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1

ALS - resources  

MedlinePLUS

Resources - ALS ... The following organizations are good resources for information on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis : Muscular Dystrophy Association - http://mda.org/disease/amyotrophic-lateral-sclerosis National Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) ...

2

Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo: a study of two manoeuvres with and without betahistine Vertigine Parossistica Posizionale Benigna: studio di due manovre con e senza betaistina associata  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Efficacy of the liberatory manoeuvre and of gradual otolitis dispersion technique, with or without associated drug therapy, have been compared. Included in this prospective study were 103 patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo seen in the Outpatient Department. Patients were classified into 4 groups according to treatment: Liberatory Manoeuvre according to methods described by Semont et al., with and

M. CAVALIERE; G. MOTTOLA; M. IEMMA

3

ALS Association  

MedlinePLUS

... Against Lou Gehrig’s Disease New Research Finds Protein Clearance is Key to Neuron Survival View all News ... difficulty getting around, traveling brings additional challenges. Read tips for travelling with ALS. OUR MISSION: Leading the ...

4

Al Composites  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present study, cold spraying technique was used to fabricate a metal matrix composite (MMC) that consists of Ni matrix and 20 vol.% Ni3Al particles at two different particle sizes as reinforcement. This study intends to investigate the effect of reinforcement particle size on microstructural and mechanical properties of cold sprayed MMCs. Two different Ni3Al powders with nominal particle size of -45 to +5 and +45 to 100 ?m were used as reinforcement in this study. Cold sprayed Ni-Ni3Al samples were subjected to the microstructural observation and characterization prior to any mechanical testing. Then, samples were tested using nano-indentation, Knoop hardness, Vickers hardness, and Resonance frequency to evaluate their mechanical properties. No significant changes were observed in microstructural characteristics due to different particle sizes. The results obtained from a variety of mechanical testings indicated that the increasing reinforcement particle size resulted in the slight reduction of mechanical properties such as elastic modulus and hardness in cold sprayed MMCs. The mechanical interlock between deposited particles defines the bonding strength in cold sprayed samples. Small size particles have a higher velocity and impact resulting in stronger interlock between deformed particles.

Chandanayaka, Tharaka; Azarmi, Fardad

2014-05-01

5

AL Amyloidosis  

PubMed Central

Definition of the disease AL amyloidosis results from extra-cellular deposition of fibril-forming monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) light chains (LC) (most commonly of lambda isotype) usually secreted by a small plasma cell clone. Most patients have evidence of isolated monoclonal gammopathy or smoldering myeloma, and the occurrence of AL amyloidosis in patients with symptomatic multiple myeloma or other B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders is unusual. The key event in the development of AL amyloidosis is the change in the secondary or tertiary structure of an abnormal monoclonal LC, which results in instable conformation. This conformational change is responsible for abnormal folding of the LC, rich in ? leaves, which assemble into monomers that stack together to form amyloid fibrils. Epidemiology AL amyloidosis is the most common type of systemic amyloidois in developed countries with an estimated incidence of 9 cases/million inhabitant/year. The average age of diagnosed patients is 65 years and less than 10% of patients are under 50. Clinical description The clinical presentation is protean, because of the wide number of tissues or organs that may be affected. The most common presenting symptoms are asthenia and dyspnoea, which are poorly specific and may account for delayed diagnosis. Renal manifestations are the most frequent, affecting two thirds of patients at presentation. They are characterized by heavy proteinuria, with nephrotic syndrome and impaired renal function in half of the patients. Heart involvement, which is present at diagnosis in more than 50% of patients, leading to restrictive cardiopathy, is the most serious complication and engages prognosis. Diagnostic methods The diagnosis relies on pathological examination of an involved site showing Congo red-positive amyloid deposits, with typical apple-green birefringence under polarized light, that stain positive with an anti-LC antibody by immunohistochemistry and/or immunofluorescence. Due to the systemic nature of the disease, non-invasive biopsies such as abdominal fat aspiration should be considered before taking biopsies from involved organs, in order to reduce the risk of bleeding complications. Differential diagnosis Systemic AL amyloidosis should be distinguished from other diseases related to deposition of monoclonal LC, and from other forms of systemic amyloidosis. When pathological studies have failed to identify the nature of amyloid deposits, genetic studies should be performed to diagnose hereditary amyloidosis. Management Treatment of AL amyloidosis is based on chemotherapy, aimed at controlling the underlying plasma clone that produces amyloidogenic LC. The hematological response should be carefully checked by serial measurements of serum free LC. The association of an alkylating agent with high-dose dexamethasone has proven to be effective in two thirds of patients and is considered as the current reference treatment. New agents used in the treatment of multiple myeloma are under investigation and appear to increase hematological response rates. Symptomatic measures and supportive care is necessary in patients with organ failure. Noticeably, usual treatments for cardiac failure (i.e. calcium inhibitors, ?-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors) are inefficient or even dangerous in patients with amyloid heart disease, that should be managed using diuretics. Amiodarone and pace maker implantation should be considered in patients with rhythm or conduction abnormalities. In selected cases, heart and kidney transplantation may be associated with prolonged patient and graft survival. Prognosis Survival in AL amyloidosis depends on the spectrum of organ involvement (amyloid heart disease being the main prognosis factor), the severity of individual organs involved and haematological response to treatment.

2012-01-01

6

Who Gets ALS?  

MedlinePLUS

... help create a world without ALS Join this nationwide movement by walking for those affected by ALS Home > About ALS Share Print Who Gets ALS? En español ALS is a disorder that affects the function of nerves and muscles. Based on U.S. population studies, a little over 5,600 people in the ...

7

/Cu-Al System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Wettability and interfacial interaction of the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system were studied. Pure Cu does not wet the Ta2O5 substrate, and improved spreading is achieved when relatively a high fraction of the active element (~40 at.% Al) was added. The Al2O3 and AlTaO4 phases were observed at the Ta2O5/Cu-Al interface. A thermodynamic evaluation allowed us to suggest that the lack of wetting bellow 40 at.% Al is due to the presence of a native oxide, which covers the drop. The conditions of the native oxide decomposition and the formation of the volatile Al2O suboxide strongly depend on the vacuum level during sessile drop experiments and the composition of the Cu-Al alloy. In our case, Al contents greater than 40% provides thermodynamic conditions for the formation of Al2O (as a result of Al reaction with Al2O3) and the drop spreading. It was suggested that the final contact angle in the Ta2O5/Cu-Al system (50°) is determined by Ta adsorption on the newly formed alumina interlayer.

Kish, Orel; Froumin, Natalya; Aizenshtein, Michael; Frage, Nachum

2014-05-01

8

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

ALS, commonly called Lou Gehrig's disease, is a devastating neurological dis- order characterized by selective upper and lower somatic, but not autonomic, motor neurone degeneration leading to paralysis and eventually death. The diagnosis of ALS requires the presence of both upper and lower motor neu- rone degeneration and progressive motor dysfunction. ALS occurs in 1 to 2.5 cases per 100,000

Chris G. Parsons; Wojciech Danysz

9

Al-Anon/Alateen  

MedlinePLUS

... Alcoholism is a complex problem. More... How does Al-Anon Work? In Al-Anon, members do not give direction or advice to ... meeting? If someone else’s drinking troubles you, attending Al-Anon and Alateen Family Group meetings can help. More... ...

10

Materialforschung Buckypapers als Dehnungssensoren  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kohlenstoff-Nanoröhrchen leiten elektrischen Strom wesentlich besser als Kupfer, sind zwanzigmal so zugfest wie Stahl und dabei äußerst elastisch und flexibel. Aufgrund dieser Eigenschaften gelten die nur wenige Nanometer dicken Röhrchen als aussichtsreicher Rohstoff für vielfältige technische Anwendungen - beispielsweise auch als elektromechanische Sensoren.

Leute, Angelika

2004-07-01

11

ALS longitudinal kickers  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the coupled-bunch instability and how it applies to the ALS accelerator. The longitudinal ALS kicker is part of the bunch-to-bunch feedback system planned to control coupled-bunch instabilities in the ALS. The mechanical features of the kicker are described, and the analytic tools developed to aid in the design are discussed. A method to predict the performance of the kicker in the accelerator from measurements on a prototype are described.

Voelker, F.

1992-10-01

12

ALS - The cost cutter  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Advanced Launch System (ALS) development program will avail itself of existing technologies in the short term in order to produce an interim 'core' vehicle that may be operational by 1993; the full, booster-incorporating system objective will then be achieved in 1998. This programmatic 'decoupling' of booster and core vehicle development efforts will separate their funding peaks. The ALS program will cut costs by colocating manufacturing and launch facilities, using Al-Li alloys in booster primary structures, and aggressively applying 'paperless' CIM. The ALS launch vehicle configuration will be primarily determined by both payload requirements and flight frequency.

Colucci, Frank

1987-10-01

13

ALS: AN ETHICAL PERSPECTIVE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig's disease, is a relentlessly progressive, fatal and presently incurable motor neuron disorder caused by degeneration of both upper and lower neurons that control voluntary skeletal muscle. ALS variants include a progressive lower motor neuron disorder, Progressive Muscular Atrophy (PMA); a progressive upper motor neuron disorder, Primary Lateral Sclerosis (PLS); and a progressive disorder

Leo McCluskey

14

About ALS: FAQ  

MedlinePLUS

... on this web site. "Recent studies in the transgenic animal models of ALS (model of familial ALS) provide evidence that creatine is effective in protecting degenerating motor neurons and delaying disease deterioration in these mice. Clinical trials are of the utmost importance to ...

15

[Phenotypic variation in ALS].  

PubMed

Making a diagnosis of typical amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is not a tough job, but when it comes to atypical forms of motor neuron disease (MND) which are not uncommon in clinical setting, we may have some difficulty to diagnose ALS/MND. There is striking phenotypic variation in sporadic ALS/MND, such as frail arm syndrome (brachial amyotrophic diplegia), pseudopolyneuritic form, hemiplegic type, ALS/MND with markedly extended involvement beyond the motor system, and MND with basophilic inclusion bodies. These variations must be recognized if physicians are to tailor advice on disease progression, prognosis, drug therapy, and care to the needs of the individual. Clinical trials of new therapeutic agents have been performed, on the assumption that patients with ALS/MND have the same underlying etiology, addressing the heterogeneous population of the patients under a single diagnostic category. This can be detrimental to the well-being of the individual, because clinical heterogeneity may mask drug effects in clinical trials. The attempt to categorize subgroups based on the clinical and pathological backgrounds within the spectrum of ALS/MND may be a critical step in facilitating clinical research in ALS/MND. Definition of clinicopathologic syndromes in patients with ALS/MND is an important challenging task that cannot be ignored. PMID:17432191

Sasaki, Shoichi

2006-11-01

16

[Environmental factors in ALS].  

PubMed

ALS is likely to be a disorder of multifactorial origin. Among all the factors that may increase the risk of ALS, environmental ones are being studied for many years, but in the recent years, several advances have pointed to a new interest in their potential involvement in the disease process, especially for the cyanotoxin BMAA. Food containing BMAA has been found on Guam, a well-known focus of ALS/parkinsonism/dementia and high levels of BMAA have been identified into the brain of these patients. The BMAA cyanotoxin is potentially ubiquitous and have also been found into the food of patients who died from ALS both in Europe and USA. BMAA can be wrongly integrated into the protein structure during mRNA traduction, competing with serine. This may induce abnormal protein folding and a subsequent cell death. Heavy metals, such as lead or mercury may be directly toxic for neuronal cells. Several works have suggested an increased risk of ALS in individuals chronically exposed to these metals. Exposure to pesticides has been suggested to be linked to an increased risk of developing ALS. The mechanism of their toxicity is likely to be mediated by paraoxonases. These proteins are in charge of detoxifying the organism from toxins, and particularly organophosphates. To date, there are insufficient scientific data to suggest that exposure to electromagnetic fields may increase the risk of having ALS. We are particularly missing longitudinal cohorts to demonstrate that risk. PMID:24703731

Juntas-Morales, Raul; Pageot, Nicolas; Corcia, Philippe; Camu, William

2014-05-01

17

Initial Symptoms of ALS  

MedlinePLUS

... Symptoms can begin in the muscles of speech, swallowing or in the hands, arms, legs or feet. Not all people with ALS experience the same symptoms or the same sequences or patterns of progression. But, progressive muscle weakness and paralysis ...

18

Primary AL Amyloidosis  

MedlinePLUS

... AL amyloidosis is a hematological disorder, associated with plasma cell dyscrasia that means an abnormal condition of ... fibrils, formed by an errant (monoclonal) group of plasma cells in the bone marrow, consist of abnormal ...

19

Isokinetic assessment in ALS.  

PubMed

Three measures of lower extremity function were compared in a homogenous population of ALS patients. Isokinetic dynamometry was shown to be a sensitive tool for change in strength over time. It demonstrated positive correlations with gait velocity as well as other behavioral measures. Manual muscle tests were relatively insensitive and no more reliable than isokinetics. Isokinetics are a useful adjunct in the assessment of ALS. PMID:11681399

Sufit, R; Clough, J A; Schram, M; Conrad, J; Erickson, L; Brooks, B R

1987-05-01

20

Al Qaeda Training Manual  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first resource is a US Department of Justice release of portions of an English translation of the Al Qaeda training manual located by police in Manchester, England during a search of an Al Qaeda member's home. The manual was found in a computer file described as "the military series" related to the "Declaration of Jihad." The cover and excerpts from the 12 chapters can be viewed as a .pdf file. Content of the text includes religious commentary, organizational tactics, guidelines for member selection, techniques for spying, and security measures. The DOJ does not provide the entire document because it does not want to encourage terrorism.

2001-01-01

21

ALS renewal moves forward  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the result of an extensive long-term planning process involving all its stakeholders—management, staff, and users—the ALS has seen its future and is aggressively moving ahead to implement its vision for keeping the facility at the cutting edge for the next 2-3 decades. The evolving strategic plan now in place aims to renew the ALS so it can address a new generation of fundamental questions about size dependent and dimensional-confinement phenomena at the nanoscale; correlation and complexity in physical, biological, and environmental systems; and temporal evolution, assembly, dynamics and ultrafast phenomena. The renewal spans three areas: (1) increased staffing at beamlines to support the growing user community and safety professionals to keep an increasingly complex facility hazard free; (2) implementing advances in accelerator, insertion device, beamline, and detector technology that will make it possible for ALS users to address emerging grand scientific and technological challenges with incisive world-class tools; and (3) construction of a user support building and guest housing that will increase the safety and user friendliness of the ALS by providing users office, meeting, experiment staging, and laboratory space for their work and on-site accommodations at reasonable rates.

Falcone, R. W.; Feinberg, B.; Hussain, Z.; Kirz, J.; Krebs, G. F.; Padmore, H. A.; Robin, D. S.; Robinson, A. L.

2007-11-01

22

Al Shanker Remembers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a 1996 interview shortly before his death, Al Shanker, longtime president of the American Federation of Teachers, discussed such topics as: his own educational experiences; how he learned about political fighting in the Boy Scouts; the appeal of socialism; multinational corporations and the nation state; teaching tough students; and John Dewey…

American Educator, 2000

2000-01-01

23

ALS insertion devices  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Light Source (ALS), the first US third generation synchrotron radiation source, is currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The low-emittance, 1.5 GeV electron storage ring and the insertion devices are specifically designed to produce high brightness beams in the UV to soft X-Ray range. The planned initial complement of insertion devices includes four 4.6 m long undulators, with period lengths of 3.9 cm, 5.0 cm (2) and 8.0 cm, and a 2.9 m long wiggler of 16 cm period length. Undulator design is well advanced and fabrication has begun on the 5.0 cm and 8.0 cm period length undulators. This paper discusses ALS insertion device requirements; general design philosophy; and design of the magnetic structure, support structure/drive systems, control system and vacuum system. 18 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.; Lancaster, H.; Plate, D.

1990-11-01

24

Al Parker: American Illustrator  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tribute to Al Parker, the noted magazine illustrator and artist, was fashioned from extensive holdings at the Washington University Library in St. Louis. Known as "The Dean of Illustrators," Al Parker attended school at the St. Louis School of Fine Arts at Washington University and went on to become of the most prolific and important American illustrators of the twentieth century. Parker was best-known for his modernist deployment of line, patterning, and bold, flat colors, which helped shape the general "look" of the period from the 1930s to the 1960s. Using short clips of Parker's original illustrations and drawings, this exhibit offers a glimpse into his work and contributions to the medium. Of particular interest is the section devoted to Parker's famous "Mother-Daughter" covers for the Ladies Home Journal, which began in 1939 and ran for 17 years.

2001-01-01

25

Jasechko et al. reply.  

PubMed

replying to A. M. J. Coenders-Gerrits et al. 506, http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature12925 (2014)In their Comment, Coenders-Gerrits et al. suggest that our conclusion that transpiration dominates the terrestrial water cycle is biased by unrepresentative input data and optimistic uncertainty ranges related to runoff, interception and the isotopic compositions of transpired and evaporated moisture. We clearly presented the uncertainties applied in our Monte-Carlo sensitivity analysis, we reported percentile ranges of results rather than standard deviations to best communicate the nonlinear nature of the isotopic evaporation model, and we highlighted that the uncertainty in our calculation remains large, particularly in humid catchments (for example, figure 2 in our paper). PMID:24522604

Jasechko, Scott; Sharp, Zachary D; Gibson, John J; Birks, S Jean; Yi, Yi; Fawcett, Peter J

2014-02-13

26

ALS Project Management Manual  

SciTech Connect

This manual has been prepared to help establish a consistent baseline of management practices across all ALS projects. It describes the initial process of planning a project, with a specific focus on the production of a formal project plan. We feel that the primary weakness in ALS project management efforts to date stems from a failure to appreciate the importance of ''up-front'' project planning. In this document, we present a guide (with examples) to preparing the documents necessary to properly plan, monitor, and control a project's activities. While following the manual will certainly not guarantee good project management, failure to address the issues we raise will dramatically reduce the chance of success. Here we define success as meeting the technical goals on schedule and within the prescribed budget.

Krupnick, Jim; Harkins, Joe

2000-05-01

27

AL Users' Manual. Third Edition.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

AL is a high-level programming language for manipulator control useful in industrial assembly research. The document describes the current state of the AL system now in operation at the Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, and teaches the reader h...

S. Mujtaba R. Goldman

1981-01-01

28

Al Jazirah, Sudan  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Al Jazirah (also Gezira) is one of the 26 states of Sudan. The state lies between the Blue Nile and the White Nile in the east-central region of the country. It is a well populated area suitable for agriculture. The area was at the southern end of Nubia and little is known about its ancient history and only limited archaeological work has been conducted in this area. The region has benefited from the Gezira Scheme, a program to foster cotton farming begun in 1925. At that time the Sennar Dam and numerous irrigation canals were built. Al Jazirah became the Sudan's major agricultural region with more than 2.5 million acres (10,000 km) under cultivation. The initial development project was semi-private, but the government nationalized it in 1950. Cotton production increased in the 1970s but by the 1990s increased wheat production has supplanted a third of the land formerly seeded with cotton.

The image was acquired December 25, 2006, covers an area of 56 x 36.4 km, and is located near 14.5 degrees north latitude, 33.1 degrees east longitude.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

2008-01-01

29

Al Mashriq: Lebanon  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Part of the Al-Mashriq online Web resource for countries located in the Levant, this site is devoted to providing a host of materials, thematically organized, about the country of Lebanon. Persons seeking to read a bit about Lebanon's early history will want to read the first chapter of Kamal Salibi's "A House of Many Mansions-The History of Lebanon," which is provided here. For those looking for a geographic orientation to the landscape of Lebanon, an interactive map provides a number of photographs and brief remarks on various important cities and cultural sites, such as Beirut and the Roman temples at Baalbak. Along with these sections, the site also offers thematic sections devoted to education, food, maps, money, politics, and religion that will be useful to those students looking for background information on Lebanon.

30

Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere als Mineralisationstemplate  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Die vorliegende Arbeit beschäftigt sich mit der Synthese und den Eigenschaften von doppelthydrophilen Blockcopolymeren und ihrer Anwendung in einem biomimetischen Mineralisationsprozeß von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat. Doppelthydrophile Blockcopolymere bestehen aus einem hydrophilen Block, der nicht mit Mineralien wechselwirkt und einem zweiten Polyelektrolyt-Block, der stark mit Mineraloberflächen wechselwirkt. Diese Blockcopolymere wurden durch ringöffnende Polymerisation von N-carboxyanhydriden (NCA's) und a-methoxy-?-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 als Initiator hergestellt. Die hergestellten Blockcopolymere wurden als effektive Wachstumsmodifikatoren für die Kristallisation von Calciumcarbonat und Bariumsulfat Mineralien eingesetzt. Die so erhaltenen Mineralpartikel (Kugeln, Hantel, eiförmige Partikel) wurden durch Lichtmikroskopie in Lösung, SEM und TEM charakterisiert. Röntgenweitwinkelstreuung (WAXS) wurde verwendet, um die Modifikation von Calciumcarbonat zu ermitteln und die Größe der Calciumcarbonat- und Bariumsulfat-Nanopartikel zu ermitteln. This work describes the synthesis and characterization of double hydrophilic block copolymers and their use in a biomimetic mineralization process of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate. Double hydrophilic block copolymers consist of a hydrophilic block that does not interact with minerals and another hydrophilic polyelectrolyte block that strongly interacts with mineral surfaces. These polymers were synthesised via ring opening polymerisation of N-carboxyanhydride (NCA), and the first hydrophilic block a-methoxy-?-amino[poly(ethylene glycol)] PEG-NH2 was used as an initiator. The prepared block copolymers were used as effective crystal growth modifiers to control the crystallization of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate minerals. The resulting mineral particles (spheres, dumbbells, egg-like particles) were characterised by light microscopy in solution, by SEM, and by TEM. X-Ray scattering measurements (WAXS) were used to prove the modification of Calcium Carbonate particles and to calculate the size of Calcium Carbonate and Barium Sulfate nanoparticles.

Kasparova, Pavla

2002-07-01

31

Electromigration Testing of Al-Alloy Films.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A search for reliability improvement of Al film interconnections has led to the introduction of Al-Alloy films such as Al+Cu, Al+Cu+Si and so on. This report describes the results of an in-depth study of Al, Al+Cu (2 wt % Cu) and Al+Cu+Si (2 wt % Cu + 1% ...

P. B. Ghate

1980-01-01

32

Correlation between Al 2O 3 particles and interface of Al–Al 2O 3 coatings by cold spray  

Microsoft Academic Search

Al–Al2O3 composite coatings with different Al2O3 particle shapes were prepared on Si and Al substrate by cold spray. The powder compositions of metal (Al) and ceramic (Al2O3) having different sizes and agglomerations were varied into ratios of 10:1wt% and 1:1wt%. Al2O3 particles were successfully incorporated into the soft metal matrix of Al. It was found that crater formation between the

Ha Yong Lee; Se Hun Jung; Soo Yong Lee; Young Ho You; Kyung Hyun Ko

2005-01-01

33

Al, Al/C and Al/Si implantations in 6H-SiC  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Multiple-energy Al implantations were performed with and without C or Si coimplantations into 6H-SiC epitaxial layers and bulk substrates at 850°C. The C and Si co-implantations were used as an attempt to improve Al acceptor activation in SiC. The implanted material was annealed at 1500, 1600, and 1650°C for 45 min. The Al implants are thermally stable at all annealing temperatures and Rutherford backscattering via channeling spectra indicated good lattice quality in the annealed Al-implanted material. A net hole concentration of 8 × 1018 cm-3 was measured at room temperature in the layers implanted with Al and annealed at 1600°C. The C or Si co-implantations did not yield improvement in Al acceptor activation. The co-implants resulted in a relatively poor crystal quality due to more lattice damage compared to Al implantation alone. The out-diffusion of Al at the surface is more for 5Si co-implantation compared to Al implant alone, where 5Si means a Si/Al dose ratio of 5.

Rao, Mulpuri V.; Griffiths, Peter; Gardner, Jason; Holland, O. W.; Ghezzo, M.; Kretchmer, J.; Kelner, G.; Freitas, J. A.

1996-01-01

34

Frequently Asked Questions about ALS and the ALS Registry  

MedlinePLUS

... cancer. However, there are no registries or ongoing tracking efforts for ALS in the United States. The ... primary lateral sclerosis will develop problems with nerve cells for both upper and ... part, locations, and phone numbers for more details. Use the “ALS Clinical ...

35

75 FR 62858 - United States, et al.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact...District of New York in United States of America, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.,...

2010-10-13

36

76 FR 38700 - United States, et al.  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.; Public Comments and Response on Proposed...on the proposed Final Judgment in United States, et al. v. American Express Company, et al.,...

2011-07-01

37

Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Al\\/Al-Mg\\/Al composite sheet metals  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two different types of aluminum alloys of AA1050 and AA5182 were used to manufacture Al\\/Al-Mg\\/Al composite sheet metals by roll bonding technology at room temperature. The composite sheet metals were annealed at 400 °C and carried out uniaxial tension tests to investigate mechanical properties. Macroscopic mechanical properties are strongly dependent on the volume (or thickness) fraction of two component layers.

Jaehyung Cho; Su-Hyeon Kim; Hyoung-Wook Kim; Cha-Yong Lim; Eun-Young Kim; Shi-Hoon Choi

2011-01-01

38

Reliable Au Wire Bonding to Al/Ti/Al Pad  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we describe bond degradation and the bondability of an Au wire to a thin-Al/Ti/Al pad. It is found that the pad structure of Al(300 nm)/Ti(300 nm)/Al(1000 nm) is useful for the prevention of bond degradation upon heat treatment at 473 K for 3.6 Ms. Use of the pad necessitated an annealing temperature of at least 723 K, because of its lower initial bond resistance. With heat treatment after thermosonic ball bonding, the bond resistance is almost invariable and the bond shear strength does not decrease. The life of the bond between the Au wire and the pad is extended with thickening of the Ti layer.

Ueno, Hiroshi

1993-05-01

39

AlN/Fe/AlN nanostructures for magnetooptic magnetometry  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu nanostructures with ultrathin Fe grown by sputtering on Si substrates are evaluated as probes for magnetooptical (MO) mapping of weak currents. They are considered for a laser wavelength of ? = 410 nm (3.02 eV) and operate at oblique light incidence angles, ?(0), to enable detection of both in-plane and out-of-plane magnetization. Their performance is evaluated in terms of MO reflected wave electric field amplitudes. The maximal MO amplitudes in AlN/Fe/AlN/Cu are achieved by a proper choice of layer thicknesses. The nanostructures were characterized by MO polar Kerr effect at ?(0) ? 5° and longitudinal Kerr effect spectra (?(0) = 45°) at photon energies between 1 and 5 eV. The nominal profiles were refined using a model-based analysis of the spectra. Closed form analytical expressions are provided, which are useful in the search for maximal MO amplitudes.

Lišková-Jakubisová, E.; VišÅovský, Š.; Široký, P.; Hrabovský, D.; Pištora, J.; Harward, I.; Celinski, Z.

2014-05-01

40

Reply to Gopalswamy et al.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The comment of Gopalswamy et al. (thereafter GMY) relates to a letter discussing coronal mass ejections (CMEs), interplanetary ejecta and geomagnetic storms. GMY contend that Cane et al. incorrectly identified ejecta (interplanetary CMEs) and hypothesize that this is because Cane et al. fail to understand how to separate ejecta from "shock sheaths" when interpreting solar wind and energetic particle data sets. They (GMY) are wrong be cause the relevant section of the paper was concerned with the propagation time to 1 AU of any potentially geoeffective structures caused by CMEs, i.e. upstream compression regions with or without shocks, or ejecta. In other words, the travel times used by Cane et al. were purposefully and deliberately distinct from ejecta travel times (except for those slow ejecta, approx. 30% of their events, which generated no upstream features), and no error in identification was involved. The confusion of GMY stems from the description did not characterize the observations sufficiently clearly.

Cane, H. V.; Richardson, I. G.

2003-01-01

41

Comparison of one and two-neutron transfer near the coulomb barrier for the 27 Al( 18 O, 16 O) 29 Al, 27 Al( 18 0, 17 O) 28 Al and 27 Al( 13 C, 12 C) 28 Al reactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Total reaction cross sections for the transfer reactions27Al(18O,16O)29Al,27Al(18O,17O)28Al and27Al(13C,12C)28Al are reported for center-of-mass energies between 13 and 20 MeV for18O projectiles and between 11 and 17.5 MeV for13C projectiles. The reaction products,29Al and28Al, beta decay to29Si and28Si, respectively, and the subsequent? decays of29Si and28Si were measured. Due to the relatively long beta decay half lives, data were taken in a

S. A. Schiller; J. S. Eck

1975-01-01

42

Comparing the Thermodynamic Behaviour of Al(1)+ZrO2(s) to Al(1)+Al2O3(s)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

In an effort to better determine the thermodynamic properties of Al(g) and Al2O(g). the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+ZrO2(s) was compared to the vapor in equilibrium with Al(l)+Al2O3(s) over temperature range 1197-to-1509K. The comparison was made directly by Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry with an instrument configured for a multiple effusion-cell vapor source (multi-cell KEMS). Second law enthalpies of vaporization of Al(g) and Al2O(g) together with activity measurements show that Al(l)+ZrO2(s) is thermodynamically equivalent to Al(l)+Al2O3(s), indicating Al(l) remained pure and Al2O3(s) was present in the ZrO2-cell. Subsequent observation of the Al(l)/ZrO2 and vapor/ZrO2 interfaces revealed a thin Al2O3-layer had formed, separating the ZrO2-cell from Al(l) and Al(g)+Al2O(g), effectively transforming it into an Al2O3 effusion-cell. This behavior agrees with recent observations made for Beta-NiAl(Pt) alloys measured in ZrO2 effusion-cell.

Copland, Evan

2004-01-01

43

High Density Sliding at Ta/Al and Al/Al Interfaces  

SciTech Connect

We present 3D-nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results for the velocity dependence of the frictional force at smooth sliding interfaces for Ta and Al single crystals. For Ta/Al we consider Al(100)/Ta(100) and Al(111)/Ta(110) interfaces sliding along [001] and [11(bar sign)0]fcc /[001]bcc respectively. These are compared with Al(111)/Al(100) interfaces at the same loads, corresponding to a pressure of 15 GPa. Both interfacial pairs show similar behavior in the velocity dependence of the frictional force: a low velocity regime with an increasing frictional force followed by a strain induced transformation regime at velocities above approximately 1/10 the transverse sound speed, followed by a fluidized interface at high velocities. For both interfacial pairs, the high velocity dependence of the frictional force exhibits power law behavior, Ft {proportional_to} v-{beta} with {beta}=3/4. We discuss the structural changes that influence dissipation in each of these regimes.

Hammerberg, J. E.; Germann, T. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Ravelo, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Physics Dept., University of Texas -- El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968-0515 (United States); Materials Research Institute, University of Texas - El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968-0515 (United States)

2006-07-28

44

Neuroproteomics: an insight into ALS.  

PubMed

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease of unknown aetiology. Diagnosis is made through physical examination, electrophysiological findings, and by excluding other conditions. There is not a single biomarker that concludes the diagnosis. The aim of this study was to investigate differentially expressed proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS patients compared to control subjects, with the purpose to identify a panel of possible biomarkers for the disease. The differentially expressed spots/proteins were submitted to two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis and recognized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Parkin-like and many iron and zinc binding were some of the proteins found in ALS CSF. Parkin is a ligase involved in ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of recessive familial Parkinson's disease. Iron and zinc are involved with many important metabolic processes and are related to neurodegenerative disease. Common features of ALS comprise failure of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and increased levels of metal ions in the brain. Therefore, the identification of these proteins can be a significant step in ALS research. These and other identified proteins are discussed in this study. PMID:23146297

Mendonça, D M F; Pizzati, L; Mostacada, K; de S Martins, S C; Higashi, R; Ayres Sá, L; Moura Neto, V; Chimelli, L; Martinez, A M B

2012-12-01

45

Interaction of Al-Si, Al-Ge, and Zn-Al eutectic alloys with SiC\\/Al discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interactions between Al-Si, Al-Ge, and Zn-Al eutectic alloys with SiC whisker-reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites were studied as a function of temperature above the eutectic melting temperature. Penetration extended several millimetres into the composite for the Al-Si and Al-Ge alloys but was restricted to a thin surface layer (50 µm) for the Zn-Al alloy. The extent of the penetration zone

W. C. Moshier; J. S. Ahearn; D. C. Cooke

1987-01-01

46

ALS - A unique design approach  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An advanced launch system (ALS), which is intended to be flexible and to deliver a wide range of payloads at a reduced cost, is discussed. The ALS concept also features total quality management, modular subsystems, standardized interfaces, standardized missions, and off-line payload encapsulation. The technological improvements include manufacturing of dry structures, use of composite materials, adaptive guidance and control systems, and laser-initiated radar systems. The operational improvements range from paperless management, to rocket engine leak detection devices and automated ground operations.

Chamberlain, Roger A.

1990-09-01

47

Al-Biruni's mechanical calendar.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper is concerned with a mechanical calendar described by the great scientist al-Biruni, who died in 440/1048. The description occurs in a book devoted to the construction of various types of astrolabe and related instruments. The Arabic text presented in this paper was prepared from three manuscripts. This is preceded by a brief introduction which gives a sketch of the life and works of al-Biruni together with information about the provenance and contents of the three manuscripts. The text is followed by an English translation and the paper concludes with a technical commentary.

Hill, D. R.

48

Andalusian astronomy: al-Zij al-Muqtabis of Ibn al-Kammâd.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the twelfth century the Arabic astronomer Ibn al-Kammâd, living in Islamic Spain, composed three sets of astronomical tables, called "zijes". The zijes were largely based on the work of predecessors, going back to Ptolemy on the one hand, and Hindu astronomers on the other. None of his zijes survived in the original Arabic, but a Latin manuscript contains a translation of an apparently complete zij, the "al-Zij al-Muqtabis". This paper examines the body of astronomical knowledge contained in this zij. Specifically, it is shown that one can gain valuable information on the solar theory of the Islamic astronomers from this translation. Furthermore, the theory of lunar and solar eclipses in the work is analyzed, and tables of mean planetary and solar motions are discussed. In addition, tables for the motion of the vernal equinox, star tables, and several topics of Islamic spherical astronomy are examined.

Chabás, J.; Goldstein, B. R.

1994-12-01

49

Glutamate Receptor Aptamers and ALS.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Excitotoxicity is one of the leading causes for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Our goal was to develop a novel class of powerful aptamer- based, anti-excitotoxic inhibitors against GluR2Qflip, a key AMPA receptor subunit that controls the calcium pe...

L. Niu

2009-01-01

50

AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange  

MedlinePLUS

... with Agent Orange » AL Amyloidosis and Agent Orange Public Health Public Health Public Health Home Military Exposures Military Exposures Home 4 Ways ... Publications & Reports About Us About the Office of Public Health Post-Deployment Health Clinical Public Health About Clinical ...

51

Dynamic Modeling of ALS Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of dynamic modeling and simulation of Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems is to help design them. Static steady state systems analysis provides basic information and is necessary to guide dynamic modeling, but static analysis is not sufficient to design and compare systems. ALS systems must respond to external input variations and internal off-nominal behavior. Buffer sizing, resupply scheduling, failure response, and control system design are aspects of dynamic system design. We develop two dynamic mass flow models and use them in simulations to evaluate systems issues, optimize designs, and make system design trades. One model is of nitrogen leakage in the space station, the other is of a waste processor failure in a regenerative life support system. Most systems analyses are concerned with optimizing the cost/benefit of a system at its nominal steady-state operating point. ALS analysis must go beyond the static steady state to include dynamic system design. All life support systems exhibit behavior that varies over time. ALS systems must respond to equipment operating cycles, repair schedules, and occasional off-nominal behavior or malfunctions. Biological components, such as bioreactors, composters, and food plant growth chambers, usually have operating cycles or other complex time behavior. Buffer sizes, material stocks, and resupply rates determine dynamic system behavior and directly affect system mass and cost. Dynamic simulation is needed to avoid the extremes of costly over-design of buffers and material reserves or system failure due to insufficient buffers and lack of stored material.

Jones, Harry

2002-01-01

52

Sobrevivir al cáncer: comer bien  

Cancer.gov

Sobrevivir al cáncer: comer bien Por el Instituto Nacional del Cáncer Bethesda, MD. - Más de 13 millones de personas que viven en Estados Unidos han recibido un diagnóstico de cáncer. Muchas de las personas que han tenido cáncer quieren seguir una

53

The structure and mechanical properties of Fe 3Al–30 vol.% Al 2O 3 nanocomposite  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fe3Al–30vol.% Al2O3 nanocomposite powder was fabricated via two routes. The first route involved the ball milling of Fe2O3–Al–Fe powder mixtures to produce in situ Al2O3 nanoparticles in Fe3Al matrix via mechanochemical reaction of Fe2O3 and Al. In the second route, Fe3Al–Al2O3 nanocomposite was prepared by ex situ addition of Al2O3 nanopowder to Fe–Al powder mixture followed by ball milling. The

M. Khodaei; M. H. Enayati; F. Karimzadeh

2009-01-01

54

Identification of Candida albicans ALS2 and ALS4 and Localization of Als Proteins to the Fungal Cell Surface  

PubMed Central

Additional genes in the growing ALS family of Candida albicans were isolated by PCR screening of a genomic fosmid library with primers designed from the consensus tandem-repeat sequence of ALS1. This procedure yielded fosmids encoding ALS2 and ALS4. ALS2 and ALS4 conformed to the three-domain structure of ALS genes, which consists of a central domain of tandemly repeated copies of a 108-bp motif, an upstream domain of highly conserved sequences, and a domain of divergent sequences 3? of the tandem repeats. Alignment of five predicted Als protein sequences indicated conservation of N- and C-terminal hydrophobic regions which have the hallmarks of secretory signal sequences and glycosylphosphatidylinositol addition sites, respectively. Heterologous expression of an N-terminal fragment of Als1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae demonstrated function of the putative signal sequence with cleavage following Ala17. This signal sequence cleavage site was conserved in the four other Als proteins analyzed, suggesting identical processing of each protein. Primary-structure features of the five Als proteins suggested a cell-surface localization, which was confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence with an anti-Als antiserum. Staining was observed on mother yeasts and germ tubes, although the intensity of staining on the mother yeast decreased with elongation of the germ tube. Similar to other ALS genes, ALS2 and ALS4 were differentially regulated. ALS4 expression was correlated with the growth phase of the culture; ALS2 expression was not observed under many different in vitro growth conditions. The data presented here demonstrate that ALS genes encode cell-surface proteins and support the conclusion that the size and number of Als proteins on the C. albicans cell surface vary with strain and growth conditions.

Hoyer, L. L.; Payne, T. L.; Hecht, J. E.

1998-01-01

55

AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

Kroemer, Herbert

1990-07-01

56

AlSb/InAs/AlSb quantum wells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Researchers studied the InAs/AlSb system recently, obtaining 12nm wide quantum wells with room temperature mobilities up to 28,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S and low-temperature mobilities up to 325,000 cm(exp 2)/V center dot S, both at high electron sheet concentrations in the 10(exp 12)/cm(exp 2) range (corresponding to volume concentrations in the 10(exp 18)/cm(exp 2) range). These wells were not intentionally doped; the combination of high carrier concentrations and high mobilities suggest that the electrons are due to not-intentional modulation doping by an unknown donor in the AlSb barriers, presumably a stoichiometric defect, like an antisite donor. Inasmuch as not intentionally doped bulk AlSb is semi-insulating, the donor must be a deep one, being ionized only by draining into the even deeper InAs quantum well. The excellent transport properties are confirmed by other observations, like excellent quantum Hall effect data, and the successful use of the quantum wells as superconductive weak links between Nb electrodes, with unprecendentedly high critical current densities. The system is promising for future field effect transistors (FETs), but many processing problems must first be solved. Although the researchers have achieved FETs, the results so far have not been competitive with GaAs FETs.

Kroemer, Herbert

1990-01-01

57

Al-Anon and recovery.  

PubMed

The history of Al-Anon and its current demographics are reviewed. In order to understand 12-step recovery and psychotherapy for family members of alcoholics, the concept of codependence is defined with a set of diagnostic criteria consistent with the DSM-III-R definition of personality traits and disorders. At the core of codependence are denial and an unrealistic relationship to willpower. The therapeutic implications of considering codependence as a personality disorder are explored, as are the characteristics that make codependence unique among personality disorders: the central role of denial and the existence of a self-help organization to facilitate recovery. The dynamics of working the 12 steps on codependent characteristics are outlined. A synergistic relationship between psychotherapy and the 12 steps is described. Special attention is given the emergence of Al-Anon adult children of alcoholic meetings, and the future of codependence is discussed. PMID:2648500

Cermak, T L

1989-01-01

58

First-principles calculations on Al/AlB 2 interfaces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The AlB 2 (1 1 1) surfaces and Al (1 1 1)/AlB 2 (0 0 0 1) interface were studied by first-principles calculations to clarify the heterogeneous nucleation potential of ?-Al grains on AlB 2 particles in purity aluminium and hypoeutectic Al-Si alloys. It is demonstrated that the AlB 2 (0 0 0 1) surface models with more than nine atomic layers exhibit bulk-like interior, wherein the interlayer relaxations localized within the top three layers are well converged. The outmost layer of AlB 2 free surface having a preference of metal atom termination is evidenced by surface energy calculations. With Al atoms continuing the natural stacking sequence of bulk AlB 2, Al-Al metallic bonds are formed across interface during the combination of Al atoms with Al-terminated AlB 2 surface. The calculated interfacial energy of the Al/AlB 2 interface is much larger than that between the ?-Al and aluminium melts, elucidating the poor nucleation potency of ?-Al grains on AlB 2 particles from thermodynamic considerations.

Han, Y. F.; Dai, Y. B.; Wang, J.; Shu, D.; Sun, B. D.

2011-06-01

59

TiN/Al2O3/TiAlON Composite.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The present invention pertains to novel improved density ceramic composites of TiN/Al2O3/TiAlON in which there is no spinel and no AlN, but alpha-alumina, titanium nitride, and titanium aluminum oxynitride. In general, the improved density TiN/Al2O3/TiAlO...

K. Han

1990-01-01

60

[Coagulation behavior of Al13 species].  

PubMed

Coagulation behavior of Al13 species was examined in synthetic water with high alkalinity and high humic acid concentration from viewpoint of the transformation of Al hydrolysis products during the coagulation process. The results indicated that coagulation efficiency of Al coagulants positively correlated with the content of Al13 in the coagulation process. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3) was more effective than polyaluminum chloride (PACI) in removing turbidity and dissolved organic matter in the synthetic water because AlCl3 could not only generate Al13 species but also function as pH control agent in the coagulation process. During coagulation process pH control can improve coagulation process through regulating Al speciation, and AlCl3 benefited most from pH control. PMID:17304842

Hu, Cheng-zhi; Liu, Hui-juan; Qu, Jiu-hui

2006-12-01

61

Tensile Behavior of Al2O3/FeAl + B and Al2O3/FeCrAlY Composites  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of Al2O3/FeAl + B and Al2O3/FeCrAlY composites for high-temperature applications was assessed. The major emphasis was on tensile behavior of both the monolithics and composites from 298 to 1100 K. However, the study also included determining the chemical compatibility of the composites, measuring the interfacial shear strengths, and investigating the effect of processing on the strength of the single-crystal Al2O3 fibers. The interfacial shear strengths were low for Al203/FeAl + B and moderate to high for Al203/FeCrAlY. The difference in interfacial bond strengths between the two systems affected the tensile behavior of the composites. The strength of the Al203 fiber was significantly degraded after composite processing for both composite systems and resulted in poor composite tensile properties. The ultimate tensile strength (UTS) values of the composites could generally be predicted with either rule of mixtures (ROM) calculations or existing models when using the strength of the etched-out fiber. The Al2O3/FeAl + B composite system was determined to be unfeasible due to poor interfacial shear strengths and a large mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE). Development of the Al2O3/FeCrAlY system would require an effective diffusion barrier to minimize the fiber strength degradation during processing and elevated temperature service.

Draper, S. L.; Eldridge, J. I.; Aiken, B. J. M.

