhan, C; Ziaee, H; Pynsent, P B; McMinn, D J W

    2014-10-01

    We report a 12- to 15-year implant survival assessment of a prospective single-surgeon series of Birmingham Hip Resurfacings (BHRs). The earliest 1000 consecutive BHRs including 288 women (335 hips) and 598 men (665 hips) of all ages and diagnoses with no exclusions were prospectively followed-up with postal questionnaires, of whom the first 402 BHRs (350 patients) also had clinical and radiological review. Mean follow-up was 13.7 years (12.3 to 15.3). In total, 59 patients (68 hips) died 0.7 to 12.6 years following surgery from unrelated causes. There were 38 revisions, 0.1 to 13.9 years (median 8.7) following operation, including 17 femoral failures (1.7%) and seven each of infections, soft-tissue reactions and other causes. With revision for any reason as the end-point Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed 97.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 96.9 to 97.9) and 95.8% (95% CI 95.1 to 96.5) survival at ten and 15 years, respectively. Radiological assessment showed 11 (3.5%) femoral and 13 (4.1%) acetabular radiolucencies which were not deemed failures and one radiological femoral failure (0.3%). Our study shows that the performance of the BHR continues to be good at 12- to 15-year follow-up. Men have better implant survival (98.0%; 95% CI 97.4 to 98.6) at 15 years than women (91.5%; 95% CI 89.8 to 93.2), and women < 60 years (90.5%; 95% CI 88.3 to 92.7) fare worse than others. Hip dysplasia and osteonecrosis are risk factors for failure. Patients under 50 years with osteoarthritis fare best (99.4%; 95% CI 98.8 to 100 survival at 15 years), with no failures in men in this group. PMID:25274912

  13. Autogenous hard palate mucosa: the ideal lower eyelid spacer?

    PubMed Central

    Wearne, M.; Sandy, C.; Rose, G.; Pitts, J; Collin, J

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Raising a displaced lower eyelid frequently involves recession of the lower eyelid retractors with interposition of a "spacer," and several materials for this purpose have been described. This study reviewed the results of autogenous palatal mucosa in the treatment of lower eyelid displacement, including assessment of any donor site morbidity.?METHODS—A retrospective case note review of consecutive patients treated at Moorfields Eye Hospital between 1993 and 1998. All patients underwent insertion of hard palate mucosa between the inferior border of the tarsus and the recessed conjunctiva and lower eyelid retractors. Parameters studied included the underlying diagnosis, measurements of lower lid displacement or retraction, related previous surgery, the experience of the operating surgeon, intraoperative and postoperative complications, surgical outcome, and length of follow up. The main outcome measure was the position of the lower eyelid relative to the globe in primary position of gaze.?RESULTS—102 lower eyelids of 68 patients were included and a satisfactory lid position was achieved in 87/102 (85%), with inadequate lengthening or significant recurrence of displacement occurring in 15 cases. Donor site haemorrhage requiring treatment in the early postoperative period occurred in seven patients (10%).?CONCLUSION—Autogenous hard palate mucosa is an effective eyelid spacer and provides good long term support for the lower eyelid. Donor site complications are the main disadvantage, but may be minimised by attention to meticulous surgical technique and appropriate postoperative management.?? PMID:11567962

  14. Subject-specific finite element model with an optical tracking system in total hip replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Miles, Brad; Kolos, Elizabeth; Walter, William L; Appleyard, Richard; Li, Qing; Chen, Youngang; Ruys, Andrew J

    2015-04-01

    Intra-operative peri-prosthetic femoral fractures are a significant concern in total hip arthroplasty and can occur at any time during surgery, with the highest incidence during implant insertion. This study combines subject-specific finite element analysis modeling with an optical tracking system to characterize the resultant strain in the bone and results of impaction during total hip replacement surgery. The use of ABG II femoral stem (Stryker Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ, USA) in the model yielded the following results. Hammer velocity was measured experimentally using a three-dimensional optical tracking system and these data were input into the finite element analysis model so that intra-operative loading scenario could be simulated. A quasi-static explicit simulation and a dynamic loading step using two implant-bone interface friction (0.1 and 0.4 friction coefficients) states were simulated. The maximum swing velocity of a mallet was experimentally measured at 1.5?m/s and occurred just before impaction of the hammer with implant introducer. Two friction states resulted in different results with the lower friction coefficient generating higher strains in the anterior regions of the model and higher displacement of the implant with respect to the femur when compared to the high friction state. PMID:25934257

  15. 2008 Otto Aufranc Award: component design and technique affect cement penetration in hip resurfacing.

    PubMed

    Beaulé, Paul E; Matar, Wadih Y; Poitras, Philippe; Smit, Kevin; May, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Either excessive or insufficient cement penetration within the femoral head after hip resurfacing influences the risk of femoral failures. However, the factors controlling cement penetration are not yet fully understood. We determined the effect of femoral component design and cementation technique on cement penetration. Six retrieved femoral heads were resurfaced for each implant (BHR, ASR, Conserve Plus, DuROM, ReCAP) using the manufacturers' recommendations for implantation. In addition, the BHR was implanted using the Conserve Plus high-viscosity cementation technique, "BHR/hvt," and vice versa for the Conserve, "Conserve/lvt." The average cement penetration was highest with BHR (65.62% +/- 15.16%) compared with ASR (12.25% +/- 5.12%), Conserve Plus(R) (19.43% +/- 5.28%), DuROM (17.73% +/- 3.96%), and ReCAP (26.09% +/- 5.20%). Cement penetration in BHR/hvt remained higher than all other implants equaling 36.7% +/- 6.6%. Greater femoral component design clearance correlated with cement mantle thickness. Femoral component design in hip resurfacing plays a major role in cement penetration. PMID:18923883

  16. 2008 Otto Aufranc Award: Component Design and Technique Affect Cement Penetration in Hip Resurfacing

    PubMed Central

    Matar, Wadih Y.; Poitras, Philippe; Smit, Kevin; May, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Either excessive or insufficient cement penetration within the femoral head after hip resurfacing influences the risk of femoral failures. However, the factors controlling cement penetration are not yet fully understood. We determined the effect of femoral component design and cementation technique on cement penetration. Six retrieved femoral heads were resurfaced for each implant (BHR®, ASR®, Conserve Plus®, DuROM®, ReCAP®) using the manufacturers’ recommendations for implantation. In addition, the BHR was implanted using the Conserve Plus® high-viscosity cementation technique, “BHR/hvt,” and vice versa for the Conserve, “Conserve/lvt.” The average cement penetration was highest with BHR (65.62% ± 15.16%) compared with ASR® (12.25% ± 5.12%), Conserve Plus® (19.43% ± 5.28%), DuROM® (17.73% ± 3.96%), and ReCAP® (26.09% ± 5.20%). Cement penetration in BHR/hvt remained higher than all other implants equaling 36.7% ± 6.6%. Greater femoral component design clearance correlated with cement mantle thickness. Femoral component design in hip resurfacing plays a major role in cement penetration. PMID:18923883

  17. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665... § 890.3665 Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. (a) Identification. A congenital hip dislocation abduction splint is a...

  18. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665... § 890.3665 Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. (a) Identification. A congenital hip dislocation abduction splint is a...

  19. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665... § 890.3665 Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. (a) Identification. A congenital hip dislocation abduction splint is a...

  20. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. 890.3665... § 890.3665 Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. (a) Identification. A congenital hip dislocation abduction splint is a...

  1. Posterior Hip Pain in an Athletic Population

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Rachel M.; Slabaugh, Mark A.; Grumet, Robert C.; Virkus, Walter W.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Nho, Shane J.

    2010-01-01

    Context: Posterior hip pain is a relatively uncommon but increasingly recognized complaint in the orthopaedic community. Patient complaints and presentations are often vague or nonspecific, making diagnosis and subsequent treatment decisions difficult. The purposes of this article are to review the anatomy and pathophysiology related to posterior hip pain in the athletic patient population. Evidence Acquisition: Data were collected through a thorough review of the literature via a MEDLINE search of all relevant articles between 1980 and 2010. Results: Many patients who complain of posterior hip pain actually have pain referred from another part of the body—notably, the lumbar spine or sacroiliac joint. Treatment options for posterior hip pain are typically nonoperative; however, surgery is warranted in some cases. Conclusions: Recent advancements in the understanding of hip anatomy, pathophysiology, and treatment options have enabled physicians to better diagnosis athletic hip injuries and select patients for appropriate treatment. PMID:23015944

  2. Retrograde peri-implantitis

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Jumshad B.; Shivakumar, B.; Sudarsan, Sabitha; Arun, K. V.; Kumar, T. S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Retrograde peri-implantitis constitutes an important cause for implant failure. Retrograde peri-implantitis may sometimes prove difficult to identify and hence institution of early treatment may not be possible. This paper presents a report of four cases of (the implant placed developing to) retrograde peri-implantitis. Three of these implants were successfully restored to their fully functional state while one was lost due to extensive damage. The paper highlights the importance of recognizing the etiopathogenic mechanisms, preoperative assessment, and a strong postoperative maintenance protocol to avoid retrograde peri-implant inflammation. PMID:20922082

  3. Effect of hip angle on anterior hip joint force during gait Cara L. Lewis a,

    E-print Network

    Moran, Daniel

    with the development of the hip pain yet all eight had a tear of the anterosuperior region of the acetabular labrum of the anterior hip joint (e.g. acetabular labrum). Running may be one example of an activity where low magnitude hip pain [5]. The exact mechanism by which running may lead to a tear in the acetabular labrum has

  4. Osteoporotic Hip and Spine Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Hip and spine fractures represent just a portion of the burden of osteoporosis; however, these fractures require treatment and often represent a major change in lifestyle for the patient and their family. The orthopedic surgeon plays a crucial role, not only in the treatment of these injuries but also providing guidance in prevention of future osteoporotic fractures. This review provides a brief epidemiology of the fractures, details the surgical techniques, and outlines the current treatment guidelines for orthopedic surgeons. PMID:26246944

  5. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. 888...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/ polyacetal cemented...

  6. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. 888...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/ polyacetal cemented...

  7. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. 888...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented...

  8. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. 888...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/ polyacetal cemented...

  9. 21 CFR 888.3380 - Hip joint femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. 888...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented prosthesis. ...femoral (hemi-hip) trunnion-bearing metal/polyacetal cemented...

  10. Do revision total hip augments provide appropriate modularity?

    PubMed Central

    Teeter, Matthew G.; Naudie, Douglas D. R.; Howard, James L.; McCalden, Richard W.; MacDonald, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Porous metal acetabular augments have become widely used to fill bony defects in patients undergoing revision total hip arthroplasty. The objective of this study was to determine whether the currently offered size range of the augments is appropriate for surgical needs. Methods We reviewed the cases of all patients at 1 centre with a porous revision shell, and when an augment was used we recorded the patient and implant characteristics. Results We reviewed the cases of 281 patients, and augments were used in 24. Augment diameter was skewed toward the small end (p < 0.001), although thickness was not (p = 0.05); 21 of 24 augments were those with the smallest 3 diameters and thicknesses. Conclusion Given the sizes used, the full range of inventory provided by the manufacturer may be unnecessary, as surgeons will likely attempt a larger shell before a larger augment. PMID:25621911

  11. Head-Neck Taper Corrosion in Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Hussenbocus, S.; Kosuge, D.; Solomon, L. B.; Howie, D. W.; Oskouei, R. H.

    2015-01-01

    Modularity at the head-neck junction of the femoral component in THA became popular as a design feature with advantages of decreasing implant inventory and allowing adjustment of leg length, offset, and soft tissue balancing through different head options. The introduction of a new modular interface to femoral stems that were previously monoblock, or nonmodular, comes with the potential for corrosion at the taper junction through mechanically assisted crevice corrosion. The incidence of revision hip arthroplasty is on the rise and along with improved wear properties of polyethylene and ceramic, use of larger femoral head sizes is becoming increasingly popular. Taper corrosion appears to be related to all of its geometric parameters, material combinations, and femoral head size. This review article discusses the pathogenesis, risk factors, clinical assessment, and management of taper corrosion at the head-neck junction. PMID:25954757

  12. Model-based cone-beam CT reconstruction for image-guided minimally invasive treatment of hip osteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Yoshito; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Murphy, R. J.; Kutzer, M. D.; Taylor, R. H.; Siewerdsen, J. H.; Armand, M.

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: Accurate assessment of the size and location of osteolytic regions is essential in minimally invasive hip revision surgery. Moreover, image-guided robotic intervention for osteolysis treatment requires precise localization of implant components. However, high density metallic implants in proximity to the hip make assessment by either 2D or 3D x-ray imaging difficult. This paper details the initial implementation and evaluation of an advanced model-based conebeam CT (CBCT) reconstruction algorithm to improve guidance and assessment of hip osteolysis treatment. Method: A model-based reconstruction approach called Known Component Reconstruction (KCR) was employed to obtain high-quality reconstruction of regions neighboring metallic implants. KCR incorporates knowledge about the implant shape and material to precisely reconstruct surrounding anatomy while simultaneously estimating implant position. A simulation study involving a phantom generated from a CBCT scan of a cadaveric hip was performed. Registration accuracy in KCR iterations was evaluated as translational and rotational error from the true registration. Improvement in image quality was evaluated using normalized cross correlation (NCC) in two regions of interest (ROIs) about the femoral and acetabular components. Result: The study showed significant improvement in image quality over conventional filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized-likelihood (PL) reconstruction. The NCC in the two ROIs improved from 0.74 and 0.81 (FBP) to 0.98 and 0.86 (PL) and >0.99 for KCR. The registration error was 0.01 mm in translation (0.02° in rotation) for the acetabular component and 0.01 mm (0.01° rotation) for the femoral component. Conclusions: Application of KCR to imaging hip osteolysis in the presence of the implant offers a promising step toward quantitative assessment in minimally invasive image-guided osteolysis treatment. The method improves image quality (metal artifact reduction), yields a precise registration estimate of the implant, and offers a means for reducing radiation dose in intraoperative CBCT.

  13. Cementless Hip Arthroplasty in Southern Iran, Midterm Outcome and Comparison of Two Designs

    PubMed Central

    Shahcheraghi, Gholam Hossein; Hashemi, Seyed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cementless hip prosthesis was designed to provide biologic fixation, without the use of cement. The second generation components have shown more reliable bone ingrowths and survival rates. We are reporting a midterm result of two designs of cementless prosthesis in a unique culture with different social habits and expectations. Methods: 52 primary cementless total hip arthroplasty in 42 patients with the mean age of 48.8 years were retrospectively studied. Two groups of prosthesis had been implanted: Harris-Galante II (HGII) in 15 and Versys-Trilogy (V-T) in 37 hips, both from Zimmer company. The patients were assessed clinically, radiographically and with Harris hip score, SF36, WOMAC, and MACTAR questionnaires, with 65 months (26-136) mean follow-up. Results: All the V-T prostheses had survived well. Eight of HG II were revised by the last follow-up in 19-102 months. All had undergone acetabular revision and 2 combined with femoral revision. Broken tines of HGII cups were seen in 4 radiographs. The 65 months overall survival was 96.2% for femoral and 84.6% for acetabular components. 90% had good or excellent Harris hip scores. The functional scores were poorer in the HG II group. Pain relief and improved walking were the two main patients’ expectations fulfilled in 97.6% and 92.8%, respectively. Conclusions: The outcome of cementless total hip arthroplasty (THA) is satisfactory and comparable with the literature based on the results of function and survival of this small comparative group. The use of HGII acetabular component should be abandoned. PMID:26379348

  14. Life Estimation of Hip Joint Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desai, C.; Hirani, H.; Chawla, A.

    2014-11-01

    Hip joint is one of the largest weight-bearing structures in the human body. In the event of a failure of the natural hip joint, it is replaced with an artificial hip joint, known as hip joint prosthesis. The design of hip joint prosthesis must be such so as to resist fatigue failure of hip joint stem as well as bone cement, and minimize wear caused by sliding present between its head and socket. In the present paper an attempt is made to consider both fatigue and wear effects simultaneously in estimating functional-life of the hip joint prosthesis. The finite element modeling of hip joint prosthesis using HyperMesh™ (version 9) has been reported. The static analysis (load due to the dead weight of the body) and dynamic analysis (load due to walking cycle) have been described. Fatigue life is estimated by using the S-N curve of individual materials. To account for progressive wear of hip joint prosthesis, Archard's wear law, modifications in socket geometry and dynamic analysis have been used in a sequential manner. Using such sequential programming reduction in peak stress has been observed with increase in wear. Finally life is estimated on the basis of socket wear.

  15. [Capsular retraction of the hip].

    PubMed

    Lequesne, M

    1993-01-01

    The diagnosis of capsular retraction of the hip is based on measurement of the capacity of the joint cavity on arthrography: it is reduced by at least 25% (normally 15 ml +/- 2 ml). The opaque area is only visible reduced in the more severe forms with a capacity of 5 ml or less. The arthrographic image is therefore not the key to the diagnosis. The major clinical sign is restriction of joint movement, especially in abduction and rotation. Secondary, "surgical" capsular retraction of the hip is the most common form. It is associated with synovial chondromatosis in more than one half of cases. The mean capacity is 6.8 ml (range: 0 to 12 ml). Irreducible flexion deformity and limitation of movement are of variable severity. Capsulectomy must be combined with joint debridement (systematically including the depth of the socket). "Medical" capsular retraction of the hip is the rarest form. It may be either idiopathic or secondary to diabetes or chronic barbiturate abuse. It is subacute and resolves within several months to two years. Fluoroscopic intra-articular injection of corticosteroids, repeated as required by pain, constitutes the best treatment. PMID:8333704

  16. Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer (IGS) length variation across the Drosophilinae (Diptera: Drosophilidae)

    E-print Network

    Markow, Therese

    - 1 - Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer (IGS) length variation across the Drosophilinae (Diptera The intergenic spacer of the ribosomal genes in eukaryotes (IGS) contains duplications of the core transcription of ribosomes in protein synthesis, cellular growth, and organismal development, ribosomal genes are highly

  17. Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells Qiao Yang a

    E-print Network

    Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells Qiao Yang January 2012 Available online 30 January 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Spacer Oxygen demand Scale up a b s t r a c t Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require more compact reactor designs

  18. Thin Dielectric Spacer for the Monolithic Integration of Bulk Germanium or

    E-print Network

    Miller, David A. B.

    Thin Dielectric Spacer for the Monolithic Integration of Bulk Germanium or Germanium Quantum Wells germanium (Ge) or Ge quantum wells with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) waveguides through selective epitaxy process to realize sub-30-nm spacers. Index Terms: Integrated optoelectronics, germanium, quantum wells

  19. Complete Nanowire Crossbar Framework Optimized for the Multi-Spacer Patterning Technique

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Complete Nanowire Crossbar Framework Optimized for the Multi-Spacer Patterning Technique M. Haykel.leblebici@epfl.ch Giovanni De Micheli EPF Lausanne, Switzerland giovanni.demicheli@epfl.ch ABSTRACT Nanowire crossbar the utilization of the multi-spacer patterning technique to fabricate nanowire crossbars with a high cross

  20. Decoding Nanowire Arrays Fabricated with the Multi-Spacer Patterning Technique

    E-print Network

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Decoding Nanowire Arrays Fabricated with the Multi-Spacer Patterning Technique M. Haykel Ben Jamaa, Switzerland haykel.benjamaa@epfl.ch ABSTRACT Silicon nanowires are a promising solution to address the increas and encoding scheme for decoding nanowires fabri- cated with the Multi-Spacer-Patterning Technique (MSPT

  1. Three-dimensional microstructuring of carbon by thermoplastic spacer evaporation during pyrolysis

    E-print Network

    Chung, Deborah D.L.

    Three-dimensional microstructuring of carbon by thermoplastic spacer evaporation during pyrolysis pyrolysis of an epoxy-based film that coated the spacer and parts of the sub- strate. Fillers were chosen to reduce the shrinkage during pyrolysis and to increase the electrical conductivity. Multiwalled carbon

  2. Altered palmitoylation and neuropathological deficits in mice lacking HIP14

    PubMed Central

    Singaraja, Roshni R.; Huang, Kun; Sanders, Shaun S.; Milnerwood, Austen J.; Hines, Rochelle; Lerch, Jason P.; Franciosi, Sonia; Drisdel, Renaldo C.; Vaid, Kuljeet; Young, Fiona B.; Doty, Crystal; Wan, Junmei; Bissada, Nagat; Henkelman, R. Mark; Green, William N.; Davis, Nicholas G.; Raymond, Lynn A.; Hayden, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    Huntingtin interacting protein 14 (HIP14, ZDHHC17) is a huntingtin (HTT) interacting protein with palmitoyl transferase activity. In order to interrogate the function of Hip14, we generated mice with disruption in their Hip14 gene. Hip14?/? mice displayed behavioral, biochemical and neuropathological defects that are reminiscent of Huntington disease (HD). Palmitoylation of other HIP14 substrates, but not Htt, was reduced in the Hip14?/? mice. Hip14 is dysfunctional in the presence of mutant htt in the YAC128 mouse model of HD, suggesting that altered palmitoylation mediated by HIP14 may contribute to HD. PMID:21775500

  3. Studies of host response to orthopedic implants and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Santavirta, S; Takagi, M; Gómez-Barrena, E; Nevalainen, J; Lassus, J; Salo, J; Konttinen, Y T

    1999-01-01

    The use of implanted biomaterials in orthopedic surgery has increased rapidly during the past two decades. Total joint replacement of the hip or knee joint has become common treatment; at the same time, an increasing number of fractures are treated with osteosynthesis. The original Charnley low-friction arthroplasty of the hip is still widely used and gives in large series excellent results. Aseptic loosening of this arthroplasty has been thought to be due to wear debris of the methylmethacrylate used for fixation of the implants, or to debris generated from wear of the polyethylene socket. To date, many different materials have been tried in order to reduce wear and generation of macrophage irritating submicron sized particles, or to provide more biocompatible components. However, trials to improve the methylmethacrylate cement or to invent better polyethylenes have often failed. Diamond coating of the metallic components seems promising: there is less wear and diamond is very biocompatible in bulk and small particulate form. Biodegradable implants have also been found useful in treating fractures. Bioactive bioabsorbable materials may also make possible a tissue engineering approach and can be used as carriers for selected drugs and cytokines. Because many promising materials and designs have failed in clinical use, extensive theoretical and experimental testing is mandatory before introducing new materials and implants in a clinical setting. PMID:10537589

  4. The Internal Transcribed Spacer Region of Belonolaimus (Nemata: Belonolaimidae)

    PubMed Central

    Cherry, T.; Szalanski, A. L.; Todd, T. C.; Powers, T. O.

    1997-01-01

    Belonolaimus isolates from six U.S. states were compared by restriction endonuclease digestion of amplified first internal transcribed spacer region (ITS1) of the nuclear ribosomal genes. Seven restriction enzymes were selected for evaluation based on restriction sites inferred from the nucleotide sequence of a South Carolina Belonolaimus isolate. Amplified product size from individuals of each isolate was approximately 700 bp. All Midwestern isolates gave distinct restriction digestion patterns. Isolates identified morphologically as Belonolaimus longicaudatus from Florida, South Carolina, and Palm Springs, California, were identical for ITS1 restriction patterns. The correlation between ITS1 restriction patterns and the distribution of B. longicaudatus isolates suggest that the California isolate is a relatively recent introduction into the state. PMID:19274130

  5. Tribolayer Formation in a Metal-on-Metal (MoM) Hip Joint: An Electrochemical Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, MT; Nagelli, C; Pourzal, R; Fischer, A; Laurent, MP; Jacobs, JJ; Wimmer, MA

    2013-01-01

    The demand for total hip replacement (THR) surgery is increasing in the younger population due to faster rehabilitation and more complete restoration of function. Up to 2009, metal-on-metal (MoM) hip joint bearings were a popular choice due to their design flexibility, post-operative stability and relatively low wear rates. The main wear mechanisms that occur along the bearing surface of MoM joints are tribochemical reactions that deposit a mixture of wear debris, metal ions and organic matrix of decomposed proteins known as a tribolayer. No in-depth electrochemical studies have been reported on the structure and characteristics of this tribolayer or about the parameters involved in its formation. In this study, we conducted an electrochemical investigation of different surfaces (bulk-like: control, nano-crystalline: new implant and tribolayer surface: retrieved implant) made out of two commonly used hip CoCrMo alloys (high-carbon and low-carbon). As per ASTM standard, cyclic polarization tests and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests were conducted. The results obtained from electrochemical parameters for different surfaces clearly indicated a reduction in corrosion for the tribolayer surface (Icorr: 0.76 ?A/cm2). Further, polarization resistance (Rp:2.39±0.60M?/cm2) and capacitance (Cdl:15.20±0.75 ?F/cm2) indicated variation in corrosion kinetics for the tribolayer surface, that attributed to its structure and stability in a simulated body environment. PMID:24099949

  6. Accuracy of Computer-assisted Navigation for Femoral Head Resurfacing Decreases in Hips with Abnormal Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Malak, Sharif; Anderson, Iain A.

