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Sample records for histamine releasing factor

  1. Enhancement of antigen-induced leukocyte histamine release by a mononuclear cell--derived factor.

    PubMed

    Bamzai, A K; Kretschmer, R R

    1978-09-01

    Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells from ragweed-sensitive patients significantly enhanced the release of histamine from antigen-triggered leukocytes of ragweed-sensitive as well as control individuals. Supernatants of mononuclear cells from control individuals did not reveal this enhancing effect, nor was it found with the use of supernatants of unstimulated mononuclear cells of ragweed-sensitive patients or culture media with PHA alone. Supernatant fluids of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated mononuclear cells of patients sensitive to trees and grass also revealed this enhancing effect. The factor(s) responsible for the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine is heat labile and has a molecular weight of less than 10,000 daltons. The mechanism and site of action of the enhancing factor could involve initiating and/or modulating steps of the leukocyte histamine release reaction. This factor, presumably a lymphokine or a monokine, may constitute a regulating link between cell-mediated immunity and histamine-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in allergic patients. PMID:79584

  2. Tick Histamine Release Factor Is Critical for Ixodes scapularis Engorgement and Transmission of the Lyme Disease Agent

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Jianfeng; Narasimhan, Sukanya; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Lei; Wang, Penghua; Fikrig, Erol

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are distributed worldwide and affect human and animal health by transmitting diverse infectious agents. Effective vaccines against most tick-borne pathogens are not currently available. In this study, we characterized a tick histamine release factor (tHRF) from Ixodes scapularis and addressed the vaccine potential of this antigen in the context of tick engorgement and B. burgdorferi transmission. Results from western blotting and quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR showed that tHRF is secreted in tick saliva, and upregulated in Borrelia burgdorferi-infected ticks. Further, the expression of tHRF was coincident with the rapid feeding phase of the tick, suggesting a role for tHRF in tick engorgement and concomitantly, for efficient B. burgdorferi transmission. Silencing tHRF by RNA interference (RNAi) significantly impaired tick feeding and decreased B. burgdorferi burden in mice. Interfering with tHRF by actively immunizing mice with recombinant tHRF, or passively transferring tHRF antiserum, also markedly reduced the efficiency of tick feeding and B. burgdorferi burden in mice. Recombinant tHRF was able to bind to host basophils and stimulate histamine release. Therefore, we speculate that tHRF might function in vivo to modulate vascular permeability and increase blood flow to the tick bite-site, facilitating tick engorgement. These findings suggest that blocking tHRF might offer a viable strategy to complement ongoing efforts to develop vaccines to block tick feeding and transmission of tick-borne pathogens. PMID:21124826

  3. Protection against malaria in mice is induced by blood stage-arresting histamine-releasing factor (HRF)-deficient parasites.

    PubMed

    Demarta-Gatsi, Claudia; Smith, Leanna; Thiberge, Sabine; Peronet, Roger; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Matondo, Mariette; Apetoh, Lionel; Bruhns, Pierre; Ménard, Robert; Mécheri, Salaheddine

    2016-07-25

    Although most vaccines against blood stage malaria in development today use subunit preparations, live attenuated parasites confer significantly broader and more lasting protection. In recent years, Plasmodium genetically attenuated parasites (GAPs) have been generated in rodent models that cause self-resolving blood stage infections and induce strong protection. All such GAPs generated so far bear mutations in housekeeping genes important for parasite development in red blood cells. In this study, using a Plasmodium berghei model compatible with tracking anti-blood stage immune responses over time, we report a novel blood stage GAP that lacks a secreted factor related to histamine-releasing factor (HRF). Lack of HRF causes an IL-6 increase, which boosts T and B cell responses to resolve infection and leave a cross-stage, cross-species, and lasting immunity. Mutant-induced protection involves a combination of antiparasite IgG2c antibodies and FcγR(+) CD11b(+) cell phagocytes, especially neutrophils, which are sufficient to confer protection. This immune-boosting GAP highlights an important role of opsonized parasite-mediated phagocytosis, which may be central to protection induced by all self-resolving blood stage GAP infections. PMID:27432939

  4. A method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kampen, G T; Poulsen, L K; Reimert, C M; Skov, P S

    1997-12-29

    Histamine releasing factors, i.e. cytokines capable of inducing histamine release from basophils or mast cells, have been suggested to be involved in the pathogenesis of, for example, allergic late-phase reactions. Here we describe a controlled method for production and determination of histamine releasing activity (HRA) from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC). MNC were incubated with concanavalin A (Con A) for 2 h and cultured for another 40 h in fresh serum free medium. The culture supernatants were concentrated 19-25 fold by ultrafiltration (molecular weight cut-off: 3000 Da). The preparations of HRA induced dose- and Ca2+-dependent histamine release from leukocytes. Supernatants of parallel cultures of unstimulated MNC did not induce histamine release. The HRA was neither due to exogenous histamine releasing compounds (e.g. Con A) nor to residual histamine in the preparations of HRA. The kinetics of HRA induced histamine release (half-maximal release after > 40 min) were slower and more protracted than those of anti-IgE induced histamine release. However, based on a comparison between HRA induced histamine release from leukocytes and purified (97%) basophils, this did not appear to be due to an indirect effect on the basophils. Finally, neither the production of nor the response to HRA was dependent on the allergic status of the donor. PMID:9520301

  5. Impaired basophil histamine release from allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Weeke, B; Nolte, H

    1987-04-01

    A few patients (6-7%) with a verified type I allergic reaction do not respond with histamine release after challenge of their basophils with specific antigen (non-responding basophils from allergic patients). Sera from these non-responding patients were used for passive sensitization of responding cells from healthy controls. When these sensitized cells were challenged with specific antigen, histamine release was observed indicating that the non-responding allergic patients have circulating antigen-specific IgE capable of binding to Fc-receptors on the basophils. These findings suggest the possibility that non-responding basophils have impaired cell functions. We therefore examined the influence of enhanced IgE receptor stimulation on histamine release in non-responding basophils. This was made by stimulating protein kinase C activity by a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). When the non-responding cells were incubated with the phorbol ester and challenged with either anti-IgE or specific antigen, the cells released histamine. These findings support the hypothesis that the unresponsiveness of basophils in some allergic patients is associated with impaired IgE receptor complex activation or subcellular functioning and not with a lack of cell-bound IgE. PMID:2440283

  6. Release of platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine. II. The cellular origin of human PAF: monocytes, polymorphonuclear neutrophils and basophils.

    PubMed Central

    Camussi, G; Aglietta, M; Coda, R; Bussolino, F; Piacibello, W; Tetta, C

    1981-01-01

    The origin of platelet activating factor (PAF) from human leucocytes was investigated. Purified monocytes release PAF passively at pH 10.6, when challenged with Ionophore A 23187 or under phagocytic stimuli. Pure preparations of polymorphonuclear neutrophils liberate PAF passively, when challenged with C5a, neutrophil cationic proteins (CP), their carboxypeptidase B derived products (C5a des Arg, CP des Arg) or under phagocytic stimuli. Basophil rich buffy coat cells release PAF when challenged with C5a, CP, anti-IgE (in low amount) or Synacthen concomitantly with basophil degranulation and histamine release. Electron microscopy studies, carried out on Synacthen-stimulated basophil rich buffy coat, provide morphological evidence for platelet-basophil interaction. In conclusion our data demonstrate that PAF can be released from different leucocyte populations. However, the stimuli able to trigger such release appear to have some specificity for the cell target. Images Figure 5 PMID:6161885

  7. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  8. Characterisation of textile dust extracts: I. Histamine release in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J S; Duncan, P G

    1984-01-01

    Cotton, flax, hemp, and cotton bracts extracts did not release histamine from mouse, rat, guinea pig, horse, cow, and monkey lung. Neither rat peritoneal mast cells nor mouse mastocytoma cells released histamine when incubated with textile dust extracts. Compound 48/80 caused a considerable release of histamine from all these tissues and the extracts released histamine from pig and human lung tissues. Whereas dusts that cause bronchospasm in man released histamine--for instance, cotton--those that are inactive, such as pericarps, did not. Histamine release was not quantitatively related to the concentration of extract used. Cotton bracts extract released histamine from pig lung tissue whereas in the same preparations methyl piperonylate was inactive. The active releasing agent was highly water soluble but could not be steam distilled from, nor extracted by, ether from bracts extract. These physicochemical properties are not characteristic of methyl piperonylate. There was no correlation between the induction of histidine decarboxylase and the histamine releasing capacity of the extracts. We conclude that pig lung is a useful qualitative assay tissue for the further characterisation of the histamine releasing agent(s) in textile dust extracts. PMID:6197990

  9. Homogeneous time resolved fluorescence assay to measure histamine release.

    PubMed

    Claret, Emmanuel J; Ouled-Diaf, Josy; Seguin, Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine synthesized by the enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. Implication of histamine in allergy is well described but histamine is also found in some specific neurones, functions as a neurotransmitter and regulates sleep/wake cycles, hormonal secretion, cardiovascular control and thermo-regulation. We have developed a TR-FRET histamine assay, based on the competition between sample histamine and allophycocyanine (XL665) labelled histamine for binding to a Europium cryptate (EuK) labelled antibody. As histamine is a small monoamine molecule, high affinity antibodies have been raised against carrier protein conjugated histamine. Therefore, sample histamine needs to be derivatized in the same way as the conjugated histamine, so that the antibody will have a similar affinity for both molecules. This acylation step is performed directly in wells and does not need to be done in separate vials, making handling easier for large numbers of samples. The incubation takes place at room temperature for 3 hours. The assay covers a measurement range of 1.56 to 400 nM and shows an analytical sensitivity of 1.3nM. We have shown that miniaturization of sample and reagents volumes down to 20 micro l does not alter these performances. This histamine release assay provides a particularly well adapted procedure for HTS and secondary screening compared to current heterogeneous methods. PMID:14683484

  10. Immunological release of histamine from bovine leucocytes. Unusual adrenergic modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Holroyde, M C; Eyre, P

    1976-01-01

    Sensitized bovine granulocytes release histamine when exposed to specific antigen. In comparison with in vitro systems in several other species, the modulation of this release by adrenergic agents is unique. Beta-Adrenoceptor stimulation potentiates (rather than inhibits), whereas alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation inhibits (rather than potentiates) histamine release. Adrenaline, which is generally considered to be a physiological antagonist of the anaphylactic reaction, potentiated histamine release in this study. Dopamine, which is present in high concentration in bovine mast cells, was without effect. The results are discussed in terms of the possible role of granulocytes in bovine hypersensitivity. PMID:60282

  11. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour. PMID:25746330

  12. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  13. Histamine release by Western red cedar (Thuja plicata) from lung tissue in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Nicholls, P. J.

    1974-01-01

    Evans, Elizabeth and Nicholls, P. J. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 28-30. Histamine release by Western red cedar(Thuja plicata)from lung tissue in vitro. Various respiratory symptoms have previously been observed in workers exposed to dust from Western red cedar (Thuja plicata). Although an allergic basis for these effects has been proposed, the possibility that the dust may contain a pharmacologically active agent was investigated. Aqueous extracts of two samples of red cedar released significant amounts of histamine from pig and human lung in vitro. For one of these samples, using pig lung, a dose-response relation was found over a narrow range of concentrations. These dusts possessed the same order of histamine-releasing activity as a sample of cotton dust. Potassium cyanide reduced the release of histamine caused by low concentrations of Western red cedar. Similar effects of cyanide on the histamine-releasing activity of cotton dust and compound 48/80 were observed. It is possible that release of histamine in the lungs and upper respiratory tract occurs on inhalation of dust from Western red cedar and this may be a contributory factor to the development of respiratory symptoms in workers exposed to the dust of this wood. PMID:4132384

  14. The mechanism of basophil histamine release in patients with periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Olsson-Wennström, A; Wennström, J L; Mergenhagen, S E; Siraganian, R P

    1978-01-01

    Histamine release from washed peripheral blood basophils of thirty-three subjects with varying degrees of periodontal disease was studied. Dental plaque, serum and basophil leucocytes were collected from individual patients. There was no histamine release when autologous, washed sonicated plaque was added to leucocytes. However, the incubation of autologous plaque with serum at 37 degrees C for 30 min generated a factor which induced histamine release from basophils. This serum factor was stable to heat (56 degrees C, 30 min), eluted from a Sephadex G-100 column at a volume corresponding to a molecular weight of approximately 16,000 daltons and its action was inhibited by antibody to C5. This factor, therefore, is probably C5a. There was a variation in the degree of histamine release seen with the leucocytes of different donors. This variability was a property of the basophil rather than a function of the serum. Basophils from patients with gingival indices of 0.5 to 1.0 had significantly more histamine release than basophils from patients with gingival indices of less than 0.5 or greater than 1.5 (P less than 0.001). These experiments demonstrate that dental plaque activates serum to form C5a which in turn releases histamine from basophils. However, these experiments do not indicate a role for IgE in this reaction since the direct interaction of plaque with basophils did not cause histamine release. The release of mediators from mast cells could play an important role in the induction of the inflammatory response in periodontal disease. PMID:81729

  15. Blood histamine release: A new allergy blood test

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottlieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Lollies, P.

    1985-05-01

    Allergen-mediated histamine release from human leukocytes represents an important model for in vitro studies of allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of histamine released in allergic patients (pts) by radioenzymatic assay following mixing of their blood with common allergens represents a reliable index for diagnosis of atopic allergy. Three categories of allergies were used: (1) housedust and mite; (2) cat and dog dander; (3) trees and grasses and ragweed mixture. The presence of allergy was established by intradermal skin testing in the study group of 82 pts. Significant atopy was defined as greater than or equal to 3+ (overall range 0-4 +, negative to maximum) on skin testing. The test was carried out in tubes with 0.5 ml heparinized blood, 0.5 ml tris albumin buffer, and one of the allergens (60-100 PNU/ml). In 20 controls without allergy, there always was less than or equal to 4% histamine release (normal response). A significant allergen-mediated histamine release, ranging from 12 to 30% of the total blood histamine content, was observed in 96% of the pts with skin test sensitivity of greater than or equal to 3+. There was good agreement between skin testing and histamine release in terms of the allergen causing the response. Thus, measurement of histamine release in blood in response to allergen challenge represents a clinically useful in vitro test for the diagnosis of atopic allergy. Because data can be obtained from a single sample and are highly quantitative, this new method should have application to the longitudinal study of allergic pts and to the assessment of interventions.

  16. Enhanced Basophil Reactivities during Severe Malaria and Their Relationship with the Plasmodium falciparum Histamine-Releasing Factor Translationally Controlled Tumor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Pelleau, Stéphane; Diop, Sylvie; Dia Badiane, Méry; Vitte, Joana; Beguin, Pierre; Nato, Farida; Diop, Bernard M.; Bongrand, Pierre; Parzy, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest shared pathogenic pathways during malaria and allergy. Indeed, IgE, histamine, and the parasite-derived Plasmodium falciparum histamine-releasing factor translationally controlled tumor protein (PfTCTP) can be found at high levels in serum from patients experiencing malaria, but their relationship with basophil activation remains unknown. We recruited P. falciparum-infected patients in Senegal with mild malaria (MM; n = 19) or severe malaria (SM; n = 9) symptoms and healthy controls (HC; n = 38). Levels of serum IgE, PfTCTP, and IgG antibodies against PfTCTP were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Basophil reactivities to IgE-dependent and -independent stimulations were measured ex vivo using fresh blood by looking at the expression level of the basophil activation marker CD203c with flow cytometry. Unstimulated basophils from MM had significantly lower levels of CD203c expression compared to those from HC and SM. After normalization on this baseline level, basophils from SM showed an enhanced reactivity to calcimycin (A23187) and hemozoin. Although SM reached higher median levels of activation after anti-IgE stimulation, great interindividual differences did not allow the results to reach statistical significance. When primed with recombinant TCTP before anti-IgE, qualitative differences in terms of a better ability to control excessive activation could be described for SM. IgE levels were very high in malaria patients, but concentrations in MM and SM were similar and were not associated with basophil responses, which demonstrates that the presence of IgE alone cannot explain the various basophil reactivities. Indeed, PfTCTP could be detected in 32% of patients, with higher concentrations for SM. These PfTCTP-positive patients displayed significantly higher basophil reactivities to any stimulus. Moreover, the absence of anti-PfTCTP IgG was associated with higher responses in SM but not MM. Our results show an

  17. The fate of released histamine: reception, response and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Histamine released from ECL cells elicits responses from a variety of cellular targets in the vicinity. Three sets of receptors are involved (H1, H2 and H3). Receptor occupation is promptly transduced into cellular responses. The responses, in turn, are terminated by diverse mechanisms: enzymatic inactivation, cellular uptake and desensitization at the receptor level. Under specific pathological conditions, histamine effects could be exaggerated by the presence of derivatives that may be of marginal relevance under physiological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:10461350

  18. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  19. Automated histamine analysis for in vitro allergy testing. I. A method utilizing allergen-induced histamine release from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Siraganian, R P; Brodsky, M J

    1976-06-01

    A sensitive, automated, histamine assay system has been developed and applied for in vitro allergy testing. Nine common pollen and environmental allergens were used at three log dilutions for in vivo studies utilizing small volumes of blood (15-20 ml). The clinical evaluation was correlated with the results of the histamine release. two different procedures were utilized. The first is the commonly used histamine release from washed leukocytes. There was excellent correlation between the clinical evaluation and the results of histamine release from washed leukocytes in 17 different individuals. The second and simpler method utilized whole heparinized blood which might better reflect the immunologic reaction which occurs in vivo. Aliquots of blood and allergen were incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C and each supernatant was then analyzed for histamine release. There was excellent correlation between the two tests in 29 patients tested by both the whole blood and washed leukocyte methods. There was also good correlation between the clinical evaluation of the patients amd the intro tests. The precision, accuracy, and sensitivity of the automated histamine assay make feasible its routine application in the clinical study of allergic patients. PMID:58879

  20. Lymphatic diamine oxidase secretion stimulated by fat absorption is linked with histamine release.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Li, Xiaoming; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Qing; Xu, Min; Wollin, Armin; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2013-04-15

    Diamine oxidase (DAO) is abundantly expressed in mammalian small intestine catalyzing the oxidative breakdown of polyamines and histamine. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between stimulation of intestinal diamine oxidase secretion with intestinal fat absorption and histamine release. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated and intraduodenal tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic DAO activity and protein secretion were analyzed by radiometric assay and Western blot, respectively. Lymphatic histamine concentration was measured by ELISA. Infusion of Liposyn II (4.43 kcal/3 ml) resulted in a ~3.5-fold increase in lymphatic DAO protein secretion and DAO activity, peaking at 1 h and lasting for 3 h. Liposyn II infusion also increased the lymphatic histamine release, a substrate for DAO. To determine the relationship of DAO release with histamine release, histamine was administered intraperitoneally (10 mg/kg) in fasting rats and resulted in a significant doubling in lymphatic DAO activity, supporting a link between histamine and DAO. In addition, ip administration of the histamine H4 receptor antagonist JNJ7777120 significantly reduced the Liposyn II-induced DAO output by 65.9%, whereas H(1) (pyrilamine maleate), H(2) (ranitidine), and H(3) (thioperamide maleate) receptor antagonists had little effect. We conclude that DAO secretion may contribute to the catabolism of histamine released during fat absorption and this is probably mediated through the histamine H(4) receptor. PMID:23413254

  1. Histamine H3 receptors regulate acetylcholine release from the guinea pig ileum myenteric plexus

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, E.; Coruzzi, G.; Bertaccini, G. )

    1991-01-01

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor agonists and antagonists on the acetylcholine release from peripheral nerves was evaluated in the guinea pig longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations, preloaded with ({sup 3}H)choline. In the presence of H1 and H2 blockade, histamine and (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine inhibited the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release, being (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine more active than histamine, but behaving as a partial agonist. The effect of histamine was completely reversed by selective H3-blocking drugs, thioperamide and impromidine, while only submaximal doses of (R)-{alpha}-methylhistamine were antagonized. Furthermore, thioperamide and impromidine enhanced the electrically-evoked acetylcholine release. On the contrary, the new H3-blocker, HST-7, was found substantially ineffective, both as histamine antagonist and as acetylcholine overflow enhancer. These data suggest that histamine exerts an inhibitory control on the acetylcholine release from intestinal cholinergic nerves through the activation of H3 receptors.