1995-01-01

62

Mg isotopic heterogeneity, Al-Mg isochrons, and canonical 26Al/27Al in the early solar system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Abstract-There is variability in the Mg isotopic composition that is a reflection of the widespread heterogeneity in the isotopic composition of the elements in the solar system at approximately 100 ppm. Measurements on a single calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) gave a good correlation of 26Mg/24Mg with 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>/24Mg, yielding an isochron corresponding to an initial (26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span>)o = (5.27 ± 0.18) × 10-5 and an initial (26Mg/24Mg)o = -0.127 ± 0.032‰ relative to the standard. This isochron is parallel to that obtained by <link href="#b41 #b42">Jacobsen et <span class="hlt">al</span>. (2008), but is distinctively offset. This demonstrates that there are different initial Mg isotopic compositions in different samples with the same 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span>. No inference about uniformity/heterogeneity of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> on a macro scale can be based on the initial (26Mg/24Mg)o values. Different values of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> for samples representing the same point in time would prove heterogeneity of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span>. The important issue is whether the bulk solar inventory of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> was approximately 5 × 10-5 at some point in the early solar system. We discuss ultra refractory phases of solar type oxygen isotope composition with 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> from approximately 5 × 10-5 to below 0.2 × 10-5. We argue that the real issues are: intrinsic heterogeneity in the parent cloud; mechanism and timing for the later production of 16O-poor material; and the relationship to earlier formed 16O-rich material in the disk. 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>-free refractories can be produced at a later time by late infall, if there is an adequate heat source, or from original heterogeneities in the placental molecular cloud from which the solar system formed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wasserburg, G. J.; Wimpenny, Josh; Yin, Qing-Zhu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">63</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApPhA.tmp..246S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Plasmonics properties of trimetallic <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@Ag@Au and <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@AuAg nanostructures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bimetallic and trimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention in recent times due to their enhanced electrochemical and catalytic properties compared to monometallic nanoparticles. The numerical calculations using Mie theory has been carried out for three-layered metal nanoshell dielectric-metal-metal (DMM) system consisting of a particle with a dielectric core (<span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3), a middle metal Ag (Au) layer and an outer metal Au (Ag) shell. The results have been interpreted using plasmon hybridization theory. We have also prepared <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@Ag@Au and <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@AgAu triple-layered core-shell or alloy nanostructure by two-step laser ablation method and compared with calculated results. The synthesis involves temporal separations of <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Ag, and Au deposition for step-by-step formation of triple-layered core-shell structure. To form <span class="hlt">Al</span>@Ag nanoparticles, we ablated silver for 40 min in aluminium nanoparticle colloidal solution. As aluminium oxidizes easily in water to form alumina, the resulting structure is core-shell <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3. The <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3 particle acts as a seed for the incoming energetic silver particles for multilayered <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@Ag nanoparticles is formed. The silver target was then replaced by gold target and ablation was carried out for different ablation time using different laser energy for generation of <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@Ag@Au core-shell or <span class="hlt">Al@Al</span>2O3@AgAu alloy. The formation of core-shell and alloy nanostructure was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The absorption spectra show shift in plasmon resonance peak of silver to gold in the range 400-520 nm with increasing ablation time suggesting formation of Ag-Au alloy in the presence of alumina particles in the solution.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Singh, Rina; Soni, R. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">64</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14645389"> <span id="translatedtitle">Form of <span class="hlt">Al</span> changes with <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration in leaves of buckwheat.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. cv. Jianxi) is known as an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-accumulating plant. The process leading to the accumulation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in the leaves was investigated, focusing on the chemical form of <span class="hlt">Al</span> using 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-nuclear magnetic resonance. Leaves with different <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations were prepared by growing buckwheat on a very acidic soil (Andosol) amended with or without CaCO3 (1 or 3 g x kg-1 soil). When the <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration of the leaves was lower, only one major signal was observed at a chemical shift of 16.1 ppm, which was assigned to an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-oxalate complex at a 1:3 ratio. However, when the <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration of the leaves increased to a high level (e.g. 12 g <span class="hlt">Al</span> kg-1), an additional signal at a chemical shift of 11.2 ppm was observed. This signal was assigned to an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate complex at a 1:1 ratio. In the leaf with a high <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration, both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-oxalate (1:3) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate (1:1) were detected in marginal and middle parts, while only <span class="hlt">Al</span>-oxalate was detected in the basal part. The oxalate concentration did not differ very much between leaves with low and high <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations at the same position, while citrate concentration significantly increased with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration when the oxalate/<span class="hlt">Al</span> ratio became lower than 3.0. As the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate complex has been demonstrated to be the form of transport in the xylem, the results suggest that when internal oxalate is enough to form a complex with <span class="hlt">Al</span> at a 3:1 ratio in the leaves with a low <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate converts to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-oxalate. However, this conversion does not occur in the leaves with a very high <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration, resulting in the coexistence of both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-oxalate and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate complexes. PMID:14645389</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shen, Renfang; Iwashita, Takashi; Ma, Jian Feng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">65</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21608136"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span> Polycrystals along with <span class="hlt">Al</span> Nanoparticles Using Thermal Plasma Route</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper for the first time reports the (200) oriented growth of hexagonal Aluminum nitride crystals during synthesis of aluminum nanoparticles in dc transferred arc thermal plasma reactor by gas phase condensation in nitrogen plasma. The structural and morphological study of as synthesized <span class="hlt">Al</span>N crystal and aluminium nanoparticles was done by using the x-ray diffraction method, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kanhe, Nilesh S.; Nawale, A. B.; Kulkarni, N. V.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Mathe, V. L. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411007 (India); Das, A. K. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai, 400085 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">66</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940032245&hterms=powder+metallography&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dpowder%2Bmetallography"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-base composite containing high volume fraction of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N for advanced engines</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A particulate reinforced Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N composite alloy has a Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix and greater than about 13 volume percent fine particles of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N within the matrix. The particles preferably have a diameter from about 15 nanometers to about 50 nanometers. The particulate reinforced Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N composite alloy may be prepared by cryomilling prealloyed Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> in liquid nitrogen using grinding media having a diameter of from about 2 to 6 mm at an impeller speed of from about 450 RPM to about 800 RPM. The cryomilling may be done for a duration of from about 4 hours to about 20 hours to obtain a cryomilled powder. The cryomilled powder may be consolidated to form the particulate reinforced Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N composite alloy. The particulate reinforced alloy can further include a toughening alloy. The toughening alloy may include NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y, FeCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y, and Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hebsur, Mohan (inventor); Whittenbeger, John D. (inventor); Lowell, Carl F. (inventor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">67</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49428031"> <span id="translatedtitle">Evolution of deformation texture in <span class="hlt">Al\\/Al–Mg\\/Al</span> composite sheets during cold-roll cladding</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al\\/Al–Mg\\/Al</span> composite sheets were fabricated by roll cladding to investigate the evolution of deformation texture through the thickness direction. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to analyze the heterogeneity of deformation texture in each component layer of the composite sheets. Finite element analysis (FEA) was conducted to simulate the deformation history in each component layer during roll cladding. The deformation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eun-Young Kim; JaeHyung Cho; Hyoung-Wook Kim; Shi-Hoon Choi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">68</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40368817"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electrochemical behaviour and corrosion performance of Mg–Li–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–Zn anodes with high <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study investigated the electrochemical and corrosion performance of Mg–Li–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–Zn anodes with <span class="hlt">Al</span> compositions of ?3 wt.% and ?9 wt.%. Mg–Li–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–Zn alloy with ?9 wt.% <span class="hlt">Al</span> had a relatively negative open-circuit potential and a high discharge voltage in MgCl2 electrolyte, owing to the distribution of numerous <span class="hlt">Al</span>Li particles in the matrix of the alloy. <span class="hlt">Al</span>Li particles were believed to transform</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">M. C. Lin; C. Y. Tsai; J. Y. Uan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">69</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40940053"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructures and mechanical properties of Fe 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-based Fe–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–C alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper results on the microstructures and mechanical properties of Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-based Fe–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–C alloys with strengthening precipitates of the perovskite-type ?-phase Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span>Cx are presented. The alloys are prepared by vacuum induction melting and cast into Cu-moulds. The composition of the Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix of the investigated Fe–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–C alloys varies between 23 and 29at.% <span class="hlt">Al</span>. The ternary C-additions range from 1 to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Schneider; L. Falat; G. Sauthoff; G. Frommeyer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">70</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48342061"> <span id="translatedtitle">Werbung <span class="hlt">als</span> Verhaltensvorbild für Mitarbeiter</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Seit der Kampagne „FedEx. Whatever it takes.“ gilt das Logistikunternehmen FedEx <span class="hlt">als</span> Trendsetter in Sachen Werbung. Mit der\\u000a Kampagne ist es FedEx gelungen, seine tendenziell „farblose“ Dienstleistung emotional aufzuladen und für den Kunden greifbar\\u000a zu machen. Zudem konnte die Bekanntheit der Marke gesteigert werden. FedEx schaffte noch im Erscheinungsjahr der Kampagne\\u000a erstmals den Sprung in das Interbrand-Ranking der einhundert wertvollsten</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sven Henkel; Torsten Tomczak; Wolfgang Jenewein</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">71</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49256081"> <span id="translatedtitle">The coarsening behavior of duplex <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3\\/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 4 composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In The Present Study, The Grain Growth Behavior Of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3\\/Nial2O4 Composite Is Compared With That Of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 And Of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4. Duplex <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3\\/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 composite shows strong resistance to coarsening. The activation energy for the grain growth of monolithic <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O 3 is the same as that of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 in composite. However, the activation energy for the grain growth of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 is changed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">W. H. Tuan; M. C. Lin; W. H. Tzing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">72</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40987596"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth stage kinetics in the synthesis of <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites by directed oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg-Si alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Although synthesis of ceramic matrix composites by the directed oxidation process offers significant advantages over traditional composite processing routes, the scientific basis for the process is not fully understood. This paper is addressed to understanding the mechanism of composite growth from <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg-Si alloys theoretically and experimentally. Analysis of the oxidation kinetics of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg-Si alloys for various</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Venugopalan; T. DebRoy</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">73</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE94016877"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonstoichiometry of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr intermetallic phases.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nonstoichiometry of metastable cubic (beta)(prime) and equilibrium tetragonal (beta) <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr intermetallic phases of the nominal composition <span class="hlt">Al</span>(sub 3)Zr in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich alloys has been extensively studied. It is proposed that the ''dark contrast'' of (beta)(prim...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">V. Radmilovic G. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">74</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10174408"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nonstoichiometry of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr intermetallic phases</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nonstoichiometry of metastable cubic {beta}{prime} and equilibrium tetragonal {beta} <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr intermetallic phases of the nominal composition <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Zr in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich alloys has been extensively studied. It is proposed that the ``dark contrast`` of {beta}{prime} core in {beta}{prime}/{sigma}{prime} complex precipitates, in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Zr based alloys, is caused by incorporation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Li atoms into the {beta}{prime} phase on Zr sublattice sites, forming nonstoichiometric <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr intermetallic phases, rather than by Li partitioning only. {beta}{prime} particles contain very small amounts of Zr, approximately 5 at.%, much less than the stoichiometric 25 at.% in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Zr metastable phase. These particles are, according to simulation of high resolution images, of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}(<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 0.4}Li{sub 0.4}Zr{sub 0.2}) type. Nonstoichiometric particles of average composition <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 4}Zr and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 6}Zr are observed also in the binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zr alloy, even after annealing for several hours at 600{degree}C.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Radmilovic, V.; Thomas, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">75</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE99002885"> <span id="translatedtitle">U-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy charge makeup equation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The (sup 235)U content in fuel tubes (g(sup 235)U/ft) is directly proportional to the (sup 235)U concentration (g(sup 235)U/cc) in the U-<span class="hlt">Al</span> core alloy. In order to prepare enriched uranium metal, aluminum, and U-<span class="hlt">Al</span> scrap for U-<span class="hlt">Al</span> production melts, the ove...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. C. Rhode</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">76</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53919357"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cr-Nb (Aluminium - Chromium - Niobium)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This document is part of Subvolume A1 'Light Metal Systems. Part 1: Selected Systems from Ag-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Er' of Volume 11 'Ternary Alloy Systems - Phase Diagrams, Crystallographic and Thermodynamic Data critically evaluated by MSIT®' of Landolt-Börnstein - Group IV Physical Chemistry. It provides the data for the ternary system <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cr-Nb (Aluminium - Chromium - Niobium).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">77</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JCrGr.312.2569K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Possibility of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth using Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N solvent</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The possibility of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth using Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N solvent was investigated. Based on theoretical prediction, we selected Li 3N as a suitable nitrogen source for <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth. First, vapor phase epitaxy using Li 3N and <span class="hlt">Al</span> as source materials was performed to confirm the following reaction on the growth surface: Li 3N+<span class="hlt">Al=Al</span>N+3Li. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds to form <span class="hlt">Al</span>N on the substrate under appropriate conditions. Next, <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth using Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N solvent was carried out. The Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N solvent was prepared by annealing of mixtures composed of Li 3N and <span class="hlt">Al</span>. The results imply that <span class="hlt">Al</span>N was formed under an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich condition. Moreover, it was found that Li was swept out from <span class="hlt">Al</span>N grains during growth. The results suggest that <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth using Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N solvent might be a key technology to obtain an <span class="hlt">Al</span>N crystal boule.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kangawa, Yoshihiro; Kakimoto, Koichi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">78</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20005991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wear behavior of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>{sub 3}Ti composite manufactured by a centrifugal method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present study was to develop a wear-resistant, light <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>{sub 3}Ti composite material. An <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>{sub 3}Ti composite specimen was machined from a thick-walled tube of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>{sub 3}Ti functionally graded material (FGM) manufactured by the centrifugal method from a commercial ingot of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5 mass% Ti master alloy. The alloy was heated to a temperature where solid <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Ti particles resided in a liquid <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix, and then the centrifugal method was carried out. <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Ti particles in a commercial alloy ingot exist as platelets, and this shape was maintained through the casting. Three kinds of wear specimens were prepared, taking into account the morphology of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Ti particles in the thick-walled FGM tube; the <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Ti particles were arranged with their platelet planes nearly normal to the radial direction as a result of the applied centrifugal force. The wear resistance of the <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>{sub 3}Ti composite was significantly higher than that of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span>. Wear-resistance anisotropy and dissolution of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Ti into the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix at the near-surface region, around 100 {micro}m in depth, were also observed. The mechanism of the supersaturated-layer formation and the origin of the anisotropic wear resistance are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Watanabe, Yoshimi; Yamanaka, Noboru; Fukui, Yasuyoshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">79</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JSSCh.198..330R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aluminium distribution in ZSM-5 revisited: The role of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> interactions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present a theoretical study of the distribution of <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms in zeolite ZSM-5 with Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span>=47, where we focus on the role of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> interactions rather than on the energetics of <span class="hlt">Al</span>/Si substitutions at individual sites. Using interatomic potential methods, we evaluate the energies of the full set of symmetrically independent configurations of <span class="hlt">Al</span> siting in a Si94<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O192 cell. The equilibrium <span class="hlt">Al</span> distribution is determined by the interplay of two factors: the energetics of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/Si substitution at an individual site, which tends to populate particular T sites (e.g., the T14 site), and the <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> interaction, which at this Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span> maximises <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> distances in general agreement with Dempsey's rule. However, it is found that the interaction energy changes approximately as the inverse of the square of the distance between the two <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms, rather than the inverse of the distance expected if this were merely charge repulsion. Moreover, we find that the anisotropic nature of the framework density plays an important role in determining the magnitude of the interactions, which are not simply dependent on <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> distances.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruiz-Salvador, A. Rabdel; Grau-Crespo, Ricardo; Gray, Aileen E.; Lewis, Dewi W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">80</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=PIA07216&hterms=Arabic+Arabic+al-+arab+yah&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DArabic%2B%257C%2B%25D8%25A7%25D9%2584%25D8%25B9%25D8%25B1%25D8%25A8%25D9%258A%25D8%25A9%2B%257C%2Bal-%25CA%25BBarab%25C4%25AByah%2B%257C%2B%25D8%25B9%25D8%25B1%25D8%25A8%25D9%258A%252F%2526"> <span id="translatedtitle">Opportunity's 'Rub <span class="hlt">al</span> Khali' Panorama</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><p/> [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for Opportunity's 'Rub <span class="hlt">al</span> Khali' Panorama (QTVR) <p/> This panoramic image, dubbed 'Rub <span class="hlt">al</span> Khali,' was acquired by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on the plains of Meridiani during the period from the rover's 456th to 464th sols on Mars (May 6 to May 14, 2005). Opportunity was about 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) south of 'Endurance Crater' at a place known informally as 'Purgatory Dune.' <p/> The rover was stuck in the dune's deep fine sand for more than a month. 'Rub <span class="hlt">al</span> Khali' (Arabic translation: 'the empty quarter') was chosen as the name for this panorama because it is the name of a similarly barren, desolate part of the Saudi Arabian desert on Earth. <p/> The view spans 360 degrees. It consists of images obtained in 97 individual pointings of the panoramic camera. The camera took images with five camera filters at each pointing. This 22,780-by-6,000-pixel mosaic is an approximately true-color rendering generated using the images acquired through filters admitting light wavelengths of 750, 530, and 480 nanometers. <p/> Lighting varied during the nine sols it took to acquire this panorama, resulting in some small image seams within the mosaic. These seams have been smoothed in sky parts of the mosaic to better simulate the vista that a person would see if able to view it all at the same time on Mars. <p/> Opportunity's tracks leading back to the north (center of the panorama) are a reminder of the rover's long trek from Endurance Crater. The deep ruts dug by Opportunity's wheels as it became stuck in the sand appear in the foreground. The crest and trough of the last ripple the rover crossed before getting stuck is visible in the center. These wind-formed sand features are only about 10 to 15 centimeters (4 to 6 inches) tall. The crest of the actual ripple where the rover got stuck can be seen just to the right of center. The tracks and a few other places on and near ripple crests can be seen in this color image to be dustier than the undisturbed or 'normal' plains soils in Meridiani. Since the time these ruts were made, some of the dust there has been blown away by the wind, reaffirming the dynamic nature of the martian environment, even in this barren, ocean-like desert of sand.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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<a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">81</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009bein.book...29D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Instandhaltungsmanagement <span class="hlt">als</span> Gestaltungsfeld Ganzheitlicher Produktionssysteme</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sich kontinuierlich verändernde Rahmenbedingungen, wie beispielsweise eine steigende Variantenvielfalt, verkürzte Produktlebenszyklen sowie Kundenforderungen nach höherer Qualität, kürzeren Lieferzeiten und geringeren Kosten, fordern von produzierenden Unternehmen eine stetige Anpassung der Prozesse, der Organisation und der Strukturen. Seit den 90er Jahren versuchen immer mehr deutsche Unternehmen diesen veränderten Anforderungen mit der Einführung eines Ganzheitlichen Produktionssystems (GPS) zu begegnen. Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme sind dabei in ihren Grundlagen an das Toyota Produktionssystem angelehnt, vereinigen aber auch weitere Methoden zu einem unternehmensspezifischen Regelwerk. Im Rahmen des langfristigen Trends zu unternehmensindividuellen Produktionssystemen wird sowohl in der Industrie <span class="hlt">als</span> auch in der Forschung intensiv über das Toyota Produktionssystem, Lean Production, Lean Management und Ganzheitliche Produktionssysteme diskutiert, werden Konzepte zu Implementierung und Betrieb erstellt und die Wirtschaftlichkeit untersucht.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dombrowski, Uwe; Schulze, Sven; Otano, Isabel Crespo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">82</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/282257"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructure and properties of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si)-Si composites formed by in situ reaction of <span class="hlt">Al</span> with aluminosilicate ceramics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si)-Si composites have been formed by in situ reaction of molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> with aluminosilicate ceramics. This reactive metal penetration (RMP) process is driven by a strongly negative Gibbs energy for reaction. In the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/mullite system, <span class="hlt">Al</span> reduces mullite to produce {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} and elemental Si. With excess <span class="hlt">Al</span> (i.e., x > 0), a composite of {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}, <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) alloy, and Si can be formed. Ceramic-metal composites containing up to 30 vol pct <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) were prepared by reacting molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> with dense, aluminosilicate ceramic preforms or by reactively hot pressing <span class="hlt">Al</span> and mullite powder mixtures. Both reactive metal-forming techniques produce ceramic composite bodies consisting of a fine-grained alumina skeleton with an interpenetrating <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) metal phase. The rigid alumina ceramic skeletal structure dominates composite physical properties such as the Young`s modulus, hardness, and the coefficient of thermal expansion, while the interpenetrating ductile <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) metal phase contributes to composite fracture toughness. Microstructural analysis of composite fracture surfaces shows evidence of ductile metal failure of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) ligaments. <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si)-Si composites produced by in situ reaction of aluminum with mullite have improved mechanical properties and increased stiffness relative to dense mullite, and composite fracture toughness increases with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) content.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ewsuk, K.G.; Glass, S.J.; Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tomsia, A.P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Fahrenholtz, W.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">83</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyC..503...29K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of tunneling barrier thicknesses for Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb tunnel junctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The tunnel barrier thicknesses of Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb tunnel junctions were measured using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray Reflection (XRR). By investigating the barrier thickness dependence of current density Jc, the barrier height for Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb junctions was calculated. Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb junctions with different Jc were fabricated by controlling the O2 exposure in <span class="hlt">Al</span> oxidation. The junctions show good tunneling properties with subgap leakage factor Vm larger than 30 mV in the range of Jc from tens of A/cm2 to several kA/cm2. TEM images showed clear interface and indicated the <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ox thicknesses ranging from 0.8 nm to 1.9 nm, and the average barrier height was estimated to be 0.17 eV for Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb tunnel junctions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kang, Xinjie; Ying, Liliang; Wang, Hai; Zhang, Guofeng; Peng, Wei; Kong, Xiangyan; Xie, Xiaoming; Wang, Zhen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">84</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40267405"> <span id="translatedtitle">Radioscopic visualization of melting, alloying and solidification of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Cu</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Horizontal directional solidification (HDS) and horizontal directional melting (HDM) of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>–4.5%wt Cu alloy were studied in real-time with in situ X-ray radioscopic visualization technology. Cu into pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> and the stratification and mixing of Cu in <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Cu alloy melt were monitored. Some characteristics of the dynamics of the solid–liquid interface profile during HDS of a rectangular <span class="hlt">Al</span></p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hongbin Yin; Jean N Koster</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">85</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23151625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Single crystal growth and characterization of binary stoichiometric and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Binary stoichiometric Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> (Ni–25at% <span class="hlt">Al</span>) single crystals and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich single-crystal-like (Ni–26at% <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Ni–27at% <span class="hlt">Al</span>) alloys that do not contain any ternary additions have been successfully grown for the first time, by using the floating zone method. The quality of the crystals was examined by the Laue X-ray back-reflection method and optical microscopy. The stoichiometric single crystals had good crystallinity. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. Golberg; M Demura; T Hirano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">86</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l56w3417k43225l2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructures and corrosion properties of casting in situ <span class="hlt">Al</span> 3 Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of Ti content and the alloying elements of Si and Cu on the microstructures of casting in situ <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites were investigated. Simultaneously, their corrosion properties were also discussed. The results indicate that\\u000a the aspect ratios of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti platelets in different <span class="hlt">Al</span> based composites are different although all of them are in flaky shape. The morphologies of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tijun Chen; Jian Li; Yuan Hao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">87</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://jxb.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/55/394/131.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Form of <span class="hlt">Al</span> changes with <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration in leaves of buckwheat</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. cv. Jianxi) is known as an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-accumulating plant. The process leading to the accumulation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in the leaves was investigated, focusing on the chemical form of <span class="hlt">Al</span> using 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-nuclear magnetic resonance. Leaves with different <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations were pre- pared by growing buckwheat on a very acidic soil (Andosol) amended with or without CaCO3 (1 or</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Renfang Shen; Takashi Iwashita; Jian Feng M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">88</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014ApSS..292..620C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influences of <span class="hlt">Al</span> particles on the microstructure and property of electrodeposited Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite coatings with different contents of <span class="hlt">Al</span> microparticles were prepared from a conventional Watt bath. The influences of <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loadings in the bath on the surface morphology, composition, texture, grain size, microstrain, residual stress and anti-corrosion of the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite coating were investigated. The friction coefficients of the coatings at 200 °C were also evaluated by a pin-on-disctribometer. The results showed that the surface morphology of the coatings changed from pyramid + colonied structure to colonied structure with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loadings. The (2 0 0) preferred orientation for pure Ni coating evolved to random orientation with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loadings. The grain size obtained the minimum value of 72.28 nm at <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loading of 100 g/L and the microstrain of the coating increased with increasing the <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loadings. The incorporation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> particles decreased the residual stress of the electro-deposited coating and all the coatings deposited at different <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loadings possessed low residual stress. As the <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle loading increased, the anti-corrosion of the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> coatings increased owing to the combined effect of increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> content in the coatings and the texture evolution from (2 0 0) plane to (1 1 1) plane. The wear result suggested that the increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> particle content did not improve the wear performance of the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite coatings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cai, Fei; Jiang, Chuanhai</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">89</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49425063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guinier-Preston zones in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Cu and <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Ag single crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Guinier-Preston zones in <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Ag and <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Cu were investigated by diffuse X-ray and neutron scattering. In <span class="hlt">Al</span>-3 at % Ag no differences are found between zones formed above and below 500 K (?- and ?-zones, respectively). Their average Ag concentration is (80 ± 10) at %, and the Ag concentration decreases by 10–15% from shell to core of the zones. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bernd Schönfeld; Alexander Malik; Gernot Kostorz; Willy Bührer; Jan Skov Pedersen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">90</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/l73323j3274033m2.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2 O 3 \\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> Composites by Directed Melt Oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si-Zn Alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Observations are presented on the initiation and growth of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites by the directed melt oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys containing metallic Zn or using external dopant ZnO. Thermal\\u000a gravimetric analysis, optical microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis were employed to characterize the progress of oxidation\\u000a and the nature of oxidation products. Both Zn and ZnO dopants were able to initiate the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jingzhong Zhao; Huiping Chai; Fajian Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">91</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24726768"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analysis of smoking and LPO in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Smoking has been suggested as one of the risk factor for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) development. In order to investigate whether adverse effects of cigarette smoke in <span class="hlt">ALS</span> have any association with increase in oxidative stress, disease severity, lipid hydroperoxides (LPO) and superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1) levels were measured in biofluids of smoker and never smoker <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients and clinically correlated. Serum and CSF from sporadic <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients (n=50) diagnosed with El Escorial criteria were collected in the study. Serum (n=50) and CSF (n=42) were also collected from normal healthy controls. The LPO levels were estimated using commercially available kits. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were used to quantitate SOD1. Their levels were further analyzed among smoker and never smoker subjects. Significantly elevated LPO in sera and CSF of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients were observed (p<0.05). There was considerably increased LPO in sera and CSF of smoker <span class="hlt">ALS</span> subjects matched with disease severity as compared to never smoker <span class="hlt">ALS</span> (p<0.05). <span class="hlt">ALS</span> group did not show any alteration in SOD1 when compared to controls (p>0.05). In addition, no change has been observed in SOD1 levels in <span class="hlt">ALS</span> subjects who smoke (p>0.05). Increased LPO and unaltered SOD1 in <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients may suggest the neuro-pathological association of LPO with <span class="hlt">ALS</span> disease independent of SOD1. With current findings, it may be proposed that LPO levels might constitute as probable biomarker for smoker <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients, however, it cannot be concluded without larger gender matched studies. Additional investigations are needed to determine whether LPO upregulation is primary or secondary to motor neuron degeneration in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. PMID:24726768</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anand, Akshay; Gupta, Pawan K; Prabhakar, Sudesh; Sharma, Suresh; Thakur, Keshav</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">92</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997PhyB..234..983S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guinier-Preston zones in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Cu and <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Ag single crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Guinier-Preston zones in <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Ag and <span class="hlt">Al</span>?Cu were investigated by diffuse X-ray and neutron scattering. In <span class="hlt">Al</span>-3 at % Ag no differences are found between zones formed above and below 500 K (?- and ?-zones, respectively). Their average Ag concentration is (80 ± 10) at %, and the Ag concentration decreases by 10-15% from shell to core of the zones. In <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1.75 at % Cu, Guinier-Preston I zones are dominantly monolayers with a Cu fraction of (84 ± 2) at %.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schönfeld, Bernd; Malik, Alexander; Kostorz, Gernot; Bührer, Willy; Skov Pedersen, Jan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">93</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18583010"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation of Ni<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span> 2O 3 composites for controlled development of surface layers and toughening</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation of Ni<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 composites has been performed to develop protective layers with compressive stress for toughening. The dominant formation of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 is observed for Ni<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 composites contrary to the consecutive formation of Ni3<span class="hlt">Al+Al</span>2O3, 2Ni+<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, 2NiO+<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, and NiO+Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 for Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder. The NiO formed on the composites immediately diffuses along with the grain boundary, reacts with boundary <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, and provides</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Osami Abe; Yoshitaka Ohwa</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">94</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=158226"> <span id="translatedtitle">Internal Detoxification Mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in Hydrangea (Identification of <span class="hlt">Al</span> Form in the Leaves).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An internal detoxification mechanism for <span class="hlt">Al</span> was investigated in an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-accumulating plant, hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla), focusing on <span class="hlt">Al</span> forms present in the cells. The leaves of hydrangea contained as much as 15.7 mmol <span class="hlt">Al</span> kg-1 fresh weight, and more than two-thirds of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> was found in the cell sap. Using 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>- nuclear magnetic resonance, the dominant peak of <span class="hlt">Al</span> was observed at a chemical shift of 11 to 12 parts per million in both intact leaves and the extracted cell sap, which is in good accordance with the chemical shift for the 1:1 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate complex. Purification of cell sap by molecular sieve chromatography (Sephadex G-10) combined with ion-exclusion chromatography indicated that <span class="hlt">Al</span> in fractions with the same retention time as citric acid contributed to the observed 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> peak in the intact leaves. The molar ratio of <span class="hlt">Al</span> to citric acid in the crude and purified cell sap approximated 1. The structure of the ligand chelated with <span class="hlt">Al</span> was identified to be citric acid. Bioassay experiments showed that the purified <span class="hlt">Al</span> complex from the cell sap did not inhibit root elongation of corn (Zea mays L.) and the viability of cells on the root tip surface was also not affected. These observations indicate that <span class="hlt">Al</span> is bound to citric acid in the cells of hydrangea leaves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ma, J. F.; Hiradate, S.; Nomoto, K.; Iwashita, T.; Matsumoto, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">95</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12223659"> <span id="translatedtitle">Internal Detoxification Mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in Hydrangea (Identification of <span class="hlt">Al</span> Form in the Leaves).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An internal detoxification mechanism for <span class="hlt">Al</span> was investigated in an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-accumulating plant, hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla), focusing on <span class="hlt">Al</span> forms present in the cells. The leaves of hydrangea contained as much as 15.7 mmol <span class="hlt">Al</span> kg-1 fresh weight, and more than two-thirds of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> was found in the cell sap. Using 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>- nuclear magnetic resonance, the dominant peak of <span class="hlt">Al</span> was observed at a chemical shift of 11 to 12 parts per million in both intact leaves and the extracted cell sap, which is in good accordance with the chemical shift for the 1:1 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-citrate complex. Purification of cell sap by molecular sieve chromatography (Sephadex G-10) combined with ion-exclusion chromatography indicated that <span class="hlt">Al</span> in fractions with the same retention time as citric acid contributed to the observed 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> peak in the intact leaves. The molar ratio of <span class="hlt">Al</span> to citric acid in the crude and purified cell sap approximated 1. The structure of the ligand chelated with <span class="hlt">Al</span> was identified to be citric acid. Bioassay experiments showed that the purified <span class="hlt">Al</span> complex from the cell sap did not inhibit root elongation of corn (Zea mays L.) and the viability of cells on the root tip surface was also not affected. These observations indicate that <span class="hlt">Al</span> is bound to citric acid in the cells of hydrangea leaves. PMID:12223659</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ma, J. F.; Hiradate, S.; Nomoto, K.; Iwashita, T.; Matsumoto, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">96</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19916602"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions with ammonia: selective etching of <span class="hlt">Al</span>11(-) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>12(-).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Reactivity of aluminum cluster anions toward ammonia was studied via mass spectrometry. Highly selective etching of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(11)(-) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(12)(-) was observed at low concentrations of ammonia. However, at sufficiently high concentrations of ammonia, all other sizes of aluminum cluster anions, except for <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)(-), were also observed to deplete. The disappearance of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(11)(-) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(12)(-) was accompanied by concurrent production of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(11)NH(3)(-) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(12)NH(3)(-) species, respectively. Theoretical simulations of the photoelectron spectrum of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(11)NH(3)(-) showed conclusively that its ammonia moiety is chemisorbed without dissociation, although in the case of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(12)NH(3)(-), dissociation of the ammonia moiety could not be excluded. Moreover, since differences in calculated <span class="hlt">Al</span>(n)(-) + NH(3) (n=9-12) reaction energies were not able to explain the observed selective etching of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(11)(-) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(12)(-), we concluded that thermodynamics plays only a minor role in determining the observed reactivity pattern, and that kinetics is the more influential factor. In particular, the conversion from the physisorbed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(n)(-)(NH(3)) to chemisorbed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(n)NH(3)(-) species is proposed as the likely rate-limiting step. PMID:19916602</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Grubisic, Andrej; Li, Xiang; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Schnöckel, Hansgeorg; Tenorio, Francisco J; Martinez, Ana</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">97</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3201391"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calcium platinum aluminium, CaPt<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A preliminary X-ray study of CaPt<span class="hlt">Al</span> has been reported previously by Hulliger [J. Alloys Compd (1993), 196, 225–228] based on X-ray powder diffraction data without structure refinement. With the present single-crystal X-ray study, we confirm the assignment of the TiNiSi type for CaPt<span class="hlt">Al</span>, in a fully ordered inverse structure. All three atoms of the asymmetric unit have .m. site symmetry. The structure features a ? 3[<span class="hlt">Al</span>Pt] open framework with a fourfold coordination of Pt by <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms and vice versa. The Ca atoms are located in the large channels of the structure.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kenfack Tsobnang, Patrice; Fotio, Daniel; Ponou, Simeon; Fon Abi, Charles</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">98</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP..tmp...91P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interfacial Phenomena in <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: <span class="hlt">Al/solder/Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT, (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of <span class="hlt">Al</span> pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> substrate and migration of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pstru?, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">99</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012APS..DNP.EA055O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Uncertainties in production of stellar 26<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While most of ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span> content is believed to be produced in supernovae, as much as 20% may come from novae whose favorable energies enable the precise study of the production mechanism of ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span> in novae. This study achieves greater importance because ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span> is one of the critical isotopes that governs the path by which nucleosynthesis takes to heavier species and would also indirectly constrain the ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span> content produced by supernovae thereby impacting the ratio of stellar ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/^60Fe, an important benchmark in supernovae nucleosynthesis. Despite significant progress on the subject there remains large uncertainties in one of the competing ^26<span class="hlt">Al</span> production channels which relies on the ^25<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,?)^26Si transition. This uncertainty is primarily characterized by the undetermined energy of the excited 3^+ ^26Si state which decays to the ground state of ^25<span class="hlt">Al</span>+p. To determine the resonance strength and energy of this transition an experiment is planned at the NSCL, which populates ^26Si through the beta decay of ^26P. Using an array of Ge clover detectors to measure the energies of the beta-delayed photons and their intensities, one could then determine ??, which then allows the calculation of the resonance strength (since ?p is known), completing the decay scheme of the ^25<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,?)^26Si transition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ortez, Ronaldo; Wrede, Christopher; Bennet, Micheal; Santia, Marco; Bowe, Alice</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">100</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP...23.1614P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interfacial Phenomena in <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>/Cu, and Cu/Cu Joints Soldered Using an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn Alloy with Ag or Cu Additions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The studies of soldered joints were carried out in systems: <span class="hlt">Al/solder/Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>/solder/Cu, Cu/solder/Cu, where the solder was (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT, (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Ag and (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn)EUT with 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 at.% of Cu addition. Brazing was performed at 500 °C for 3 min. The EDS analysis indicated that the composition of the layers starting from the Cu pad was CuZn, Cu5Zn8, and CuZn4, respectively. Wetting tests were performed at 500 °C for 3, 8, 15, and 30 min, respectively. Thickness of the layers and their kinetics of growth were measured based on the SEM micrographs. The formation of interlayers was not observed from the side of <span class="hlt">Al</span> pads. On the contrary, dissolution of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> substrate and migration of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich particles into the bulk of the solder were observed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pstru?, Janusz; Gancarz, Tomasz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span 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<a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">101</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JCrGr.383...25P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and characterization of <span class="hlt">AlGaN/AlN/GaN/Al</span>GaN double heterojunction structures with <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN as buffer layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) structures with GaN, <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.025Ga0.975N and <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.04Ga0.96N high resistivity (HR) buffers were grown on sapphire by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The structural and electrical properties of these three samples were investigated and compared. By increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN buffer, full width at half maximum (FWHM) values of (0002) and (10-12) x-ray rocking curves for buffer increase, indicating higher threading dislocation density. Room temperature noncontact Hall measurements were performed, and the measured 2DEG mobility was 1828 cm2/V s for GaN buffer, 1728 cm2/V s for <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.025Ga0.975N buffer, and 1649 cm2/V s for <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.04Ga0.96N buffer, respectively. Combining the theoretical calculation with the experiments, it was demonstrated that the decrease of mobility was attributed to higher dislocation density in sample with higher <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN buffer. Devices were fabricated and it was found that the double heterojunction (DH) HEMT with <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.025Ga0.975N buffer could effectively reduce the buffer leakage current.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Peng, Enchao; Wang, Xiaoliang; Xiao, Hongling; Wang, Cuimei; Yin, Haibo; Chen, Hong; Feng, Chun; Jiang, Lijuan; Hou, Xun; Wang, Zhanguo</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">102</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40939388"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructures and wear resistances of hybrid <span class="hlt">Al–(Al</span> 3Ti+<span class="hlt">Al</span> 3Ni) FGMs fabricated by a centrifugal method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Al</span> based functionally graded materials (FGMs), reinforced by a hybrid of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti platelets and <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ni granular particles, were fabricated by the centrifugal method with both ingots of commercial <span class="hlt">Al</span>–5mass%Ti and <span class="hlt">Al</span>–20mass%Ni master alloys. The ratios of <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Ti and <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Ni alloys were 3:1, 1:1 and 1:3 (in mass), and the applied G numbers are 30, 50 and 80. The microstructures</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshimi Watanabe; Tatsuru Nakamura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">103</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40504905"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>\\/Ti 2<span class="hlt">Al</span>C composites prepared by spark plasma sintering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>\\/Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>C composites were produced by spark plasma sintering technology from mixed powders of Ti, <span class="hlt">Al</span> and TiC. X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns showed that the sintered products mainly consisted of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>C phases. Electric probe microcosmic analysis (EPMA) photos indicated different microstructures depending on composition. In one case, when 7vol.%TiC was mixed in the starting powders, the produced Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>C particles</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bingchu Mei; Yoshinari Miyamoto</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">104</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=UCRLTRANS11534"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anodic Behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and the Alloys <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In-Ga in Aluminum-Air Batteries.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By recording of the polarization characteristics and measurement of the currents of self-dissolution, the anodic behavior of aluminum and the alloys <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In-Ga was tested under the operating conditions of aluminum-air batteries. The tests were con...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. M. Drazic A. R. Despic S. K. Zecevic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">105</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/100618"> <span id="translatedtitle">Heterogeneous nucleation of solidification of Si in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si-P alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Heterogeneous nucleation of solidification in melt spun <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si-P has been studied using differential scanning calorimetry, and transmission, scanning transmission and high resolution electron microscopies. The microstructures of the heat treated melt spun alloys all consist of an <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic distributed along the <span class="hlt">Al</span> grain boundaries, and Si embedded in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix. The Si microstructure depends on the level of P: coarse faceted Si particles are nucleated by <span class="hlt">Al</span>P particles in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si containing 2 ppm P and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si-P containing 35 ppm P whereas eutectic droplets of fine Si particles are nucleated by the surrounding <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix at a high undercooling in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si containing 0.25 ppm P. The Si nucleation onset temperature remains approximately constant while the peak and end temperatures both decrease with increasing cooling rate, in agreement with classical nucleation theory. Kinetic analysis, using the spherical cap model gives contact angles of 10{degree}, 43{degree} and 10{degree} for Si nucleation in low and high purity <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si-P respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ho, C.R.; Cantor, B. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)] [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">106</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-02-01/pdf/2010-1959.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 5120 - United States, et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Stericycle, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States, et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Stericycle, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive Impact...Court for the District of Columbia in United States, et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Stericycle, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>., Civil...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">107</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/15020715"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress Corrosion Cracking of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aluminum and magnesium based alloys are being used for reducing the weight of automobiles. For structural applications they must have adequate stress corrosion resistance and yet, under some circumstances, stress corrosion cracking can occur in both alloy systems. Precipitation of the Mg rich Beta-phase (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Mg2) at grain boundaries of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg alloys and the Beta-phase (Mg17<span class="hlt">Al</span>12) at grain boundaries of the Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys are critical factors in their stress corrosion performance. In Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>, the Beta-phase is cathodic to the matrix while in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg case, the Beta-phase is anodic to the matrix. These phases produce localized galvanic induced-corrosion that leads to intergranular stress corrosion cracking and cracking growth rates of 5 and 103 times faster than the solution treated condition, for <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jones, Russell H.; Vetrano, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">108</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE89012981"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural Evolution of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu-Mg Alloys.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Since subsequent microstructures and properties depend upon initial decomposition processes, the early developments in a binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li and quaternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu-Mg alloy were observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Interpretation of hig...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Miyasato G. Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">109</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD740826"> <span id="translatedtitle">A Structural Stability-Mechanical Behavior Correlation in Eutectic <span class="hlt">Al-CuAl</span>(2).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Attention is directed to the effects of physiocochemical instability and the associated structural changes on the ambient temperature mechanical behavior of lamellar <span class="hlt">Al-CuAl</span>2. A detailed correlation is made of tensile yielding, flow, and fracture morpholo...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Pattnaik A. Lawley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1972-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">110</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.alsa.org/als-care/resources/publications-videos/factsheets/patient-bill-of-rights.html"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ALS</span> Association's Patient Bill of Rights for People Living with <span class="hlt">ALS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePLUS</a></p> <p class="result-summary">... with <span class="hlt">ALS</span> Manuals <span class="hlt">ALS</span> Association Brochures Webinars Our Videos Factsheets Library Order Form Products to Aid in Daily Living Informative Web Links Books Daily Activities Made Easier Stories of Courage Search ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">111</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24815517"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quantitatively probing the <span class="hlt">Al</span> distribution in zeolites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The degree of substitution of Si(4+) by <span class="hlt">Al</span>(3+) in the oxygen-terminated tetrahedra (<span class="hlt">Al</span> T-sites) of zeolites determines the concentration of ion-exchange and Brønsted acid sites. Because the location of the tetrahedra and the associated subtle variations in bond angles influence the acid strength, quantitative information about <span class="hlt">Al</span> T-sites in the framework is critical to rationalize catalytic properties and to design new catalysts. A quantitative analysis is reported that uses a combination of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis and (27)<span class="hlt">Al</span> MAS NMR spectroscopy supported by DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. To discriminate individual <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms, sets of ab initio EXAFS spectra for various T-sites are generated from DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations, allowing quantitative treatment of the EXAFS single- and multiple-photoelectron scattering processes out to 3-4 atom shells surrounding the <span class="hlt">Al</span> absorption center. It is observed that identical zeolite types show dramatically different <span class="hlt">Al</span> distributions. A preference of <span class="hlt">Al</span> for T-sites that are part of one or more 4-member rings in the framework over those T-sites that are part of only 5- and 6-member rings in an HBEA150 zeolite has been determined using this analysis. PMID:24815517</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vjunov, Aleksei; Fulton, John L; Huthwelker, Thomas; Pin, Sonia; Mei, Donghai; Schenter, Gregory K; Govind, Niranjan; Camaioni, Donald M; Hu, Jian Zhi; Lercher, Johannes A</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">112</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080047349&hterms=Alstom&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DAlstom"> <span id="translatedtitle">Durability Assessment of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The durability of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> is a prime concern for the implementation of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> into aerospace engines. Two durability issues, the effect of high temperature exposure on mechanical properties and impact resistance, have been investigated and the results are summarized in this paper. Exposure to elevated temperatures has been shown to be detrimental to the room temperature ductility of gamma alloys with the most likely mechanisms being the ingress of interstitials from the surface. Fluorine ion implantation has been shown to improve the oxidation resistance of gamma alloys, and ideally it could also improve the environmental embrittlement of high Nb content Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys. The effect of F ion implantation on the surface oxidation and embrittlement of a third generation, high Nb content Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy (Ti-45<span class="hlt">Al</span>-5Nb-B-C) were investigated. Additionally, the ballistic impact resistance of a variety of gamma alloys, including Ti-48<span class="hlt">Al</span>-2Cr- 2Nb, Ti-47<span class="hlt">Al</span>-2Cr-2Nb, ABB-2, ABB-23, NCG359E, 95A and Ti-45<span class="hlt">Al</span>-5Nb-B-C was accessed. Differences in the ballistic impact properties of the various alloys will be discussed, particularly with respect to their manufacturing process, microstructure, and tensile properties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">113</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22al%22&pg=2&id=EJ997797"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diana <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Hadid: Identity and Heritage</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Diana <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Hadid's sculptures reflect the many locations, cultures, histories, and mythologies that have shaped her as an artist. In large-scale works which have the appearance of architectural ruins, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Hadid employs imagery drawn from many diverse interests including science and technology, history, and literature. She also incorporates images and…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jungerberg, Tom; Smith, Anna; Borsh, Colleen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">114</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA543813"> <span id="translatedtitle">Future of <span class="hlt">Al</span> Qa'ida.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The death of Osama bin Laden has triggered a re-evaluation of <span class="hlt">al</span> Qa'ida and its threat to the United States. Some have argued that <span class="hlt">al</span> Qa'ida will become increasingly irrelevant. 'Between the Arab Spring and the death of bin Laden, it is hard to imagine gr...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. G. Jones</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">115</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39864150"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modification of hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Modification of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic microstructure has been studied by using the entrained droplet technique in a range of hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys doped with different levels of phosphorus and sodium. Differential scanning calorimetry has been used to investigate the kinetics of silicon nucleation during eutectic solidification, and transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the eutectic</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. R. Ho; B. Cantor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">116</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA526329"> <span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation Evolution in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-0.1Sc, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-0.1Zr and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-0.1Sc-0.1Zr (at.%) Alloys During Isochronal Aging.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precipitation strengthening is investigated in binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-0.1Sc, <span class="hlt">Al</span>- 0.1Zr and ternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-0.1-c-0.1Zr (at.%) alloys aged isochronally between 200 and 600 C. Precipitation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Sc (L12) commences between 200 and 250 C in <span class="hlt">Al</span>- 0.1Sc, reaching a 670 MPa peak ...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. P. Lee D. C. Dunand D. N. Seidman K. E. Knipling R. A. Karnesky</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">117</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3169149"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetics of <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin cluster compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin aluminum hydroxide clusters are essential models in establishing molecular pathways for geochemical reactions. Enthalpies of formation are reported for two salts of aluminum centered ?-Keggin clusters, <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 selenate, (Na(<span class="hlt">Al</span>O4)<span class="hlt">Al</span>12(OH)24(SeO4)4•12H2O) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 sulfate, (Na<span class="hlt">Al</span>O4<span class="hlt">Al</span>12(OH)24(SO4)4•12H2O). The measured enthalpies of solution, ?Hsol, at 28?