    2009-01-01

    Computer-assisted navigation systems for hip resurfacing arthroplasty are designed to minimize the chance of implant malposition. However, there is little evidence computer navigation is useful in the presence of anatomical deformity. We therefore determined the accuracy of an image-free resurfacing hip arthroplasty navigation system in the presence of a pistol grip deformity of the head and femoral neck junction and of a slipped upper femoral epiphysis deformity. We constructed an artificial phantom leg from machined aluminum with a simulated hip and knee. The frontal and lateral plane implant-shaft angles for the guide wire of the femoral component reamer were calculated with the computer navigation system and with an electronic caliper combined with micro-CT. There was a consistent disagreement between the navigation system and our measurement system in both the frontal plane and lateral plane with the pistol grip deformity. We found close agreement only for the frontal plane angle calculation in the presence of the slipped upper femoral epiphysis deformity, but calculation of femoral head size was inaccurate. The use of image-free navigation for the positioning of the femoral component appears questionable in these settings. PMID:19421830

  7. An analysis of the head-neck taper interface in retrieved hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Lieberman, J R; Rimnac, C M; Garvin, K L; Klein, R W; Salvati, E A

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mating surfaces of femoral heads and stems for evidence of corrosion, and to evaluate the quality of the taper lock of modular hip prostheses. Forty-eight implants with three different designs were evaluated. Group I (26 implants) had a cobalt alloy head and cobalt alloy stem. Group II (ten implants) had a cobalt alloy head and a titanium stem. Group III (12 implants) had a cobalt alloy head with a titanium stem that was coupled in the factory via a shrink fit. The implants were examined under light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. In cases where the femoral head was still assembled to the stem, pull-off testing was performed using an MTS machine. The average failure load for the pull-off tests for each group of prostheses was as follows: Group I (nine implants) 3,003 N +/- 623 N; Group II (six implants) 4453 N +/- 570 N; and Group III (12 implants) 6859 N +/- 3525 N. The Group III implants required a significantly greater pull-off force than those in Group I (p = 0.002). There was no evidence of corrosion in Group I. In Group II, crevice corrosion was noted in one taper interface and there was fretting in two other tapers. No corrosion was noted in Group III. Improving the tolerances of the mating surfaces may be a key factor in preventing corrosion. This would not only increase the forces that are necessary to debond the matting surfaces, but also decrease corrosion by reducing micromotion and fluid at the taper interface. PMID:8131330

  8. Single electron transistor with P-type sidewall spacer gates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Han; Li, Dong Hua; Lee, Joung-Eob; Kang, Kwon-Chil; Kim, Kyungwan; Park, Byung-Gook

    2011-07-01

    A single-electron transistor (SET) is one of the promising solutions to overcome the scaling limit of the Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor (MOSFET). Up to now, various kinds of SETs are being proposed and SETs with a dual gate (DG) structure using an electrical potential barrier have been demonstrated for room temperature operation. To operate DG-SETs, however, extra bias of side gates is necessary. It causes new problems that the electrode for side gates and the extra bias for electrical barrier increase the complexity in circuit design and operation power consumption, respectively. For the reason, a new mechanism using work function (WF) difference is applied to operate a SET at room temperature by three electrodes. Its structure consists of an undoped active region, a control gate, n-doped source/drain electrodes, and metal/silicide or p-type silicon side gates, and a SET with metal/silicide gates or p-type silicon gates forms tunnel barriers induced by work function between an undoped channel and grounded side gates. Via simulation, the effectiveness of the new mechanism is confirmed through various silicide materials that have different WF values. Furthermore, by considering the realistic conditions of the fabrication process, SET with p-type sidewall spacer gates was designed, and its brief fabrication process was introduced. The characteristics of its electrical barrier and the controllability of its control gate were also confirmed via simulation. Finally, a single-hole transistor with n-type sidewall spacer gates was designed. PMID:22121580

  9. Modified Open-door Laminoplasty Using Hydroxyapatite Spacers and Miniplates

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Sung-Won; Kim, Bum-Joon; Choi, Jong-Il; Ha, Sung-Kon; Kim, Sang-Dae; Lim, Dong-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cervical laminoplasty has been widely accepted as one of the major treatments for cervical myelopathy and various modifications and supplementary procedures have been devised to achieve both proper decompression and stability of the cervical spine. We present the retrospectively analyzed results of a modified unilateral open-door laminoplasty using hydroxyapatite (HA) spacers and malleable titanium miniplates. Methods From June 2008 to May 2012, among patients diagnosed with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, the patients who received laminoplasty were reviewed. Clinical outcome was assessed using Frankel grade and Japanese Orthopaedic Association score. The radiologic parameters were obtained from plain films, 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance images. Results A total of 125 cervical laminae were operated in 38 patients. 11 patients received 4-level laminoplasty and 27 patients received 3-level laminoplasty. Postoperatively, the mean Frankel grade and JOA score were significantly improved from 3.97 to 4.55 and from 12.76 to 14.63, respectively (p<0.001). Radiologically, cervical curvature was worsened from 19.09 to 15.60 (p=0.025). The percentage of range of motion preservation was 73.32±22.39%. The axial dimension of the operated spinal canal was increased from 1.75 to 2.70 cm2 (p<0.001). Conclusion In the presenting study, unilateral open-door laminoplasty using HA spacers and miniplates appears to be a safe, rapid and easy procedure to obtain an immediate and rigid stabilization of the posterior elements of the cervical spine. This modified laminoplasty method showed effective expansion of the spinal canal and favorable clinical outcomes. PMID:25346767

  10. Missed low-grade infection in suspected aseptic loosening has no consequences for the survival of total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Boot, Willemijn; Moojen, Dirk Jan F; Visser, Els; Lehr, A Mechteld; De Windt, Tommy S; Van Hellemondt, Gijs; Geurts, Jan; Tulp, Niek J A; Schreurs, B Wim; Burger, Bart J; Dhert, Wouter J A; Gawlitta, Debby; Vogely, H Charles

    2015-12-01

    Background and purpose - Aseptic loosening and infection are 2 of the most common causes of revision of hip implants. Antibiotic prophylaxis reduces not only the rate of revision due to infection but also the rate of revision due to aseptic loosening. This suggests under-diagnosis of infections in patients with presumed aseptic loosening and indicates that current diagnostic tools are suboptimal. In a previous multicenter study on 176 patients undergoing revision of a total hip arthroplasty due to presumed aseptic loosening, optimized diagnostics revealed that 4-13% of the patients had a low-grade infection. These infections were not treated as such, and in the current follow-up study the effect on mid- to long-term implant survival was investigated. Patients and methods - Patients were sent a 2-part questionnaire. Part A requested information about possible re-revisions of their total hip arthroplasty. Part B consisted of 3 patient-related outcome measure questionnaires (EQ5D, Oxford hip score, and visual analog scale for pain). Additional information was retrieved from the medical records. The group of patients found to have a low-grade infection was compared to those with aseptic loosening. Results - 173 of 176 patients from the original study were included. In the follow-up time between the revision surgery and the current study (mean 7.5 years), 31 patients had died. No statistically significant difference in the number of re-revisions was found between the infection group (2 out of 21) and the aseptic loosening group (13 out of 152); nor was there any significant difference in the time to re-revision. Quality of life, function, and pain were similar between the groups, but only 99 (57%) of the patients returned part B. Interpretation - Under-diagnosis of low-grade infection in conjunction with presumed aseptic revision of total hip arthroplasty may not affect implant survival. PMID:26364842

  11. The influence of obesity on early outcomes in primary hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Michalka, Patrick K R; Khan, Riaz J K; Scaddan, Matthew C; Haebich, Samantha; Chirodian, Nish; Wimhurst, James A

    2012-03-01

    Obesity is considered an independent risk factor for adverse outcome after arthroplasty surgery. Data on 191 consecutive total hip arthroplasties were prospectively collected. Body mass index (BMI) was calculated for each patient and grouped into nonobese (BMI <30 kg/m(2)), obese (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), and morbidly obese (BMI ?35 kg/m(2)). Primary outcomes included functional improvement (Oxford hip score, 6-minute walk test and Short Form-12 Health Survey general health questionnaire) and postoperative complications. Subgroup analysis of surgeons' overall perception of operative technical difficulty was also performed. This study shows that total hip arthroplasties in obese patients were perceived, by the surgeon, to be significantly more difficult. However, this did not translate to an increased risk of complications, operation time, or blood loss, nor suboptimal implant placement. In addition, our results suggest that obese patients gain similar benefit from hip arthroplasty as do nonobese patients, but morbidly obese patients have significantly worse 6-minute walk test scores at 6 weeks. PMID:21802250

  12. Hip Joint Replacement Using Monofilament Polypropylene Surgical Mesh: An Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Bia?ecki, Jacek; Klimowicz-Bodys, Ma?gorzata Dorota; Wierzcho?, Edward; Ko?omecki, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint dysplasia is a deformation of the articular elements (pelvic acetabulum, head of the femur, and/or ligament of the head of the femur) leading to laxity of the hip components and dislocation of the femoral head from the pelvic acetabulum. Diagnosis is based on symptoms observed during clinical and radiological examinations. There are two treatment options: conservative and surgical. The classic surgical procedures are juvenile pubic symphysiodesis (JPS), triple pelvic osteotomy (TPO), total hip replacement (THR), and femoral head and neck resection (FHNE). The aim of this experiment was to present an original technique of filling the acetabulum with a polypropylene implant, resting the femoral neck directly on the mesh. The experiment was performed on eight sheep. The clinical value of the new surgical technique was evaluated using clinical, radiological, and histological methods. This technique helps decrease the loss of limb length by supporting the femoral neck on the mesh equivalent to the femoral head. It also reduces joint pain and leads to the formation of stable and mobile pseudarthrosis. The mesh manifested osteoprotective properties and enabled the formation of a stiff-elastic connection within the hip joint. The method is very cost-effective and the technique itself is simple to perform. PMID:24987672

  13. Joint issues – conflicts of interest, the ASR hip and suggestions for managing surgical conflicts of interest

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest in medicine and surgery are troubling because they have the capacity to skew decision making in ways that might be detrimental to patient care and well-being. The recent case of the Articular Surface Replacement (ASR) hip provides a vivid illustration of the harmful effects of conflicts of interest in surgery. Discussion We identify financial and nonfinancial conflicts of interest experienced by surgeons, hospitals and regulators in the ASR case. These conflicts may have impacted surgical advice, decision-making and evidence gathering with respect to the ASR prosthesis, and contributed to the significant harms experienced by patients in whom the hip was implanted. Drawing on this case we explore shortcomings in the standard responses to conflicts of interest – disclosure and recusal. We argue disclosure is necessary but by no means sufficient to address conflicts of interest. Using the concept of recusal we develop remedies including second opinions and third party consent which may be effective in mitigating conflicts, but their implementation introduces new challenges. Summary Deployment of the ASR hip is a case of surgical innovation gone wrong. As we show, there were multiple conflicts of interest involved in the introduction of the ASR hip into practice and subsequent attempts to gloss over the mounting body of evidence about its lack of safety and effectiveness. Conflicts of interest in surgery are often not well managed. We suggest strategies in this paper which can minimise the conflicts of interest associated with surgical innovation. PMID:25128372

  14. Biomechanics of the Hip Capsule and Capsule Management Strategies in Hip Arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nepple, Jeffrey J; Smith, Matthew V

    2015-12-01

    Recent advances in our understanding of the function of the hip capsule have clarified its importance to normal hip function and kinematics. The iliofemoral ligament is the primary stabilizing structure for controlling anterior translation and external rotation of the hip, and is violated by the arthroscopic interportal capsulotomy. Microinstability of the hip occurring after surgical trauma remains a poorly defined clinical entity. In certain at-risk populations, capsular repair should be considered as part of an arthroscopic hip procedure to achieve optimal outcomes and avoid iatrogenic instability (dislocation or microinstability). Despite a lack of conclusive evidence-based indications, we recommend capsular repair in the settings of borderline hip dysplasia (or dysplastic variants such as increased femoral anteversion), hip hypermobility, connective tissue disorders, and traumatic or atraumatic instability. With careful attention to arthroscopic capsular management, adequate exposure can be achieved and reproducibly allow for an effective capsular repair when indicated. PMID:26524549

  15. Ion implantation of surgical Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.M.; Buchanan, R.A.

    1984-09-01

    Ion implantation of N into surgical Ti-6Al-4V alloy dramatically improved the corrosive-wear performance of the alloy. Experiments made use of a special apparatus designed to simulate pertinent chemical and mechanical aspects of the sliding interface between the alloy head and the polyethylene cup of an artificial hip joint and, at the same time, provide an electrochemical measure of wear rate. Profilometer measurements and Rutherford backscattering experiments in conjunction with ion implanted markers were also used to assess wear. All evidence points to a marked improvement in wear rate due to the ion implantation treatment. Samples and wear product were analyzed by ion backscattering of He and H ions. A speculative reason for the improvement is discussed. 21 references, 7 figures.

  16. Pseudo-dynamic analysis of a cemented hip arthroplasty using a force method based on the Newmark algorithm.

    PubMed

    Ramos, A; Talaia, P; Queirós de Melo, F J

    2016-01-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop an approached model to study dynamic behavior and prediction of the stress distribution in an in vitro Charnley cemented hip arthroplasty. An alternative version of the described pseudo-dynamic procedure is proposed by using the time integration Newmark algorithm. An internal restoring force vector is numerically calculated from the displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors. A numerical model of hip replacement was developed to analyze the deformation of a dynamically stressed structure for all time steps. The experimental measurement of resulting internal forces generated in the structure (internal restoring force vector) is the second fundamental step of the pseudo-dynamic procedure. These data (as a feedback) are used by the time integration algorithm, which allows updating of the structure's shape for the next displacement, velocity, and acceleration vectors. In the field of Biomechanics, the potentialities of this method contribute to the determination of a dynamically equivalent in vitro stress field of a cemented hip prosthesis; implant fitted in patients with a normal mobility or practice sports. Consequences of the stress distribution in the implant zone that underwent cyclic fatigue loads were also discussed by using a finite element model. Application of this method in Biomechanics appears as a useful tool in the approximate stress field characterization of the peak stress state. Results show a peak value around two times the static situation, more for making possible the prediction of future damage and a programed clinical examination in patients using hip prosthesis. PMID:25483822

  17. Metal on metal total hip arthroplasty and a large groin mass: Not always adverse reaction to metallic debris

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Harry; Magnussen, Alex; Sharma, Aadhar; Skinner, John

    2014-01-01

    Due to their improved wear rates, Metal-on-metal bearings have been increasingly used in the past decade by orthopaedic surgeons carrying out total hip arthroplasty. However there is increasing evidence that there are significant complications associated with such implants. One well documented complication is that of metallic debris leading to pseudotumour formation, however there is less known about associations with other tumours within the pelvis. We present two cases where an intra-pelvic mass in patients with metal-on-metal implants were diagnosed as being of a different aetiology. This highlights the need for careful assessment of such patients in order to guide appropriate management. PMID:25560054

  18. Influence of head size on the development of metallic wear and on the characteristics of carbon layers in metal-on-metal hip joints

    PubMed Central

    Sprecher, Christoph M; Wimmer, Markus A; Milz, Stefan; Taeger, Georg

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Particles originating from the articulating surfaces of hip endoprostheses often induce an inflammatory response, which can be related to implant failure. We therefore analyzed the metal content in capsular tissue from 44 McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prostheses (with 3 different head sizes) and we also analyzed the morphological structure of layers located on articulating surfaces. Methods Atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) was used to analyze the metal content in capsular tissue. Visually detectable carbon layers located on the articulating surfaces were evaluated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive Xray spectroscopy (EDX), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results Metallic debris was detected in all capsular tissue samples but no statistically significant differences in metal content were found in relation to implant head size. The morphological characteristics of the different layer zones allowed an exact analysis of contact and non-contact areas. Furthermore, surface layers appear to have a protective function because they can prevent sharp-edged particles from damaging the prostheses surface. Interpretation The implant head size does not appear to influence the amount of metallic debris. The layers obviously act like a lubricating agent because the protection function does not occur in regions without layers where the metal surface often shows numerous scratches. As layers are not generated immediately after the implantation of hip prostheses, these findings may at least partially explain the high amount of wear early after implantation. PMID:19421914

  19. Sonography of Sports Injuries of the Hip

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, Aaron R. L.; Seidenberg, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Sports-related injuries of the hip are a common complaint of both competitive and recreational athletes of all ages. The anatomic and biomechanical complexity of the hip region often cause diagnostic uncertainty for the clinicians evaluating these injuries. Therefore, obtaining additional diagnostic information is often crucial for providing injured athletes with a prompt and accurate diagnosis so they can return to activity as soon as possible. Musculoskeletal ultrasound is becoming increasingly important in evaluating and treating sports-related injuries of the hip. Evidence Acquisition: The PubMed database was searched in May of 2013 for English-language articles pertaining to sonography of sports injuries of the hip using the following keywords in various combinations: musculoskeletal, ultrasound, hip, hip sonography, and sports. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: Musculoskeletal ultrasound is currently being used for both diagnosis and treatment in a wide range of acute and chronic conditions affecting the hip, including tendinosis, tendon/muscle strains, ligamentous sprains, enthesopathies, growth plate injuries, fractures, bursitis, effusions, synovitis, labral tears, and snapping hip. Therapeutically, it is used to guide injections, aspirations, and biopsies. Conclusion: Musculoskeletal ultrasound use is expanding and will likely continue to do so as more clinicians realize its capabilities. Characteristics, including accessibility, portability, noninvasiveness, dynamic examination, power Doppler examination, and low cost highlight the potential of ultrasound. PMID:25364486

  20. Process for HIP canning of composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhas, John J. (inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A single step is relied on in the canning process for hot isostatic pressing (HIP) metallurgy composites. The composites are made from arc sprayed and plasma sprayed monotape. The HIP can is of compatible refractory metal and is sealed at high vacuum and temperature. This eliminates outgassing during hot isostatic pressing.

  1. Manufacturing of Medical Implants by Combination of Selective Laser Melting and Laser Ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallmann, S.; Glockner, P.; Daniel, C.; Seyda, V.; Emmelmann, C.

    2015-09-01

    The perfect fit of hip stem prostheses is supposed to have positive effects on their lifetime performance. Moreover, the ingrowth of tissue into the surface of the implant has to be assured to create a firm and load bearing contact. For the manufacturing of customized hip stem prostheses, the technology of Selective Laser Melting has shown promising results. Poor surface quality, however, makes it necessary to finish up the part by e.g., sand blasting or polishing. With the use of laser ablation for post-processing, reproducible and functionalized surface morphologies might be achievable. Hence, with the motive to produce customized hip stem prostheses, a combined process chain for both mentioned laser technologies is developed. It is examined what type of surface should be produced at which part of the process chain. The produced implants should contain the demanded final surface characteristics without any conventional post-processing. Slight advantages for the Selective Laser Melting regarding the accuracy for different geometrical structures of 400 ?m depth were observed. However, an overall improvement of surface quality after the laser ablation process in terms of osseointegration could be achieved. A complete laser based production of customized hip stem implants is found to be with good prospects.

  2. Plasma-sprayed coating of hydroxyapatite on metal implants--a review.

    PubMed

    Talib, R J; Toff, M R M

    2004-05-01

    Metal implants such as titanium, stainless steel and Co-Cr-Mo are used for load bearing purposes such as hip joint prostheses, fixing plates and dental root implants. For practical application, plasma-sprayed coatings of hydroxyapatite (HA) on metal implants are applied to promote early formation of strong bonds between metal implant and living bone. Plasma spray coating involves heating of HA material to a semi-molten or molten state and then propels its to a metal substrate. The plasma flame temperature is in the range of 6,000 degrees C to 16,000 degrees C but the surface temperature of the substrate rarely exceeds 150 degrees C. The HA materials are feed into the spray gun in the form of powders. Furthermore, this paper will discuss the processes of plasma-sprayed coating of HA on various types of metal implants. PMID:15468864

  3. Antibiotic-impregnated articulating cement spacer for infected total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Parag; Ranjan, Rajeev; Bandyopadhyay, Utpal; Chouksey, Shiv; Mitra, SR; Gupta, Samar K

    2011-01-01

    Background: Standard treatment of chronic infected total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is a two-stage revision, the first step being placement of an antibiotic-impregnated cement spacer. Here we describe the results of a new technique (modification of the Goldstien's technique) for intraoperative manufacture of a customized articulating spacer at minimal cost and with relatively good conformity and longevity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six infected knees underwent this procedure from June 2002 to May 2007. The technique consists of using the freshened femur and tibia interface as molds wrapped in a tin foil for manufacturing the two components of the spacer with antibiotic-impregnated methyl methycrylate cement. We used the spacer and the femoral component of the trial set of a TKA system to mold them to perfect articulation. We also reinforced the spacer with a K-wire scaffold to prevent fracture of the cement mantle in the last 21 cases. Results: All 36 knees showed excellent results in terms of infection control, mobility, and stability. There was significant improvement in the WOMAC and Knee Society Scores (20 and 39 points respectively). There were two fractures of the spacers in the initial 15 cases that did not have K-wire scaffolding but none in the last 21 that had reinforcement. Conclusion: This technique provides a more conforming spacer, with good range of motion and stability. The reinforcement helps in preventing the fracture of the cement mantle and is cost effective. PMID:22144747

  4. Conversion total hip arthroplasty: Primary or revision total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Baghoolizadeh, Mahta

    2015-11-18

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasingly common procedure among elderly individuals. Although conversion THA is currently bundled in a diagnosis related group (DRG) with primary THA, there is a lack of literature supporting this classification and it has yet to be identified whether conversion THA better resembles primary or revision THA. This editorial analyzed the intraoperative and postoperative factors and functional outcomes following conversion THA, primary THA, and revision THA to understand whether the characteristics of conversion THA resemble one procedure or the other, or are possibly somewhere in between. The analysis revealed that conversion THA requires more resources both intraoperatively and postoperatively than primary THA. Furthermore, patients undergoing conversion THA present with poorer functional outcomes in the long run. Patients undergoing conversion THA better resemble revision THA patients than primary THA patients. As such, patients undergoing conversion THA should not be likened to patients undergoing primary THA when determining risk stratification and reimbursement rates. Conversion THA procedures should be planned accordingly with proper anticipation of the greater needs both in the operating room, and for in-patient and follow-up care. We suggest that conversion THA be reclassified in the same DRG with revision THA as opposed to primary THA as a step towards better allocation of healthcare resources for conversion hip arthroplasties. PMID:26601055

  5. Conversion total hip arthroplasty: Primary or revision total hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzkopf, Ran; Baghoolizadeh, Mahta

    2015-01-01

    Total hip arthroplasty (THA) is an increasingly common procedure among elderly individuals. Although conversion THA is currently bundled in a diagnosis related group (DRG) with primary THA, there is a lack of literature supporting this classification and it has yet to be identified whether conversion THA better resembles primary or revision THA. This editorial analyzed the intraoperative and postoperative factors and functional outcomes following conversion THA, primary THA, and revision THA to understand whether the characteristics of conversion THA resemble one procedure or the other, or are possibly somewhere in between. The analysis revealed that conversion THA requires more resources both intraoperatively and postoperatively than primary THA. Furthermore, patients undergoing conversion THA present with poorer functional outcomes in the long run. Patients undergoing conversion THA better resemble revision THA patients than primary THA patients. As such, patients undergoing conversion THA should not be likened to patients undergoing primary THA when determining risk stratification and reimbursement rates. Conversion THA procedures should be planned accordingly with proper anticipation of the greater needs both in the operating room, and for in-patient and follow-up care. We suggest that conversion THA be reclassified in the same DRG with revision THA as opposed to primary THA as a step towards better allocation of healthcare resources for conversion hip arthroplasties. PMID:26601055

  6. HIP Joining of Cemented Carbides

    SciTech Connect

    Derby, B.; Miodownik, M.