  2. The response of a human bronchial epithelial cell line to histamine: Intracellular calcium changes and extracellular release of inflammatory mediators

    SciTech Connect

    Noah, T.L.; Paradiso, A.M.; Madden, M.C.; McKinnon, K.P.; Devlin, R.B. )

    1991-11-01

    Epithelial cells are likely to modulate inflammation and tissue repair in the airways, but the factors responsible for these processes remain unclear. Because human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. The authors therefore investigated the response of an SV-40/adenovirus-transformed human bronchial epithelial cell line (BEAS-2B) to histamine, a mediator with relevance for airway diseases. The intracellular calcium response to histamine (10(-4) M) was measured, using Fura-2 and microspectrofluorimetry. Histamine induced a transient increase in intracellular calcium that originated from intracellular sources; this effect was inhibited by the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine, suggesting that BEAS cells retain functioning histamine receptors. BEAS cells were grown to confluence on microporous, collagen-coated filters, allowing measurement of vectorial release of soluble mediators. Monolayers exposed to histamine for 30 min released interleukin-6 and fibronectin in the apical direction, in a dose-dependent manner. Little eicosanoid production was induced by histamine, either in the apical or the basolateral direction, although BEAS cells constitutively produced small amounts of prostaglandin E2 and 15-HETE. However, these cells formed large amounts of eicosanoids in response to ozone exposure as a positive control. Comparison of their data with published reports for human airway epithelia in primary culture suggests that the BEAS cell line is, in a number of respects, a relevant model for the study of airway epithelial responses to a variety of stimuli.

  3. The release of histamine by parasympathetic stimulation in guinea-pig auricle and rat ileum.

    PubMed Central

    Bani-Sacchi, T; Barattini, M; Bianchi, S; Blandina, P; Brunelleschi, S; Fantozzi, R; Mannaioni, P F; Masini, E

    1986-01-01

    Two preparations, a segment of rat ileum and the vagally innerved guinea-pig auricles, have been used in an analysis of the responses to vagal or to electrical field stimulation. The responses to parasympathetic stimulation were depressed by atropine and by tetrodotoxin, and potentiated by eserine. Supramaximal stimulation (10-20 Hz) resulted in increased release of acetylcholine and histamine, both in rat ileum and guinea-pig auricles. The release of histamine after parasympathetic stimulation did not exhibit tachyphylaxis, and it was not reproduced by non-parasympathetic stimuli. In both preparations, atropine produced a significant, dose-related reduction of histamine measured in the bath fluid after stimulation, while eserine increased histamine output. A significant diminution of mast cell granules metachromasia was observed in guinea-pig auricles and in rat intestine after parasympathetic stimulation. The possibility is discussed that acetylcholine released by parasympathetic stimulation would in turn evoke the secretion of histamine from tissue mast cells. PMID:2422351

  4. The release of histamine during gastric acid secretion in conscious rats

    PubMed Central

    el Munshid, H. A.; Lake, H. J.

    1974-01-01

    1. Conscious gastric-cannulated rats were given [3H]histidine and aminoguanidine by dosage procedures intended to build up fast-turnover and slow-turnover pools of tissue [3H]histamine. Acid secretion was stimulated by I.V. infusion of pentagastrin, and the [3H]histamine content of gastric juice and excretion in urine were determined at 30 min intervals. 2. The amount of [3H]histamine in gastric juice derived from either a slow-turnover or fast-turnover pool was very low in unstimulated animals, and was not altered during pentagastrin-stimulated acid secretion. 3. From a slow-turnover pool pentagastrin caused increased urinary excretion of [3H]histamine. This was abolished by gastrectomy, so that the [3H]histamine liberated by pentagastrin from this pool appears to have been derived from the stomach. Evidence was not found for the existence of a slow-turnover histamine pool in the glandular mucosa of the stomach, and the source within the stomach of this pentagastrin-liberated histamine is thus uncertain. 4. From a fast-turnover pool pentagastrin did not cause an increased urinary excretion of [3H]histamine. The amount of [3H]histamine excreted by gastrectomized rats was not different from that produced by gastric-cannulated animals. This suggests that a high proportion of urinary histamine derived from a fast-turnover pool was non-gastric in origin. 5. Differences in the time scale of [3H]histamine release and acid secretion were not found. In some experiments the urinary output of [3H]histamine was prolonged beyond the end of pentagastrin administration and gastric acid secretion. However, the overall data do not suggest that urinary histamine output and gastric acid secretion take different time courses. PMID:4141368

  5. Roles of intracellular Ca2+ and cyclic AMP in mast cell histamine release induced by radiographic contrast media.

    PubMed

    Saito, Mami; Itoh, Yoshinori; Yano, Takahisa; Sendo, Toshiaki; Goromaru, Takeshi; Sakai, Naoko; Oishi, Ryozo

    2003-04-01

    Mast cell histamine release is considered to be associated with the etiology of anaphylactoid reactions to iodinated radiographic contrast media (RCM). In the present study, the effects of various ionic and non-ionic RCM on histamine release from mast cells were compared, and the possible mechanisms of the histamine release were subsequently determined. Both ionic (ioxaglate and amidotrizoate) and non-ionic (iohexol, ioversol, iomeprol, iopamidol and iotrolan) RCM increased histamine release from the dissociated rat pulmonary cells, whereby ionic materials were more potent than non-ionic agents. There was no significant correlation between the extent of histamine release and the osmolarity of each RCM solution. In addition, hyperosmotic mannitol solution (1000 mOsm/kg) caused no marked histamine release. Thus, it is unlikely that the hyperosmolarity of RCM solutions contributes to the histamine release. RCM also stimulated, but to a lesser extent, the histamine release from rat peritoneal cells. The RCM-induced histamine release from both types of cells was inhibited by dibutyl cyclic AMP or combined treatment with forskolin and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Corresponding to these results, RCM markedly reduced the cellular cyclic AMP content. On the other hand, the removal of intracellular but not the extracellular Ca2+ attenuated the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. From these findings, it is suggested that the decrease in cellular cyclic AMP content and an increase in intracellular Ca2+ contribute at least in part to the RCM-induced mast cell histamine release. PMID:12690428

  6. [Effect of nociceptin on histamine and serotonin release in the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Gyenge, Melinda; Hantos, Mónika; Laufer, Rudolf; Tekes, Korniléa

    2006-01-01

    Role in pain sensation of both nociceptin (NC), the bioactive heptadecapeptide sequence of preproorphaninFQ and of histamine has been widely evidenced in the central nervous system (CNS). In the current series of experiments effect of intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered NC (5.5 nmol/rat) on histamine and serotonin levels in blood plasma, CSF and brain areas (hypothalamus and hippocampus) was studies and compared to the effect of the mast cell degranulator Compound 48/80(100microg/kg, i.c.v.) and the neuroactive peptide Substance P (50nmol/rat, i.c.v.). It was found that all the three compounds increased the histamine level in the CNS, however their activity concerning the mast cell-, and neuronal histamine release is different. NC could release histamine from both the mast cells and the neurons and it decreased CNS serotonin levels. Substance P was found the most potent in increasing CNS histamine levels. Compound 48/80 treatment resulted in elevated histamine levels both in the CNS and blood plasma. It is concluded that the histamine releasing effects of i.c.v. administered NC and SP are limited to the CNS, but in the effect of Compound 48/80 its blood-brain barrier impairing activity is also involved. Data also demonstrate that NC has significant effect on both the histaminergic and serotonergic neurotransmission in the CNS. PMID:17094659

  7. Complexity of lectin-mediated reactions in bacteria-induced histamine release.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C; Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Espersen, F; Bøg-Hansen, T C; Lihme, A

    1984-08-01

    We have earlier suggested that bacteria-induced histamine release is caused by different mechanisms, including allergic and non-immunological mechanisms, and that the latter probably depends on lectin-mediated reactions. Two possibilities of lectin-mediated reactions were examined in this study, bacterial surface lectins bind to sugars on the basophil cell membrane leading to histamine release, and the reverse reaction where bacterial aminosugars react with lectins on the basophil cell surface. In the bacterial histamine release caused by the Staph. aureus strain Wood 46 it was possible to demonstrate a reverse reaction, but not a bacterial lectin-mediated reaction. The reaction seems to be complex, as lower concentrations of sugars might potentiate the release of histamine by binding to the target cell or bacteria, while the release is inhibited by higher concentrations. PMID:6208803

  8. Inhibition of cortical acetylcholine release and cognitive performance by histamine H3 receptor activation in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Blandina, P.; Giorgetti, M.; Bartolini, L.; Cecchi, M.; Timmerman, H.; Leurs, R.; Pepeu, G.; Giovannini, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of histamine and agents at histamine receptors on spontaneous and 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine, measured by microdialysis from the cortex of freely moving, rats, and on cognitive tests are described. 2. Local administration of histamine (0.1-100 microM) failed to affect spontaneous but inhibited 100 mM K(+)-stimulated release of acetylcholine up to about 50%. The H3 receptor agonists (R)-alpha-methylhistamine (RAMH) (0.1-10 microM), imetit (0.01-10 microM) and immepip (0.01-10 microM) mimicked the effect of histamine. 3. Neither 2-thiazolylethylamine (TEA), an agonist showing some selectivity for H1 receptors, nor the H2 receptor agonist, dimaprit, modified 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine. 4. The inhibitory effect of 100 microM histamine was completely prevented by the highly selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit but was resistant to antagonism by triprolidine and cimetidine, antagonists at histamine H1 and H2 but not H3 receptors. 5. The H3 receptor-induced inhibition of K(+)-evoked release of acetylcholine was fully sensitive to tetrodotoxin (TTX). 6. The effects of intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of imetit (5 mg kg-1) and RAMH (5 mg kg-1) were tested on acetylcholine release and short term memory paradigms. Both drugs reduced 100 mM K(+)-evoked release of cortical acetylcholine, and impaired object recognition and a passive avoidance response. 7. These observations provide the first evidence of a regulatory role of histamine H3 receptors on cortical acetylcholine release in vivo. Moreover, they suggest a role for histamine in learning and memory and may have implications for the treatment of degenerative disorders associated with impaired cholinergic function. PMID:8982515

  9. Activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells in rats.

    PubMed

    Huang, Z L; Mochizuki, T; Watanabe, H; Maeyama, K

    1999-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism by which stress induces rapid histamine release from mast cells, Wistar rats, pretreated as neonates with capsaicin, were subjected to immobilization stress for 2 h, and histamine release was measured in paws of anesthetized rats by using in vivo microdialysis after activation of sensory nerves by electrical or chemical stimulation. Immobilization stress studies indicated that in control rats stress induced a 2.7-fold increase in the level of plasma histamine compared to that in freely moving rats. Whereas pretreatment with capsaicin significantly decreased stress-induced elevation of plasma histamine. Microdialysis studies showed that electrical stimulation of the sciatic nerve resulted in a 4-fold increase of histamine release in rat paws. However, this increase was significantly inhibited in rats pretreated with capsaicin. Furthermore, injection of capsaicin into rat paw significantly increased histamine release in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that activation of sensory nerves participates in stress-induced histamine release from mast cells. PMID:10462124

  10. Inhibitors of adriamycin-induced histamine release in vitro limit adriamycin cardiotoxicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Klugmann, F. B.; Decorti, G.; Candussio, L.; Grill, V.; Mallardi, F.; Baldini, L.

    1986-01-01

    The activity of theophylline and disodium cromoglycate was tested on adriamycin-induced histamine release in vitro and on adriamycin cardiotoxicity in vivo. Both substances significantly inhibited the release of histamine induced by 100 micrograms ml-1 of adriamycin on rat peritoneal cells and produced significant protection against adriamycin-mediated acute and chronic cardiotoxicity in mice. N-acetylcysteine, a free radical scavenger, successfully used in the prevention of the cardiomyopathy, was also found to be an inhibitor of histamine release induced by adriamycin and compound 48/80 on rat peritoneal cells. This study further supports the hypothesis that the release of histamine may be involved in the pathogenesis of anthracycline cardiotoxicity. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:2432914

  11. Cardiac mast cells regulate myocyte ANP release via histamine H2 receptor in beating rabbit atria.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Wen, Jin Fu; Jin, Jing Yu; Quan, He Xiu; Cho, Kyung Woo

    2009-06-01

    It has been shown that histamine inhibits atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release. Because cardiac mast cells are the principal source of histamine in the heart, we hypothesized that cardiac mast cells are involved in the regulation of atrial ANP release. To test the hypothesis, experiments were performed in perfused beating rabbit atria allowing atrial pacing and measurements of changes in atrial stroke volume, intraatrial pulse pressure and myocyte ANP release. Mast cell degranulation with Compound 48/80 decreased atrial myocyte ANP release, and the response was blocked by a selective histamine H(2) receptor blocker, cimetidine, indicating that histamine was responsible for the decrease in ANP release. Mast cell stabilization with cromolyn blocked the Compound 48/80-induced decrease in ANP release. These data suggest that mast cell-derived histamine is involved in the regulation of cardiac ANP release. Thus, the cardiac mast cell-cardiomyocyte communication via the histamine-ANP pathway may implicate in the cardiac disorder associated with mast cell degranulation such as in acute coronary syndrome or cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:19328828

  12. Enhanced histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs exposed to sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Katayama, Noboru; Wakamori, Kazuo )

    1992-06-01

    To clarify the relationship between air pollution and mast cell response, the effects of sulfuric acid aerosols on histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs were investigated. Guinea pigs were exposed to 0.3, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) aerosols or 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for 2 and 4 weeks. After the exposure, lung mast cell suspensions were isolated by collagenase treatment and antigen- or A23187-induced histamine release was measured. Antigen-induced histamine release from mast cells was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 2 weeks, but exposure to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 4 weeks did not show the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine release. A23187-induced histamine release was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks, but suppression of histamine release from lung mast cells stimulated with A23187 was observed by the exposure to 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} for 4 weeks. The exposure to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} showed no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. The combination of 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} with 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks resulted in no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. These results suggested that functional properties of lung mast cells may be altered by a low concentration of H{sub 2}So{sub 4} aerosol exposure.

  13. FK506 inhibition of histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils.

    PubMed

    Sengoku, T; Kishi, S; Sakuma, S; Ohkubo, Y; Goto, T

    2000-03-01

    Histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils are thought to be closely involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Some reports show that FK506 (tacrolimus hydrate) inhibited histamine release and cytokine production by mast cells and basophils. However, as the effects of FK506 has not been compared with those of clinically used drugs in those reports, the clinical relevancy of FK506 inhibition remained unclear. In this paper, we compared the actions of FK506 with those of steroids or disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) which has been clinically used. FK506 inhibited histamine release by Brown-Norway rat peritoneal mast cells more potently than steroids and especially DSCG. FK506 also inhibited histamine release by a mast rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-1 cell line and human peripheral blood basophils, whereas steroids failed to inhibit histamine release by human basophils. FK506 as well as steroids inhibited TNF-alpha and IL-4 production by RBL-1 cells. FK506 was therefore more effective than steroids and DSCG in inhibiting histamine release, and it also had the ability of inhibiting cytokine production by mast cells as steroids do. We concluded that FK506 might regulate allergic diseases via these actions, judging from the viewpoint of clinical relevancy. PMID:10685002

  14. Modulation of histamine release from human basophils in vitro by physiological concentrations of zinc

    SciTech Connect

    Marone, G.; Findlay, S.R.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1981-05-01

    Zinc, at physiologic concentrations, inhibits in vitro histamine release from human basophils induced by several immunologic (i.e., antigen and anti-immunoglobulin E (IgE) and nonimmunologic (Ca/sup + +/ ionophore A23187 and formylated tripeptide formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (f-met peptide)) stimuli in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition begins at about 10(-6) (ionophore A23187, anti-IgE and antigen) or 10(-5) M (f-met peptide) and is maximum at 10(-4) M (80--100% inhibition of histamine release). The activity of zinc is about 25-fold greater with respect to ionophore A23187 (ID50 . 1.1 x 10(-6) M) than to f-met peptide-induced (ID50 . 4 x 10(-5) M) histamine release. Its activity on IgE-mediated histamine release is intermediate between these two extremes (ID50 . 9.7 x 10(-6) M). Zinc does not affect the first stage of histamine release but acts on the calcium-dependent second stage. It is a competitive antagonist of the action of Ca/sup + +/ in histamine secretion induced by antigen, anti-IgE and f-met peptide (but not by A23187) with a dissociation constant of about 1.2 x 10(-5) M. The addition of colchicine with zinc fails to increase the inhibition caused by the ion alone, suggesting the two compounds work via a common mechanism of action. Deuterium oxide reversed, in a dose-dependent manner, the inhibition of histamine release caused by zinc. These results suggest that the effect of zinc on histamine release from human basophils may be related to its influence on the microtubule system, directly or via its interaction with calcium.