°C in 5 N HCl for the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 selenate and sulfate are ?924.57 (± 3.83) and ?944.30 ( ± 5.66) kJ·mol-1, respectively. The enthalpies of formation from the elements, ?Hf,el, for <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 selenate and sulfate are ?19,656.35 ( ± 67.30) kJ·mol-1, and ?20,892.39 ( ± 70.01) kJ·mol-1, respectively. In addition, ?Hf,el for sodium selenate decahydrate was calculated using data from high temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry measurements: ?4,006.39 ( ± 11.91) kJ·mol-1. The formation of both ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin cluster compounds is exothermic from oxide-based components but energetically unfavorable with respect to a gibbsite-based assemblage. To understand the relative affinity of the ?-Keggin clusters for selenate and sulfate, the enthalpy associated with two S-Se exchange reactions was calculated. In the solid state, selenium is favored in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 compound relative to the binary chalcogenate, while in 5 N HCl, sulfur is energetically favored in the cluster compound compared to the aqueous solution. This contribution represents the first thermodynamic study of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 cluster compounds and establishes a method for other such molecules, including the substituted versions that have been created for kinetic studies. Underscoring the importance of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 clusters in natural and anthropogenic systems, these data provide conclusive thermodynamic evidence that the <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin cluster is a crucial intermediate species in the formation pathway from aqueous aluminum monomers to aluminum hydroxide precipitates.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Armstrong, Christopher R.; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">118</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19840053031&hterms=trigger+points&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dtrigger%2Bpoints"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 in the interstellar medium</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The amount of dispersed interstellar <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 detected by the HEAO 3 gamma-ray spectrometer cannot have been synthesized by supernova explosions if current calculations of the production ratio p(26)/p(27) approximately equal to 0.001 are correct. Simple models of chemical evolution of the Galaxy are presented to explain this point. The observed <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 is more likely due to about 100 million dispersed novae, or to a single old (10,000-1,000,000 yr) supernova remnant that today surrounds the solar system. If the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 is dispersed, the high interstellar ratio today <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-27 about equal to 0.00002 calls into question the requirement that a supernova trigger for formation of the solar system was the cause of a concentration 3-times larger. Also discussed is p-process production in novae with application to the question of live Sm-146 in the solar system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Clayton, D. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1984-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">119</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940007975&hterms=coarsened&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dcoarsened"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys for structural uses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alloys based on the intermetallic compound Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> are of technological interest as high temperature structural alloys. These alloys possess a relatively low density, high melting temperature, good thermal conductivity, and (usually) good oxidation resistance. However, Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-base alloys suffer from poor fracture resistance at low temperatures as well as inadequate creep strength at elevated temperatures. This research program explored macroalloying additions to Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-base alloys in order to identify possible alloying and processing routes which promote both low temperature fracture toughness and high temperature strength. Initial results from the study examined the additions of Fe, Co, and Hf on the microstructure, deformation, and fracture resistance of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-based alloys. Of significance were the observations that the presence of the gamma-prime phase, based on Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span>, could enhance the fracture resistance if the gamma-prime were present as a continuous grain boundary film or 'necklace'; and the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-20Fe alloy was ductile in ribbon form despite a microstructure consisting solely of the B2 beta phase based on Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>. The ductility inherent in the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-20Fe alloy was explored further in subsequent studies. Those results confirm the presence of ductility in the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-20Fe alloy after rapid cooling from 750 - 1000 C. However exposure at 550 C caused embrittlement; this was associated with an age-hardening reaction caused by the formation of Fe-rich precipitates. In contrast, to the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-20Fe alloy, exploratory research indicated that compositions in the range of Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-12Fe retain the ordered B2 structure of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>, are ductile, and do not age-harden or embrittle after thermal exposure. Thus, our recent efforts have focused on the behavior of the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-12Fe alloy. A second parallel effort initiated in this program was to use an alternate processing technique, mechanical alloying, to improve the properties of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-alloys. Mechanical alloying in the conventional sense requires ductile powder particles which, through a cold welding and fracture process, can be dispersion strengthened by submicron-sized oxide particles. Using both the Ni-35<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Fe alloys to contain approx. 1 v/o Y2O3. Preliminary results indicate that mechanically alloyed and extruded Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Fe + Y2O3 alloys when heat treated to a grain-coarsened condition, exhibit improved creep resistance at 1000 C when compared to Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>; oxidation resistance comparable to Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>; and fracture toughness values a factor of three better than Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>. As a result of the research initiated on this NASA program, a subsequent project with support from Inco Alloys International is underway.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koss, D. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">120</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JPCM...15..385S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure development in amorphous <span class="hlt">Al</span> La alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Melt-spun <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys containing 2.7-10 at.% La were studied by means of x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, electrical resistivity, thermal and microhardness measurements. Fully amorphous structures were only obtained for thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>La7.7 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>La10 ribbons and exhibit concentration fluctuations. Phase separation into two metastable bcc structures is observed; they appear successively and are finally replaced by the equilibrium phases alpha (fcc)<span class="hlt">Al</span> and (orthorhombic)<span class="hlt">Al</span>11La3. The transformation kinetics is analysed in terms of a general Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov model and of local kinetic parameters. The Avrami exponent monitors changes in the crystallization behaviour; nucleation of the stable phases occurs after partial dissolution of the metastable phases. The low values of the activation energy reflect the high instability of these glasses.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schmidt, U.; Eisenschmidt, Ch; Syrowatka, F.; Bartusch, R.; Zahra, C. Y.; Zahra, A.-M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">121</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42695786"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tree fine root Ca\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> molar ratio – Indicator of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and acidity stress</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">High soil acidity and elevated soil <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations limit plant growth in many terrestrial ecosystems. Aluminium toxicity can be ameliorated by Ca. Thus, Ca\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> molar ratios in soil solution and in plant tissues have been proposed as superior indicators than <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration itself for evaluating the <span class="hlt">Al</span> toxicity stress to trees (Cronan & Grigal, J Environ Qual 1995;24:209 – 226). This article</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">E. I. Vanguelova; Y. Hirano; T. D. Eldhuset; L. Sas-Paszt; M. R. Bakker; Ü. Püttsepp; I. Brunner; K. Lõhmus; D. Godbold</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">122</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005GeCoA..69.5263K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of isotopically exchangeable <span class="hlt">Al</span> in soil materials using 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> tracer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solubility of aluminium (<span class="hlt">Al</span>) in many acidic soils is controlled by complexation reactions with soil organic matter. In such soils, <span class="hlt">Al</span> solubility is theoretically a function of the pool size of "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span>, i.e., the total amount of <span class="hlt">Al</span> that equilibrates with the soil solution within a defined period of time. To date, no reliable measurements of "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span> in soil materials exist. In this study, we determined the isotopically exchangeable pool of <span class="hlt">Al</span> ( EAl) as an operationally defined assessment of "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span> in acidic mineral soils. The suitability of CuCl 2 and pyrophosphate (Na 4P 2O 7) as extractants for "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span> was also evaluated. Eleven samples, mostly from spodic B horizons, were spiked with carrier-free 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> and equilibrated for different time periods (1-756 h). The size of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool with which the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> tracer exchanged increased with time during the whole experimental period. Thus, contact time between solid and solution phases needs to be defined when assessing the "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool. Values of EAl obtained after 1 to 5 d of equilibration were equal to the amount of CuCl 2 extractable <span class="hlt">Al</span>, but considerably smaller than the Na 4P 2O 7-extractable pool. Equilibration times greater than 5 d resulted in CuCl 2 extractable <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations that under-estimated the "active" <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool. Three of the investigated samples were rich in imogolite-type materials (ITM). In these samples, 30-50 % of the added 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> rapidly became associated with soil constituents in forms that could not be extracted by Na 4P 2O 7, indicating that a part of ITM may be in a dynamic state.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kleja, D. Berggren; Standring, W.; Oughton, D. H.; Gustafsson, J.-P.; Fifield, K.; Fraser, A. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">123</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/54623165"> <span id="translatedtitle">TEM study of Pt nanoparticles on gamma <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3\\/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> support</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Pt gamma <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 as one of the most important catalysts has attracted much attention in research. Moving beyond the current phenomenological understanding of the nanoparticle support interaction necessitates the examination of the Pt\\/ gamma-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 interface at the atomic level. To produce the model interface, Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>(110) single crystal was oxidized at 1223K in order to fabricate gamma <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 (440). The crystallinity</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhongfan Zhang; Long Li; Judith Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">124</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/e785k374m5551555.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Damage mechanisms in a cast ductile iron and a <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2 O 3 p \\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mechanical behavior and damage mechanisms of an <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 particulate-reinforced <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix composite (<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3p\\u000a \\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>) prepared by pressure infiltration are investigated and compared with those of a cast ductile iron. In addition to low\\u000a cost and reduced weight, the composite has a Young’s modulus comparable to the ductile iron. However, its fracture toughness\\u000a is lower than that of the ductile iron.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. H. Zhu; P. K. Liaw; J. M. Corum; J. G. R. Hansen; J. A. Cornie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">125</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39866701"> <span id="translatedtitle">Simulation of clusters formation in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu based and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn based alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A Monte Carlo computer simulation is adopted to investigate the role of micro-alloying elements Mg and Ag in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn alloys. Small amount additions of Mg to the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu alloy markedly retard the formation of Cu clusters due to the preferential trapping of free-vacancies available for Cu diffusion. On the other hand, additions of Mg to the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn alloy</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Daqin Chen; Yuansheng Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">126</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19980019510&hterms=sodium+bicarbonate&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dsodium%2Bbicarbonate"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrosion Studies of 2195 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li Alloy and 2219 <span class="hlt">Al</span> Alloy with Differing Surface Treatments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Corrosion studies of 2195 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li and 2219 <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys have been conducted using the scanning reference electrode technique (SRET) and the polarization resistance (PR) technique. The SRET was used to study corrosion mechanisms, while corrosion rate measurements were studied with the PR technique. Plates of <span class="hlt">Al</span>203 blasted, soda blasted and conversion coated 2219 <span class="hlt">Al</span> were coated with Deft primer and the corrosion rates studied with the EIS technique. Results from all of these studies are presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Danford, M. D.; Mendrek, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">127</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19441466"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal stability of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and nanocomposite Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>SiN thin films.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>SiN coatings were synthesized by a cathodic arc deposition process. Titanium, Ti50<span class="hlt">Al</span>50 alloy and <span class="hlt">Al</span>Si (88 at.% of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and 12 at.% of Si) alloy targets were adopted as the cathode materials. X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that Ti0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.5N and Ti49<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.44Si0.07N possess a B1-NaCl crystal structure. The lattice constants of the Ti0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.5N and Ti0.49<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.44Si0.07N calculated from XRD pattern were 0.418 nm and 0.422 nm, respectively. For the high temperature oxidation test, the coated samples were annealed at 900 degrees C in air atmosphere for 2 hours. In this study, the deposited Ti0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.5N had completely transformed to TiO2 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, and Ti0.49<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.44Si0.07N remained the as-deposited structure after oxidation treatment. It indicated that Ti0.49<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.44Si0.07N possesses superior oxidation resistance than Ti0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.5N, due to the amorphous SiNx phase existed in the nanocomposite structure. The different oxidation mechanisms of Ti50<span class="hlt">Al</span>50N and Ti0.49<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.44Si0.07N at high temperature of 900 degrees C are developed in this study. PMID:19441466</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Sheng-Min; Chang, Yin-Yu; Lin, Dong-Yih; Wang, Da-Yung; Wu, Weite</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">128</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/51754266"> <span id="translatedtitle">27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR\\/NMR Study of Kondo Semiconductor CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR\\/NMR measurements have been performed on CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 in relevance to the novel phase below T0=27 K of isostructural CeRu2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10. NQR peaks are assigned to five crystallographically inequivalent <span class="hlt">Al</span> sites. No splitting of the NQR spectra down to 1.5 K confirms the lack of phase transition in this compound. The gaplike decrease in the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1\\/T1 above about 20</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yukihiro Kawamura; Shingo Edamoto; Tomoaki Takesaka; Takashi Nishioka; Harukazu Kato; Masahiro Matsumura; Yo Tokunaga; Shinsaku Kambe; Hiroshi Yasuoka</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">129</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.scipub.org/fulltext/ajes/ajes53434-443.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Water Quality and Planktonic Communities in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Khadoud Spring, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Hassa,Saudi Arabia</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Problem statement: <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Khadoud spring is one of the most important wat er resources in <span class="hlt">Al</span>- Hassa Governorate, Saudi Arabia. However, much of its biotic information is still unknown. This study presented preliminary ecological information of thi s aquatic body. The aim of this research was to study the water characteristics and the planktonic organisms inhibiting <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Khadoud spring and its irrigational</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adel A. Fathi; Mohammed A. Al-Kahtani</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">130</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=N19980210984"> <span id="translatedtitle">CVD Fiber Coatings for <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> Composites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While sapphire-fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>) composites are an attractive candidate for high-temperature structures, the significant difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix and the sapphire fiber creates...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. E. Boss</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">131</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5875445"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Pd-Mn and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cr-Pd-Mn quasicrystalline alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While searching for new multicomponent quasicrystalline alloys, the authors have suggested a principle of composition activity in the quasicrystal constitution. This means that some new quasicrystals can be constituted by adding several quasicrystalline alloy compositions, and these alloys can be obtained by means of rapid solidification or ingot processing. Guided by this principle, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mn-Cr, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Mn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Cr, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Cr-Mn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mn-Ni-Ti, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mn-Fe-Ti, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Ni-Ti and other multicomponent quasicrystalline alloys have been found. A recent study used <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 70]Pd[sub 20]Mn[sub 10], <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 65]Cu[sub 20]Fe[sub 15] and <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 85]Cr[sub 15] quasicrystalline alloys to formulate new alloys. Both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Fe-Pd-Mn and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cr-Pd-Mn alloys are quasicrystalline. In this paper, they discuss these two quasicrystals, their formation, electronic diffraction and composition scope and thermal stability in detail.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen Zhenhua (Univ. of Technology, Hunan (China). Powder Metallurgy Research Inst.); Inoue, Akihisa; Masumoto, Tsuyoshi (Tohoku Univ. (Japan). Metal Research Inst.)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">132</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=CENBG7705"> <span id="translatedtitle">Production of exp 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> by Spallation of Fe, Si, <span class="hlt">Al</span> Nuclei.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cross sections for exp 7 Be, exp 10 Be and exp 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> formation in <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si and Fe targets bombarded with 0.6 and 24GeV protons have been measured by using highly selective chemical separation and low-level background counters. Results for exp 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> at 0.6Ge...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Paillard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">133</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41314271"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">Al</span> coating conditions on laser weldability of <span class="hlt">Al</span> coated steel sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span> coated steel sheets with excellent heat resistance, thermal reflection, and corrosion resistance are widely used in various applications. The laser weldability of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> coated steel sheet for full penetration welding was reported. The phenomenon caused by intermixed aluminum and behavior of aluminum in the weld were investigated. <span class="hlt">Al</span> coated steel sheets that have various thickness and coating mass</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jung-Han LEE; Jong-Do KIM; Jin-Seok OH; Seo-Jeong PARK</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">134</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41038204"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetism and solid solution effects in Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> (40% <span class="hlt">Al</span>) alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solid solution effects of ternary additions of transition elements in intermetallic Ni–40% <span class="hlt">Al</span> were investigated by both experimental studies and theoretical calculations. Co solute atoms when sitting at Ni sublattice sites do not affect the lattice parameter and hardening behavior of Ni–40<span class="hlt">Al</span>. On the other hand, Fe, Mn, and Cr solutes, which are mainly on <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice sites, substantially</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chain T Liu; Chong Long Fu; Matthew F Chisholm; James R Thompson; Maja Krcmar; Xun-Li Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">135</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA471059"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preparation of Optoelectronic Devices Based on <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>GaN Superlattices.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results on growth and fabrication experiments of <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>GaN superlattices for ultraviolet 'UV' optoelectronic devices. Superlattices with extremely short periods have been studied. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>N 'barrier' layers are 0.5 nm thick, and the AlxGa1-xN 'we...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Chandolu B. Borisov G. Kipshidze J. Yun M. Holtz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">136</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910043314&hterms=alumina&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dalumina"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reaction of Ti and Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys with alumina</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reaction of single-crystal <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 with pure Ti and Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys with different <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations was examined in the temperature range of 1173 to 1573 K. Significant reaction occurred between <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 and the Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys with <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations lower than that corresponding to the gamma-Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase. The reaction mechanism was determined to be simultaneous diffusion of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and atomic oxygen from <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 into Ti and the Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Misra, Ajay K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">137</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47896183"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface and interface analysis of PVD <span class="hlt">Al</span>ON and ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 diffusion barriers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The suitability of PVD films of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 and of ternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N as diffusion barriers between a nickel based superalloy CMSX-4 and NiCoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y for a possible application\\u000a in gas turbines was investigated. Therefore, an <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 film and, alternatively, an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N film were deposited on CMSX-4 at 100?°C substrate temperature by means of reactive magnetron\\u000a sputtering ion plating (MSIP). After characterization of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Cremer; M. Witthaut; K. Reichert; D. Neuschütz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">138</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/414333"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wet oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs vs. <span class="hlt">Al</span>As: A little gallium is good</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Buried oxides formed from the wet oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs alloys, rather than <span class="hlt">Al</span>As, are found to be superior in terms of oxidation isotropy, mechanical stability, and strain. It is not surprising that vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) using <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs oxide layers as current apertures have shown promising reliability as compared to VCSELs using <span class="hlt">Al</span>As layers. Comparisons of lifetime data for VCSELs with differing oxide layers is presented. The beneficial properties of oxides converted from <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs alloys are found to provide robust device processing of reliable VCSELs and may play an important role in other advanced optoelectronic devices.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hou, H.Q.; Lear, K.L.; Chui, H.C.; Hammons, B.E.; Nevers, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonics Research Dept.; Hull, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Photonics Research Dept.]|[Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">139</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20020071128&hterms=Ni-In+japan&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DNi-In%2Bjapan"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atomistic Modeling of Ru<span class="hlt">Al</span> and (RuNi) <span class="hlt">Al</span> Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atomistic modeling of Ru<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ru<span class="hlt">Al</span>Ni alloys, using the BFS (Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith) method for alloys is performed. The lattice parameter and energy of formation of B2 Ru<span class="hlt">Al</span> as a function of stoichiometry and the lattice parameter of (Ru(sub 50-x)Ni(sub x)<span class="hlt">Al</span>(sub 50)) alloys as a function of Ni concentration are computed. BFS based Monte Carlo simulations indicate that compositions close to Ru25Ni25<span class="hlt">Al</span>50 are single phase with no obvious evidence of a miscibility gap and separation of the individual B2 phases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gargano, Pablo; Mosca, Hugo; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Gray, Hugh R. (Technical Monitor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">140</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SeScT..27l2001A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hot-electron drift velocity in <span class="hlt">AlGaN/AlN/Al</span>GaN/GaN camelback channel</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nanosecond pulses were employed to study hot-electron transport in a nominally undoped <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.33Ga0.67N/<span class="hlt">AlN/{Al</span>0.1Ga0.9N/GaN} heterostructure where the mobile electrons are spread in a composite {<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.1Ga0.9/GaN} dual channel exhibiting a camelback electron density profile at high electric fields. The highest velocity of ˜1.6× 107 cm s-1 was obtained at electric field of 160 kV cm-1 in the channel with the electron density of 0.8 × 1013?cm-2 owing to its proximity to the LO-phonon-plasmon resonance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ardaravi?ius, L.; Kiprijanovi?, O.; Liberis, J.; Matulionis, A.; Li, X.; Zhang, F.; Wu, M.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Morkoç, H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img 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</div> </div> </div><!-- page_7 div --> <div id="page_8" class="hiddenDiv"> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">141</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..MARP25007N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing the origin of 1/f critical-current noise in nanoscale <span class="hlt">Al/AlOx/Al</span> Josephson junctions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present measurements of the low frequency noise in nanoscale <span class="hlt">Al/AlOx/Al</span> Josephson junctions made by the shadow/angle evaporation technique. We investigate the differences in the nature of the charge trap fluctuations when the junction electrodes are in the normal state vs. in the superconducting state, as a test of some recent theoretical models. To do that, we compare the magnitude, temperature dependence, and magnetic field dependence of junction resistance fluctuations in the normal state above the <span class="hlt">Al</span> transition temperature to that of the resistance and critical current fluctuations measured in the superconducting state. We also explore whether the observed fluctuators are thermally-activated or tunneling as a function of temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nugroho, Christopher; Orlyanchik, Vladimir; Dove, Allison; Olson, Gustaf; Yoscovits, Zachary; Eckstein, James; van Harlingen, Dale</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">142</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53598306"> <span id="translatedtitle">Anodic behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and the alloys <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In-Ga in aluminum-air batteries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The anodic behavior of aluminum and the alloys <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-In-Ga was tested under the operating conditions of aluminum-air batteries. The tests were conducted in an aqueous solution of 2 M NaCl, and the results obtained were compared with the results obtained from a special test of these alloys as the anode in a standard electrochemical cell. Significant results and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. M. Drazic; A. R. Despic; S. K. Zecevic</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">143</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013Nanot..24I5203X"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-performance nonvolatile <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>Ox/CdTe:Sb nanowire memory device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we demonstrate a room temperature processed nonvolatile memory device based on an <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>Ox/CdTe:Sb nanowire (NW) heterojunction. Electrical analysis shows an echelon hysteresis composed of a high-resistance state (HRS) and a low-resistance state (LRS), which can allow it to write and erase data from the device. The conductance ratio is as high as 106, with a retention time of 3 × 104 s. Moreover, the SET voltages ranged from +6 to +8 V, whilst the RESET voltage ?0 V. In addition, flexible memory nano-devices on PET substrate with comparable switching performance at bending condition were fabricated. XPS analysis of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>Ox/CdTe:Sb NW heterojunction after controlled Ar+ bombardment reveals that this memory behavior is associated with the presence of ultra-thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ox film. This <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>Ox/CdTe:Sb NW heterojunction will open up opportunities for new memory devices with different configurations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xie, Chao; Nie, Biao; Zhu, Long; Zeng, Long-Hui; Yu, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xian-He; Fang, Qun-Ling; Luo, Lin-Bao; Wu, Yu-Cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">144</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JCrGr.377...32Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">High quality <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN grown on ELO <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/sapphire templates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The defect structure and the homogeneity of 1-3 µm thick AlxGa1-xN layers grown on epitaxially laterally overgrown (ELO) <span class="hlt">Al</span>N on patterned <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/sapphire templates have been investigated in dependence on the miscut direction of the c-plane sapphire substrates, the etching depth into the sapphire and the <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration. It was found that shallowly etched <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/sapphire templates with a 0.25° miscut toward the a-plane provide a smooth surface of ELO <span class="hlt">Al</span>N and therefore a good <span class="hlt">Al</span> homogeneity in the overgrown <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.8Ga0.2N layer. The threading dislocation density in these layers is as low as 5×108 cm-2.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeimer, U.; Kueller, V.; Knauer, A.; Mogilatenko, A.; Weyers, M.; Kneissl, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">145</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/286891"> <span id="translatedtitle">Selective oxidation of buried <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs versus <span class="hlt">Al</span>As layers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report significant differences between the properties of buried oxides converted from <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs and <span class="hlt">Al</span>As layers using selective wet oxidation. Layers of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub {ital x}}Ga{sub 1{minus}{ital x}}As with {ital x}{ge}0.96 exhibit crystallographic dependent oxidation rates, while for layers with {ital x}{le}0.92 the oxidation rate is isotropic. Mesas containing partially oxidized layers of <span class="hlt">Al</span>As are unstable to rapid thermal cycling and exhibit excessive strain at the oxide terminus, while mesas containing partially oxidized layers of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs are robust and lack evidence of strain. Finally, the oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs layers, rather than <span class="hlt">Al</span>As, is found to provide robust oxide apertures for reliable vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Chui, H.C.; Hammons, B.E.; Hou, H.Q.; Drummond, T.J. [Photonics Research Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)] [Photonics Research Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Hull, R. [Department of Materials Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">146</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920074405&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 1200 C and 1300 C isothermal and cyclic oxidation behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 continuous fiber-reinforced/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites were studied. Oxidation resulted in formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 external scales in a similar manner as scales formed on monolithic Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>. The isothermal oxidation of an <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite resulted in oxidation of the matrix along the fiber/matrix interface near the fiber ends. This oxide acted as a wedge between the fiber and the matrix, and, under cyclic oxidation conditions, led to further oxidation along the fiber lengths and eventual cracking of the composite. The oxidation behavior of composites in which the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 fibers were sputter coated with nickel prior to processing was much more severe. This was attributed to open channels around the fibers which formed during processing, most likely as a result of the diffusion of the nickel coating into the matrix.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doychak, J.; Nesbitt, J. A.; Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">147</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/335265"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of an oxide dispersion on the critical <span class="hlt">Al</span> content in Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Oxide-dispersed iron aluminides with <span class="hlt">Al</span> contents ranging from 10 to 28 at.% were oxidized in air at temperatures between 600 and 1300 C in order to determine the critical <span class="hlt">Al</span> content necessary to form a protective, external alumina scale. A Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion, performed similarly to an <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} dispersion, indicated little effect of Y on the critical <span class="hlt">Al</span> content. Compared to ingot-processed iron aluminides, the addition of an oxide dispersion reduced the critical <span class="hlt">Al</span> content at 900 C. This reduction is attributed to the finer grain size in the oxide-dispersed Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pint, B.A.; Leibowitz, J.; DeVan, J.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">148</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22116017"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal diffusion in Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> multilayer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> multilayers deposited by ion beam sputtering of nominal design [Ni(200A)/<span class="hlt">Al</span>(100A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 and [Ni(50A)/<span class="hlt">Al</span>(227A)] Multiplication-Sign 5 on Si substrates were annealed at 200 Degree-Sign C. As-deposited and annealed samples were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray reflectometry (XRR). The effort was to study the path of alloying in the above two multilayers of same elements but of opposite stoichiometric ratio. We find distinct differences in alloying of these samples.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Swain, M.; Bhattacharya, D.; Singh, S.; Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai 400085 (India); Gupta, M. [UGC-DAE-Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-05</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">149</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPhCS.202a2010S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Studies of astrophysically interesting nucleus 23<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the ?-delayed proton decay of 23<span class="hlt">Al</span> with a novel detector setup at the focal plane of the MARS separator at the Texas A&M University to resolve existing controversies about the proton branching of the IAS in 23Mg and to determine the absolute proton branchings by combining our results to the latest ??-decay data. We have made also a high precision mass measurement of the ground state of 23<span class="hlt">Al</span> to establish more accurate proton separation energy of 23<span class="hlt">Al</span>. Here the description of the used techniques along with preliminary results of the experiments are given.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saastamoinen, A.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Eronen, T.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Jenkins, D.; Jokinen, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Woods, P. J.; Äystö, J.; Igisol/Mars Groups</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">150</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40506881"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3–NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites and functional gradient materials fabricated by reactive hot pressing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3–NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites were fabricated by mixing NiO, <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Cr powders and then reactive hot pressing. The high temperature alloy NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> was formed by the reaction of extra <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Cr and the Ni reduced from NiO. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3–NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites with various <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 fractions were successfully fabricated by the proper addition of extra Ni, Cr, <span class="hlt">Al</span> or <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 powders. A five-layer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Q. Li; K. M. Gu; J. N. Tang; S. H. Xie; Y. H. Zhuang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">151</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40361757"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3–FeCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites and functionally graded materials fabricated by reactive hot pressing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3–FeCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites were fabricated by mixing Fe2O3, <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Cr powders and then reactive hot pressing. The high temperature alloy FeCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> was formed by the reaction of extra <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Cr and the Fe reduced from Fe2O3. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3–FeCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites with various <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 fractions were successfully fabricated by the proper addition of extra Fe, Cr, <span class="hlt">Al</span> or <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 powders. A five-layer</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. Q. Li; W. A. Sun; W. Q. Ao; K. M. Gu; P. Xiao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">152</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/8718001096w31471.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Separating method and dynamic processes of Nano-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 13</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to investigate the characteristics of pure Nano-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13, Nano-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 was separated and purified from a series of poly-aluminum chloride (PAC) solutions which had the same <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 percentage but different total <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations, by using column chromatography, ethanol-acetone resolving and SO2?\\u000a 4\\/Ba2+ displacement. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 species yield was characterized by <span class="hlt">Al</span>-ferron timed complexation spectrophotometry and 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance). The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baoyu Gao; Yongbao Chu; Qinyan Yue; Chunyan Kong; Xiaona Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">153</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/971365"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interdiffusion in Diffusion Couples: U-Mo v. <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interdiffusion and microstructural development in the U-Mo-<span class="hlt">Al</span> system was examined using solid-tosolid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure <span class="hlt">Al</span>, annealed at 600°C for 24 hours. The influence of Si alloying addition (up to 5 wt.%) in <span class="hlt">Al</span> on the interdiffusion microstructural development was also examined using solid-to-solid diffusion couples consisting of U-7wt.%Mo, U-10wt.%Mo and U-12wt.%Mo vs. pure <span class="hlt">Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-2wt.%Si, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5wt.%Si annealed at 550°C up to 20 hours. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) were employed to examine the development of a very fine multiphase intermetallic layer. In ternary U-Mo-<span class="hlt">Al</span> diffusion couples annealed at 600°C for 24 hours, interdiffusion microstructure varied of finely dispersed UAl3, UAl4, U6Mo4<span class="hlt">Al</span>43, and UMo2<span class="hlt">Al</span>20 phases while the average composition throughout the interdiffusion zone remained constant at approximately 80 at.% <span class="hlt">Al</span>. Interdiffusion microstructure observed by SEM/TEM analyses and diffusion paths drawn from concentration profiles determined by EPMA appear to deviate from the assumption of “local thermodynamic equilibrium,” and suggest that interdiffusion occurs via supersaturated UAl4 followed by equilibrium transformation into UAl3, U6Mo4<span class="hlt">Al</span>43, UAl4 and UMo2<span class="hlt">Al</span>20 phases. Similar observation was made for U-Mo vs. <span class="hlt">Al</span> diffusion couples annealed at 550°C. The addition of Si (up to 5 wt.%) in <span class="hlt">Al</span> significantly reduced the thickness of the intermetallic layer by changing the constituent phases of the interdiffusion zone developed in U-Mo vs. <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si diffusion couples. Specifically, the formation of (U,Mo)(<span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si)3 with relatively large solubility for Mo and Si, along with UMo2<span class="hlt">Al</span>20 phases was observed along with disappearance of U6Mo4<span class="hlt">Al</span>43 and UAl4 phases. Simplified understanding based on U-<span class="hlt">Al</span>, U-Si, and Mo-Si binary phase diagrams is discussed in the light of the beneficial effect of Si alloying addition.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. D. Keiser, Jr.; E. Perez; B. Yao; Y. H. Sohn</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">154</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ApSS..261..567E"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of minor elements in <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy on zincate pretreatment</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effects of minor elements in <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys on Zn deposition during double zincate pretreatment were investigated using four <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys: <span class="hlt">Al</span> foil containing ca. 55 ppm Cu (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Cu)), <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1%Si (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si)), 99.99% <span class="hlt">Al</span> (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(4N)) and 99.999% <span class="hlt">Al</span> (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(5N)). SEM images showed that a uniform Zn layer was deposited on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Cu) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) but not on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(4N) or <span class="hlt">Al</span>(5N) after the double zincate process. Immersion potential during the zincate process indicated that the duration of substitution reaction of Zn deposition and <span class="hlt">Al</span> dissolution on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Cu) was shorter than that on the other alloys. These results suggest that a small amount of Cu increases the efficiency of the zincate process and the density of Zn deposition. Etching pretreatment of alloys in sulfuric acid containing Cu2+ ions before zincate pretreatment dramatically improved the uniformity and efficiency of Zn deposition on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) but not on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(4N) or <span class="hlt">Al</span>(5N), indicating that small and dispersed Cu particles were deposited efficiently on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Si) alloy and provided Zn nucleation sites. From the results, it was concluded that the activity level of native <span class="hlt">Al</span> for the zincate process is considerable low and is thus dramatically affected by alloying or surface modification with a small amount of electrochemically active elements.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Egoshi, Shinnosuke; Azumi, Kazuhisa; Konno, Hidetaka; Ebihara, Ken; Taguchi, Yoshihiro</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">155</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19188608"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substitutional alloy of Ce and <span class="hlt">Al</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The formation of substitutional alloys has been restricted to elements with similar atomic radii and electronegativity. Using high-pressure at 298 K, we synthesized a face-centered cubic disordered alloy of highly dissimilar elements (large Ce and small <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms) by compressing the Ce(3)<span class="hlt">Al</span> intermetallic compound >15 GPa or the Ce(3)<span class="hlt">Al</span> metallic glass >25 GPa. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Ce L(3)-edge absorption spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations revealed that the pressure-induced Kondo volume collapse and 4f electron delocalization of Ce reduced the differences between Ce and <span class="hlt">Al</span> and brought them within the Hume-Rothery (HR) limit for substitutional alloying. The alloy remained after complete release of pressure, which was also accompanied by the transformation of Ce back to its ambient 4f electron localized state and reversal of the Kondo volume collapse, resulting in a non-HR alloy at ambient conditions. PMID:19188608</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng, Qiao-Shi; Ding, Yang; Mao, Wendy L; Luo, Wei; Blomqvist, Andreas; Ahuja, Rajeev; Yang, Wenge; Shu, Jinfu; Sinogeikin, Stas V; Meng, Yue; Brewe, Dale L; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Mao, Ho-Kwang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-24</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">156</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA444823"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span> Qaeda: Statements and Evolving Ideology.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Osama Bin Laden and the <span class="hlt">Al</span> Qaeda terrorist network have conducted a sophisticated public relations and media campaign over the last 10 years. Terrorism analysts believe that these messages have been designed to elicit psychological reactions and communica...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. M. Blanchard</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">157</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2650295"> <span id="translatedtitle">Substitutional alloy of Ce and <span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The formation of substitutional alloys has been restricted to elements with similar atomic radii and electronegativity. Using high-pressure at 298 K, we synthesized a face-centered cubic disordered alloy of highly dissimilar elements (large Ce and small <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms) by compressing the Ce3<span class="hlt">Al</span> intermetallic compound >15 GPa or the Ce3<span class="hlt">Al</span> metallic glass >25 GPa. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction, Ce L3-edge absorption spectroscopy, and ab initio calculations revealed that the pressure-induced Kondo volume collapse and 4f electron delocalization of Ce reduced the differences between Ce and <span class="hlt">Al</span> and brought them within the Hume-Rothery (HR) limit for substitutional alloying. The alloy remained after complete release of pressure, which was also accompanied by the transformation of Ce back to its ambient 4f electron localized state and reversal of the Kondo volume collapse, resulting in a non-HR alloy at ambient conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zeng, Qiao-Shi; Ding, Yang; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Wei; Blomqvist, Andreas; Ahuja, Rajeev; Yang, Wenge; Shu, Jinfu; Sinogeikin, Stas V.; Meng, Yue; Brewe, Dale L.; Jiang, Jian-Zhong; Mao, Ho-kwang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">158</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18625409"> <span id="translatedtitle">Glial cells in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>: the missing link?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) was initially known as Charcot's sclerosis, named after the French neurobiologist and physician Jean-Martin Charcot who first described this type of muscular atrophy in the early nineteenth century. In the United States, <span class="hlt">ALS</span> became widely known as Lou Gehrig's disease after the famous baseball player who succumbed to the disease in the late 1930s. Currently, <span class="hlt">ALS</span> is the most common motor neuron disease, with a worldwide incidence of 8 cases per 100,000 population per year. Familial forms constitute approximately 5% to 10% of all cases. Onset increases with age, with a peak in the seventh decade and a slight preponderance (relative risk, 1.3-1.5) among men compared with women. Rapid progression of motor neuron loss leads to death an average of 3 to 5 years after symptom onset. The cause of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> remains unknown and there is still no curative therapy. PMID:18625409</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Raibon, Elsa; Todd, Lisa Marie; Möller, Thomas</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">159</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987E%26PSL..82..223E"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 survey of Antarctic meteorites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 survey by nondestructive gamma ray spectrometry was conducted as part of the preliminary examination effort for Antarctic meteorites. A total of 220 samples were studied. The majority of the samples were from the Allan Hills area; however, samples from several other sites, including the Yamato Mountains, were studied. Compared to worldwide falls and finds, the Antarctic group shows a clear trend toward lower <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 levels. At least 10 percent of the samples studied were clearly undersaturated in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26. The frequency of undersaturated samples suggests that terrestrial ages of several hundred thousand years are common among the Antarctic meteorite collection. The absence of samples with extremely low <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 implies that the upper limit for terrestrial ages in the Antarctic is on the order of 1 million years.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Evans, J. C.; Reeves, J. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">160</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1048882"> <span id="translatedtitle">Western Baldwin County, <span class="hlt">AL</span> Grid Interconnection Project</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Objective of this Project was to provide an additional supply of electricity to the affected portions of Baldwin County, <span class="hlt">AL</span> through the purchase, installation, and operation of certain substation equipment.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thomas DeBell</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-09-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">161</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3866720"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ALS</span> and Oxidative Stress: The Neurovascular Scenario</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Oxidative stress and angiogenic factors have been placed as the prime focus of scientific investigations after an establishment of link between vascular endothelial growth factor promoter (VEGF), hypoxia, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) pathogenesis. Deletion of the hypoxia-response element in the vascular endothelial growth factor promoter and mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) which are characterised by atrophy and muscle weakness resulted in phenotype resembling human <span class="hlt">ALS</span> in mice. This results in lower motor neurodegeneration thus establishing an important link between motor neuron degeneration, vasculature, and angiogenic molecules. In this review, we have presented human, animal, and in vitro studies which suggest that molecules like VEGF have a therapeutic, diagnostic, and prognostic potential in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. Involvement of vascular growth factors and hypoxia response elements also highlights the converging role of oxidative stress and neurovascular network for understanding and treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders like <span class="hlt">ALS</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Thakur, Keshav; Gupta, Pawan Kumar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">162</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA585745"> <span id="translatedtitle">Protein Aggregation Inhibitors for <span class="hlt">ALS</span> Therapy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of motor neurons, leading to death within 3-5 years. Gulf War veterans, and military personnel in general, exhibit a significant increased risk of d...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Diamond D. R. Kirsch R. B. Silverman R. I. Morimoto R. J. Ferrante</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">163</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10175632"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> injection system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors started commissioning the Advanced Light Source (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) storage ring on January 11, 1993. The stored beam reached 60 mA on March 24, 1993 and 407 mA on April 9, 1993. The fast pace of storage ring commissioning can be attributed partially to the robust injection system. In this paper they describe the operating characteristics of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> injection system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, C.H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">164</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/862324"> <span id="translatedtitle">17th Annual <span class="hlt">ALS</span> Users' Association Meeting</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It's not exactly Russian roulette, but scheduling October events outdoors is not risk-free, even in usually sunny California. An overflow crowd of more than 400 registered users, <span class="hlt">ALS</span> staff, and vendors enjoyed a full indoor program featuring science highlights and workshops spread over two and a half days from October 18 to October 20. However, a major storm, heralding the onset of the San Francisco Bay Area rainy season, posed a few weather challenges for the events on the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patio.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Robinson, Art; Tamura, Lori</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">165</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53403026"> <span id="translatedtitle">Atomic data for <span class="hlt">Al</span> ions (Palmeri+, 2011)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Computed level energies, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, absorption oscillator strengths, radiative and Auger widths, and K-shell fluorescence yields in <span class="hlt">Al</span>0-<span class="hlt">Al</span>11+ are given in these two tables. In Table 14 levels are identified by the electron number (N), the level index, the spin multiplicity, the total orbital angular momentum quantum number, the total angular momentum quantum number and the electronic configuration.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. Palmeri; P. Quinet; C. Mendoza; M. A. Bautista; J. Garcia; M. C. Witthoeft; T. R. Kallman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">166</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011AIPC.1349.1191N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic Properties of Disordered Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnetic properties of Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> powders prepared by filing the ingot in both as-filed and annealed form are studied. Results of Mössbauer, X-ray diffraction and DC magnetization studies show that the magnetic properties are modified due to formation of non-magnetic Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span>C0.5 phase due to C intercalated on filing. The hyperfine fields obtained are explained in terms of nearest and next nearest neighbor configurations of 57Fe.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nehra, J.; Kabra, K.; Jani, S.; Ranjith, P. M.; Lakshmi, N.; Venugopalan, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">167</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AIPC.1426..275Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Air blast characteristics of laminated <span class="hlt">al</span> and NI-<span class="hlt">AL</span> casings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Air blast characteristics of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> laminated materials were experimentally investigated in a 23 m3 closed chamber. Ni and <span class="hlt">Al</span> foils, 50 to 100 micrometers in thickness, were rolled and compacted to form a cylindrical casing with a density of 95% TMD through an explosive formation technique. Charges were prepared using 2 kg C4 explosive packed in the laminated casing to a metal-explosive mass ratio of 1.75. The blast pressure history measured on the chamber wall showed a double-shock front structure with a precursor shock followed by the primary blast. The front peak pressure for the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> cased charge reaches 1.5-2 times that of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> cased, consistent with the larger fireball recorded for the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> cased. The long time quasi-static explosion pressure (QSP) from the Ni- <span class="hlt">Al</span> cased charge is 0.8 of that of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> cased, due to half of <span class="hlt">Al</span> mass in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Fan; Ripley, Robert; Wilson, William</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">168</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993CPL...212...37S"> <span id="translatedtitle">XPS-XAES study of charge transfers at Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The chemical shift found for nickel core levels indicates the transfer of electrons from the <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 oxide to deposited Ni. This process creates the Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 surface dipoles, the electric field of which attracts free electrons from elemental <span class="hlt">Al</span> towards the sample surface. Filling <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> interface states with these electrons increases the barrier height. With increasing oxide thickness from 1.5 to 3.2 nm, the magnitude of this effect decreases while the amount of the transferred charge at Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 remains unchanged. For oxide thicknesses from 1.8 to 2.5 nm, UHV annealing of the Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> systems, with Ni deposits thicker than the effective amount of 2.5 ML, causes the formation of a Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy via interdiffusion through the oxide defects, whereas the thinner Ni deposits persist on the <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"><Img>Arapatka, T. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">169</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008STAdM...9c5005Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti/Mg composite by powder metallurgy of Mg <span class="hlt">Al</span> Ti system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An in situ titanium trialuminide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti)-particle-reinforced magnesium matrix composite has been successfully fabricated by the powder metallurgy of a Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti system. The reaction processes and formation mechanism for synthesizing the composite were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti particles are found to be synthesized in situ in the Mg alloy matrix. During the reaction sintering of the Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti system, <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti particles are formed through the reaction of liquid <span class="hlt">Al</span> with as-dissolved Ti around the Ti particles. The formed intermetallic particles accumulate at the original sites of the Ti particles. As sintering time increases, the accumulated intermetallic particles disperse and reach a relatively homogeneous distribution in the matrix. It is found that the reaction process of the Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti system is almost the same as that of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti system. Mg also acts as a catalytic agent and a diluent in the reactions and shifts the reactions of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ti to lower temperatures. An additional amount of <span class="hlt">Al</span> is required for eliminating residual Ti and solid-solution strengthening of the Mg matrix.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Zi R.; Wang, Shu Qi; Cui, Xiang H.; Zhao, Yu T.; Gao, Ming J.; Wei, Min X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">170</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JCrGr.275E.147F"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and characterization of the Ni<span class="hlt">Al-NiAl</span>Nb eutectic structure</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Despite presenting potential as high-temperature structural material, the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> intermetallic compound cannot be easily employed due to its low room temperature fracture toughness and poor creep strength. A solution for such a problem is combining such a compound with other phase using a eutectic transformation, as in the case of the Ni<span class="hlt">Al-NiAl</span>Nb eutectic structure. In this study, several samples containing Ni, <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Nb were arc melted in order to evaluate the eutectic composition of this transformation, as well as the temperature at which it occurs. The resulting phases were the B2 Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and the Laves phase Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb. It was found that the eutectic alloy occurs close to 16.0 at% Nb and the eutectic transformation temperature is 1487 °C. The amount of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase clearly decreases when the Nb content is raised. Thus, hypoeutectic alloys present Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> dendrites with Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb precipitated at the grain boundaries while hypereutectic alloys present primary dendrites of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb. The eutectic alloy was directionally solidified at growth rates varying from 5.0 to 50.0 mm/h. As expected, the lamellar spacing was found to decrease as the growth rate was increased.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ferrandini, P. L.; Araujo, F. L. G. U.; Batista, W. W.; Caram, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">171</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/516447"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling of precipitation in <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Objective was the development of a computational model of precipitation from a supersaturated alloy solid solution. The model is based on the formalism of chemical-reaction-rate theory combined with classical descriptions of precipitate thermodynamic properties and a mean-field treatment of diffusion-limited growht and coarsening. For the case of precipitation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 3}Sc in supersaturated <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sc alloys, it is demonstrated how the model can be used to calculate number densities and size distributions of precipitates as a function of aging time and temperature, including effects of continuous cooling and thermally generated point defects. Application of the model to a specific alloy system requires knowledge of diffusion data, point defect energetics, and thermodynamic properties for bulk phases and interphase interfaces. For interfaces and point defects, thermodynamic data can be difficult to measure and reliable values of defect free energies are often unavailable. For this reason, part of the efforts were devoted to applying semiempirical and first-principles atomistic techniques to the calculation of interfacial and point-defect thermodynamic properties. This report discusses applications for interphase interfaces in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ag, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sc, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li alloy systems. We also describe atomistic work aimed at understanding the energetics of vacancy clusters in <span class="hlt">Al</span>. These clusters serve as sinks for isolated vacancies during aging and their growth can lead to more complex defects, such as dislocation loops, that act as heterogeneous nucleation sites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asta, M.; Foiles, S.M.; Wolfer, W.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)] [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">172</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JIEIC..94...93S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Process Capability Analysis of Vacuum Moulding for Development of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 MMC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The purpose of the present study is to investigate process capability of vacuum moulding (VM) for development of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 metal matrix composite (MMC). Starting from the identification of component, prototypes were prepared (with three different input parameters namely: vacuum pressure; component volume and sand grit size to give output in form of dimensional accuracy). Measurements on the coordinate measuring machine helped in calculating the dimensional tolerances of the <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 MMC prepared. Some important mechanical properties were also compared to verify the suitability of the components. Final components produced are acceptable as per ISO standard UNI EN 20286-I (1995). The results of study suggest that VM process lies in ±4.5 sigma (?) limit as regard to dimensional accuracy of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 MMC is concerned. This process ensures rapid production of pre-series technological prototypes and proof of concept at less production cost and time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Singh, R.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">173</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2001JPCM...13.5387S"> <span id="translatedtitle">?-phase formation in Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The phase stability of bcc-like Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> with respect to phase transformations into the ? phase is examined by first-principles, full-potential, linear muffin-tin orbital method (FPLMTO), band-structure calculations. In agreement with experiment we find that bcc-like Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> is stable, whereas Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> is unstable. We have also performed some calculations in slightly disordered phases, and find that the disordering tends to inhibit the transformation. This supports the suggestion that a combined displacive/ordering transformation mechanism is involved in the phase transformations of the Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> system. Calculated lattice parameters and the degree of internal shuffling of atoms for the ordered Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase were found to be in excellent agreement with the experiment</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sanati, M.; Albers, R. C.; Pinski, F. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">174</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920049226&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Protective <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale formation on Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3-base alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation of Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 with additions of Cr and Y was studied to determine the mechanisms of the beneficial effects of these elements upon oxidation. Cr additions to the binary Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 alloy of up to 6.8 at. percent reduced the scale growth rates and promoted alpha-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 formation over much longer times relative to binary Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3. A major effect of Cr is to form a layer of <span class="hlt">Al</span>NbCr at the metal/scale interface, which is inherently more oxidation-resistant than the matrix alloy in the long term. Yttrium additions to a Cr-containing alloy improved the scale growth rate and adherence and changed the scale microstructure to mimic that of a typical protective <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doychak, J.; Hebsur, M. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">175</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/521616"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical properties of Ni{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>: Recent developments</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Recent developments in the understanding of the ductility and fracture behavior of Ni{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> are reviewed. Both intrinsic factors (e.g., alloy stoichiometry), and extrinsic factors (e.g., environment) have been shown to affect their mechanical properties. Of all the recent developments, perhaps the most significant is the realization that Ni{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> are intrinsically ductile (at least on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-deficient side of stoichiometry); their brittleness when tested in ambient air is due mainly to environmental embrittlement. Another intriguing discovery is that boron embrittles Ni{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> in gaseous hydrogen (until recently, B was though to have only beneficial, or at most neutral, effects). The authors review these and other recent discoveries and discuss, wherever possible, the underlying physical mechanisms giving rise to the observed mechanical behavior.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">George, E.P.; Liu, C.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">176</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-12-11/pdf/2012-29870.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 73732 - In the Matter of Amendment of the Designation of <span class="hlt">al</span>-Qa'ida in Iraq, aka Jam'at <span class="hlt">al</span> Tawhid wa'<span class="hlt">al</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...aka The Monotheism and Jihad Group, aka The <span class="hlt">al</span>-Zarqawi Network...Two Rivers, aka <span class="hlt">al</span>- Qaida Group of Jihad in Iraq, aka <span class="hlt">al</span>-Qaida Group of Jihad in the Land of the...<span class="hlt">al</span> Raafidaini, as a Foreign Terrorist Organization pursuant to...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-11</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">177</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26495778"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure and mechanical properties of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-based alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The investigation of Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–Fe–Ti–B alloys was carried out to determine the influence of iron and small titanium and boron additions on the phase composition, microstructure and mechanical characteristic, particularly with respect to high-temperature deformation conditions. These alloys, containing <span class="hlt">Al</span> 35.8 at% and Fe 3.6–8.6–17.6 at% were prepared from high-purity components and <span class="hlt">Al</span> master alloy containing Ti2B particles. The influence of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tomasz Czeppe; Stanislaw Wierzbinski</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">178</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60686134"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetization anomaly of Nb3<span class="hlt">Al</span> strands and instability of Nb3<span class="hlt">Al</span> Rutherford cables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a Cu stabilized Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span> strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span> Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span> strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ryuji Yamada; Akihiro Kikuchi; Masayoshi Wake</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">179</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPhCS.461a2017B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanism of charge transport in Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> structures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The investigation of current - voltage characteristics of structures Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> on the basis of aluminium oxide layers obtained by a method atomic layer deposition is carried out. It is established, that the possible mechanism of charge transport in structure is the space charge limited currents. The charge carrier concentration (Nt), concentration of traps (n0) and electron mobility (?) in <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layer are calculated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Borisova, T. M.; Castro, <author >R. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">180</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40062772"> <span id="translatedtitle">Role of <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2 O 3 particulate reinforcements on precipitation in 2014 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-matrix composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precipitation in commercial aluminum alloy 2014, without and with alumina particulate reinforcements, was studied using microhardness,\\u000a electrical resistivity, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and transmission electron microscopy. The precipitation sequence\\u000a in 2014 <span class="hlt">Al</span> was confirmed to be ?ss?? + GPZ ?? + ?’?a + ?’ + gH?? + ? (<span class="hlt">Al</span>CuMgSi) + ? (Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>2). Reinforcement addition decreased the time to peak hardness,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">I. Dutta; C. P. Harper; G. Dutta</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#">9</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">10</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">181</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014RJPCA..88..729S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic properties of alloys of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co-Sc systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Enthalpies of mixing for melts of the binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co system at 1870 K in the range 0 < x Co < 0.25, and at 1620 K, 0 < x Co < 0.12, are investigated by means of isoperibolic calorimetry. Enthalpies of mixing for melts of the ternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co-Sc system are investigated at 1870 K for sections <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.75(1 - x)Co0.25(1 - x)Sc x , 0 < x < 0.024, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.88(1 - x)Co0.12(1 - x)Sc x , 0 < x < 0.044. Using the literature data on the enthalpies of mixing for liquid and solid alloys, the activities of melt components, and the phase diagram of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co system, the thermodynamic properties of liquid and solid alloys of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co system over a wide range of temperatures and compositions are calculated using a software package of our own design, based on the model of ideal associated solutions (IAS). The enthalpies of mixing and the liquidus surface of the phase diagram of the ternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co-Sc system over the interval of concentrations are estimated by modeling with data on binary boundary subsystems. All of the components of both the binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co and ternary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co-Sc systems tend to interact with one another quite strongly: ? H min(<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co) = -32.5 kJ/mol at x Co = 0.44; ? H min(<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Co-Sc) = -46 kJ/mol for <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.4Co0.3Sc0.3 (estimated).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shevchenko, M. A.; Berezutskii, V. V.; Ivanov, M. I.; Kudin, V. G.; Sudavtsova, V. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">182</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/42426354"> <span id="translatedtitle">Immobilization of Zinc and Cadmium in Polluted Soils by Polynuclear <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Montmorillonite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the suitability of two aluminum-based binding agents, polynuclear <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-coated montmorillonite (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-mont-morillonite), for the immobilization of heavy metals in two contaminated agricultural soils: a loamy luvisol from an arable site in Rafz, Canton Zürich, Switzerland, and a sandy podsol from Szopienice, Upper Silesia, Poland. Both soils were polluted by lead, zinc, and cadmium: the soil from Szopienice</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aleksandra Badora; Gerhard Furrer; Anna Grünwald; Rainer Schulin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">183</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56390244"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti\\/Mg composite by powder metallurgy of Mg <span class="hlt">Al</span> Ti system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An in situ titanium trialuminide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti)-particle-reinforced magnesium matrix composite has been successfully fabricated by the powder metallurgy of a Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti system. The reaction processes and formation mechanism for synthesizing the composite were studied by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffractometry (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS). <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti particles are found to be synthesized in situ in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zi R. Yang; Shu Qi Wang; Xiang H. Cui; Yu T. Zhao; Ming J. Gao; Min X. Wei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">184</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53407499"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reaction diffusion in the NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> and CoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation life of a physically vapor-deposited overlay protective coating based on the Ni-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span> or Co-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span> (M-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span>) systems is controlled by aluminum consumption resulting from alumina spalling, erosion, and interdiffusion with the substrate. The rates of these processes are determined by coating and substrate composition, service environment, and temperature. The purposes of this study were 1) to determine the effect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stanley R. Le Vine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">185</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/2742nnn6226t7x87.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reaction diffusion in the NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> and CoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> systems</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation life of a physically vapor-deposited overlay protective coating based on the Ni-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span> or Co-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span> (M-Cr-<span class="hlt">Al</span>)\\u000a systems is controlled by aluminum consumption resulting from alumina spalling, erosion, and interdiffusion with the substrate.\\u000a The rates of these processes are determined by coating and substrate composition, service environment, and temperature. The\\u000a purposes of this study were 1) to determine the effect</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stanley R. Le Vine</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1978-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">186</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JCrGr.275E.395K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N-like Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2 can be viewed as the assemblage of eight hypothetical zincblende-like sublattices (Li 0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span> 0.5N) - partially filled with He-like Li + interstitials at the empty tetrahedral sites. Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2 is synthesized by direct reaction between Li 3N (powder, 99.5% pure) and <span class="hlt">Al</span> (wire, 99.999% pure) with the molar ratio Li 3N:<span class="hlt">Al</span> of 1:1. The reaction is performed under N 2 pressure of 700 Torr after the evacuation to 10 -3 Torr. Typical reaction temperature and time are 1023 K and 5 h, respectively. The synthesized compounds are confirmed to be a single phase of Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2 (space group: Ia3) with lattice parameter 9.427 Å by a powder X-ray diffraction method. Twelve Raman peaks are observed, although the factor group analysis for Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2 allows eight peaks (Raman active modes: A g+2E 1g+2E 2g+3F g), indicating that the rest four peaks originate from the decrease in the lattice symmetry due to the distortion between <span class="hlt">Al</span> and N bonds. With the reaction temperature above 1273 K, wurtzite-<span class="hlt">Al</span>N is synthesized instead of Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2, which results from the extreme vaporization of lithium and nitrogen from Li-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N matrix. The band gap of Li 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>N 2 evaluated using optical absorption and photoacoustic spectroscopy methods is ˜4.4 eV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kuriyama, K.; Kaneko, Y.; Kushida, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">187</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/203536"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites by reactive metal penetration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ceramic-metal composites have been made to near net-shape by reactive penetration of dense ceramic preforms by molten <span class="hlt">Al</span>. Ceramic-metal composite formation by reactive metal penetration is driven by a strongly negative Gibbs energy for reaction. For <span class="hlt">Al</span>, the general form of the reaction is (x + 2)<span class="hlt">Al</span> + (3/y)MO{sub y} {yields} <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} + M{sub 3/y}<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub x}, where MO{sub y} is an oxide that is wet by molten <span class="hlt">Al</span>. In low P{sub O{sub 2}} atmospheres and at temperatures above about 900 C, molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> reduces mullite to produce <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} and silicon. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>/mullite reaction has a {Delta}G{degree}{sub r} (1,200 K) of {minus}1,014 kJ/mol and, if the mullite is fully dense, the theoretical volume change on reaction is less than 1%. Experiments with commercial mullite containing a silicate grain boundary phase average less than 2% volume change on reaction. In the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/mullite system, reactive metal penetration produces a fine-grained alumina skeleton with an interspersed metal phase. With enough excess aluminum, mutually interpenetrating ceramic-metal composites are produced. Properties measurements show that ceramic-metal composites produced by reactive metal penetration of mullite by <span class="hlt">Al</span> have a Young`s modulus and hardness similar to that of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with improved fracture toughness ranging from5 to 9 MPa {center_dot} m{sup 1/2}. For penetration times less than 1 h, reaction layer thickness varies as the square root of time, which allows ceramic-metal composite coatings to be fabricated by controlling the penetration time.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Advanced Materials Lab.; Tomsia, A.P. [Pask Research and Engineering, Berkeley, CA (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">188</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990008594&hterms=tantalum+coating&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtantalum%2Bcoating"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-Phase (Ti<span class="hlt">Al+TiCrAl</span>) Coating Alloys for Titanium Aluminides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A coating for protecting titanium aluminide alloys, including the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> gamma + Ti3<span class="hlt">Al</span> (alpha(sub 2)) class, from oxidative attack and interstitial embrittlement at temperatures up to at least 1000 C. is disclosed. This protective coating consists essentially of titanium, aluminum. and chromium in the following approximate atomic ratio: Ti(41.5-34.5)<span class="hlt">Al</span>(49-53)Cr(9.5-12.5)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brady, Michael P. (Inventor); Smialek, James L. (Inventor); Brindley, William J. (Inventor)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">189</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40940935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of intermetallics in hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Fe alloys by dissolution of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">During the non-equilibrium solidification typical of DC (direct chill) castings a range of cooling rates occur from the surface to the casting center, and can cause the formation of metastable intermetallic phases (AlmFe, <span class="hlt">Al</span>6Fe, etc.) in addition to the stable <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Fe phase. The extensive presence of the plate-like <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Fe phase in the as-cast structure adversely influences the mechanical properties of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pedro R. Goulart; Valentim B. Lazarine; Claudenete V. Leal; José E. Spinelli; Noé Cheung; Amauri Garcia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">190</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SurSc.624....1L"> <span id="translatedtitle">First-principle study of adhesion, wetting and bonding on <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>3V(001) interface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The adhesion, wetting, and bonding on fcc-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(001)/D022-<span class="hlt">Al</span>3V(001) interface were investigated using density functional calculations. Considering different terminations of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3V(001) (<span class="hlt">Al</span>- and <span class="hlt">Al</span> + V-terminated) and stacking sites (center-, hollow- and top-sites), six <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>3V(001) models were calculated. For the models with same stacking site, <span class="hlt">Al</span> + V-terminated model has larger work of adhesion (Wad) than the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-terminated one. For the models with same termination, the work of adhesion decreases, and the interface energy (?int) increases as the order of top-, bridge- and center-sites. <span class="hlt">Al</span>-terminated-center-sited and <span class="hlt">Al</span> + V-terminated-center-sited models are more stable among six models. After complete structure relaxation, both models have the same epitaxial stacking style. Therefore, the both models can be regarded as of the same and most stable one (noted as CSI model), but separating along <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>+V inter-planes. Based on the perfect wetting and strong adhesion in CSI model, the heterogeneous nucleation of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> on <span class="hlt">Al</span>3V(001) was interpreted in terms of crystallography and thermodynamics. The interfacial bonding was discussed with analysis of valence electron density distribution and partial density of states (PDOS). The bonding is mainly contributed from <span class="hlt">Al</span>V covalent bonds and <span class="hlt">AlAl</span> metallic interactions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Jian; Qi, Yuning; Zhang, Ming; Zhou, Yong; Li, Xiao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">191</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ApPhL..95z1901W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fast reaction mechanism of a core(<span class="hlt">Al</span>)-shell (<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) nanoparticle in oxygen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Atomistic mechanisms of oxidation in a laser flash heated core (Aluminum)-shell (Alumina) nanoparticle are investigated using multimillion-atom molecular dynamics simulations. We find a thermal-to-mechanochemical transition of oxidation mechanism when the initial core temperature is above 6000 K. The transition from thermal diffusion to mechanically enhanced diffusion to ballistic transport is accompanied by a change in the intermediate reaction products from <span class="hlt">Al</span> rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O to oxygen rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>O2 clusters. Higher initial temperature of the core causes catastrophic failure of the shell, which provides direct oxidation pathways for core <span class="hlt">Al</span>, resulting in faster energy release.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Weiqiang; Clark, Richard; Nakano, Aiichiro; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Vashishta, Priya</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">192</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/mr1101032582824l.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deoxidation equilibria of molten nickel by Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Mn-<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The deoxidation equilibria of aluminum-magnesium and aluminum-manganese in liquid nickel equilibrated with <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3-saturated Mg<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 and Mn<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4, respectively, were investigated in the temperature range of 1773 to 1873 K. At 1773 K, the oxygen levels could be reduced\\u000a to 5.8 to 6.6 ppm with 2.5 to 10 ppm magnesium and 0.05 to 0.9 mass pct aluminum in the Ni-Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O system, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yihong Zhao; Kazuki Morita; Nobuo Sano</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">193</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920053767&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combustion synthesis of TiB2-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3-<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxide-aluminum exothermic reduction reaction is presently used in the combustion-synthesis of ceramic/metal composites. An excess of <span class="hlt">Al</span> is used in the reacting materials, which rapidly generate enough heat to exceed <span class="hlt">Al</span>'s melting point. The molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> thus evolved is allowed to infiltrate the porous ceramic matrix as the exothermic reaction proceeds; this feature of the process turns the disadvantage of high porosity levels in combustion-synthesized materials into an advantage. Attention is given to the system obtained with 3TiO2 + 3B2O3 + (10-x)<span class="hlt">Al</span> starting materials.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feng, H. J.; Moore, J. J.; Wirth, D. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">194</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24784279"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>(-) and Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>2(-) anions: theoretical and photoelectron spectroscopic characterization.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report a joint photoelectron spectroscopic and theoretical study of the Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>(-) and Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>2(-) anions. The ground state structures and electronic configurations of these species were identified to be C?v, (1)?(+) for Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>(-), and C2v, (2)B1 for Pt<span class="hlt">Al</span>2(-). Structured anion photoelectron spectra of these clusters were recorded and interpreted using ab initio calculations. Good agreement between theory and experiment was found. All experimental features were successfully assigned to one-electron transitions from the ground state of the anions to the ground or excited states of the corresponding neutral species. PMID:24784279</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Xinxing; Ganteför, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Alexandrova, Anastassia N</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">195</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003CPL...378...65L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Molecular structures and energetics of the neutral aluminum trimethylaluminum complex: an <span class="hlt">Al</span> <span class="hlt">Al</span> bonded global minimum?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">From their recent laboratory kinetics studies, Parker and Nelson have proposed a monobridged molecular structure for the aluminum atom-trimethylaluminum system. Here molecular structures and energetics for the neutral aluminum atom-trimethylaluminum complex (<span class="hlt">Al</span>TMA) are reported from theory. A second distinct minimum was located and characterized, corresponding to an unanticipated H 3C-<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>(CH 3) 2 geometry. In addition, the transition state between the two minima was located. The relative energies of these stationary points are also reported, predicting that the monobridged <span class="hlt">Al</span>TMA structure recently reported is higher in energy than the methylaluminum DMA discovered in this study by about 2 kcal mol -1.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Larkin, Joseph D.; Moran, Damian; Schaefer, Henry F., III</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">196</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-09-23/pdf/2010-23731.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 57846 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Brewton, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Amendment of Class E Airspace; Brewton, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...at Brewton Municipal Airport, Brewton, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, by updating the geographic coordinates...of Brewton Municipal Airport, Brewton, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. This action makes the adjustment....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-09-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">197</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-12-02/pdf/2013-28677.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 72008 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Aliceville, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Establishment of Class E Airspace; Aliceville, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...establishes Class E Airspace at Aliceville, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, to accommodate a new Area Navigation...establish Class E airspace at Aliceville, <span class="hlt">AL</span>(78 FR 52111) Docket No....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-02</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">198</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-13/pdf/2012-27494.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 67689 - Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et <span class="hlt">al</span>.;</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...812-13731] Fidelity Aberdeen Street Trust, et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Notice of Application November 6...1\\ Colchester Street Trust, et <span class="hlt">al</span>., Investment Company Act Release Nos...amending, Colchester Street Trust, et <span class="hlt">al</span>., Investment Company Act Release...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-11-13</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">199</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40288444"> <span id="translatedtitle">Study of precipitation in aged binary Mg–<span class="hlt">Al</span> and ternary Mg–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–Zn alloys using 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> NMR spectroscopy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> was used to study the development of precipitation in aged Mg–6 wt%<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Mg–9 wt%<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Mg–9 wt%<span class="hlt">Al</span>–(x) wt%Zn alloys. The 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> spectra for the aged alloys consist of two peaks; one from the aluminium in solid solution and the other from aluminium in the precipitate phase. The proportion of aluminium atoms in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Celotto; T. J. Bastow</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">200</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49302748"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation and interfacial fracture behaviour of NiCr<span class="hlt">AlY\\/Al</span> 2O 3 coatings on an orthorhombic-Ti 2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 diffusion barriers of various thicknesses have been fabricated by filtered arc ion plating between the NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coating and the O-Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb alloy. Isothermal oxidation tests and three-point bend tests have been conducted to investigate the influence of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 diffusion barriers on the oxidation and interfacial fracture behaviour of the coatings. The results indicate that the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 diffusion barrier defers</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Q. Li; Q. M. Wang; S. M. Jiang; J. Ma; J. Gong; C. Sun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">201</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40432711"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation behavior of laser remelted plasma sprayed NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y and NiCr<span class="hlt">AlY–Al</span> 2O 3 coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Two types of plasma sprayed coatings (NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y and NiCr<span class="hlt">AlY–Al</span>2O3) were remelted by continuous wave CO2 laser. A homogeneous dense remelted layer without voids, cavities, unmelted particles and microcracks was formed. As a result of isothermal oxidation tests at 1000°C, the weight gains of laser remelted coatings, especially laser remelted NiCr<span class="hlt">AlY–Al</span>2O3 coatings, were obviously lower than plasma sprayed coatings. The effects</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. N Wu; G Zhang; Z. C Feng; B. C Zhang; Y Liang; F. J Liu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">202</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40431555"> <span id="translatedtitle">Graded <span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>N, TiN, and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N multilayers deposited by radio-frequency reactive magnetron sputtering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Graded layers and multilayers have been reported to improve surface properties of steel tools. Our study was aimed at defining the appropriate processing parameters for deposition of graded <span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>N and <span class="hlt">AlN–TiN–TiAl</span>N multilayers on silicon, glass, and M2 steel tools. The layers were deposited by r.f. reactive magnetron sputtering using dual cathode targets, Ti and <span class="hlt">Al</span>. The ratio of nitrogen flow</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Raveh; M. Weiss; M. Pinkas; D. Z. Rosen; G. Kimmel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">203</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40432279"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deposition and characterization of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–N thin films from a Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> compound target</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–N thin films have been deposited from a dense and homogeneous Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> compound target onto various substrates, including stainless steel, glass, and Si100 wafer, by using RF magnetron sputtering. The films have been characterized using X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Both the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span>–N thin films</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D Zhong; J. J Moore; T. R Ohno; J Disam; S Thiel; I Dahan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">204</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008JAP...104d3502A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Exothermic reactions in Co/<span class="hlt">Al</span> nanolaminates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Vapor-deposited Co/<span class="hlt">Al</span> nanolaminates having a net equiatomic stoichiometry exhibited rapid, high-temperature synthesis. When ignited locally, 7.5-?m-thick Co/<span class="hlt">Al</span> foils were characterized by self-sustained propagating reactions with flame front speeds between ~0.5 and 9 m/s. Speed was largely affected by bilayer thickness and premixed volume fraction, consistent with previous studies of other exothermic multilayers. Cobalt aluminide foils reacted by self-propagating synthesis developed a variety of rough surface morphologies characterized by a large amplitude (peak-to-valley ~1.0 ?m), multiperiod, wavelike structure. High-temperature reaction was also stimulated by rapid global heating. Tests revealed low ignition temperatures (Tig)~240-460 °C compared with previous Co-<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder reactant experiments. Ignition temperature was influenced by bilayer thickness. All foils ignited by global heating and those reacted in a self-propagating mode developed a single-phase B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Thick Co/<span class="hlt">Al</span> nanolaminates were used successfully to join a few different materials including metalized <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 (by soldering) and polyetheretherketone (by direct attachment).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adams, D. P.; Hodges, V. C.; Bai, M. M.; Jones, E.; Rodriguez, M. A.; Buchheit, T.; Moore, J. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">205</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40514522"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved oxidation resistance of NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to improve the oxidation resistance of NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings, <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 second phase was incorporated into NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings obtained by plasma-laser technique. After laser remelting, the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 second phase was distributed in the grains as well as on the grain boundaries of the coatings. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 second phase could improve the oxidation resistance of NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings during oxidation at 1000</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. N. Wu; M. Qin; Z. C. Feng; Y. Liang; C. Sun; F. H. Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">206</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40369513"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ion-plated <span class="hlt">Al–Al</span> 2O 3 films as diffusion barriers between NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coating and orthorhombic-Ti 2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ion-plated <span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>2O3 cermet films were fabricated as diffusion barriers between NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coating and orthhombic-Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb alloy. The oxidation and interdiffusion behaviour of coatings with and without diffusion barrier were investigated in isothermal and cyclic oxidation tests at 800°C. The results indicated that substantial interdiffusion and rapid oxidation degradation occurred in the coated specimens without diffusion barrier. With <span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>2O3 diffusion barriers, deferred</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. Q. Li; Q. M. Wang; S. M. Jiang; J. Gong; C. Sun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">207</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-10/pdf/2012-16429.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 40492 - Revocation of Class D Airspace; Andalusia, <span class="hlt">AL</span>; and Amendment of Class E Airspace; Fort Rucker, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Revocation of Class D Airspace; Andalusia, <span class="hlt">AL</span>; and Amendment of Class E Airspace; Fort Rucker, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA...action removes Class D Airspace at Andalusia, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, as the Air Traffic Control Tower at...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">208</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-11-17/pdf/2011-29656.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 71355 - United States et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana, Inc. et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Proposed Final...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...OF JUSTICE Antitrust Division United States et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Montana, Inc. et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Proposed Final Judgment and Competitive...Montana, Billings Division, in United States et <span class="hlt">al</span>. v. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-11-17</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">209</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/676870"> <span id="translatedtitle">Boron strengthening in Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of boron on the strength of B2-structured Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> is considered as a function of composition, grain size and temperature. Boron does not affect the concentrations of antisite atoms or vacancies present, with the former increasing and the latter decreasing with increasing deviation from the stoichiometric composition. When vacancies are absent, the strength increase per at. % B per unit lattice strain, {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) increases with increasing aluminum concentration, but when vacancies are present (>45 at. % <span class="hlt">Al</span>), {Delta}{sigma}/({Delta}c x {epsilon}) decreases again. Boron increases grain size strengthening in Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>. B strengthening is roughly independent of temperature up to the yield strength peak but above the point, when diffusion-assisted deformation occurs, boron strengthening increases dramatically.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, I.; Li, X.; Xiao, H.; Klein, O.; Nelson, C. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering; Carleton, R.L.; George, E.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics Div.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">210</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24534024"> <span id="translatedtitle">Why is <span class="hlt">ALS</span> so Difficult to Treat?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) is proving intractable. Difficulties in pre-clinical studies contribute in small measure to this futility, but the chief reason for failure is an inadequate understanding of disease pathogenesis. Many acquired and inherited processes have been advanced as potential causes of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> but, while they may predispose to disease, it seems increasingly likely that none leads directly to <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. Rather, two recent overlapping considerations, both involving aberrant protein homeostasis, may provide a better explanation for a common disease phenotype and a common terminal pathogenesis. If so, therapeutic approaches will need to be altered and carefully nuanced, since protein homeostasis is essential and highly conserved. Nonetheless, these considerations provide new optimism in a difficult disease which has hitherto defied treatment. PMID:24534024</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Turnbull, John</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">211</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3423946"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ALS</span> and Frontotemporal Dysfunction: A Review</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Though once believed to be a disease that was limited to the motor system, it is now apparent that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) may be associated with cognitive changes in some patients. Changes are consistent with frontotemporal dysfunction, and may range from mild abnormalities only recognized with formal neuropsychological testing, to profound frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Executive function, behavior, and language are the most likely areas to be involved. Screening helpful in detecting abnormalities includes verbal or categorical fluency, behavioral inventories filled out by the caregiver, and evaluation for the presence of depression and pseudobulbar affect. Patients with cognitive dysfunction have shortened survival and may be less compliant with recommendations regarding use of feeding tubes and noninvasive ventilation. Evolving knowledge of genetic and pathological links between <span class="hlt">ALS</span> and FTD has allowed us to better understand the overlapping spectrum of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> and FTD.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Achi, Eugene Y.; Rudnicki, Stacy A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">212</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/434994"> <span id="translatedtitle">The mechanical properties of Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Only in the last few years has progress been made in obtaining reproducible mechanical properties data for Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>. Two sets of observations are the foundation of this progress. The first is that the large vacancy concentrations that exist in Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> at high temperature are easily retained at low temperature and that these strongly affect the low-temperature mechanical properties. The second is that RT ductility is adversely affected by water vapor. Purpose of this paper is not to present a comprehensive overview of the mechanical properties of Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> but rather to highlight our understanding of key phenomena and to show how an understanding of the factors which control the yield strength and fracture behavior has followed the discovery of the above two effects. 87 refs, 9 figs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, I. [Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States); George, E.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">213</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22150063"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of nanostructured <span class="hlt">Al</span>N by solid state reaction of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and diaminomaleonitrile</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solid state reaction of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) with aluminum via both mechanochemical and thermal treatment routes was studied by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the milling process, the reaction starts with the deammoniation of the DAMN molecules, followed by the formation of nanostructured <span class="hlt">Al</span>N powder as the main solid product after milling for 7 h. The reactivity of the mixed powder was also investigated during the conventional thermal treatment process using differential scanning calorimetry, derivative thermogravimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that DAMN starts to polymerize at 192 Degree-Sign C by the elimination of the amine groups. Furthermore, increasing the annealing temperature leads to the formation of a nitrogen-containing carbonaceous material with the structure similar to non-crystalline carbon. However, no evidence for the formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N was observed in the annealed samples even at temperatures as high as the <span class="hlt">Al</span> melting point. - Graphical abstract: <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanoparticles obtained after milling of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) for 12 h. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid state reaction of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) with <span class="hlt">Al</span> was studied via mechanochemical and thermal treatment routs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span>N was successfully synthesized by the mechanochemical process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The C/N material was formed by polymerization of DAMN during the thermal treatment process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No reaction between DAMN and <span class="hlt">Al</span> was detected during the thermal treatment method.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rounaghi, S.A., E-mail: s.a.rounaghi@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); Eshghi, H., E-mail: heshghi@ferdowsi.um.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1436, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kiani Rashid, A.R.; Vahdati Khaki, J. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Materials Engineering, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. P.O. Box no. 91775-1111, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scudino, S. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany)] [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); Eckert, J. [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany) [IFW Dresden, Institut fuer Komplexe Materialien, Postfach 27 01 16, Dresden D-01171 (Germany); TU Dresden, Institut fuer Werkstoffwissenschaft, Dresden D-01062 (Germany)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">214</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Axiom&pg=5&id=EJ689425"> <span id="translatedtitle">An Alternative Perspective on von Winterfeldt et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> (1997) Test of Consequence Monotonicity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">D. von Winterfeldt, N.-K. Chung, R. D. Luce, and Y. Cho (see record 1997-03378-008) provided several tests for consequence monotonicity of choice or judgment, using certainty equivalents of gambles. The authors reaxiomatized consequence monotonicity in a probabilistic framework and reanalyzed von Winterfeldt et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> main experiment via a…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ho, Moon-Ho R.; Regenwetter, Michel; Niederee, Reinhard; Heyer, Dieter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">215</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PMM...102..646N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Preparation, deformation, and failure of functional <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn-Pb nanocrystalline alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Changes in the structure, hardness, mechanical properties, and friction coefficient of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-30% Sn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-15% Sn-25% Pb, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5% Sn-35% Pb (wt %) alloys subjected to severe plastic deformation by equal-channel angular pressing (with a force of 40 tonne) and by shear at a pressure of 5 GPa have been studied. The transition into the nanocrystalline state was shown to occur at different degrees of plastic deformation. The hardness exhibits nonmonotonic variations, namely, first it increases and subsequently decreases. The friction coefficient of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-30% Sn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-15% Sn-25% Pb, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5% Sn-35% Pb alloys quenched from the melt was found to be 0.33; the friction coefficients of these alloys in the submicrocrystalline state (after equal-channel angular pressing) equal 0.24, 0.32, and 0.35, respectively. The effect of disintegration into nano-sized powders was found to occur in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-15% Sn-25% Pb, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5% Sn-35% Pb alloys after severe plastic deformation to ? = 6.4 and subsequent short-time holding.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noskova, N. I.; Vil'Danova, N. F.; Filippov, Yu. I.; Churbaev, R. V.; Pereturina, I. A.; Korshunov, L. G.; Korznikov, A. V.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">216</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvC..89f5805B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nucleosynthesis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>26 in massive stars: New <span class="hlt">Al</span>27 states above ? and neutron emission thresholds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> radioisotope is of great importance for understanding the chemical and dynamical evolution of our galaxy. Among the possible stellar sources, massive stars are believed to be the main producer of this radioisotope. Understanding 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> nucleosynthesis in massive stars requires estimates of the thermonuclear reaction rates of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>26(n,p)26Mg, <span class="hlt">Al</span>26(n,?)23Na, and Na23(?,p)26Mg reactions. These reaction rates depend on the spectroscopic properties of 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> states above the neutron and alpha thresholds. In this context, the <span class="hlt">Al</span>27(p,p')27<span class="hlt">Al</span>* reaction was studied at 18 MeV using a high-resolution Enge Split-Pole spectrometer. States from the ground state up to excitation energies of ?14 MeV were populated. While up to the 23Na + ? threshold no additional states are observed, we report for the first time 30 new levels above the 23Na + ? threshold and more than 30 new states above the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> + n threshold for which excitation energies are determined with an uncertainty of 4-5 keV.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benamara, S.; de Séréville, N.; Laird, A. M.; Hammache, F.; Stefan, I.; Roussel, P.; Ancelin, S.; Assié, M.; Coc, A.; Deloncle, I.; Fox, S. P.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre, L.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Mavilla, G.; Morfouace, P.; Sánchez-Benítez, Á. M.; Perrot, L.; Sinha, M.; Tatischeff, V.; Vandebrouck, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">217</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/872577"> <span id="translatedtitle">Electronic circuits having Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni.sub.3 <span class="hlt">Al</span> substrates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An electronic circuit component having improved mechanical properties and thermal conductivity comprises Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and/or Ni.sub.3 <span class="hlt">Al</span>, upon which an alumina layer is formed prior to applying the conductive elements. Additional layers of copper-aluminum alloy or copper further improve mechanical strength and thermal conductivity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deevi, Seetharama C. (Midlothian, VA); Sikka, Vinod K. (Oak Ridge, TN)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">218</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005JTST...14..264K"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich precipitation in CoNiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y bondcoat at high temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermal barrier coating (TBC) is applied on a surface of a gas turbine blade to provide a thermal barrier and oxidation resistant properties for the components. The ability to resist oxidation of the coating arises from the self-healing, protective <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale on top of the bondcoat, which is formed during service. However, if <span class="hlt">Al</span> depletion occurs within the bondcoat, the protective scale will lose its self-healing ability, and hence, its oxidation-resistant property. This paper investigated the depletion of <span class="hlt">Al</span> within the bondcoat by studying the microstructure of the bondcoat on a gas turbine blade after it has been in 4000 h service at 1200 °C. The results showed that <span class="hlt">Al</span> depletion had occurred at different levels throughout the turbine blade. In the area where <span class="hlt">Al</span> depletion had not yet occurred, precipitation of an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich phase was detected. Most of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> was contained within this phase, leaving only small amount of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in the surrounding matrix. A well-defined boundary was observed between the depleted and non-depleted regions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Koomparkping, T.; Damrongrat, S.; Niranatlumpong, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">219</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009MMTA...40.1541Q"> <span id="translatedtitle">Combustion Synthesis Reactions in Cold-Rolled Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ti/<span class="hlt">Al</span> Multilayers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this article, a cold rolling method was developed to fabricate Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ti/<span class="hlt">Al</span> multilayer foils, and the combustion synthesis reactions in the cold-rolled foils were investigated. Combustion synthesis reactions were initiated by heating one end of the cold-rolled foil in a flame for several seconds. The Ni/<span class="hlt">Al</span> foils went through three reaction stages. The first reaction stage was a displacement of reaction zone with <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ni as the reaction product. During the second stage, the part of the foil in the flame underwent thermal explosion. In the last stage, the heat released by thermal explosion triggered a self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction across the foil that resulted in the formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ni. In contrast, the Ti/<span class="hlt">Al</span> foils experienced only two reaction stages. First, a displacement of the reaction zone propagated across the foil with formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti at the Ti/<span class="hlt">Al</span> interface. Then a thermal explosion reaction occurred in the part of foil that was heated in the flame, resulting in many different phases in the reacted foil.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Qiu, Xiaotun; Liu, Ranran; Guo, Shengmin; Graeter, Jesse Harris; Kecskes, Laszlo; Wang, Jiaping</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">220</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60226911"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress-strain behavior of fine-grained <span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>[sub 3]Ti alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been recognized that dispersion strengthening with hard, stable, high melting point phases offers an effective technique for improving the stiffness of aluminum alloys over a wider temperature range compared to precipitation strengthening. Recent research indicates that mechanically alloyed (MA) <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti alloys have good ambient and elevated temperature properties. The MA <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti alloys are characterized by the presence of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. H. Wang; P. W. Kao; C. P. Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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style="font-weight: bold;">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">221</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011mave.book..105G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mathematik <span class="hlt">als</span> Geisteswissenschaft Der Mathematikschädigung dialogisch vorbeugen</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ursprünglich wollte ich Architekt werden getreu den Vorbildern von Vater und Großvater. Darum zeichnete ich bereits <span class="hlt">als</span> neunjähriges Kind Pläne von Häusern in der Art, wie ich sie oft zu sehen bekam. Ein ausgemustertes Holzdreieck mit einem rechten und zwei halben rechten Winkeln war das einzige Konstruktionswerkzeug, das ich damals besaß und mit dem ich mich ans Werk machte. Zuerst einmal war da natürlich ein Rechteck <span class="hlt">als</span> Grundriss des Hauses zu zeichnen: Eine Seite, ein rechter Winkel, die zweite Seite, wieder ein rechterWinkel, die dritte Seite in gleicher Länge wie die erste und dann der dritte rechte Winkel, dessen letzter Schenkel die vierte Seite gab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gallin, Peter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">222</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6137079"> <span id="translatedtitle">Stress-strain behavior of fine-grained <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>[sub 3]Ti alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">It has been recognized that dispersion strengthening with hard, stable, high melting point phases offers an effective technique for improving the stiffness of aluminum alloys over a wider temperature range compared to precipitation strengthening. Recent research indicates that mechanically alloyed (MA) <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti alloys have good ambient and elevated temperature properties. The MA <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti alloys are characterized by the presence of large volume fractions of submicron sized <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti dispersoids within a fine grain aluminum matrix. In addition, such alloys contain a significant amount of ultrafine <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 4]C[sub 3] and <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 2]O[sub 3] dispersoids incorporated during the MA process. The carbide and oxide dispersoids reside mainly along grain boundaries and can stabilize a fine-grain structure even after long term exposure at elevated temperature. The high temperature strength of these MA aluminum alloys is strongly controlled by carbide and oxide dispersoids. The Young's modulus of <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti phase was determined to be about 220 GPa. Hence, the presence of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti phase is very effective in increasing the stiffness of the MA aluminum alloys is strongly controlled by carbide and oxide dispersoids. The Young's modulus of <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti phase was determined to be about 220 GPa. Hence, the presence of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti phase is very effective in increasing the stiffness of the MA aluminum alloys. The strength of such alloys increases with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti content; however, the strengthening effect of <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 3]Ti dispersoids diminishes at temperatures above about 400C. On the other hand, such dispersoids also appear responsible for improving the high temperature ductility of the MA <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti alloys. A better understanding of the strengthening mechanisms is desirable. This paper presents the room temperature stress-strain behavior of two <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>[sub 3]Ti alloys made by mechanical alloying and hot-pressing.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, S.H.; Kao, P.W.; Chang, C.P. (National Sun Yat-Sen Univ., Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">223</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JPhCS.400c2052M"> <span id="translatedtitle">27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR Study on Novel Phase Transition in CeOs2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have performed 27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR measurements in CeOs2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 which exhibits a novel phase transition at T0=29 K The NQR parameters determined for all the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sites in ambient pressure were compared with those in CeRu2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 with T0=27 K and CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 with no phase transition. The distinct NQR splitting just below T0=32.5 K under pressure 0.66 GPa ensures an enhancement of T0 and a homogeneous transition. Despite the increase of T0, the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/Tl is suppressed over whole range of temperature than in ambient pressure. The characteristic features of no critical slowing down at T0 and of the remarkable decrease of 1/T1T starting at T > T0 become prominent under pressure, suggesting an approach to Kondo semiconductor in a valence fluctuation regime.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsumura, M.; Inagaki, T.; Kato, H.; Nishioka, T.; Tanida, H.; Sera, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">224</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19980210984&hterms=MAPLE+reactor&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DMAPLE%2Breactor"> <span id="translatedtitle">CVD Fiber Coatings for <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> Composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">While sapphire-fiber-reinforced nickel aluminide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>) composites are an attractive candidate for high-temperature structures, the significant difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion between the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix and the sapphire fiber creates substantial residual stresses in the composite. This study seeks to produce two fiber-coating systems with the potential to reduce the residual stresses in the sapphire/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite system. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was used to produce both the compensating and compliant-fiber coatings for use in sapphire/Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites. A special reactor was designed and built to produce the FGM and to handle the toxic nickel precursors. This process was successfully used to produce 500-foot lengths of fiber with coating thicknesses of approximately 3 microns, 5 microns, and 10 microns.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Boss, Daniel E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">225</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhRvC..85f5804P"> <span id="translatedtitle">26<span class="hlt">Al</span>+p elastic and inelastic scattering reactions and galactic abundances of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Galactic 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> is the first radioactive nucleus to be positively identified by ?-ray astronomy with detection of the 1.809 MeV ? ray associated with its decay. This nucleus is destroyed in astrophysical environments in the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,?)27Si and inelastic 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>+p scattering reactions where properties of 27Si levels determine reaction rates. To investigate these properties, elastic and inelastic 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>+p scattering reactions were measured between Ec.m. = 0.5-1.5 MeV at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). A candidate for a new resonance in the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,?)27Si reaction was identified. Upper limits were also set on the strengths of postulated resonances and on the cross section of the inelastic reaction, but there is little effect on current reaction rate calculations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pittman, S. T.; Bardayan, D. W.; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Matei, C.; Matos, M.; Moazen, B. H.; Nesaraja, C. D.; O'Malley, P. D.; Pain, S. D.; Parker, P. D.; Peters, W. A.; Shriner, J. F., Jr.; Smith, M. S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">226</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011JAP...109b4502P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aging- and annealing-induced variations in Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb tunnel junction properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper, we present studies of room temperature aging and annealing of Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>Ox/Nb tunnel junctions with the size of 2-3 ?m2. We observed a noticeable drop of junction normal resistance Rn unusually combined with increase in subgap resistance Rj as a result of aging. Variation in both Rn and Rj are subject to the junction size effect. An effect of aging history on the junction degradation after consequent annealing was discovered. Discussion and interpretation of the observed phenomena are presented in terms of structural ordering and reconstruction in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ox layer, driven by diffusion flows enhanced due to stress relaxation processes in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> layer interfacing the <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ox layer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pavolotsky, Alexey B.; Dochev, Dimitar; Belitsky, Victor</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">227</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SurSc.604...63P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interfacial properties of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N and oxidized <span class="hlt">Al</span>N on Si</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report on the characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) capacitors with aluminum nitride (<span class="hlt">Al</span>N) as the insulator material. <span class="hlt">Al</span>N has been grown on (1 1 1) Si by means of molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and DC magnetron sputtering (SPU). <span class="hlt">Al</span>N layers have been characterized before and after dry thermal oxidation in O 2. By analyzing changes in morphology and electrical properties, different oxidation mechanisms were identified, due to the crystalline quality difference of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N samples. In both cases, oxidation at 1000 °C was beneficial for the electrical characteristics of the MIS structures, presumably due to passivation of atom vacancies. Although <span class="hlt">Al</span>N was only partially oxidized, the flat-band voltage was reduced and the density of interface traps improved. Dominant conduction mechanism was Poole-Frenkel for the SPU sample, and changed to hopping after oxidation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Placidi, M.; Pérez-Tomás, A.; Moreno, J. C.; Frayssinet, E.; Semond, F.; Constant, A.; Godignon, P.; Mestres, N.; Crespi, A.; Millán, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">228</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5188197"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>/sub 2/O/sub 3/ adherence on CoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Adherence of protective oxides on NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> and CoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> superalloys has been promoted by a dispersion of a highly oxygen reactive element or its oxide being produced within the protection system. Two aspects of this subject are investigated here: the use of <span class="hlt">Al</span>/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as both the dispersion and protective oxide; and the production of an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion while simultaneously aluminizing the alloy. It was found that an <span class="hlt">Al</span>/sub 2/O/sub 3/ dispersion will act to promote the adherence of an external scale of <span class="hlt">Al</span>/sub 2/O/sub 3/ to a degree comparable to previously tested dispersions and an HfO/sub 2/ dispersion comparable to that produced by a Rhines pack treatment is produced during aluminization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kingsley, L.M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">229</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20100042390&hterms=water+metals+ICP-OES&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dwater%2Bmetals%2BICP-OES"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma plus beta (+<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) equals gamma'(+<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activities of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8 - 32 at.%<span class="hlt">Al</span> and temperature range T = 1400 - 1750 K in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) = gamma + beta (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1640 plus or minus 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 plus or minus 0.2 at.%<span class="hlt">Al</span> (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + beta + <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633 - 1640 K, and gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> forms via the peritectiod, gamma + beta (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) = gamma'(+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1633 plus or minus 1 K. This behavior is inconsistent with the current Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Copland, Evan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">230</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080047352&hterms=water+metals+ICP-OES&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dwater%2Bmetals%2BICP-OES"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> via the Peritectoid Reaction: gamma + beta (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)=gamma(sup prime)(+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The activities of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni were measured using multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8-32 at.%<span class="hlt">Al</span> and temperature range T=1400-1750 K in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O system. These measurements establish that equilibrium solidification of gamma(sup prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing alloys occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)=gamma + Beta(+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1640 +/- 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 +/- 0.2 at.%<span class="hlt">al</span> (at an unknown oxygen content). The {gamma + Beta (+<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633-1640 K, and gamma(sup prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> forms via the peritectoid, gamma + Beta (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)=gamma(sup prime) (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1633 +/- 1 K. This behavior is consistent with the current Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady-state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma(sup prime)-Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Copeland, Evan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">231</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53707116"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structural, morphological, and optical properties of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN\\/GaN heterostructures with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N buffer and interlayer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">AlxGa1-xN\\/GaN (x~0.3) heterostructures with and without a high-temperature (HT) <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer (IL) have been grown on sapphire (<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) substrates and <span class="hlt">Al</span>N buffer\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 templates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The effects of an <span class="hlt">Al</span>N buffer layer (BL) grown on an <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 substrate and an <span class="hlt">Al</span>N IL grown under the <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN ternary layer (TL) on structural, morphological, and optical properties of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Çörekçi; M. K. Öztürk; B. Akaoglu; M. Çakmak; S. Özçelik; E. Özbay</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">232</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19592064"> <span id="translatedtitle">The origin of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3)-rich and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-aggregate flocs composition in PACl coagulation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The composition of hydrolyzed <span class="hlt">Al</span> species is essential for the understanding of coagulation with <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based coagulants. Surface characteristics of flocs formed by coagulation with two distinct polyaluminum chloride (PACl) coagulants were identified. One commercial coagulant (PACl-C) with voluminous monomeric <span class="hlt">Al</span> and colloidal <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3) and a custom-made PACl (PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)) containing high <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) content were applied to destabilize kaolin particles. The flocs formed by PACl-C and PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) at neutral and alkaline pH ranges, respectively, were observed by FE-SEM and HR-TEM. In addition, the <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition of these flocs was characterized by XPS and HR-XRD, and the imaging of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3) precipitates and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) aggregates were conducted by SEM as well as tapping mode AFM in liquid system. The observations of flocs indicate that the morphology of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3)-rich flocs are fluffy and porous around the edge of flocs, while the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-aggregate flocs have a glossy contour and irregular structure. Both <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3)-rich and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-aggregate flocs do not possess well-formed crystalline structure except for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-like crystal exists in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-aggregate flocs. Among <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3) precipitates, colloidal <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3) is micro-scale in size, while amorphous <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3) is nano-scale. During the formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) aggregates, some coiled and clustered <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) aggregates with smoother surface were observed. The XPS study on floc surface showed that tetrahedral (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(IV)) /octahedral (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(VI)) <span class="hlt">Al</span> ratio on the surfaces of PACl-C and PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) flocs is 1:1.6 and 1:9.9, respectively. Of the in situ formed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13), almost half of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-hydroxide precipitates on the surface of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)(3)-rich flocs possess the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(IV) center. It also found that the irregularly aggregated <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) with a similar <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) crystalline structure subsists on the surface of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13)-aggregate flocs. PMID:19592064</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Jr-Lin; Huang, Chihpin; Chin, Ching-Ju M; Pan, Jill R</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">233</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18054033"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics on hydride vapor phase epitaxy of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N using <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3 and NH3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermodynamic analysis on hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N using <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3 and NH3 was performed. Regardless of the carrier gas used, partial pressures of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing gaseous species [<span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl2, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl and (<span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3)2] in equilibrium with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N are significantly low in the temperature range of 500-1500 °C when the input V\\/III ratio is above 1. This means that the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Kumagai; K. Takemoto; J. Kikuchi; T. Hasegawa; H. Murakami; A. Koukitu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">234</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013NIMPB.307..123Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">The modulation structure induced changes in mechanical properties of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers which had different separate layer thickness of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N or <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 were synthesized by sputtering Ti3<span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 targets with N2 and Ar gases. The influence of modulation periods and modulation ratios on structure and properties of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, surface profiler, and nanoindenter. Compared to Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N layer with only (2 0 0) preferred orientation, Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers were crystallized with orientations in the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N (1 1 1), Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N (2 2 2) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>N (1 0 0). Besides, weak <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 (0 2 2) orientation is observed, when modulation period is 8.9 nm. The maximum hardness about 36.6 GPa was obtained at modulation period of 10.4 nm and modulation ratio of 10:1. The hardness and the toughness of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers increase as individual Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N layer thickness increases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, J. Y.; Li, D. J.; Dong, L.; Gao, C. K.; Wang, N.; Deng, X. Y.; Gu, H. Q.; Wan, R. X.; Sun, X.