    1999-04-01

    Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) is investigated as a technique for joining the cermet WC-15% Co to itself. Encapsulation of the specimens prior to HIPing was carried out using steel encapsulation, glass encapsulation and self encapsulation. The bonds were evaluated using a four point bend method. It is shown that the glass and steel encapsulation methods have a number of inherent problems which make them inappropriate for near net shape processing. In contrast the novel self encapsulation method, described for the first time in this communication, is both simple and effective, producing joined material with bulk strength. The concept of self encapsulation is potentially widely applicable for joining composite materials.

  7. An evolutionary preserved intergenic spacer in gadiform mitogenomes generates a long noncoding RNA

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vertebrate mitogenomes are economically organized and usually lack intergenic sequences other than the control region. Intergenic spacers located between the tRNAThr and tRNAPro genes (“T-P spacers”) have been observed in several taxa, including gadiform species, but information about their biological roles and putative functions is still lacking. Results Sequence characterization of the complete European hake Merluccius merluccius mitogenome identified a complex T-P spacer ranging in size from 223–532 bp. Further analyses of 32 gadiform species, representing 8 families and 28 genera, revealed the evolutionary preserved presence of T-P spacers across all taxa. Molecular complexity of the T-P spacers was found to be coherent with the phylogenetic relationships, supporting a common ancestral origin and gain of function during codfish evolution. Intraspecific variation of T-P spacer sequences was assessed in 225 Atlantic cod specimens and revealed 26 haplotypes. Pyrosequencing data representing the mito-transcriptome poly (A) fraction in Atlantic cod identified an abundant H-strand specific long noncoding RNA of about 375 nt. The T-P spacer corresponded to the 5’ part of this transcript, which terminated within the control region in a tail-to-tail configuration with the L-strand specific transcript (the 7S RNA). Conclusions The T-P spacer is inferred to be evolutionary preserved in gadiform mitogenomes due to gain of function through a long noncoding RNA. We suggest that the T-P spacer adds stability to the H-strand specific long noncoding RNA by forming stable hairpin structures and additional protein binding sites. PMID:25145347

  8. Fast growing pseudotumour in a hairdresser after metal-on-metal hip resurfacing: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cadossi, M; Chiarello, E; Savarino, L; Mazzotti, A; Tedesco, G; Greco, M; Giannini, S

    2014-01-01

    A 44-year-old female hairdresser who underwent metal-on-metal hip resurfacing (MOMHR) for hip osteoarthritis developed a benign pelvic pseudotumour. Elevated levels of chromium and cobalt ions were detected in the blood. Patch testing after pseudotumor formation, showed positive skin reactions to cobalt and nickel. Marked hypereosinophilia was noted, as well as the presence of eosinophils in the pseudotumor mass. A revision to a ceramic-on-ceramic implant was performed. Radiographs showed no implant loosening or bone resorption. We hypothesized that a steep cup positioning as well as hypersensitivity response to the metal nanoparticles and ion release may have induced pseudotumour development. Currently there is no evidence that negative patch testing reduces the probability to develop an adverse reaction to metal debris therefore we suggest to carefully investigate patient medical history regarding occupation exposure and daily contact with jewellery, beauty and cleaning products before implanting MOMHR. The main challenge is to identify a sensitive patient candidate to MOMHR never suspected to be. PMID:24825038

  9. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B.; Dimitrov, Dimitar M.; van Staden, Anton D.; Oosthuizen, Gert A.; Dicks, Leon M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  10. Improve the performance of coated cemented hip stem through the advanced composite materials.

    PubMed

    Hedia, H S; Fouda, N

    2015-01-01

    Design of hip joint implant using functionally graded material (FGM) (advanced composite material) has been used before through few researches. It gives great results regarding the stress distribution along the implant and bone interfaces. However, coating of orthopaedic implants has been widely investigated through many researches. The effect of using advanced composite stem material, which mean by functionally graded stem material, in the total hip replacement coated with the most common coated materials has not been studied yet. Therefore, this study investigates the effect of utilizing these two concepts together; FGM and coating, in designing new stem material. It is concluded that the optimal FGM cemented stem is consisting from titanium at the upper stem layers graded to collagen at a lower stem layers. This optimal graded stem coated with hydroxyapatite found to reduce stress shielding by 57% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with hydroxyapatite. However, the optimal functionally graded stem coated with collagen reduced the stress shielding by 51% compared to homogenous titanium stem coated with collagen. PMID:26407117

  11. Early failures in large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Althuizen, Martje N R; V Hooff, Miranda L; v d Berg-v Erp, Saskia H M; V Limbeek, Jacques; Nijhof, Marc W

    2012-01-01

    Concerns have recently been raised about large head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties (LDH THA). Metal ion release due to wear may cause osteolysis, pseudotumours and necrosis. In addition, fixation of certain acetabular components is thought to be suboptimal. We present the short term outcome of the Durom LDH THA. Retrospectively, a consecutive series of 64 implants in 60 patients was analysed with a mean follow-up of 37 months. Clinical and radiological evaluation was performed on a regular basis, followed by additional evaluations when indicated. The 10-year revision percentage was calculated and compared with National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) standards. Six patients (six hips) underwent cup revision (9%). Four of these cups showed no or minimal bone fixation. Three patients had a pseudotumour. In two revision cases, ALVAL (aseptic lymphocyte-dominated vasculitis-associated lesion) was present. Lack of bone ingrowth and the presence of ARMD (adverse reaction to metal debris) seem to contribute to a high failure rate of the Durom LDH THA. The predicted ten-year revision rate of 14.2% (95% CI 5.6-22.8) is, given the broad confidence interval, not significantly outside NICE recommended standards. However, it is not clear which factors, if any, predict implant failure. Therefore, we do not advocate the use of this implant. PMID:23233178

  12. Pacemakers and Implantable Defibrillators

    MedlinePLUS

    ... a cardiac pacemaker or an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD). They are devices that are implanted in your ... and coordinate the chambers of the heart. An ICD monitors heart rhythms. If it senses dangerous rhythms, ...

  13. Implantable Medical Devices

    MedlinePLUS

    ... High Blood Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Implantable Medical Devices Updated:Sep 15,2015 For Rhythm Control ... Lifestyle Changes Recovery FAQs Medications Surgical Procedures Implantable Medical Devices Healthy Heart Quizzes • Heart Attack Tools & Resources ...

  14. Accuracy of an adjustable patient-specific guide for acetabular alignment in hip replacement surgery (Optihip).

    PubMed

    Shandiz, Mohsen Akbari; MacKenzie, James R; Hunt, Stephen; Anglin, Carolyn

    2014-09-01

    Implant malalignment in hip arthroplasty increases the risk of revision surgery due to problems such as hip instability, wear, and impingement. Traditional instrumentation lacks accuracy and does not individualize the goal. Computer-assisted surgery (CAS) and patient-specific solutions improve accuracy but add considerably to the cost, amongst other drawbacks. We developed an adjustable mechanical device, called Optihip, which is set to a patient-specific goal preoperatively and is independent of pelvis position intraoperatively. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate Optihip's accuracy ex vivo. Acetabular components were implanted into six cadaveric specimens, 12 hips, by two surgeons, with the device individually adjusted according to preoperative templating on computed tomography (CT) images relative to defined acetabular rim landmarks; options also exist for templating on single or biplanar X-rays. Intraoperatively, the device was positioned on the corresponding anatomical landmarks allowing the insertion of a guide pin, which then defined the desired orientation of the acetabular cup during impaction. Mean absolute difference between the preoperatively planned cup alignment and final acetabular cup orientation, measured from postoperative CT images, was 2.5±1.2° for inclination and 2.5±2.2° for version with maximum values of 4.7° and 6.8°, respectively. Compared with previous in vivo reports, Optihip guided the acetabular cup orientation more accurately than conventional hip arthroplasty, and comparably to CAS or patient-specific systems, while fitting into the normal surgical workflow. Although clinical testing is required to confirm these experimental results, the positive ex vivo accuracy suggests good potential for improving revision rates and patient functional outcome. PMID:25313024

  15. Augmented Fixation With Biodegradable Subacromial Spacer After Repair of Massive Rotator Cuff Tear

    PubMed Central

    Bozkurt, Murat; Akkaya, Mustafa; Gursoy, Safa; Isik, Cetin

    2015-01-01

    Unsuccessful outcomes after repair of massive rotator cuff ruptures accompanied by muscle atrophy and fatty degeneration are frequently associated with inadequate management and secondary tears. We report the functional differences after rotator cuff rupture repair with a biodegradable spacer application. In these patients, rotator cuff rupture repair should provide coverage of the humeral head. Subsequently, acromioplasty should be performed to allow adequate space for the subacromial spacer. Thereafter measurement of the intra-articular space required for application of the biodegradable spacer is performed. Using this method can decrease the rate of tears by providing a safe subacromial space in cases of massive rotator cuff rupture.

  16. Increase of the electron mobility in HEMT heterostructures with composite spacers containing AlAs nanolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Vinichenko, A. N. Gladkov, V. P.; Kargin, N. I.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasil’evskii, I. S.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of the hybridization of quantum states on electron transport in a two-barrier quantum well ?-doped through a spacer layer at the limit of heavy doping is shown theoretically and experimentally. A method for increasing the electron mobility in the quantum well by suppressing the tunnel coupling with the donor region through the introduction of an AlAs nanobarrier into the spacer layer is proposed. It is experimentally shown that, in the samples with a shallow quantum well, the AlAs nanobarrier introduced into the spacer layer provides a larger than threefold increase in the electron mobility at low temperatures.

  17. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  18. Cochlear Implants for Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenstab, M. Suzanne; Laughton, Joan

    1991-01-01

    The use of cochlear implants in children with profound bilateral hearing loss is discussed, focusing on how a cochlear implant works; steps in a cochlear implant program (evaluation, surgery, programing, and training); and rehabilitation procedures involved in auditory development and speech development. (JDD)

  19. Interventional MSK procedures: the hip.

    PubMed

    Dodré, Emilie; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Cockenpot, Eric; Chastanet, Patrick; Cotten, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous musculoskeletal procedures are widely accepted as low invasive, highly effective, efficient and safe methods in a vast amount of hip pathologies either in diagnostic or in therapeutic management. Hip intra-articular injections are used for the symptomatic treatment of osteoarthritis. Peritendinous or intrabursal corticosteroid injections can be used for the symptomatic treatment of greater trochanteric pain syndrome and anterior iliopsoas impingement. In past decades, the role of interventional radiology has rapidly increased in metastatic disease, thanks to the development of many ablative techniques. Image-guided percutaneous ablation of skeletal metastases provides a minimally invasive treatment option that appears to be a safe and effective palliative treatment for localized painful lytic lesion. Methods of tumour destruction based on temperature, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and cryotherapy, are performed for the management of musculoskeletal metastases. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery provides a non-invasive alternative to these ablative methods. Cementoplasty is now widely used for pain management and consolidation of acetabular metastases and can be combined with RFA. RFA is also used to treat benign tumours, namely osteoid osteomas. New interventional procedures such as percutaneous screw fixation are also proposed to treat non-displaced or minimally displaced acetabular roof fractures. PMID:26317896

  20. Poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted highly cross-linked polyethylene liner in primary total hip replacement: one-year results of a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Takatori, Yoshio; Moro, Toru; Kamogawa, Morihide; Oda, Hiromi; Morimoto, Shuhei; Umeyama, Takashige; Minami, Manabu; Sugimoto, Hideharu; Nakamura, Shigeru; Karita, Tatsuro; Kim, Juntaku; Koyama, Yurie; Ito, Hideya; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo

    2013-06-01

    To control particle-induced osteolysis in total hip replacement (THR), we developed a new technique to graft poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) onto the surface of polyethylene liners. A prospective cohort study was conducted to investigate the clinical safety of this novel bearing surface. Between April 2007 and September 2008, we recruited a prospective consecutive series of 80 patients in five participating hospitals. These patients received a cementless THR; a 26-mm-diameter cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy ball and a poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted cross-linked polyethylene liner were used for the bearing couplings. These individuals were followed a year postoperatively. An evaluation of clinical performance was conducted through an assessment of hip joint function based on the evaluation chart authorized by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association. No patients were lost to follow-up. No adverse events were found to be correlated with the implanted liners. The average hip joint function score improved from 43.2 preoperatively to 91.7 postoperatively at 1 year. There was no implant migration nor periprosthetic osteolysis detected on radiographic analysis. On the basis of our results, we conclude that poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine)-grafted cross-linked polyethylene liners are a safe implant option for hip replacement surgery for short-term clinical use. PMID:23238557

  1. Modulation of porphyrin photoluminescence by nanoscale spacers on silicon substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Y. C.; Zhang, Y.; Gao, H. Y.; Chen, L. G.; Gao, B.; He, W. Z.; Meng, Q. S.; Zhang, C.; Dong, Z. C.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate photoluminescence (PL) properties of quasi-monolayered tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules on silicon substrates modulated by three different nanoscale spacers: native oxide layer (NOL), hydrogen (H)-passivated layer, and Ag nanoparticle (AgNP) thin film, respectively. In comparison with the PL intensity from the TPP molecules on the NOL-covered silicon, the fluorescence intensity from the molecules on the AgNP-covered surface was greatly enhanced while that for the H-passivated surface was found dramatically suppressed. Time-resolved fluorescence spectra indicated shortened lifetimes for TPP molecules in both cases, but the decay kinetics is believed to be different. The suppressed emission for the H-passivated sample was attributed to the weaker decoupling effect of the monolayer of hydrogen atoms as compared to the NOL, leading to increased nonradiative decay rate; whereas the enhanced fluorescence with shortened lifetime for the AgNP-covered sample is attributed not only to the resonant excitation by local surface plasmons, but also to the increased radiative decay rate originating from the emission enhancement in plasmonic "hot-spots".

  2. Apparatus and methods for aligning holes through wheels and spacers and stacking the wheels and spacers to form a turbine rotor

    DOEpatents

    Berry, Robert Randolph (Greenville, SC); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY)

    2000-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor stacking fixture includes upstanding bolts for reception in aligned bolt holes in superposed aft disk, wheels and spacers and upstanding alignment rods received in openings of the disk, wheels and spacers during the rotor stacking assembly. The axially registering openings enable insertion of thin-walled tubes circumferentially about the rim of the rotor, with tight tolerances to the openings to provide supply and return steam for cooling buckets. The alignment rods have radial dimensions substantially less than their dimensions in a circumferential direction to allow for radial opening misalignment due to thermal expansion, tolerance stack-up and wheel-to-spacer mismatch due to rabbet mechanical growth. The circumferential dimension of the alignment rods affords tightly toleranced alignment of the openings through which the cooling tubes are installed.

  3. Mechanical Evaluation of Polymer Composite Hip Protectors

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Jose Daniel Diniz; Barbosa, Ayrles S. Gonçalves; Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Hip fractures often result in serious health implications, particularly in the geriatric population, and have been related to long-term morbidity and death. In most cases, these fractures are caused by impact loads in the area of the greater trochanter, which are produced in a fall. This work is aimed at developing hip protectors using composite materials and evaluating their effectiveness in preventing hip fractures under high impact energy (120?J). The hip protectors were developed with an inner layer of energy absorbing soft material and an outer rigid shell of fiberglass-reinforced polymer composite. According to the experimental results, all tested configurations proved to be effective at reducing the impact load to below the average fracture threshold of proximal femur. Furthermore, an addition of Ethylene Vinyl Acetate (EVA) to the impacted area of the composite shell proved to be beneficial to increase impact strength of the hip protectors. Thus, composite hip protectors proved to be a viable alternative for a mechanically efficient and cost-effective solution to prevent hip fractures. PMID:20871841

  4. Simple suture and anchor in rabbit hips

    PubMed Central

    Garcia Filho, Fernando Cal; Guarniero, Roberto; de Godoy Júnior, Rui Maciel; Pereira, César Augusto Martins; Matos, Marcos Almeida; Garcia, Lucas Cortizo

    2012-01-01

    Objective Using biomechanical studies, this research aims to compare hip capsulorrhaphy in rabbits, carried out with two different techniques: capsulorrhaphy with simple sutures and with anchors. Method Thirteen New Zealand Albino (Oryctolaguscuniculus) male rabbits, twenty-six hip joints, were used. First, a pilot project was performed with three rabbits (six hip joints). This experiment consisted of ten rabbits divided into two groups: group 1 underwent capsulorrhaphy on both right and left hips with simple suture using polyglycolic acid absorbable thread, and group 2 underwent capsulorrhaphy with titanium anchors. After a four-week postoperative period, the animals were euthanized and the hip joints were frozen. On the same day of the biomechanical studies, after the hip joints were previously unfrozen, the following parameters were evaluated: rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy. Results There was no relevant statistical difference in rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy between the simple suture and anchor groups. Conclusion Through biomechanical analyses, using parameters of rigidity, maximum force, maximum deformity and energy, it has been shown that capsulorrhaphy with simple suture and with anchors has similar results in rabbit hip joints. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453618

  5. Design of Composite Hip Prostheses Considering the Long-Term Behavior of the Femur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jong Wan; Jeong, Jae Youn; Ha, Sung Kyu

    A design method for the hip prosthesis is proposed which can alleviate problems associated with stress shielding, proximal loosening and the high stress of bone-implant interfaces after total hip replacement. The stress shielding which may lead to bone resorption, can cause a loosening of the stem and a fracture of femoral bone. Generally the composites were more suitable for hip prosthesis material in the long-term stability than metallic alloy because design cases of composite materials produced less stress shielding than titanium alloy. A bone remodeling algorithm was implemented in a nonlinear finite element program to predict the long-term performance of the hip prosthesis. The three neck shapes and three cross sections of composite hip were examined. It was found that the stress concentration in the distal region of the titanium stem which may cause the patient's thigh pains was reduced using composite material. The head neck shape was closely related with the cortical bone resorption and the cancellous bone apposition at proximal region whereas the cross-section was closely related with the relative micromotion between interfaces. The convex head neck type with the quadrangle cross-section produced less subsidence at proximal region on the medial side than the others. For all composite material cases, the cancellous bone apposition occurred at partial interfaces, which may result in a stable bio-fixation. The design performances of the convex neck head type with the hexagonal cross-section designed to insure the long-term stability were found to be more suitable than the others.

  6. Conservative treatment of developmental dysplasia of the hip in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Rejholec, M; el-Sisi, H

    2001-01-01

    This paper evaluates the results of conservative treatment for developmental dysplasia of the hip after an average follow-up of 3 years in 69 patients and 99 hips: 31 bilateral, 23 left side, and 14 right. They were treated at the Al-Razi Hospital, Kuwait, between January 1995 and December 1996. There were 59 girls and 10 boys aged between 5 months and 24 months (average age 12 months). The treatment consisted of traction for 1 or 2 weeks, followed by manipulation in 36 hips and manipulation with adductor longus tenotomy in 45 hips and with adductor longus and psoas tenotomy in 18 hips. Avascular necrosis of the femoral head developed in 16 hips (16%): 14 hips on the affected side and 2 hips on the unaffected side. Persistent acetabular dysplasia was present in 13 hips, subluxation in 9 hips and dislocation in 13 hips. Open reduction was later required in 5 hips, open reduction and innominate osteotomy in 8 hips, and hip extracapsular innominate osteotomy in 1 hip. The results were evaluated according to the age groups with highest rate of complications after the age of 15 months. The treatment protocol was changed to limit conservative treatment until the age of 14 months. PMID:11830913

  7. Nanometric Finishing on Biomedical Implants by Abrasive Flow Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kavithaa Thirumalai; Balashanmugam, Natchimuthu; Shashi Kumar, Panaghra Veeraiah

    2015-05-01

    Abrasive flow finishing (AFF) is a non-conventional finishing technique that offers better accuracy, efficiency, consistency, economy in finishing of complex/difficult to machine materials/components and provides the possibility of effective automation as aspired by the manufacturing sector. The present study describes the finishing of a hip joint made of ASTM grade Co-Cr alloy by Abrasive Flow Machining (AFM) process. The major input parameters of the AFF process were optimized for achieving nanometric finishing of the component. The roughness average (Ra) values were recorded during experimentation using surface roughness tester and the results are discussed in detail. The surface finished hip joints were characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and residual stress analysis using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD). The discussion lays emphasis on the significance, efficacy and versatile nature of the AFF process in finishing of bio-medical implants.

  8. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.; Contolini, R.J.

    1997-08-19

    Spacers are disclosed for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate. 3 figs.

  9. Method of forming a spacer for field emission flat panel displays

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F. (Berkeley, CA); Contolini, Robert J. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01

    Spacers for applications such as field emission flat panel displays and vacuum microelectronics, and which involves the application of aerogel/xerogel technology to the formation of the spacer. In a preferred approach the method uses a mold and mold release agent wherein the gel precursor is a liquid which can be applied to the mold filling holes which expose the substrate (either the baseplate or the faceplate). A release agent is applied to the mold prior to precursor application to ease removal of the mold after formation of the dielectric spacer. The shrinkage of the gel during solvent extraction also improves mold removal. The final spacer material is a good dielectric, such as silica, secured to the substrate.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of novel cholesterol derivatives with or without spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yun-Long; Zhang, Jun-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Cholesterol can be modified not only on C3sbnd OH, but also on C5dbnd C6. In this article, a new method was used to synthesize a series of novel cholesterol derivates, and the structures of these monomers were similar to those of mesogen-jacketed liquid crystal monomers without spacer. As comparison, types of soft-side-chain monomers with spacer were successfully synthesized in the analogical methods. After polymerization, the molecular structure and composition of those monomers and polymers were confirmed by 1H NMR, FTIR and Single Crystal Diffractometer. The molecular weight, distribution and thermal properties of the polymers were characterized by GPC, DSC, TGA, respectively. All the results proved that the polymers have excellent thermal stability, and the Tg of polymers without spacer is much higher than those with spacer.

  11. CRISPR Spacer Arrays for Detection of Viral Signatures from Acidic Hot Springs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. C.; Bateson, M. M.; Suciu, D.; Young, M. J.

    2010-04-01

    Viruses are the most abundant life-like entities on the planet Earth. Using CRISPR spacer sequences, we have developed a microarray-based approach to detecting viral signatures in the acidic hot springs of Yellowstone.