  15. Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory mediator release by histamine in human airway epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Holden, N S; Gong, W; King, E M; Kaur, M; Giembycz, M A; Newton, R

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: In asthma, histamine contributes to bronchoconstriction, vasodilatation and oedema, and is associated with the late phase response. The current study investigates possible inflammatory effects of histamine acting on nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-dependent transcription and cytokine release. Experimental approach: Using BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells, NF-κB-dependent transcription and both release and mRNA expression of IL-6 and IL-8 were examined by reporter assay, ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. Histamine receptors were detected using qualitative RT-PCR and function examined using selective agonists and antagonists. Key results: Addition of histamine to TNFα-stimulated BEAS-2B cells maximally potentiated NF-κB-dependent transcription 1.8 fold, whereas IL-6 and IL-8 protein release were enhanced 7.3- and 2.7-fold respectively. These responses were, in part, NF-κB-dependent and were associated with 2.6- and 1.7-fold enhancements of IL-6 and IL-8 mRNA expression. The H1 receptor antagonist, mepyramine, caused a rightward shift in the concentration-response curves of TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription (pA2=9.91) and release of IL-6 (pA2=8.78) and IL-8 (pA2=8.99). Antagonists of histamine H2, H3 and H4 receptors were without effect. Similarly, H3 and H4 receptor agonists did not affect TNFα-induced NF-κB-dependent transcription, or IL-6 and IL-8 release at concentrations below 10 μM. The anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, inhibited the histamine enhanced NF-κB-dependent transcription and IL-6 and IL-8 release. Conclusions and implications: Potentiation of NF-κB-dependent transcription and inflammatory cytokine release by histamine predominantly involves receptors of the H1 receptor subtype. These data support an anti-inflammatory role for H1 receptor antagonists by preventing the transcription and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:17891168

  16. Inhaled nedocromil sodium reduces histamine release from isolated large airway segments of asthmatic subjects in vivo.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, D L; Hawksworth, R J; Lee, T H

    1993-09-01

    Placement of an intrabronchial single balloon catheter provides the possibility of measuring histamine release in isolated large airway segments in vivo. We wanted to assess the protective effect of nedocromil sodium on intrabronchial histamine release after hyperosmolar challenge. Six mild asthmatics were bronchoscoped 30 min after inhalation of 4 mg nedocromil sodium or placebo, given via a metered dose inhaler in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. Lavage of the left main bronchus was carried out proximal to a balloon catheter inflated at its bifurcation, and specimens were assayed for histamine and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) by radioimmunoassay. The rise in histamine concentration in bronchial epithelial fluid following hyperosmolar saline challenge was significantly greater following placebo than following nedocromil sodium (mean +/- SEM prechallenge histamine concentration on placebo day 6.9 +/- 2.9 nM; post-challenge: 25.3 +/- 8.0 nM; mean +/- SEM prechallenge histamine concentration on the day nedocromil sodium was given: 3.7 +/- 0.7 nM; post-challenge 5.8 +/- 1.7 nM). Changes in PGD2 levels reflected the changes in histamine, but the variability of response was large, and there were no significant differences between the effects of placebo and nedocromil sodium. The procedure caused significantly greater falls in peak expiratory flow rates following placebo (mean +/- SEM percentage fall 20.2 +/- 4.4%) than following nedocromil sodium (0.9 +/- 5.8%, p < 0.02). We conclude that there is tonic basal histamine release within asthmatic airways, and that nedocromil sodium inhibits histamine release from mediator cells in vivo. PMID:7693506

  17. Centrally injected histamine increases posterior hypothalamic acetylcholine release in hemorrhage-hypotensive rats.

    PubMed

    Altinbas, Burcin; Yilmaz, Mustafa S; Savci, Vahide; Jochem, Jerzy; Yalcin, Murat

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, acting centrally as a neurotransmitter, evokes a reversal of hemorrhagic hypotension in rats due to the activation of the sympathetic and the renin-angiotensin systems as well as the release of arginine vasopressin and proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides. We demonstrated previously that central nicotinic cholinergic receptors are involved in the pressor effect of histamine. The aim of the present study was to examine influences of centrally administrated histamine on acetylcholine (ACh) release at the posterior hypothalamus-a region characterized by location of histaminergic and cholinergic neurons involved in the regulation of the sympathetic activity in the cardiovascular system-in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. Hemodynamic and microdialysis studies were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rats. Hemorrhagic hypotension was induced by withdrawal of a volume of 1.5 ml blood/100 g body weight over a period of 10 min. Acute hemorrhage led to a severe and long-lasting decrease in mean arterial pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), and an increase in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and choline (Ch) levels by 56% and 59%, respectively. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (50, 100, and 200 nmol) dose- and time-dependently increased MAP and HR and caused an additional rise in extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch levels at the most by 102%, as compared to the control saline-treated group. Histamine H1 receptor antagonist chlorpheniramine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) completely blocked histamine-evoked hemodynamic and extracellular posterior hypothalamic ACh and Ch changes, whereas H2 and H3/H4 receptor blockers ranitidine (50 nmol; i.c.v.) and thioperamide (50 nmol; i.c.v.) had no effect. In conclusion, centrally administered histamine, acting via H1 receptors, increases ACh release at the posterior hypothalamus and causes a pressor and tachycardic response in hemorrhage-hypotensive anesthetized rats. PMID:25468497

  18. Macelignan inhibits histamine release and inflammatory mediator production in activated rat basophilic leukemia mast cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Sun; Kim, Myung-Suk; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2012-10-01

    Type I allergy is characterized by the release of granule-associated mediators, lipid-derived substances, cytokines, and chemokines by activated mast cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of macelignan isolated from Myristica fragrans Houtt., we determined its ability to inhibit calcium (Ca(2+)) influx, degranulation, and inflammatory mediator production in RBL-2 H3 cells stimulated with A23187 and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Macelignan inhibited Ca(2+) influx and the secretion of β-hexosaminidase, histamine, prostaglandin E(2), and leukotriene C(4); decreased mRNA levels of cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase, interleukin-4 (IL-4), IL-13, and tumor necrosis factor-α; and attenuated phosphorylation of Akt and the mitogen-activated protein kinases extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinase. These results indicate the potential of macelignan as a type I allergy treatment. PMID:22729280

  19. A toxic substance from the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus induces histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells.

    PubMed

    Takei, M; Nakagawa, H; Kimura, A; Endo, K

    1991-03-01

    A toxic substance (P-II fraction), fractionated from the pedicellariae of the sea urchin Toxopneustes pileolus, dose-dependently caused the histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells. The histamine release induced by P-II fraction increased with time, while compound 48/80 caused a more rapid histamine release. The dose-response curve for P-II fraction was studied with concentration 0.03-2.0 mg/ml. This reaction was dependent on Ca2+ and temperature. When glucose (5.5 mM) was omitted during the incubation step, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was significantly reduced as compared to that of compound 48/80. Pyruvate reversed this reduction. On the other hand, the histamine release induced by P-II fraction was effectively potentiated by the addition of glucose (11.0 mM), but not that by compound 48/80. These results suggest that P-II fraction-induced histamine release differs from that of compound 48/80 disregards to the effects of glucose, because this histamine release appears to be more sensitive to the glycolytic pathway than compound 48/80-induced histamine release. PMID:1713736

  20. Enhancement of mite antigen-induced histamine release by deuterium oxide from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients

    SciTech Connect

    Numata, T.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamura, T.

    1981-09-01

    The mite antigen-induced histamine release from leucocytes of chronic urticarial patients was enhanced in the presence of deuterium oxide, which stabilizes microtubules. This enhancing effect of deuterium oxide on the histamine release from leucocytes may provide a useful means for the detection of allergens in vitro in chronic urticaria.

  1. Optogenetic-mediated release of histamine reveals distal and autoregulatory mechanisms for controlling arousal.

    PubMed

    Williams, Rhannan H; Chee, Melissa J S; Kroeger, Daniel; Ferrari, Loris L; Maratos-Flier, Eleftheria; Scammell, Thomas E; Arrigoni, Elda

    2014-04-23

    Histaminergic neurons in the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN) are an important component of the ascending arousal system and may form part of a "flip-flop switch" hypothesized to regulate sleep and wakefulness. Anatomical studies have shown that the wake-active TMN and sleep-active ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) are reciprocally connected, suggesting that each region can inhibit its counterpart when active. In this study, we determined how histamine affects the two branches of this circuit. We selectively expressed channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) in TMN neurons and used patch-clamp recordings in mouse brain slices to examine the effects of photo-evoked histamine release in the ventrolateral TMN and VLPO. Photostimulation decreased inhibitory GABAergic inputs to the ventrolateral TMN neurons but produced a membrane hyperpolarization and increased inhibitory synaptic input to the VLPO neurons. We found that in VLPO the response to histamine was indirect, most likely via a GABAergic interneuron. Our experiments demonstrate that release of histamine from TMN neurons can disinhibit the TMN and suppresses the activity of sleep-active VLPO neurons to promote TMN neuronal firing. This further supports the sleep-wake "flip-flop switch" hypothesis and a role for histamine in stabilizing the switch to favor wake states. PMID:24760861

  2. Metal ion-induced toxic histamine release from human basophils and mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schedle, A; Samorapoompichit, P; Füreder, W; Rausch-Fan, X H; Franz, A; Sperr, W R; Sperr, W; Slavicek, R; Simak, S; Klepetko, W; Ellinger, A; Ghannadan, M; Baghestanian, M; Valent, P

    1998-03-15

    Recent data suggest that distinct metal ions can be released from dental alloys or other biomaterials, and may cause toxic effects on various cells. In this study, the effects of 14 metal ions on histamine release from human blood basophils (n = 4), isolated tissue mast cells (lung n = 8, uterus n = 2, skin n = 1, gingiva n = 1), the basophil cell line KU-812, and the mast cell line HMC-1 were analyzed. Of the 14 metal ions, Ag+ (0.33 mM) and Hg2+ (0.33 mM) were found to induce release of histamine in blood basophils, KU-812, mast cells, and HMC-1. The effects of Ag+ and Hg2+ were dose dependent and were observed within 60 min of incubation. In primary mast cells and basophils, AU3+ (0.33 mM) also induced histamine release, whereas no effects of Au3+ on HMC-1 or KU-812 cells were seen. The other metal ions showed no effects on primary or immortal cells within 60 min. However, Pt4+ (0.33 mM) induced histamine liberation in HMC-1 and lung mast cells after 12 h. The Ag+- and Hg2+-induced rapid release of histamine from HMC-1 was associated with ultrastructural signs of necrosis, but not apoptosis. In contrast, prolonged exposure to Pt4+ (0.33 mM, 14 h) induced apoptotic cell death in HMC-1 cells, as assessed by electron microscopy and DNA analysis. Together, certain metal ions induce distinct cytopathogenic effects in mast cells and basophils. Whereas Ag+, Hg2+, and Au3+ cause direct toxicity, Pt4 causes cell death through induction of apoptosis. Whether such effects contribute to local adverse reactions to metal-containing biomaterials in vivo remains to be determined. PMID:9492216

  3. Histamine H4 Receptor mediates interleukin-8 and TNF-α release in human mast cells via multiple signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Chen, X-F; Zhang, Z; Dou, X; Li, J-J; Zhang, W; Yu, Y-Y; Yu, B; Yu, B

    2016-01-01

    Histamine, mainly produced by mast cells, is an important inflammatory mediator in immune response. Recently Histamine H4 Receptor (H4R) was also identified in mast cells, from which pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines are released. However, the mechanism of how H4R mediates these cytokines and chemokines release in mast cells was still unclear. To further explore the role of H4R in the immune inflammatory response in mast cells, we tested the release of inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), chemokine interleukin-8 (IL-8) and the relevant signaling pathways activated by H4R on LAD2 cells (a human mast cell line). We found that the release of IL-8 and TNF-α were blocked by inhibitors of PI3K, ERK and Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT signaling pathways, while the release of these cytokines and chemokines were enhanced by the inhibitor of P38 signaling pathway. However, inhibitors of the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways had little effect on the expression of the pro-inflammatory mediators. Moreover, activation of the H4R could induce phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and AKT in mast cells. In conclusion, we found that H4R mediates the release of inflammatory cytokine TNF-α and chemokine IL-8 in human mast cells via PI3K, Ca2+-Calcineurin-NFAT and MAPKs signaling pathways. PMID:26828993

  4. Comparison of histamine release from human blood monocytes, lymphocytes, adenoidal and skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Schmutzler, W; Bolsmann, K; Zwadlo-Klarwasser, G

    1995-01-01

    Monocytes and lymphocytes from human blood contain 0.043 +/- 0.007 and 0.053 +/- 0.014 pg histamine/cell, respectively, which can be released by a number of stimulants (A 23187, C5a, substance P, specific allergen). The release process takes 60-120 min to reach its end point, in contrast to tissue mast cells which complete the release within 1-3 min. Both, ketotifen (10(-7) - 10(-5) M) and disodium cromoglycate (10(-5) - 10(-3) M) inhibited histamine release dose dependently up to 40-45%, which might be particularly relevant during the later stages of acute allergic or pseudoallergic reactions. PMID:7542070

  5. Toxic oxygen metabolites and ischemia-reperfusion increase histamine synthesis and release in the isolated rat heart.

    PubMed

    Valen, G; Kaszaki, J; Szabó, I; Nagy, S; Vaage, J

    1993-01-01

    Histamine is synthetized in the heart, and released by ischemia-reperfusion injury in several species. Histamine has arrhythmogenic, chronotropic, inotropic and vasoactive effects. Cardiac histamine release during ischemia-reperfusion may be mediated by toxic oxygen metabolites. We studied the effect of ischemia-reperfusion and toxic oxygen metabolites on release and synthesis of histamine in the isolated rat heart (Langendorff model). The following groups were included: I, (n = 10) control perfusion for 60 min; II, (n = 7) H2O2 (200 microM) was given for 10 min followed by 50 min recovery; III, (n = 7) thiourea (15 mM) was given in addition to H2O2; IV, (n = 7) thiourea given alone; V, (n = 7) catalase (150 U/ml) plus H2O2; VI, (n = 7) 20 min ischemia followed by 40 min reperfusion. The contents of histamine in the coronary effluent and in cardiac tissue were measured repeatedly (radioenzymatic method). Ischemia-reperfusion and toxic oxygen metabolites increased release of histamine in the coronary effluent. Concomitantly the histamine contents in cardiac tissue increased, indicating increased synthesis of histamine. PMID:8441180

  6. Histamine release and fibrinogen adsorption mediate acute inflammatory responses to biomaterial implants in humans

    PubMed Central

    Zdolsek, Johann; Eaton, John W; Tang, Liping

    2007-01-01

    Background Medical implants often fail as a result of so-called foreign body reactions during which inflammatory cells are recruited to implant surfaces. Despite the clinical importance of this phenomenon, the mechanisms involved in these reactions to biomedical implants in humans are not well understood. The results from animal studies suggest that both fibrinogen adsorption to the implant surface and histamine release by local mast cells are involved in biomaterial-mediated acute inflammatory responses. The purpose of this study was to test this hypothesis in humans. Methods Thirteen male medical student volunteers (Caucasian, 21–30 years of age) were employed for this study. To assess the importance of fibrinogen adsorption, six volunteers were implanted with polyethylene teraphthalate disks pre-coated with their own (fibrinogen-containing) plasma or (fibrinogen-free) serum. To evaluate the importance of histamine, seven volunteers were implanted with uncoated disks with or without prior oral administration of histamine receptor antagonists. The acute inflammatory response was estimated 24 hours later by measuring the activities of implant-associated phagocyte-specific enzymes. Results Plasma coated implants accumulated significantly more phagocytes than did serum coated implants and the recruited cells were predominantly macrophage/monocytes. Administration of both H1 and H2 histamine receptor antagonists greatly reduced the recruitment of macrophages/monocytes and neutrophils on implant surfaces. Conclusion In humans – as in rodents – biomaterial-mediated inflammatory responses involve at least two crucial events: histamine-mediated phagocyte recruitment and phagocyte accumulation on implant surfaces engendered by spontaneously adsorbed host fibrinogen. Based on these results, we conclude that reducing fibrinogen:surface interactions should enhance biocompatibility and that administration of histamine receptor antagonists prior to, and shortly after

  7. Histamine modulates microglia function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histamine is commonly acknowledged as an inflammatory mediator in peripheral tissues, leaving its role in brain immune responses scarcely studied. Therefore, our aim was to uncover the cellular and molecular mechanisms elicited by this molecule and its receptors in microglia-induced inflammation by evaluating cell migration and inflammatory mediator release. Methods Firstly, we detected the expression of all known histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R and H4R), using a murine microglial cell line and primary microglia cell cultures from rat cortex, by real-time PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Then, we evaluated the role of histamine in microglial cell motility by performing scratch wound assays. Results were further confirmed using murine cortex explants. Finally, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels were evaluated by ELISA measurements to determine the role of histamine on the release of these inflammatory mediators. Results After 12 h of treatment, 100 μM histamine and 10 μg/ml histamine-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles significantly stimulated microglia motility via H4R activation. In addition, migration involves α5β1 integrins, and p38 and Akt signaling pathways. Migration of microglial cells was also enhanced in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml), used as a positive control. Importantly, histamine inhibited LPS-stimulated migration via H4R activation. Histamine or H4R agonist also inhibited LPS-induced IL-1β release in both N9 microglia cell line and hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Conclusions To our knowledge, we are the first to show a dual role of histamine in the modulation of microglial inflammatory responses. Altogether, our data suggest that histamine per se triggers microglia motility, whereas histamine impedes LPS-induced microglia migration and IL-1β release. This last datum assigns a new putative anti-inflammatory role for

  8. The major role of peripheral release of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine in formalin-induced nociception.