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">235</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/23490503"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation of Volatile Organic Compounds on <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3, Pd\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3, and PdO\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3Catalysts</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and oxidation (TPO) were used to study the decomposition and oxidation of methanol, ethanol, acetaldehyde, formic acid, and acetic acid on <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, Pd\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, and PdO\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3catalysts. The oxidation and decomposition rates were much higher on Pd\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3than on <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, even though the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were adsorbed on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3support in both cases. The VOCs surface-diffused to Pd</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Eric M Cordi; John L Falconer</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">236</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52337531"> <span id="translatedtitle">Improved electrical properties in <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN\\/GaN heterostructures using <span class="hlt">Al</span>N\\/GaN superlattice as a quasi-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN barrier</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The authors report the electrical properties of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) in <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN\\/GaN heterostructures using <span class="hlt">Al</span>N\\/GaN superlattices working as a quasi-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN barrier layer. It is found that the electrical properties (2DEG mobility and sheet carrier density) in the quasi-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN\\/GaN heterostructure are greatly improved compared to those in the conventional alloy-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN\\/GaN one at the high <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition more than 0.35. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Kawakami; A. Nakajima; X. Q. Shen; G. Piao; M. Shimizu; H. Okumura</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">237</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41031993"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructure characterization in cryomilled <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5083</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nanocrystalline metals and alloys processed by severe plastic deformation (SPD) generally have improved mechanical strength compared with conventionally processed materials. In this work, we survey the microstructure of an <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5083 alloy prepared by ball-milling powders at cryogenic temperatures (cryomilling) then consolidated by hot-isostatic pressing (HIPing) and extrusion into cylindrical billets. After milling, the particles are comprised of nanocrystalline grains,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">G. Lucadamo; N. Y. C. Yang; C. San Marchi; E. J. Lavernia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">238</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=ADA247593"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mg-Si-<span class="hlt">Al</span> Oxynitride Glasses.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The glass-forming region at 1650 deg C was investigated for Mg-Si-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N compositions containing up to 20 equivalent % N (16 atomic %), and glass batches of up to 30 g were prepared and characterized. Glasses containing up to 8 atomic % N were grey colore...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. R. Messier R. P. Gleisner</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">239</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18484338"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">AL</span> amyloidosis manifesting as systemic lymphadenopathy.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report three patients with <span class="hlt">AL</span> amyloidosis manifesting as systemic lymphadenopathy, mainly in the cervical and supraclavicular regions. Histopathology of lymph nodes showed massive deposition of <span class="hlt">AL</span> amyloid with no abnormal findings suggestive of lymphoproliferative disorders. Two of the patients were considered to be classifiable as primary systemic <span class="hlt">AL</span> amyloidosis based on the presence of M-protein in serum and abnormal plasma cells or lymphoplasmacytoid cells in the bone marrow probably producing the precursor immunoglobulin, although no visceral organs were affected. The size of the involved lymph nodes in these two patients increased gradually, and one was treated with rituximab and VAD (vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone) followed by high-dose melphalan with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (auto-PBSCT). The remaining patient showed no obvious change in the size of lymph nodes or detectable M-protein in serum. The prognosis of <span class="hlt">AL</span> amyloidosis manifesting as lymphadenopathy is usually good as long as there are no hematological malignancies or rapid increases in the size of lymph nodes, but in cases of the systemic type, intensive chemotherapy, such as high-dose melphalan with auto-PBSCT, should be actively considered in order to avoid possible involvement of visceral organs. PMID:18484338</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Matsuda, Masayuki; Gono, Takahisa; Shimojima, Yasuhiro; Yoshida, Takuhiro; Katoh, Nagaaki; Hoshii, Yoshinobu; Yamada, Toshiyuki; Ikeda, Shu-ichi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">240</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2813314"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinematics of Disease Progression in Bulbar <span class="hlt">ALS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to investigate the deterioration of lip and jaw movements during speech longitudinally in three individuals diagnosed with bulbar Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>). The study was motivated by the need to understand the relationship between physiologic changes in speech movements and clinical measures of speech performance such as speaking rate and speech intelligibility. Movements of the lip and jaw were quantified with respect to their size (i.e., path distance measure), speed, and duration. The data revealed several changes in lip and jaw movement that coincided with <span class="hlt">ALS</span> progression. In two out of three speakers, the changes in measures of path distance and speed anticipated the drop in speech intelligibility by approximately 3 months. With disease progression, increases in movement duration coincided with declines in speech intelligibility. Overall, the movement measures appeared to be sensitive to disease progression in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. Learning outcomes By the end of the manuscript, the reader should be able to: (1) describe the changes that occur in articulatory movements of the jaw and lower lip in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>; (2) understand the relationship between physiologic measures of movement and speech intelligibility and speaking rate; (3) identify critical points in the disease progression and understand which quantitative measures reveal the state of the bulbar system at these time points.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan; Lindstrom, Mary; Ball, Laura; Pattee, Gary; Zinman, Lorne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img 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showDiv("page_19");' href="#">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">241</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991SSCom..77..403S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Elastically isotropic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu quasicrystal</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Angular dependence of Rayleigh wave velocity has been measured in single grain quasi-crystals of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu using a continuous wave scanning acoustic microscope. The observed variation is quite small. This indicates the elastically isotropic nature of quasi-crystals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sathish, S.; Kulik, A.; Gremaud, G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">242</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/doepatents/biblio/869994"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ternary Dy-Er-<span class="hlt">Al</span> magnetic refrigerants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A ternary magnetic refrigerant material comprising (Dy.sub.1-x Er.sub.x)<span class="hlt">Al</span>.sub.2 for a magnetic refrigerator using the Joule-Brayton thermodynamic cycle spanning a temperature range from about 60K to about 10K, which can be adjusted by changing the Dy to Er ratio of the refrigerant.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gschneidner, Jr., Karl A. (Ames, IA); Takeya, Hiroyuki (Ibaraki, JP)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-07-25</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">243</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22495%22&pg=6&id=EJ734728"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correction to Rothermund et <span class="hlt">al</span>. (2005)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This article reports an error in the article "Retrieval of Incidental Stimulus-Response Associations as a Source of Negative Priming" by Rothermund et <span class="hlt">al</span>. ("Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition," Vol 31(3) May 2005, 482-495). Table 1 (p. 484) was incorrectly typeset. The correct layout is provided. (The following…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rothermund, Klaus; Wentura, Dirk; De Houwer, Jan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">244</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41315105"> <span id="translatedtitle">Bulk nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span> prepared by cryomilling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bulk nanocrystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span> was fabricated by mechanically milling at cryogenic temperature (cryomilling) and then by hot pressing in vacuum. By using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the microstructure evolution of the material during cryomilling and consolidation was investigated. With increasing the milling time, the grain size decreased sharply and reduced to 42 nm</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cheng Junsheng; Cui Hua; Chen Hanbin; Yang Bin; Fan Jianzhong; Zhang Jishan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">245</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47949245"> <span id="translatedtitle">Megatrends <span class="hlt">als</span> Treiber der Zukunftssicherung des Controllings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">\\u000a Es besteht Einigkeit in Theorie und Praxis, das Controlling <span class="hlt">als</span> eine Führungsunterstützungsfunktion anzusehen. Sie besteht\\u000a darin, die Führung bei der Wahrnehmung ihrer Steuerungsaufgaben mit einem koordinierten System von Planung und Kontrolle sowie\\u000a Informationsversorgung zu unterstützen. Im Fokus der Unterstützung stehen Ziele und Strategien der Organisation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Péter Horváth; Johannes Isensee; Mischa Seiter</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">246</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/58665475"> <span id="translatedtitle">En torno <span class="hlt">al</span> Siglo de los Niños</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Willen KOOPS ; Michael ZUCKERMAN (eds.). Beyond the Century of the Child : cultural history and developmental psychology. Denyse BAILLARGEON. Un Québec en mal d´enfants. La médicalisation de la maternité, 1910-1970. Enrique PERDIGUERO (comp.). Salvad <span class="hlt">al</span> niño. Estudios sobre la protección\\u000aa la infancia en la Europa mediterránea a comienzos del siglo XX.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rosa Ballester Añón</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">247</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Amyotrophic+AND+Lateral+AND+Sclerosis&id=EJ869605"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinematics of Disease Progression in Bulbar <span class="hlt">ALS</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of this study was to investigate the deterioration of lip and jaw movements during speech longitudinally in three individuals diagnosed with bulbar amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>). The study was motivated by the need to understand the relationship between physiologic changes in speech movements and clinical measures of speech…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Ball, Laura J.; Pattee, Gary L.; Zinman, Lorne</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">248</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006PSSBR.243.1431K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics on hydride vapor phase epitaxy of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N using <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3 and NH3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A thermodynamic analysis on hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N using <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3 and NH3 was performed. Regardless of the carrier gas used, partial pressures of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing gaseous species [<span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl2, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl and (<span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3)2] in equilibrium with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N are significantly low in the temperature range of 500-1500 °C when the input V/III ratio is above 1. This means that the driving force for <span class="hlt">Al</span>N growth (?PAl) becomes almost equal to the input partial pressure of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3, which is quite different from HVPE of GaN. The good agreement between the calculated and experimental growth rates shows that HVPE of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N is thermodynamically controlled.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kumagai, Y.; Takemoto, K.; Kikuchi, J.; Hasegawa, T.; Murakami, H.; Koukitu, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">249</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040028027&hterms=Alstom&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DAlstom"> <span id="translatedtitle">Durability Assessment of Gamma Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Gamma Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> was evaluated as a candidate alloy for low-pressure turbine blades in aeroengines. The durability of g-Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> was studied by examining the effects of impact or fretting on its fatigue strength. Cast-to-size Ti-48<span class="hlt">Al</span>-2Cr-2Nb was studied in impact testing with different size projectiles at various impact energies as the reference alloy and subsequently fatigue tested. Impacting degraded the residual fatigue life. However, under the ballistic impact conditions studied, it was concluded that the impacts expected in an aeroengine would not result in catastrophic damage, nor would the damage be severe enough to result in a fatigue failure under the anticipated design loads. In addition, other gamma alloys were investigated including another cast-to-size alloy, several cast and machined specimens, and a forged alloy. Within this Ti-48-2-2 family of alloys aluminum content was also varied. The cracking patterns as a result of impacting were documented and correlated with impact variables. The cracking type and severity was reasonably predicted using finite element models. Mean stress affects were also studied on impact-damaged fatigue samples. The fatigue strength was accurately predicted based on the flaw size using a threshold-based, fracture mechanics approach. To study the effects of wear due to potential applications in a blade-disk dovetail arrangement, the machined Ti-47-2-2 alloy was fretted against In-718 using pin-on-disk experiments. Wear mechanisms were documented and compared to those of Ti-6<span class="hlt">Al</span>-4V. A few fatigue samples were also fretted and subsequently fatigue tested. It was found that under the conditions studied, the fretting was not severe enough to affect the fatigue strength of g-Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Draper, Susan L.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Pereira, J. Michael; Miyoshi, Kazuhisa; Arya, Vinod K.; Zhuang, Wyman</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">250</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24704984"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fate of hydrolyzed <span class="hlt">Al</span> species in humic acid coagulation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The hydrolysis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based coagulants in acidic conditions is necessary for the removal of organic matter by the coagulation/sedimentation process. However, interactions between hydrolyzed <span class="hlt">Al</span> species and organic matter are complicated and this makes it difficult to optimize coagulant dosing for organics removal. The goal of this study was to investigate the reactions of hydrolyzed <span class="hlt">Al</span> species in the coagulation of organic matter. Two polyaluminum chloride (PACl) coagulants, a commercial product with sulfate (PACl-C) and lab-prepared material (PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13) containing 7% and 96% of total <span class="hlt">Al</span> as <span class="hlt">Al</span>13, respectively, have been applied to investigate the coagulation of humic acid (HA). At pH 6, a lower dosage of PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 than of PACl-C was required for optimized HA removal through coagulation/sedimentation due to the strong complexation and charge neutralization by <span class="hlt">Al</span>13. Observation of the coagulation process using wet scanning electron microscopy showed that PACl-C produced both clustered flocs and linear precipitates in the presence of sulfate while PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 produced curled precipitates due to the formation of intermolecular complex, when both coagulants were added at the optimum doses. Investigation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-HA floc by (27)<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NMR and <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2p XPS suggested that monomeric <span class="hlt">Al</span> (Alm) was hydrolyzed into <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)3 with tetrahedron for PACl-C coagulation while a half of <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 slowly decomposed into octahedral <span class="hlt">Al</span>-HA precipitates for PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 coagulation. Meanwhile, C ls XPS indicated that aromatic CC of HA was preferentially removed from solution to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-HA flocs for both PACl-C and PACl-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 coagulation. It was concluded that <span class="hlt">Al</span>-HA complexation strongly affects the reaction pathways for <span class="hlt">Al</span> hydrolysis and the final nature of the precipitates during PACl coagulation of HA and that the hydrolysis products are also strongly affected by the characteristics of the PACl coagulant. PMID:24704984</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Jr-Lin; Huang, Chihpin; Dempsey, Brian; Hu, Jing-Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">251</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1000697"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure of vapor-phase deposited <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ge thin films and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ge intermediate layer bonding of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based microchannel structures.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-based high-aspect-ratio microscale structures (HARMS) are basic building blocks for all-<span class="hlt">Al</span> microdevices. Bonding of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based HARMS is essential for device assembly. In this paper, bonding of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based HARMS to flat <span class="hlt">Al</span> plates using <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ge thin film intermediate layers is investigated. The structure of sputter codeposited <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ge thin films was studied by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy as a function of the average film composition. The structure of the interface region between <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based HARMS bonded to flat <span class="hlt">Al</span> plates is studied by combining focused ion beam sectioning and scanning electron microscopy. An extended bonding interface region, {approx}100 {micro}m in width, is observed and suggested to result from liquidus/solidus reactions as well as diffusion of Ge in solid <span class="hlt">Al</span> at the bonding temperature of 500 C. The extended interface region is suggested to be beneficial to <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> bonding via <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ge intermediate layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mei, F. H.; Meng, W. J.; Hiller, J.; Miller, D. J.; Materials Science Division; Louisana State Univ.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">252</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992PhRvL..68.2188N"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calculation of the structure of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(331) stepped surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Car-Parinello-like calculations have been used to compute the relaxation of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(331) surface, with results that are in remarkable agreement with the low-energy electron-diffraction analysis of Adams and Sorenson. Rapid screening of the steps on <span class="hlt">Al</span>(331) is illustrated by comparing its charge density and relaxations to those of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(110) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(111).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nelson, J. S.; Feibelman, Peter J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">253</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22self-construal%22&pg=2&id=EJ666015"> <span id="translatedtitle">When Validity Testing Lacks Validity: Comment on Levine et <span class="hlt">al</span>.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Addresses each of the three main areas of Levine et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> (see this issue, CS 764 297) validity testing: mean differences in self-construals between Asians and Westerners and within individuals; priming experiments; and factor analysis of self-construal scales. Suggests that Levine et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> conclusions on crucial aspects of validity are untenable.…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, Min-Sun; Raja, Narayan S.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">254</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23924708"> <span id="translatedtitle">High-performance nonvolatile <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>O(x)/CdTe:Sb nanowire memory device.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Here we demonstrate a room temperature processed nonvolatile memory device based on an <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>O(x)/CdTe:Sb nanowire (NW) heterojunction. Electrical analysis shows an echelon hysteresis composed of a high-resistance state (HRS) and a low-resistance state (LRS), which can allow it to write and erase data from the device. The conductance ratio is as high as 10?, with a retention time of 3 × 10? s. Moreover, the SET voltages ranged from +6 to +8 V, whilst the RESET voltage ?0 V. In addition, flexible memory nano-devices on PET substrate with comparable switching performance at bending condition were fabricated. XPS analysis of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>O(x)/CdTe:Sb NW heterojunction after controlled Ar? bombardment reveals that this memory behavior is associated with the presence of ultra-thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>O(x) film. This <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>O(x)/CdTe:Sb NW heterojunction will open up opportunities for new memory devices with different configurations. PMID:23924708</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xie, Chao; Nie, Biao; Zhu, Long; Zeng, Long-Hui; Yu, Yong-Qiang; Wang, Xian-He; Fang, Qun-Ling; Luo, Lin-Bao; Wu, Yu-Cheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">255</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/896194"> <span id="translatedtitle">Abrasive wear behavior of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>-TiB2 composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Abrasive wear of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> with 10, 20, and 40 vol.% TiB2 has been investigated using particles of different types and sizes. The addition of TiB2 as a particulate reinforcement to Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> increases the hardness of the composite with respect to Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>, and reduces the wear rate at all volume fractions on garnet and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 abrasives. Abrasion on SiC resulted in a minimum of the wear rate for the composite with 20% TiB2for most conditions. The composite with 40% TiB2consistently exhibited wear rates higher than the other composites when abraded on SiC. The only instance when the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>?40% TiB2 composite had a lower wear rate was when it was abraded on 16 and 37 mm SiC particles. The Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>?TiB2 composite serves as a model system for studying the effect of reinforcement volume fraction on composite wear behavior and is discussed in terms of a composite wear model developed by Axe?n and Jacobson. q1999 Published by Elsevier Science S.A. All rights reserved.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Alman, David E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">256</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MAR.G5002Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metastable <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich phases in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sm system: A genetic-algorithm study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Metallic glasses formed by <span class="hlt">Al</span> and about 10% rare earths such as Sm are important high-strength-low-density materials. Various metastable crystalline phases are formed in the early stages of the devitrification of <span class="hlt">Al</span>90Sm10 glasses. Identification of these phases is crucial to understand the phase selection during amorphization and devitrification processes, and thus provides critical information for the control of microstructures in order to obtain desired mechanical properties. In this study, we use a genetic algorithm to systematically study the low energy <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich phases of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sm system. We discovered a new <span class="hlt">Al</span>5Sm phase that matches excellently with the experimentally detected M1 phase in lattice parameters as well as diffraction patterns. In addition, we established the energy landscape as a function of <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich side of the phase diagram, and found key geometries of Sm-centered local clusters which could serve as building blocks for other metastable phases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Feng; Ye, Zhuo; McBreaty, Ian; Mendelev, Mikhail; Ott, Ryan; Park, Eun Soo; Kramer, Matt; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">257</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1251..300A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Precipitation mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substituted tobermorite using hydrothermal reaction</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We examined the addition of different crystal phases of alumina (?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) to slurries consisting of quartz and slaked lime for synthesis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substituted tobermorite. XRD results showed that <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substituted tobermorite formed after the reaction. It was clear that two kinds of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substituted tobermorite synthesized using different alumina crystal phases shows different morphologies. The difference in the reactivity of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 had an influence in the hydrothermal reaction environment. The coordination number and chemical bonding-state of <span class="hlt">Al</span> caused the different morphology of the tobermorite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abe, Kazuki; Maeda, Hirotaka; Ishida, Emile H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">258</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40111735"> <span id="translatedtitle">Correlation of microstructure and high temperature oxidation resistance of plasma sprayed NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>, NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y, and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>O composite coatings on Ti?6<span class="hlt">Al</span>?4V</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the present study Ni?18Cr?6<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Ni?22Cr?10<span class="hlt">Al</span>?1Y and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>O composite powders were coated on Ti?6<span class="hlt">Al</span>?4V substrates by atmospheric\\u000a plasma spraying, and the coated specimens were evaluated by isothermal and cyclic oxidation resistance tests at 800°C. The\\u000a oxidation kinetics of the plasma sprayed NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>, NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y, and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>O composite coated specimens obey a parabolic rate law.\\u000a The oxidation resistance of the plasma sprayed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Byung-Young Choi; Jing Liang; Wei Gao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">259</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40939554"> <span id="translatedtitle">Crystallization of Mg–<span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-based metallic liquids under ultra-high gravity</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present results from high-temperature centrifugal processing, which is a new method to detect the sequence of crystallization and to physically isolate eutectic compositions in multi-component alloys. Alloys of composition Mg50<span class="hlt">Al</span>30Y6Li7Cu7, Mg50<span class="hlt">Al</span>30Y6Li7Cu7, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>52.6Cu13.4Ge28Si6 were processed for 2 h in a centrifuge above their melting point at an inertial acceleration of 60,000 g (g=gravitational acceleration) and then slowly cooled to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jörg F Löffler; William L Johnson</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">260</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19870044771&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adherent <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scales formed on undoped NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Changes in the spalling behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scales formed on an undoped NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy are described. Two samples of Ni-15Cr-13<span class="hlt">Al</span> (wt pct), one a control and the other sanded, were subjected to 25 oxidation cycles. It is observed that adherent scales formed on the sanded sample; however, the control sample had speckled, spalled scales. The data reveal that the adherent scales are caused by repeated removal of surface layers after each oxidation cycle. It is determined that interfacial segregation of sulfur influences spallation and sulfur removal increases bonding. The effect of moisture on scale adhesions is investigated.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smialek, James L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">261</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18838240"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced microwave absorption properties of Fe3<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 fine particle composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Fe3<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 composites were prepared by mechanochemical synthesis using a mixture of Fe2O3, <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe as the starting material. Microwave characteristics were measured in the range 0.1-18 GHz. A reflection loss (RL) exceeding -20 dB in the frequency range 7.2-17.4 GHz was achieved for an absorber of 1.5-2.5 mm. An optimal RL of -45 dB was obtained at 8.9 GHz</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jianqiang Wei; Jianbo Wang; Qingfang Liu; Liang Qiao; Tao Wang; Fashen Li</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">262</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17888935"> <span id="translatedtitle">Relative importance of hydrolyzed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(III) species (<span class="hlt">Al</span>(a), <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b), and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c)) during coagulation with polyaluminum chloride: a case study with the typical micro-polluted source waters.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The relative importance of three different <span class="hlt">Al</span> species, <span class="hlt">Al</span>(a) (monomeric species, instantaneous reacted species), <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b) (medium polymer species, reacted less than 120 min), and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c) (colloidal or solid species, no reaction), defined by timed complexation reaction rate measured by using ferron reagent in polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was investigated in terms of DOC (dissolved organic carbon), UV(254), and turbidity removal efficiencies. Micro-polluted, typical North China, source waters were used to conduct the experiments. The results show that DOC removal is correlated well to the content of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b). Removal of UV(254) is determined by the content of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c), particularly <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c). Turbidity removal is primarily related to the content of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c); however, <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b) could destabilize particles efficiently, and the flocs formed by <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b) are not as large as those formed by <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c), which affected the settling efficiency. Unlike the preformed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b), the in situ formed <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b) could remove turbidity more efficiently since <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c) is the dominant final species formed during coagulation. <span class="hlt">Al</span>(a) shows a strong ability to react with some unsatisfied coordinate bonds of organic matter to facilitate particle and DOC removal. The distinct coagulation feature of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(a), <span class="hlt">Al</span>(b), and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(c) can be applied to develop tailor-made PACl (with the correct distribution of <span class="hlt">Al</span> species) to match the characteristics of raw water for optimized coagulation. PMID:17888935</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui; He, Wenjie; Chow, Christopher W K</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-12-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">263</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/13165732"> <span id="translatedtitle">THERMODYNAMIC MODELLING OF THE Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ca SYSTEM</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the ternary Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ca phase diagram was constructed by combining the three constituent binary systems of Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ca and Mg-Ca. The Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> system is taken from COST 507 database. The thermodynamic descriptions of the Mg-Ca and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ca systems are obtained by modelling the Gibbs energy of all phases as a function of composition and temperature. The model parameters</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">F. ISLAM; M. MEDRAJ</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">264</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40850839"> <span id="translatedtitle">26<span class="hlt">Al</span>– 26Mg and 207Pb– 206Pb systematics of Allende CAIs: Canonical solar initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>\\/ 27<span class="hlt">Al</span> ratio reinstated</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The precise knowledge of the initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>\\/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> ratio [(26<span class="hlt">Al</span>\\/27<span class="hlt">Al</span>)0] is crucial if we are to use the very first solid objects formed in our Solar System, calcium–aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) as the “time zero” age-anchor and guide future work with other short-lived radio-chronometers in the early Solar System, as well as determining the inventory of heat budgets from radioactivities for early</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Benjamin Jacobsen; Qing-Zhu Yin; Frederic Moynier; Yuri Amelin; Alexander N. Krot; Kazuhide Nagashima; Ian D. Hutcheon; Herbert Palme</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">265</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24045848"> <span id="translatedtitle">Controlled step-wise isomerization of the Keggin-type <span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) and determination of the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>(13) structure.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Partial hydrolysis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cl3 with Ca(OH)2 and the amino acid glycine enables the selective transformation of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin structures, outlining the ? ? ? ? ? isomerization process. Through this, a new ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>13 Keggin structure was able to be isolated and characterized through (27)<span class="hlt">Al</span> NMR and single-crystal XRD. PMID:24045848</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smart, Scott E; Vaughn, John; Pappas, Iraklis; Pan, Long</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">266</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=AD786938"> <span id="translatedtitle">Liquidus-Solidus Determinations in the System Mg<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 - <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The high-temperature portion of the system Mg<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 has been reinvestigated using a graphite resistance furnace under Ar. The melting points of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 and Mg<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 were measured to be 2045 and 2085C respectively. A 'divorced eutectic microstructure' wa...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. J. Viechnicki F. Schmid J. W. McCauley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1973-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">267</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JKPS...63.1625J"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and characterization of a high-quality <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.45Ga0.55N layer with <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N superlattices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the growth and characterization of a Si-doped, n-type <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layer with 45% <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition. For the application of n-type <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layers with high <span class="hlt">Al</span> compositions in ultraviolet emitters, we fabricated an n-<span class="hlt">Al</span>0.45Ga0.55N layer with high crystalline quality and high electrical conductivity by inserting <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.85Ga0.15N/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N superlattices (SLs) to prevent cracks prior to growing the n-type <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layer. The dislocation density in the n-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layer with a 45% <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition and SLs was less than 2.4 × 1010 cm-2, which was lower than the dislocation density of 5.3 × 1010 cm-2 for the n-<span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layer without SLs. The resistivity, mobility, and free-electron concentration in the n-type <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.45Ga0.55N layer with SLs were 2.2 × 10-2 ?·cm, 55.0 cm2/V-s, and 5.0 × 1018 cm-3 at room temperature, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jeon, Seong-Ran; Park, Si-Hyun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">268</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992JCrGr.118..314T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Analytical investigations of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 and ??-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Crystals of the solid electrolytes Na +-?-alumina and Na +-??-alumina have been synthesized by high temperature solution growth in Na 2O rich fluxes between 1600 and 1700°C. Chemical analysis revealed varying compositions due to a solid solution for both materials. The mean compositions (Na 1.62<span class="hlt">Al</span> 11O 17.31 for Na +-?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 and Na 1.41Mg 0.62<span class="hlt">Al</span> 10.45O 17 for Na +-??-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3) determined by electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) indicate untypical sodium contents for these compounds than described usually. For the analytical measurements certain conditions have to be observed because of the high sodium mobility in these materials.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tietz, F.; Koepke, J.; Urland, W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">269</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17654976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis and characterization of <span class="hlt">Al-Zn/Al</span>2O3 nano-powder composites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Composites consisting of <span class="hlt">Al-Zn/Al</span>2O3 have been synthesized using high energy mechanical milling. High energy ball milling increases the sintering rate of the composite powder due to increased diffusion rate. Owing to the finer microstructure, the hardness of the sintered composite produced by using the mechanically milled nanocomposite powder is significantly higher than that of the sintered composite produced by using the as-mixed powder. The mean crystallite size of the matrix has been determined to be 27 nm by Scherrer equation using X-ray diffraction data. The powders have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The effect of high-energy ball milling and subsequent annealing on a mixture of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and ZnO has also been investigated. DTA result show that the reaction temperature of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-ZnO decreases with the increase in the ball milling time. PMID:17654976</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Durai, T G; Das, Karabi; Das, Siddhartha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">270</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991MTA....22.2837C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calculation of phase diagrams and solidification paths of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Thermodynamic models for the various phases in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich corner of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Cu system were developed on the basis of the phase equilibrium and limited thermodynamic data available in the literature and the thermodynamic descriptions of the three consitituent binary systems, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu, and Cu-Li. The calculated isothermal section at several temperatures and the liquidus projection are in ageement with the experimental determinations. Combining the thermodynamic models and the Scheil model or the modified Scheil model to incllude solidstate back-diffusion, quantitative solidification paths were predited. The calculated amount of the primary phase formed during solidification was compared with those obtained experimentally.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Sinn-Wen; Chuang, Ying-Yu; Austin Chang, Y.; Chu, Men G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">271</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930070119&hterms=FGM&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DFGM"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fabrication and properties of functionally graded Ni<span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A modified sedimentation process was used in the production of a functionally gradient material (FGM), Ni<span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3. A simple finite element model was used to guide our design and fabrication efforts by estimating residual stress states as a function of composite structure. This approach could lead to tailored designs that enhance or avoid specific residual stress states. Thermal cycling tests were factored into the model to predict time dependent or steady-state internal temperature and stress profiles. Four-point bend tests were conducted to establish the mechanical load-displacement behavior of a single interlayer FGM at room temperature, 800 and 1000 K. Room temperature bend strength of the FGM was 3-4 times that of the base Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>. At elevated temperatures, composite fracture occurred in a gradual, noncatastrophic mode involving Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> retardation of a succession of cracks originating in the alumina face.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, D. P.; Lannutti, J. J.; Noebe, R. D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">272</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JAP...114u3506M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy localization on the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice of Pt3<span class="hlt">Al</span> with L12 order</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A three-dimensional molecular-dynamics model of Pt3<span class="hlt">Al</span> with L1 order was developed and found to support the excitation of discrete breathers (DBs) and energy localization on the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice. For an initial lattice temperature of 0 K, large-amplitude DBs polarized along [100] are found to be very weakly damped, retaining most of their initial energy for more than 1000 cycles, while DBs polarized along [111] damped out over ˜15 cycles. Because the DBs and their dissipation channels are confined to the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice, long-lived nonequilibrium states with large energy differences between the <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Pt sublattices occur. Since collisions during irradiation more efficiently generate lattice vibrations in light atoms than heavy atoms, such nonequilibrium states may occur and alter the relaxation processes occurring during radiation damage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Medvedev, N. N.; Starostenkov, M. D.; Manley, M. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">273</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880043042&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Adherent <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scales produced on undoped NiCr<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Repeated oxidation and polishing of high purity Ni-15Cr-13<span class="hlt">Al</span> has dramatically changed its cyclic oxidation behavior from nonadherent to adherent. No apparent change in scale phase, morphology or interface structure occurred during this transition, dismissing any mechanism based on pegging, vacancy sink, or growth stress. The principle change that did occur was a reduction in the sulfur content from 10 ppmw to 3 ppmw after 25 cycles at 1120 C. These observations are used to support the model of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale adherence put forth by Smeggil et <span class="hlt">al</span>. which claims that <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale spallation occurs due to sulfur segregation and bond deterioration at the oxide-metal interface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smialek, James L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">274</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAP...111h3505Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">First-principles study of shear behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>, TiN, and coherent <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN interfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this ab initio work, density functional theory was used to calculate the ideal shear strengths of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span>, pure TiN, the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN interfacial region, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN multilayers. The ideal shear strength of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN interface was found to vary from very low (on the order of the ideal shear strength of <span class="hlt">Al</span>) to very high (on the order of the ideal shear strength of TiN), depending on whether the TiN at the interface was Ti- or N-terminated, respectively. The results suggest that the shear properties of <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN depend strongly on the chemistry of the interface, <span class="hlt">Al</span>:N versus <span class="hlt">Al</span>:Ti terminations. Nevertheless, for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiN multilayers, the ideal shear strength was limited by shear in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> layer away from the interface, even when the individual layer thickness is less than a nanometer.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yadav, S. K.; Ramprasad, R.; Misra, A.; Liu, X.-Y.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">275</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40067366"> <span id="translatedtitle">Defect Band Characteristics in Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si High-Pressure Die Castings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Bands of positive macrosegregation and porosity commonly follow the surface contour of components produced by high-pressure\\u000a die casting (HPDC). In this article, <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy <span class="hlt">Al</span>Si7Mg and Mg alloys AZ91 and AM60 were cast into tensile test bars using cold-chamber\\u000a (cc) HPDC. Microstructural characterization revealed that externally solidified crystals (ESCs) are not necessary for defect\\u000a band formation, and that defect bands</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. M. Gourlay; H. I. Laukli; A. K. Dahle</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">276</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53702460"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tribological properties of thermally sprayed Ti<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 composite coating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed wear resistant Ti<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting. A feedstock of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Salman; B. Gabbitas; J. Li; D. Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">277</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11207932"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transmission electron microscopy studies of squeeze cast <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N composites.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aluminium-matrix composites containing approximately 45 vol.% <span class="hlt">Al</span>N particles were fabricated by melt infiltration of aluminium into an <span class="hlt">Al</span>N preform under a pressure up to 130 MPa. Three types of aluminium alloy (2024, 6060 and 5754) were used. The as-prepared composites were studied by light microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopies, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. As a result of the melt infiltration process, the composites are very dense and the microstructure shows a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement. The interfaces are clean with very little porosity. Composites with 2024 and 6060 matrices were carefully studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) after heat treatments. Dislocation density in the matrix of the reinforced material increases due to the difference in thermal expansion coefficients of aluminium alloys and <span class="hlt">Al</span>N. This can induce an accelerated ageing response of the coherent and semicoherent precipitations of age-hardened matrices. This behaviour has been studied in the 2024 and 6060 composites by using microhardness measurements and TEM. Reactions between the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N reinforcement and aluminium matrices (6060 and 5754) were observed and analysed by TEM. Matrices containing some of magnesium display a Mg<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 spinel formation at the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/matrix interface. The spinel formation is probably due to the reaction between magnesium of the matrix and the thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layer on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N surfaces. This reaction can affect the mechanical behaviour of the composite infiltrated with the 5754 matrix. This has been confirmed by overageing some samples at high temperatures (300 degrees C and 550 degrees C) for 10 days in order to emphasize the interfacial reactions. PMID:11207932</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chédru, M.; Vicens, J.; Chermant, J. L.; Mordike, B. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">278</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/18636005"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tribological Properties of Ti(<span class="hlt">Al,O)\\/Al</span>2O3 Composite Coating by Thermal Spraying</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity air fuel (HVAF) thermally sprayed wear resistant Ti(<span class="hlt">Al,O)\\/Al</span>2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting and dummy blocks</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Asma Salman; Brian Gabbitas; Peng Cao; Deliang Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">279</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39872746"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanical properties of an <span class="hlt">Al\\/Mg\\/Al</span> trilaminated composite fabricated by hot rolling</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">Al\\/Mg\\/Al</span> composite with a trilaminate structure was fabricated by hot rolling and its mechanical properties at quasi-static\\u000a rates of strain were investigated. The bonding strength of the trilaminated composite is about 40 MPa, mainly attributing\\u000a to the mechanical bond at the interfaces. The first layer failure strength of the laminated composite increases from 305 to\\u000a 372 MPa when the relative thickness</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">X. P. ZhangT; T. H. Yang; J. Q. Liu; X. F. Luo; J. T. Wang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">280</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/59027217"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental studies on the ignition of single Ni\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Fe\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span>, and Ti particles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The work presented here focuses on the ignition of single Ni- and Fe-coated <span class="hlt">Al</span> particles in pure CO2 and Ar atmospheres and Ti particles in O2\\/N2 and O2\\/Ar environments. The importance of studying Ni- and Fe-coated <span class="hlt">Al</span> particles is related to their potential use in propulsion and materials synthesis applications. Meanwhile, Ti combustion may be utilized to eliminate hazardous chemical</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Timothy Al Andrzejak</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return 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class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_6");' href="#">6</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_7");' href="#">7</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_8");' href="#">8</a> <a onClick='return 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title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">281</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.materialsaustralia.com.au/lib/pdf/materials_forum/volume28/gp%2037.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Corrosion Behavior of Twin-Roll Cast <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg-Si Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span>Mg and <span class="hlt">Al</span>MgSi alloys are used for automotive applications, where a good corrosion resistance is required. Recently, there has been a growing interest in using strip casting as a method to produce low-cost aluminum sheet for automotive applications. The present work was undertaken to investigate the corrosion behavior of twin-roll cast AA5754 and AA6016 sheet for panel applications, on the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Feriha Birol; Yucel Birol</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">282</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/h5rt75086kk12560.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">laser cladding of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> bronze on <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy AA333</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study investigates the effects of laser-processing parameters, such as laser power, traverse speed, powder-feed\\u000a rate, and flow rate and species of assisting gas, and material prop-erties, such as substrate surface condition, on laser\\u000a cladding of Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> bronze on <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy AA333. The proper processing parameters were determined experimentally and are discussed\\u000a in terms of their effects on laser-clad</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Y. Liu; J. Mazumder; K. Shibata</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">283</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40067308"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strain Rates and Grain Growth in <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5754 and <span class="hlt">Al</span> 6061 Friction Stir Spot Welds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The stir zone temperature and microstructures are compared in friction stir spot welds produced in <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5754 and <span class="hlt">Al</span> 6061 alloys.\\u000a Electron backscattered diffraction was used to determine the relationship between tool rotation speed during welding and final\\u000a stir zone grain size. Comparison of the grain sizes in rapidly quenched welds with those in air-cooled joints confirmed that\\u000a grain growth</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Gerlich; M. Yamamoto; T. H. North</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">284</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46495732"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of shape variations on the structure of directionally solidified <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span> 3 Ni composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect on structure of some of the possible changes in shape of directionally solidified <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>3Ni eutectic composites has been studied for two growth conditions. The shape changes investigated included both contraction\\u000a and divergence in cross-section of the grown part, as well as 90 deg bends in the center-line of the composites. The experimental\\u000a results showed that contractions in the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mahmoud M. Farag; Merton C. Flemings</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1976-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">285</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53259801"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of sputtered Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>B</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The magnetic properties and high frequency characteristics of sputtered Fe81<span class="hlt">Al</span>19 and Fe81<span class="hlt">Al</span>10B9 thin films have been investigated. The above two thin films were sputtered at different oblique deposition angles in order to induce magnetic anisotropy in the film. The saturation magnetization of the films is easily above 12 kG, while the coercivity and the magnetic anisotropy field of the films</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. C. Hsieh; M. Y. Jian; H. W. Chang; X. G. Zhao; W. C. Chang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">286</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6537542"> <span id="translatedtitle">Reliable <span class="hlt">AlInGaAs/Al</span>GaAs strained-layer diode lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A semiconducting diode laser is described comprising: a GaAs substrate; and an <span class="hlt">Al</span>InGaAs alloy active layer positioned between <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaAs confining layers; said active layer and said confining layers further positioned between GaAs contact layers so as to form a contact/confining/active/confining/contact multilayer structure, said multilayer structure secured to the substrate through one of the contact layers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, C.A.; Walpole, J.N.; Hong K. Choi; Donnelly, J.P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">287</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/60069634"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetic energy distributions of sputtered neutral aluminum clusters: <span class="hlt">Al--Al</span>[sub 6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neutral aluminum clusters sputtered from polycrystalline aluminum were analyzed by laser postionization time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The kinetic energy distributions of <span class="hlt">Al</span> through <span class="hlt">Al</span>[sub 6] were measured by a neutrals time-of-flight technique. The interpretation of laser postionization TOF data to extract velocity and energy distributions is presented. The aluminum cluster distributions are qualitatively similar to previous copper cluster distribution measurements</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. R. Coon; W. F. Calaway; M. J. Pellin; G. A. Curlee; J. M. White</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">288</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/46501058"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solution kinetics of Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2 in an <span class="hlt">Al</span>4Cu alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The results of a recently-developed, spherical, finite geometry, mathematical model using numerical methods are compared to\\u000a existing closed-form models. The geometry and boundary conditions imposed by the closed-form models are shown to be restrictive\\u000a in the application of these models to the solution kinetics of second phases. A quantitative metallography study of the solution\\u000a kinetics of Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>2 in an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-4</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">D. L. Baty; R. A. Tanzilli; R. W. Heckel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1970-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">289</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5920228"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure analysis of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> martensite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Neutron elastic scattering experiments were performed in order to investigate the structure of the low temperature martensitic phase of Ni/sub 62.5/<span class="hlt">Al</span>/sub 37.5/ alloy. The average structure analyzed from the integrated intensity was approximately described by the (5,/minus/2) structure proposed by Martynov et <span class="hlt">al</span>. Small deviation from the exact (5,/minus/2) model in the positional parameters and the anomalously large Debye-Waller factor were obtained. The observed satellite profiles show asymmetrical broadening, and the peak positions shift from the regular reciprocal lattice points. These anomalous features of scattering profiles were tentatively interpreted by introducing spatial modulation of the strain and order parameters. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Noda, Y.; Shapiro, S.M.; Shirane, G.; Yamada, Y.; Fuchizaki, K.; Tanner, L.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">290</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/960677"> <span id="translatedtitle">Observable Proxies For 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> Enhancement</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We consider the cospatial production of elements in supernova explosions to find observationally detectable proxies for enhancement of {sup 26}<span class="hlt">Al</span> in supernova ejecta and stellar systems. Using four progenitors we explore a range of 1D explosions at different energies and an asymmetric 3D explosion. We find that the most reliable indicator of the presence of {sup 26}<span class="hlt">Al</span> in unmixed ejecta is a very low S/Si ratio ({approx} 0.05). Production of N in O/S/Si-rich regions is also indicative. The biologically important element P is produced at its highest abundance in the same regions. Proxies should be detectable in supernova ejecta with high spatial resolution multi wavelength observations, but the small absolute abundance of material injected into a proto-planetary disk makes detection unlikely in existing or forming stellar/planetary systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Patrick A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ellinger, Carola I [ASU; Arnett, William D [UNIV ARIZONA</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">291</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..APR.H9003B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Polarized Cold Neutron Capture in ^27<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The NPDGamma Experiment at the Spallation Neutron Source at ORNL is measuring the parity-odd correlation between the neutron spin and the direction of the emitted photon in the capture of cold neutrons on a 16-liter liquid parahydrogen target. The goal is to determine the strength of the weak nucleon-nucleon interaction. One of the main background contributions comes from the gamma rays produced by neutrons captured in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> walls of the target vessel. To quantify this effect a commissioning experiment measured the parity-odd and parity-even asymmetries in the angular distribution of the gamma rays from the capture of polarized cold neutrons in a solid <span class="hlt">Al</span> target. A status of the analysis of this experiment will be presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Balascuta, Septimiu</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">292</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19790025087&hterms=xdata&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3Dxdata"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of Si<span class="hlt">Al</span>ON materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cold pressing and sintering techniques were used to produce ceramic test specimens in which the major phase was either Si3N4 or a solid solution having the beta Si3N4 structure. Additional components were incorporated to promote liquid phase sintering. Glass and/or crystalline phase were consequently retained in boundaries between Si3N4 grains which largely determined the physical properties of the bodies. Systems investigated most extensively included R-Si-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N (R = rare earth element) Zr-Si-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N, Y-Si-Be-O-N, and R1-R2-Si-O-N. Room temperature and 1370 C modulus of ruptured, 1370 C creep, and oxidation behavior are discussed in terms of phase relationships in a parent quinery, and relavent oxide systems.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Layden, G. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1979-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">293</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24292005"> <span id="translatedtitle">[Communication with <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients: neurosurgical approach].</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By progression of the disease, motor neurons degenerate in patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) eventually lose nearly all voluntary muscles in the body. They are awake and aware but cannot move or communicate (locked-in state). Since the function of the brain is preserved, one possible measure to support their communication is to interpret their motor intention by decoding (deciphering) brain signals and present it with external devices. This technology called "brain-machine interface (BMI)" is now close to clinical use in Japan and USA.In our system, we record electrocorticogram (ECoG) obtained with subudural electrodes during their motor imagery, decode it and determine the movement they intended. So far, one patient of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> with severe paralysis, implanted with this electrodes, successfully operated the PC communication tool only by thinking. PMID:24292005</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoshimine, Toshiki; Yanagisawa, Takufumi; Sawada, Jin-Ichi; Hazama, Takanori; Mochizuki, Hideki; Hirata, Masayuki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">294</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JAP....88.5865C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hot electron transport in <span class="hlt">Al</span>N</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The energy distribution of electrons that were transported through a thin intrinsic <span class="hlt">Al</span>N film was directly measured as a function of the applied field. The measurements were realized by extracting the electrons into vacuum through a semitransparent Au contact and measuring their energies using an electron spectrometer. At moderate applied fields (100 kV/cm), the energy distribution was found to follow a Maxwellian model corresponding to a temperature of 2700 K and a drift component below the spectrometer resolution. At higher fields, intervalley scattering was evidenced by the presence of a second peak at 0.7 eV. This coincides well with the energy position of the LM valleys in <span class="hlt">Al</span>N.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Collazo, R.; Schlesser, R.; Roskowski, A.; Davis, R. F.; Sitar, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">295</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41130808"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3–<span class="hlt">Al</span> nano-composite powder prepared by a wet chemical method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A wet chemical method was used to prepare <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3-coated <span class="hlt">Al</span> nano-size-composite powders using <span class="hlt">Al</span>, aluminum nitrate and ammonia as the starting materials. TEM, SEM, TG\\/DSC, zeta potential, XPS, X-ray were used to characterize the composite powders. Results showed that a uniform thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>(OH)3 layer can formed on the surface of <span class="hlt">Al</span> particles. After calcined at 1000°C for 2h, the thin</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hong-xia Lu; Jie Hu; Chang-ping Chen; Hong-wei Sun; Xing Hu; De-lin Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">296</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49257013"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation mechanism of in situ <span class="hlt">Al</span> 3Ti in <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix during hot pressing and subsequent friction stir processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In situ <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites were fabricated by a combination of vacuum hot pressing (VHP) and friction stir processing (FSP). The formation mechanism of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti and the effect of VHP and FSP parameters on the resultant microstructure and mechanical properties were investigated. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Ti formed due to the reactive diffusion between <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ti during VHP, and the number of</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Q. Zhang; B. L. Xiao; D. Wang; Z. Y. Ma</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">297</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/26624950"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermal analysis of phase transformation kinetics in ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 seeded boehmite and ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 seeding on the transformation kinetics of high purity commercial boehmite and ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 was investigated. The effect of seed size, powder purity, sample homogeneity, and sample density on the transformation kinetics are discussed. The temperature and activation energy of the ? to ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 phase transformation decreases for boehmite and ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 powders with an appropriate addition of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Scott Nordahl; Gary L. Messing</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">298</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39798981"> <span id="translatedtitle">Monitoring <span class="hlt">ALS</span>1 and <span class="hlt">ALS</span>3 Gene Expression During In Vitro Candida albicans Biofilm Formation Under Continuous Flow Conditions</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">ALS</span>1 and <span class="hlt">ALS</span>3 encode cell-surface associated glycoproteins that are considered to be important for Candida albicans biofilm formation. The main goal of the present study was to monitor <span class="hlt">ALS</span>1 and <span class="hlt">ALS</span>3 gene expression during C. albicans biofilm formation (on silicone) under continuous flow conditions, using the Centers for Disease Control biofilm reactor (CDC\\u000a reactor). For <span class="hlt">ALS</span>1, we found few changes in</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heleen Nailis; Roosmarijn Vandenbroucke; Kelly Tilleman; Dieter Deforce; Hans Nelis; Tom Coenye</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">299</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/g6877536160r556h.