  12. Spacer geometry and particle deposition in spiral wound membrane feed channels.

    PubMed

    Radu, A I; van Steen, M S H; Vrouwenvelder, J S; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Picioreanu, C

    2014-11-01

    Deposition of microspheres mimicking bacterial cells was studied experimentally and with a numerical model in feed spacer membrane channels, as used in spiral wound nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane systems. In-situ microscopic observations in membrane fouling simulators revealed formation of specific particle deposition patterns for different diamond and ladder feed spacer orientations. A three-dimensional numerical model combining fluid flow with a Lagrangian approach for particle trajectory calculations could describe very well the in-situ observations on particle deposition in flow cells. Feed spacer geometry, positioning and cross-flow velocity sensitively influenced the particle transport and deposition patterns. The deposition patterns were not influenced by permeate production. This combined experimental-modeling approach could be used for feed spacer geometry optimization studies for reduced (bio)fouling. PMID:25055226

  13. Insight: implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Meng, E; Sheybani, R

    2014-09-01

    Implantable electronic medical devices have achieved remarkable medical advances in the treatment of the most challenging conditions, starting with the introduction of the first implantable pacemaker in 1958. Increasing demand for innovation in existing and novel implantable devices is fuelled by the growing aging population and the increased prevalence of chronic diseases. This perspective article provides an overview of the implantable medical device ecosystem, highlights recent developments, and discusses challenges and opportunities for translation of new innovative implants enabled by microtechnologies and microfabrication. PMID:24903337

  14. The Impact of Lumbar Spine Disease and Deformity on Total Hip Arthroplasty Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Blizzard, Daniel J; Nickel, Brian T; Seyler, Thorsten M; Bolognesi, Michael P

    2016-01-01

    Concurrent spine and hip disease is common. Spinal deformities can restrict lumbar range of motion and lumbar lordosis, leading to pelvic obliquity and increased pelvic tilt. A comprehensive preoperative workup and component templating ensure appropriate compensation for altered pelvic parameters for implantation of components according to functional positioning. Pelvic obliquity from scoliosis must be measured to calculate appropriate leg length. Cup positioning should be templated on standing radiograph to limit impingement from cup malposition. In spinal deformity, the optimal position of the cup that accommodates pelvic parameters and limits impingement may lie outside the classic parameters of the safe zone. PMID:26614917

  15. Metal-on-Metal Hip Arthroplasty: A Review of Adverse Reactions and Patient Management

    PubMed Central

    Drummond, James; Tran, Phong; Fary, Camdon

    2015-01-01

    Recent alarming joint registry data highlighting increased revision rates has prompted further research into the area of metal-on-metal hip replacements and resurfacings. This review article examines the latest literature on the topic of adverse reactions to metal debris and summarises the most up-to-date guidelines on patient management. Adverse reactions to metal debris can cause significant damage to soft tissue and bone if not diagnosed early. Furthermore, not every patient with an adverse reaction to metal debris will be symptomatic. As such, clinicians must remain vigilant when assessing and investigating these patients in order to detect failing implants and initiate appropriate management. PMID:26132653

  16. Comparison of trunk and hip muscle activity during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Won-Gyu

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the activity of trunk and hip muscles during different degrees of lumbar and hip extension. [Subjects] The study enrolled 18 participants. [Methods] Two exercises (hip and lumbar extension) and two ranges (180° and <180°) were studied. [Results] Differences in degree of extension affected the percentage maximal voluntary isometric contraction of the lumbar erector spinae and biceps femoris muscles, with significantly higher average values at >180° than at 180° lumbar extension. No significant differences were found in gluteus maximus activity according to exercise type or range. [Conclusion] Hip extension may be more effective and safer for lumbar rehabilitation than lumbar extension. PMID:26504276

  17. Trends in Cochlear Implants

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Fan-Gang

    2004-01-01

    More than 60,000 people worldwide use cochlear implants as a means to restore functional hearing. Although individual performance variability is still high, an average implant user can talk on the phone in a quiet environment. Cochlear-implant research has also matured as a field, as evidenced by the exponential growth in both the patient population and scientific publication. The present report examines current issues related to audiologic, clinical, engineering, anatomic, and physiologic aspects of cochlear implants, focusing on their psychophysical, speech, music, and cognitive performance. This report also forecasts clinical and research trends related to presurgical evaluation, fitting protocols, signal processing, and postsurgical rehabilitation in cochlear implants. Finally, a future landscape in amplification is presented that requires a unique, yet complementary, contribution from hearing aids, middle ear implants, and cochlear implants to achieve a total solution to the entire spectrum of hearing loss treatment and management. PMID:15247993

  18. Hip prosthesis introduction and early revision risk

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and purpose Little is known about the effect of the learning curve for different types of total hip arthroplasties (THAs). We investigated the prostheses survival of THAs just after the implementation of a model new to the hospital, and compared these results with the results of THAs done when more than 100 implantations had been undertaken. In addition, we investigated whether differences exist between different types of femoral stems and acetabular cups at the early implementation phase. Patients and methods We used comprehensive registry data from all units (n = 76) that performed THAs for primary osteoarthritis in Finland between 1998 and 2007. Complete data including follow-up data to December 31, 2010 or until death were available for 33,819 patients (39,125 THAs). The stems and cups used were given order numbers in each hospital and classified into 5 groups: operations with order number (a) 1–15, (b) 16–30, (c) 31–50, (d) 51–100, and (e) > 100. We used Cox’s proportional hazards modeling for calculation of the adjusted hazard ratios for the risk of revision during the 3 years following the implementation of a new THA endoprosthesis type in the groups. Results Introduction of new endoprosthesis types was common, as more than 1 in 7 patients received a type that had been previously used in 15 or less operations. For the first 15 operations after a stem or cup type was introduced, there was an elevated risk of revision (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.3, 95% CI: 1.1–1.5). There were differences in the risk of early revision between stem and cup types at implementation. Interpretation The first 15 operations with a new stem or cup model had an increased risk of early revision surgery. Stems and cups differed in their early revision risk, particularly at the implementation phase. Thus, the risk of early revision at the implementation phase should be considered when a new type of THA is brought into use. PMID:23368748

  19. Hip Arthroscopy: Less Invasive Technique

    PubMed Central

    Nogier, Alexis; Boyer, Thierry; Khan, M. Tahir

    2014-01-01

    The popularity of hip arthroscopy has increased significantly over the past decade. It is technically demanding and may be associated with complications such as iatrogenic damage to the articular cartilage or acetabular labrum, compression injuries to the structures in the perineum, and distraction injuries to the leg. Some of these complications can be avoided by paying meticulous attention to the technique and reducing the traction/surgical time. We describe a technique by which the risk of injury to the articular cartilage may be minimized by introduction of the surgical instruments under direct vision, rather than under radiologic control. The described technique is likely to reduce the operating time by addressing the peripheral-compartment pathologies first—without traction. Traction is only required for the central-compartment procedures. Exposure to ionizing radiation is also diminished (eliminated with practice) because the portals are established under direct vision of the arthroscopist. PMID:24749026

  20. Abdominal compartment syndrome after hip arthroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Justin; Owens, Brett D

    2010-01-01

    As hip arthroscopy becomes a more common procedure, more complications may occur. We present a case of abdominal compartment syndrome resulting from fluid extravasation in a 42-year-old man who underwent routine hip arthroscopy for femoral acetabular impingement. He had not had previous surgeries to that hip, and arthroscopy was performed in the supine position. After adequate distraction, arthroscopy was performed with an automated pressure- and flow-controlled pump with the pressure maintained between 40 and 60 mm Hg. We performed debridement of a degenerative tear of the anterosuperior labrum, removal of a pincer lesion, and a psoas tenotomy through a capsular window. A distended abdomen was noted on drape removal, and the patient required decompressive laparotomy for abdominal compartment syndrome. Extravasation of arthroscopy fluid is a potentially devastating complication during hip arthroscopy, and there should be careful monitoring by the surgeons, anesthesiologists, and operating room staff. PMID:20117637

  1. Taking care of your new hip joint

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Cabrera AL. Total hip replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ... Groomes TE. Total knee replacement. In: Frontera, WR, Silver JK, Rizzo TD, eds. Essentials of Physical Medicine ...

  2. Understanding and Treating the Snapping Hip.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Meng; Lewis, Cara L; Kim, Young-Jo

    2015-12-01

    Snapping hip, or coxa saltans is a palpable or auditory snapping with movement of the hip joint. Extra-articular snapping is divided into external and internal types, and is caused laterally by the iliotibial band and anteriorly by the iliopsoas tendon. Snapping of the iliopsoas usually requires contraction of the hip flexors and may be difficult to distinguish from intra-articular coxa saltans. Ultrasound can be a useful modality to dynamically detect tendon translation during hip movement to support the diagnosis of extra-articular snapping. Coxa saltans is typically treated with conservative measures including anti-inflammatories, stretching, and avoidance of inciting activities. Recalcitrant cases are treated with surgery to lengthen the iliopsoas or the iliotibial band. PMID:26524554

  3. Risks of hip and knee replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  4. Deciding to have knee or hip replacement

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Arthroplasty of the hip In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Arthroplasty of the knee. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  5. Developmental Dislocation (Dysplasia) of the Hip (DDH)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... First-born children • Babies born in the breech position (especially with feet up by the shoulders). The ... clunks” as the hip is put in di?erent positions. Your doctor will use speci?c maneuvers to determine ...

  6. Postoperative Rehabilitation Guidelines for Hip Arthroscopy in an Active Population

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Michael L.; Robinson, Kevin; Gill, Lance; Griffin, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Context: With the evolution of hip arthroscopy has come an increased recognition of intra-articular hip pathologies and improved techniques for their management. Whereas mechanical problems can often be corrected through surgery, functional deficits must be corrected through the rehabilitation process. Therefore, the evolution of hip arthroscopy has necessitated a progression in hip rehabilitation to ensure optimal postsurgical results. Evidence Acquisition: Literature review was conducted with PubMed, EMBASE, and PEDro (1992 to 2009) with the terms hip, rehabilitation, and physical therapy. Results: Although it is generally accepted that rehabilitation after hip arthroscopy is important, there is limited evidence-based research to support the rehabilitative guidelines. Conclusion: The common goal of hip rehabilitation should remain focused on the return to pain-free function of the hip joint. Outcome data indicate that this goal is being met; however, further data are required to completely validate the long-term success of hip rehabilitation after arthroscopy. PMID:23015942

  7. Arthroscopic Hip Revision Surgery for Residual FAI

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Christopher M.; Giveans, Russell; Bedi, Asheesh; Samuelson, Kathryn M.; Stone, Rebecca M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: There is a steep surgical learning curve when managing femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) and residual FAI can lead to continued pain and disability. There is very limited data reporting outcomes after revision arthroscopy for residual FAI. Methods: The records of patients that underwent arthroscopic hip revision surgery for residual FAI based on plain radiographs and 3D CT scans were reviewed. Pre and post-operative structural pathomorphology, intra-operative findings, and pre and post-operative outcomes measures using Modified Harris Hip Scoring (MHHS), SF-12 scoring, and pain on a visual analogue scale (VAS) were evaluated. Outcomes after revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to a cohort that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Results: 59 patients (85 hips) underwent arthroscopic revision FAI correction (mean 20.8 months follow-up). There were 98 previous arthroscopic surgeries and 4 previous surgical dislocations. There were 39 males and 46 females with a mean age of 29.5 years (range 16 - 59). 80 hips had residual cam-type FAI, and 64 hips had residual pincer-type FAI and underwent femoral and rim resections, respectively. The labrum was debrided in 27 hips, repaired in 48 hips and reconstructed with allograft in 8 hips. Adhesions were excised for 54 hips. The results of revision arthroscopic FAI correction were compared to 154 patients (169 hips) that underwent primary arthroscopic FAI correction (mean 25.2 months follow-up). The mean improvement for outcomes scores after revision FAI correction was 18.9 points (MHHS, p<.01), 13.4 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 2.2 points (VAS, p<.01) compared to 23.7 points (MHHS, p<.01), 22.3 points (SF-12, p<.01), and 4.6 points (VAS, p<.01) after primary arthroscopic FAI correction. Most recent outcomes scores and mean improvement in outcome scores were significantly better after primary (81.1% good/ excellent results) compared to revision (69.8% good/excellent results) FAI correction (MHS (p>.05), SF-12 (p<.01), VAS (p<.01). Conclusion: With appropriate indications and expectations, arthroscopic hip revision surgery for residual FAI led to significantly improved outcome measures. Outcomes, however, were inferior to those after primary arthroscopic FAI corrective surgery.

  8. Hip-hop, Streetdance, and the Remaking of the Global Filipino

    E-print Network

    Perillo, Jeffrey Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    of Hip-Hop Music: Can Hip-Hop in Therapy Facilitate Empathicof hip-hop music: can hip-hop in therapy facilitate empathicTherapy: A Practical Guide for Communicating with Youth and Young Adults through Rap Music.

  9. [Treatment of hip fractures in elderly patients].

    PubMed

    Hack, Juliana; Bliemel, Christopher; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Bücking, Benjamin

    2015-04-01

    Hip fractures are among the most common fractures in elderly people. The annual number of femoral fractures is even expected to increase because of an aging society. Due to the high number of comorbidities, there are special challenges in treating geriatric hip fracture patients, which require a multidisciplinary management. This includes surgical treatment allowing full weight bearing in the immediate postoperative period, osteoporosis treatment and falls prevention as well as an early ortho-geriatric rehabilitation program. PMID:25919823

  10. Serum Metal Ion Levels Following Total Hip Arthroplasty With Modular Dual Mobility Components.

    PubMed

    Matsen Ko, Laura J; Pollag, Kimberley E; Yoo, Joanne Y; Sharkey, Peter F

    2016-01-01

    Dual mobility acetabular components can reduce the incidence of total hip arthroplasty (THA) instability. Modular dual mobility (MDM) components facilitate acetabular component implantation. However, corrosion can occur at modular junctions. Serum cobalt and chromium levels and Oxford scores were obtained at minimum two year follow-up for 100 consecutive patients who had THA with MDM components. Average Oxford score was 43 (range 13-48). Average serum cobalt and chromium values were 0.7 mcg/L (range, 0.0 to 7.0) and 0.6 mcg/L (range, 0.1 to 2.7), respectively. MARS MRI was performed for four patients with pain and elevated serum cobalt levels. Two of these studies were consistent with adverse local tissue reaction. We recommend use of MDM implants in only patients at high risk for dislocation following THA. PMID:26318084

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of peri-prosthetic infections in total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Hudetz, Damir; Rod, Eduard; Radi?, Andrej; Ivkovi?, Alan

    2012-02-01

    Total hip replacement (THR) has a very good clinical outcome. Peri-prosthetic infection is a severe complication with infection rates 0.5-2% after primary THR. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in recent years have allowed drafting of evidence based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of peri-prosthetic infection after THR. If an implant related infection is suspected, a complex standardised procedure should be carried out. The most commonly cultured microorganisms causing peri-prosthetic infections are coagulase-negative staphylococci and S.aureus followed by mixed flora, streptococci, gram-negative bacilli, enterococci and anaerobes. Different treatment strategies can be applied regarding virulence of a specific pathogen, mechanical stability of the implant and patient's condition. Treatment options always include antibiotic therapy with/without surgical procedures like debridement, one/two stage approach or resection arthroplasty. PMID:22634931

  12. Assessing risk factors for early hip osteoarthritis in activity-related hip pain: a Delphi study

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, K A; Glyn-Jones, S; Batt, M E; Arden, N K; Newton, J L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Hip pain and injury as a result of activity can lead to the development of early hip osteoarthritis (OA) in susceptible individuals. Our understanding of the factors that increase susceptibility continues to evolve. The ability to clearly identify individuals (and cohorts) with activity-related hip pain who are at risk of early hip OA is currently lacking. The purpose of this study was to gain expert consensus on which key clinical measures might help predict the risk of early hip OA in individuals presenting with activity-related hip pain. The agreed measures would constitute a standardised approach to initial clinical assessment to help identify these individuals. Methods This Dephi study used online surveys to gain concordance of expert opinion in a structured process of ‘rounds’. In this study, we asked ‘What outcome measures are useful in predicting hip OA in activity-related hip pain?’ The Delphi panel consisted of experts from sport and exercise medicine, orthopaedics, rheumatology, physiotherapy and OA research. Results The study identified key clinical measures in the history, examination and investigations (plain anteroposterior radiograph and femoroacetabular impingement views) that the panel agreed would be useful in predicting future risk of hip OA when assessing activity-related hip pain. The panel also agreed that certain investigations and tests (eg, MR angiography) did not currently have a role in routine assessment. There was a lack of consensus regarding the role of MRI, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and certain biomechanical and functional assessments. Conclusions We provide a standardised approach to the clinical assessment of patients with activity-related hip pain. Assessment measures rejected by the Delphi panel were newer, more expensive investigations that currently lack evidence. Assessment measures that did not reach consensus include MRI and PROMs. Their role remains ambiguous and would benefit from further research. PMID:26419679

  13. Nanotechnology and Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Lavenus, Sandrine; Louarn, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    The long-term clinical success of dental implants is related to their early osseointegration. This paper reviews the different steps of the interactions between biological fluids, cells, tissues, and surfaces of implants. Immediately following implantation, implants are in contact with proteins and platelets from blood. The differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells will then condition the peri-implant tissue healing. Direct bone-to-implant contact is desired for a biomechanical anchoring of implants to bone rather than fibrous tissue encapsulation. Surfaces properties such as chemistry and roughness play a determinant role in these biological interactions. Physicochemical features in the nanometer range may ultimately control the adsorption of proteins as well as the adhesion and differentiation of cells. Nanotechnologies are increasingly used for surface modifications of dental implants. Another approach to enhance osseointegration is the application of thin calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings. Bioactive CaP nanocrystals deposited on titanium implants are resorbable and stimulate bone apposition and healing. Future nanometer-controlled surfaces may ultimately direct the nature of peri-implant tissues and improve their clinical success rate. PMID:21253543

  14. Tuberculosis of hip: A current concept review.

    PubMed

    Saraf, Shyam Kumar; Tuli, Surendra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of the hip is second to spine only hence a good number of cases are visiting the medical facilities every year. Many present in the advanced stage of the disease due to delayed diagnosis. In early stages of TB of hip, there is a diagnostic dilemma when plain X-rays are negative. In the present time, diagnostic modalities have improved from the days when diagnosis was based essentially on clinicoradiological presentation alone. By the time definite radiological changes appear on plain X-ray, the disease has moderately advanced. The modern diagnostic facilities like ultrasonography (USG) or magnetic resonance imaging of the hip joint, USG guided aspiration of synovial fluid and obtaining the material for polymerase chain reaction and tissue diagnosis must be utilized. In the treatment, current emphasis is more on mobility with stability at hip. Joint debridement, skeletal traction, and mobilization exercises may give more satisfying results as compared to the immobilization by hip spica. Adults with advanced arthritis and healed infection should be informed and discussed the various treatment modalities including the joint replacement. More and more surgeons are taking up the challenge of putting the total hip replacement in the active stage of the disease. Until the long term results in active disease are well established, we recommend it for the healed disease only in selected cases. PMID:25593352

  15. Tuberculosis of hip: A current concept review

    PubMed Central

    Saraf, Shyam Kumar; Tuli, Surendra Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) of the hip is second to spine only hence a good number of cases are visiting the medical facilities every year. Many present in the advanced stage of the disease due to delayed diagnosis. In early stages of TB of hip, there is a diagnostic dilemma when plain X-rays are negative. In the present time, diagnostic modalities have improved from the days when diagnosis was based essentially on clinicoradiological presentation alone. By the time definite radiological changes appear on plain X-ray, the disease has moderately advanced. The modern diagnostic facilities like ultrasonography (USG) or magnetic resonance imaging of the hip joint, USG guided aspiration of synovial fluid and obtaining the material for polymerase chain reaction and tissue diagnosis must be utilized. In the treatment, current emphasis is more on mobility with stability at hip. Joint debridement, skeletal traction, and mobilization exercises may give more satisfying results as compared to the immobilization by hip spica. Adults with advanced arthritis and healed infection should be informed and discussed the various treatment modalities including the joint replacement. More and more surgeons are taking up the challenge of putting the total hip replacement in the active stage of the disease. Until the long term results in active disease are well established, we recommend it for the healed disease only in selected cases. PMID:25593352

  16. Tribological performance of the biological components of synovial fluid in artificial joint implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subir; Choudhury, Dipankar; Roy, Taposh; Moradi, Ali; Masjuki, H. H.; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda

    2015-08-01

    The concentration of biological components of synovial fluid (such as albumin, globulin, hyaluronic acid, and lubricin) varies between healthy persons and osteoarthritis (OA) patients. The aim of the present study is to compare the effects of such variation on tribological performance in a simulated hip joint model. The study was carried out experimentally by utilizing a pin-on-disk simulator on ceramic-on-ceramic (CoC) and ceramic-on-polyethylene (CoP) hip joint implants. The experimental results show that both friction and wear of artificial joints fluctuate with the concentration level of biological components. Moreover, the performance also varies between material combinations. Wear debris sizes and shapes produced by ceramic and polyethylene were diverse. We conclude that the biological components of synovial fluid and their concentrations should be considered in order to select an artificial hip joint to best suit that patient.

  17. Bone-resorbing cytokines in serum of patients with aseptic loosening of hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    Granchi, D; Verri, E; Ciapetti, G; Stea, S; Savarino, L; Sudanese, A; Mieti, M; Rotini, R; Dallari, D; Zinghi, G; Montanaro, L

    1998-09-01

    Our aim was to determine if the serum levels of bone-resorbing cytokines (IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, IL-6, GM-CSF) are altered in patients with aseptic loosening of a total hip prosthesis, and if such levels are influenced by the type of implant. We determined cytokine levels in sera from 35 patients before revision for failed total hip arthroplasty and compared them with those in 25 healthy donors. We also assessed the soluble receptor of interleukin-2 (sIL-2r) in serum as an indication of a specific immune reaction against the implant. Our findings showed that the sIL-2r and TNF-alpha serum level did not change. The IL-6 level was not significantly altered, but was higher in patients with TiAIV prostheses than in those with a CrCoMo implant and in patients with cemented prostheses. The IL-1beta level was found to be higher in those with a TiAIV cemented prosthesis than in the control group (p=0.0001) and other groups of patients (p=0.003 v uncemented TiAIV, p=0.01 v cemented CrCoMo, p=0.001 v uncemented CrCoMo). The GM-CSF level significantly increased in patients compared with healthy subjects (p=0.008), and it was higher in those with cemented than with uncemented implants (p=0.01). Only patients with cementless CrCoMo prostheses had levels of GM-CSF similar to those of the control group. The highest GM-CSF concentrations were observed in patients treated with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the last months before revision (p=0.04). In addition, when massive osteolysis was observed, the level of GM-CSF tended to decrease to that of the control group. PMID:9768909

  18. Magnetic resonance imaging of hip joint cartilage and labrum

    PubMed Central

    Zilkens, Christoph; Miese, Falk; Jäger, Marcus; Bittersohl, Bernd; Krauspe, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    Hip joint instability and impingement are the most common biomechanical risk factors that put the hip joint at risk to develop premature osteoarthritis. Several surgical procedures like periacetabular osteotomy for hip dysplasia or hip arthroscopy or safe surgical hip dislocation for femoroacetabular impingement aim at restoring the hip anatomy. However, the success of joint preserving surgical procedures is limited by the amount of pre-existing cartilage damage. Biochemically sensitive MRI techniques like delayed Gadolinium Enhanced MRI of Cartilage (dGEMRIC) might help to monitor the effect of surgical or non-surgical procedures in the effort to halt or even reverse joint damage. PMID:22053256

  19. Invariant hip moment pattern while walking with a robotic hip exoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Ferris, Daniel P

    2011-03-15

    Robotic lower limb exoskeletons hold significant potential for gait assistance and rehabilitation; however, we have a limited understanding of how people adapt to walking with robotic devices. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that people reduce net muscle moments about their joints when robotic assistance is provided. This reduction in muscle moment results in a total joint moment (muscle plus exoskeleton) that is the same as the moment without the robotic assistance despite potential differences in joint angles. To test this hypothesis, eight healthy subjects trained with the robotic hip exoskeleton while walking on a force-measuring treadmill. The exoskeleton provided hip flexion assistance from approximately 33% to 53% of the gait cycle. We calculated the root mean squared difference (RMSD) between the average of data from the last 15 min of the powered condition and the unpowered condition. After completing three 30-min training sessions, the hip exoskeleton provided 27% of the total peak hip flexion moment during gait. Despite this substantial contribution from the exoskeleton, subjects walked with a total hip moment pattern (muscle plus exoskeleton) that was almost identical and more similar to the unpowered condition than the hip angle pattern (hip moment RMSD 0.027, angle RMSD 0.134, p<0.001). The angle and moment RMSD were not different for the knee and ankle joints. These findings support the concept that people adopt walking patterns with similar joint moment patterns despite differences in hip joint angles for a given walking speed. PMID:21333995

  20. HIP HOP for HIV Awareness: Using Hip Hop Culture to Promote Community-Level HIV Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Mandy J.; Hallmark, Camden J.; McNeese, Marlene; Blue, Nike; Ross, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper was to determine the effectiveness of the HIP HOP for HIV Awareness intervention, an innovative model utilising an exchange of an HIV test for a hip hop concert ticket, in a metropolitan city among African American youth and young adults. A subset of intervention participants participated in standardised testing, sex…

  1. The 1963 Hip-Hop Machine: Hip-Hop Pedagogy as Composition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2003-01-01

    Proposes an alternative invention strategy for research-based argumentative writing. Investigates the coincidental usage of the term "whatever" in hip-hop, theory, and composition studies. Presents a "whatever-pedagogy" identified as "hip-hop pedagogy," a writing practice that models itself after digital sampling's rhetorical strategy of…

  2. Hip Reconstruction Osteotomy by Ilizarov Method as a Salvage Option for Abnormal Hip Joints

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Masood; Rashid, Haroon; Raza, Hasnain

    2014-01-01

    Hip joint instability can be secondary to congenital hip pathologies like developmental dysplasia (DDH) or acquired such as sequel of infective or neoplastic process. An unstable hip is usually associated with loss of bone from the proximal femur, proximal migration of the femur, lower-extremity length discrepancy, abnormal gait, and pain. In this case series of 37 patients coming to our institution between May 2005 and December 2011, we report our results in treatment of unstable hip joint by hip reconstruction osteotomy using the Ilizarov method and apparatus. This includes an acute valgus and extension osteotomy of the proximal femur combined with gradual varus and distraction (if required) for realignment and lengthening at a second, more distal, femoral osteotomy. 18 males and 19 females participated in the study. There were 17 patients with DDH, 12 with sequelae of septic arthritis, 2 with tuberculous arthritis, 4 with posttraumatic arthritis, and 2 with focal proximal femoral deficiency. Outcomes were evaluated by using Harris Hip Scoring system. At the mean follow-up of 37 months, Harris Hip Score had significantly improved in all patients. To conclude, illizarov hip reconstruction can successfully improve Trendelenburg's gait. It supports the pelvis and simultaneously restores knee alignment and corrects lower-extremity length discrepancy (LLD). PMID:24895616

  3. [Effect of spacer on red and green phosphorescent organic light-emitting devices].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Fang-Hui; Huang, Jin

    2014-02-01

    We have investigated the performances of organic light-emitting diodes (OLED) with different spacer, the structure was fabricated as ITO/MoO3 (40 nm)/NPB(40 nm)/TCTA(10 nm)/CBP:GIr114:R-4B2%(30 nm)/spacer (3 nm)/CBP: GIr114%:R-4B2%(30 nm)/BCP(10 nm)/Alq3 (40 nm)/LiF(1 nm)/Al(100 nm), the spacers were CBP, TCTA, TPBI and BCP separately, GIr1 and R-4B were green and red phosphorescent dye respectively. The results showed that compared to the reference device utilized CBP as the spacer layer, TCTA, TPBI and BCP had higher current efficiency in excess of 59%, 79% and 93%, the maximum current efficiency of 16.91 cd x A(-1) was achieved with BCP as the spacer at voltage of 5 V, TPBI and BCP as the spacer layer obtained the higher current density and lower efficiency roll-off. We attributed to these results to the follow reasons, the first was that carriers and excitons were limited to a narrow recombination region because of TCTA with higher LUMO energy level and triplet energy, which improved the probability of carriers recombination, in addition, more serious quenching at higher current density. The second reason was that TPBI and BCP had the higher HOMO energy level and electron mobility, which broadened excitons recombination zone. In addition, the spacer layer caused the accumulation of electrons or holes and the formation of high space electric field, leading to carrier injection and transport more effectively. In particular, we obtained a better stability of phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes since the way for the red and green co-doped with host material. PMID:24822393

  4. Spectral tunability of the spacer layer in metasurface absorbers (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kai; Zhang, Nan; Ji, Dengxin; Song, Haomin; Zeng, Xie; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-10-01

    Potential solar energy applications of metamaterial absorbers require spectrally tunable resonance to ensure the overlap with intrinsic absorption profiles of active materials. Although those resonance peaks of metamaterial absorbers can be tuned precisely by lithography-fabricated nanopatterns with different lateral dimensions, they are too expensive for practical large-area applications. In this work, we will report another freedom to tune the spectral position of the super absorbing resonance, i.e. the spacer thickness. The structure was fabricated by evaporating an optically opaque metallic ground plate, a dielectric spacer layer, and a top metallic thin film followed by thermal annealing processes to form discrete nanoparticles. As the spacer thickness increases from 10-90 nm, two distinct shifts of the absorption peak can be observed [i.e. a blue-shift for thinner (10-30 nm) and a red-shift for thicker spacer layers (30-90 nm)]. To understand the physical mechanism, we characterized effective optical constants of top nanopattern layer and loaded them into numerical simulation models. A good agreement with experimental data was only observed in the thick spacer region (i.e. 30-90 nm). The optical behavior for thinner spacers cannot be explained by effective medium theory and interference mechanism. Therefore, a microscopic study has to be performed to reveal strongly coupled modes under metallic nanopatterns, which can be interpreted as separate antennas strongly coupled with the ground plate. Since the resonant position is sensitive to the spacer thickness, a tunable super absorbing metasurface is realizable by introducing spatial tunable materials like stretchable chemical/ biomolecules.