    PubMed

    Parada, C A; Tambeli, C H; Cunha, F Q; Ferreira, S H

    2001-01-01

    Formalin injected subcutaneously into the paw is a widely used model of pain. This procedure evokes a short-lasting period of flinching (phase 1) and a long-lasting period of intense flinching (phase 2) following a very short period of quiescence. Phase 2 has been extensively used to support the involvement of central (spinal cord) sensitization in inflammatory hyperalgesia. The present study evaluated the contribution of stimulation of peripheral nociceptors by the release of endogenous mediators at the site of lesion. The participation of histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine was demonstrated by the treatment of the rat hindpaws with selective histamine H1 (pyrilamine and meclizine) and histamine H2 (cimetidine) receptor antagonists or selective 5-hydroxytryptamine(1A) (WAY100,135) and 5-hydroxytryptamine(4/3) (tropisetron) receptor antagonists. The co-administration of pyrilamine or meclizine with formalin (1%) significantly reduced phases 1 and 2, while cimetidine had no effect. Pyrilamine administration during the period of quiescence (10min after formalin administration) caused strong dose-related inhibition of phase 2. The co-administration of tropisetron with formalin caused a blockade of both phases, while with WAY100,135 caused only inhibition of the phase 2. In contrast, tropisetron administrated during the period of quiescence did not cause antinociception. Histamine and 5-hydroxytryptamine receptors could be strongly activated in naïve animals by administration of a mixture of both agonists or compound 48/80 (2microg/paw) which is known to release both mediators from mast cells. Pretreatment of the paws with a mast cell stabilizer, sodium cromoglycate, significantly reduced the second phase of the formalin injection model. From these results we suggest that phases 1 and 2 of the formalin test are dependent upon the ongoing afferent input. Furthermore, while histamine H1 participates in both phases, 5-hydroxytryptamine(4/3) participates in phase 1 and 5

  9. Effect of subarachnoid hemorrhage on contractile responses and noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Lobato, R.D.; Marin, J.; Salaices, M.; Rico, M.L.; Sanchez, C.F.

    1981-10-01

    This study analyzes the changes induced by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) on the contractile responses and the noradrenaline release evoked in cat cerebral arteries by histamine. The dose-dependent vasoconstriction induced by histamine on the cerebral arteries of normal cats was significantly reduced by diphenhydramine and phentolamine. When SAH was produced 3 and 7 days before the experiment, the histamine-induced vasoconstriction also decreased. Thereafter, a tendency to normalization in the contractile vascular responses was observed such that in 15 days after the hemorrhage it was not significantly different from that found in controls animals. The decrease in the contractile responses to histamine provoked by SAH was similar to that seen after pretreatment with intracisternal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine. The amount of radioactivity released by histamine following preincubation with /sup 3/H-noradrenaline from the cerebral arteries of cats exposed to SAH 3, 7, and 15 days before the experiment was significantly reduced when compared with controls. Moreover, the basal level of tritium release and the radioactivity retained at the end of the experiment were also decreased after SAH. Results indicate histamine releases noradrenaline from cat cerebral arteries, and SAH produce a transient denervation of the perivascular adrenergic nerve endings, which explained by the impairment of the indirect adrenergic mechanism involved in the overall contractile response elicited by this amine in cerebral arteries. Histamine does not seem to play a significant role in the production of the cerebral vasospasm occurring after SAH.

  10. Effects of aegeline, a main alkaloid of Aegle Marmelos Correa leaves, on the histamine release from mast cells.

    PubMed

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Riyanto, Sugeng; Sukari, Mohamad Aspollah; Maeyama, Kazutaka

    2011-07-01

    Aegeline or N-[2-hydroxy-2(4-methoxyphenyl) ethyl]-3-phenyl-2-propenamide is a main alkaloid isolated from Aegle marmelos Correa collected in Yogyakarta Indonesia. In our study, we investigated the effects of aegeline on the histamine release from mast cell. The study was performed by using (1) rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cell line, and (2) rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). DNP(24)-BSA, thapsigargin, ionomycin, compound 48/80 and PMA were used as inducers for histamine release from mast cell. In our study, aegeline inhibited the histamine release from RBL-2H3 cells induced by DNP(24)-BSA. Indeed, aegeline showed strong inhibition when RBL-2H3 cells induced by Ca(2+) stimulants such as thapsigargin and ionomycin. Aegeline is suggested to influence the intracellular Ca(2+) pool only since could not inhibit the (45)Ca(2+) influx into RBL-2H3 cells. Aegeline showed weak inhibitory effects on the histamine release from RPMCs, even though still succeed to inhibit when the histamine release induced by thapsigargin. These findings indicate that aegeline altered the signaling pathway related to the intracellular Ca(2+) pool in which thapsigargin acts. Based on the results, the inhibitory effects of aegeline on the histamine release from mast cells depended on the type of mast cell and also involved some mechanisms related to intracellular Ca(2+) signaling events via the same target of the action of thapsigargin or downstream process of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling in mast cells. PMID:21715270

  11. Effects of shear stress on intracellular calcium change and histamine release in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenzhong; Chen, Jiyao; Zhou, Luwei

    2009-01-01

    Massage, one form of physical therapy, is widely used for a large number of musculoskeletal disorders, but its exact mechanism still remains to be elucidated. One hypothesis is that the shear stress caused by massage may induce cutaneous mast cells to release histamine, thereby improving the local tissue microcirculation of blood. In the present work, a mast cell line (rat basophilic leukemia cells, RBL-2H3) was used in vitro to study cellular responses to the stimulus of shear stress generated by a rotating rotor in a cell dish. The intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]c) was studied by confocal fluorescence microscopy with Fluo-3/AM staining and the released histamine was measured with a fluorescence spectrometer using o-phthalaldehyde (OPA) staining. An elevation of [Ca2+]c occurred immediately after the shear stress, followed by histamine release. However, both [Ca2+]c increase and histamine release disappeared when a Ca2+-free saline was used, indicating that the rise in the [Ca2+]c is due to a Ca2+ influx from the extracellular buffer. Furthermore, Ruthenium red, a transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV) inhibitor, could effectively block the shear stressinduced histamine release, suggesting that TRPV membrane proteins are the likely targets of the shear stress. Because histamine is a well-known mediator of microvascular tissue dilation, these results may have an important impact on understanding the mechanism involved in massage therapy. PMID:19888909

  12. Influence of glucocorticoids on histamine release and 45calcium uptake by isolated rat mast cells.

    PubMed

    Grosman, N; Jensen, S M

    1984-01-01

    Hydrocortisone and prednisolone inhibited the histamine release from isolated rat mast cells induced by antigen, the ionophore A23187, and compound 48/80 in the absence and in the presence of calcium. Hydrocortisone reduced the response to the different releasing agents by 50% in the concentration range 2-6 X 10(-4) M, whereas prednisolone was about 1.5 times more potent. The inhibitory effect of hydrocortisone had a rapid onset of action and maximal inhibition was observed after preincubation for 20 minutes. The effect of hydrocortisone was reversed by including 2 mM glucose in the medium. The reversal was only partial with antigen and the ionophore A23187, indicating a greater energy requirement of these releasing agents compared with compound 48/80. The inhibition of the histamine release was accompanied by a concentration-related inhibition of the 45Ca uptake, except with the ionophore. The inhibition of the 45Ca uptake was also reversed by glucose, but differences were noted concerning the influence of preincubation time. The observations are explained by an association of 45Ca to cellular material, e.g. granules, secondary to the release process. The effects of hydrocortisone and prednisolone were qualitatively identical and were not observed with estriol. The glucocorticoid inhibition of histamine release does not seem to be caused by effects on phospholipase activity or cyclic AMP metabolism. The present observations are fully consistent with an impaired mitochondrial function as the mechanism for the mast cell effects of the glucocorticoids. PMID:6199955

  13. Effects of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) on Ca2+ concentration and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Fukugasako, Sanae; Ito, Shinichi; Ikemoto, Yoshimi

    2003-01-01

    Mechanisms of methyl p-hydroxybenzoate (methyl paraben) action in allergic reactions were investigated by measuring the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs). In the presence or absence of extracellular Ca2+, methyl paraben (0.1–10 mM) increased [Ca2+]i, in a concentration-dependent manner. Under both the conditions, methyl paraben alone did not evoke histamine release. In RPMCs pretreated with a protein kinase C (PKC) activator (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) 3 and 10 nM), methyl paraben (0.3–3 mM) induced histamine release. However, a high concentration (10 mM) of the agent did not increase the histamine release. U73122 (0.1 and 0.5 μM), an inhibitor of phospholipase C (PLC), significantly inhibited the methyl paraben-induced histamine release in PMA-pretreated RPMCs. U73343 (0.5 μM), an inactive analogue of U73122, did not inhibit the histamine release caused by methyl paraben. In Ca2+-free solution, PLC inhibitors (U73122 0.1 and 0.5 μM, D609 1–10 μM) inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i, whereas U73343 (0.5 μM) did not. Xestospongin C (2–20 μM) and 2 aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (30 and 100 μM), blockers of the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor, inhibited the methyl paraben-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in Ca2+-free solution. In conclusion, methyl paraben causes an increase in [Ca2+]i, which may be due to release of Ca2+ from storage sites by IP3 via activation of PLC in RPMCs. In addition, methyl paraben possibly has some inhibitory effects on histamine release via unknown mechanisms. PMID:12770943

  14. The effects of a chactoid scorpion venom and its purified toxins on rat blood pressure and mast cells histamine release.

    PubMed

    Ettinger, Keren; Cohen, Gadi; Momic, Tatjana; Lazarovici, Philip

    2013-08-01

    The effect of the venom of the Chactoid family of scorpions on blood pressure was scantly investigated and was addressed in the present study using the venom of the Israeli scorpion, Scorpio maurus palmatus. Blood pressure in rats was monitored via cannulated femoral artery, while venom and toxins were introduced into femoral vein. Venom injection elicited a biphasic effect, expressed first by a fast and transient hypotensive response, which lasted up to 10 min, followed by a hypertensive response, which lasted up to one hour. It was found that these effects resulted from different venom components. Phospholipase A₂ produced the hypotensive effect, while a non-enzymatic neurotoxic polypeptide fraction produced the hypertensive effect. Surprisingly, the main neurotoxic polypeptide to mice had no effect on blood pressure. In vitro experiments indicated that the hypertensive factors caused histamine release from the peritoneal mast cells, but this effect is assumed to be not relevant to their in vivo effect. In spite of the cytotoxic activity of phospholipase A₂, it did not release histamine. These findings suggest that the effects of venom and isolated fractions on blood pressure parameters are mediated by different mechanisms, which deserve further pharmacological investigation. PMID:23899970

  15. The Effects of a Chactoid Scorpion Venom and Its Purified Toxins on Rat Blood Pressure and Mast Cells Histamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Ettinger, Keren; Cohen, Gadi; Momic, Tatjana; Lazarovici, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the venom of the Chactoid family of scorpions on blood pressure was scantly investigated and was addressed in the present study using the venom of the Israeli scorpion, Scorpio maurus palmatus. Blood pressure in rats was monitored via cannulated femoral artery, while venom and toxins were introduced into femoral vein. Venom injection elicited a biphasic effect, expressed first by a fast and transient hypotensive response, which lasted up to 10 min, followed by a hypertensive response, which lasted up to one hour. It was found that these effects resulted from different venom components. Phospholipase A2 produced the hypotensive effect, while a non-enzymatic neurotoxic polypeptide fraction produced the hypertensive effect. Surprisingly, the main neurotoxic polypeptide to mice had no effect on blood pressure. In vitro experiments indicated that the hypertensive factors caused histamine release from the peritoneal mast cells, but this effect is assumed to be not relevant to their in vivo effect. In spite of the cytotoxic activity of phospholipase A2, it did not release histamine. These findings suggest that the effects of venom and isolated fractions on blood pressure parameters are mediated by different mechanisms, which deserve further pharmacological investigation. PMID:23899970

  16. Histamine Induces ATP Release from Human Subcutaneous Fibroblasts, via Pannexin-1 Hemichannels, Leading to Ca2+ Mobilization and Cell Proliferation*

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Ana Rita; Paramos-de-Carvalho, Diogo; Certal, Mariana; Costa, Maria Adelina; Costa, Cristina; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Sévigny, Jean; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2013-01-01

    Changes in the regulation of connective tissue ATP-mediated mechano-transduction and remodeling may be an important link to the pathogenesis of chronic pain. It has been demonstrated that mast cell-derived histamine plays an important role in painful fibrotic diseases. Here we analyzed the involvement of ATP in the response of human subcutaneous fibroblasts to histamine. Acute histamine application caused a rise in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) and ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via H1 receptor activation. Histamine-induced [Ca2+]i rise was partially attenuated by apyrase, an enzyme that inactivates extracellular ATP, and by blocking P2 purinoceptors with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azo(benzene-2,4-disulfonic acid) tetrasodium salt and reactive blue 2. [Ca2+]i accumulation caused by histamine was also reduced upon blocking pannexin-1 hemichannels with 10Panx, probenecid, or carbenoxolone but not when connexin hemichannels were inhibited with mefloquine or 2-octanol. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of vesicular exocytosis, also did not block histamine-induced [Ca2+]i mobilization. Prolonged exposure of human subcutaneous fibroblast cultures to histamine favored cell growth and type I collagen synthesis via the activation of H1 receptor. This effect was mimicked by ATP and its metabolite, ADP, whereas the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist, MRS2179, partially attenuated histamine-induced cell growth and type I collagen production. Expression of pannexin-1 and ADP-sensitive P2Y1 receptor on human subcutaneous fibroblasts was confirmed by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. In conclusion, histamine induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts, via pannexin-1 hemichannels, leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization and cell growth through the cooperation of H1 and P2 (probably P2Y1) receptors. PMID:23918924

  17. Histamine release in skin monitored with the microdialysis technique does not correlate with the weal size induced by cow allergen.

    PubMed

    Horsmanheimo, L; Harvima, I T; Harvima, R J; Ylönen, J; Naukkarinen, A; Horsmanheimo, M

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to monitor histamine release in immediate-type hypersensitivity reactions in the skin of 10 atopic patients, sensitive to cow, by using the microdialysis technique. Three healthy subjects, without any atopic features or background, served as the control group. The probe inserted into the forearm dermal skin was perfused with isotonic saline solution. Samples were collected at 15-min intervals. After the first allergen challenge of four prick tests close to the probe with cow allergen extract, the skin was similarly repricked again in five patients and three healthy subjects, and in five other patients, 25 microliters of 10 mumol/l substance P (SP) was injected intracutaneously. The samples were analysed for histamine by radioenzyme assay. The patients were clinically evaluated for allergic symptoms, prick- and scratch-patch test reactivity and for serum cow-specific, and total, IgE levels. The baseline histamine concentration was 7.5 +/- 4.0 nmol/l (mean +/- standard deviation: SD; n = 10). After the allergen challenge, the histamine concentration in the consecutive samples was 11.9 +/- 11.0 nmol/l, 91.1 +/- 127.3 nmol/l, 61.0 +/- 94.2 nmol/l and 33.7 +/- 53.7 nmol/l. The peak concentration was detected in the 15-30 min fraction, and it varied between 0 and 406 nmol/l regardless of the weal size. The second allergen challenge was unable to induce marked additional histamine release, but SP induced extensive histamine liberation in those patients who did not exhibit histamine release during the preceding prick tests. In three healthy subjects, the baseline histamine concentration was 6.2 +/- 3.9 nmol/l. After the allergen challenge, no additional histamine liberation could be measured. Surprisingly, the histamine release was not related to the size of the cow-induced weal nor was it related to any specific allergic symptoms or IgE levels. The results suggest that, in some patients, mast cell mediators other than histamine play a

  18. L3L4ES antigen and secretagogues induce histamine release from porcine peripheral blood basophils after Ascaris suum infection.