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of the dynamic Young's modulus and vibration damping for cryomilled Ni<span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>N composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Measurements were made of the dynamic Young's modulus (stiffness) and damping for Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> specimens containing varying amounts of aluminium nitride and prepared by cryomilling. Five specimens of Ni<span class="hlt">Al–Al</span>N were measured at room temperature, each specimen having a different percentage of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N in the range 1%–30%. Further measurements were made on the 1% and 30% <span class="hlt">Al</span>N specimens for the temperature range</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A Wolfenden; D. A Coan; M. G Hebsur</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">300</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/48748641"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Cr on the Oxidation of Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> at 500°C</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The influence of chromium on the mechanical properties of the aluminides Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> has been studied extensively. In order to evaluate the role of Cr during the early stages of oxidation, Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> containing 2 and 4 at.% Cr were oxidized in dry air at 500°C for 6, 50, and 100 hr. The oxide scale on Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> consists</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Velon; D.-Q. Yi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2002-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">301</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41021627"> <span id="translatedtitle">Grain refinement and superplasticity in 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A preliminary investigation of thermomechanical processing of 5083 aluminum plate (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-4.7%Mg-0.7%Mn) was undertaken to develop a fine-grain sheet for superplastic forming applications. Significant differences in grain size and the extent of superplasticity are seen in hot-rolled vs. cold-rolled sheets, with tensile elongations exceeding 600% for the cold-rolled alloy. Additionally, a separate fine-grain sheet of the same alloy, produced by Alusuisse</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Verma; A. K. Ghosh; S. Kim; C. Kim</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">302</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53112248"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogen Solubility in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-bearing Perovskite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">It is generally accepted that silicate perovskite is the dominant mineral in the Earth's lower mantle. Previous studies have been completed to determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the pure end-member MgSiO3. Recent studies have shown that the addition of <span class="hlt">Al</span> to MgSiO3 can have a significant effect on the material properties of the mineral, such as compressibility, and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. C. Watson; M. J. Krawczynski; Y. Fei</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">303</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5197016"> <span id="translatedtitle">Commissioning experiences of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> booster synchrotron</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Installation of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> booster synchrotron proper was completed on April 30, 1991, and commissioning has just begun. Circulating beam around the booster was observed on the first day of operation, May 3, 1991. The beam was visible for about 400 turns. In this paper we describe the status and commissioning experience of the 1.5-GeV electron synchrotron accelerator. 14 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kim, C.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">304</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1990ZPhyA.335..393S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fluctuation properties of states in26<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fluctuation properties of the energy levels of26<span class="hlt">Al</span> from the ground state to excitation energies of about 8 MeV have been examined. Several statistics have been employed, and particular attention has been given to the suitability of these statistics for small sample sizes. The results show, for a variety of states, behavior intermediate between GOE and Poisson but apparently favoring GOE. The results are consistent with the fluctuations' being independent of isospin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shriner, J. F.; Bilpuch, E. G.; Endt, P. M.; Mitchell, G. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1990-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">305</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/47704314"> <span id="translatedtitle">Indentation Tests on <span class="hlt">Al</span> Matrix Syntactic Foams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">This paper investigates mechanical response of <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix syntactic foams manufactured by pressure infiltration casting under\\u000a indentation test. Syntactic foams with ceramic microspheres of three different particle sizes and inner structures were manufactured\\u000a and tested. Because the hollow microspheres are stronger than the porous ones, the syntactic foam with hollow microspheres\\u000a has a higher compressive strength than that of the</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">X. F. Tao; G. K. Schleyer; Y. Y. Zhao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">306</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/u6j5026074320p67.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Die Triangulation <span class="hlt">als</span> Methode in der Politikwissenschaft</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Die Forderung nach „Methodenpluralismus“ scheint in jüngster Zeit den „Methodenstreit“ sowohl zwischen Befürwortern qualitativer\\u000a und quantitativer Techniken (Kelle 2007: 25-46) <span class="hlt">als</span> auch innerhalb der quantitativen Forschungstradition zwischen Nutzern von Aggregat- und Individualdaten abgelöst zu\\u000a haben. So ist einerseits die letztere Auseinandersetzung zumindest auf der methodischen Ebene gelöst worden, nachdem sich\\u000a die Verwendung der Mehrebenenanalyse (Raudenbusch\\/ryk 2002; Engel 1998; Langer 2004)</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Susanne Pickel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">307</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010AIPC.1304..411S"> <span id="translatedtitle">?-decay of 23<span class="hlt">Al</span> and nova nucleosynthesis</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have studied the ?-decay of 23<span class="hlt">Al</span> with a novel detector setup at the focal plane of the MARS separator at the Texas A&M University to resolve existing controversies about the proton intensities of the IAS in 23Mg and to determine the absolute proton branching ratios by combining our results to the latest ?-decay data. Experimental technique, results and the relevance for nova nucleosynthesis are discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Saastamoinen, A.; Trache, L.; Banu, A.; Bentley, M. A.; Davinson, T.; Hardy, J. C.; Iacob, V. E.; Jenkins, D. G.; Jokinen, A.; McCleskey, M.; Roeder, B.; Simmons, E.; Tabacaru, G.; Tribble, R. E.; Woods, P. J.; Äystö, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">308</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52748702"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fermi surface of La<span class="hlt">Al</span>2</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A result is reported of a calculation of the energy bandstructure and the Fermi surface for the cubic Laves-phase La<span class="hlt">Al</span>2 by an APW method. To improve on a previous calculation by Switendick (1973) the energy bandstructure has been calculated self-consistently with the local-spin-density approximation and a relativistic approximation. The tenth band Fermi surface is a sphere centred at the Gamma</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Hasegawa; A. Yanase</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">309</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/q38625w825175341.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alkali adsorption on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(001) surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The chemisorption of Na on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>(001) surface has been studied by 2D bandstructure calculations on slab models using a density functional STO-LCAO method. Two slab models of three and five layers of substrate atoms have been used. Overlayers of the structuresp(2×2),c(2×2) andp(1×1), representing coverages of a quarter, a half and a full atomic monolayer of sodium atoms, respectively, have</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. Reichert; N. Rüsch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1992-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">310</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41021741"> <span id="translatedtitle">Silicide precipitation strengthened Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Precipitation of a titanium silicide Ti5Si3 was found to be beneficial to improvement of the creep resistance of a fully lamellar Ti-48<span class="hlt">Al</span>-1.5Cr cast alloy without the sacrifice of tensile properties. The addition of 0.26–0.65 mol% Si generates fine precipitates less than 200 nm in size during aging at 900 °C for 5 h. The precipitates are effective obstacles to dislocation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">T. Noda; M. Okabe; S. Isobe; M. Sayashi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">311</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3472785"> <span id="translatedtitle">Room Temperature Radiolytic Synthesized Cu@Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>O2-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 Nanoparticles</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Colloidal Cu@Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>O2-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 bimetallic nanoparticles were prepared by a gamma irradiation method in an aqueous system in the presence of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) and isopropanol respectively as a colloidal stabilizer and scavenger of hydrogen and hydroxyl radicals. The gamma irradiation was carried out in a 60Co gamma source chamber with different doses up to 120 kGy. The formation of Cu@Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>O2-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 nanoparticles was observed initially by the change in color of the colloidal samples from colorless to brown. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) confirmed the presence of bonds between polymer chains and the metal surface at all radiation doses. Results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed that Cu@Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>O2-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 nanoparticles are in a core-shell structure. By controlling the absorbed dose and precursor concentration, nanoclusters with different particle sizes were obtained. The average particle diameter increased with increased precursor concentration and decreased with increased dose. This is due to the competition between nucleation, growth, and aggregation processes in the formation of nanoclusters during irradiation.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Abedini, Alam; Saion, Elias; Larki, Farhad; Zakaria, Azmi; Noroozi, Monir; Soltani, Nayereh</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">312</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011APS..SHK.Q2004Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Air Blast Characteristics for Laminate <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ni Composites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Air blast characteristics of laminate <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ni composites were investigated in a 23 m^3 closed chamber. 50 to 100 ?m thick <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ni or <span class="hlt">Al</span> foils were rolled to form a cylindrical shell, which was then compacted to a density larger than 99% TMD through an explosive formation technique. Charges were prepared using 2 kg C4 explosive packed in the laminate metal shell to a metal-explosive mass ratio of 1.75. Pressure and temperature were measured through transducers on the chamber wall and pyrometry sensors facing the charge center. The pressure history showed a double-shock front structure with an accelerating precursor shock of high amplitude followed by the primary blast, suggesting considerable early-time reaction of small laminate fragments. Significant enhanced explosion pressure (QSP) was observed as compared with baseline charges in solid shell. Recovered residue showed fragments in flakes with a considerable fraction in the molten. The pressure and temperature results are further analyzed to distinguish the reaction properties between the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ni (gasless reaction for them alone) and <span class="hlt">Al</span> laminates as well as their effect on air blast. The results are also compared with previous investigations using various shell materials and compositing techniques.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Fan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">313</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000JSSCh.155...71H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Experimental Investigation in the Quaternary Systems Ti Ni <span class="hlt">Al</span> N and Ti Ni <span class="hlt">Al</span> O</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The experimental evaluation of phase equilibria in the Ti-Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-N and Ti-Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O phase diagrams are based on alloy samples, which were prepared of elemental powder blends by argon-levitation melting in a Hukin crucible. The experimental investigation employed X-ray powder diffraction, metallography, SEM, and EMPA techniques in the as-cast state as well as after annealing at 900°C. Two quaternary compounds Ti 3Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2N and Ti 3Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O deriving from the filled Ti 2Ni type ( ? phase) were observed. The novel phases are in equilibrium with the Ti 2Ni-type solid solution phase (Ti 1- x<span class="hlt">Al</span> x) 2Ni, which exhibits a maximum solubility of 14 at.% <span class="hlt">Al</span> in binary Ti 2Ni. Atom order in all these phases was monitored by quantitative X-ray powder diffraction (Rietveld analyses). The difference of X-ray spectra among the various phases deriving from parent Ti 2Ni type was analyzed and the complex atom site occupation mode was discussed in terms of the general classification scheme for ? phases.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huneau, B.; Ding, J. J.; Rogl, P.; Bauer, J.; Ding, X. Y.; Bohn, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">314</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JTST...18..536G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 Intermetallic-HVOF Coatings: Structure and Properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Transition metal aluminides in their coating form are currently being explored in terms of resistance to oxidation and mechanical behavior. This interest in transition metal aluminides is mainly due to the fact that their high <span class="hlt">Al</span> content makes them attractive for high-temperature applications. This is also a reason to study their resistance to wear; they may be suitable for use in applications that produce a lot of wear in aggressive environments, thus replacing established coating materials. In this study, the microstructure, microhardness, and wear and oxidation performance of Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 coatings produced by high-velocity oxy-fuel spraying are evaluated with two main aims: (i) to compare these two coating systems—a commonly studied aluminide (Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>) and, Nb<span class="hlt">Al</span>3, an aluminide whose deposition by thermal spraying has not been attempted to date—and (ii) to analyze the relationship between their microstructure, composition and properties, and so clarify their wear and oxidation mechanisms. In the present study, the higher hardness of niobium aluminide coatings did not correlate with a higher wear resistance and, finally, although pesting phenomena (disintegration in oxidizing environments) were already known of in bulk niobium aluminides, here their behavior in the coating form is examined. It was shown that such accelerated oxidation was inevitable with respect to the better resistance of Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span>, but further improvements are foreseen by addition of alloying elements in that alloy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Guilemany, J. M.; Cinca, N.; Dosta, S.; Cano, I. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">315</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006MMTA...37.3283D"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interactions between iron, manganese, and the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic in hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sand-cast plates were used to determine the effect of iron and manganese concentrations on porosity levels in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-9 pct Si-0.5 pct Mg alloys. Iron increased porosity levels. Manganese additions increased porosity levels in alloys with 0.1 pct Fe, but reduced porosity in alloys with 0.6 and 1 pct Fe. Thermal analysis and quenching were undertaken to determine the effect of iron and managanese on the solidification of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic. At high iron levels, the presence of large ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi was found to reduce the number of eutectic nucleation events and increase the eutectic grain size. The preferential formation of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>15Mn3Si2 upon addition of manganese reversed these effects. It is proposed that this interaction is due to ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi and the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic having common nuclei. Porosity levels are proposed to be controlled by the eutectic grain size and the size of the iron-bearing intermetallic particles rather than the specific intermetallic phase that forms.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dinnis, C. M.; Taylor, J. A.; Dahle, A. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">316</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MMTA...39.2435C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Strontium and Phosphorus on Eutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si Nucleation and Formation of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi in Hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si Foundry Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present investigation was carried out on hypoeutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys containing two levels of Fe, 0.5 and 1.1 wt pct, and Sr in the range of 30 to 500 ppm. The addition of Sr in excess of 100 ppm significantly reduced the number of eutectic grains and also resulted in the formation of polygonal-shaped <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Si2Sr intermetallics. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Si2Sr phase surrounded the P-rich particles. This may suggest that the otherwise potent nuclei for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si eutectic, aluminum phosphide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>P), become poisoned or deactivated by the formation of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Si2Sr phase around the particles. At the high-Fe level (1.1 wt pct Fe), pre-eutectic formation of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi platelets further reduced the number of eutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si nucleation events. It is proposed that both eutectic silicon and ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi are preferentially nucleated on <span class="hlt">Al</span>P particles. Nucleation of eutectic silicon, therefore, becomes more difficult when it is preceded by the formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Si2Sr or ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi, because fewer nuclei are available to nucleate silicon. Addition of up to 60 ppm P to the alloys increased the formation temperature of the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi platelets but did not significantly alter the size, whereas the addition of Sr decreased the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>5FeSi nucleation temperature by reducing the potency of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>P particles.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cho, Y. H.; Lee, H.-C.; Oh, K. H.; Dahle, A. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">317</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000noao.prop..362S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Understanding The Secondary in <span class="hlt">AL</span> Com</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We will use the MMT Spectrograph at moderate resolution to explore the secondary in the faint (20th mag), ultrashort period (81 min) cataclysmic variable <span class="hlt">AL</span> Com. WHT optical spectra obtained during our HST UV spectral program in 1996 indicated broad band features consistent with MgH and CaH. The corresponding lack of TiO implies a metal defficiency in the secondary. Confirmation and further exploration of these features will provide important insight into abundance peculiarities related to the evolution of close binaries, as <span class="hlt">AL</span> Com sits at the critical juncture of the orbital period minimum in evolution. Theoretical models predict systems that start at high mass should ultimately evolve to the period minimum, after which the secondary becomes a degenerate low mass (brown dwarf-like) star. The low mass transfer rate in <span class="hlt">AL</span> Com allows us a rare glimpse into the stellar properties that are affected by mass transfer scenarios in comparison to normal field M dwarfs and brown dwarfs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Szkody, Paula; Hawley, Suzanne; Harrison, Thomas; Howell, Steve; Laws, Chris</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">318</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6545210"> <span id="translatedtitle">An <span class="hlt">ALS</span> (Advanced Light Source) handbook</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This booklet aims to provide the prospective user of the Advanced Light Source with a concise description of the radiation a researcher might expect at his or her experimental station. The focus is therefore on the characteristics of the light that emerges from insertion devices and bending magnets and on how components of the beam lines further alter the properties of the radiation. The specifications and operating parameters of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> injection system and storage ring are of only peripheral interest. To this end, Sections 3 and 5 and most of Section 4 are devoted to summary presentations, by means of performance plots and tabular compilations, of radiation characteristics at the <span class="hlt">ALS</span>--spectral brightness, flux, coherent power, resolution, time structure, etc.--assuming a representative set of four undulators and one wiggler and a corresponding set of five beam lines. As a complement to these performance summaries, Section 1 is a general introductory discussion of synchrotron radiation and the <span class="hlt">ALS</span>, and Section 2 provides a compendious introduction to the characteristics of synchrotron radiation from bending magnets, wigglers, and undulators. In addition, Section 4 briefly introduces the theory of diffraction grating and crystal monochromators. 15 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Not Available</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">319</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20777188"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energetic ion bombarded Fe/<span class="hlt">Al</span> multilayers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The utility of ion-assisted deposition is investigated to explore the possibility of counteracting the deficiency of back-reflected current of Ar neutrals in the case of lighter elements such as <span class="hlt">Al</span>. A range of energetically ion bombarded Fe/<span class="hlt">Al</span> multilayers sputtered with applied surface bias of 0, -200, or -400 V were deposited onto Si(111) substrates in an argon atmosphere of 4 mTorr using a computer controlled dc magnetron sputtering system. Grazing incidence reflectivity and rocking curve scans by synchrotron x rays of wavelength of 1.38 A were used to investigate the structures of the interfaces produced. Substantial evidence has been gathered to suggest the gradual suppression of interfacial mixing and reduction in interfacial roughness with increases of applied bias. The densification of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> microstructure was noticeable and may be a consequence of resputtering attributable to the induced ion bombardment. The average interfacial roughnesses were calculated for the 0, -200, and -400 V samples to be 7{+-}0.5, 6{+-}0.5, and 5{+-}0.5 A respectfully demonstrating a 30% improvement in interface quality. Data from rocking curve scans point to improved long-range correlated roughness in energetically deposited samples. The computational code based on the recursive algorithm developed by Parratt [Phys. Rev. 95, 359 (1954)] was successful in the simulation of the specular reflectivity curves.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Al-Busaidy, M.S.; Crapper, M.D. [College Science, Physics Department, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al-Khod 123 (Oman); Department of Physics, Loughborough University, Loughborough (United Kingdom)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-05-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">320</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3666397"> <span id="translatedtitle">?-Synuclein Modification in an <span class="hlt">ALS</span> Animal Model</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) is a progressively paralytic neurodegenerative disease that can be caused by mutations in Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1). Transgenic mice that overexpress mutant SOD1 develop paralysis and accumulate aggregates of mutant protein in the brainstem and spinal cord. Bee venom (BV), which is also known as apitoxin, is extracted from honeybees and is commonly used in oriental medicine for the treatment of chronic rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether BV affects misfolded protein aggregates such as alpha-synuclein, which is a known pathological marker in Parkinson disease, and ubiquitin-proteasomal activity in hSOD1G93A mutant mice. BV was bilaterally administered into a 98-day-old hSOD1G93A animal model. We found that BV-treated hSOD1G93A transgenic mice showed reduced detergent-insoluble polymerization and phosphorylation of ?-synuclein. Furthermore, phosphorylated or nitrated ?-synuclein was significantly reduced in the spinal cords and brainstems of BV-treated hSOD1G93A mice and reduced proteasomal activity was revealed in the brainstems of BV-treated symptomatic hSOD1G93A. From these findings, we suggest that BV treatment attenuates the dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasomal system in a symptomatic hSOD1G93A <span class="hlt">ALS</span> model and may help to slow motor neuron loss caused by misfolded protein aggregates in <span class="hlt">ALS</span> models.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yang, Eun Jin; Choi, Sun-Mi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" 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showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">321</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008AIPC..999..257V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Devitrification of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Y-Ni Glasses</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Crystallization of gas-atomized <span class="hlt">Al</span>-4.3Y-3.8Ni alloy powder during consolidation has been studied ex-situ in a transmission electron microscope using high-resolution lattice imaging together with the image simulations, selected-area diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry experiments. The as-atomized powder is predominantly amorphous but some particles others show evidence of decomposition. On the application of heat and pressure two types of decomposition product are formed initially; equiaxed nanoscale ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> grains embedded in an amorphous matrix, and dendritic aluminum grains containing complex ordered structures. The ordered structures in the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> were identified as Guinier-Preston like zones: thin sheets of solute rich material parallel to {100} and {110} aluminum planes with ordered cubic symmetry. Amorphous and micro-crystalline phases are in between the aluminum-rich regions. The second and third stages of crystallization involve the conversion of these ordered phases and embryonic precipitates to the better-known binary and ternary compounds.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Vasiliev, A. L.; Aindow, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">322</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070021778&hterms=Si+Al+Ca&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DSi%252C%2BAl%252C%2BO%252C%2BCa"> <span id="translatedtitle">Solidification Behavior of gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> Containing Alloys in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The chemical activities of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni in gamma(prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing systems were measured using the multi-cell Knudsen effusion-cell mass spectrometry technique (multi-cell KEMS), over the composition range 8 - 32 at.%<span class="hlt">Al</span> and temperature range T = 1400 - 1750 K. From these measurements a better understanding of the equilibrium solidification behaviour of gamma(prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-containing alloys in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O system was established. Specifically, these measurements revealed that (1) gamma(prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> forms via the peritectiod reaction, gamma + Beta (+ A12O3) = gamma (prime) (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1633 +/- 1 K, (2) the {gamma + Beta + <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3} phase field is stable over the temperature range 1633 through 1640 K, and (3) equilibrium solidification occurs by the eutectic reaction, L (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3) = gamma + Beta (+ <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3), at 1640 +/- 1 K and a liquid composition of 24.8 +/- 0.2 at.%<span class="hlt">Al</span> (at an unknown oxygen content). When projected onto the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> binary, this behaviour is inconsistent with the current Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram and a new diagram is proposed. This new Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase diagram explains a number of unusual steady-state solidification structures reported previously and provides a much simpler reaction scheme in the vicinity of the gamma(prime)-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Copland, Evan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">323</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JMEP...19.1357A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Potentiodynamic Polarization Aspects of the As-cast and Sprayed <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn-Si Alloys in a Sodium Chloride Solution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present study compares the corrosion behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn-Si alloys processed by spray forming with that of the conventional chill cast ones in aqueous 0.1 N NaCl solution. Spray forming resulted in finer microstructural features with uniform distribution of second-phase particles. The spray formed <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si samples showed improved corrosion resistance as compared to the chill cast ones. The Sn containing alloys showed inferior corrosion resistance in the neutral electrolyte. The addition of 12.5 wt.% Si to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Sn alloys improves the corrosion resistance.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anil, M.; Balaji, S.; Upadhyaya, A.; Ghosh, M. K.; Ojha, S. N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">324</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20010060374&hterms=nemoto&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dnemoto"> <span id="translatedtitle">Creep and Toughness of Cryomilled Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> Containing Cr</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N + Cr composites were produced by blending cryomilled Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder with approx. 10 vol % Cr flakes. In comparison to the as-consolidated matrices, hot isostatically pressed Cr-modified materials did not demonstrate any significant improvement in toughness. Hot extruded Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N+10.5Cr, however, possessed a toughness twice that determine for the base Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N alloy. Measurement of the 1200 to 1400 K plastic flow properties revealed that the strength of the composites was completely controlled by the properties of the Ni<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>N matrices. This behavior could be successfully modeled by the Rule-of-Mixtures, where load is shed from the weak Cr to the strong matrix.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whittenberger, J. Daniel; Aikin, Beverly; Salem, Jon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">325</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19890005862&hterms=burtin&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dburtin"> <span id="translatedtitle">The oxidation of Ni-rich Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> intermetallics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The oxidation of Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> intermetallic alloys in the beta-Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field and in the two phase beta-Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>/gamma'-Ni3<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field has been studied between 1000 and 1400 C. The stoichiometric beta-Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy doped with Zr was superior to other alloy compositions under cyclic and isothermal oxidation. The isothermal growth rates did not increase monotonically as the alloy <span class="hlt">Al</span> content was decreased. The characteristically ridged alpha-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 scale morphology, consisting of cells of thin, textured oxide with thick growth ridges at cell boundaries, forms on oxidized beta-Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys. The correlation of scale features with isothermal growth rates indicates a predominant grain boundary diffusion growth mechanism. The 1200 C cyclic oxidation resistance decreases near the lower end of the beta-Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase field.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Doychak, Joseph; Smialek, James L.; Barrett, Charles A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1988-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">326</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004ApSS..231...86V"> <span id="translatedtitle">Secondary ion emission from polycrystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span> under Cs + irradiation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Work function and secondary ion intensity variations apparent during the initial stages of sputtering with 1 keV Cs + ions have been recorded from <span class="hlt">Al</span> under Cs + irradiation. These are compared with each other and ion-induced L 23MM Auger emissions induced through Ar + and Xe + irradiation. As expected, the <span class="hlt">Al</span> + and <span class="hlt">Al</span> - intensities scale with the substrate work function in a manner consistent with the electron tunneling model. Likewise, the <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2+ population scales with the Auger signal consistent with a surface excitation initiated process. Furthermore, only single 2p vacancies were noted indicating that <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2+ forms from the sputtered <span class="hlt">Al</span> + population and <span class="hlt">Al</span> + forms from the sputtered <span class="hlt">Al</span> 0 population. The work function dependence exhibited by <span class="hlt">Al</span> + reveals that this is a minor process, at least for these ions under these conditions.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">van der Heide, P. A. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">327</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SuMi...72..370B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Computational study of OCN- chemisorption over <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanostructures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were applied to consider the adsorption of cyanato anion (OCN-) on the external surfaces of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanotubes and <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nano-cages. The interaction energies of OCN- (N-side) interacted with (6, 0) and (4, 4) <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanotubes are about -2.84 and -2.72 eV, respectively, implying that the pristine (6, 0) <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanotubes is more reactive and sensitive than (4, 4) <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanotubes for OCN- detection. The adsorption energy of the reaction between OCN- and <span class="hlt">Al</span>16N16 is too strong (-3.32 eV) than that of <span class="hlt">Al</span>12N12 (-3.24 eV). The results demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nano-cages have a better condition for practical applications as a chemical adsorbent for the adsorption of OCN- compared with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N nanotubes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baei, Mohammad T.; Taghartapeh, Mohammad Ramezani; Lemeski, E. Tazikeh; Soltani, Alireza</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">328</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17234942"> <span id="translatedtitle">Unexpected stability of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6: a borane analog?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Whereas boron has many hydrides, aluminum has been thought to exhibit relatively few. A combined anion photoelectron and density functional theory computational study of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H-6 anion and its corresponding neutral, <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6, showed that <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6 can be understood in terms of the Wade-Mingos rules for electron counting, suggesting that it may be a borane analog. The data support an <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6 structure with a distorted tetrahedral aluminum atom framework, four terminal <span class="hlt">Al</span>-H bonds, and two sets of counter-positioned <span class="hlt">Al-H-Al</span> bridging bonds. The large gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals found for <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6, together with its exceptionally high heat of combustion, further suggests that <span class="hlt">Al</span>4H6 may be an important energetic material if it can be prepared in bulk. PMID:17234942</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, X; Grubisic, A; Stokes, S T; Cordes, J; Ganteför, G F; Bowen, K H; Kiran, B; Willis, M; Jena, P; Burgert, R; Schnöckel, H</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">329</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChPhL..29j8501L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced Light Extraction in <span class="hlt">Al</span>InGaN UV Light-Emitting Diodes by an Embedded <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>GaN Distributed Bragg Reflector</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A novel kind of <span class="hlt">Al</span>InGaN ultraviolet (UV) light-emitting diode (LED) with an embedded <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>0.3Ga0.7N distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) is proposed to enhance light extraction efficiency (LEE). The simulation technique we adopt to calculate the LEE of LEDs is based on the theory of spontaneous emission in a layered medium, the well-known mode-matching technique and the scattering matrix approach. The <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>0.3Ga0.7N DBR was intentionally designed to have peak reflectivity at the LED emission wavelength and the optical properties of the DBR were simulated by using the transfer matrix method. A high LEE of 45.7% at 370 nm wavelength was predicted for a proposed <span class="hlt">Al</span>InGaN UV LED consisting of 24 periods of the <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>0.3Ga0.7N DBR, which is 1.5 times of that of the conventional <span class="hlt">Al</span>InGaN UV LED. The investigation shows that the <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>0.3Ga0.7N DBR grown on GaN templates with sapphire as a substrate by MOCVD can enhance the LEE effectively and would be very promising for the fabrication of high performance GaN-based UV LEDs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Liu, Hui; Zhao, Heng; Hou, Jin; Liu, Dan; Gao, Yi-Hua</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">330</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JMEP...22.2098S"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Nature of Interfaces in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/Mg-AZ31 Couples Joined by Magnetic Pulse Welding (MPW)</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The microstructure and the phase composition of the interfaces of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/Mg-AZ31 magnetic pulse welding (MPW) joints were characterized by SEM and TEM analyses. The mechanical properties were tested by nanoindentation. Properties of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050 interface joint were established. The interface is almost free from <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Fe precipitates, which are present in the base metal. The hardness value is higher than that of the base metal; however, values of the Young's modulus of the interface and base metal are similar. It was suggested that the interface evolution in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050 system includes local melting and rapid solidification of the base materials. A wavy shaped heterogeneous interface was detected in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-1050/Mg-AZ31 joints. Some areas are free from visible intermetallic phases (IMPs), while others contain pockets of relatively coarse intermetallic precipitates. The presence of a relatively large fraction of globular porosity at the interface indicates that local melting takes place in the course of MPW. TEM characterization of regions free of IMPs at the interface reveals regions consisting of fcc supersaturated <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg solid solution, apparently formed as a result of local mechanical alloying during MPW. In other regions, the composition and structure correspond to the Mg17<span class="hlt">Al</span>12 phase, which was probably formed by local melting and rapid solidification.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Stern, A.; Aizenshtein, M.; Moshe, G.; Cohen, S. R.; Frage, N.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">331</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/514668"> <span id="translatedtitle">Alignment of the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>/Ti{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> lamellar microstructure in Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys by growth from a seed material</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">By using an appropriately oriented seed from the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si system, the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>/Ti{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> lamellar microstructure was aligned parallel to the growth direction in a number of directionally solidified Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>-based alloys. The seed composition was kept constant at Ti-43<span class="hlt">Al</span>-3Si (at.%) and the composition of the master ingots was varied for alloys in the Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si, Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Nb-Si, and Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span> systems. The lamellar microstructure could be aligned for alloys containing up to approximately 47 at.% (<span class="hlt">Al</span> + Si) in each of these systems. For the composition of seed material, Ti-43<span class="hlt">Al</span>-3Si, where alpha is the primary solidification phase, the original orientation of the lamellar microstructure was maintained after heating to and cooling from the single-phase alpha region making seeding of the alpha phase possible. When this silicon containing seed was used, the nucleation of the primary beta phase in master alloys of Ti-(47 {minus} x)<span class="hlt">Al</span>-xSi(x = 0 to 1 at.%) could be suppressed resulting in the nucleation and growth of only the alpha phase with an orientation determined by the seed crystal. After steady state conditions were reached, single PST crystals with an aligned lamellar microstructure could be grown at growth rates as high as 40 mm/h.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, D.R.; Masuda, Y.; Inui, H.; Yamaguchi, M. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering] [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">332</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ApSS..256..261T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 on the properties of cold sprayed <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span> 2O 3 composite coatings on AZ91D magnesium alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Composite coatings using pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> powder blended with ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 as feedstock were deposited on AZ91D magnesium alloy substrates by cold spray (CS). The content of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 in the feedstock was 25 wt.% and 50 wt.%, respectively. The effects of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 on the porosity, microhardness, adhesion and tensile strength of the coatings were studied. Electrochemical tests were carried out in neutral 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution to evaluate the effect of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 on the corrosion behavior of the coatings. The results showed that the composite coatings possessed lower porosity, higher adhesion strength and tensile strength than cold sprayed pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> coating. The corrosion current densities of the composite coatings were similar to that of the pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> coating and much higher than that of bare AZ91D magnesium alloy.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tao, Yongshan; Xiong, Tianying; Sun, Chao; Jin, Huazi; Du, Hao; Li, Tiefan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">333</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JInst...8C0021O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Spatial and temporal mapping of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>O during oxidation in pulsed laser ablation of La<span class="hlt">Al</span>O3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present the first spatio-temporal mapping of two simultaneously present species in a plasma used for pulsed laser deposition. We apply laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIF) to map ground state populations of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>O in plasma plumes generated by ablation of La<span class="hlt">Al</span>O3 in an O2 or Ar atmosphere. Around a specific distance from the target, we observe <span class="hlt">Al</span> vanish simultaneously with the turnup of <span class="hlt">Al</span>O. This can be assigned to the oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in the background atmosphere occurring after a sufficient slowing of the expanding <span class="hlt">Al</span> front. This is consistent with the absence of such effects when argon is taken as background. A quantitative evaluation of data promises to reveal important dynamical reaction and deposition parameters for identification of the origin of specific properties of PLD grown films such as 2-dimensional conductive interfaces.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Orsel, K.; Groenen, R.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Koster, G.; Rijnders, G.; Boller, K.-J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">334</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20634400"> <span id="translatedtitle">Short-period superlattices of <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N grown on <span class="hlt">Al</span>N substrates</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-quality short-period superlattices of <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N have been grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy with ammonia on <span class="hlt">Al</span> face of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N (0001) substrates. A significant reduction was achieved in the dislocation density, down to 3x10{sup 8} cm{sup -2}. Complete removal of residual <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface oxide is needed in order to obtain low dislocation density in homoepitaxy on <span class="hlt">Al</span>N. We show that the presence of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} islands with the surface coverage as low as 0.2% results in increased dislocation density.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nikishin, S.A.; Borisov, B.A.; Chandolu, A.; Kuryatkov, V.V.; Temkin, H.; Holtz, M.; Mokhov, E.N.; Makarov, Yu.; Helava, H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Nano Tech Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-3102 (United States); Nano Tech Center/Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States); Fox Group Inc., 1154 Stealth Street, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-11-08</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">335</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8467E..0WH"> <span id="translatedtitle">High electron mobility <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N/GaN HEMT structure with a nano-scale <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Epitaxies of <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures with different thickness of nano-scale <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayers have been realized by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technology. After epitaxy, high resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), temperature-dependent Hall Effect and atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements were used to characterize the properties of these samples. First, it was found that the <span class="hlt">Al</span> composition of <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN layer increases from 21.6 to 34.2% with increasing the thickness of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer from 0 to 5 nm under the same <span class="hlt">Al</span>GaN growth conditions. This result may due to the influences of compressive stress and <span class="hlt">Al</span> incorporation induced by the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer. Then, we also found that the room-temperature (RT) electron mobility stays higher than 1500 cm2/Vs in the samples within <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer thickness range of 1.5 nm, on the other hand, the low-temperature (80K) electron mobility drops dramatically from 8180 to 5720 cm2/Vs in the samples with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer thickness increasing from 1 to 1.5 nm. Furthermore, it was found that the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) density increases from 1.15×1013 to 1.58×1013 cm-2 beyond the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer thickness of 1 nm. It was also found that the temperature independent 2DEG densities are observed in the samples with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N interlayer thickness of 0.5 and 1 nm. The degenerated characteristics of the samples with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N thickness thicker than 1.5 nm show the degraded crystalline quality which matched the observation of surface defects and small cracks formations from their AFM images. Finally, the 2DEG mobilities of the proposed structures can be achieved as high as 1705 and 8180 cm2/Vs at RT and 80K, respectively.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Huang, Shih-Chun; Chen, Wen-Ray; Hsu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Jia-Ching; Chang, Kuo-Jen; Lin, Wen-Jen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">336</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/953776"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Reaction with XeF2 on Surface Adhesion of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 Surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The change of surface adhesion after fluorination of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces using XeF{sub 2} was investigated with atomic force microscopy. The chemical interaction between XeF{sub 2} and <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fresh <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces were obtained by etching top silicon layers of Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} with XeF{sub 2}. The surface adhesion and chemical composition were measured as a function of time after the exposure to air or annealing (at 200 C under vauum). The correlation between the adhesion force increase and presence of <span class="hlt">Al</span>F{sub 3} on the surface was revealed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Tianfu; Park, Jeong Y.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-07-28</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">337</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApPhL.102c2103C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of thin <span class="hlt">AlSb/Al</span>As barriers on InAs by mid-infrared intersubband absorption measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We present mid-infrared intersubband absorption measurements on InAs/<span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb coupled-quantum-wells systems with thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb barriers. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb barrier width in our samples is varied between 1 and 4 monolayers, with a strained <span class="hlt">Al</span>As boundary layer used for strain compensation. The optical absorption energy difference between the 1-4 and 2-3 transitions is used as a measure of the barrier coupling strength and modeled by a one-band Schroedinger solver. Our results let us conclude that the composite <span class="hlt">AlSb/Al</span>As barrier behaves like an effective <span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb barrier with an effective thickness that does not include the last As layer. This observation must be taken into account when designing complex heterostructures relying on very thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb, like in InAs/<span class="hlt">Al</span>Sb quantum cascade lasers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Castellano, Fabrizio; Ohtani, Keita; Nevou, Laurent; Faist, Jerome</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">338</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25041826"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interfacial microstructure and growth mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 in Grf/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites fabricated by liquid pressure method.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, Grf/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composite was fabricated by liquid pressure method. The diffusion layer and the nucleation and growth of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 were observed at the interface of Grf/<span class="hlt">Al</span> composites by TEM and HRTEM. The growth mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 was analyzed in detail by crystallography theory. It was found that <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 had no phase relations with the carbon fiber. (0001) layer of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 was parallel with main growth direction. Both the diffusion layer at the interface and crystal structure of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 affected the shape of <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3. At a certain position, <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3 could connect two fibers when the fibers were close to each other. PMID:25041826</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Wang; Chenchong, Wang; Zhichao, Zhang; Ping, Liang; Yanhua, Shi; Guofu, Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">339</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15723513"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> source and synthesis of ordered <span class="hlt">Al</span>-SBA-15 hexagonal particles with nanostairs and terraces.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We investigated the effect of various aluminum sources on the morphology and microstructure of nanoporous <span class="hlt">Al</span>-SBA-15. With aluminum tri-sec-butoxide (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-TSB), very large, ordered hexagonal rods of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-SBA-15 covered by nanostairs and terraces were synthesized. Such a morphology was not obtained with an inorganic <span class="hlt">Al</span> source (sodium aluminate) or with organic sources seemingly similar to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-TSB, such as aluminum tri-tert-butoxide, aluminum tri-n-butoxide, or aluminum isopropoxide. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy/transmission electron microscopy, N(2) adsorption/desorption, and high-performance (129)Xe NMR suggest that preparing an organic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si precursor by premixing liquid organic <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Si sources (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-TSB and tetraethyl orthosilicate) is crucial in obtaining highly ordered mesoporous <span class="hlt">Al</span>-SBA-15 materials with a well-defined morphology. PMID:15723513</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Wenjiang; Huang, Shing-Jong; Liu, Shang-Bin; Coppens, Marc-Olivier</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">340</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ApPhL..93n1905Z"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of reaction with XeF2 on surface adhesion of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 surfaces</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The change in surface adhesion after fluorination of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 surfaces using XeF2 was investigated with atomic force microscopy. The chemical interaction between XeF2 and <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 surfaces was studied by in situ x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Fresh <span class="hlt">Al</span> and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 surfaces were obtained by etching top silicon layers of Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Si/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 with XeF2. The surface adhesion and chemical composition were measured after the exposure to air or annealing (at 200 °C under vacuum). The correlation between the adhesion force increase and presence of <span class="hlt">Al</span>F3 on the surface was revealed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Zhang, Tianfu; Park, Jeong Y.; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" 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id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">341</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986poso.symp..664L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Performance of Li<span class="hlt">Al/LiI(Al</span>2O3)/FeS2 thermal batteries</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Performances of the Li<span class="hlt">Al/LiI(Al</span>2O3)/FeS2 systems with different percentages of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 in the electrolyte were tested from 460 C to 580 C at various current densities and were compared with the performance of the Li<span class="hlt">Al</span>/LiCl-KCl/FeS2 system. The results of single-cell and battery tests indicate that the Li<span class="hlt">Al/LiI(Al</span>2O3)/FeS2 system has a feasibility for thermal potential applications. Compared to the Li<span class="hlt">Al</span>/LiCl-KCl/FeS2 system, the LiI(<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)-based system has poorer specific conductance and lower cell potential, but longer discharge life and greater capacity. A salient feature of the LiI(<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3)-based system, important for reliability considerations, is its apparent greater flexibility in battery internal heat control.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lin, Yung-Hsin; Yu, Kuo-Tung; Yao, Pei-Chin; Hsu, Shu-En</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">342</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/44514"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transmission electron microscopy study of <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites fabricated by reactive metal infiltration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The microstructure of <span class="hlt">Al/{alpha}--Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites made by infiltrating molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> into dense mullite preforms has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The growth of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites was found to proceed through three stages. Initially, <span class="hlt">Al</span> infiltrates into a dense mullite preform through grain boundary diffusion, and reacts with mullite at grain boundaries to form a partial reaction zone. Then, a complete reaction takes place in the reaction region between the partial reaction zone and the full reaction zone to convert the dense mullite preform to a composite of {alpha}--<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} (matrix) and an <span class="hlt">Al</span>--Si phase (thin channels). Finally, the reduced Si from the reaction diffuses out of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite through the metal channels, whereas <span class="hlt">Al</span> from the molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool is continuously drawn to the reaction region until the mullite preform is consumed or the sample is remove from the molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool. Based on the observed microstructure, infiltration mechanisms have been discussed, and a growth model of the composites is proposed in which the process involves repeated nucleation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} grains and grain growth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Y.; Jia, J. [Department of Materials Engineering, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 87801 (United States); Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">343</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApSS..283...87W"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 coatings oxidized from <span class="hlt">Al</span> with different proportion of seed crystals at a lower temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span> layer with ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 seed crystals was prepared on the surface of 316L stainless steel (SS) by a double cathodes discharge technique, in which the mixed targets of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped with different proportions of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 were used. Then, <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 coatings were obtained after plasma oxidization at 580 °C. The phase composition, microstructure and morphology of the coatings were studied respectively by means of glancing-angle (1°) X-ray diffractometry (GAXRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the bonding force and corrosion resistance of the coatings were measured. The results indicated that ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 nucleated and grew surrounding the seed crystals as the Volmer-Weber Mode. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 coating was compact, performing a good corrosion resistance and metallurgical bonding. The inducing effects of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 with different fractions were discussed. ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 (5.5 wt.%) was distributed in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> layer when the target possessing 10% ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 was used. After plasma oxidation, 65.54 wt.% ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 was obtained which was 10.34% more than that obtained by the oxidation of pure <span class="hlt">Al</span> at the same condition. However, the inducing effects became weak with the further increment of content of ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 seed crystals.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Chen; Lin, Yuebin; He, Fei; Luo, Xinyi; Tao, Jie</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">344</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JNuM..395..162K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Interdiffusion between U(Mo,Pt) or U(Mo,Zr) and <span class="hlt">Al</span> or <span class="hlt">Al</span> A356 alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Solid state reactions in chemical diffusion couples U-7 wt.%Mo-0.9 wt.%Pt/<span class="hlt">Al</span> at 580 °C and U-7 wt.%Mo-0.9 wt.%Pt/<span class="hlt">Al</span> A356 alloy, U-7 wt.%Mo-1 wt.%Zr/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and U-7 wt.%Mo-1 wt.%Zr/<span class="hlt">Al</span> A356 alloy at 550 °C were characterized. Results were obtained from optical and scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis and X-ray diffraction. The UAl 3, UAl 4 and <span class="hlt">Al</span> 20Mo 2U phases were identified in the interaction layers of ?U(Mo,Pt)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> and ?U(Mo,Zr)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> diffusion couples. <span class="hlt">Al</span> 43Mo 4U 6 ternary compound was also identified in ?U(Mo,Zr)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> due to the decomposition of ?U(Mo,Zr) phase. The U(<span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si) 3 and U 3Si 5 phases were identified in the interaction layers of ?U(Mo,Pt)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> A356 and ?U(Mo,Zr)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> A356 diffusion couples. These phases are formed due to the migration of Si to the interaction layer. In the diffusion couple U(Mo,Zr)/<span class="hlt">Al</span> A356, Zr 5<span class="hlt">Al</span> 3 phase was also identified in the interaction layer. The use of synchrotron radiation at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS, CNPq, Campinas, Brazil) was necessary to achieve a complete crystallographic characterization.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Komar Varela, C.; Mirandou, M.; Aricó, S.; Balart, S.; Gribaudo, L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">345</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/29452"> <span id="translatedtitle">TEM characterization of <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite fabricated by reactive metal infiltration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The microstructure of <span class="hlt">Al/{alpha}-Al</span>{sub 2}0{sub 3} composites made by infiltrating <span class="hlt">Al</span> into dense mullite preforms has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy. Observations revealed that the formation of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}0{sub 3} composites involves three stages. Initially, <span class="hlt">Al</span> infiltrates into a dense mullite preform through grain boundary diffusion, and reacts with mullite at grain boundaries to form a partial reaction zone. Then, a complete reaction takes place in the reaction region between the partial reaction zone and the full reaction zone to convert the dense mullite preform to a composite of {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}0{sub 3} (matrix) and an <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si phase (thin channels). Finally, the reduced Si from the reaction diffuses out of the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>{sub 2}0{sub 3} composite through the metal channels, whereas <span class="hlt">Al</span> from the molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool is continuously drawn to the reaction region until the mullite preform is consumed or the sample is removed from the molten <span class="hlt">Al</span> pool. Based on the observed microstructure, infiltration mechanisms have been discussed, and a growth model of the composites is proposed in which the process involves repeated nucleation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}0{sub 3} grains and grain growth.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, Y.; Jia, J. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials Engineering; Loehman, R.E.; Ewsuk, K.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-12-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">346</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15369378"> <span id="translatedtitle">Infrared spectra of aluminum hydrides in solid hydrogen: <span class="hlt">Al</span>2H4 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2H6.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The reaction of laser-ablated <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms and normal-H(2) during co-deposition at 3.5 K produces <span class="hlt">Al</span>H, <span class="hlt">Al</span>H(2), and <span class="hlt">Al</span>H(3) based on infrared spectra and the results of isotopic substitution (D(2), H(2) + D(2) mixtures, HD). Four new bands are assigned to <span class="hlt">Al</span>(2)H(4) from annealing, photochemistry, and agreement with frequencies calculated using density functional theory. Ultraviolet photolysis markedly increases the yield of <span class="hlt">Al</span>H(3) and seven new absorptions for <span class="hlt">Al</span>(2)H(6) in the infrared spectrum of the solid hydrogen sample. These frequencies include terminal <span class="hlt">Al</span>-H(2) and bridge <span class="hlt">Al-H-Al</span> stretching and <span class="hlt">Al</span>H(2) bending modes, which are accurately predicted by quantum chemical calculations for dibridged <span class="hlt">Al</span>(2)H(6), a molecule isostructural with diborane. Annealing these samples to remove the H(2) matrix decreases the sharp <span class="hlt">Al</span>H(3) and <span class="hlt">Al</span>(2)H(6) absorptions and forms broad 1720 +/- 20 and 720 +/- 20 cm(-1) bands, which are due to solid (<span class="hlt">Al</span>H(3))(n). Complementary experiments with thermal <span class="hlt">Al</span> atoms and para-H(2) at 2.4 K give similar spectra and most product frequencies within 2 cm(-1). Although many volatile binary boron hydride compounds are known, binary aluminum hydride chemistry is limited to the polymeric (<span class="hlt">Al</span>H(3))( solid. Our experimental characterization of the dibridged <span class="hlt">Al</span>(2)H(6) molecule provides an important link between the chemistries of boron and aluminum. PMID:15369378</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wang, Xuefeng; Andrews, Lester; Tam, Simon; DeRose, Michelle E; Fajardo, Mario E</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-07-30</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">347</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013GeCoA.120..514P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamics of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitution in Fe-oxyhydroxides</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ab initio simulation results are presented for dilute <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitution in the common Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide materials hematite, goethite, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite. Experimental evidence from the literature suggests that <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitution in these materials may influence particle stability and phase transformation behavior, typically stabilizing the oxyhydroxide phases relative to the oxide, hematite. We find that all the alloyed phases studied are unstable with respect to phase separation into their unalloyed Fe/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-(oxyhydr)oxide end members. Among the phases studied, ferrihydrite is predicted to allow <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitution with the lowest energy cost, while hematite appears to have the strongest tendency for phase separation. Considering the effect on thermodynamic stability relative to the stable Fe-oxide hematite, the three Fe-oxyhydroxide materials (goethite, lepidocrocite, ferrihydrite) are shown to be stabilized relative to doped <span class="hlt">Al</span>-hematite as <span class="hlt">Al</span> content is increased. Interactions between <span class="hlt">Al</span> dopant atoms on neighboring Fe sites are simulated and are shown to have minimal influence on Fe–<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloying thermodynamics in each of the materials simulated within the range of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-dopant concentrations calculated. Simulations of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitutions at the goethite (1 0 1) surface indicate that surface segregation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> dopants is energetically favored for low <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentrations, however this tendency diminishes when <span class="hlt">Al</span> dopants form a full monolayer at the mineral surface.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pinney, Nathan; Morgan, Dane</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">348</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JPSJ...79j3701K"> <span id="translatedtitle">27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR/NMR Study of Kondo Semiconductor CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">27<span class="hlt">Al</span>-NQR/NMR measurements have been performed on CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 in relevance to the novel phase below T0=27 K of isostructural CeRu2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10. NQR peaks are assigned to five crystallographically inequivalent <span class="hlt">Al</span> sites. No splitting of the NQR spectra down to 1.5 K confirms the lack of phase transition in this compound. The gaplike decrease in the spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T1 above about 20 K, following the Korringa law (T1T = const.) below 20 K, indicates a pseudogap opening near the Fermi level. The gap magnitude of 70 K with a mid-gap state of 42% is estimated based on a rectangular density of states. The gap magnitude is much larger than the gap of 15 K evaluated previously from the electrical resistivity, which suggests CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 to be a Kondo semiconductor with a Kondo temperature much higher than 300 K.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kawamura, Yukihiro; Edamoto, Shingo; Takesaka, Tomoaki; Nishioka, Takashi; Kato, Harukazu; Matsumura, Masahiro; Tokunaga, Yo; Kambe, Shinsaku; Yasuoka, Hiroshi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">349</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JPCS...74.1387L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Zirconium adsorption and incorporation on a reconstructed <span class="hlt">Al</span>-T4 <span class="hlt">Al</span>N(0001) surface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We discuss the energetic stability and electronic structure of zirconium adsorption and incorporation on a 2×2 reconstructed <span class="hlt">Al</span>N(0001) surface. We employ density-functional theory within the generalized-gradient approximation to study such effects. First-principles total energy calculations reveal that the most stable positions of a Zr adatom on the reconstructed 2×2-T4 <span class="hlt">Al</span>N(0001) surface are at the S1 and Sp substitutional sites. In addition, calculating the relative surface energy of several configurations, we constructed a phase diagram showing the energetically most stable surfaces as a function of the aluminium chemical potential. Based on these results, we find that incorporation at <span class="hlt">Al</span>-substitutional sites is energetically favorable compared to adsorption on the top layers. In particular, we find that Zr-S1 and Zr-Sp structures are stable over the entire chemical potential range. This effect can lead to the formation of a non-reactive interfacial ZrN(111) layer on the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N(0001) surface, which can offer a good interfacial combination between <span class="hlt">Al</span>N substrate and other metal contacts, i.e. zirconium.