  5. [The artificial lens implant].

    PubMed

    Cârstocea, B; Selaru, D; Filip, M; Sandu, E; Stefan, C; Isp??oiu, C; Banaeu, I

    1993-01-01

    The paper presents a short history of the cataract intervention, starting from the lens luxation in vitreum and going to the implant of artificial lens. From the three classes of artificial lenses, up-to-date options are the posterior chamber artificial lenses. Today, in 80% of the cases, artificial lens implant is done, 80% of the implanted lenses being posterior chamber lenses. The paper also exposes various operatorial techniques, post-operatorial evolution and the results obtained. PMID:8507623

  6. Automatic assessment of volume asymmetries applied to hip abductor muscles in patients with hip arthroplasty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemt, Christian; Modat, Marc; Pichat, Jonas; Cardoso, M. J.; Henckel, Joahnn; Hart, Alister; Ourselin, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    Metal-on-metal (MoM) hip arthroplasties have been utilised over the last 15 years to restore hip function for 1.5 million patients worldwide. Althoug widely used, this hip arthroplasty releases metal wear debris which lead to muscle atrophy. The degree of muscle wastage differs across patients ranging from mild to severe. The longterm outcomes for patients with MoM hip arthroplasty are reduced for increasing degrees of muscle atrophy, highlighting the need to automatically segment pathological muscles. The automated segmentation of pathological soft tissues is challenging as these lack distinct boundaries and morphologically differ across subjects. As a result, there is no method reported in the literature which has been successfully applied to automatically segment pathological muscles. We propose the first automated framework to delineate severely atrophied muscles by applying a novel automated segmentation propagation framework to patients with MoM hip arthroplasty. The proposed algorithm was used to automatically quantify muscle wastage in these patients.

  7. [The use of small diameter cups in total uncemented hip replacement].

    PubMed

    Drobniewski, Marek; Sibi?ski, Marcin; Grzegorzewski, Andrzej; Synder, Marek

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze early results of total uncemented hip replacement with use of small diameter acetabular components. In the group of 13 patients (15 hips) with severe dysplastic coxarthrosis mean age at surgery was 43.6 years. There were 8 right and 7 left hips operated. For clinical assessment Merle d'Aubigné and Postel classification modified by Charnley was used. Radiographs were evaluated according to Engh and Massini, De Lee and Charnley as well as Gruen classification system. The mean follow up was almost 18 months. There were 11 good and 4 satisfactory results. No very good and poor results were found. Subjective assessment of patients was much better than with use of Merle d'Aubigné and Postel classification. The use of small uncemented cups in a valuable method witch allows good positioning of acetabular component. Implantation of this type of cups gives satisfactory fixation without use of bone grafts but limits possibility of limb length inequality correction. PMID:19777948

  8. Short-term results with the Zweymueller-SL metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Petsinis, Georgios; Repanti, Maria; Papazisis, Zisis; Iliopoulos, Panagiotis; Soucacos, Panagiotis N

    2002-01-01

    In a prospective study we followed 266 consecutive patients who received 350 Zweymueller-SL uncemented total hip replacements with metal-on-metal articulation for osteoarthritis. Mean follow-up was 52 (range 37-92) months. Patient age at the time of surgery was 55±9 (25-70) years. Pre-operative Harris score of 45±19 was increased post-operatively to 96±4. Pre-operative invalidity was significantly improved post-operatively (P<0.001), and 97% of the patients were either satisfied or very satisfied with the results. There was no aseptic loosening of either component. Revision was made in six hips (1.8%) because of either septic loosening (five, 1.5%) or technical error (one, 0.3%). At revision, surgical microscopic evidence for metalosis (Mirra grades 1 and 2) was shown in all revised hips. The reasons for early loosening were unrelated to the metal-on-metal bearing but rather were the result of either low-grade deep infection or inadequate surgical technique. Survival rate for Zweymueller screw socket and stem 7.6 years after implantation was 99.4% and 96.8% respectively. There was no evidence that metal-on-metal articulation gives rise to new problems or complications. PMID:24570158

  9. [Silastic implant and synovitis].

    PubMed

    Sennwald, G

    1989-07-22

    The silastic implant based on siloxane polymere induces granulomatous synovitis in certain predisposed individuals, a reaction which may continue even after removal of the implant. This is also true of a prosthesis of the trapezium in two of our patients, though to a lesser degree. This is probably the reason why the problem has not yet been widely recognized. The hypothesis is put forward that an enzymatic predisposition may allow chemical degradation of the fragmented silastic implant into a toxic component responsible for the pathologic condition. The slow progression of the lesions is a challenge for the future and puts in question the further use of silastic implants. PMID:2678435

  10. Genetic alterations in periprosthetic soft-tissue masses from patients with metal-on-metal hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, Virinder Kaur; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Reito, Aleksi; Nieminen, Jyrki; Porkka, Noora; Wirtanen, Tiina; Laitinen, Minna; Eskelinen, Antti; Knuutila, Sakari

    2015-11-01

    Adverse soft tissue reactions in patients with metal-on-metal (MoM) hip replacement are associated with cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) particles released from the implant. Exposing the patients to long periods of increased metal ions concentrations resulting from the wear of these implants poses an increased risk of genotoxicity/mutagenicity. A variable proportion of patients develop periprosthetic soft-tissue masses or pseudotumors at the site of the implant. There is a concern that exposure to increased metal ions could increase the risk of cancer. In order to investigate whether the periprosthetic soft-tissue mass harbours any cancer- related genetic alterations, we studied DNA isolated from periprosthetic tissues of 20 patients with MoM hip replacement, for copy number alterations and mutations in hotspot regions of 50 cancer genes using aCGH and amplicon-based next generation sequencing. Our results showed copy number gains at 12q14.3 and 21q21.1in tumour from patient diagnosed with liposarcoma. Copy number alterations in periprosthetic tissues were seen in three other patients, one had a region of gain at 9q24.1 affecting JAK2 and INSL6, and two patients had region of gain at 6p21.1, affecting RUNX2. Mutation analysis showed V1578del mutation in NOTCH1 in two patients. The copy number alterations and mutations seen in periprosthetic soft-tissue masses are earlier reported in either haematological malignancies or in osteoblast related bone dysplasia. The presence of genetic anomalies was associated with longer in-situ time of the implant. Our findings warrant the need of similar studies in larger patient cohorts to evaluate the risk of development of neoplastic alterations in periprosthetic tissues of patients with MoM hip replacement. PMID:26355908

  11. Analysis of elastohydrodynamic lubrication in McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip joint replacement.

    PubMed

    Yew, A; Udofia, I; Jagatia, M; Jin, Z M

    2004-01-01

    An elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis was carried out in this study for a typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis under a simple steady state rotation. The finite element method was used initially to investigate the effect of the cement and bone on the predicted contact pressure distribution between the two articulating surfaces under dry conditions, and subsequently to determine the elastic deformation of both the femoral and the acetabular components required for the lubrication analysis. Both Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation were coupled and solved numerically using the finite difference method. Important features in reducing contact stresses and promoting fluid-film lubrication associated with the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant were identified as the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup. For the typical McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip prosthesis considered under typical walking conditions, an increase in the femoral head radius from 14 to 17.4 mm (for a fixed radial clearance of 79 microm) was shown to result in a 25 per cent decrease in the maximum dry contact pressure and a 60 per cent increase in the predicted minimum film thickness. Furthermore, the predicted maximum contact pressure considering both the cement and the bone was found to be decreased by about 80 per cent, while the minimum film thickness was predicted to be increased by 50 per cent. Despite a significant increase in the predicted minimum lubricating film thickness due to the large femoral head and the thin acetabular cup, a mixed lubrication regime was predicted for the McKee-Farrar metal-on-metal hip implant under estimated in vivo steady state walking conditions, depending on the surface roughness of the bearing surfaces. This clearly demonstrated the important influences of the material, design and manufacturing parameters on the tribological performance of these hard-on-hard hip prostheses. Furthermore, in the present contact mechanics analysis, the significant increase in the elasticity due to the relatively thin acetabular cup was not found to cause equatorial contact and gripping of the ball. PMID:14982343

  12. Implantable sensor technology: measuring bone and joint biomechanics of daily life in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Stresses and strains are major factors influencing growth, remodeling and repair of musculoskeletal tissues. Therefore, knowledge of forces and deformation within bones and joints is critical to gain insight into the complex behavior of these tissues during development, aging, and response to injury and disease. Sensors have been used in vivo to measure strains in bone, intraarticular cartilage contact pressures, and forces in the spine, shoulder, hip, and knee. Implantable sensors have a high impact on several clinical applications, including fracture fixation, spine fixation, and joint arthroplasty. This review summarizes the developments in strain-measurement-based implantable sensor technology for musculoskeletal research. PMID:23369655

  13. Particle-initiated breakdown characteristics on a ribbed spacer surface for SF/sub 6/ gas insulated switchgear

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagiwa, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Endo, F. )

    1988-07-01

    Cylindrical post spacers were used to investigate the fundamental effect of ribs on particle initiated breakdown characteristics. Improved breakdown characteristics, obtained by attaching the ribs, changed with the distance between them. The shorter the distance was, the higher the breakdown voltage. When the distance was less than 20 to 30% of the spacer length, the breakdown voltage increased 20 to 60%. The rib effectiveness for SF/sub 6/ gas insulated switchgear spacers was demonstrated.

  14. Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT Images of Al-Steel-Perspex Specimens Mimicking a Hip Prosthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhogarhia, Manish; Munshi, P.; Lukose, Sijo; Subramanian, M. P.; Muralidhar, C.

    2008-09-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a relatively new technique developed in the late 1970's, which enables the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure of objects. Beam hardening caused by the polychromatic spectrum is an important problem in X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). It leads to various artifacts in reconstruction images and reduces image quality. In the present work we are considering the Artifact Reduction in Total Hip Prosthesis CT Scan which is a problem of medical imaging. We are trying to reduce the cupping artifact induced by beam hardening as well as metal artifact as they exist in the CT scan of a human hip after the femur is replaced by a metal implant. The correction method for beam hardening used here is based on a previous work. Simulation study for the present problem includes a phantom consisting of mild steel, aluminium and perspex mimicking the photon attenuation properties of a hum hip cross section with metal implant.

  15. Artifact Reduction in X-Ray CT Images of Al-Steel-Perspex Specimens Mimicking a Hip Prosthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Madhogarhia, Manish; Munshi, P.; Lukose, Sijo; Subramanian, M. P.; Muralidhar, C.

    2008-09-26

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is a relatively new technique developed in the late 1970's, which enables the nondestructive visualization of the internal structure of objects. Beam hardening caused by the polychromatic spectrum is an important problem in X-ray computed tomography (X-CT). It leads to various artifacts in reconstruction images and reduces image quality. In the present work we are considering the Artifact Reduction in Total Hip Prosthesis CT Scan which is a problem of medical imaging. We are trying to reduce the cupping artifact induced by beam hardening as well as metal artifact as they exist in the CT scan of a human hip after the femur is replaced by a metal implant. The correction method for beam hardening used here is based on a previous work. Simulation study for the present problem includes a phantom consisting of mild steel, aluminium and perspex mimicking the photon attenuation properties of a hum hip cross section with metal implant.

  16. Size of metallic and polyethylene debris particles in failed cemented total hip replacements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. M.; Salvati, E. A.; Betts, F.; DiCarlo, E. F.; Doty, S. B.; Bullough, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    Reports of differing failure rates of total hip prostheses made of various metals prompted us to measure the size of metallic and polyethylene particulate debris around failed cemented arthroplasties. We used an isolation method, in which metallic debris was extracted from the tissues, and a non-isolation method of routine preparation for light and electron microscopy. Specimens were taken from 30 cases in which the femoral component was of titanium alloy (10), cobalt-chrome alloy (10), or stainless steel (10). The mean size of metallic particles with the isolation method was 0.8 to 1.0 microns by 1.5 to 1.8 microns. The non-isolation method gave a significantly smaller mean size of 0.3 to 0.4 microns by 0.6 to 0.7 microns. For each technique the particle sizes of the three metals were similar. The mean size of polyethylene particles was 2 to 4 microns by 8 to 13 microns. They were larger in tissue retrieved from failed titanium-alloy implants than from cobalt-chrome and stainless-steel implants. Our results suggest that factors other than the size of the metal particles, such as the constituents of the alloy, and the amount and speed of generation of debris, may be more important in the failure of hip replacements.

  17. Airflows after inhalation of terbutaline sulphate aerosol from a 750-ml spacer for four weeks.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, N E; Hidinger, K G; Rosenhall, L; Hagstad, H; Löfgren, L; Perk, J; Stiksa, G; Ström, K

    1986-01-01

    Terbutaline sulphate was administered to 40 adult asthmatic patients via an ordinary metered-dose inhaler (MDI) or one connected to a 750-ml spacer in an open, randomized, crossover study. Spirometry was obtained before the start of the study and again after four weeks of treatment with each inhaler. The patients recorded on a diary card the severity of their asthma symptoms and the peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) in the morning before and after drug administration and in the evening. Preinhalation spirometric values were higher after four weeks with the 750-ml spacer than at the start of the study (P less than or equal to 0.05). Daily morning and evening PEFR values were higher after use of the 750-ml spacer than after use of the ordinary MDI (P less than 0.05). Daily symptom scores were generally low. A significantly better effect (P less than or equal to 0.05) with the 750-ml spacer was achieved only in daytime dyspnea. The investigators conclude that the attachment of a 750-ml spacer to an ordinary metered-dose inhaler can improve the efficacy of terbutaline sulphate in the long-term treatment of asthma. PMID:3698068

  18. Mouse rDNA: sequences and evolutionary analysis of spacer and mature RNA regions.

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, W E; Goldberg, G; Bowman, L H; Steinmetz, D; Schlessinger, D

    1983-01-01

    Two regions of mouse rDNA were sequenced. One contained the last 323 nucleotides of the external transcribed spacer and the first 595 nucleotides of 18S rRNA; the other spanned the entire internal transcribed spacer and included the 3' end of 18S rRNA, 5.8S rRNA, and the 5' end of 28S rRNA. The mature rRNA sequences are very highly conserved from yeast to mouse (unit evolutionary period, the time required for a 1% divergence of sequence, was 30 X 10(6) to 100 X 10(6) years). In 18S rRNA, at least some of the evolutionary expansion and increase in G + C content is due to a progressive accretion of discrete G + C-rich insertions. Spacer sequence comparisons between mouse and rat rRNA reveal much more extensive and frequent insertions and substitutions of G + C-rich segments. As a result, spacers conserve overall G + C richness but not sequence (UEP, 0.3 X 10(6) years) or specific base-paired stems. Although no stems analogous to those bracketing 16S and 23S rRNA in Escherichia coli pre-rRNA are evident, certain features of the spacer regions flanking eucaryotic mature rRNAs are conserved and could be involved in rRNA processing or ribosome formation. These conserved regions include some short homologous sequence patterns and closely spaced direct repeats. PMID:6621535

  19. Clustered regularly interspaced short palindrome repeats (CRISPRs) have spacers of extrachromosomal origin.

    PubMed

    Bolotin, Alexander; Quinquis, Benoit; Sorokin, Alexei; Ehrlich, S Dusko

    2005-08-01

    Numerous prokaryote genomes contain structures known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), composed of 25-50 bp repeats separated by unique sequence spacers of similar length. CRISPR structures are found in the vicinity of four genes named cas1 to cas4. In silico analysis revealed another cluster of three genes associated with CRISPR structures in many bacterial species, named here as cas1B, cas5 and cas6, and also revealed a certain number of spacers that have homology with extant genes, most frequently derived from phages, but also derived from other extrachromosomal elements. Sequence analysis of CRISPR structures from 24 strains of Streptococcus thermophilus and Streptococcus vestibularis confirmed the homology of spacers with extrachromosomal elements. Phage sensitivity of S. thermophilus strains appears to be correlated with the number of spacers in the CRISPR locus the strain carries. The authors suggest that the spacer elements are the traces of past invasions by extrachromosomal elements, and hypothesize that they provide the cell immunity against phage infection, and more generally foreign DNA expression, by coding an anti-sense RNA. The presence of gene fragments in CRISPR structures and the nuclease motifs in cas genes of both cluster types suggests that CRISPR formation involves a DNA degradation step. PMID:16079334

  20. Percutaneously assisted total hip (PATH) and Supercapsular percutaneously assisted total hip (SuperPATH) arthroplasty: learning curves and early outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gofton, Wade

    2015-01-01

    Background A new family of micro-posterior approaches, percutaneously assisted total hip (PATH), SuperCapsular (SuperCap) and Supercapsular percutaneously assisted total hip (SuperPATH) allow preservation of the short external rotators. This study assesses early outcomes and learning curves of the PATH and SuperPATH approaches. Methods Early outcomes of the first consecutive 49 PATH and 50 SuperPATH cases performed by a non-developer surgeon were evaluated. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare age, body mass index (BMI), and pre-operative hemoglobin. Gender was compared using a Chi-square test. Clinical outcomes were compared using a nonparametric Wilcoxon test or a Chi-square test. Learning curves were assessed using operative time as a surrogate. Acetabular cup abduction and anteversion were compared using the first post-operative radiograph and a modified protractor. Results Both cohorts were similar with respect to diagnosis, gender, and BMI. Mean operative time in minutes was recorded for the PATH (114.5±17.5) and SuperPATH (101.7±18.3) cohorts (P value =0.0002). PATH operative time reached a plateau by case 40, but SuperPATH operative time continued to decrease by case 50. Transfusion rates were low in the PATH (4%) and SuperPATH (6%) cohorts. Mean length of stay (LOS) in days for the SuperPATH and PATH cohorts were 2.2 and 3.0, respectively (P value <0.0001). Complication rates were low in the SuperPATH (4.0%) and PATH (4.1%) cohorts. Acetabular cups in the SuperPATH cohort (anteversion: 23.5°±8.2°, abduction: 39.0°±8.4°) were significantly more anteverted (P value <0.0001) and less abducted (P value <0.05) than in the PATH cohort (anteversion: 13.1°±7.1°; abduction: 42.9°±7.6°). Conclusions Early results demonstrate that the PATH and SuperPATH approaches can be adopted with minimal complications and outcomes consistent with innovator outcomes, even during the learning curve. The SuperPATH technique was associated with shorter operative time that continued to decrease, suggesting that proficiency continues to decrease beyond the first 50 cases. In this author’s experience, acetabular cups implanted using the SuperPATH technique were more anteverted than those implanted using the PATH technique. Greater use of the transverse acetabular ligament to guide cup alignment reduced this effect. PMID:26366396

  1. Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head with thorough debridement, bone grafting and bone-marrow mononuclear cells implantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Wei; Yin, Zong Sheng

    2014-02-01

    Osteonecrosis of the femoral head (ONFH) is a disease with a wide-ranging etiology and poorly understood pathogenesis seen commonly in young patients. Various head-preserving procedures have been used to avert the need for total hip replacement. These include vascularized and non-vascularized bone grafting procedures, bone marrow containing osteogenic precursors implanted into the necrotic lesion. We use drills, curettes, broaches under image intensifier to perform a thorough debridement of all necrotic lesion, pack autogenous cortical and cancellous bone which were harvested from the ipsilateral iliac crest tightly into the femoral head, implant bone-marrow mononuclear cells containing mesenchymal stem cells into the necrotic lesion. The study included 15 patients (20 hips, 10 males, 5 females, mean age 35 years, range 23-58 years) with stage II-III ONFH according to the association research circulation osseous classification. The outcome was determined by changes in the Harris hip score (HHS), by progression in radiographic stages, and by the need for hip arthroplasty. The mean follow-up was 24 months (range 9-36 months). The mean HHS increased from 64 to 85 points. The overall clinical success rate is 80 %. There were no infection, femoral neck fracture or other complications. Thorough debridement, autogenous bone grafting and bone-marrow mononuclear cells implantation is an effective procedure in patient with small lesion, early-stage ONFH. PMID:23412306

  2. 21 CFR 890.3665 - Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3665 Congenital hip dislocation abduction splint. (a) Identification. A congenital hip...

  3. Hip or knee replacement - before - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePLUS

    ... replace all or part of your hip or knee joint with an artificial device (a prosthesis). Below are some questions you may want to ask your doctor or nurse to help you prepare for your hip or knee replacement.