    PubMed

    Uston, P I; Urban, J F; Ashraf, M; Lee, C M; Ampy, F R

    2007-02-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the role of porcine basophils in protective immunity. Experimental pigs were infected with 10(3) Ascaris suum eggs daily for 21 days. Control pigs were maintained helminth-free. Circulating porcine basophils were isolated from the anticoagulated whole blood of A. suum-infected and noninfected pigs by dextran (4.5%) sedimentation of erythrocytes or by the centrifugation of dextran-isolated leukocytes through discontinuous Percoll gradients. Results showed that 2.2% of the isolated leukocytes, stained with May-Grunwald Giemsa, were basophils. Each basophil from infected pigs contained 1.30 x 10(-2) to 1.20 x 10(-1) pg of histamine. Peripheral blood basophils (PBBs) from infected swine released 49% specific histamine when induced with A. suum-derived antigen (L3L4ES), 55% with anti-immunoglobulin G, and 62% with calcium ionophore A23l87. During A. suum infection, the number of isolated basophils and histamine levels peaked at 14 to 21 days postinfection and then showed a significant decrease. Percent-specific histamine released from PBBs by infected swine was significantly greater than that released by control pigs. The L3L4ES antigen and secretagogues effectively induced specific/nonspecific histamine release from PBBs and should facilitate future investigations of porcine basophils. PMID:17096138

  19. Dual effects of protoporphyrin and long wave ultraviolet light on histamine release from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, A.; Gigli, I.; Barrett, K.E. )

    1990-06-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of long wave ultraviolet light (UVA) and various doses of protoporphyrin (PP) on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal and cutaneous mast cells. We also correlated these results with morphologic characteristics and viability of the cells. PP at a dose of 30 ng/ml plus UVA-induced negligible histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMC), but was able to suppress the ability of the cells to release histamine in response to subsequent exposure to the calcium ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, or the combination of Ag and IgE. This functional change was associated with an increase in cell size, and cell lysis that gradually occurred during 24 h in culture. PP at a dose of 3 ng/ml plus UVA also significantly inhibited secretogogue-induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells, but this dose was not associated with significant changes in morphology or viability. These various effects of PP plus UVA were also observed with mast cell preparations obtained by the enzymatic dispersion of rat skin. The suppression of secretogogue-induced histamine release in rat peritoneal mast cells treated with PP (3 ng/ml) and UVA could not be reversed by culturing the cells in the dark for 24 h in the absence of PP. Unlike the direct cytotoxic histamine releasing action of high doses of PP plus UVA, the suppressive effect of low PP doses could not be inhibited by catalase, but could be reduced by the absence of calcium. Our results indicate that PP plus UVA has dual effects on mast cells, apparently involving distinct mechanisms. This implies the possibility that PP and UVA at appropriate doses could be used in photochemotherapy of mast cell-mediated skin diseases.

  20. Pyrazolopyrimidines: synthesis, effect on histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Quintela, J M; Peinador, C; Moreira, M J; Alfonso, A; Botana, L M; Riguera, R

    2001-04-01

    A series of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-d]pyrimidines (3--6) substituted at positions 1 (R(1)=Ph, H, tert-butyl and ribosetribenzoate), 4 (R(2)=chlorine, nitrogen and oxygen nucleophiles), and 6 (dimethylamino) have been synthesized and their effect on the release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells measured. After chemical stimulation, (polymer 48/80), several compounds (i.e. 3b, 4a, 4b, 4d, 4g, 5a), produce inhibition two to three times higher (40--60%) than DSCG but this action is lower after preincubation. 4b (R(1)=Ph, R(2)=NHCH(2)Ph; 50--70% inhibition) and 5a (R(1)=H, R(2)=OMe; 50--55% inhibition) are the most active ones in both experiments. With ovoalbumin as stimulus, several pyrazolopyrimidines show inhibition similar to DSCG, the most active compounds being 6a--d (IC(50)=12--16 microM; R(1)=ribosetribenzoate, R(2)=methoxy and amino). Compounds 4e (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=OMe) and 4g (R(1)=t-butyl, R(2)=piperidino) are inducers of the release of histamine (60 and 150% increase). Compounds 4b and 4c showed cytotoxic activity (IC(50)=1 microg/mL) to HT-29 human colon cancer cells. PMID:11461757

  1. Simultaneous detection of histamine release and lactate production in rat mast cells induced by compound 48/80 using sup 1 H NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshizaki, Kazuo; Arizono, Naoki )

    1991-04-01

    {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was used to evaluate histamine release and lactate production in intact mast cells isolated from rats. The resonance lines of the aromatic histamine protons in mast cells, detected by the selective spin-excitation technique, were broader and located in a lower magnetic field than those in free histamine solution. When exocytosis of mast-cell granules was induced by compound 48/80, free histamine appeared, with a corresponding decrease in the amount of histamine in the mast cells; the lactate signal was also detected in the spectrum. On the addition of compound 48/ 80, there was a further release of histamine from mast cells, accompanied by further production of lactate. This result indicates that the mechanisms which induce the exocytosis of granules, and/or the events following exocytosis, activate glycolysis.

  2. The effects of thermal stimuli on intracellular calcium change and histamine releases in rat basophilic leukemia mast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zu-Hui; Zhu, Dan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2012-05-01

    The effects of thermal stimuli on rat basophilic leukemia mast cells were studied. The cells in calcium-contained or calcium-free buffers were thermally stimulated in the temperature range of 25-60 °C. The corresponding calcium ion concentration in cells [Ca2+]i as well as the released histamine from cells was measured with fluorescence staining methods. The ruthenium red (RR), a block of membrane calcium channels (transient receptor potential family V (TRPV)), was used in experiments. Under the stimulus of 25-50 °C, no significant difference on [Ca2+]i was found between these three groups of the cells in calcium-contained buffer without or with RR and cells in calcium-free saline, indicating that the increased calcium in cytosol did not result from the extracellular buffer but came from the intracellular calcium stores. The [Ca2+]i continuously increased under the temperature of 50-60 °C, but the RR and calcium-free saline can obviously diminish the [Ca2+]i increase at these high temperatures, reflecting that the opening of the TRPV2 channels leads to a calcium influx resulting in the [Ca2+]i increment. The histamine release also became significant in these cases. Since the released histamine is a well-known mediator for the microcirculation promotion, the histamine release from mast cells could be one of the mechanisms of thermal therapy.

  3. Modulation of human basophil histamine release by protein kinase C inhibitors differs with secretagogue and with inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Bergstrand, H; Lundquist, B; Karabelas, K; Michelsen, P

    1992-03-01

    To assess possible involvement of protein kinase C (PKC) in human basophil degranulation, the present work compared effects of various purported PKC inhibitors on leukocyte histamine release triggered by different stimuli. The effects recorded varied with the inhibitor and the secretagogue used; moreover, with a given secretagogue, different inhibitors often displayed different activities. Thus, histamine release triggered by the PKC activator 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was blocked by K252a, staurosporine and the purported specific PKC inhibitor Ro 31-7549, and reduced by calphostin C, H-7, TMB-8 and W-7 but not affected by polymyxin B; it was augmented by 2.1 microM palmitoyl carnitine. The leukocyte response induced by another putative activator of PKC, 1,2-isopropylidene-3-decanoyl-sn-glycerol, was also enhanced by 2.1 microM palmitoyl carnitine, slightly increased by staurosporine, TMB-8 and W-7 but not affected by calphostin C, H-7, K252a or Ro 31-7549, whereas the hyperosmolar mannitol-induced response was reduced by H-7, calphostin C, TMB-8 and W-7 and slightly augmented by staurosporine. Anti-IgE-induced histamine release was blocked by staurosporine and K252a and reduced by calphostin C, sphingosine, TMB-8 and W-7 but not affected by H-7, polymyxin B or retinal. It was enhanced by Ro 31-7549. In contrast, leukocyte histamine release induced by calcium ionophore A23187 or by ionomycin was blocked by retinal, TMB-8 and W-7 and reduced by calphostin C and palmitoyl carnitine but enhanced by H-7, staurosporine and polymyxin B; K252a and Ro 31-7549 did not affect such responses. Formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine-triggered histamine release was barely affected by any agent used. Thus, the specific PKC inhibitor Ro 31-7549 selectively blocked 4 beta-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-triggered leukocyte histamine release. These results imply that examined secretagogues trigger human leukocyte histamine release through partly separate pathways

  4. Basophil histamine release in patients with birch pollen hypersensitivity with and without allergic symptoms to fruits.

    PubMed

    Kleine-Tebbe, J; Galleani, M; Jeep, S; Pilz, B; Baisch, A; Kunkel, G

    1992-12-01

    Histamine release (HR) studies were performed in 40 birch pollen-allergic patients (positive case history, positive SPT, positive birch pollen-specific serum IgE: RAST > or = 3) with (n = 20, A) and without (n = 20, B) fruit hypersensitivity, and 10 nonatopic volunteers (C). Several fruit allergens were used and characterized by protein determination and immunoblot techniques. Dose-dependent HR (apple peel = apple pulp > peach = cherry) was demonstrated in both allergic groups, but to a higher extent in patients with fruit allergy (P < 0.01). Increased basophil sensitivity to birch pollen was found in the group with fruit allergy (P < 0.001). Strong correlations between the mediator response induced by several fruits indicate common allergens within the extracts. We conclude that fruit-related symptoms require not only high specific serum IgE, but a strong cellular sensitization to birch pollen allergens together with an increased cellular reactivity to fruit allergens. PMID:1283657

  5. Histamine released from epidermal keratinocytes plays a role in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-induced itching in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Andoh, Tsugunobu; Yoshihisa, Yoko; Shimizu, Tadamichi

    2015-11-01

    Sunburn, wound repair, and chronic renal failure with hemodialysis are usually accompanied by both pigmentation and itching. Proopiomelanocortin-derived α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) is produced in response to external stimuli, such as UV irradiation, and is involved in cutaneous pigmentation. However, it is unclear whether α-MSH is also involved in the itching. We therefore investigated whether α-MSH elicited itch-related responses in mice. We found that an intradermal injection of α-MSH induced hind-paw scratching, an itch-related response, in mice. The α-MSH-induced scratching was inhibited by the μ-opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone and the H1 histamine receptor antagonist terfenadine. In mast cell-deficient mice, α-MSH also elicited scratching, which was inhibited by terfenadine. The immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, a key enzyme required for the production of histamine, histamine, and the melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors were shown in not only mast cells but also keratinocytes in murine skin. In addition to the expression of l-histidine decarboxylase and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors, the mouse keratinocyte cell lines (Pam212) also showed immunoreactivity for l-histidine decarboxylase, histamine, and melanocortin 1 and 5 receptors. The application of α-MSH induced the release of histamine from Pam212 cells. These findings indicate that α-MSH may play an important role in the itching associated with pigmented cutaneous lesions and that the histamine released from keratinocytes is involved in this α-MSH-induced itching. PMID:26358220

  6. The Effects of Electrical Stimuli on Calcium Change and Histamine Release in Rat Basophilic Leukemia Mast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Dan; Wu, Zu-Hui; Chen, Ji-Yao; Zhou, Lu-Wei

    2013-06-01

    We apply electric fields at different frequencies of 0.1, 1, 10 and 100 kHz to the rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) mast cells in calcium-containing or calcium-free buffers. The stimuli cause changes of the intracellular calcium ion concentration [Ca2+]i as well as the histamine. The [Ca2+]i increases when the frequency of the external electric field increases from 100 Hz to 10 kHz, and then decreases when the frequency further increases from 10 kHz to 100 kHz, showing a peak at 100 kHz. A similar frequency dependence of the histamine release is also found. The [Ca2+]i and the histamine releases at 100 Hz are about the same as the values of the control group with no electrical stimulation. The ruthenium red (RR), an inhibitor to the TRPV (transient receptor potential (TRP) family V) channels across the cell membrane, is used in the experiment to check whether the electric field stimuli act on the TRPV channels. Under an electric field of 10 kHz, the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-concentration buffer is about 3.5 times as much as that of the control group with no electric stimulation, while the [Ca2+]i in a calcium-free buffer is only about 2.2 times. Similar behavior is also found for the histamine release. RR blockage effect on the [Ca2+]i decrease is statistically significant (~75%) when mast cells in the buffer with calcium are stimulated with a 10 kHz electric field in comparison with the result without the RR treatment. This proves that TRPVs are the channels that calcium ions inflow through from the extracellular environment under electrical stimuli. Under this condition, the histamine is also released following a similar way. We suggest that, as far as an electric stimulation is concerned, an application of ac electric field of 10 kHz is better than other frequencies to open TRPV channels in mast cells, and this would cause a significant calcium influx resulting in a significant histamine release, which could be one of the mechanisms for electric therapy.

  7. The effect of a herbal water-extract on histamine release from mast cells and on allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Haggag, Eman G; Abou-Moustafa, Magda A; Boucher, William; Theoharides, Theoharis C

    2003-01-01

    A water extract of a mixture of eight herbs (chamomile, saffron, anise, fennel, caraway, licorice, cardomom and black seed) was tested for its inhibitory effect on histamine released from rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated either by compound 48/80 or be IgE/anti-IgE. The effect of the herb extract was compared to that of the flavonoid quercetin. The herbal water-extract inhibited histamine released from chemically- and immunologically-induced cells by 81% and 85%, respectively; quercetin treated cells were inhibited by 95% and 97%, respectively. The clinical results showed significant improvements of sleep discomfort, cough frequency and cough intensity in addition to increased percentages of FEV1/FVC in patients suffering from allergic asthma, who used the herbal tea compared to those who used the placebo tea. PMID:15277119

  8. Suppressed histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells by ultraviolet B irradiation: decreased diacylglycerol formation as a possible mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Danno, K.; Fujii, K.; Tachibana, T.; Toda, K.; Horio, T.

    1988-06-01

    This study was designed to investigate the effect of ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation on mast cell functions. Purified mast cells obtained from rat peritoneal cavity were irradiated with UVB and subsequently exposed to a degranulator, compound 48/80, or the calcium ionophore A-23187. The amount of histamine released from mast cells measured by the enzyme isotopic assay was significantly decreased by UVB irradiation (100-400 mJ/cm2). Within this dose range, UVB alone was not cytotoxic to the cells because it did not induce histamine release. The suppression was observed when mast cells were subjected to degranulation without intervals after UVB irradiation, and even after 5 h postirradiation. The wavelength of 300 nm from a monochromatic light source showed the maximum effect. When mast cells prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)arachidonate were irradiated and challenged by compound 48/80, label accumulation in diacylglycerol produced by the phosphatidylinositol cycle was considerably decreased by UVB irradiation. From these results, we hypothesize that, within an adequate irradiation dose, UVB irradiation suppresses histamine release from mast cells, probably by causing noncytotoxic damage to the membrane phospholipid metabolism, which is tied to the degranulation mechanisms.

  9. Mosla dianthera inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic reactions through the inhibition of histamine release and inflammatory cytokine production

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dong-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyun . E-mail: shkim72@knu.ac.kr; Eun, Jae-Soon; Shin, Tae-Yong . E-mail: tyshin@woosuk.ac.kr

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of the aqueous extract of Mosla dianthera (Maxim.) (AEMD) on the mast cell-mediated allergy model and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as asthma, sinusitis and rheumatoid arthritis. The discovery of drugs for the treatment of allergic disease is an important subject in human health. AEMD inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic reactions in mice. AEMD decreased immunoglobulin E-mediated local allergic reactions, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. AEMD attenuated intracellular calcium level and release of histamine from rat peritoneal mast cells activated by compound 48/80. Furthermore, AEMD attenuated the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and calcium ionophore A23187-stimulated TNF-{alpha}, IL-8 and IL-6 secretion in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of AEMD on the pro-inflammatory cytokines was nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) dependent. AEMD decreased PMA and A23187-induced degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. Our findings provide evidence that AEMD inhibits mast cell-derived immediate-type allergic reactions and involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and NF-{kappa}B in these effects.

  10. [Histamine in regulation of bone remodeling processes].

    PubMed

    Wiercigroch, Marek; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is under autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and central nervous system control. One of the potential endogenous factors affecting bone remodeling is histamine, an endogenous amine which acts as a mediator of allergic reactions and neuromediator, and induces production of gastric acid. Histamine H₁ receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions, H₂ receptor antagonists in peptic ulcer disease, and betahistine (an H₃ receptor antagonist and H₁ receptor agonist) is used in the treatment of Ménière's disease. Excess histamine release in mastocytosis and allergic diseases may lead to development of osteoporosis. Clinical and population-based studies on the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on the skeletal system have not delivered unequivocal results. Expression of mRNA of histamine receptors has been discovered in bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts). Histamine synthesis has been demonstrated in osteoclast precursors. Histamine increases bone resorption both by direct effects on osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, and indirectly, by increasing the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts. In in vivo studies, H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists exerted protective effects on the bone tissue, although not in all experimental models. In the present article, in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far, concerning the effects of histamine and drugs modifying its activity on the skeletal system, have been reviewed. PMID:24018454

  11. The role of histamine in burn, tourniquet and endotoxin shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Markley, K; Horakova, Z; Smallman, E T; Beaven, M A

    1975-01-01

    The release of histamine and mortality was studied in mice after various types of experimental shock. In burn shock, serum histamine rose significantly after injury, but there was no correlation between increased serum histamine and high mortality as a consequence of several therapy regimens. For example, after treatment with histamine or Compound 48/80 before burning, there was a rise of serum histamine, yet shock mortality fell significantly. Although separate administration of antagonists of H1 - or H2 - histamine receptors had no effect on mortality, pretreatment with both diphenhydramine and burimamide significantly increased shock mortality. In tourniquet shock, serum histamine rose significantly, and treatment with both antagonists before trauma produced a significant elevation of shock mortality. In endotoxin shock, prior treatment with one or both drugs did not change mortality. These results suggest that endogenous histamine is not a lethal factor in burn and tourniquet trauma, but rather it appears to have a compensatory, beneficial effect. PMID:241652

  12. Anaplasma phagocytophilum Infects Mast Cells via α1,3-Fucosylated but Not Sialylated Glycans and Inhibits IgE-Mediated Cytokine Production and Histamine Release

    PubMed Central

    Ojogun, Nore; Barnstein, Brian; Huang, Bernice; Oskeritzian, Carole A.; Homeister, Jonathon W.; Miller, Daniel; Ryan, John J.; Carlyon, Jason A.