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">López-Pérez, William; González-Hernández, Rafael; Rodríguez M, Jairo Arbey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">350</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MARN46005Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Quasiparticle diffusion in <span class="hlt">Al</span> film and transmission with an <span class="hlt">Al</span>/W interface</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Cryogenic Dark Matter Search (CDMS) experiment uses both high-purity Si and Ge crystals to directly search for Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs). These detectors simultaneously measure the ionization and phonon energy produced by particle interactions. This talk will focus on experiments performed with a separate set of test devices fabricated to study the fundamental physics of the CDMS phonon sensors. In our test experiments, an ^55Fe source was used to excite a NaCl reflector, producing 2.6 keV x-rays that hit our test devices after passing through a collimator. The devices under study consisted of a 250 ? m wide x 350 ? m long <span class="hlt">Al</span> absorber film (300 nm thick) coupled to two 250 ? m x 250 ? m (40 nm thick) W transition edge sensors (TESs), one at each end of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> film. The impinging x-rays break Cooper pairs in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> film, producing quasiparticles that we detect as they propagate into the W TESs. We studied the diffusion of these quasiparticles, trapping in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> film, and their transmission probability at the <span class="hlt">Al</span>/W interfaces. Results from our precision experiments will be presented in this talk. These results are also being used to further optimize the design of SuperCDMS detectors for a proposed 100 kg scale dark matter search.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yen, Jeffrey; Brink, Paul; Cabrera, Blas; Cherry, Matt; Pyle, Matt; Redl, Peter; Tomada, Astrid; Young, Betty</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">351</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1068161"> <span id="translatedtitle">THE THERMAL EXPANSION OF THE DIRECTIONALLY SOLIDIFIED <span class="hlt">Al-CuAl</span>{sub 2} EUTECTIC</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Alloys of <span class="hlt">Al</span>- Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2} eutectic composition were prepared from 99.999% pure materials and directionally solidified in a temperature gradient of about 45°C/cm at different growth rates R. The {lambda}{sup 2}R = constant relation was verified and lamellar spacings of 7.5, 3.5, 2.6, 1.8 and 1.4 ~m were obtained. Dilatometer specimens were machined with axes aligned in the principal lamellae coordinate directions. Thermal expansion was measured by standard dilatometry (Cu standard) using a set point program cycling between room temperature and 500°C . Thermal expansion of the directionally solidified <span class="hlt">Al-CuAl</span>{sub 2} eutectic is greatest in the growth direction (in the plane of the lamellae), least in the transverse direction (orthogonal to the growth direction in the plane of the lamellae) and intermediate in the vertical direction (normal to the lamellae) . The most significant finding of the study is that the thermal expansion increases with decreasing lamellar spacing between limits defined approximately by the thermal expansion of the Cu<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2} phase alone and the predicted thermal expansion of an isotropic elastic model of the composite.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Baker, Dennis F.; Bragg, Robert H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1980-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">352</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IJMPB..23.1407S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tribological Properties of Ti(<span class="hlt">Al,O)/Al</span>2O3 Composite Coating by Thermal Spraying</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity air fuel (HVAF) thermally sprayed wear resistant Ti(<span class="hlt">Al,O)/Al</span>2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting and dummy blocks aluminium extrusion. A feedstock of Ti(<span class="hlt">Al,O)/Al</span>2O3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and TiO2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity air-fuel (HVAF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700°C). The wear resistance of the coating was investigated by a tribometer using a spherical ended alumina pin as a counter body under dry and lubricating conditions. The results showed that composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature than at room temperature without using lubricant. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salman, Asma; Gabbitas, Brian; Cao, Peng; Zhang, Deliang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">353</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910051591&hterms=XD&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DXD"> <span id="translatedtitle">1000 to 1300 K slow plastic compression properties of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-deficient Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Nickel aluminides containing 37, 38.5 and 40 at. pct <span class="hlt">Al</span> have been fabricated by XD synthesis and hot pressing. Such materials were compression tested in air under constant velocity conditions between 1000 and 1300 K. Examination of the microstructures of hot pressed and compression tested aluminides indicated that the structure consisted of two phases, gamma-prime and Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>, for essentially all conditions, where gamma-prime was usually found on the Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> grain boundaries. The stress-strain behavior of all three intermetallics was similar where flow at a nominally constant stress occurred after about two-percent plastic deformation. Furthermore, the 1000 to 1300 K flow stress-strain rate properties are nearly identical for these materials, and they are much lower than those for XD processed Ni-50<span class="hlt">Al</span>. The overall deformation of the two phase nickel aluminides appears to be controlled by dislocation climb in Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> rather than processes in gamma-prime.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Whittenberger, J. D.; Kumar, K. S.; Mannan, S. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">354</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670940"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revisiting the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>?O? interface: coherent interfaces and misfit accommodation.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the coherent and semi-coherent <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations with a mixed, metallic-ionic atomistic model. For the coherent interfaces, both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-terminated and O-terminated nonstoichiometric interfaces have been studied and their relative stability has been established. To understand the misfit accommodation at the semi-coherent interface, a 1-dimensional (1D) misfit dislocation model and a 2-dimensional (2D) dislocation network model have been studied. For the latter case, our analysis reveals an interface dislocation structure with a network of three sets of parallel dislocations, each with pure-edge character, giving rise to a pattern of coherent and stacking-fault-like regions at the interface. Structural relaxation at elevated temperatures leads to a further change of the dislocation pattern, which can be understood in terms of a competition between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation interaction energy at the interface. Our results are expected to serve as an input for the subsequent dislocation dynamics models to understand and predict the macroscopic mechanical behavior of <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 composite heterostructures. PMID:24670940</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilania, Ghanshyam; Thijsse, Barend J; Hoagland, Richard G; Lazi?, Ivan; Valone, Steven M; Liu, Xiang-Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">355</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatSR...4E4485P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revisiting the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 Interface: Coherent Interfaces and Misfit Accommodation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the coherent and semi-coherent <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations with a mixed, metallic-ionic atomistic model. For the coherent interfaces, both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-terminated and O-terminated nonstoichiometric interfaces have been studied and their relative stability has been established. To understand the misfit accommodation at the semi-coherent interface, a 1-dimensional (1D) misfit dislocation model and a 2-dimensional (2D) dislocation network model have been studied. For the latter case, our analysis reveals an interface dislocation structure with a network of three sets of parallel dislocations, each with pure-edge character, giving rise to a pattern of coherent and stacking-fault-like regions at the interface. Structural relaxation at elevated temperatures leads to a further change of the dislocation pattern, which can be understood in terms of a competition between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation interaction energy at the interface. Our results are expected to serve as an input for the subsequent dislocation dynamics models to understand and predict the macroscopic mechanical behavior of <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 composite heterostructures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilania, Ghanshyam; Thijsse, Barend J.; Hoagland, Richard G.; Lazi?, Ivan; Valone, Steven M.; Liu, Xiang-Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">356</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3967201"> <span id="translatedtitle">Revisiting the <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 Interface: Coherent Interfaces and Misfit Accommodation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We study the coherent and semi-coherent <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 interfaces using molecular dynamics simulations with a mixed, metallic-ionic atomistic model. For the coherent interfaces, both <span class="hlt">Al</span>-terminated and O-terminated nonstoichiometric interfaces have been studied and their relative stability has been established. To understand the misfit accommodation at the semi-coherent interface, a 1-dimensional (1D) misfit dislocation model and a 2-dimensional (2D) dislocation network model have been studied. For the latter case, our analysis reveals an interface dislocation structure with a network of three sets of parallel dislocations, each with pure-edge character, giving rise to a pattern of coherent and stacking-fault-like regions at the interface. Structural relaxation at elevated temperatures leads to a further change of the dislocation pattern, which can be understood in terms of a competition between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation interaction energy at the interface. Our results are expected to serve as an input for the subsequent dislocation dynamics models to understand and predict the macroscopic mechanical behavior of <span class="hlt">Al/?-Al</span>2O3 composite heterostructures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Pilania, Ghanshyam; Thijsse, Barend J.; Hoagland, Richard G.; Lazic, Ivan; Valone, Steven M.; Liu, Xiang-Yang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">357</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24972820"> <span id="translatedtitle">Delayed diagnosis in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>: The problem continues.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied the limitations to early diagnosis in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>). The diagnostic process was assessed in 120 consecutive patients, including onset, interval to diagnosis, investigations, specialist assessment and pre-diagnostic management. Times from onset to first consultation (T1), second consultation (T2) and diagnosis (TD) were considered. Predictors of diagnostic delay were determined by multivariate logistic regression, adjusted for gender, age, clinical manifestations, and specialism of the first and second consultants. There were 101 consecutive <span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients with complete datasets (69% men; median age at diagnosis 61.5years). The mean TD and median TD were respectively 10.1 and 9.5months. In 55%, the first consultant was a general practitioner (GP), in 16% a neurologist and in 14% an orthopedist. The diagnosis of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> was made by non-neurologists in 9 patients. The odds of delayed diagnosis (?12months) were higher (1.56; 0.19-12.56) in younger patients (?45years) (p<0.05). Female gender (0.56; 0.29-1.70) and bulbar-onset (0.56; 0.29-1.70) were independently associated with earlier diagnosis (p<0.05). Assessment by a neurologist at the first (0.32; 0.19-2.46) or second consultation (0.87; 0.21-1.21) was associated with a shorter diagnosis time (<12months) (p<0.05). We conclude that diagnostic delay mainly resulted from delayed referral from non-neurologist physicians to a neurologist. Moreover, incomplete neurophysiological investigation had a relevant impact. PMID:24972820</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Nzwalo, Hipolito; de Abreu, Daisy; Swash, Michael; Pinto, Susana; de Carvalho, Mamede</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">358</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930041111&hterms=PCT&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPCT"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transformation to Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 in a 63.0 at. pct Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microstructures of 63 at. pct P/M Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys with a composition close to the stoichiometry of the Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase were investigated using homogenized and quenched specimens aged at low temperatures for various times. Results of analyses of XRD data and electron microscopy observations were used for quantitative phase analysis, performed to calculate the (Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> + Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3)/Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase boundary locations. The measured lattice parameters of Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase formed at 823, 873, and 923 K indicated an increase in tetragonality of the phase with increasing nickel content.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khadkikar, P. S.; Locci, I. E.; Vedula, K.; Michal, G. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">359</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21194991"> <span id="translatedtitle">Growth and characterization of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N superlattices prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span>N coatings were prepared using a reactive direct current magnetron sputtering system from Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span> targets. Structural characterization of the coatings using x-ray diffraction (XRD) revealed the B1 NaCl structure of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span>N coatings with a prominent reflection along the (111) plane. The XPS data confirmed the bonding structures of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span>N single layer coatings. Subsequently, nanolayered multilayer coatings of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N were deposited on silicon and mild steel (MS) substrates at different modulation wavelengths ({lambda}) with a total thickness of approximately 1.0 {mu}m. The modulation wavelengths were calculated from the x-ray reflectivity data using modified Bragg's law. Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N multilayer coatings were textured along (111) for {lambda}<200 A and the XRD patterns showed the formation of superlattice structure for coatings deposited at {lambda}=102 A. The x-ray reflectivity data showed reflections of fifth and seventh orders for multilayer coatings deposited at {lambda}=102 and 138 A, respectively, indicating the formation of sharp interfaces between Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span>N layers. The cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy image of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N multilayer coatings indicated a noncolumnar and dense microstructure. A maximum hardness of 39 GPa was observed for Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N multilayer coatings deposited at {lambda}=93 A, which was higher than the rule-of-mixture value (30 GPa) for Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and Cr<span class="hlt">Al</span>N. Study of thermal stability of the coatings in air using micro-Raman spectroscopy indicated that the Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N multilayer coatings were stable up to 900 deg. C in air. Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/CrAl</span>N multilayer coatings also exhibited improved corrosion resistance when compared to the MS substrate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Barshilia, Harish C.; Deepthi, B.; Rajam, K. S.; Bhatti, Kanwal Preet; Chaudhary, Sujeet [Surface Engineering Division, National Aerospace Laboratories, Post Bag No. 1779, Bangalore 560 017 (India); Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, New Delhi 110 016 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">360</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/231085"> <span id="translatedtitle">The {beta}-Ti(<span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si) + Ti{sub 5}(Si,<span class="hlt">Al</span>){sub 3} eutectic reaction in the Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si ternary system</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Dual phase alloys Ti + Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3} or Ti{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> + Ti{sub 5}(Si,<span class="hlt">Al</span>){sub 3} are recently of special interest, due to their probable high performance at elevated temperatures. In 1988, a eutectic line of Ti{sub 3}(<span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si) + Ti{sub 5}(Si,<span class="hlt">Al</span>){sub 3} was first established in a Ti-rich portion of the Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si system, and was further reported in the following years. However, the reported line only covered a limited range in the Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si ternary system; thus, extensive study over a wider range in the ternary phase diagram is necessary. In the present paper, the details of the {beta}-Ti(<span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si) + Ti{sub 5}(Si,<span class="hlt">Al</span>){sub 3} eutectic line, ranging from 0 at% <span class="hlt">Al</span> to 40 at% <span class="hlt">Al</span> will be reported, together with the melting temperatures and the microstructures of the eutectic alloys. It is suggested that the eutectic line in this paper means the liquidus valley between {beta}-Ti-rich liquidus surface and Ti{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-rich liquidus surface, while the eutectic microstructure, here, means the coupled-growth microstructure solidified along this liquidus valley.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Wu, J.; Qiu, G.; Zhang, L. [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). Dept. of Materials Science] [Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China). Dept. of Materials Science</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return 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href="#">11</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_12");' href="#">12</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_13");' href="#">13</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_14");' href="#">14</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_15");' href="#">15</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_16");' href="#">16</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_17");' href="#">17</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#">18</a> <a style="font-weight: bold;">19</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#">20</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#">21</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#">22</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_23");' href="#">23</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_24");' href="#">24</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_25");' href="#">25</a> </span> </span> <a id="NextPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">361</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4012400"> <span id="translatedtitle">Modeling <span class="hlt">ALS</span> and FTLD proteinopathies in yeast</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In recent years there have been several reports of human neurodegenerative diseases that involve protein misfolding being modeled in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This review summarizes recent advances in understanding the specific mechanisms underlying intracellular neuronal pathology during Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD), including SOD1, TDP-43 and FUS protein inclusions and the potential of these proteins to be involved in pathogenic prion-like mechanisms. More specifically, we focus on findings from yeast systems that offer tremendous possibilities for screening for genetic and chemical modifiers of disease-related proteotoxicity.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">362</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780013346&hterms=color+doped+ceo2+solid&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dcolor%2Bdoped%2Bceo2%2Bsolid"> <span id="translatedtitle">Development of Si<span class="hlt">Al</span>ON materials</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cold pressing and sintering techniques were used to produce ceramic bodies in which the major phase was beta prime Si3-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-O-N4 solid solution. A variety of foreign oxides were used to promote liquid phase sintering, and this resulted in the incorporation of additional solid phases in the ceramic bodies which controlled elevated temperature properties. None of the bodies studied to date exhibited both adequate high temperature mechanical properties and oxidation resistance. Criteria are suggested to guide the formulation of bodies with improved high temperature properties.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Layden, G. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">363</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/495821"> <span id="translatedtitle">Orbit stability of the <span class="hlt">ALS</span> storage ring</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Advanced Light Source (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) storage ring, a synchrotron light source of the third generation, is specified to maintain its electron orbit stable within one tenth of the rms beam size. In the absence of a dedicated orbit feed-back system, several orbit-distorting effects were investigated, aided by a new interactive simulation tool, the code TRACY V. The effort has led to a better understanding of the behavior of a variety of accelerator subsystems and in consequence produced a substantial improvement in day-to-day orbit stability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Keller, R.; Nishimura, H.; Biocca, A. [and others</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">364</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996SSCom..99..813R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Calculated site substitution in ?'-Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The site preference of 3 d, 4 d and 5 d transition-metal ternary substitutional additions to Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span> is studied by the linear muffin-tin orbitals method within the framework of the local density and multisublattice single-site coherent potential approximations in conjunction with a phenomenological expansion of the ordering energy. The substitution behaviour of the three d-transition series is found to follow the same simple trend and it is shown that the calculated reversal of the site-preference of Co, Cu, and Pd at high temperatures leads to a modification of previous interpretations of experimental data.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ruban, A. V.; Skriver, H. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">365</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1136..627H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effect of <span class="hlt">Al</span> Content in <span class="hlt">Al</span>/TiO2 Powder Mixture on Formation of Phases in ?-Ti<span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 Nano Composite Prepared by Mechanical Alloying</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mechanochemical synthesis of a nano composite comprising a nano structured ?-Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy matrix and nano crystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 particles, was studied in this research. The precursors consisted of TiO2 powder mixed together with various amounts of <span class="hlt">Al</span> powder. The mixtures were subjected to intense mechanical activation in a high energy ball mill. Milled powders were cold pressed and heated to form the final nano composite phases and to sinter them together. Thermal behavior of milled powders was studied by DTA technique. DTA results of samples show that by increasing the <span class="hlt">Al</span> content of samples, the intensity of aluminothermic reaction increases and the temperature of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> formation decreases. Also, the effect of <span class="hlt">Al</span> content on structure of sintered samples was studied by XRD and SEM techniques. XRD results indicate that by increasing of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> content, less Ti3<span class="hlt">Al</span> phase is formed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Heshmati-Manesh, S.; Alamolhoda, S.; Ataie, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">366</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=PB2008106089"> <span id="translatedtitle">Compositions and Methods for Treating Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The present invention provides compositions and methods for treating <span class="hlt">ALS</span> and other diseases, particularly motor neuron diseases that are mediated by aberrant aggregation of SOD. Patients with <span class="hlt">ALS</span> may be treated using a compound of the invention which inhi...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">C. Breneman H. Zhang J. Chung M. D. De Beus W. Colon</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">367</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008LPI....39.1255R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ca,<span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich Inclusions in Rumuruti Chondrites</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We studied 20 R chondrites and found 126 Ca,<span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich objects (101 CAIs, 19 <span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich chondrules, and 6 spinel-rich fragments). Based on the mineralogical characterisation the inclusions can be grouped into different classes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rout, S. S.; Bischoff, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">368</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-04-21/pdf/2010-8838.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 20773 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Jackson, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...09-ASO-27] Establishment of Class E Airspace; Jackson, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION...that establishes Class E airspace at Jackson Muni, Jackson, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC, April 21, 2010. FOR...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">369</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-03-23/pdf/2010-6277.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 13670 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Gadsden, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...No. 09-ASO-28] Amendment of Class E Airspace; Gadsden, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION...amends Class E airspace at Northeast Alabama Regional, Gadsden, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC, March 23, 2010. FOR...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-03-23</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">370</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-27/pdf/2010-1374.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 4270 - Modification of Class E Airspace; Anniston, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...09-ASO-22] Modification of Class E Airspace; Anniston, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION...Class E airspace at Anniston Metropolitan Airport, Anniston, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. DATES: Effective Date: 0901 UTC, January 27, 2010....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-27</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">371</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-10-29/pdf/2010-27367.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 66806 - Nationwide Life Insurance Company, et <span class="hlt">al</span>.,</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...File No. 812-13648] Nationwide Life Insurance Company, et <span class="hlt">al</span>., Notice of Application October 25, 2010. AGENCY: Securities...1\\ In the Matter of Nationwide Investing Foundation, et <span class="hlt">al</span>., 1940 Act Rel. No. 23133 (April 28, 1998)...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-10-29</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">372</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-04-10/pdf/2013-08317.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 21428 - Royce Focus Trust, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>.;</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...30447; File No. 812-14034] Royce Focus Trust, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>.; Notice of Application April 4, 2013. AGENCY: Securities...1\\ Royce Global Trust, Inc., et <span class="hlt">al</span>., Investment Company Act Release Nos. 22665 (May 16,...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-04-10</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">373</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JSSCh.198..542R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Synthesis of nanostructured <span class="hlt">Al</span>N by solid state reaction of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and diaminomaleonitrile</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The solid state reaction of diaminomaleonitrile (DAMN) with aluminum via both mechanochemical and thermal treatment routes was studied by X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the milling process, the reaction starts with the deammoniation of the DAMN molecules, followed by the formation of nanostructured <span class="hlt">Al</span>N powder as the main solid product after milling for 7 h. The reactivity of the mixed powder was also investigated during the conventional thermal treatment process using differential scanning calorimetry, derivative thermogravimetry and thermogravimetric analysis. The results reveal that DAMN starts to polymerize at 192 °C by the elimination of the amine groups. Furthermore, increasing the annealing temperature leads to the formation of a nitrogen-containing carbonaceous material with the structure similar to non-crystalline carbon. However, no evidence for the formation of <span class="hlt">Al</span>N was observed in the annealed samples even at temperatures as high as the <span class="hlt">Al</span> melting point.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rounaghi, S. A.; Eshghi, H.; Kiani Rashid, A. R.; Vahdati Khaki, J.; Samadi Khoshkhoo, M.; Scudino, S.; Eckert, J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">374</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930060673&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle">Investigation of etching techniques for superconductive Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3/Nb fabrication processes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Wet etching, CF4 and SF6 reactive ion etching (RIE), RIE/wet hybrid etching, Cl-based RIE, ion milling, and liftoff techniques have been investigated for use in superconductive Nb/<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3/Nb fabrication processes. High-quality superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) junctions have been fabricated using a variety of these etching methods; however, each technique offers distinct tradeoffs for a given process an wafer design. In particular, it was shown that SF6 provides an excellent RIE chemistry for low-voltage anisotropic etching of Nb with high selectivity to <span class="hlt">Al</span>. The SF6 tool has greatly improved the trilevel resist junction insulation process. Excellent repeatability, selectivity with respect to quartz, and submicron resolution make Cl2 + BCl3 + CHCl3 RIE a very attractive process for trilayer patterning.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lichtenberger, A. W.; Lea, D. M.; Lloyd, F. L.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">375</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1110976"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy localization on the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice of Pt3<span class="hlt">Al</span> with L12 order</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">A three-dimensional molecular-dynamics model of with order was developed and found to support the excitation of discrete breathers (DBs) and energy localization on the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice. For an initial lattice temperature of 0 K, large-amplitude DBs polarized along [100] are found to be very weakly damped, retaining most of their initial energy for more than 2000 cycles, while DBs polarized along [111] damped out over ~30 cycles. Because the DBs and their dissipation channels are confined to the <span class="hlt">Al</span> sublattice, long-lived nonequilibrium states with large energy differences between the <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Pt sublattices occur. Since collisions during irradiation more efficiently generate lattice vibrations in light atoms than heavy atoms, such nonequilibrium states may occur and alter the relaxation processes occurring during radiation damage.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Medvedev, Nikolay N [Altay State Technical University, Russia] [Altay State Technical University, Russia; Starostenkov, Mikhail D [Altay State Technical University, Russia] [Altay State Technical University, Russia; Manley, Michael E [ORNL] [ORNL</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">376</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvB..88d5314S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Epitaxial Zintl aluminide Sr<span class="hlt">Al</span>4 grown on a La<span class="hlt">Al</span>O3 substrate</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Zintl phases are a class of intermetallic materials that have simultaneously ionic and covalent bonding resulting from charge transfer between two different atomic species. We present a combined first principles and experimental study of Zintl-phase Sr<span class="hlt">Al</span>4, which is grown in thin film form on the perovskite oxide La<span class="hlt">Al</span>O3 using molecular beam epitaxy. The structural properties are investigated using reflection-high-energy electron diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and cross-section transmission electron microscopy, which reveal relaxed epitaxial island growth. Photoelectron spectroscopy measurements verify the Zintl-Klemm nature of the bonding in the material and are utilized to determine the band offset and the work function of Sr<span class="hlt">Al</span>4, while transport measurements confirm its metallic behavior. The experimentally observed properties are confirmed using density functional calculations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schlipf, Lukas; Slepko, Alexander; Posadas, Agham B.; Seinige, Heidi; Dhamdhere, Ajit; Tsoi, Maxim; Smith, David J.; Demkov, Alexander A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">377</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23836781"> <span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of human sporadic <span class="hlt">ALS</span> biomarkers in the familial <span class="hlt">ALS</span> transgenic mSOD1(G93A) mouse model.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder of motor neurons. Although most cases of <span class="hlt">ALS</span> are sporadic (s<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) and of unknown etiology, there are also inherited familial <span class="hlt">ALS</span> (f<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) cases that share a phenotype similar to s<span class="hlt">ALS</span> pathological and clinical phenotype. In this study, we have identified two new potential genetic <span class="hlt">ALS</span> biomarkers in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) obtained from s<span class="hlt">ALS</span> patients, namely the TDP-43 (TAR DNA-binding protein 43) and SLPI (secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor). Together with the previously discovered ones-CyFIP2 and RbBP9, we investigated whether these four potential <span class="hlt">ALS</span> biomarkers may be differentially expressed in tissues obtained from mutant SOD1(G93A) transgenic mice, a model that is relevant for at least 20% of the f<span class="hlt">ALS</span> cases. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of brain, spinal cord and muscle tissues of the mSOD1(G93A) and controls at various time points during the progression of the neurological disease showed differential expression of the four identified biomarkers in correlation with (i) the tissue type, (ii) the stage of the disease and (iii) the gender of the animals, creating thus a novel spatiotemporal molecular signature of <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. The biomarkers detected in the f<span class="hlt">ALS</span> animal model were homologous to those that were identified in hMSC of our s<span class="hlt">ALS</span> cases. These results support the possibility of a molecular link between s<span class="hlt">ALS</span> and f<span class="hlt">ALS</span> and may indicate common pathogenetic mechanisms involved in both types of <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. Moreover, these results may pave the path for using the mSOD1(G93A) mouse model and these biomarkers as molecular beacons to evaluate the effects of novel drugs/treatments in <span class="hlt">ALS</span>. PMID:23836781</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Lilo, Eitan; Wald-Altman, Shane; Solmesky, Leonardo J; Ben Yaakov, Keren; Gershoni-Emek, Noga; Bulvik, Shlomo; Kassis, Ibrahim; Karussis, Dimitrios; Perlson, Eran; Weil, Miguel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">378</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993MTA....24...83K"> <span id="translatedtitle">Transformation to Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 in a 63.0 At. Pct Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Microstructures in a 63 at. pct Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy, produced by a powder metallurgy process, have been investigated in detail in as-quenched and aged (823 to 923 K) conditions. The parent L10 martensite plus B2 Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> microstructure in the as-quenched state transformed nearly completely to the orthorhombic Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase upon aging at 823 K for 720 hours. The volume fraction of Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 formed as a function of aging time at 823 K was observed to obey cellular reaction kinetic behavior. The specimens aged at 823 K for short times indicated that nucleation of the Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase occurred preferentially at grain boundaries. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations of short-time aged specimens revealed a complex microstructure consisting of shortrange ordered domains of Ni2<span class="hlt">Al</span> in a matrix of 7R martensite, in addition to new variants of 3R martensite and Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3. Aging at 873 and 923 K for 720 hours produced a stable two-phase microstructure consisting of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3. A quantitative phase analysis was carried out to calculate the (Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> + Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3)/Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 phase boundary locations. The measured lattice parameters of Ni5<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 formed at 823, 873, and 923 K indicated an increase in tetragonality of the phase with increasing nickel content.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Khadkikar, P. S.; Locci, I. E.; Vedula, K.; Michal, G. M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1993-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">379</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/52372661"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural characterization of rapidly solidified <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Co powders</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A study of the combined effect of alloying elements and melt superheat has been carried out on the as-solidified structure of rapidly solidified <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li-Co powders. Three alloys, viz., <span class="hlt">Al</span>-3 pct Li, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-3 pct Li-0.4 pct Co, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-3 pct Li-0.8 pct Co were chosen, and the liquid melt in each alloy atomized from the temperatures 1173 and 1073 K, using</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Fawzy H. Samuel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1986-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">380</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/85760771313h6234.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Deformation behavior of bimodal nanostructured 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Cryomilled 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys blended with volume fractions of 15, 30, and 50 pct unmilled 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span> were produced by consolidation\\u000a of a mixture of cryomilled 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span> and unmilled 5083 <span class="hlt">Al</span> powders. A bimodal grain size was achieved in the as-extruded alloys\\u000a in which nanostructured regions had a grain size of 200 nm and coarse-grained regions had a grain</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">B. O. Han; E. J. Lavernia; Z. Lee; S. Nutt; D. Witkin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">381</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40291369"> <span id="translatedtitle">NiCoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings with and without an <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> interlayer on an orthorhombic Ti 2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb-based alloy: Oxidation and interdiffusion behaviors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The mechanism of oxidation protection of NiCoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y overlay coatings on the orthorhombic Ti2<span class="hlt">Al</span>Nb-based alloy (O alloy) Ti–22<span class="hlt">Al</span>–26Nb (at.%) is described. While the bare alloy exhibited poor oxidation resistance at 800°C, adding NiCoCr<span class="hlt">Al</span>Y coatings significantly improved the oxidation resistance. However, serious interdiffusion between the coatings and the substrate resulted in rapid degradation of the coating system. Several reaction layers were formed</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Q. M. Wang; K. Zhang; J. Gong; Y. Y. Cui; C. Sun; L. S. Wen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">382</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19242020"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure-Induced Covalent Bonding in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li Compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Formation mechanism of a deep pseudogap in the electronic density of states of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li Bergman and Zintl compounds is discussed with an emphasis on the differences among isostructural <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mg compounds. Since Li scatters electrons very weakly in comparison with <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Mg, the potential landscape for electrons in <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li compounds is not that of the entire close-packed structure but</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kazuki Nozawa; Yasushi Ishii</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">383</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40699107"> <span id="translatedtitle">The bioavailability of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in soils to tea plants</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In order to understand the relationship between forms of <span class="hlt">Al</span> in soils and the uptake of <span class="hlt">Al</span> from soil into tea plants, tea leaves and soils were collected from 13 tea gardens in the east of China. The <span class="hlt">Al</span> concentration measured in the tea leaves was found to be best predicted by ‘available’ <span class="hlt">Al</span> extracted by 0.02 M CaCl2. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Deming Dong; Zhonglei Xie; Yaoguo Du</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">384</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/39757788"> <span id="translatedtitle">Sulfidation behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-modified MP35N alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">A commercial superalloy, MP35N, which was modified by adding various amounts of <span class="hlt">Al</span> up to 10 wt.%, has been studied over the temperature range of 600–900°C in 0.01 atm sulfur vapor. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>-modified alloys contained a second phase whose amount increased with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span>. The sulfidation rate followed the parabolic rate law and decreased with increasing <span class="hlt">Al</span> content. An activation</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chichang Shing; D. L. Douglass; F. Gesmundot</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">385</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/p555k54378518547.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>5083</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fine scale microstructure of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5083 (H-131) sensitized at 448 K (175 °C) for 1, 10, 25, 50, 100, 240, 500, and 1000 hours\\u000a has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the evolution of the ? phase (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Mg2) at grain boundaries and on pre-existing intragranular particles. In fully sensitized <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5083, the ? phase (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Mg2) forms heterogeneously both at grain boundaries</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Goswami; G. Spanos; P. S. Pao; R. L. Holtz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">386</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56145974"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural Evolution and Stress Corrosion Cracking Behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>5083</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The fine scale microstructure of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5083 (H-131) sensitized at 448 K (175 °C) for 1, 10, 25, 50, 100, 240, 500, and 1000 hours has been investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to study the evolution of the beta phase (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Mg2) at grain boundaries and on pre-existing intragranular particles. In fully sensitized <span class="hlt">Al</span>-5083, the beta phase (<span class="hlt">Al</span>3Mg2) forms heterogeneously both</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Goswami; G. Spanos; P. S. Pao; R. L. Holtz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">387</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53857441"> <span id="translatedtitle">High permittivity Li and <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped NiO ceramics</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">High-permittivity dielectric NiO-based ceramics co-doped with Li and <span class="hlt">Al</span> (LANO) have been prepared by a traditional solid-state synthesis. Analyses of the ceramic microstructure and composition indicate that <span class="hlt">Al</span> ions are distributed in grain boundaries, and that uniform boundaries indexed as Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O4 surround the grains. The concentration of <span class="hlt">Al</span> has a remarkable effect on the dielectric properties of the LANO ceramics.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuanhua Lin; Jianfei Wang; Lei Jiang; Yu Chen; Ce-Wen Nan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">388</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/19542405"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lasing characteristics of visible <span class="hlt">AlGaInP\\/Al</span>GaAs vertical-cavity lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the lasing characteristics of gain-guided <span class="hlt">AlGaInP\\/Al</span>GaAs visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes. At room temperature, continuous-wave operation is achieved over the wavelength range of 657--685 nm with the minimum threshold current at 670 nm. Devices with a 10-[mu]m diameter have threshold currents as low as 1.25 mA at room temperature (297 K) and 0.8 mA at 250 K. In</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Kent D. Choquette; J. A. Lott</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">389</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7038026"> <span id="translatedtitle">Lasing characteristics of visible <span class="hlt">AlGaInP/Al</span>GaAs vertical-cavity lasers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">We report the lasing characteristics of gain-guided <span class="hlt">AlGaInP/Al</span>GaAs visible vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diodes. At room temperature, continuous-wave operation is achieved over the wavelength range of 657--685 nm with the minimum threshold current at 670 nm. Devices with a 10-[mu]m diameter have threshold currents as low as 1.25 mA at room temperature (297 K) and 0.8 mA at 250 K. In addition, a single predetermined linear polarization state is found, independent of the lasing mode order and operating temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.; Lott, J.A. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-5800 (United States))</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">390</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/878779"> <span id="translatedtitle">In<span class="hlt">AlGaAs/Al</span>GaAs Superlattices for Polarized Electron Photocathodes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Highly efficient emitters of polarized electrons based on the In<span class="hlt">AlGaAs/Al</span>GaAs superlattice give an optimistic prognosis to explorations of such structures as the sources for accelerators. A new set of these SL structures with minimized conduction band offset was designed and recently tested. A new technology of surface protection in MBE growth leads to a significantly reduced heat-cleaning temperature. At these lowered cleaning temperatures, the thermal degradation of the working structure parameters is avoided. As a result a polarization P of up to 91% at corresponding quantum efficiency (QE) of 0.3% was achieved at room temperature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mamaev, Yu.A.; Subashiev, A.V.; Yashin, Yu.P.; Gerchikov, L.G.; /St. Petersburg Polytechnic Inst.; Maruyama, T.; Luh, D.-A.; Clendenin, J.E.; /SLAC; Ustinov, V.M.; Zhukov, A.E.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-08-15</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">391</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.springerlink.com/index/e7j8726877347568.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation Behaviour of TBC Systems on ?-Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> Based Alloy Ti–45<span class="hlt">Al</span>–8Nb</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The lifetime of thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems on gamma titanium aluminides was determined in the temperature range\\u000a between 850 °C and 950 °C under cyclic oxidation conditions in air. Coupons of the alloy Ti–45<span class="hlt">Al</span>–8Nb (at.%) were coated by\\u000a pack aluminizing. A subset of samples was subsequently annealed at 910 °C for 312 h in argon. During this heat treatment,\\u000a the two-phase (Nb,Ti)<span class="hlt">Al</span>3 plus</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">R. Braun; M. Fröhlich; C. Leyens; D. Renusch</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">392</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JGRA..119..260Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetic model of Janaki et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> bifurcated current sheet</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Space satellite observations show that current sheets in the space plasma environment are often characterized by bifurcated structures. In a recent paper a two-fluid model of the bifurcated current sheet was constructed on the basis of the pseudo potential method. A straightforward generalization of Janaki et <span class="hlt">al.'s</span> two-fluid model to kinetic formalism, however, leads to an unphysical situation of negative particle velocity distribution function occurring over a certain range of velocity space. If one assumes an isotropic background plasma population, however, one can show that a rigorous, physically valid kinetic solution of the bifurcated current sheet can be obtained.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yoon, P. H.; Janaki, M. S.; Dasgupta, B.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">393</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhyE...60..196A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Hydrogenic donor in asymmetric <span class="hlt">AlGaAs/GaAs/Al</span>GaAs quantum wells</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this work we study the effects of barrier height ratio VL/VR on asymmetric <span class="hlt">AlGaAs/GaAs/Al</span>GaAs quantum wells in absence of external influences. We use a variational method within the effective mass approximation to observe the effects of the barrier height ratio. It has been observed that the binding energy of the impurity, the expectation value of the electron-impurity distance along the z-direction, density of impurity states, and edge binding energy difference depend strongly on the barrier height ratio. Furthermore we present new curves that analyze the binding energy of asymmetric quantum wells as functions of barrier height ratio.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Akbas, H.; Dane, C.; Erdogan, I.; Akankan, O.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">394</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996AJ....111.2367H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Superoutburst Photometry of <span class="hlt">AL</span> Comae Berenices</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Photometric observations obtained during the 1995 April - May superoutburst of the dwarf nova <span class="hlt">AL</span> Comae Berenices are presented. This star shows rare, large-amplitude outbursts, the last definitely seen in 1975. During the 1995 outburst, as with that of 1961, there was a sharp, two-magnitude temporary minimum in the outburst light curve at about 28 days after maximum tight. We offer an explanation for such temporary minima involving the migration of a cooling wave within the accretion disk. V and I band CCD time-series photometry taken throughout the two-month-tong event, reveal a complex period structure with two dominant periods, one near 82 min and one near 41 min. Early in the outburst, photometric modulations of 81 and 86 min were seen and are likely to be related to superorbital modulations seen in other large outburst amplitude dwarf novae. Superhumps developed after ˜10 days and show a quasi-stable, nonphase coherent period of 82.5 min. A low-amplitude 41 min period was present throughout, also appearing not to be phase coherent. We conclude that the two dominant periods seen are of related origin and we list several possible mechanisms for their cause. Previous quiescence observations of <span class="hlt">AL</span> Com have shown periods near 87 and 41 min.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Howell, Steve B.; De Young, James; Mattei, Janet A.; Foster, Grant; Szkody, Paula; Cannizzo, John K.; Walker, Gary; Fierce, Erik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">395</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012MMTA...43.3359A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mechanochemical Behavior of NiO-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Fe Powder Mixtures to Produce (Ni, Fe)3<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 Nanocomposite Powder</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">(Ni, Fe)3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-30 vol pct <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 nanocomposite powder was synthesized by mechanochemical reaction of Fe-NiO-<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder mixtures. Structural evolution during mechanical alloying was studied by employing X-ray diffractometry (XRD), differential thermal analysis (DTA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). After 78 minutes of milling, the (Ni, Fe)3<span class="hlt">Al</span>-30 vol pct <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 nanocomposite can be synthesized by reaction 3Fe + 7<span class="hlt">Al</span> + 6NiO with a combustion mode. DTA results revealed that milling for 60 minutes decreases the temperature of reaction from 1040 K to 898 K (767 °C to 625 °C). TEM images corroborate a homogenous dispersion of reinforcements in the matrix of the nanocomposite proving that the reduction in the crystallite size of both reinforcements and matrix is within the nanometer range.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Adabavazeh, Z.; Karimzadeh, F.; Enayati, M. H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">396</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SuMi...64..367M"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-flux on the growth of <span class="hlt">AlN/GaN/Al</span>N films on Si (1 1 1) substrate by MBE</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> flux on the crystal quality of <span class="hlt">AlN/GaN/Al</span>N heterostructures grown on Si (1 1 1) substrates by solid source molecular beam epitaxy, using a 13.56 MHz RF nitrogen source, was investigated. The thickness of 69.94 nm is obtained for good growth conditions giving the comparable FWHM of the XRD-rocking curve of 0.46° (27.6 arcmin) when compared with other samples and previous reports. We found that the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N sample grown under low <span class="hlt">Al</span>-flux has produced a good structural quality and low compressive strain value compared to the sample grown under high <span class="hlt">Al</span>-fluxes.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Mohd Yusoff, M. Z.; Mahyuddin, A.; Hassan, Z.; Abu Hassan, H.; Abdullah, M. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">397</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE86004606"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of Surface Layers of Icosahedral <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Mn).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Surfaces layers of the icosahedral phase of <span class="hlt">Al</span>(Mn) have been formed from thin, alternating <span class="hlt">Al</span>/Mn layers deposited on <span class="hlt">Al</span> or Fe surfaces by rapid electron-beam or laser melting, by ion beam mixing, and by solid-state diffusion. The electron beam and laser t...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">J. A. Knapp D. M. Follstaedt</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1985-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">398</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/12615435"> <span id="translatedtitle">Nucleosynthesis of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> in Rotating Wolf-Rayet Stars</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> radionuclide can be detected through its decay emission line at 1.809 MeV, as was first observed by Mahoney et <span class="hlt">al</span>. (1982). Since then, COMPTEL on board of the CGRO satellite, performed a sky survey in this energy range, and provided maps of the 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span> distribution in the Galaxy. These results revealed that the main contributors to</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Palacios; G. Meynet; C. Vuissoz</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2004-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">399</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NIMPB.333...42X"> <span id="translatedtitle">26<span class="hlt">Al</span> interferences in accelerator mass spectrometry measurements</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The identification of interferences to 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> was conducted with a 5 MV tandem accelerator mass spectrometer. In addition to 9Be1+, 17O2+ and 35Cl4+ ions observed previously, this study confirmed existence of the most significant interference 37Cl4+ continuum ion to 16 MeV 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>3+ by measuring primary standard mixed with Cl with various 37Cl/35Cl ratios. The 37Cl- ions were formed by 37Cl16O- molecular-dissociation before the injection magnet, resulting in -0.7% of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>- magnetic rigidity. Subsequently, the 37Cl4+ ions have ME/q2 value that differ from 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>3+ by -0.1%. These allow the 37Cl- and 37Cl4+ to simultaneously pass through injection magnet, analytical magnet and high-energy analyser, and finally reach the detector with 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>3+. Further investigations on high charge states (26<span class="hlt">Al</span>5+ and 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>7+) indicate that the problem of interferences is generic. That is, interferences closest to 24 MeV 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>5+ ions include 10B2+, 16O3+, 35Cl7+ and 37Cl7+ ions, while 32 MeV 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>7+ ions may be interfered by 7Li2+, 16O4+, 18O5+, 35Cl9+ and 37Cl9+. However, it remains unclear that 37Cl continuum events observed in 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>3+-AMS do not exist in 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>5+ and 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>7+-AMS operations.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Xu, Sheng; Freeman, Stewart P. H. T.; Rood, Dylan H.; Shanks, Richard P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">400</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-10-31/pdf/2011-27805.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">76 FR 67054 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Fayette, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Amendment of Class E Airspace; Fayette, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...action amends Class E Airspace at Fayette, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, as the Fayette Non-Directional Beacon...rulemaking to amend Class E airspace at Fayette, <span class="hlt">AL</span> (76 FR 44285) Docket No....</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-10-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return 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showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">401</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-06-18/pdf/2013-14150.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">78 FR 36411 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Tuskegee, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Amendment of Class E Airspace; Tuskegee, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...action amends Class E Airspace at Tuskegee, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, as the Tuskegee VOR/DME has been decommissioned...Moton Field Municipal Airport, Tuskegee, <span class="hlt">AL</span> (78 FR 18928). Interested parties...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-06-18</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">402</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-31/pdf/2012-18522.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 45238 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Montgomery, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Amendment of Class E Airspace; Montgomery, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...amends Class E Airspace in the Montgomery, <span class="hlt">AL</span> area, by recognizing the name change of...amends Class E airspace for the Montgomery, <span class="hlt">AL</span>, area at the request of FAAs...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-31</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">403</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22al%22&id=EJ1004284"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Practical Enactment of Adventure Learning: Where Will You <span class="hlt">AL</span>@?</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The Adventure Learning (<span class="hlt">AL</span>) approach to designing and implementing learning experiences has great potential for practitioners. This manuscript delineates the practical enactment of <span class="hlt">AL</span> to support the K-12 community, teacher educators, and residential environmental science program providers in the conceptualization and delivery of their own <span class="hlt">AL</span>…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Miller, Brant G.; Hougham, R. Justin; Eitel, Karla Bradley</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">404</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-07-09/pdf/2012-16620.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">77 FR 40265 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, <span class="hlt">AL</span></span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Regulation; Tennessee River, Decatur, <span class="hlt">AL</span> AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. The deviation is necessary to install...Tennessee River, mile 304.4, at Decatur, <span class="hlt">AL</span>. The vertical clearance of the bridge...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-07-09</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">405</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49300602"> <span id="translatedtitle">Flash ignition of <span class="hlt">Al</span> nanoparticles: Mechanism and applications</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aluminum nanoparticles (<span class="hlt">Al</span> NPs), due to their high energy density, are important materials for propulsion systems, material synthesis and hydrogen generation. However, the oxidation mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> NPs at large heating rate remains inconclusive due to the lack of direct experimental evidence. Here, we studied the oxidation mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> NPs under large heating rate (on the order of 106K\\/s</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yuma Ohkura; Pratap M. Rao; Xiaolin Zheng</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">406</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008RJPCA..82.1801R"> <span id="translatedtitle">Complex equilibria in unsaturated vapor over <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Unsaturated <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br 3 vapor pressure was measured over the temperature and pressure ranges 560 845 K and 54 145 torr by the static method using a quartz diaphragm pressure gauge with increased sensitivity (the confidence interval of pressure, including thermal drift of zero pressure gauge point, was 0.3 torr, and that of temperature, 0.3 K). Two equilibrium models were considered, one including <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br3 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Br6 and the other, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br3, <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Br6, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Br9. The molecular constants of all vapor constituents were determined using density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-31G( d,p) level. The thermodynamic functions of all bromides were calculated in the rigid rotator-harmonic oscillator approximation. The enthalpies of independent equilibria for each model were determined by minimizing the residual sum of the squares of pressure discrepancies. According to the first model, 0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>2Br6 = <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br3, ? H o(298.15) = 13629.1 ± 9 cal/mol. According to the second model, 0.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>2Br6 = <span class="hlt">Al</span>Br3, ? H o(298.15) = 13638.8 ± 8 cal/mol, and 1.5<span class="hlt">Al</span>2Br6 = <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Br9, ? H o(298.15) = -8528 ± 800 cal/mol. The second model, for which the variance of pressure differs insignificantly from the experimental variance of pressure, should be given preference.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rusin, A. D.; Nisel'Son, L. A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">407</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010JNuM..399..189A"> <span id="translatedtitle">U-Mo/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si interaction: Influence of Si concentration</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Within the framework of the development of low enriched nuclear fuels for research reactors, U-Mo/<span class="hlt">Al</span> is the most promising option that has however to be optimised. Indeed at the U-Mo/<span class="hlt">Al</span> interfaces between U-Mo particles and the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix, an interaction layer grows under irradiation inducing an unacceptable fuel swelling. Adding silicon in limited content into the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix has clearly improved the in-pile fuel behaviour. This breakthrough is attributed to an U-Mo/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si protective layer around U-Mo particles appeared during fuel manufacturing. In this work, the evolution of the microstructure and composition of this protective layer with increasing Si concentrations in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix has been investigated. Conclusions are based on the characterization at the micrometer scale (X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectroscopy) of U-Mo7/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si diffusion couples obtained by thermal annealing at 450 °C. Two types of interaction layers have been evidenced depending on the Si content in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloy: the threshold value is found at about 5 wt.% but obviously evolves with temperature. It has been shown that for Si concentrations ranging from 2 to 10 wt.%, the U-Mo7/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si interaction is bi-layered and the Si-rich part is located close to the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si for low Si concentrations (below 5 wt.%) and close to the U-Mo for higher Si concentrations. For Si weight fraction in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy lower than 5 wt.%, the Si-rich sub-layer (close to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si) consists of U(<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si) 3 + UMo 2<span class="hlt">Al</span> 20, when the other sub-layer (close to U-Mo) is silicon free and made of UAl 3 and U 6Mo 4<span class="hlt">Al</span> 43. For Si weight concentrations above 5 wt.%, the Si-rich part becomes U 3(Si, <span class="hlt">Al</span>) 5 + U(<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si) 3 (close to U-Mo) and the other sub-layer (close to <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si) consists of U(<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si) 3 + UMo 2<span class="hlt">Al</span> 20. On the basis of these results and of a literature survey, a scheme is proposed to explain the formation of different types of ILs between U-Mo and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys (i.e. different protective layers).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Allenou, J.; Palancher, H.; Iltis, X.; Cornen, M.; Tougait, O.; Tucoulou, R.; Welcomme, E.; Martin, Ph.; Valot, C.; Charollais, F.; Anselmet, M. C.; Lemoine, P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">408</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40660075"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-body abrasion of a cast <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Cu (2014 <span class="hlt">Al</span>) alloy–<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 particle composite: influence of heat treatment and abrasion test parameters</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An <span class="hlt">Al</span>–Cu (2014 <span class="hlt">Al</span>) alloy reinforced with 10vol.% <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 particles (size: 75–150?m), prepared by liquid metallurgy route, has been investigated under two-body (high stress) abrasive wear condition. The influence of varying load, abrasive size and sliding distance on the abrasive wear behaviour of the specimens was also studied. The base alloy prepared under similar condition has also been studied under</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">O. P. Modi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2001-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">409</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40506279"> <span id="translatedtitle">Kinetic evaluation of combustion synthesis 3TiO 2 + 7<span class="hlt">Al</span> ? 3Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> + 2<span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 3 using non-isothermal DSC method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In situ process has been utilized to fabricate Ti<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 composites, with thermodynamically compatible matrices and reinforcements being obtained, through displacement reaction between TiO2 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>. However, the reaction involves intermediate steps between the starting and final materials, affecting the final phases and consequently the properties. In this paper, a model-free Kissinger-type method is applied to the non-isothermal differential scanning calorimetry</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Run-hua Fan; Bing Liu; Jing-de Zhang; Jian-qiang Bi; Yan-sheng Yin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">410</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/27038540"> <span id="translatedtitle">Proposal and Performance Analysis of Normally Off GaN\\/In<span class="hlt">AlN\\/Al</span>N\\/GaN HEMTs With 1-nm-Thick In<span class="hlt">Al</span>N Barrier</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Design considerations and performance of n++ GaN\\/In<span class="hlt">AlN\\/Al</span>N\\/GaN normally off high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) are analyzed. Selective and damage-free dry etching of the gate recess through the GaN cap down to a 1-nm-thick In<span class="hlt">Al</span>N barrier secures positive threshold voltage, while the thickness and the doping of the GaN cap influence the HEMT direct current and microwave performance. The cap doping density</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jan Kuzmik; Clemens Ostermaier; G. Pozzovivo; Bernhard Basnar; Werner Schrenk; Jean-François Carlin; M. Gonschorek; Eric Feltin; Nicolas Grandjean; Y. Douvry; Christophe Gaquiere; Jean-Claude De Jaeger; K. C?ic?o; Karol Frohlich; J. S?kriniarova?; Jaroslav Kovac; Gottfried Strasser; Dionyz Pogany; Erich Gornik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">411</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21518326"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ab initio molecular dynamics of <span class="hlt">Al</span> irradiation-induced processes during <span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} growth</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span> bombardment induced structural changes in {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} (R-3c) and {gamma}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Fd-3m) were studied using ab initio molecular dynamics. Diffusion and irradiation damage occur for both polymorphs in the kinetic energy range from 3.5 to 40 eV. However, for {gamma}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) subplantation of impinging <span class="hlt">Al</span> causes significantly larger irradiation damage and hence larger mobility as compared to {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Consequently, fast diffusion along {gamma}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}(001) gives rise to preferential {alpha}-<span class="hlt">Al</span>{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) growth, which is consistent with published structure evolution experiments.