  4. Application of Ganz Surgical Hip Dislocation Approach in Pediatric Hip Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Sung Jin; Kwak, Hong-Seok; Park, Moon Seok; Yoo, Won Joon; Chung, Chin Youb; Choi, In Ho

    2009-01-01

    Background Ganz surgical hip dislocation is useful in the management of severe hip diseases, providing an unobstructed view of the femoral head and acetabulum. We present our early experience with this approach in pediatric hip diseases. Methods Twenty-three hips of 21 patients with pediatric hip diseases treated using the Ganz surgical hip dislocation approach were the subjects of this study. The average age at the time of surgery was 15.7 years. There were 15 male and 6 female patients who were followed for an average of 15.1 months (range, 6 to 29 months). Diagnoses included hereditary multiple exostoses in 9 hips, slipped capital femoral epiphysis in 7, Legg-Calvé-Perthes disease in 4, osteoid osteoma in 1, pigmented villonodular synovitis in 1, and neonatal septic hip sequelae in 1. Medical records were reviewed to record diagnoses, principal surgical procedures, operative time, blood loss, postoperative rehabilitation, changes in the range of hip joint motion, and complications. Results Femoral head-neck osteochondroplasty was performed in 17 patients, proximal femoral realignment osteotomy in 6, open reduction and subcapital osteotomy for slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) in 2, core decompression and bone grafting in 2, hip distraction arthroplasty in 2, and synovectomy in 2. Operative time averaged 168.6 minutes when only osteochondroplasty and/or synovectomy were performed. Hip flexion range improved from a preoperative mean of 84.7° to a mean of 115.0° at the latest follow-up visit. Early continuous passive motion and ambulation were stressed in rehabilitation. No avascular necrosis of the femoral head was noted up to the time of the latest follow-up visit, except for in one SCFE patient whose surgical intervention was delayed for medical reasons. Conclusions Ganz surgical hip dislocation provides wide exposure of the femoral head and neck, which enables complete and precise evaluation of the femoral head and neck contour. Hence, the extensive impinging bump can be excised meticulously, and the circulation of the femoral head can be monitored during surgery. The Ganz procedure was useful in severe pediatric hip diseases and allowed for quick rehabilitation with fewer complications. PMID:19885048

  5. Results of uncemented distal locked prosthesis in revision hip arthroplasty with proximal femoral bone loss: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, Sanjay; Jhunjhunwala, Hari Ram; Pachore, Jawahir A; Joglekar, Siddharth B; Eachempati, Krishna Kiran

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Management of bone loss is a challenge in revision total hip arthroplasty (THA). A retrospective review was performed to study the use of uncemented distal locked prosthesis in cases with proximal femoral bone loss. Materials and Methods: Uncemented stems with distal interlocking were used in 65 hips during revision THAs with 38 hips having Paprosky IIIB/IV defects between January 1998 and February 2004. There were 48 males and 17 females in the study with an average age of 53 years (range 30-80 years). Radiographic and clinical outcome evaluation using the Harris hip score (HHS) were performed. Results: An improvement in HHS (mean: 33 points) was observed at final followup (mean: 9 years). Regeneration of proximal bone stock was observed without signs of loosening or subsidence and none of the stems were revised. Three patients developed recurrent dislocation while one had a stem subsidence of 1cm following removal of interlocking bolts. Conclusion: Uncemented distal locked prosthesis provide adequate stability in revision THA, aiding the reconstruction of bony deficiencies while avoiding the disadvantages of fully porous or cemented implants. PMID:23533020

  6. Results of the cementless Mallory-Head primary total hip arthroplasty: a 5 to 7 year review.

    PubMed Central

    Mulliken, B. D.; Bourne, R. B.; Rorabeck, C. H.; Nayak, N.

    1996-01-01

    We reviewed the results of 172 plasma-sprayed, titanium primary total hip arthroplasties inserted without cement and followed 5 to 7 years. Hips were replaced for a wide range of diagnoses and patient ages. No femoral components had been revised nor were any considered unstable. Clinical results have been excellent; 88% of hips had either no or slight amount of pain and only 5% of patients had thigh pain when specifically asked. Radiographically, this femoral component achieved stability after an initial subsidence in 9% of cases. Extensive femoral bone resorption was rare, and distal cortical hypertrophy was commonly seen. Pelvic osteolysis occurred in 16 (9%) cases and was considered major in 10 of these. It was the cause of failure of 3 acetabular components. Femoral endosteal lysis was not observed. We concluded that mechanical stability of the Mallory-Head titanium total hip prostheses is excellent. However, significant pelvic osteolysis had occurred commonly with this implant design, and will continue to pose major reconstructive problems in the future. Images Figure 5 Figure 7a Figure 7b Figure 7c Figures 8 a-b Figures 9 a-b Figures 10 a-b Figures 11a-d PMID:9129271

  7. Postoperative Changes in In Vivo Measured Friction in Total Hip Joint Prosthesis during Walking

    PubMed Central

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by ‘running-in’ effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different ‘running-in’ effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  8. Postoperative changes in in vivo measured friction in total hip joint prosthesis during walking.

    PubMed

    Damm, Philipp; Bender, Alwina; Bergmann, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Loosening of the artificial cup and inlay is the most common reasons for total hip replacement failures. Polyethylene wear and aseptic loosening are frequent reasons. Furthermore, over the past few decades, the population of patients receiving total hip replacements has become younger and more active. Hence, a higher level of activity may include an increased risk of implant loosening as a result of friction-induced wear. In this study, an instrumented hip implant was used to measure the contact forces and friction moments in vivo during walking. Subsequently, the three-dimensional coefficient of friction in vivo was calculated over the whole gait cycle. Measurements were collected from ten subjects at several time points between three and twelve months postoperative. No significant change in the average resultant contact force was observed between three and twelve months postoperative. In contrast, a significant decrease of up to 47% was observed in the friction moment. The coefficient of friction also decreased over postoperative time on average. These changes may be caused by 'running-in' effects of the gliding components or by the improved lubricating properties of the synovia. Because the walking velocity and contact forces were found to be nearly constant during the observed period, the decrease in friction moment suggests an increase in fluid viscosity. The peak values of the contact force individually varied by 32%-44%. The friction moment individually differed much more, by 110%-129% at three and up to 451% at twelve months postoperative. The maximum coefficient of friction showed the highest individual variability, about 100% at three and up to 914% at twelve months after surgery. These individual variations in the friction parameters were most likely due to different 'running-in' effects that were influenced by the individual activity levels and synovia properties. PMID:25806805

  9. Mixing of components from different manufacturers in total hip arthroplasty: prevalence and comparative outcomes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Keith; Pickford, Martin; Newell, Claire; Howard, Peter; Hunt, Linda P; Blom, Ashley W

    2015-12-01

    Background and purpose - There have recently been highly publicized examples of suboptimal outcomes with some newer implant designs used for total hip replacement. This has led to calls for tighter regulation. However, surgeons do not always adhere to the regulations already in place and often use implants from different manufacturers together to replace a hip, which is against the recommendations of the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and the directions of the manufacturers. Patients and methods - We used data from the National Joint Registry of England and Wales (NJR) to investigate this practice. Results - Mixing of components was common, and we identified over 90,000 cases recorded between 2003 and 2013. In the majority of these cases (48,156), stems and heads from one manufacturer were mixed with polyethylene cemented cups from another manufacturer. When using a cemented stem and a polyethylene cup, mixing of stems from one manufacturer with cups from another was associated with a lower revision rate. At 8 years, the cumulative percentage of revisions was 1.9% (95% CI: 1.7-2.1) in the mixed group as compared to 2.4% (2.3-2.5) in the matched group (p = 0.001). Mixing of heads from one manufacturer with stems from another was associated with a higher revision rate (p < 0.001). In hip replacements with ceramic-on-ceramic or metal-on-metal bearings, mixing of stems, heads, and cups from different manufacturers was associated with similar revision rates (p > 0.05). Interpretation - Mixing of components from different manufacturers is a common practice, despite the fact that it goes against regulatory guidance. However, it is not associated with increased revision rates unless heads and stems from different manufacturers are used together. PMID:26201845

  10. Percutaneous and skeletal biocarbon implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, V.

    1977-01-01

    Review of carbon implants developed by NASA discussed four different types of implants and subsequent improvements. Improvements could be of specific interest to rehabilitation centers and similar organizations.

  11. Monte Carlo characterization of materials for prosthetic implants and dosimetric validation of Pinnacle 3 TPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palleri, Francesca; Baruffaldi, Fabio; Angelini, Anna Lisa; Ferri, Andrea; Spezi, Emiliano

    2008-12-01

    In external beam radiotherapy the calculation of dose distribution for patients with hip prostheses is critical. Metallic implants not only degrade the image quality but also perturb the dose distribution. Conventional treatment planning systems do not accurately account for high-Z prosthetic implants heterogeneities, especially at interfaces. The materials studied in this work have been chosen on the basis of a statistical investigation on the hip prostheses implanted in 70 medical centres. The first aim of this study is a systematic characterization of materials used for hip prostheses, and it has been provided by BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code. The second aim is to evaluate the capabilities of a specific treatment planning system, Pinnacle 3, when dealing with dose calculations in presence of metals, also close to the regions of high-Z gradients. In both cases it has been carried out an accurate comparison versus experimental measurements for two clinical photon beam energies (6 MV and 18 MV) and for two experimental sets-up: metallic cylinders inserted in a water phantom and in a specifically built PMMA slab. Our results show an agreement within 2% between experiments and MC simulations. TPS calculations agree with experiments within 3%.

  12. Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity.

    PubMed

    Pizon, Anthony F; Abesamis, Michael; King, Andrew M; Menke, Nathan

    2013-12-01

    Prosthetic hip-associated cobalt toxicity (PHACT) is gaining recognition due to the use of metal-on-metal total hip replacements. Identifying true toxicity from merely elevated cobalt levels can be extremely difficult due to the lack of available data. An extensive review of the medical literature was undertaken to characterize cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips. As an objective approach to making the diagnosis of PHACT, we suggest the following criteria: (1) elevated serum or whole blood cobalt levels due to a prosthetic hip, (2) at least two test-confirmed findings consistent with cobalt toxicity, and (3) exclusion of other etiologies. Adhering to objective diagnostic data for PHACT is a realistic and prudent method by which to eliminate the subjectivity of vague or difficult to identify complaints. These diagnostic criteria are not meant to evaluate prosthetic hardware failure, but as a means to identify systemic cobalt toxicity. Finally, assessment of cobalt toxicity from prosthetic hips should be done in conjunction with a medical toxicologist. PMID:24258006

  13. Cystic lesion around the hip joint

    PubMed Central

    Yukata, Kiminori; Nakai, Sho; Goto, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Yuichi; Shimaoka, Yasunori; Yamanaka, Issei; Sairyo, Koichi; Hamawaki, Jun-ichi

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a narrative review of cystic lesions around the hip and primarily consists of 5 sections: Radiological examination, prevalence, pathogenesis, symptoms, and treatment. Cystic lesions around the hip are usually asymptomatic but may be observed incidentally on imaging examinations, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Some cysts may enlarge because of various pathological factors, such as trauma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or total hip arthroplasty (THA), and may become symptomatic because of compression of surrounding structures, including the femoral, obturator, or sciatic nerves, external iliac or common femoral artery, femoral or external iliac vein, sigmoid colon, cecum, small bowel, ureters, and bladder. Treatment for symptomatic cystic lesions around the hip joint includes rest, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug administration, needle aspiration, and surgical excision. Furthermore, when these cysts are associated with osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and THA, primary or revision THA surgery will be necessary concurrent with cyst excision. Knowledge of the characteristic clinical appearance of cystic masses around the hip will be useful for determining specific diagnoses and treatments. PMID:26495246

  14. Implantable, Ingestible Electronic Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinberg, Leonard

    1987-01-01

    Small quartz-crystal-controlled oscillator swallowed or surgically implanted provides continuous monitoring of patient's internal temperature. Receiver placed near patient measures oscillator frequency, and temperature inferred from previously determined variation of frequency with temperature. Frequency of crystal-controlled oscillator varies with temperature. Circuit made very small and implanted or ingested to measure internal body temperature.

  15. Synthetically programmable nanoparticle superlattices using a hollow three-dimensional spacer approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auyeung, Evelyn; Cutler, Joshua I.; Macfarlane, Robert J.; Jones, Matthew R.; Wu, Jinsong; Liu, George; Zhang, Ke; Osberg, Kyle D.; Mirkin, Chad A.

    2012-01-01

    Crystalline nanoparticle arrays and superlattices with well-defined geometries can be synthesized by using appropriate electrostatic, hydrogen-bonding or biological recognition interactions. Although superlattices with many distinct geometries can be produced using these approaches, the library of achievable lattices could be increased by developing a strategy that allows some of the nanoparticles within a binary lattice to be replaced with `spacer' entities that are constructed to mimic the behaviour of the nanoparticles they replace, even though they do not contain an inorganic core. The inclusion of these spacer entities within a known binary superlattice would effectively delete one set of nanoparticles without affecting the positions of the other set. Here, we show how hollow DNA nanostructures can be used as `three-dimensional spacers' within nanoparticle superlattices assembled through programmable DNA interactions. We show that this strategy can be used to form superlattices with five distinct symmetries, including one that has never before been observed in any crystalline material.

  16. Rotor bore and turbine rotor wheel/spacer heat exchange flow circuit

    DOEpatents

    Caruso, Philip M. (Selkirk, NY); Eldrid, Sacheverel Quentin (Saratoga Springs, NY); Ladhani, Azad A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeMania, Alan Richard (Niskayuna, NY); Palmer, Gene David (Clifton Park, NY); Wilson, Ian David (Clifton Park, NY); Rathbun, Lisa Shirley (Scotia, NY); Akin, Robert Craig (Schenectady, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a turbine having closed-circuit steam-cooling passages about the rim of the rotor during steady-state operation, compressor discharge air is supplied to the rotor bore for passage radially outwardly into the wheel space cavities between the wheels and spacers. Communicating slots and channels in the spacers and wheels at circumferentially spaced positions enable egress of the compressor discharge air into the hot gas flow path. At turbine startup, cooling air flows through the closed-circuit steam passages to cool the outer rim of the rotor while compressor discharge air pre-warms the wheels and spacers. At steady-state, cooling steam is supplied in the closed-circuit steam-cooling passages and compressor discharge air is supplied through the bore and into the wheel space cavities to cool the rotor.

  17. AA stacking, tribological and electronic properties of double-layer graphene with krypton spacer.

    PubMed

    Popov, Andrey M; Lebedeva, Irina V; Knizhnik, Andrey A; Lozovik, Yurii E; Potapkin, Boris V; Poklonski, Nikolai A; Siahlo, Andrei I; Vyrko, Sergey A

    2013-10-21

    Structural, energetic, and tribological characteristics of double-layer graphene with commensurate and incommensurate krypton spacers of nearly monolayer coverage are studied within the van der Waals-corrected density functional theory. It is shown that when the spacer is in the commensurate phase, the graphene layers have the AA stacking. For this phase, the barriers to relative in-plane translational and rotational motion and the shear mode frequency of the graphene layers are calculated. For the incommensurate phase, both of the barriers are found to be negligibly small. A considerable change of tunneling conductance between the graphene layers separated by the commensurate krypton spacer at their relative subangstrom displacement is revealed by the use of the Bardeen method. The possibility of nanoelectromechanical systems based on the studied tribological and electronic properties of the considered heterostructures is discussed. PMID:24160531

  18. Identification of rickettsial isolates at the species level using multi-spacer typing

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Raoult, Didier

    2007-01-01

    Background In order to estimate whether multi-spacer typing (MST), based on the sequencing of variable intergenic spacers, could serve for the identification of Rickettsia at the species level, we applied it to 108 rickettsial isolates or arthropod amplicons that include representatives of 23 valid Rickettsia species. Results MST combining the dksA-xerC, mppA-purC, and rpmE-tRNAfMet spacer sequences identified 61 genotypes, allowing the differentiation of each species by at least one distinct genotype. In addition, MST was discriminatory at the strain level in six species for which several isolates or arthropod amplicons were available. Conclusion MST proved to be a reproducible and high-resolution genotyping method allowing clear identification of rickettsial isolates at the species level and further additional differentiation of strains within some species. PMID:17662158

  19. Graphene for Biomedical Implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Thomas; Podila, Ramakrishna; Alexis, Frank; Rao, Apparao; Clemson Bioengineering Team; Clemson Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we used graphene, a one-atom thick sheet of carbon atoms, to modify the surfaces of existing implant materials to enhance both bio- and hemo-compatibility. This novel effort meets all functional criteria for a biomedical implant coating as it is chemically inert, atomically smooth and highly durable, with the potential for greatly enhancing the effectiveness of such implants. Specifically, graphene coatings on nitinol, a widely used implant and stent material, showed that graphene coated nitinol (Gr-NiTi) supports excellent smooth muscle and endothelial cell growth leading to better cell proliferation. We further determined that the serum albumin adsorption on Gr-NiTi is greater than that of fibrinogen, an important and well understood criterion for promoting a lower thrombosis rate. These hemo-and biocompatible properties and associated charge transfer mechanisms, along with high strength, chemical inertness and durability give graphene an edge over most antithrombogenic coatings for biomedical implants and devices.

  20. Hip-Hopping across China: Intercultural Formulations of Local Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Catrice

    2012-01-01

    The linguistic dimensions of globalized hip-hop cannot be understood simply as a byproduct of English as an American export. As hip-hop mobilizes, it is common (and arguably necessary) for global hip-hop communities to struggle through purposeful, semiotically rooted dialectics over what constitutes "authentic" and respectable forms of local…

  1. Revolutionizing Environmental Education through Indigenous Hip Hop Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorlewski, Julie; Porfilio, Brad J.

    2012-01-01

    Based upon the life histories of six Indigenous hip hop artists of the Beat Nation artist collective, this essay captures how Indigenous hip hop has the potential to revolutionize environmental education. Hip hop provides Indigenous youth an emancipatory space to raise their opposition to neocolonial controls of Indigenous territories that…

  2. Return to sport after hip arthroscopy: aggregate recommendations from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers.

    PubMed

    Domb, Benjamin G; Stake, Christine E; Finch, Nathan A; Cramer, T Luke

    2014-10-01

    Hip arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical technique often performed in athletes who want an expeditious return to sport. To the authors' knowledge, no studies in the literature provide a time frame or criteria for return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to develop an aggregate recommendation for return to sport after hip arthroscopy based on data assimilated from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers. Twenty-seven orthopedic surgeons from high-volume hip arthroscopy centers completed a survey regarding return to sport after hip arthroscopy. The questionnaire asked surgeons to give a time frame for return to sport and to choose meaningful criteria that an athlete must meet prior to return to sport. Surgeons were asked to categorize various common sports as high, medium, or low risk with regard to the hip. The aggregate results were used to create standardized recommendations for time, criteria, and risk for return to competitive sports. Regarding time frame for return to sport, 70% of surgeons recommended 12 to 20 weeks. In addressing criteria for return to sport, 85% of surgeons recommended that patients need to be able to reproduce all motions involved in their sport without pain. A majority of surgeons recommended criteria of pain-free running, jumping, lateral agility drills, and single-leg squats. Finally, surgeons categorized sports requiring the most movement and impact of the hip joint (football, basketball, wrestling, and martial arts) as high-risk sports. Sports with less impact on the hip, such as golf, were ranked as low risk. PMID:25275978

  3. Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane with integrated spacer for treating asthma: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Berger, William E; Tashkin, Donald P

    2015-01-01

    Flunisolide hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) with integrated spacer is the most recent reformulated inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) for asthma available in the United States. It is the only product that combines a corticosteroid extrafine aerosol with a built-in spacer. The potential clinical benefit of the flunisolide HFA formulation and its integrated spacer for treating persistent asthma was assessed through a comprehensive review of the published literature and data from the past 10 years focusing on (1) flunisolide, the molecule, and the impact of the HFA reformulation; (2) updated information on the anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA, particularly in the distal airways; and (3) the usefulness of an integrated spacer. Flunisolide HFA was found effective and safe in clinical studies and comparable with the chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) formulation, but at about one-third the dose of flunisolide CFC, likely reflecting both the device and the particle size of the reformulated product. Compared with the CFC formulation, the extrafine aerosol and smaller particle size of flunisolide HFA substantially increased pulmonary deposition and decreased oropharyngeal deposition. The integrated spacer further enhanced the pulmonary/oropharyngeal deposition ratio. Examination of lung biopsy specimens indicated a favorable anti-inflammatory response to flunisolide HFA in peripheral airways. Pediatric studies showed no significant effects on growth. The data indicate that flunisolide HFA is a safe and effective maintenance therapy for asthma patients. The integrated spacer may provide an added advantage for patients, especially those who may be more likely to experience adverse effects of ICSs, both local and systemic, including children susceptible to adverse effects on growth. PMID:25635610

  4. Stable inverted small molecular organic solar cells using a p-doped optical spacer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Seo, Ji-Won; Lee, Jung-Yong

    2014-11-01

    We report inverted small molecular organic solar cells using a doped window layer as an optical spacer. The optical spacer was used to shift the optical field distribution inside the active layers, generating more charge carriers from sunlight. In this report, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD) was doped with 2,2-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile (F6-TCNNQ), a p-type dopant material. P-doped MeO-TPD was adopted as an optical spacer because it has a large energy band gap, and its conductivity can be increased by several orders of magnitude through a doping process. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 4.15% was achieved with the doped window layer of optimized thickness. Lastly, we present significantly improved stability of the inverted devices with the MeO-TPD layer.We report inverted small molecular organic solar cells using a doped window layer as an optical spacer. The optical spacer was used to shift the optical field distribution inside the active layers, generating more charge carriers from sunlight. In this report, N,N,N',N'-tetrakis(4-methoxyphenyl)-benzidine (MeO-TPD) was doped with 2,2-(perfluoronaphthalene-2,6-diylidene)dimalononitrile (F6-TCNNQ), a p-type dopant material. P-doped MeO-TPD was adopted as an optical spacer because it has a large energy band gap, and its conductivity can be increased by several orders of magnitude through a doping process. As a result, a power conversion efficiency of 4.15% was achieved with the doped window layer of optimized thickness. Lastly, we present significantly improved stability of the inverted devices with the MeO-TPD layer. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05425c

  5. COMPONENT VERSION IN MODULAR TOTAL HIP REVISION

    PubMed Central

    Kopec, Michael A.; Pemberton, Aaron; Milbrandt, Joseph C.; Allan, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    Morphologic changes of the proximal femur make revision total hip arthroplasty challenging. Metaphyseal retroversion and diaphyseal varus are common in this scenario. Twenty-one total hip revisions using a modular femoral prosthesis were examined by obtaining three radiographs (A/P, surgical lateral, and true lateral of the femur) to assemble CAD models for determining the range of modular component positioning. An average of femoral neck anteversion was observed. Seventeen of 21 cases (81%) had retroverted metaphyseal segments (?23.2°+/?17.4°) and/or varus stems (?32.1°+/?13.0°). Neck anteversion averaged 21.4°(+/?10.0°). One of 21 cases (5%) resulted in component orientation similar to a non-modular prosthesis. Modular components provide options to accommodate proximal femoral remodeling not afforded by monobloc stems in total hip revision surgery. PMID:19742077

  6. Measurement of Hip Geometry-Technical Background.

    PubMed

    Beck, Thomas J; Broy, Susan B

    2015-01-01

    Conventional dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry images display a digital projection of the inorganic mineral mass in a scanned region. Bone mineral density software generates an average of the pixels within one or more regions. Although not used in the conventional analysis, the images also contain dimensional information limited to the plane of the image. The hip structure analysis method and that of the similar GE, Madison, WI, algorithm Advanced Hip Analysis use both the dimensional information and the mineral mass data to compute the types of dimensional properties (i.e., geometry) that are used to evaluate mechanical strength in engineering analyses. This article describes the hip structure analysis method and a somewhat cruder geometry approximation that does not require a reanalysis of the image. Limitations of the methods are discussed. PMID:26277850

  7. Multilayer barrier films comprising nitrogen spacers between free-standing barrier layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granstrom, Jimmy Erik

    The air sensitivity of organic electronic devices has delayed the broad commercialization of the printed "plastics" electronics technology. The vacuum deposition methods used to fabricate multi-layers which fulfill the encapsulation requirements for plastic electronic devices are complex and expensive. Fully printed "plastic" electronics requires the development of encapsulation architectures which comprise solution deposited barriers and/or low-cost free-standing barrier films based on polymers, e.g. poly ethylene terephthalate (PET). One way to reach this goal is the insertion of contaminant-free (e.g. pure N2) gas-phase spacers between free-standing barrier films in a multilayer structure. The spacers themselves do not exhibit any barrier properties (diffusion of gas permeants in a gas phase is orders of magnitude faster than in a solid), but they delay the attainment of steady state. The spacer also reduces the chemical potential gradient across downstream barrier layers during the transient regime, reducing permeation rate to the device. Furthermore, if sorption is not fully equilibrated and introduces a kinetic barrier to transport, the additional sorption and desorption steps needed for permeant to reach the device may also slow the steady-state permeation rate. Encapsulation architectures utilizing both single-matrix (without nitrogen spacers) and multiple-matrix structures (with nitrogen spacers) were fabricated in this study, including Russian Doll structures utilizing pairs of free-standing barrier films and epoxy seals separated by nitrogen spacers. This structure enables the use of low-cost epoxy to attach two or more free-standing barrier films to a substrate with improved barrier performance. The performance of various Russian Doll encapsulations was evaluated with the calcium thin film optical transmission test, showing improved performance of the Russian doll configuration relative to a non-nested barrier/spacer architecture, and demonstrating that water vapor transmission rates of 0.00021 g/m2, day or below can be achieved with low-cost materials in this architecture. This WVTR correlates to a predicted lifetime of more than 10 years for inverted organic bulk heterojunction solar cell modules fabricated and tested by Konarka Technologies (Lowell, MA, USA). The use of thin instability suppressed barriers, deposited by solution, can be used to further optimize the cost/performance ratio of encapsulation architectures comprising nitrogen spacers.