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells are sentinels for infection. Upon exposure to pathogens, they release their stores of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and histamine. Mast cells are also important for the control of certain tick-borne infections. Anaplasma phagocytophilum is an obligate intracellular tick-transmitted bacterium that infects neutrophils to cause the emerging disease granulocytic anaplasmosis. A. phagocytophilum adhesion to and infection of neutrophils depend on sialylated and α1,3-fucosylated glycans. We investigated the hypotheses that A. phagocytophilum invades mast cells and inhibits mast cell activation. We demonstrate that A. phagocytophilum binds and/or infects murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs), murine peritoneal mast cells, and human skin-derived mast cells. A. phagocytophilum infection of BMMCs depends on α1,3-fucosylated, but not sialylated, glycans. A. phagocytophilum binding to and invasion of BMMCs do not elicit proinflammatory cytokine secretion. Moreover, A. phagocytophilum-infected cells are inhibited in the release of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-13, and histamine following stimulation with IgE or antigen. Thus, A. phagocytophilum mitigates mast cell activation. These findings potentially represent a novel means by which A. phagocytophilum usurps host defense mechanisms and shed light on the interplay between mast cells and vector-borne bacterial pathogens. PMID:21536789

  13. In Vivo Electrochemical Evidence for Simultaneous 5-HT and Histamine Release in the Rat Substantia Nigra pars Reticulata Following Medial Forebrain Bundle Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Parastoo; Dankoski, Elyse C.; Wood, Kevin M.; Ambrose, R. Ellen; Wightman, R. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the mechanisms of serotonin (5-hydoxytryptophan (5-HT)) in the brain requires an in vivo method that combines fast temporal resolution with chemical selectivity. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is a technique with sufficient temporal and chemical resolution for probing dynamic 5-HT neurotransmission events; however, traditionally it has not been possible to probe in vivo 5-HT mechanisms. Recently, we optimized FSCV for measuring 5-HT release and uptake in vivo in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) with electrical stimulation of the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in the rat brain. Here, we address technical challenges associated with rat DRN surgery by electrically stimulating 5-HT projections in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB), a more accessible anatomical location. MFB stimulation elicits 5-HT in the SNR; furthermore, we find simultaneous release of an additional species. We use electrochemical and pharmacological methods and describe physiological, anatomical and independent chemical analyses to identify this species as histamine. We also show pharmacologically that increasing the lifetime of extracellular histamine significantly decreases 5-HT release, most likely due to increased activation of histamine H-3 receptors that inhibit 5-HT release. Despite this, under physiological conditions, we find by kinetic comparisons of DRN and MFB stimulations that the simultaneous release of histamine does not interfere with the quantitative 5-HT concentration profile. We therefore present a novel and robust electrical stimulation of the MFB that is technically less challenging than DRN stimulation to study 5-HT and histamine release in the SNR. PMID:21682723

  14. Inhibition of IgE-dependent histamine release from human dispersed lung mast cells by anti-allergic drugs and salbutamol.

    PubMed Central

    Church, M. K.; Hiroi, J.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of the anti-allergic drugs, sodium cromoglycate (SCG), lodoxamide, traxanox, RU31156 and the beta-adrenoceptor agonist salbutamol to inhibit IgE-dependent histamine and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release was assessed using human dispersed lung mast cells. The anti-allergic drugs were weak inhibitors of histamine release, high concentrations (100-1000 microM) producing less than 35% inhibition. Salbutamol produced 39% inhibition at 10 microM. The efficacy of both SCG and salbutamol was inversely related to the concentration of anti-IgE used for challenge and to the degree of histamine release. Rapid tachyphylaxis was observed with all anti-allergic drugs but not with salbutamol. Cross-tachyphylaxis was observed between SCG and the other anti-allergic drugs, suggesting a common mechanism of action. No cross-tachyphylaxis was observed between SCG and salbutamol. SCG was significantly (P less than 0.001) more effective in inhibiting PGD2 than it was histamine release. Preferential inhibition of PGD2 compared with histamine release was less marked (P less than 0.05) with salbutamol and not significant with the other anti-allergic drugs. Mast cells dispersed by enzymatic digestion of human lung released more histamine on immunological challenge than mechanically dispersed cells obtained by fine chopping of tissue. Enzyme treatment of mechanically dispersed cells removed this difference. Enzymatically and mechanically dispersed cells responded similarly to the inhibitory effects of SCG and salbutamol. Our results suggest that salbutamol is a more effective inhibitor of mediator release from human lung mast cells than anti-allergic drugs. However, with the low levels of mediator release achieved during an allergic reaction in man in vivo, both salbutamol and SCG are likely to be effective inhibitors of both preformed and newly generated mediators. PMID:2435353

  15. Bisphenol A at concentrations relevant to human exposure enhances histamine and cysteinyl leukotriene release from bone marrow-derived mast cells.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Edmund; Dolinoy, Dana C; Mancuso, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), a monomer of polycarbonate plastics and epoxide resin, acts as an endocrine-active compound and has been shown to enhance the inflammatory response to allergen challenge. Previous reports in rodents have demonstrated that perinatal BPA exposure alters airway inflammation following sensitization and challenge to ovalbumin in juvenile and adult offspring. Additionally, a high concentration of BPA has been shown to enhance mediator release in mast cell lines. This study aimed to determine if short-term BPA exposure, at levels relevant to human exposure, enhances mast cell release of histamine and cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). Primary murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) produced from the femurs of female C57BL/6 mice were stimulated with BPA or estradiol (E2) in vitro. It was observed that both BPA and E2 increased BMMC histamine release over a range of nanomolar concentrations (1-1000 nM). The estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist ICI 182,780 partially blocked the ability of E2, but not BPA, to elevate histamine release. BPA also increased CysLT release, which was not abrogated by ER inhibition. It was also observed that the ability of BPA to enhance histamine and CysLT release was inhibited by blocking the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway with U0126 or by chelating extracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) using EGTA. In summary, these experiments are the first to demonstrate that acute BPA exposure enhances mast cell histamine and CysLT release in vitro--an effect that is not dependent on an ER-mediated mechanism. Instead, BPA-induced mast cell histamine and CysLT release may be mediated, in part, by the ERK pathway and extracellular Ca(2+) concentrations. These data suggest that exposure to BPA at levels relevant to human exposure may provoke an acute inflammatory response in atopic individuals via enhanced mast cell activation. PMID:23782309

  16. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies. PMID:23814966

  17. Differential effects of the complement peptides, C5a and C5a des Arg on human basophil and lung mast cell histamine release.

    PubMed Central

    Schulman, E S; Post, T J; Henson, P M; Giclas, P C

    1988-01-01

    The ability of purified anaphylatoxins to induce human lung mast cell mediator release was investigated. In eight anti-IgE responsive (histamine release = 22 +/- 5%, mean +/- SEM) mast cell preparations of 1-96% purity, C5a and C5a des Arg (0.55 pg/ml to 55 micrograms/ml), failed to elicit or potentiate histamine release; lung fragments were similarly unresponsive. The related peptide C3a was also inactive. All anaphylatoxins failed to induce mast cell leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) release. LTC4 release was also negligible from basophils where C5a was a potent histamine release stimulus. Supernatants from C5a-challenged mast cells remained fully active on basophils, excluding carboxypeptidase inactivation of C5a as an explanation for the lung mast cell results. In contrast to lung, skin mast cells were C5a-responsive (histamine release = 8 +/- 1%, at 55 micrograms/ml, n = 2). We conclude that C5a, though devoid of activity on the human lung mast cell, is a human basophil and skin mast cell secretagogue. These findings demonstrate significant organ-specific heterogeneity in mast cell responsiveness. PMID:2449462

  18. A role for tryptase in the activation of human mast cells: modulation of histamine release by tryptase and inhibitors of tryptase.

    PubMed

    He, S; Gaça, M D; Walls, A F

    1998-07-01

    Tryptase, the most abundant protein product of human mast cells is emerging as an important mediator and target for therapeutic intervention in allergic disease. We have investigated the potential of tryptase and inhibitors of tryptase to modulate histamine release from human mast cells. Addition of purified human tryptase in concentrations ranging from 1 to 100 mU/ml stimulated a concentration-dependent release of histamine from cells dispersed from tonsil, although not from skin tissue. The reaction dependent on an intact catalytic site being inhibited by heat inactivation of the enzyme, or by preincubating with the tryptase inhibitors APC366 or leupeptin or the tryptic substrate N-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BAPNA). Tryptase-induced histamine release took approximately 6 min to reach completion, appeared to require exogenous calcium and magnesium, and on the basis of inhibition by antimycin A and 2-deoxy-D-glucose, seemed to be a noncytotoxic process. Pre-incubation of cells with tryptase at concentrations that were suboptimal for histamine release had little effect on their responsiveness to anti-immunoglobulin (Ig) E or to calcium ionophore A23187, but at higher concentrations their subsequent activation was inhibited. APC366 significantly inhibited histamine release induced by anti-IgE or calcium ionophore from both tonsil and skin cells, with up to 90% inhibition being observed at a concentration of 100 microM with skin. IgE-dependent histamine release was inhibited also by leupeptin, benzamidine and BAPNA. Tryptase may act as an amplification signal for mast cell activation, and this could account at least partly for the potent mast cell stabilizing properties of tryptase inhibitors. PMID:9655871

  19. BAM8-22 peptide produces itch and nociceptive sensations in humans independent of histamine release.

    PubMed

    Sikand, Parul; Dong, Xinzhong; LaMotte, Robert H

    2011-05-18

    Chronic itch accompanying many dermatological, neurological, and systemic diseases is unresponsive to antihistamines. Our knowledge of endogenous chemicals that evoke histamine-independent itch and their molecular targets is very limited. Recently it was demonstrated in behavioral and cellular experiments that bovine adrenal medulla 8-22 peptide (BAM8-22), a proteolytically cleaved product of proenkephalin A, is a potent activator of Mas-related G-protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs), MrgprC11 and hMrgprX1, and induces scratching in mice in an Mrgpr-dependent manner. To study the sensory qualities that BAM8-22 evokes in humans, we tested the volar forearm of 15 healthy volunteers with heat-inactivated cowhage spicules previously soaked in the peptide. BAM8-22 produced itch in each subject, usually accompanied by sensations of pricking/stinging and burning. The sensations were occasionally accompanied by one or more mechanically evoked dysesthesias, namely alloknesis, hyperknesis, and/or hyperalgesia, but no wheal or neurogenic flare in the skin surrounding the application site. The inactive truncated peptide BAM8-18 produced weak or no sensations. Pretreatment of the tested skin with an antihistamine cream (doxepin) inhibited histamine-induced sensations, dysesthesias, and skin reactions but not the sensations and dysesthesias evoked by BAM8-22. We show that BAM8-22 produces itch and nociceptive sensations in humans in a histamine-independent manner. Thus, BAM8-22 may be an endogenous itch mediator that activates, in humans, MrgprX1, a novel target for potential anti-itch treatments. PMID:21593341

  20. BAM8–22 peptide produces itch and nociceptive sensations in humans independent of histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Sikand, Parul; Dong, Xinzhong; LaMotte, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Chronic itch accompanying many dermatological, neurological and systemic diseases is unresponsive to antihistamines. Our knowledge of endogenous chemicals that evoke histamine-independent itch and their molecular targets is very limited. Recently it was demonstrated in behavioral and cellular experiments that bovine adrenal medulla 8–22 peptide (BAM8–22), a proteolytically cleaved product of proenkephalin A, is a potent activator of Mas-related G protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs), MrgprC11 and hMrgprX1, and induces scratching in mice in a Mrgpr-dependent manner. To study the sensory qualities that BAM8–22 evokes in humans we tested the volar forearm of 15 healthy volunteers with heat-inactivated cowhage spicules previously soaked in the peptide. BAM8–22 produced itch in each subject, usually accompanied by sensations of pricking/stinging and burning. The sensations were occasionally accompanied by one or more mechanically evoked dysesthesias, namely alloknesis, hyperknesis, and hyperalgesia, but no wheal or neurogenic flare in the skin surrounding the application site. The inactive truncated peptide BAM8–18 produced weak or no sensations. Pretreatment of the tested skin with an antihistamine cream (doxepin) inhibited the histamine-induced sensations, dysesthesias and skin reactions but not the sensations and dysesthesias evoked by BAM8–22. We show that BAM8–22 produces itch and nociceptive sensations in humans in a histamine-independent manner. Thus, BAM8–22 may be an endogenous itch mediator that activates, in humans, MrgprX1, a novel target for potential anti-itch treatments. PMID:21593341

  1. Histamine and the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bolam, J Paul; Ellender, Tommas J

    2016-07-01

    The neuromodulator histamine is released throughout the brain during periods of wakefulness. Combined with an abundant expression of histamine receptors, this suggests potential widespread histaminergic control of neural circuit activity. However, the effect of histamine on many of these circuits is unknown. In this review we will discuss recent evidence for histaminergic modulation of the basal ganglia circuitry, and specifically its main input nucleus; the striatum. Furthermore, we will discuss recent findings of histaminergic dysfunction in several basal ganglia disorders, including in Parkinson's disease and most prominently, in Tourette's syndrome, which has led to a resurgence of interest in this neuromodulator. Combined, these recent observations not only suggest a central role for histamine in modulating basal ganglia activity and behaviour, but also as a possible target in treating basal ganglia disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26275849

  2. Blocking of Histamine Release and IgE Binding to FcεRI on Human Basophils by Antibodies Produced in Camels

    PubMed Central

    Sana, Yousef; Abdulrahman, Rawashdeh; Raida, Khalil; Sami, Abdel-Hafez

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The production of camel heavy-chain antihuman IgE (huIgE) that has the potential to block IgE-FcεRI interaction and histamine release by basophils. Methods Camels were immunized with a synthetic loop peptide (SLP) designed in a multiple antigen peptide system (MAPS) forming SLP-MAPS immunogen. Camel polyclonal antibodies (PCAs) were produced, purified, characterized using Protein A & G, ELISA, and SDS-PAGE, and tested for their potency to block passive sensitization and histamine release of human basophils using flow cytometry (FCM) and ELISA, respectively. Results FCM data indicated that camel conventional (IgG1) and heavy chain antibodies (HCAbs; IgG2, and IgG3) had blocking activities of 43.9%, 72%, and 96.6%, respectively. Moreover, both IgG2 and IgG3 achieved remarkable inhibition rates of 93.98% and 97.05% in histamine release, respectively, whereas the IgG1inhibiting activity was 60.05%. Conclusions Camel PCAs produced against SLP-MAPS were capable of blocking the IgE-receptor interaction and the release of histamine by basophils with superiority to HCAbs. These findings may pave the way toward the possible use of camel anti-huIgE HCAbs as blocking antibodies in the treatment of IgE-mediated allergy and asthma. PMID:26333705

  3. Histamine H3 receptor activation inhibits dopamine synthesis but not release or uptake in rat nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Aquino-Miranda, Guillermo; Escamilla-Sánchez, Juan; González-Pantoja, Raúl; Bueno-Nava, Antonio; Arias-Montaño, José-Antonio

    2016-07-01

    We studied the effect of activating histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) on rat nucleus accumbens (rNAcc) dopaminergic transmission by analyzing [(3)H]-dopamine uptake by synaptosomes, and dopamine synthesis and depolarization-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release in slices. The uptake of [(3)H]-dopamine by rNAcc synaptosomes was not affected by the H3R agonist RAMH (10(-10)-10(-6) M). In rNAcc slices perfusion with RAMH (1 μM) had no significant effect on [(3)H]-dopamine release evoked by depolarization with 30 mM K(+) (91.4 ± 4.5% of controls). The blockade of dopamine D2 autoreceptors with sulpiride (1 μM) enhanced K(+)-evoked [(3)H]-dopamine release (168.8 ± 15.5% of controls), but under this condition RAMH (1 μM) also failed to affect [(3)H]-dopamine release. Dopamine synthesis was evaluated in rNAcc slices incubated with the l-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) decarboxylase inhibitor NSD-1015 (1 mM). Forskolin-induced DOPA accumulation (220.1 ± 10.4% of controls) was significantly reduced by RAMH (41.1 ± 6.5% and 43.5 ± 9.1% inhibition at 100 nM and 1 μM, respectively), and this effect was prevented by the H3R antagonist ciproxifan (10 μM). DOPA accumulation induced by preventing cAMP degradation with IBMX (iso-butyl-methylxantine, 1 mM) or by activating receptors for the vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) with PACAP-27 (1 μM) was reduced (IBMX) or prevented (PACAP-27) by RAMH (100 nM). In contrast, DOPA accumulation induced by 8-Bromo-cAMP (1 mM) was not affected by RAMH (100 nM). These results indicate that in rNAcc H3Rs do not modulate dopamine uptake or release, but regulate dopamine synthesis by inhibiting cAMP formation and thus PKA activation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26169221

  4. Controlled-release formulation of antihistamine based on cetirizine zinc-layered hydroxide nanocomposites and its effect on histamine release from basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Samer; Ali, Hussein Al; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    A controlled-release formulation of an antihistamine, cetirizine, was synthesized using zinc-layered hydroxide as the host and cetirizine as the guest. The resulting well-ordered nanolayered structure, a cetirizine nanocomposite “CETN,” had a basal spacing of 33.9 Å, averaged from six harmonics observed from X-ray diffraction. The guest, cetirizine, was arranged in a horizontal bilayer between the zinc-layered hydroxide (ZLH) inorganic interlayers. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies indicated that the intercalation takes place without major change in the structure of the guest and that the thermal stability of the guest in the nanocomposites is markedly enhanced. The loading of the guest in the nanocomposites was estimated to be about 49.4% (w/w). The release study showed that about 96% of the guest could be released in 80 hours by phosphate buffer solution at pH 7.4 compared with about 97% in 73 hours at pH 4.8. It was found that release was governed by pseudo-second order kinetics. Release of histamine from rat basophilic leukemia cells was found to be more sensitive to the intercalated cetirizine in the CETN compared with its free counterpart, with inhibition of 56% and 29%, respectively, at 62.5 ng/mL. The cytotoxicity assay toward Chang liver cells line show the IC50 for CETN and ZLH are 617 and 670 μg/mL, respectively. PMID:22848164

  5. In vitro histamine release from basophils of asthmatic and atopic individuals in D/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, R.; Lichtenstein, L.M.