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Music, Denis; Nahif, Farwah; Friederichsen, Niklas; Schneider, Jochen M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Sarakinos, Kostas [Plasma and Coatings Physics Division, Linkoeping University, SE-58183 Linkoeping (Sweden)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-03-14</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">412</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15746387"> <span id="translatedtitle">Supra-canonical 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> and the residence time of CAIs in the solar protoplanetary disk.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The canonical initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> ratio of 4.5 x 10(-5) has been a fiducial marker for the beginning of the solar system. Laser ablation and whole-rock multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-source mass spectrometry magnesium isotope analyses of calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV3 meteorites demonstrate that some CAIs had initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> values at least 25% greater than canonical and that the canonical initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> cannot mark the beginning of solar system formation. Using rates of Mg diffusion in minerals, we find that the canonical initial 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>/27<span class="hlt">Al</span> is instead the culmination of thousands of brief high-temperature events incurred by CAIs during a 10(5)-year residence time in the solar protoplanetary disk. PMID:15746387</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Young, Edward D; Simon, Justin I; Galy, Albert; Russell, Sara S; Tonui, Eric; Lovera, Oscar</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">413</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhyB..396..138Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">Self-diffusion in the intermetallic compounds Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>: An embedded atom method study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The self-diffusion in Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span> are investigated by the molecular dynamics (MD) with an analytical embedded atom method (EAM) model which is fitted by the basic physical properties of pure constituents nickel (Ni) and aluminum (<span class="hlt">Al</span>), and the characteristic properties of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>, including the equilibrium lattice constant, the elastic constants, the cohesive energy, and the effective defect formation energies, are calculated. Furthermore, in Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni 3<span class="hlt">Al</span>, the activation energy and migration energy of Ni atom and <span class="hlt">Al</span> atom are also calculated, respectively. The present calculations are in agreement with the experimental value and the theoretical results obtained from other authors.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Song; Wang, Chong-Yu; Yu, Tao; Cai, Jun</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">414</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012PhyB..407.4530O"> <span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic and physical properties of Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span>: an atomistic study by EAM simulation</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">With this work we present a newly developed potential for the Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span> system, which is based on the analytical embedded atom method (EAM) with long range atomic interactions. The potential yields for the two most relevant phases B2-Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and D03-Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> lattice constants, elastic constants, as well as bulk and point defect formation enthalpies, which are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical data. In addition, the phonon dispersions for B2-Fe<span class="hlt">Al</span> and D03-Fe3<span class="hlt">Al</span> show a good agreement with available experiments. The calculated lattice constants and formation enthalpy for disordered Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys are in good agreement with experimental data or other theoretical calculations. This indicates that the present EAM potentials of Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span> system is suitable for atomistic simulations of structural and kinetic properties for the Fe-<span class="hlt">Al</span> system.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Ouyang, Yifang; Tong, Xiaofeng; Li, Chang; Chen, Hongmei; Tao, Xiaoma; Hickel, Tilmann; Du, Yong</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">415</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/40928626"> <span id="translatedtitle">Rates of oxygen exchange between the <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O 8<span class="hlt">Al</span> 28(OH) 56(H 2O) 26 18+(aq) (<span class="hlt">Al</span> 30) molecule and aqueous solution</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Rates of steady exchange of oxygens between bulk solution and the largest known aluminum polyoxocation: <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O8<span class="hlt">Al</span>28(OH)56(H2O)2618+(aq) (<span class="hlt">Al</span>30) are reported at pH?4.7 and 32–40°C. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>30 molecule is a useful model for geochemists because it is ?2 nm in length, comparable to the smallest colloidal solids, and it has structural complexity greater than the surfaces of most aluminum (hydr)oxide minerals. The</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brian L. Phillips; Alasdair Lee; William H. Casey</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2003-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">416</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApSS..285..287G"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layer thickness on high-temperature stability of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>2O3 multilayers which have constant Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N layer thickness (10 nm) and various <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layer thicknesses ranging from 0.5 nm to 4.5 nm were synthesized on alumina substrate by magnetron sputtering. The effects of annealing on the mechanical and structural properties of the multilayers were investigated using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), X-ray reflection (XRR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Nanoindenter. It was found that the hardness for the multilayers with <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layer thickness from 0.5 nm to 4.5 nm was much higher than Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N or <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 monolayer and their hardness values were over 36 GPa. The annealed multilayers displayed high-temperature stable hardness and elastic modulus. The hardness increases from 36 GPa of as-deposited to 39 GPa of annealed multilayer at 700 °C in the case of lO=1.2?nm. It also indicates the highest elastic modulus of 560 GPa after 700 °C annealing. The multilayers had polycrystallines of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N(1 1 1) and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N(2 2 2) textures. Compared with as-deposited multilayers, the annealed multilayers exhibited unchanged textures. The interface and layered structure also showed good high-temperature stability.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gao, C. K.; Yan, J. Y.; Dong, L.; Li, D. J.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">417</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49632126"> <span id="translatedtitle">Critical role of top interface layer on the bipolar resistive switching of <span class="hlt">Al\\/PEDOT:PSS\\/Al</span> memory device</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The role of top interface layer in bipolar resistive switching (BRS) behaviors of <span class="hlt">Al\\/PEDOT:PSS\\/Al</span> memory devices was investigated via comparison with the Au\\/PEDOT:PSS\\/<span class="hlt">Al</span> system. The I–V characteristic curves of device with a PEDOT:PSS layer sandwiched between two <span class="hlt">Al</span> electrodes displayed bipolar resistive switching characteristics, while the device with Au top electrode showed a permanent breakdown in forming process. HRTEM and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Jong Yun Kim; Hu Young Jeong; Jeong Won Kim; Tae Hyun Yoon; Sung-Yool Choi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">418</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49150489"> <span id="translatedtitle">Wear assessment of <span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span> 2O 3 nano-composite surface layer produced using friction stir processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">An innovative technique, friction stir processing (FSP) was employed for the fabrication of <span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 nano-composite surface layer on an <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloy substrate. Aluminum work pieces with pre-placed nano-sized <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 powder which was filled in a shallow groove were subjected to various numbers of passes from one to four. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that increase in the number of FSP</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Shafiei-Zarghani; S. F. Kashani-Bozorg; A. Zarei-Hanzaki</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">419</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53009668"> <span id="translatedtitle">Influence of Process Control Agents on Mechanochemical Synthesis of Ni<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 Nano Composite powder</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Mechanochemical synthesis of an intermetallic Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix nano composite powder has been studied in this paper. Micron sized powders of nickel oxide (NiO) and aluminum powders were subjected to high energy ball milling under an argon protected atmosphere. According to an exothermic exchange reaction assisted by high energy ball milling, nickel oxide is reduced by <span class="hlt">Al</span> and a Ni<span class="hlt">Al\\/Al</span>2O3 composite</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. Heshmati-Manesh; A. Jabbarnia</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">420</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/49302860"> <span id="translatedtitle">The effect of <span class="hlt">Al</span> content on the galvanic corrosion behaviour of coupled Ni\\/graphite and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span> coatings</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this study, the corrosion behaviour of 75Ni\\/25graphite abradable coating and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span> bonding coatings with different <span class="hlt">Al</span> content were investigated with open circuit potential and polarization tests. The galvanic corrosion of the coupled Ni\\/graphite and Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span> coatings was studied by using a zero-resistance ammeter in 5wt% NaCl solution. The experimental results showed that the corrosion resistance of the Ni–<span class="hlt">Al</span> coatings</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Cunguan Xu; Lingzhong Du; Bin Yang; Weigang Zhang</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a 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showDiv("page_23");' href="#" title="Next Page"> <img id="NextPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.next.18x20.png" alt="Next Page" /></a> <a id="LastPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">421</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://petrology.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/reprint/47/5/901.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> Sapphirine and Ca-<span class="hlt">Al</span> Hibonite-bearing Granulite Xenoliths from the Chyulu Hills Volcanic Field, Kenya</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Basanites of the Chyulu Hills (Kenya Rift) contain mafic Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ca-<span class="hlt">Al</span> granulite xenoliths. Their protoliths are interpreted as troctolitic cumulates; however, the original mineral assemblages were almost completely transformed by subsolidus reactions. Mg-<span class="hlt">Al</span> granulites contain the minerals spinel, sapphirine, sillimanite, plagioclase, corundum, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and garnet, whereas Ca-<span class="hlt">Al</span> granulites are characterized by hibonite, spinel, sapphirine, mullite, sillimanite, plagioclase, quartz,</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. ULIANOV; A. KALT</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">422</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/56686611"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds in <span class="hlt">Al</span>5186–<span class="hlt">Al</span>2024: The Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the microstructures and mechanical properties are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening <span class="hlt">Al</span>5083 and age hardening <span class="hlt">Al</span>2024 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. In this paper, we report the results of microstructural, mechanical property investigations of <span class="hlt">Al</span>5186–<span class="hlt">Al</span>2024 friction stir welds produced using various rotations and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. A. Akbari Mousavi; S. H. ShamAbadi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">423</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/55901409"> <span id="translatedtitle">Dissimilar Friction Stir Welds in <span class="hlt">Al</span>5186<span class="hlt">Al</span>2024: The Effect of Process Parameters on Microstructures and Mechanical Properties</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">The effect of tool traverse and rotation speeds on the microstructures and mechanical properties are quantified for welds between non-age-hardening <span class="hlt">Al</span>5083 and age hardening <span class="hlt">Al</span>2024 and compared to single alloy joints made from each of the two constituents. In this paper, we report the results of microstructural, mechanical property investigations of <span class="hlt">Al</span>5186-<span class="hlt">Al</span>2024 friction stir welds produced using various rotations and</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">S. A. A. Akbari Mousavi; S. H. Shamabadi</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">424</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41081620"> <span id="translatedtitle">Structure, hardness and thermal stability of Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N and nanolayered Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N\\/CrN multilayer films</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N films were deposited on silicon (111) substrates from a Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> target using a reactive DC magnetron sputtering process in Ar+N2 plasma. Films were prepared at various nitrogen flow rates and Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span> target compositions. Similarly, CrN films were prepared from the reactive sputtering of Cr target. Subsequently, nanolayered Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N\\/CrN multilayer films were deposited at various modulation wavelengths (?). X-ray diffraction</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Harish C. Barshilia; M. Surya Prakash; Anjana Jain; K. S. Rajam</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2005-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">425</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19548729"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters: a first principles study.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using first principles method we report the oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au(n-1) clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O(2) with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au(n-1)<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by <span class="hlt">Al</span> results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au(n-1)<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au(3)<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Au(5)<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O(2) with <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Au, Au<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Au(3)<span class="hlt">Al</span>, and Au(20)<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au(n-1)<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from <span class="hlt">Al</span> to Au. Moreover, the O(2) molecule prefers to attach at the <span class="hlt">Al</span> site rather than at the Au site. PMID:19548729</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajesh, Chinagandham; Majumder, Chiranjib</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">426</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21559731"> <span id="translatedtitle">Oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters: A first principles study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using first principles method we report the oxidation of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters. This work is divided into two parts: (i) the equilibrium structures and stability of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au{sub n-1} clusters (n=2-7,21) and (ii) the interaction of O{sub 2} with stable clusters. The calculations are performed using the plane wave pseudopotential approach under the density functional theory and generalized gradient approximation for the exchange and correlation functional. The optimized geometries of Au{sub n-1}<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters indicate that the substitution of Au by <span class="hlt">Al</span> results an early onset of three-dimensional structures from tetramer onwards. This is different from the results of transition metal doped Au clusters, where the planar conformation of Au clusters retains up to heptamer. The stability of Au{sub n-1}<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters has been analyzed based on the binding energy, second difference in energy, and the energy gaps between the highest occupied molecular orbital and lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy levels. Based on the energetics, the Au{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> and Au{sub 5}<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters are found to have extraordinary stability. The oxidation mechanism of <span class="hlt">Al</span> doped Au clusters have been studied by the interaction of O{sub 2} with <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Au, Au<span class="hlt">Al</span>, Au{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span>, and Au{sub 20}<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters. It is found that the oxidation of Au{sub n-1}<span class="hlt">Al</span> clusters undergoes via dissociative mechanism, albeit significant charge transfer from <span class="hlt">Al</span> to Au. Moreover, the O{sub 2} molecule prefers to attach at the <span class="hlt">Al</span> site rather than at the Au site.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Rajesh, Chinagandham [RMC, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Majumder, Chiranjib [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-21</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">427</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JMEP..tmp..200S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Metallurgical Characteristics of Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN Coating Synthesized by the PVD Process on a Cutting Insert</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN coating was deposited on a tungsten carbide insert, using the plasma-enhanced physical vapor deposition (PEPVD) process. The microstructure of the coating was examined and it was found that the Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN coating was uniform, highly dense, and less porous. The different phases formed in the coating were analyzed using the x-ray diffraction. The hardness and scratch resistance were measured using the nanoindentation tester and scratch tester, respectively. Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN exhibited higher hardness, higher Young's modulus, and superior scratch resistance when compared to the conventional coatings, such as Ti<span class="hlt">Al</span>N, <span class="hlt">Al</span>CrN, and TiN. The surface morphology of the coating was characterized using the atomic force microscope (AFM). The surface roughness was found to be lesser in the Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN coating. The Ti<span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span>CrN coating has proved to have better corrosion resistance, compared to the uncoated carbide substrate.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Sampath Kumar, T.; Balasivanandha Prabu, S.; Manivasagam, Geetha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">428</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=IAE2876"> <span id="translatedtitle">Effects of Crystalline Electric Field in Pr<span class="hlt">Al</span> sub 2 and Ce<span class="hlt">Al</span> sub 2.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The experiments on the inelastic scattering of neutrons are carried out on the polycrystal samples of Pr<span class="hlt">Al</span> sub 2 , Ce<span class="hlt">Al</span> sub 2 and La<span class="hlt">Al</span> sub 2 aimed at the investigation of the c field crystalline electric field effects in the compounds of the light rare ea...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">P. A. Alekseev I. P. Sadikov I. A. Markova O. D. Chistyakov</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1977-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">429</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20877439"> <span id="translatedtitle">Probing Galactic 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> with Exotic Ion Beams</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The goal of understanding the production of galactic 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> brings together progress in nuclear astrophysics from observations, theory, meteoritics, and laboratory experiments. In the case of experimental work, nuclear reactions involving unstable isotopes are being studied to elucidate the production of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> in stellar explosive nucleosynthesis. We discuss a direct measurement of the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,{gamma})27Si reaction with the DRAGON collaboration at TRIUMF, and a measurement of 25<span class="hlt">Al</span>+p elastic scattering with the CRIB (CNS-U.Tokyo) collaboration, toward constraining the 25<span class="hlt">Al</span>(p,{gamma})26Si reaction.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Alan A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton ON L8S 4M1 (Canada)</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-07-12</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">430</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014MMTA...45.1647C"> <span id="translatedtitle">Diffusion Research in BCC Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mo Ternary Alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Interdiffusion in Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mo ? solid solution was investigated at 1523 K (1250 °C) by analyzing diffusion couples. From the concentration profiles analytically represented by error function expansion (ERFEX), the ternary interdiffusion coefficients and impurity diffusivity were extracted by the Whittle-Green and generalized Hall methods. A comparison of the diffusion in five Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-X (Co, Cr, Fe, Mo, and V) ternaries reveals Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Mo is comparably like Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-(Cr, V) while Ti-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-(Co, Fe) are predominantly of interstitial nature.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chen, Yi; Tang, Bin; Xu, Guanglong; Wang, Chuanyun; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan; Cui, Yuwen</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2014-04-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">431</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996CP....211...81G"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si ordering in chabazites: A Monte Carlo study</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The <span class="hlt">Al</span>, Si distribution in the framework of chabazites has been studied as a function of the <span class="hlt">Al</span> loading by Monte Carlo simulations. The atom ordering has been characterized by several thermodynamic variables and order parameters obtained from the simulations at room temperature. One finds three different <span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si ordering patterns, whose stability limits are defined from characteristic changes in the thermodynamic variables. Long-range order is found in the atom distribution for <span class="hlt">Al</span> loading higher than 0.44. We have found similarities with the <span class="hlt">Al</span>,Si distribution in other zeolitic frameworks which include six-membered rings.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gordillo, M. C.; Herrero, C. P.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1996-11-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">432</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012RuMet2012..431S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder alloys: II. Compacting of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powders produced by various methods</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The technological properties of granulated Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powders produced by gas spraying of melts and Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> powders produced by calcium hydride reduction (CHR) of mixtures of nickel and aluminum oxides are compared. The possibilities of production of compact workpieces from these powders using hydrostatic pressing, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, and hot extrusion are estimated. To improve compressibility, preliminary milling and/or mechanical activation of the powders are proposed. The strength properties of Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> rods with a diameter of 20 mm extruded from a temperature of 1100°C and made from the granulated powders are slightly higher than those made from the CHR powders. At temperatures higher than 800°C the properties becomes similar. Transition point t d.b from the ductile to brittle state of samples made from powders sprayed in nitrogen and argon is 100-150°C higher than those made from the CHR powders. The difference in the mechanical properties is caused by the structural and chemical microheterogeneity of granules (microingots), which is inherited in the rods after hot deformation and annealing at 1200-1400°C and is (0.67-0.88) T m Ni<span class="hlt">Al</span> ( T m is the melting point, K).</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Skachkov, O. A.; Povarova, K. B.; Drozdov, A. A.; Morozov, A. E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">433</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/897563"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetization anomaly of Nb3<span class="hlt">Al</span> strands and instability of Nb3<span class="hlt">Al</span> Rutherford cables</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Using a Cu stabilized Nb{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> strand with Nb matrix, a 30 meter long Nb{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> Rutherford cable was made by a collaboration of Fermilab and NIMS. Recently the strand and cable were tested. In both cases instability was observed at around 1.5 Tesla. The magnetization of this Nb{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> strand was measured first using a balanced coil magnetometer at 4.2 K. Strands showed an anomalously large magnetization behavior around at 1.6 T, which is much higher than the usual B{sub c2} {approx} 0.5 Tesla (4.2 K) of Nb matrix. This result is compared with the magnetization data of short strand samples using a SQUID magnetometer, in which a flux-jump signal was observed at 0.5 Tesla, but not at higher field. As a possible explanation for this magnetization anomaly, the interfilament coupling through the thin Nb films in the strands is suggested. The instability problem observed in low field tests of the Nb{sub 3}<span class="hlt">Al</span> Rutherford cables is attributed to this effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yamada, Ryuji; /Fermilab; Kikuchi, Akihiro; /Tsukuba Magnet Lab; Wake, Masayoshi; /KEK, Tsukuba</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2006-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">434</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JEMat..41.2350T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Energy Relaxation Rates in <span class="hlt">AlInN/Al</span>N/GaN Heterostructures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The two-dimensional (2D) electron energy relaxation in <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.83In0.17N/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN heterostructures has been investigated experimentally. Shubnikov-de Haas (SdH) effect measurements were employed in the investigations. The electron temperature ( T e) of hot electrons was obtained from the lattice temperature ( T L) and the applied electric field dependencies of the amplitude of SdH oscillations. The experimental results for the electron temperature dependence of power loss are also compared with current theoretical models for power loss in 2D semiconductors. The power loss from the electrons was found to be proportional to ( T {e/3} - T {L/3}) for electron temperatures in the range 1.8 K < T e < 14 K, indicating that the energy relaxation of electrons is due to acoustic phonon emission via unscreened piezoelectric interaction. The effective mass and quantum lifetime of the 2D electrons have been determined from the temperature and magnetic field dependencies of the amplitude of SdH oscillations, respectively. The values obtained for quantum lifetime suggest that remote ionized impurity scattering is the dominant scattering mechanism in <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.83In0.17N/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN heterostructures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tiras, E.; Ardali, S.; Arslan, E.; Ozbay, E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-09-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">435</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20442029"> <span id="translatedtitle">Guided lamb wave electroacoustic devices on micromachined <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span> plates.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">An electroacoustic micro-device based on the propagation of guided acoustic Lamb waves in <span class="hlt">AlN/Al</span> plate is described. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>N thin film is deposited by sputtering technique, optimized to achieve a high degree of orientation (rocking curve full-width at half-maximum /sp lap/ 3.5 degrees ) of the c-axis perpendicular to the plate surface. The <span class="hlt">Al</span>N plate is micromachined using anisotropic reactive ion etching (RIE), followed by isotropic RIE to remove the silicon underlayer. Simulation results for the dispersion phase velocity curves and the electromechanical coupling coefficient (K(2)) are obtained by the matrix method and by the finite element method and compared with experimental data. A delay line is implemented on the structure and tested for the propagation of the first symmetrical Lamb mode (s(0)) at the frequency of 1.22 GHz. Measurements have shown that the structure is suitable for implementation of arrays of electroacoustic devices on a single chip for application to both sensing devices and signal processing systems. PMID:20442029</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Di Pietrantonio, Fabio; Benetti, Massimiliano; Cannatà, Domenico; Beccherelli, Romeo; Verona, Enrico</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">436</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/41066842"> <span id="translatedtitle">Strengthening of <span class="hlt">Al</span> 2O3\\/6061<span class="hlt">Al</span> particulate composite at liquid nitrogen temperature</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">Particulate reinforced <span class="hlt">Al</span> matrix composites are of potential use in many structural applications, because of their high specific modulus, high specific strength, high wear resistance, low thermal expansion, and relatively low cost of production. Significant research has been undertaken with the purpose of increasing the authors understanding of the room and elevated temperature mechanical behavior of this subclass of composites.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">H. X. Li; J. Lo; X. R. Xiao</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1995-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">437</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22al%22&pg=5&id=EJ923625"> <span id="translatedtitle">Aesthetic Leadership (<span class="hlt">AL</span>): Development and Implementation of Aesthetic Leadership Scale (<span class="hlt">ALS</span>) of the School Directors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study aims to develop a scale for measuring the aesthetic leadership (<span class="hlt">AL</span>) characteristics of the school directors and to show that it can be applicable. The population of the study is composed of the teachers who are on duty in the elementary, secondary and high schools located in Izmit, Kocaeli. Sample of this descriptive study comprises 400…</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Polat, Soner; Oztoprak-Kavak, Zehra</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">438</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19990021236&hterms=high+young+modulus&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dhigh%2Byoung%2527s%2Bmodulus"> <span id="translatedtitle">High Temperature Mechanical Characterization and Analysis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 /<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 Composition</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Sixteen ply unidirectional zirconia coated single crystal <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 fiber reinforced polycrystalline <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 was tested in uniaxial tension at temperatures to 1400 C in air. Fiber volume fractions ranged from 26 to 31%. The matrix has primarily open porosity of approximately 40%. Theories for predicting the Young's modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate strength were applied and evaluated for suitability in predicting the mechanical behavior of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3/<span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 composites. The composite exhibited pseudo tough behavior (increased area under the stress/strain curve relative to monolithic alumina) from 22 to 1400 C. The rule-of-mixtures provides a good estimate of the Young's modulus of the composite using the constituent properties from room temperature to approximately 1200 C for short term static tensile tests in air. The ACK theory provides the best approximation of the first matrix cracking stress while accounting for residual stresses at room temperature. Difficulties in determining the fiber/matrix interfacial shear stress at high temperatures prevented the accurate prediction of the first matrix cracking stress above room temperature. The theory of Cao and Thouless, based on Weibull statistics, gave the best prediction for the composite ultimate tensile strength.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Gyekenyesi, John Z.; Jaskowiak, Martha H.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1999-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">439</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011ApSS..257.3489A"> <span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced fibroblast cell adhesion on <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span> 2O 3 nanowires</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Biological cells stick together via transmembrane proteins, which are linked to receptor molecules of the extracellular matrix (ECM). This specific biochemical adhesion plays a leading role in many cellular processes, among them cell differentiation, morphogenesis, and wound healing. Various medical applications require endogen cells to bind to an exogene substrate as in the case of an implant. Coatings with proteins that naturally belong to the ECM are known to enhance the cell adhesion. However, the choice of inorganic materials, which promote cell adhesion, is limited. Here, we report on a new engineered surface composed of <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span> 2O 3 bi-phasic nanowires (NWs), which promotes the adhesion of fibroblast cells. Fibroblasts grow well on this inorganic layer and keep proliferating. Using the cell monolayer rheology (CMR) technique, we show that the adhesion of fibroblasts on <span class="hlt">Al/Al</span> 2O 3 NWs is comparable to fibronectin coated surfaces. To our knowledge, this is one of the strongest cell adhesions on an inorganic surface, which has been reported on so far, since it compares to bio-organic layers such as fibronectin.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Aktas, O. C.; Sander, M.; Miró, M. M.; Lee, J.; Akkan, C. K.; Smail, H.; Ott, A.; Veith, M.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2011-02-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">440</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ntis.gov/search/product.aspx?ABBR=DE90634539"> <span id="translatedtitle">Magnetic properties of Ce(Fe(1-x)<span class="hlt">Al</span>(x))2 (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-rich side).</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ntis.gov/search/index.aspx">National Technical Information Service (NTIS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Magnetic properties of the Laves phase system Ce(Fe(sub 1-x) <span class="hlt">Al</span>(sub x))(sub 2) were investigated by means of magnetization and electrical resistivity measurements for 0.60 <= X < 0.90. X-ray powder diffratograms reveal that at least up to 40% of iron in C...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">A. Y. Takeuchi S. F. Cunha</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' 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onclick='return showDiv("page_25.0");' href="#" title="Last Page"> <img id="LastPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.last.18x20.png" alt="Last Page" /></a> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">441</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009IJMPB..23.1377P"> <span id="translatedtitle">Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Hypereutectic <span class="hlt">Al-Si/Al</span>Np Composite</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Hypereutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloys with fine and evenly distributed Si precipitates have superior mechanical properties In this study, hypereutectic <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloy powders which contained 15 and 20wt% Si were prepared by a gas atomization process. 1, 3 and 5wt% <span class="hlt">Al</span>N particles were blended with the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Si alloy powders using turbular mixer. The mixture was consolidated by Hot Press at 550°C for 1h under 60MPa. Relative density of the sintered samples was about 98% of theoretical density. This study was investigated by two ways. One is the effect of reinforcement weight fraction and the other is the effect of Silicon contents on the mechanical properties of the composite. Microstructural characterization and phase evaluation were carried out using X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectrometer. The results showed that the smaller the reinforcement particle size was and the better its distribution was, the higher ultimate tensile strength and hardness were.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Park, Seulki; Choi, Jinmyung; Park, Bonggyu; Park, Ikmin; Park, Yongho; Kim, Yongjin</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate"></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">442</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009APS..SHK.B5002B"> <span id="translatedtitle">Constitutive Model Constants for <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T651 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T6</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Aluminum 7075-T651 and 7075-T6 are characterized at quasi-static and high strain rates to determine Johnson-Cook (J-C) strength and fracture model constants. Constitutive model constants are required as input to computer codes to simulate projectile (fragment) impact or similar impact events on structural components made of these material. J-C strength model constants (A, B, n, C, and m) for the two alloys are determined from tension stress-strain data at room and high temperature to 250^oC. J-C strength model constants for <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T651 are: A=527 MPa, B=676 MPa, n=0.71, C=0.017, and m=1.61 and for <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T6: A = 546 MPa, B = 674 MPa, n = 0.72, C = 0.059, and m =1.56. J-C fracture model constants are determined form quasi-static and high strain rate/high temperature tests on notched and smooth tension specimens. J-C fracture model constants for the two alloys are: <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T651; D1 = 0.110, D2 = 0.573, D3= -3.4446, D4 = 0.016, and D 5= 1.099 and <span class="hlt">Al</span>7075-T6; D1= 0.451 D2= -0.952 D3= -.068, D4 =0.036, and D5 = 0.697.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Brar, Nachhatter; Joshi, Vasant; Harris, Bryan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-06-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">443</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.gpo.gov:80/fdsys/pkg/FR-2010-01-19/pdf/2010-946.pdf"> <span id="translatedtitle">75 FR 2920 - In the Matter of the Designation of <span class="hlt">al</span>-Qa'ida in the Arabian Peninsula (AQAP), Also Known as <span class="hlt">al</span>...</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collection.action?collectionCode=FR">Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013</a></p> <p class="result-summary">...Peninsula, Also Known as Tanzim Qa'idat <span class="hlt">al</span>-Jihad fi Jazirat <span class="hlt">al</span>- Arab, Also Known as <span class="hlt">al</span>-Qa'ida Organization in the Arabian Peninsula...Peninsula, also known as Tanzim Qa'idat <span class="hlt">al</span>- Jihad fi Jazirat <span class="hlt">al</span>-Arab, also known as <span class="hlt">al</span>-Qa'ida Organization in the Arabian...</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author"></p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-19</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">444</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008NJPh...10e3001S"> <span id="translatedtitle">In situ investigation of spinodal decomposition in hypermonotectic <span class="hlt">Al</span> Bi and <span class="hlt">Al</span> Bi Zn alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Spinodal decomposition of hypermonotectic <span class="hlt">Al</span> 6 wt.%Bi, <span class="hlt">Al</span> 8 wt.%Bi and <span class="hlt">Al</span> 6 wt.%Bi 8 wt.%Zn alloys has been investigated using synchrotron radiography. In the case of the 6 and 8 wt.%Bi binary alloys undercoolings of 70 and 110 K, respectively, were required to initiate the L?L1+L2 reaction, which appeared to occur very close to the monotectic reaction temperature. The nucleated L2 droplets were set in collective size-dependent motion by forces coupled to external fields (gravity and imposed temperature gradient) as well as forces arising due to internal fluctuations of the system. With experimental conditions similar to those realized during strip casting of the same materials, it was found that the size-dependant droplet velocity field combined with Stokes drag at the L1 L2 interfaces as well as attractive and repulsive diffusion-coupling between adjacent L2 droplets, yield complex meso- to microscale hydrodynamics. The hydrodynamics are the dominating mechanisms for L2 droplet coagulation, and are accordingly decisive for the final size distribution and geometrical dispersion of the soft Bi-rich component in the cast material. A different decomposition mode was observed in the <span class="hlt">Al</span> 6 wt.%Bi 8 wt.%Zn ternary alloy, with the L2 droplets undergoing an immiscible miscible immiscible transition. In contrast to what was found for the binaries, L2 domains formed at relatively small undercoolings, and very little droplet motion was observed, as all L2 domains nucleated and remained on the crucible walls until they encroached on the monotectic front. At small distances from the monotectic front a Zn-rich solute boundary layer preceding the ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span>, caused the L2 domains to dissolve as Bi Zn <span class="hlt">Al</span> regains complete miscibility upon reaching a critical Zn-concentration. In the shallow mush region behind the monotectic reaction, a high Zn solid solubility and a relatively fast diffusion of Zn in ?-<span class="hlt">Al</span> combine to cause a rapid diminishing Zn concentration in the mush liquid, restoring Bi-immiscibility and consequentially a secondary nucleation of L2 droplets in the mush.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Schaffer, P. L.; Mathiesen, R. H.; Arnberg, L.; Di Sabatino, M.; Snigirev, A.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2008-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">445</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012ChJCP..25..659Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">First Principles Study of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li Intermetallic Compounds</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The structural properties, heats of formation, elastic properties, and electronic structures of four compositions of binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li intermetallics, <span class="hlt">Al</span>3Li, <span class="hlt">Al</span>Li, <span class="hlt">Al</span>2Li3, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>4Li9, are analyzed in detail by using density functional theory. The calculated formation heats indicate a strong chemical interaction between <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Li for all the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li intermetallics. In particular, in the Li-rich <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li compounds, the thermodynamic stability of intermetallics linearly decreases with increasing concentration of Li. According to the computational single crystal elastic constants, all the four <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li intermetallic compounds considered here are mechanically stable. The polycrystalline elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio have been deduced by using Voigt, Reuss, and Hill approximations, and the calculated ratios of bulk modulus to shear modulus indicate that the four compositions of binary <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li intermetallics are brittle materials. With the increase of Li concentration, the bulk modulus of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Li intermetallics decreases in a linear manner.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yu, Hai-li; Duan, Xiao-hui; Ma, Yong-jun; Zeng, Min</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">446</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009MS%26E....4a2006S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Tribological properties of thermally sprayed Ti<span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 composite coating</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The use of thermal spray coatings provides protection to the surfaces operating in severe environments. The main goal of the current work is to investigate the possibility of using a high velocity oxy fuel (HVOF) thermally sprayed wear resistant Ti<span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 coating on tool steel (H13) which is used for making dies for aluminium high pressure die casting. A feedstock of Ti<span class="hlt">Al/Al</span>2O3 composite powder was produced from a mixture of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and TiO2 powders by high energy mechanical milling, followed by a thermal reaction process. The feedstock was then thermally sprayed using a high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) technique onto H13 steel substrates to produce a composite coating. The present study describes and compares the tribological properties such as friction and sliding wear rate of the coating both at room and high temperature (700°C). The results showed that the composite coating has lower wear rate at high temperature (700°C) than the uncoated H13 sample. At Room temperature without using lubricant there is no much significant difference between the wear rate of the coated and uncoated samples. The experimental results showed that the composite coating has great potential for high temperature application due to its lower wear rate at high temperature in comparison with the uncoated sample at the same temperature. The composite coating was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical microscopy and X-ray diffractometry (XRD). This paper reports the experimental observations and discusses the wear resistance performance of the coatings at room and high temperatures.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Salman, A.; Gabbitas, B.; Li, J.; Zhang, D.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-08-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">447</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23043345"> <span id="translatedtitle">Removal of phosphate from water using six <span class="hlt">Al</span>-, Fe-, and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Fe-modified bentonite adsorbents.</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p class="result-summary">This study was part of a larger effort that involves evaluating alternatives to upgrading secondary treatment systems in the United Arab Emirates for the removal of nutrients. In this study, six modified bentonite (BNT) phosphate adsorbents were prepared using solutions that contained hydroxy-polycations of aluminum (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-BNT), iron (Fe-BNT), and mixtures of aluminum and iron (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Fe-BNT). The adsorption kinetics and capacities of the six adsorbents were evaluated, and the adsorbents were used to remove phosphorus from synthetic phosphate solutions and from treated wastewater. The experimental adsorption kinetics results were well represented by the pseudo-second-order kinetic model, with R(2) values ranging from 0.99 to 1.00. Similarly, the experimental equilibrium adsorption results were well represented by the Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms, with R(2) values ranging from 0.98 to 1.00. The adsorption capacities of the adsorbents were dependent on the BNT preparation conditions; the types, quantities and combination of metals used; BNT particle size; and adsorption pH. The Langmuir maximum adsorption capacities of the six adsorbents ranged from 8.9-14.5 mg P/g-BNT. The results suggested that the BNT preparations containing Fe alone or in combination with <span class="hlt">Al</span> achieved higher adsorption capacities than the preparations containing only <span class="hlt">Al</span>. However, the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-BNT preparations exhibited higher adsorption rates than the Fe-BNT preparation. Three of the six adsorbents were used to remove phosphate from secondarily treated wastewater samples, and the removal results were comparable to those obtained using synthetic phosphate solutions. The BNT adsorbents also exhibited adequate settling characteristics and significant regeneration potential. PMID:23043345</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Shanableh, Abdallah M; Elsergany, Moetaz M</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">448</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/6294055"> <span id="translatedtitle">Formation of Nb/sub 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> in powder processed Nb-<span class="hlt">Al</span> superconductors</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In high magnetic fields, the critical current density is strongly dependent on the upper critical field, which is determined primarily by the stoichiometry of the Nb/sub 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span>. The critical temperature (T/sub c/), like the upper critical field, is considered to be a measure of the ''intrinsic'' quality of the superconductor, indicating the stoichiometry, order, and strain. If the A15 phase is stoichiometric and well ordered, a high T/sub c/ (and high H/sub C/sub 2//) is expected, regardless of the volume fraction of superconductor. On the other hand, if sigma phase is present with the A15, the resultant composition gradient across the sigma-A15 interface(s) requires that some of the A15 be off-stoichiometric, and therefore that the T/sub c/ (and H/sub C/sub 2//) be low. Thus the extent of the A15 (Nb/sub 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span>) reaction and the quality of the A15 formed are interdependent. This work focuses on the factors that control the extent of Nb/sub 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> formation in Nb/<span class="hlt">Al</span> powder wires. The morphology and content of the reacted and unreacted wires are studied in optical, SEM, and TEM micrographs. Critical current density data and its dependence on processing are explained in terms of the unreacted microstructure and its effect on the extent of Nb/sub 3/<span class="hlt">Al</span> formation. As a method of improving the critical current density, a new variation of the conventional powder process for wire manufacturing is developed and tested.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Johnson, P.E.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1987-05-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">449</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20000021315&hterms=lying&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dlying"> <span id="translatedtitle">The Low-Lying States of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cu and <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ag</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The singlet and triplet states of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cu and <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ag below about 32 000/cm are studied using the internally contracted multireference configuration-interaction method. A more elaborate study of the X(sup 1)Sum(sup +) ground state of <span class="hlt">Al</span>Cu is undertaken using extended Gaussian basis sets, including the effect of inner-shell correlation and including a perturbational estimate of relativistic effects. Our best estimate of the spectroscopic constants (r(sub 0), DeltaG(sub 1/2), and D(sub 0)) for the X(sup 1)Sum(sup+) state with the experimental values in parentheses are: 4.416(4.420) a(sub 0), 295 (294) /cm, and 2.318 (2.315) eV. The calculations definitively assign the upper state in the observed transition at 14 892/cm to the lowest (sup 1)Prod state. The calculated spectroscopic constants and radiative lifetime for the (sup 1)Prod state are in good agreement with experiment. The calculations support the tentative assignments of Behm et <span class="hlt">al</span>. for three band systems observed in the visible region between 25 000 and 28 000 / cm. However, the computed spectroscopic constants are in very poor agreement with those deduced from an analysis of the spectra. Analogous theoretical results for <span class="hlt">Al</span>Ag suggest that the (2)(sup 3)Prod, (3)(sup 3)Prod, and (3)(sup 1)Sum(sup +) states account for the bands observed, but not assigned, by Duncan and co-workers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1994-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">450</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1997NIMPB.123..279Y"> <span id="translatedtitle">26<span class="hlt">Al</span> uptake and accumulation in the rat brain</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">To investigate the cause of Alzheimer's disease (senile dementia), 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> incorporation in the rat brain was studied by accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). When 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> was injected into healthy rats, a considerable amount of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> entered the brain (cerebrum) through the blood-brain barrier 5 days after a single injection, and the brain 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> level remained almost constant from 5 to 270 days. On the other hand, the level of 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> in the blood decreased remarkably 75 days after injection. Approximately 89% of the 26<span class="hlt">Al</span> taken in by the brain cell nuclei bound to chromatin. This study supports the theory that Alzheimer's disease is caused by irreversible accumulation of aluminium (<span class="hlt">Al</span>) in the brain, and brain cell nuclei.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Yumoto, S.; Nagai, H.; Imamura, M.; Matsuzaki, H.; Hayashi, K.; Masuda, A.; Kumazawa, H.; Ohashi, H.; Kobayashi, K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1997-03-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">451</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1989JaJAP..28...68I"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span> Impurity Purification in Quartz Grown by the Hydrothermal Method</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary"><span class="hlt">Al</span> impurity purification in synthetic quartz grown by the hydrothermal method was studied by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The purification process can be expressed by the equation. Alsq{=}a{\\cdot}\\exp (b\\cdotAllasca), with Alsq and Allasca representing the respective <span class="hlt">Al</span> contents in synthetic quartz and lascas used as the nutrient. a and b are constants which depend on the growth condition. Analytical data showed different <span class="hlt">Al</span> content depending on growth region: it was highest in the S-region and lowest in the Z-region. <span class="hlt">Al</span> content in the Z-region did not significantly differ (˜10 ppm), when the nutrient used for crystal growth had an <span class="hlt">Al</span> content of between 29 ppm and 240 ppm. S-regions were not purified when the nutrient with <span class="hlt">Al</span> content of less than 30 ppm was used. Influence of <span class="hlt">Al</span> content on crystal morphology in the purification process was discussed.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Iwasaki, Fumiko; Iwasaki, Hideo; Suzuki, Carlos K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1989-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">452</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20104681"> <span id="translatedtitle">Cavity nucleation in <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5083 alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In this paper the authors address the controversial issue of nucleation of cavities in <span class="hlt">Al</span> 5083 alloys. They focus on the origin of cavities during the manufacture of these alloys into SPF (superplastic forming) sheet form. Experimental observations on the pre-existing cavities in this alloy are made using optical and electron microscopy. The effects of rolling direction and state of stress during superplastic deformations on the formation of cavities are also discussed. Numerical simulations of the sheet manufacturing process are carried out to understand the effect of hard phase/matrix, mechanical properties and interfacial strength on the origin of cavities. Based on the numerical results, a simplified model relating the process, material parameters and the cavity nucleation is presented.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Chandra, N.; Chen, Z.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">453</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009JAP...105a3707T"> <span id="translatedtitle">Comparison of the transport properties of high quality <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N/GaN and <span class="hlt">AlInN/Al</span>N/GaN two-dimensional electron gas heterostructures</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The transport properties of high mobility <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N/GaN and high sheet electron density <span class="hlt">AlInN/Al</span>N/GaN two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) heterostructures were studied. The samples were grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition on c-plane sapphire substrates. The room temperature electron mobility was measured as 1700 cm2/V s along with 8.44×1012 cm-2 electron density, which resulted in a two-dimensional sheet resistance of 435 ?/? for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.2Ga0.8N/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN heterostructure. The sample designed with an <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.88In0.12N barrier exhibited very high sheet electron density of 4.23×1013 cm-2 with a corresponding electron mobility of 812 cm2/V s at room temperature. A record two-dimensional sheet resistance of 182 ?/? was obtained in the respective sample. In order to understand the observed transport properties, various scattering mechanisms such as acoustic and optical phonons, interface roughness, and alloy disordering were included in the theoretical model that was applied to the temperature dependent mobility data. It was found that the interface roughness scattering in turn reduces the room temperature mobility of the <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.88In0.12N/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN heterostructure. The observed high 2DEG density was attributed to the larger polarization fields that exist in the sample with an <span class="hlt">Al</span>0.88In0.12N barrier layer. From these analyses, it can be argued that the <span class="hlt">AlInN/Al</span>N/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), after further optimization of the growth and design parameters, could show better transistor performance compared to <span class="hlt">AlGaN/Al</span>N/GaN based HEMTs.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tülek, Remziye; Ilgaz, Aykut; Gökden, Sibel; Teke, Ali; Öztürk, Mustafa K.; Kasap, Mehmet; Özçelik, Süleyman; Arslan, Engin; Özbay, Ekmel</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2009-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">454</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012JAP...112g3717H"> <span id="translatedtitle">Surface plasmon polariton enhanced electroluminescence and electron emission from electroformed <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3-Ag diodes</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Electroforming of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3-Ag diodes results in voltage-controlled negative resistance (VCNR) in the current-voltage (I-V) curves. Electroluminescence (EL) and electron emission into vacuum (EM) develop simultaneously. The temperature dependence between 200 and 300 K of VCNR, EL, and EM of <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3-Ag diodes with anodic <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 thicknesses between 12 and 41 nm has been studied. I-V curves and VCNR are slightly temperature dependent. The voltage for the onset of EL, VEL, is between ~1.3 and ~1.9 V for the range of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 thicknesses, with small temperature dependence. The density of defects in anodic <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 is >1.5 × 1020 cm-3. Defect conduction bands that form from excited states of F- or F+-centers, oxygen vacancies in <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3, determine the value of the barrier height at the <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 interface, ?A, and they control EM. EM is anomalous. The threshold voltage for EM, VEM, is ~1.9 to ~2.5 V for the range of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 thicknesses, which is less than the work function of Ag, 4.6 eV. EM at 300 K is ~10-9 A. As temperature is lowered, EM drops to ~10-12 A at TD ? 290 K and recovers to ~10-9 A at TR ? 260 K. The particular values of TD and TR depend on sample preparation and <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 thickness. The source of anomalous EM is electrons that tunnel through the high field region at the <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3 interface into defect conduction bands. They gain energy and momentum by combining with surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) that are generated at the <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3-Ag interface by EL photons. EL from <span class="hlt">Al-Al</span>2O3-Ag diodes with 12 nm or 15 nm of <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 is much larger than EL from diodes with thicker <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 layers. The conducting channel of electroformed diodes with the thinnest <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 acts as a microcavity in which the electromagnetic field due to SPPs stimulates EL from defect centers by the Purcell effect.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Hickmott, T. W.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2012-10-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">455</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://academic.research.microsoft.com/Publication/53187784"> <span id="translatedtitle">Semiconducting behavior in CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 and CeRu2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 single crystals</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://academic.research.microsoft.com/">Microsoft Academic Search </a></p> <p class="result-summary">We have firstly succeeded in growing orthorhombic YbFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10-type CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 and CeRu2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 single crystals by <span class="hlt">Al</span> self-flux method, and measured the electrical resistivity rho and magnetic susceptibility chi. Both compounds show negative temperature coefficient in rho above ~100 K. The rho(T) of CeFe2<span class="hlt">Al</span>10 shows a broad peak at around 100 K and increases again at low temperatures, suggesting semiconducting ground state.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Tomoaki Takesaka; Kenta Oe; Riki Kobayashi; Yukihiro Kawamura; Takashi Nishioka; Harukazu Kato; Masahiro Matsumura; Kazuto Kodama</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2010-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">456</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20070032921&hterms=Ni-based+Superalloys&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3DNi-based%2BSuperalloys"> <span id="translatedtitle">Measured Activities of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni in gamma-(Ni) and gamma'-(Ni)3<span class="hlt">Al</span> in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Pt System</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Adding Pt to Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span> coatings is critical to achieving the required oxidation protection of Ni-based superalloys, but the nature of the Pt effect remains unresolved. This research provides a fundamental part of the answer by measuring the influence of Pt on the activities of <span class="hlt">Al</span> and Ni in gamma-(Ni), gamma prime-(Ni)3<span class="hlt">Al</span> and liquid in the Ni-<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Pt system. Measurements have been made at 25 compositions in the Ni-rich corner over the temperature range, T = 1400-1750 K, by the vapor pressure technique with a multiple effusion-cell mass spectrometer (multi-cell KEMS). These measurements clearly show adding Pt (for X(sub Pt) less than 0.25) decreases a(<span class="hlt">Al</span>) while increasing a(Ni). This solution behavior supports the idea that Pt increases <span class="hlt">Al</span> transport to an alloy / <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 interface and also limits the interaction between the coating and substrate alloys in the gamma-(Ni) + gamma prime-(Ni)3<span class="hlt">Al</span> region. This presentation will review the progress of this study.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Copland, Evan</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2007-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">457</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013MMTA...44.3337L"> <span id="translatedtitle">Achieving <span class="hlt">Al</span> Melt/Carbon and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti Melts/Carbon Interfaces Wetting via Ultrasonic Couple Processing</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Good wetting among <span class="hlt">Al</span>, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti melts and C (carbon) solid was achieved by ultrasonic couple processing (UCP). Due to the action of interfacial tension of wetting, <span class="hlt">Al</span> melt and <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti melts climb along the side wall of C solid. The wetting angle at the triple junction of gaseous, liquid, and solid phases is all lower than 15 deg. In the meantime, good wetting between <span class="hlt">Al</span> melt and C powder was also achieved by the ultrasonic couple processing. <span class="hlt">Al</span> melt infiltrated into the interior of C powder through the capillarity. When the ultrasonic couple processing was applied in the system of wetting between <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti melts and C powder, owing to the superimposed effect of incident acoustic wave and reflected acoustic wave at <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti melts/C interface, local high temperature occurred in the <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Ti melts near C interface, and the superimposed effect can effectively obstruct a direct reaction of <span class="hlt">Al</span> melt and C, inhibit the formation of undesirable <span class="hlt">Al</span>4C3, and promote dissolved Ti to react with C and dissociated C to form TiC particle phase.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Li, Y. L.; Zhou, T. G.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2013-07-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">458</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910054025&hterms=al2o3&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dal2o3"> <span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 and O-16 in the early solar system - Clues from meteoritic <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">The study focuses on 26 <span class="hlt">Al</span>2O3 grains up to 20 micron in size recovered from the Murchison C2 chrondite. It is observed that Mg-26/Mg-24 ranges up to 56 times the solar system ratio, but the initial <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26/<span class="hlt">Al</span>-27 ratios do not exceed the canonical maximum of 0.00005 in other meteoritic samples. It is concluded that this ratio represents the abundance of live <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 in the early solar system, not fossil radiogenic Mg-26 surviving from presolar times. The grains are shown to divide into three groups on the basis of <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26, O-16, Ti, and V content, and distinctive correlations are found for <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26 and O-16. An origin from at least three discrete components is suggested, two of which contained live <span class="hlt">Al</span>-26.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Anders, Edward; Lewis, Roy S.; Virag, Alois; Zinner, Ernst</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1991-01-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result odd" lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">459</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/665229"> <span id="translatedtitle">Positron lifetime studies of decomposition in 2024 (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn-Cu-Mg) alloys</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p class="result-summary">In the current paper, the decomposition behavior of the engineering alloys 2024 (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu-Mg) and 7010 (<span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn-Cu-Mg) is studied using positron lifetime measurements. Positrons probe open volume defects such as vacancies and dislocations. However, they may also be used to investigate coherent zones and incoherent precipitates. In order to understand the rather complicated precipitation sequences and the response of positrons to different type of precipitates occurring in 2024 and 7010 alloys, binary and ternary laboratory alloys were also investigated under the same experimental conditions as the engineering alloys. The interpretations of the results are based on experiences of the group from extensive positron studies of laboratory alloys such as <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Zn-Mg, <span class="hlt">Al</span>-Cu, and further <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys (see also the review (4)). Their collected results are shown as lifetimes and curve-shape parameters S of the electron-positron momentum distribution curves characteristic for different precipitates in <span class="hlt">Al</span> alloys.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Dlubek, G. [ITA Inst. fuer Innovative Technologien GmbH, Halle (Germany)] [ITA Inst. fuer Innovative Technologien GmbH, Halle (Germany); [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany). Fachbereich Physik; Lademann, P.; Krause, H.; Krause, S.; Unger, R. [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany). Fachbereich Physik] [Martin-Luther-Univ. Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany). Fachbereich Physik</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">1998-09-04</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="floatContainer result " lang="en"> <div class="resultNumber element">460</div> <div class="resultBody element"> <p class="result-title"><a target="resultTitleLink" href="http://science.gov/scigov/link.html?type=RESULT&redirectUrl=http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000ApPhL..77.3998S"> <span id="translatedtitle">Two-dimensional electron-gas <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN heterostructures with extremely thin <span class="hlt">Al</span>N barriers</span></a>  </p> <div class="result-meta"> <p class="source"><a target="_blank" id="logoLink" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p class="result-summary">Plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy is used to grow a set of two-dimensional electron-gas <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN structures with <span class="hlt">Al</span>N barrier thicknesses varied between 24 and 50 Å. The density of the two-dimensional electron gas formed at the GaN/<span class="hlt">Al</span>N interface increases from 1.51×1013 cm-2 for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N barrier width of 24 Å to 3.65×1013 cm-2 for the <span class="hlt">Al</span>N barrier width of 49 Å. The increase in the electron sheet density is accompanied by a decrease in electron mobility related to tensile strain relaxation and enhanced interface roughness scattering. It is shown that room-temperature sheet resistances below 200 ?/? can be achieved in <span class="hlt">Al</span>N/GaN high electron mobility transistor structures with 35-45 Å <span class="hlt">Al</span>N barriers.</p> <div class="credits"> <p class="dwt_author">Smorchkova, I. P.; Keller, S.; Heikman, S.; Elsass, C. R.; Heying, B.; Fini, P.; Speck, J. S.; Mishra, U. K.</p> <p class="dwt_publisher"></p> <p class="publishDate">2000-12-01</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div id="filter_results_form" class="filter_results_form floatContainer" style="visibility: visible;"> <div style="width:100%" id="PaginatedNavigation" class="paginatedNavigationElement"> <a id="FirstPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#" title="First Page"> <img id="FirstPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.first.18x20.png" alt="First Page" /></a> <a id="PreviousPageLink" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");' href="#" title="Previous Page"> <img id="PreviousPageLinkImage" class="Icon" src="http://www.science.gov/scigov/images/icon.previous.18x20.png" alt="Previous Page" /></a> <span id="PageLinks" class="pageLinks"> <span> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_1");' href="#">1</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_2");' href="#">2</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_3");' href="#">3</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_4");' href="#">4</a> <a onClick='return showDiv("page_5");' href="#">5</a