  8. Comparison of velocity and temperature fields for two types of spacers in an annular channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lávi?ka, David

    2012-04-01

    The paper deals with measurement of flow field using a modern laser method (PIV) in an annular channel of very small dimension - a fuel cell model. The velocity field was measured in several positions and plains around the spacer. The measurement was extended also to record temperatures by thermocouples soldered into stainless-steel tube wall. The measurement was focused on cooling process of the preheated fuel cell tube model, where the tube was very slowly flooded with water. Main result of the paper is comparison of two spacer's designs with respect to measured velocity and temperature fields.

  9. Production Principles and Technological Development of Novel Woven Spacer Preforms and Integrated Stiffener Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torun, Ahmet R.; Mountasir, Adil; Hoffmann, Gerald; Cherif, Chokri

    2013-06-01

    3D textile preforms offer a high potential to increase mechanical properties of composites and/or decrease manufacturing costs. Within the scope of this study, production principles were developed for complex spacer preforms and integrated stiffeners. These principles were applied through technological further development of the well-known face-to-face and terry weaving techniques. Various woven preforms were produced with Glass fibre/Polypropylene (GF/PP) Commingled yarns, however, the technology is suitable for any type of reinforcement yarns. U-shaped woven spacer preform was consolidated into a sandwich composite component for lightweight applications.

  10. Heterogeneous Diversity of Spacers within CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankui; Deem, Michael W.

    2010-09-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) in bacterial and archaeal DNA have recently been shown to be a new type of antiviral immune system in these organisms. We here study the diversity of spacers in CRISPR under selective pressure. We propose a population dynamics model that explains the biological observation that the leader-proximal end of CRISPR is more diversified and the leader-distal end of CRISPR is more conserved. This result is shown to be in agreement with recent experiments. Our results show that the CRISPR spacer structure is influenced by and provides a record of the viral challenges that bacteria face.

  11. Poor outcome of revised resurfacing hip arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Lisa N; Prosser, Gareth H; Graves, Stephen E; Davidson, David C; Stanford, Tyman E

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose Recent years have seen a rapid increase in the use of resurfacing hip arthroplasty despite the lack of literature on the long-term outcome. In particular, there is little evidence regarding the outcome of revisions of primary resurfacing. The purpose of this analysis was to examine the survivorship of primary resurfacing hip arthroplasties that have been revised. Patients and methods Over 12,000 primary resurfacing hip arthroplasties were recorded by the Australian Orthopaedic Association National Joint Replacement Registry between September 1, 1999 and December 31, 2008. During this time, 397 revisions for reasons other than infection were reported for these primary resurfacings and classified as acetabular, femoral, or both acetabular and femoral revisions. The survivorship of the different types of revisions was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared using proportional hazard models. Additionally, the outcome of a femoral-only revision was compared to that of primary conventional total hip arthroplasty. Results Acetabular-only revision had a high risk of re-revision compared to femoral-only and both acetabular and femoral revision (5-year cumulative per cent revision of 20%, 7%, and 5% respectively). Femoral-only revision had a risk of re-revision similar to that of revision of both the acetabular and femoral components. Femoral-only revision had over twice the risk of revision of primary conventional total hip arthroplasty. Interpretation Revision of a primary resurfacing arthroplasty is associated with a major risk of re-revision. The best outcome is achieved when either the femoral-only or both the acetabular and femoral components are revised. Technically straightforward femoral-only revisions generally have a worse outcome than a primary conventional total hip arthroplasty. PMID:20170416

  12. The Formation of "Hip-Hop Academicus"--How American Scholars Talk about the Academisation of Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soderman, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Social activism and education have been associated with hip-hop since it emerged in New York City 38 years ago. Therefore, it might not be surprising that universities have become interested in hip-hop. This article aims to highlight this "hip-hop academisation" and analyse the discursive mechanisms that manifest in these academisation…

  13. Calibration of CT Hounsfield units for radiotherapy treatment planning of patients with metallic hip prostheses: the use of the extended CT-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coolens, C.; Childs, P. J.

    2003-06-01

    Heterogeneity corrections for radiotherapy dose calculations are based on the electron density of the disturbing heterogeneity. However, when CT planning a radiotherapy treatment, where metallic hip implants are present, considerable artefacts are seen in the images. Often, an additional problem arises whereby no information regarding the artificial hip's composition and geometry is available. This study investigates whether the extended CT range can be used to determine the composition (hence electron density) of artificial hips in radiotherapy patients. Two CT-calibration methods were evaluated, one based on material substitution, the other a stoichiometric calibration. We also evaluate whether the physical dimensions of metal prostheses can be accurately imaged for subsequent use in treatment planning computers. Neither calibration method successfully predicted electron densities. However, the limited range of implant-materials used in patients means that the extended CT range can still successfully distinguish between implant densities. The physical dimensions can be determined to +/-2 mm by establishing the required windowing of displays for each material. The cross-sectional area of the prosthesis and the presence of other high-density objects in a CT slice can influence the generated CT number and careful design of calibration phantoms is essential.

  14. Contributions of human tissue analysis to understanding the mechanisms of loosening and osteolysis in total hip replacement

    PubMed Central

    Gallo, Jiri; Vaculova, Jana; Goodman, Stuart B.; Konttinen, Yrjö T.; Thyssen, Jacob P.

    2015-01-01

    Aseptic loosening and osteolysis are the most frequent late complications of total hip arthroplasty (THA) leading to revision of the prosthesis. This review aims to demonstrate how histopathological studies contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of aseptic loosening/osteolysis development. Only studies analysing periprosthetic tissues retrieved from failed implants in humans were included. Data from 101 studies (5532 patients with failure of THA implants) published in English or German between 1974 and 2013 were included. “Control” samples were reported in 45 of the 101 studies. The most frequently examined tissues were the bone-implant interface membrane and pseudosynovial tissues. Histopathological studies contribute importantly to determination of key cell populations underlying the biological mechanisms of aseptic loosening and osteolysis. The studies demonstrated the key molecules of the host response at the protein level (chemokines, cytokines, nitric oxide metabolites, metalloproteinases). However, these studies also have important limitations. Tissues harvested at revision surgery reflect specifically end-stage failure and may not adequately reveal the evolution of pathophysiological events that lead to prosthetic loosening and osteolysis. One possible solution is to examine tissues harvested from stable total hip arthroplasties that have been revised at various time periods due to dislocation or periprosthetic fracture in multicenter studies. PMID:24525037

  15. Role of the compression screw in the dynamic hip-screw system: A finite-element study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Chen, Yen-Nien; Li, Chun-Ting; Peng, Yao-Te; Chang, Chih-Han

    2015-12-01

    The dynamic hip-screw (DHS) system is a common implant for fixation of proximal femur fractures. During assembly, it has been recommended to remove the compression screw after initial compression has been obtained; however, related complications had been reported. So far, the role of compression screw in the reconstructed stability of hip fractures as well as the mechanical strength of the DHS system has rarely been mentioned. This study investigated the function of this screw in the DHS system during fracture healing. Based on the FE method, six numerical models of proximal femur were employed to analyze the mechanical response of a DHS implant with various fracture types and different fixation strategies (with or without a compression screw). The displacement of the femur head and peak von Mises stress were selected as indices of the stability of a fractured femur stabilized by a DHS device and of the risk of implant failure, respectively. Our results showed that a retained compression screw increased reconstructed structural stiffness, reducing the displacement of the femur head. This screw also helped to lessen mechanical failure of side plate by reducing the peak von Mises stress around the connection between the barrel and side plate. Both findings were evident in the proximal femur fracture involving the intertrochanteric part, and even more obvious in the setting of bony defects. Thus, we recommend the maintenance of compression screw in the DHS system while treating the intertrochanteric fracture, particularly in cases with bony defects. PMID:26521645

  16. Validation of a computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear in total hip arthroplasty using all polyethylene cemented acetabular components.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Jean; Zaoui, Amine; Scemama, Caroline; Martell, John; Bragdon, Charles; Hamadouche, Moussa

    2015-03-01

    Although cemented all polyethylene (PE) cups have been routinely used in total hip arthroplasty for decades, no computer-assisted method for measurement of radiographic wear has ever been specifically validated for these implants. Using a validated hip phantom model, AP plain hip radiographs were obtained consecutively for eight simulated wear positions. A version of Martell's Hip Analysis Suite software dedicated to all polyethylene sockets was used by three different examiners of varied experience. Bias (mean, standard deviation and 95% confidence interval limit), repeatability (standard deviation and 95% limit) and reproducibility (standard deviation and 95% limit) for two-dimensional wear measurements were assessed, as recommended by the current ASTM guidelines. Using this protocol, the dedicated software showed an overall mean bias of 0.089?±?0.060?mm (mean?±?SD), and 0.118?mm for 95% CI limit. Repeatability (intra examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.106?mm and 0.292?mm. Reproducibility (inter examiner) standard deviation and 95% limit were respectively 0.112?mm and 0.308?mm. Martell Hip Analysis for all PE cemented cups is a reliable and low-cost instrument in the assessment of wear, despite being less precise than its original version dedicated to cementless components. PMID:25564735

  17. Spine interbody implants: material selection and modification, functionalization and bioactivation of surfaces to improve osseointegration.

    PubMed

    Rao, Prashanth J; Pelletier, Matthew H; Walsh, William R; Mobbs, Ralph J

    2014-05-01

    The clinical outcome of lumbar spinal fusion is correlated with achievement of bony fusion. Improving interbody implant bone on-growth and in-growth may enhance fusion, limiting pseudoarthrosis, stress shielding, subsidence and implant failure. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and titanium (Ti) are commonly selected for interbody spacer construction. Although these materials have desirable biocompatibility and mechanical properties, they require further modification to support osseointegration. Reports of extensive research on this topic are available in biomaterial-centric published reports; however, there are few clinical studies concerning surface modification of interbody spinal implants. The current article focuses on surface modifications aimed at fostering osseointegration from a clinician's point of view. Surface modification of Ti by creating rougher surfaces, modifying its surface topography (macro and nano), physical and chemical treatment and creating a porous material with high interconnectivity can improve its osseointegrative potential and bioactivity. Coating the surface with osteoconductive materials like hydroxyapatite (HA) can improve osseointegration. Because PEEK spacers are relatively inert, creating a composite by adding Ti or osteoconductive materials like HA can improve osseointegration. In addition, PEEK may be coated with Ti, effectively bio-activating the coating. PMID:24890288

  18. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  19. Biological in situ Dose Painting for Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Using Drug-Loaded Implantable Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Cormack, Robert A.; Sridhar, Srinivas; Suh, W. Warren; D'Amico, Anthony V.; Makrigiorgos, G. Mike

    2010-02-01

    Purpose: Implantable devices routinely used for increasing spatial accuracy in modern image-guided radiation treatments (IGRT), such as fiducials or brachytherapy spacers, encompass the potential for in situ release of biologically active drugs, providing an opportunity to enhance the therapeutic ratio. We model this new approach for two types of treatment. Methods and Materials: Radiopaque fiducials used in IGRT, or prostate brachytherapy spacers ('eluters'), were assumed to be loaded with radiosensitizer for in situ drug slow release. An analytic function describing the concentration of radiosensitizer versus distance from eluters, depending on diffusion-elimination properties of the drug in tissue, was developed. Tumor coverage by the drug was modeled for tumors typical of lung stereotactic body radiation therapy treatments for various eluter dimensions and drug properties. Six prostate {sup 125}I brachytherapy cases were analyzed by assuming implantation of drug-loaded spacers. Radiosensitizer-induced subvolume boost was simulated from which biologically effective doses for typical radiosensitizers were calculated in one example. Results: Drug distributions from three-dimensional arrangements of drug eluters versus eluter size and drug properties were tabulated. Four radiosensitizer-loaded fiducials provide adequate radiosensitization for {approx}4-cm-diameter lung tumors, thus potentially boosting biologically equivalent doses in centrally located stereotactic body treated lesions. Similarly, multiple drug-loaded spacers provide prostate brachytherapy with flexible shaping of 'biologically equivalent doses' to fit requirements difficult to meet by using radiation alone, e.g., boosting a high-risk region juxtaposed to the urethra while respecting normal tissue tolerance of both the urethra and the rectum. Conclusions: Drug loading of implantable devices routinely used in IGRT provides new opportunities for therapy modulation via biological in situ dose painting.

  20. Mycological Society of America Comparison of Isozymes, rDNA Spacer Regions and MAT-2 DNA Sequences as Phylogenetic

    E-print Network

    Harrington, Thomas C.

    Mycological Society of America Comparison of Isozymes, rDNA Spacer Regions and MAT-2 DNA Sequences 66044-8897 Comparison of isozymes, rDNA spacer regions and MAT-2DNA sequences as phylogenetic characters to the phylogenies inferred from partial rDNA sequences and isozyme data. Part of the MAT-2 HMG box of species

  1. Design and fabrication of a novel porous implant with pre-set channels based on ceramic stereolithography for vascular implantation.

    PubMed

    Bian, Weiguo; Li, Dichen; Lian, Qin; Zhang, Weijie; Zhu, Linzhong; Li, Xiang; Jin, Zhongmin

    2011-09-01

    Being a multi-etiological factors disease, osteonecrosis of the femoral head affects many young people, leading to the collapse of the femur head; eventually the hip arthroplasty is needed if not treated in time. Unfortunately, as yet, no satisfactory therapy to repair necrotic bone at an early stage is present. Novel implants with pre-set channels were designed for the treatment of early femoral head necrosis. Ceramic stereolithography was applied to fabricate the green part from ?-TCP powder. Other processes, such as dehydration, rinsing, drying and sintering, were processed successively. The final ceramic part remains the same as the engineered part in both shape and internal structure. No significant deformation or crack occurred. X-ray diffraction showed that no facies changed or chemical reaction occurred during the fabrication process. The chemical composition remains the same as that of the original ?-TCP powder. The compressive strength is 23.54 MPa, close to that of natural cancellous bone. Novel implants with a pre-set channel were designed and fabricated for blood vessel implantation. Bioceramic stereolithography technology based directly on the CAD model in this research shows advantages in accurate design, optimization of 3D scaffold and critical control of the fabrication process. This proposed implant shows promising clinical application in the restoration of early femoral head necrosis. PMID:21725148

  2. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  3. Oxygen implanter for simox

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, M.; Benveniste, V.; Ryding, G.; Douglas-Hamilton, D. H.; Reed, M.; Gagne, G.; Armstrong, A.; Mack, M.

    1985-01-01

    Interest in silicon or) insulator (SOI) technology has led to the development of several alternatives to silicon on sapphire. One of the most promising techniques makes use of an ion implanter to form a buried oxide layer directly in the silicon substrate. To have useful single crystalline silicon on top of the oxide layer, it is necessary to do the implant at high wafer temperatures and rely on solid phase epitaxy to maintain surface structure. A high current, 160 keV, Nova ion implanter has been adapted to provide the ability to perform oxygen implants at elevated temperatures. The operator is free to choose any temperature in the range between 400°C and 600°C. The system then preheats the wafers to the selected temperature before the implant begins. A novel technique for providing both heating and cooling capability to the end station is employed. An infrared signal from the wafers is monitored by a room temperature lead salt detector. This signal is then used by a servo-loop to control the heating of the end station and to maintain the wafer temperature to within ± 20°C during the implant. High doses of the type necessary to form a silicon dioxide buried layer require long lived, high current oxygen sources. An oxygen source has been specially developed, which provides as much as 10 mA of ion current. At a 6 mA output, source lifetimes in excess of 40 hours have been achieved. The implanter uses a specifically designed high temperature disk, which holds ten wafers, each of four inch diameter. A variety of implant angles lying between 0° and 15° is available. The beam is scanned mechanically and an electron flood gun can be used to prevent wafer charging. Special thermal barriers have been employed to protect the apparatus from extreme temperatures and to make the heating sequence more efficient and more rapid. Every effort has been made to avoid contamination of the implant. The implant disk, for example, is overcoated with silicon monoxide. Silicon apertures have also been designed for the machine. The implanter has been used to do a high current oxygen implant with a dose of 1.25 × 10 18/cm 2, at a temperature of 570°C. Preliminary analysis of the results is very promising.

  4. Arthroscopic Treatment of Symptomatic Internal Snapping Hip with Combined Pathologies

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Duck-Soo; Hwang, Jung-Mo; Kim, Pil-Sung; Rhee, Sung-Min; Park, Seung-Hwan; Kang, Soo Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release was introduced in 2000. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release for painful internal snapping hip with concomitant hip pathologies. Methods Between January 2009 and December 2011, we performed arthroscopic iliopsoas tendon release and related surgeries in 25 patients (20 men and 5 women; mean age, 32 years; range, 17 to 53 years) with combined intraarticular hip pathologies. The patients were followed for a minimum of 2 years postoperatively. Clinical and radiological evaluations were performed. Results Snapping sounds had disappeared by the 2-year follow-up in 24 of the 25 patients. All patients who had presented with loss of flexion strength postoperatively showed recovery at postoperative week 6 to 10. Harris hip score improved from 65 points (range, 46 to 86 points) preoperatively to 84 points (range, 67 to 98 points) postoperatively (p < 0.001). Seven hips (28%) had an excellent score, 15 hips (60%) a good score, 2 hips (8%) a fair score, and one hip (4%) a poor score (p < 0.001). The Tonnis grade of osteoarthritis did not change in any of the patients at the last follow-up. Conclusions Patients with painful internal snapping hip have combined hip pathologies. Therefore, the surgeon should keep in mind that painful internal snapping hips are frequently combined with concomitant intraarticular pathologies. PMID:26217460

  5. Do novice runners have weak hips and bad running form?

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Anne; Russo, Kelsey; Edwards, Lauren; Noehren, Brian

    2014-01-01

    First, we sought to better understand the predisposition of novice female runners to injury by identifying potential differences in running mechanics and strength between experienced female runners and active novice runners. Secondly, we aimed to assess the relationship between hip and trunk strength with non-sagittal hip kinematics during running. Two female populations were recruited: 19 healthy experienced runners and 19 healthy active novice runners. Strength measurements of the hip abductors and external rotators were measured using a hand held dynamometer while trunk endurance was assessed via a side-plank. Next, an instrumented gait analysis was performed while each participant ran at 3.3m/s. Group comparisons were made using an independent t-test to identify differences in the impact peak, loading rate, peak non-sagittal hip joint angles, trunk endurance, and hip strength. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between hip kinematics and strength measurements. There were no statistically significant differences in impact peak, loading rate, peak non-sagittal hip kinematics, or strength. However, the novice runners did show a clinically meaningful trend toward increased peak hip internal rotation by 3.8° (effect size 0.520). A decrease in trunk side-plank endurance was associated with an increased peak hip internal rotation angle (r=-0.357, p=0.03), whereas isometric strength was not related to kinematics. Programs aiming to prevent injuries in novice runners should target trunk performance and possibly hip neuromuscular control, rather than hip strength. PMID:24656715

  6. Do novice runners have weak hips and bad running form?

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Anne; Russo, Kelsey; Nicholson, Lauren; Noehren, Brian

    2014-01-01

    First, we sought to better understand the predisposition of novice female runners to injury by identifying potential differences in running mechanics and strength between experienced female runners and active novice runners. Secondly, we aimed to assess the relationship between hip and trunk strength with non-sagittal hip kinematics during running. Two female populations were recruited: 19 healthy experienced runners and 19 healthy active novice runners. Strength measurements of the hip abductors and external rotators were measured using a hand held dynamometer while trunk endurance was assessed via a side-plank. Next, an instrumented gait analysis was performed while each participant ran at 3.3 m/s. Group comparisons were made using an independent t-test to identify differences in the impact peak, loading rate, peak non-sagittal hip joint angles, trunk endurance, and hip strength. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were calculated between hip kinematics and strength measurements. There were no statistically significant differences in impact peak, loading rate, peak non-sagittal hip kinematics, or strength. However, the novice runners did show a clinically meaningful trend towards increased peak hip internal rotation by 3.8 degrees (effect size 0.520). A decrease in trunk side-plank endurance was associated with an increased peak hip internal rotation angle (r=?.357, p=0.03), whereas isometric strength was not related to kinematics. Programs aiming to prevent injuries in novice runners should target trunk performance and possibly hip neuromuscular control, rather than hip strength. PMID:24656715

  7. Does bearing size influence metal ion levels in large-head metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty? A comparison of three total hip systems

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was twofold: first, to determine whether there is a statistically significant difference in the metal ion levels among three different large-head metal-on-metal (MOM) total hip systems. The second objective was to assess whether position of the implanted prostheses, patient demographics or factors such as activity levels influence overall blood metal ion levels and whether there is a difference in the functional outcomes between the systems. Methods In a cross-sectional cohort study, three different metal-on-metal total hip systems were assessed: two monoblock heads, the Durom socket (Zimmer, Warsaw, IN, USA) and the Birmingham socket (Smith and Nephew, Memphis, TN, USA), and one modular metal-on-metal total hip system (Pinnacle, Depuy Orthopedics, Warsaw, IN, USA). Fifty-four patients were recruited, with a mean age of 59.7 years and a mean follow-up time of 41 months (12 to 60). Patients were evaluated clinically, radiologically and biochemically. Statistical analysis was performed on all collected data to assess any differences between the three groups in terms of overall blood metal ion levels and also to identify whether there was any other factor within the group demographics and outcomes that could influence the mean levels of Co and Cr. Results Although the functional outcome scores were similar in all three groups, the blood metal ion levels in the larger monoblock large heads (Durom, Birmingham sockets) were significantly raised compared with those of the Pinnacle group. In addition, the metal ion levels were not found to have a statistically significant relationship to the anteversion or abduction angles as measured on the radiographs. Conclusions When considering a MOM THR, the use of a monoblock large-head system leads to higher elevations in whole blood metal ions and offers no advantage over a smaller head modular system. PMID:24472283

  8. Evolution of the Ribosomal DNA Spacers of Drosophila melanogaster : Different Patterns of Variation on X and Y Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Scott M.; Furnier, Glenn R.; Fuog, Eric; Strobeck, Curtis

    1987-01-01

    Length variation of the ribosomal gene spacers of Drosophila melanogaster was studied. Analysis of 47 X chromosomal and 47 Y chromosomal linked rDNA arrays collected from five continents indicates that the arrays on the two chromosomes differ qualitatively. The Y-linked arrays from around the world share little or no similarity for either their overall length or the organization of their spacers. Most of the X-linked arrays do, however, share a major length spacer of 5.1 kb. In addition, those X-linked arrays that have a major 5.1-kb band have similar spacer organization as demonstrated by genomic DNA digestions with several restriction enzymes. These data strongly support the hypothesis that spacer length patterns on only X-linked genes are maintained primarily by natural selection. PMID:3038672

  9. Examination of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer sequences of 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos' and Mycoplasma haemofelis.

    PubMed

    Sasaoka, Fumina; Suzuki, Jin; Fujihara, Masatoshi; Watanabe, Yusaku; Nagai, Kazuya; Harasawa, Ryô

    2012-01-01

    The intergenic spacer region between the 16S and 23S rRNA genes of mycoplasmas has been used for a genetic marker for identification of the species. Here we show the intergenic spacer regions of two hemotropic mycoplasmas, Mycoplasma haemofelis and 'Candidatus Mycoplasma haemobos (synonym: 'C. M. haemobovis')' are also useful for classification of this particular group of mycoplasms. The spacer region of M. haemofelis and `C. M. haemobos' consisted of 209 and 210 base pairs, respectively, and both lacked the spacer tRNA genes. Phylogenetic analysis suggested a monophyletic relationship among hemoplasmas and M. fastidiosum. A hypothetical secondary structure predicted in the spacer regions tentatively assigned the boxA and boxB motifs peculiar to the members of the genus Mycoplasma. M. haemofelis and 'C. M. haemobos' possessed a stem-loop structure in common, despite the presence of a palindromic nucleotide substitution in the stem region. PMID:21836377

  10. The Effect of RAS on Individuals With Total Hip Replacement and Hip Revision Surgery

    E-print Network

    Rettedal, Scott

    2014-12-31

    The Effect of RAS on Individuals With Total Hip Replacement and Hip Revision Surgery By Scott Rettedal Submitted to the graduate degree program in Music Education and Music Therapy and the Graduate Faculty of the University of Kansas in partial fulfillment... Revision Surgery ________________________________ Dr. Deanna Hanson-Abromeit Date approved: December 5, 2014 iii Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate whether individuals receiving Rhythmic Auditory Stimulation...