    1982-05-01

    It was found that spontaneous histamine release from human basophils in H/sub 2/O-based buffers is negligible; in D/sub 2/O-based buffers, however, release is observed with the cells of some donors. Analysis of this phenomenon revealed release from the basophils of 1 of 22 control individuals (5%), 15 of 47 patients with allergic rhinitis (32%), and 14 of 20 asthmatic patients (70%). The difference between both patient groups and controls and between atopics and asthmatics was highly significant. That D/sub 2/O release was not cytotoxic is suggested by the finding that 37/sup 0/ was optimal, with inhibition at 4/sup 0/C or 46/sup 0/C as well as by EDTA, 2-deoxyglucose, and dibromoacetophenone, an inhibitor of phospholipase A/sub 2/. The release mechanism was unusual in that dibutyryl cAMP and agonists that cause an increase in cAMP lead to no inhibition. No correlation was noted between the total serum IgE level (and thus the number of IgE receptors on the basophil surface) and the magnitude of D/sub 2/O release. No increase in D/sub 2/O release was observed in 17 ragweed-sensitive patients through a ragweed season. A unique property of D/sub 2/O release was the loss of reactivity by preincubating cells at 37/sup 0/C for 30 min before adding D/sub 2/O. Non-D/sub 2/O-reactive cells could be ''converted'' to D/sub 2/O-reactive cells by incubation with antigen in the whole blood phase during leukocyte isolation; these cells showed the same loss of releaseability at 37/sup 0/C and an inhibitor profile similar to D/sub 2/O-responsive cells from ragweed allergic or asthmatic patients. We suggest that D/sub 2/O-based buffers reveal, in atopic and asthmatic patients, in vivo basophil activation; whether this is due to IgE cross-links, to C split products, or to other stimuli is not yet clear.

  6. Characterization of prostanoid receptors mediating inhibition of histamine release from anti-IgE-activated rat peritoneal mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C L; Jones, R L; Lau, H Y A

    2000-01-01

    Prostanoid receptors mediating inhibition of anti-IgE induced histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells have been characterized pharmacologically. PGD2 and the specific DP receptor agonists BW 245C and ZK 118182 were the most potent inhibitors with half-maximal concentrations of 0.26, 0.06 and 0.02 μM respectively. The maximum inhibition attainable was 60–65% with 10−5 M BW 245C and ZK 118182. Among several EP receptor agonists investigated, only PGE2 and the EP2/EP3 receptor agonist misoprostol induced significant inhibition (46.8±4.7% at 10−4 M and 18.7±6.8% at 10−5 M respectively). The IP receptor agonists cicaprost and iloprost were both less potent than the DP agonists in inhibiting histamine release (45.2±3.3% and 35.1±2.5% inhibition respectively at 10−5 M), whereas PGF2α and the TP receptor agonist U-46619 were only marginally effective. The EP4/TP receptor antagonist AH 23848 failed to affect the inhibitory actions of PGD2 or PGE2 even at 10−5 M, whereas the DP/EP1/EP2 receptor antagonist AH 6809 slightly enhanced the effect of PGD2 at 10−6 M. At concentrations of 3×10−6 to 10−5 M, the putative DP receptor antagonist ZK 138357 dose-dependently suppressed the inhibitory activities of the DP agonists, PGE2 and cicaprost. The antagonism of ZK 138357 against the DP receptor agonists appeared to be competitive with pA2 values of around six. In conclusion, these data support our earlier proposal that an inhibitory DP receptor is the predominant prostanoid receptor in rat peritoneal mast cell. The properties of this receptor in relation to putative DP receptor subtypes reported in the literature are discussed. PMID:10711359

  7. Anti-Allergic Cromones Inhibit Histamine and Eicosanoid Release from Activated Human and Murine Mast Cells by Releasing Annexin A1

    PubMed Central

    Yazid, Samia; Sinniah, Ajantha; Solito, Egle; Calder, Virginia; Flower, Rod J.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although the ‘cromones’ (di-sodium cromoglycate and sodium nedocromil) are used to treat allergy and asthma, their ‘mast cell stabilising’ mechanism of pharmacological action has never been convincingly explained. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that these drugs act by stimulating the release of the anti-inflammatory protein Annexin-A1 (Anx-A1) from mast cells. Experimental approach We used biochemical and immuno-neutralisation techniques to investigate the mechanism by which cromones suppress histamine and eicosanoid release from cord-derived human mast cells (CDMCs) or murine bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMDMCs) from wild type and Anx-A1 null mice. Key results CDMCs activated by IgE-FcRε1 crosslinking, released histamine and prostaglandin (PG) D2, which were inhibited (30–65%) by 5 min pre-treatment with cromoglycate (10 nM) or nedocromil (10 nM), as well as dexamethasone (2 nM) and human recombinant Anx-A1 (1–10 nM). In CDMCs cromones potentiated (2–5 fold) protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation and Anx-A1 phosphorylation and secretion (3–5 fold). Incubation of CDMCs with a neutralising anti-Anx-A1 monoclonal antibody reversed the cromone inhibitory effect. Nedocromil (10 nM) also inhibited (40–60%) the release of mediators from murine bone marrow derived-mast cells from wild type mice activated by compound 48/80 and IgE-FcRε1 cross-linking, but were inactive in such cells when these were prepared from Anx-A1 null mice or when the neutralising anti-Anx-A1 antibody was present. Conclusions and Implications We conclude that stimulation of phosphorylation and secretion of Anx-A1 is an important component of inhibitory cromone actions on mast cells, which could explain their acute pharmacological actions in allergy. These findings also highlight a new pathway for reducing mediator release from these cells. PMID:23527056

  8. 6-Methoxyluteolin from Chrysanthemum zawadskii var. latilobum suppresses histamine release and calcium influx via down-regulation of FcεRI α chain expression.

    PubMed

    Shim, Sun-Yup; Park, Jeong-Ro; Byun, Dae-Seok

    2012-05-01

    Mast cells and basophils are important effector cells in immunoglobulin-E (IgE)-mediated allergic reactions. Using the human basophilic KU812F cells, we assessed the inhibitory effects of 6-methoxyluteolin, isolated from Chrysanthemum zawadskii, in the FcεRI-mediated allergic reaction. We determined that 6-methoxyluteolin inhibited anti-FcεRI α chain antibody (CRA-1)-induced histamine release, as well as elevation of intracellular calcium concentration [Ca2+]i in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of 6-methoxyluteolin on the cell surface expression and the mRNA level of the FcεRI α chain were determined by flow cytometric analysis and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RTPCR), respectively. Therefore, these results show that 6- methoxyluteolin is a potent inhibitor of histamine release and calcium influx via down-regulation of the FcεRI α chain. PMID:22561855

  9. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life. PMID:26242570

  10. Phenolic constituents of the Bangladeshi medicinal plant Pothos scandens and their anti-estrogenic, hyaluronidase inhibition, and histamine release inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Muhit, Md Abdul; Izumikawa, Masahiro; Umehara, Kaoru; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Extracts from the stem and roots of the Bangladeshi medicinal plant Pothos scandens L. (Araceae) were isolated, and three hemiterpene glucoside aromatic esters, pothobanosides A (1), B (2), and C (3), and a phenylisobutanoid, pothobanol (4), along with 14 known compounds, were characterized. The isolates were tested for their estrogenic/anti-estrogenic activity using the estrogen-responsive human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, and syringoyl derivatives (2, 3, and canthoside B) showed strong inhibitory activity against both cell lines. Their less oxygenated analogs (1, and markhamioside F) were almost inactive. The isolates were also evaluated for hyaluronidase and histamine release inhibitory activities, and pothobanoside A (1) showed significant hyaluronidase inhibitory activity among the isolated compounds, which was similar to that of the positive control rosmarinic acid. Because hyaluronidase produces an angiogenic response that has been implicated in tumor invasiveness and metastasis, 1 could be valuable as an anti-tumor compound with a different mechanism of action from related compounds (2, 3). Pothobanoside C (3) and pothobanol (4) were also found to inhibit histamine release to a similar degree to the positive control epigallocatechin 3-O-(3"-O-methyl)-gallate. The histamine release inhibitory potency of these isolates may support the traditional uses of this plant in folk medicine. PMID:26542239

  11. Diamine oxidase-gold ultrastructural localization of histamine in human skin biopsies containing mast cells stimulated to degranulate in vivo by exposure to recombinant human stem cell factor.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, A M; Costa, J J; Morgan, E S; Monahan-Earley, R A; Galli, S J

    1997-10-15

    Stem cell factor (SCF) has a major role in hematopoiesis and in the regulation of mast cell development and function. For example, recombinant human SCF (rhSCF) can induce the development of human mast cells from precursor cells in vitro, stimulate mediator release from human skin mast cells in vitro, and promote both the development and functional activation of human skin mast cells in vivo. In the present study, we used a new ultrastructural enzyme-affinity method, employing diamine oxidase (DAO)-conjugated gold particles (DAO-gold), to detect histamine in skin biopsies obtained from patients with breast carcinomas who were receiving daily subcutaneous (SC) injections of rhSCF in a phase I study of this cytokine. We examined control biopsies obtained at sites remote from rhSCF injection as well as biopsies of rhSCF-injected skin that were obtained within 2 hours and 30 minutes of the SC injection of rhSCF at that site. The rhSCF-injected sites (which clinically exhibited a wheal-and-flare response), but not the control sites, contained mast cells undergoing regulated secretion by granule extrusion. The DAO-gold-affinity method detected histamine in electron-dense granules of mast cells in control and injected skin biopsies; however, the altered matrix of membrane-free, extruded mast cell granules was largely unreactive with DAO-gold. Notably, DAO-gold bound strongly to fibrin deposits and collagen fibers that were adjacent to degranulated mast cells. These findings represent the first morphologic evidence of histamine secretion by classical granule exocytosis in human mast cells in vivo. PMID:9376568

  12. Histamine and substance P in synovial fluid of patients with temporomandibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Li, W; Long, X; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Fang, W

    2015-05-01

    Although psychosocial factors and malocclusion are regarded as potential causes of temporomandibular disorders (TMD), the underlying pathogenesis is poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that substance P (SP), which has been associated with both psychosocial factors and malocclusion, and histamine, whose release can be induced by SP, may be implicated in the pathogenetic process. This study was designed to measure the concentration of histamine and SP in synovial fluid (SF) of both 38 patients with TMD and 11 healthy controls, and analyse the correlation between histamine and SP. Patients with TMD were divided into three subgroups: displaced disc with reduction (DDR), displaced disc without reduction (DDNR) and osteoarthritis (OA), with 10, 13, 15 subjects in every subgroup, respectively. After collecting SF samples, histamine and SP levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis (ELISA) and calibrated by bicinchoninic acid (BCA)-quantified protein level in the samples. The results suggest that OA group presented a significantly higher level of both histamine and SP than DDNR, DDR and healthy control groups. Histamine or SP in DDR and DDNR groups tend to be higher than control group, but no significance was found. Painful TMJs show higher histamine and SP than painless TMJs. Correlation analysis reveals a significant correlation between histamine and SP concentrations. Collectively, this study showed the changes of histamine and SP in the SF from different stages of TMD and found a significant correlation between the two substances, suggesting their potential implication in the pathogenesis of TMD. PMID:25545415

  13. Suppression of Basophil Histamine Release and Other IgE-dependent Responses in Childhood Schistosoma mansoni/hookworm Coinfection

    PubMed Central

    Pinot de Moira, Angela; Fitzsimmons, Colin M.; Jones, Frances M.; Wilson, Shona; Cahen, Pierre; Tukahebwa, Edridah; Mpairwe, Harriet; Mwatha, Joseph K.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Skov, Per S.; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Dunne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. The poor correlation between allergen-specific immunoglobulin E (asIgE) and clinical signs of allergy in helminth infected populations suggests that helminth infections could protect against allergy by uncoupling asIgE from its effector mechanisms. We investigated this hypothesis in Ugandan schoolchildren coinfected with Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm. Methods. Skin prick test (SPT) sensitivity to house dust mite allergen (HDM) and current wheeze were assessed pre-anthelmintic treatment. Nonspecific (anti-IgE), helminth-specific, and HDM-allergen-specific basophil histamine release (HR), plus helminth- and HDM-specific IgE and IgG4 responses were measured pre- and post-treatment. Results. Nonspecific- and helminth-specific-HR, and associations between helminth-specific IgE and helminth-specific HR increased post-treatment. Hookworm infection appeared to modify the relationship between circulating levels of HDM-IgE and HR: a significant positive association was observed among children without detectable hookworm infection, but no association was observed among infected children. In addition, hookworm infection was associated with a significantly reduced risk of wheeze, and IgG4 to somatic adult hookworm antigen with a reduced risk of HDM-SPT sensitivity. There was no evidence for S. mansoni infection having a similar suppressive effect on HDM-HR or symptoms of allergy. Conclusions. Basophil responsiveness appears suppressed during chronic helminth infection; at least in hookworm infection, this suppression may protect against allergy. PMID:24782451

  14. Histamine-induced vasodilatation in the human forearm vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Crowe, Jane; Cuthbert, Hayley; Jenkins, Paul J; Johnston, Neil R; Eddleston, Michael; Bateman, D Nicholas; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate the mechanism of action of intra-arterial histamine in the human forearm vasculature. Methods Three studies were conducted to assess changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) using venous occlusion plethysmography in response to intra-brachial histamine. First, the dose–response was investigated by assessing FBF throughout a dose-escalating histamine infusion. Next, histamine was infused at a constant dose to assess acute tolerance. Finally, a four way, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to assess FBF response to histamine in the presence of H1- and H2-receptor antagonists. Flare and itch were assessed in all studies. Results Histamine caused a dose-dependent increase in FBF, greatest with the highest dose (30 nmol min−1) infused [mean (SEM) infused arm vs. control: 26.8 (5.3) vs. 2.6 ml min−1 100 ml−1; P < 0.0001]. Dose-dependent flare and itch were demonstrated. Acute tolerance was not observed, with an increased FBF persisting throughout the infusion period. H2-receptor antagonism significantly reduced FBF (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo at 30 nmol min−1 histamine: −11.9 ml min−1 100 ml−1 (−4.0, −19.8), P < 0.0001) and flare (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo: −403.7 cm2 (−231.4, 576.0), P < 0.0001). No reduction in FBF or flare was observed in response to the H1-receptor antagonist. Itch was unaffected by the treatments. Histamine did not stimulate vascular release of tissue plasminogen activator or von Willebrand factor. Conclusion Histamine causes dose-dependent vasodilatation, flare and itch in the human forearm. H2-receptors are important in this process. Our results support further exploration of combined H1- and H2-receptor antagonist therapy in acute allergic syndromes. PMID:23488545

  15. Histamine induces NF-κB controlled cytokine secretion by orbital fibroblasts via histamine receptor type-1.

    PubMed

    Virakul, Sita; Phetsuksiri, Tanachaporn; van Holten-Neelen, Conny; Schrijver, Benjamin; van Steensel, Leendert; Dalm, Virgil A S H; Paridaens, Dion; van den Bosch, Willem A; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells and their products are likely to be involved in regulating orbital fibroblast activity in Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO). Histamine is abundantly present in granules of mast cells and is released upon mast cell activation. However, the effect of histamine on orbital fibroblasts has not been examined so far. Orbital tissues from GO patients and controls were analyzed for the presence of mast cells using toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical detection of CD117 (stem cell factor receptor). Orbital fibroblasts were cultured from GO patients and healthy controls, stimulated with histamine and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10 and CXCL11) were measured in culture supernatants. Also hyaluronan levels were measured in culture supernatants and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HYAL) gene expression levels were determined. In addition, histamine receptor subtype gene expression levels were examined as well as the effect of the histamine receptor-1 (HRH1) antagonist loratadine and NF-κB inhibitor SC-514 on histamine-induced cytokine production. Mast cell numbers were increased in GO orbital tissues. Histamine stimulated the production of IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 by orbital fibroblasts, while it had no effect on the production of CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10, CXCL11 and hyaluronan. Orbital fibroblasts expressed HRH1 and loratadine and SC-514 both blocked histamine-induced IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 production by orbital fibroblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that histamine can induce the production of NF-κB controlled-cytokines by orbital fibroblasts, which supports a role for mast cells in GO. PMID:27170049

  16. Histamine receptor antagonists, cyclooxygenase blockade, and tumor necrosis factor during acute septic insult.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Carey, D; Byrne, K; Walsh, C; Fisher, B; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1998-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be a major endogenous mediator of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. We proposed that treatment of septic pigs with the combined agents ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and histamine receptor antagonists, cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) would result in lower circulating levels of TNF and decreased parameters of sepsis-induced injury in these animals. To test this, plasma TNF activity, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, arterial PO2 and bronchoalveolar lavage protein content were monitored for 300 min in four groups of anesthetized pigs: saline-infused control pigs (n = 4); pigs infused for 60 min with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(8) organisms/mL, .3 mL/20 kg/min) (n = 5) and pigs infused for 60 min with P. aeruginosa plus ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg) alone (n = 4) or ibuprofen plus cimetidine (150 mg) and diphenhydramine (30 mg/kg) at 0 and 120 min (CID, n = 4). Within 60 min, pigs infused with P. aeruginosa exhibited increased plasma TNF activity (>8-fold increase in ng/mL TNF; L929 cytolysis assay) and showed alterations in all hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters. Ibuprofen or CID administration in the septic pigs decreased peak TNF activity by 4.6 and 10.2 ng/mL, respectively, and CID treatment was correlated with better attenuation of certain sepsis-induced alterations. These results show that CID treatment attenuates sepsis-induced injury and that this is correlated with reduced plasma TNF activity in a porcine model of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. PMID:9488252

  17. Histamine and histamine receptor regulation of gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Lindsey; Hodges, Kyle; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter released throughout the body that regulates multiple physiological responses. Primarily histamine is acknowledged for its role in inflammatory reactions to foreign pathogens that enter the body. Aside from inflammatory responses, histamine expression and synthesis has been detected in various cancer cell lines and multiple malignancies. Through experimentation histamine has demonstrated its ability to manage proliferation and angiogenesis in these cancerous cells, in either a positive or inhibitory manner. Regulation of angiogenesis and proliferation have been proven to be carried out by the stimulation or inhibition of numerous pathways and secondary response elements, such as VEGFA/C, IP3/Ca2+, G-proteins, cAMP, and many more. The activation of these different response pathways is linked to the binding of ligands to the histamine receptors H1-H4HR. These receptors exhibit various effects dependent on whether it binds an agonist, antagonist, or its specific ligand, histamine. In cancer cell lines and different tumor cells the binding of these different compounds has shown to be one of the main components in exerting proliferative or antiproliferative changes in the microenvironment. It is also known that the histamine receptors have varying degrees of expression in different forms of cancer, and this expression can impact the tumor in various ways. This clearly indicates the significance of histamine receptors in cancer formation, and one of the aims of this review is to cover this topic concisely and in depth. Histamine is produced from numerous cells such as basophils and mast cells and is synthesized from the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). In this review we will prominently discuss the function of mast cells and HDC in histamine expression in various gastrointestinal carcinomas. We also briefly discuss current studies to support these claims. In this review we hope to give the reader a clear and comprehensible overview of

  18. Aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 activation by adenosine and histamine inhibits ischemic norepinephrine release in cardiac sympathetic neurons: mediation by protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Robador, Pablo A; Seyedi, Nahid; Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Koda, Kenichiro; Levi, Roberto

    2012-10-01

    During myocardial ischemia/reperfusion, lipid peroxidation leads to the formation of toxic aldehydes that contribute to ischemic dysfunction. Mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) alleviates ischemic heart damage and reperfusion arrhythmias via aldehyde detoxification. Because excessive norepinephrine release in the heart is a pivotal arrhythmogenic mechanism, we hypothesized that neuronal ALDH2 activation might diminish ischemic norepinephrine release. Incubation of cardiac sympathetic nerve endings with acetaldehyde, at concentrations achieved in myocardial ischemia, caused a concentration-dependent increase in norepinephrine release. A major increase in norepinephrine release also occurred when sympathetic nerve endings were incubated in hypoxic conditions. ALDH2 activation substantially reduced acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release, an action prevented by inhibition of ALDH2 or protein kinase Cε (PKCε). Selective activation of G(i/o)-coupled adenosine A(1), A(3), or histamine H(3) receptors markedly inhibited both acetaldehyde- and hypoxia-induced norepinephrine release. These effects were also abolished by PKCε and/or ALDH2 inhibition. Moreover, A(1)-, A(3)-, or H(3)-receptor activation increased ALDH2 activity in a sympathetic neuron model (differentiated PC12 cells stably transfected with H(3) receptors). This action was prevented by the inhibition of PKCε and ALDH2. Our findings suggest the existence in sympathetic neurons of a protective pathway initiated by A(1)-, A(3)-, and H(3)-receptor activation by adenosine and histamine released in close proximity of these terminals. This pathway comprises the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2, culminating in aldehyde detoxification and inhibition of hypoxic norepinephrine release. Thus, pharmacological activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in cardiac sympathetic nerves may have significant protective effects by alleviating norepinephrine-induced life-threatening arrhythmias that

  19. Histamine H4-receptors inhibit mast cell renin release in ischemia/reperfusion via protein kinase C ε-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 activation.