  11. Ion implantation at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, N.Q.; Leaf, G.K.

    1985-11-01

    A kinetic model has been developed to investigate the synergistic effects of radiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation and preferential sputtering on the spatial redistribution of implanted solutes during implantation at elevated temperatures. Sample calculations were performed for Al and Si ions implanted into Ni. With the present model, the influence of various implantation parameters on the evolution of implant concentration profiles could be examined in detail.

  12. Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte flow with spiral spacers

    E-print Network

    Improving electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells through optimizing the anolyte h l i g h t s " The spiral spacers improve electricity production in tubular microbial fuel cells to create a helical flow for improving electricity generation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs

  13. Nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker for Fungi

    E-print Network

    barcoding uses standardized 500- to 800-bp sequences to identify species of all eukaryotic kingdoms usingNuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode marker , C. André Levesqueb , Wen Chenb , and Fungal Barcoding Consortiuma,2 a National Center

  14. A Molecular Phylogeny of Apiaceae Subfamily Apioideae: Evidence from Nuclear Ribosomal DNA Internal Transcribed Spacer Sequences

    E-print Network

    Downie, Stephen R.

    Transcribed Spacer Sequences Stephen R. Downie; Deborah S. Katz-Downie American Journal of Botany, Vol. 83, No-9122%28199602%2983%3A2%3C234%3AAMPOAS%3E2.0.CO%3B2-M American Journal of Botany is currently published by Botanical

  15. Investigations in Number, Data, and Space[R]. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2013

    2013-01-01

    "Investigations in Number, Data, and Space"[R], published by Pearson Scott Foresman, is an activity-based K-5 mathematics curriculum designed to help students understand number and operations, geometry, data, measurement, and early algebra. Each instructional unit focuses on a particular content area and lasts from two to five-and-a-half weeks.…

  16. Joint perpendicular anisotropy and strong interlayer exchange coupling in systems with thin vanadium spacers

    SciTech Connect

    Devolder, T. Le Goff, A.; Eimer, S.; Adam, J.-P.

    2015-04-28

    We study the influence of the insertion of a vanadium spacer layer between an FeCoB layer and a [Co/Ni] multilayer in an MgO substrate-based system mimicking the reference system of a perpendicular anisotropy magnetic tunnel junction. The anisotropy of the [Co/Ni] multilayer gradually improves with the vanadium thicknesses t, up to an optimized state for t?=?8?Å, with little influence of the thermal annealing. The interlayer exchange coupling is ferromagnetic and very strong for t?6 Å. It can be adjusted by thermal treatment at t?=?8?Å from no coupling in the as-grown state to more than 2?mJ/m{sup 2} after 250?°C annealing. For this spacer thickness, the magnetic properties are consistent with the occurrence of a bcc (001) to an fcc (111) crystalline structure transition at the vanadium spacer. The remaining interlayer exchange coupling at t?=?8?Å is still substantially higher than the one formerly obtained with a Tantalum spacer, which holds promise for further optimization of the reference layers of tunnel junctions meant for magnetic random access memories.

  17. Tailored Phase Transitions via Mixed-Mesogen Liquid Crystalline Polymers with Silicon-Based Spacers

    E-print Network

    Mather, Patrick T.

    by a coupling between liquid crys- talline order and rubber elasticity resulting from the underlying crossTailored Phase Transitions via Mixed-Mesogen Liquid Crystalline Polymers with Silicon-Based Spacers-chain liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs) is desired for a variety of applications, including soft actuation

  18. Electrochemical behavior and dioxygen reactivity of tripodal dinuclear copper complexes linked by unsaturated rigid spacers.

    PubMed

    Gomila, Antoine; Le Poul, Nicolas; Kerbaol, Jean-Michel; Cosquer, Nathalie; Triki, Smaïl; Douziech, Bénédicte; Conan, Françoise; Le Mest, Yves

    2013-02-14

    New dinucleating ligands based on two tripodal tris(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (TMPA) units linked by a series of delocalized ?-electrons spacers have been synthesized. Their di-Cu(II) complexes have been prepared and structurally characterized. As compared to the corresponding monotopic complexes, these dinuclear Cu(II) complexes reveal spectroscopic and voltammetric features ascribable to weakly perturbed electronic interactions. In the case of the anthracenyl spacer, observation both in the solid and in solution suggests that the existence of intramolecular ?-? stacking interactions influences the geometry of the complex and hence its electronic properties. The bis-Cu(I) complexes were prepared electrochemically. In the specific case of the complex bearing a mono-alkyne spacer, addition of dioxygen in acetonitrile leads to the slow formation of a trans-?-1,2 peroxo Cu(2) complex which shows good stability at 268 K (t(1/2) = 240 s). Analysis of the kinetics of the peroxo formation by UV-vis spectroscopy suggests that the increased activation barrier for intramolecular binding of dioxygen is due to the rigidity of the spacer. PMID:23104234

  19. Cladistic biogeography of Juglans (Juglandaceae) based on chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer sequences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The phylogenetic utility of sequence variation from five chloroplast DNA intergenic spacer (IGS) regions: trnT-trnF, psbA-trnH, atpB-rbcL, trnV-16S rRNA, and trnS-trnfM was examined in the genus Juglans. A total of seventeen taxa representing the four sections within Juglans and an outgroup taxon, ...

  20. Large, Rapidly Evolving Intergenic Spacers in the Mitochondrial DNA of the Salamander Family Ambystomatidae (Amphibia: Caudata)

    E-print Network

    Shaffer, H. Bradley

    Large, Rapidly Evolving Intergenic Spacers in the Mitochondrial DNA of the Salamander Family, in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of all of the sexual species of the salamander family Ambystomatidae, of a shared 240 variation in mitochondrial genome size. In a study of the relationship between endothermy and mtDNA size

  1. Archaeal Viruses of the Sulfolobales: Isolation, Infection, and CRISPR Spacer Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Erdmann, Susanne; Garrett, Roger A

    2015-01-01

    Infection of archaea with phylogenetically diverse single viruses, performed in different laboratories, has failed to activate spacer acquisition into host CRISPR loci. The first successful uptake of archaeal de novo spacers was observed on infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 with an environmental virus mixture isolated from Yellowstone National Park (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012). Experimental studies of isolated genetic elements from this mixture revealed that SMV1 (S ulfolobus Monocauda Virus 1), a tailed spindle-shaped virus, can induce spacer acquisition in CRISPR loci of Sulfolobus species from a second coinfecting conjugative plasmid or virus (Erdmann and Garrett, Mol Microbiol 85:1044-1056, 2012; Erdmann et al. Mol Microbiol 91:900-917, 2014). Here we describe, firstly, the isolation of archaeal virus mixtures from terrestrial hot springs and the techniques used both to infect laboratory strains with these virus mixtures and to obtain purified virus particles. Secondly, we present the experimental conditions required for activating SMV1-induced spacer acquisition in two different Sulfolobus species. PMID:25981476

  2. Employing 454 amplicon pyrosequencing to reveal intragenomic divergence in the internal transcribed spacer

    E-print Network

    Laudal, Arnfinn

    spacer rDNA region in fungi Daniel L. Lindner1 , Tor Carlsen2 , R. Henrik Nilsson3 , Marie Davey2 been accepted as a DNA barcoding marker for fungi and is widely used in phylogenetic studies; however, animals, and fungi, and this variability has the potential to inflate species richness estimates

  3. Characterization of the role of oxide spacers in multilayer-enhanced SERS probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobbia, Pietro; Henegar, Alex; Gougousi, Theodosia; Cullum, Brian M.

    2015-05-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has several advantages as a transduction method for many types of optical sensors, due to its sensitivity and potential for multiplexed detection. Over the years, SERS probes have been developed to be capable of extreme sensitivities, with single molecule SERS having been achieved in randomly located hot-spots of colloidal aggregates. However, these structures suffer from significant irreproducibility, due to the randomness of the aggregation. Alternatively, strategies such as ordered 2D arrays or enhancement based on single probes (e.g. immunno-nanosensors, nanostars) have high reproducibilities but limited enhancement factors. In our laboratory a widely applicable enhancing geometry based on metal thin films interleaved with dielectric spacers that takes advantage of interaction into the volume of the probe (perpendicularly to the surface) to enhance the signal independently from the underlying structure has been developed. Preliminary evidence into the mechanism of this enhancement suggests that the dielectric spacer material and thickness play a key role in the magnitude of the resulting enhancement. In this paper we investigate the thickness dependence of the multilayer enhancement using substrates fabricated using ultrathin oxide deposited by atomic layer deposition as spacers. The SERS enhancement measured for substrates based on semiconductor and dielectric materials have been characterized in order to understand the origin of this dependence. In addition a model to describe the mechanism by which the spacer properties influence the multilayer enhancement will also be discussed.

  4. Wafer-Level Packaging Technology for RF Applications Based on a Rigid Low-Loss Spacer

    E-print Network

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    Wafer-Level Packaging Technology for RF Applications Based on a Rigid Low-Loss Spacer Substrate Alexander Polyakov #12;#12;Wafer-Level Packaging Technology for RF Applications Based on a Rigid Low Dr. N.J.A. van Veen, Koninklijke Philips Electronics N.V. Prof. Dr.-Ing. H. Sandmaier, Universität

  5. Persistently High Hip Circumference after Bariatric Surgery Is a Major Hurdle to Successful Hip Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Meller, Menachem M.; Courville, Amber B.; Sumner, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of class III obesity (BMI ? 40?kg/m2) in black women is 18%. As class III obesity leads to hip joint deterioration, black women frequently present for orthopedic care. Weight loss associated with bariatric surgery should lead to enhanced success of hip replacements. However, we present a case of a black woman who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with the expectation that weight loss would make her a better surgical candidate for hip replacement. Her gastric bypass was successful as her BMI declined from 52.0?kg/m2 to 33.7?kg/m2. However, her hip circumference after weight loss remained persistently high. Therefore, at surgery the soft tissue tunnel geometry presented major challenges. Tunnel depth and immobility of the soft tissue interfered with retractor placement, tissue reflection, and surgical access to the acetabulum. Therefore a traditional cup placement could not be achieved. Instead, a hemiarthroplasty was performed. After surgery her pain and reliance on external support decreased. But her functional independence never improved. This case demonstrates that a lower BMI after bariatric surgery may improve the metabolic profile and decrease anesthesia risk, but the success of total hip arthroplasties remains problematic if fat mass in the operative field (i.e., high hip circumference) remains high. PMID:24711820

  6. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail

    PubMed Central

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3–32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  7. Outcomes of Geriatric Hip Fractures Treated with AFFIXUS Hip Fracture Nail.

    PubMed

    Mabrouk, Ahmed; Madhusudan, Mysore; Waseem, Mohammed; Kershaw, Steven; Fischer, Jochen

    2014-01-01

    Geriatric hip fractures are one of the commonest fractures worldwide. The purpose of this study was to report the outcomes of a series of unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail. A retrospective study of 100 unstable geriatric hip fractures treated with AFFIXUS hip fracture nail is presented. The mean follow-up duration was 8 months (range 3-32). Of the patients 83% were female. The average age was 85 years. The fracture was treated by closed reduction and intramedullary fixation. The mean acute hospital stay was 17.6 days. Systemic complications occurred in 29 patients (29%) and local complications in 3 patients (3%) including lag screw cutout in one patient (1%), lag screw backout in one patient (1%), and deep infection in one patient (1%). Mechanical failures and periprosthetic fractures were not observed in our series. Fractures united in all patients. Preinjury activity level was recovered in 78% of the patients. The results of AFFIXUS hip fracture nail were satisfactory in most elderly patients. The unique design of the lag screw and its thread spacing had effectively reduced cut-out rate. PMID:25580303

  8. Critical Organ Preservation in Reirradiation Brachytherapy by Injectable Spacer

    SciTech Connect

    Kishi, Kazushi Sonomura, Tetsuo; Shirai, Shintaro; Sato, Morio; Tanaka, Kayo

    2009-10-01

    Purpose: This case series study evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an interstitial high-dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) procedure combined with an at-risk organ-sparing procedure. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients who were scheduled for reirradiation treatment for recurrent cancer after receiving a median dose of 60 Gy (range, 44-70 Gy) in 2-Gy fractions of previous external beam treatment were enrolled. Thirteen patients had lesions in the head and neck, and other lesions were located in the axilla, skeleton, breast, pelvis, and abdominal wall. Chief complaints included local masses (for 25) and refractory pain (for 21). After high-dose rate brachytherapy applicator needle implantation, an optimal CT-based three-dimensional brachytherapy plan was created with a virtual at-risk organ shift from the target. According to the plan, hyaluronic acid gel was injected to maintain the shift during irradiation. The prescribed dose was the result of an individualized tradeoff between target dose and at-risk organ dose, to avoid serious complications. A single-fraction dose of 18.0 Gy (median, equivalent to 75.6 Gy at an {alpha}/{beta} value of 3; range, 16-20 Gy) was applied to the tumor. Results: The at-risk organ dose decreased from 9.1 {+-} 0.9 Gy to 4.4 {+-} 0.4 Gy (mean {+-} standard deviation, p < 0.01), and the normal tissue complication probability decreased from 60.8% {+-} 12.6% to 16.1% {+-} 19.8% (p < 0.01). The shift effect lasted at least 4 hours and disappeared gradually. Distinct tumor shrinkage in 20 of 21 eligible patients, including tumor disappearance in 6 patients, pain reduction in 18 of 21 eligible patients, and no unexpected late toxicity greater than grade 2 were observed during the 19.5-month observation period. Conclusions: This at-risk organ-sparing preservation procedure may provide a safe and efficient reirradiation treatment.

  9. The Philippine "Hip Hop Stick Dance"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces a dance that blends the traditional cultural heritage of the Philippines with modern music and moves. "Hip Hop Stick Dance" incorporates Tinikling (the Philippine national dance) and Arnis (a Filipino style of martial arts) to create a contemporary combination of rhythm, dance, and fitness. It was designed to introduce…

  10. Multimodal Hip Hop Productions as Media Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, K. C. Nat

    2012-01-01

    This study draws on ethnographic data from a year-long multimodal media production (MMP) course and the experience of an African American female adolescent who used the production of multimodal Hip Hop texts to express her creativity and growing socially conscious view of the world. The study demonstrates how students made meaning multimodally and…

  11. Injury incidence in hip hop dance.

    PubMed

    Ojofeitimi, S; Bronner, S; Woo, H

    2012-06-01

    Hip hop dance has rapidly become a popular international art form. There is limited information on injury patterns in this population. The purpose of this study was to determine injury incidence and patterns among three groups of hip hop dancers. Three hundred and twelve intermediate, advanced, and expert hip hop dancers were recruited at battles, dance conferences, clubs, and on dance related web sites within the United States and internationally. A Web-based survey was conducted over a 6-month period. Inclusion criteria included intermediate and advanced level dancers over the age of 13. Dancers were divided into three main categories: Breakers, Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Separate analysis of variances were used to compare injury pattern differences between groups. Two hundred and thirty-two dancers reported a total of 738 injuries. Five hundred and six of these (sustained by 205 dancers) were time-loss (TL) injuries. Annual injury incidence was 237% (162% involving TL). Lower extremity injuries were 52% and upper extremity injuries 32% of total injuries. Breakers had a higher injury incidence compared with Popper/Lockers, and New Schoolers. Hip hop dancers report injury rates that are higher than other dance forms but similar to gymnastics. These dancers should be educated concerning injury prevention, biomechanics, and use of protective equipment. PMID:20807386

  12. The Rap on Hip-Hop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piekarski, Bill

    2004-01-01

    From its humble origins some 30 years ago in New York's bombed-out, poverty-ravaged South Bronx, hip-hop has risen to become a dominant cultural force both here and abroad. Strictly defined, the term refers to the entire cultural constellation that accompanies rap music, which in 2001 surpassed country music as the most popular musical genre in…

  13. Biocompatibility of surgical implants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaelble, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Method of selecting biocompatible materials for surgical implants uses fracture mechanic relationships and surface energies of candidate materials in presence of blood plasma. Technique has been used to characterize 190 materials by parameters that reflect their biocompatibility.

  14. Risks of Breast Implants

    MedlinePLUS

    ... larger and longer than these conducted so far. Breastfeeding Some women who undergo breast augmentation can successfully ... breast implant silicone shell into breast milk during breastfeeding. Although there are currently no established methods for ...

  15. Simple Implant Augmentation Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Anh H; Bartlett, Erica L; Kania, Katarzyna; Bae, Sang Mo

    2015-11-01

    Augmentation rhinoplasty among Asian patients is often performed to improve the height of the nasal dorsum. As the use of autogenous tissues poses certain limitations, alloplastic materials are a viable alternative with a long history of use in Asia. The superiority of one implant prosthesis over another for augmentation rhinoplasty is a matter of debate, with each material representing varying strengths and weaknesses, indications for use, and precautions to consider in nasal implant placement. An implant prosthesis should be used on a case-by-case basis. Augmentation rhinoplasty requires the consideration of specific anatomical preoperative factors, including the external nose, nasal length, nasofrontal angle, humps, and facial proportions. It is equally important to consider several operative guidelines to appropriately shape implants to minimize the occurrence of adverse effects and postoperative complications. The most common postoperative complications include infection, nasal height change, movement of implant prosthesis, and silicone implant protrusion. In addition, the surgeon should consider the current standards of Asian beauty aesthetics to better understand the patient's desired outcome. PMID:26648804

  16. Biomaterials in cochlear implants

    PubMed Central

    Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The cochlear implant (CI) represents, for almost 25 years now, the gold standard in the treatment of children born deaf and for postlingually deafened adults. These devices thus constitute the greatest success story in the field of ‘neurobionic’ prostheses. Their (now routine) fitting in adults, and especially in young children and even babies, places exacting demands on these implants, particularly with regard to the biocompatibility of a CI’s surface components. Furthermore, certain parts of the implant face considerable mechanical challenges, such as the need for the electrode array to be flexible and resistant to breakage, and for the implant casing to be able to withstand external forces. As these implants are in the immediate vicinity of the middle-ear mucosa and of the junction to the perilymph of the cochlea, the risk exists – at least in principle – that bacteria may spread along the electrode array into the cochlea. The wide-ranging requirements made of the CI in terms of biocompatibility and the electrode mechanism mean that there is still further scope – despite the fact that CIs are already technically highly sophisticated – for ongoing improvements to the properties of these implants and their constituent materials, thus enhancing the effectiveness of these devices. This paper will therefore discuss fundamental material aspects of CIs as well as the potential for their future development. PMID:22073103

  17. Rethinking Pedagogy in Urban Spaces: Implementing Hip-Hop Pedagogy in the Urban Science Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adjapong, Edmund S.; Emdin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    A significant amount of research regarding Hip-Hop Based Education (HHBE) fails to provide insight on how to incorporate elements of Hip-Hop into daily teaching practices; rather Hip-Hop based educators focus mainly on incorporating Hip-Hop culture into curricula. This study explores the benefits of using two specific Hip-Hop pedagogical practices…

  18. Effects of Compliance on Trunk and Hip Integrative Neuromuscular Training on Hip Abductor Strength in Female Athletes

    PubMed Central

    SUGIMOTO, DAI; MYER, GREGORY D.; BUSH, HEATHER M.; HEWETT, TIMOTHY E.

    2014-01-01

    Sugimoto, D, Myer, GD, Bush, HM, and Hewett, TE. Effects of compliance on trunk and hip integrative neuromuscular training on hip abductor strength in female athletes. Recent studies demonstrate the link between reduced hip abductor strength and increased risk for knee injury such as patellofemoral pain syndrome in women athletes. Meta-analytic reports indicate that the efficacy of integrative neuromuscular training (INT) is associated with compliance to the prescribed programming. Thus, the purpose was to investigate the compliance effects of a trunk and hip–focused INT exercises on hip abductor strength in young women athletes. In a controlled laboratory study design, 21 high school women volleyball players (mean age = 15.6 ± 1.4 years, weight = 64.0 ± 7.4 kg, height = 171.5 ± 7.0 cm) completed isokinetic hip abductor strength testing in pre- and postintervention, which consisted of 5 phases of supervised progressive trunk and hip–focused INT exercises twice a week for 10 weeks. The compliance effects were analyzed based on the changed hip abductor strength values between pre- and postintervention and 3 different compliance groups using 1-way analysis of variance and Pearson’s correlation coefficients. The participants in the high-compliance group demonstrated significant hip abductor peak torque increases compared with noncompliance group (p = 0.02), but not between moderate-compliance and noncompliance groups (p = 0.27). The moderate correlation coefficient value (r = 0.56) was recorded between the isokinetic hip abductor peak torque changes and the 3 compliance groups. Because of the observed significant effects and moderate linear association, the effectiveness of a trunk and hip–focused INT protocol to improve hip abduction strength seems dependent on compliance. Compliance of trunk and hip–focused INT is an important aspect of increasing hip abductor strength increase in young women athletes. PMID:24751656

  19. Usefulness of Arthroscopic Treatment of Painful Hip after Acetabular Fracture or Hip Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung-Taek; Lee, Woo-Yong; Kang, Chan; Kim, Dong-Yeol; Zheng, Long

    2015-01-01

    Background Painful hip following hip dislocation or acetabular fracture can be an important signal for early degeneration and progression to osteoarthritis due to intraarticular pathology. However, there is limited literature discussing the use of arthroscopy for the treatment of painful hip. The purpose of this retrospective study was to analyze the effectiveness and benefit of arthroscopic treatment for patients with a painful hip after major trauma. Methods From July 2003 to February 2013, we reviewed 13 patients who underwent arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation and were followed up for a minimum of 2 postoperative years. The degree of osteoarthritis based on the Tonnis classification pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up was determined. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using visual analogue scale for pain (VAS) and modified Harris hip score (MHHS), and range of motion (ROM) of the hip pre- and postoperatively at final follow-up. Results There were nine male and four female patients with a mean age at surgery of 28 years (range, 20 to 50 years). The mean follow-up period of the patients was 59.8 months (range, 24 to 115 months), and the mean interval between initial trauma and arthroscopic treatment was 40.8 months (range, 1 to 144 months). At the final follow-up, VAS and MHHS improved significantly from 6.3 and 53.4 to 3.0 and 88.3, respectively (p = 0.002 and p < 0.001, respectively). However, there were no significant differences in hip flexion, abduction, adduction, external rotation, and internal rotation as minor improvements from 113.1°, 38.5°, 28.5°, 36.5°, and 22.7° to 118.5°, 39.0°, 29.2°, 38.9°, and 26.5° were observed, respectively (p = 0.070, p = 0.414, p = 0.317, p = 0.084, and p = 0.136, respectively). None of the patients exhibited progression of osteoarthritis of the hip at the final follow-up. Conclusions Arthroscopic treatment after acetabular fracture or hip dislocation is effective and delays the progression of traumatic osteoarthritis. PMID:26640626

  20. Evaluation of silicon nitride as a wear resistant and resorbable alternative for total hip joint replacement

    PubMed Central

    Olofsson, Johanna; Grehk, T. Mikael; Berlind, Torun; Persson, Cecilia; Jacobson, Staffan; Engqvist, Håkan

    2012-01-01

    Many of the failures of total joint replacements are related to tribology, i.e., wear of the cup, head and liner. Accumulation of wear particles at the implants can be linked to osteolysis which leads to bone loss and in the end aseptic implant loosening. Therefore it is highly desirable to reduce the generation of wear particles from the implant surfaces. Silicon nitride (Si3N4) has shown to be biocompatible and have a low wear rate when sliding against itself and is therefore a good candidate as a hip joint material. Furthermore, wear particles of Si3N4 are predicted to slowly dissolve in polar liquids and they therefore have the potential to be resorbed in vivo, potentially reducing the risk for aseptic loosening. In this study, it was shown that ?-Si3N4-powder dissolves in PBS. Adsorption of blood plasma indicated a good acceptance of Si3N4 in the body with relatively low immune response. Si3N4 sliding against Si3N4 showed low wear rates both in bovine serum and PBS compared with the other tested wear couples. Tribofilms were built up on the Si3N4 surfaces both in PBS and in bovine serum, controlling the friction and wear characteristics. PMID:23507807