    PubMed

    Aldi, Silvia; Takano, Ken-ichi; Tomita, Kengo; Koda, Kenichiro; Chan, Noel Y-K; Marino, Alice; Salazar-Rodriguez, Mariselis; Thurmond, Robin L; Levi, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    Renin released by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) from cardiac mast cells (MCs) activates a local renin-angiotensin system (RAS) causing arrhythmic dysfunction. Ischemic preconditioning (IPC) inhibits MC renin release and consequent activation of this local RAS. We postulated that MC histamine H4-receptors (H4Rs), being Gαi/o-coupled, might activate a protein kinase C isotype-ε (PKCε)-aldehyde dehydrogenase type-2 (ALDH2) cascade, ultimately eliminating MC-degranulating and renin-releasing effects of aldehydes formed in I/R and associated arrhythmias. We tested this hypothesis in ex vivo hearts, human mastocytoma cells, and bone marrow-derived MCs from wild-type and H4R knockout mice. We found that activation of MC H4Rs mimics the cardioprotective anti-RAS effects of IPC and that protection depends on the sequential activation of PKCε and ALDH2 in MCs, reducing aldehyde-induced MC degranulation and renin release and alleviating reperfusion arrhythmias. These cardioprotective effects are mimicked by selective H4R agonists and disappear when H4Rs are pharmacologically blocked or genetically deleted. Our results uncover a novel cardioprotective pathway in I/R, whereby activation of H4Rs on the MC membrane, possibly by MC-derived histamine, leads sequentially to PKCε and ALDH2 activation, reduction of toxic aldehyde-induced MC renin release, prevention of RAS activation, reduction of norepinephrine release, and ultimately to alleviation of reperfusion arrhythmias. This newly discovered protective pathway suggests that MC H4Rs may represent a new pharmacologic and therapeutic target for the direct alleviation of RAS-induced cardiac dysfunctions, including ischemic heart disease and congestive heart failure. PMID:24696042

  20. Mobilization of leucocytes and subsequent release of histamine and lysosomal enzymes into the peritoneal and pleural cavities of rats by actinomycin D (dactinomycin).

    PubMed

    Giro, S N; Joshi, B; Peoples, S A

    1975-01-01

    1. The effects of intraperitoneal injections of actinomycin D on the temporal characteristics of the accumulation of the inflammatory exudate and cells into the peritoneal and pleural cavities were studied in male Sprague Dawley rats. 2. A measurable quantity of the exudate appeared in both cavities within 24 h and reached maxima in the peritoneal and pleural cavities on the fourth and third days, respectively. Thereafter, the accumulated volume of liquid decreased progressively in the peritoneal cavity but stayed more or less at about the same level in the pleural cavity until the sixth day. 3. The pooled peritoneal and pleural exudates contained neutrophils, macrophages, mast cell and eosinophils. The leucocyte infiltration occurred in two phases, the maximum cell numbers being found on the third and fifth days. A precipitous fall in the number of leucocytes occurred on the fourth day. Neutrophils and macrophages accounted for 85-95% of the total number of leucocytes. 4. The supernatant of the inflammatory exudate after centrifugation at 3,000 g contained histamine and the soluble lysosomal enzyme proteins, acid phosphatase and beta-glucuronidase until the sixth day following the initial dose of actinomycin D. 5. It is suggested that the release of lysosomal enzymes in the exudate, subsequent to leucocyte mobilization and the release of histamine from the mast cells, are probably involved in the genesis of inflammatory conditions induced by actinomycin D. PMID:50158

  1. Regulation of histamine synthesis and tryptase expression through transcription factors, growth factor independent 1 (Gfi1) and Gfi1b, in murine cultured mast cells.

    PubMed

    Taura, Azusa; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are involved in various immunological responses, although it remains unknown how their terminal differentiation is regulated. We previously established a culture model that mimics the process of mast cell maturation in the cutaneous tissue and found that growth factor independent 1 (Gfi1) was up-regulated whereas its paralogue Gfi1b down-regulated. Here we investigated the roles of Gfi1 and Gfi1b in the process of mast cell maturation using a murine mast cell line, MC9. Gfi1 and Gfi1b cDNAs were stably expressed in MC9 cells using the recombinant lentivirus. Histamine synthesis was significantly induced by stem cell factor (SCF) alone, whereas tryptase expression was significantly augmented in the presence of both SCF and Swiss 3T3 cells. Since exogenously expressed Gfi1 and Gfi1b might affect their expression levels in MC9 cells, we investigated the relationship between the expression profiles of Gfi1/Gfi1b proteins and maturation indices, such as histamine synthesis and tryptase expression. The comparison suggested that histamine synthesis during the co-culture period was positively regulated by Gfi1b while augmented expression of tryptase was abolished by one-sided expression of Gfi1/Gfi1b. Our findings indicated the involvement of Gfi1 and Gfi1b in the process of murine mast cell maturation. PMID:24389484

  2. Histamine up-regulates fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 and increases FOXP2 neurons in cultured neural precursors by histamine type 1 receptor activation: conceivable role of histamine in neurogenesis during cortical development in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During rat development, histamine (HA) is one of the first neuroactive molecules to appear in the brain, reaching its maximal value at embryonic day 14, a period when neurogenesis of deep layers is occurring in the cerebral cortex, suggesting a role of this amine in neuronal specification. We previously reported, using high-density cerebrocortical neural precursor cultures, that micromolar HA enhanced the effect of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 on proliferation, and that HA increased neuronal differentiation, due to HA type 1 receptor (H1R) activation. Results Clonal experiments performed here showed that HA decreased colony size and caused a significant increase in the percentage of clones containing mature neurons through H1R stimulation. In proliferating precursors, we studied whether HA activates G protein-coupled receptors linked to intracellular calcium increases. Neural cells presented an increase in cytoplasmic calcium even in the absence of extracellular calcium, a response mediated by H1R. Since FGF receptors (FGFRs) are known to be key players in cell proliferation and differentiation, we determined whether HA modifies the expression of FGFRs1-4 by using RT-PCR. An important transcriptional increase in FGFR1 was elicited after H1R activation. We also tested whether HA promotes differentiation specifically to neurons with molecular markers of different cortical layers by immunocytochemistry. HA caused significant increases in cells expressing the deep layer neuronal marker FOXP2; this induction of FOXP2-positive neurons elicited by HA was blocked by the H1R antagonist chlorpheniramine in vitro. Finally, we found a notable decrease in FOXP2+ cortical neurons in vivo, when chlorpheniramine was infused in the cerebral ventricles through intrauterine injection. Conclusion These results show that HA, by activating H1R, has a neurogenic effect in clonal conditions and suggest that intracellular calcium elevation and transcriptional up

  3. The role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A C; Fantozzi, R

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘neurogenic inflammation’ has been adopted to describe the local release of inflammatory mediators, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from neurons. Once released, these neuropeptides induce the release of histamine from adjacent mast cells. In turn, histamine evokes the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide; thus, a bidirectional link between histamine and neuropeptides in neurogenic inflammation is established. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on the role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation, with particular regard to nociceptive pain, as well as neurogenic inflammation in the skin, airways and bladder. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23734637

  4. In vitro inhibition of histamine release behavior of cetirizine intercalated into Zn/Al- and Mg/Al-layered double hydroxides.

    PubMed

    Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    The intercalation of cetirizine into two types of layered double hydroxides, Zn/Al and Mg/Al, has been investigated by the ion exchange method to form CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites, respectively. The basal spacing of the nanocomposites were expanded to 31.9 Å for CTZAN and 31.2 Å for CTMAN, suggesting that cetirizine anion was intercalated into Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and arranged in a tilted bilayer fashion. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study supported the formation of both the nanocomposites, and the intercalated cetirizine is thermally more stable than its counterpart in free state. The loading of cetirizine in the nanocomposite was estimated to be about 57.2% for CTZAN and 60.7% CTMAN. The cetirizine release from the nanocomposites show sustained release manner and the release rate of cetirizine from CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, presumably due to the different release mechanism. The inhibition of histamine release from RBL2H3 cells by the free cetirizine is higher than the intercalated cetirizine both in CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites. The viability in human Chang liver cells at 1000 μg/mL for CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites are 74.5 and 91.9%, respectively. PMID:22754339

  5. In Vitro Inhibition of Histamine Release Behavior of Cetirizine Intercalated into Zn/Al- and Mg/Al-Layered Double Hydroxides

    PubMed Central

    Hussein-Al-Ali, Samer Hasan; Al-Qubaisi, Mothanna; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Ismail, Maznah; Zainal, Zulkarnain; Hakim, Muhammad Nazrul

    2012-01-01

    The intercalation of cetirizine into two types of layered double hydroxides, Zn/Al and Mg/Al, has been investigated by the ion exchange method to form CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites, respectively. The basal spacing of the nanocomposites were expanded to 31.9 Å for CTZAN and 31.2 Å for CTMAN, suggesting that cetirizine anion was intercalated into Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) and arranged in a tilted bilayer fashion. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) study supported the formation of both the nanocomposites, and the intercalated cetirizine is thermally more stable than its counterpart in free state. The loading of cetirizine in the nanocomposite was estimated to be about 57.2% for CTZAN and 60.7% CTMAN. The cetirizine release from the nanocomposites show sustained release manner and the release rate of cetirizine from CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites at pH 7.4 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, presumably due to the different release mechanism. The inhibition of histamine release from RBL2H3 cells by the free cetirizine is higher than the intercalated cetirizine both in CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites. The viability in human Chang liver cells at 1000 μg/mL for CTZAN and CTMAN nanocomposites are 74.5 and 91.9%, respectively. PMID:22754339

  6. Facile preparation of pH-sensitive micelles self-assembled from amphiphilic chondroitin sulfate-histamine conjugate for triggered intracellular drug release.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chuanming; Gao, Chunmei; Lü, Shaoyu; Chen, Chen; Yang, Jinlong; Di, Xin; Liu, Mingzhu

    2014-03-01

    Stimuli-responsive materials, enabling drugs to be released in the acidic tumor and intracellular microenvironments, draw an increasing attention in chemotherapy. Here novel pH-sensitive biodegradable micelles are fabricated using a one-step, one-medium process without organic solvent for efficient loading and rapid intracellular release of hydrophobic cargos. The amphiphilic chondroitin sulfate-histamine conjugate (CS-his) were successfully synthesized and assembled into nanoparticles in aqueous medium with desirable size (133 nm) and low critical micelle concentration (CMC) (0.05 mg/L). Owning to the pH-sensitive structure of imidazole, the nanoparticles show pH-responsive behavior upon reducing the pH value of surrounding media, accompany with formation of large aggregates and increase of ζ potential. When the nanoparticles were utilized to deliver the model drug DOX, they exhibited a specific on-off switch drug release behavior, triggering DOX release in acidic surroundings (intracellular endosomes) and sealing DOX in neutral surroundings (blood circulation or extracellular matrix). CCK-8 assays and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) against HepG2 cells indicated that the nanoparticles themselves had no associated cytotoxicity, while drug-loaded nanoparticles possessed high cytotoxicity to model cells and presented high efficiency of cellular uptake. These flexible micelles with an on-off switched drug release may offer a promising pattern to accurately deliver a wide variety of hydrophobic payloads to tumor cells for cancer therapy. PMID:24398081

  7. Interleukin-4 (IL-4) enhances and soluble interleukin-4 receptor (sIL-4R) inhibits histamine release from peripheral blood basophils and mast cells in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zuberbier, T.; Herz, U.; Enssle, K.; Wahn, U.; Renz, H.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyse the effect of interleukin-4 (IL-4) on allergen and anti-IgE mediated histamine release from basophils and human skin mast cells and to assess whether soluble recombinant interleukin-4 receptor (sIL4R) can inhibit these effects. Anti-IgE stimulated histamine release from peripheral blood basophils and mast cells of atopic donors was enhanced after preincubation with IL-4, whereas after preincubation with sIL-4R it was inhibited. These effects were even more pronounced when samples were stimulated with a clinically relevant allergen. In IL-4 preincubated skin mast cells, there was a similar enhancement of anti-IgE stimulated histamine release, which could again be inhibited by sIL-4R. The effects of IL-4 and sIL4R were dose- and time-dependent. Mice sensitized to ovalbumin and treated with soluble recombinant murine sIL-4R showed significantly reduced immediate-type cutaneous hypersensitivity responses compared with untreated mice. These in vivo effects were IgE independent, since there were no significant differences in total and allergen specific IgE/IgG1 antibody titres between treated and untreated mice. This indicates that IL4 exerts priming effects on histamine release by effector cells of the allergic response and that these effects are potently antagonized by soluble IL-4R both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18472844

  8. Sequencing and Transcriptional Analysis of the Streptococcus thermophilus Histamine Biosynthesis Gene Cluster: Factors That Affect Differential hdcA Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Calles-Enríquez, Marina; Eriksen, Benjamin Hjort; Andersen, Pia Skov; Rattray, Fergal P.; Johansen, Annette H.; Fernández, María; Ladero, Victor; Alvarez, Miguel A.

    2010-01-01

    Histamine, a toxic compound that is formed by the decarboxylation of histidine through the action of microbial decarboxylases, can accumulate in fermented food products. From a total of 69 Streptococcus thermophilus strains screened, two strains, CHCC1524 and CHCC6483, showed the capacity to produce histamine. The hdc clusters of S. thermophilus CHCC1524 and CHCC6483 were sequenced, and the factors that affect histamine biosynthesis and histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) expression were studied. The hdc cluster began with the hdcA gene, was followed by a transporter (hdcP), and ended with the hdcB gene, which is of unknown function. The three genes were orientated in the same direction. The genetic organization of the hdc cluster showed a unique organization among the lactic acid bacterial group and resembled those of Staphylococcus and Clostridium species, thus indicating possible acquisition through a horizontal transfer mechanism. Transcriptional analysis of the hdc cluster revealed the existence of a polycistronic mRNA covering the three genes. The histidine-decarboxylating gene (hdcA) of S. thermophilus demonstrated maximum expression during the stationary growth phase, with high expression levels correlated with high histamine levels. Limited expression was evident during the lag and exponential growth phases. Low-temperature (4°C) incubation of milk inoculated with a histamine-producing strain showed lower levels of histamine than did inoculated milk kept at 42°C. This reduction was attributed to a reduction in the activity of the HdcA enzyme itself rather than a reduction in gene expression or the presence of a lower cell number. PMID:20656875

  9. Histamine in neurotransmission and brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Panula, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its central role in the mediation of allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion and inflammation in the periphery, histamine serves an important function as a neurotransitter in the central nervous system. The histaminergic neurons originate from the tuberomamillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus and send projections to most parts of the brain. The central histamine system is involved in many brain functions such as arousal, control of pituitary hormone secretion, suppression ofeating and cognitive functions. The effects of neuronal histamine are mediated via G-protein-coupled H1-H4 receptors. The prominent role of histamine as a wake-promoting substance has drawn interest to treat sleep-wake disorders, especially narcolepsy, via modulation of H3 receptor function. Post mortem studies have revealed alterations in histaminergic system in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Brain histamine levels are decreased in Alzheimer's disease patients whereas abnormally high histamine concentrations are found in the brains of Parkinson's disease and schizophrenic patients. Low histamine levels are associated with convulsions and seizures. The release of histamine is altered in response to different types of brain injury: e.g. increased release of histamine in an ischemic brain trauma might have a role in the recovery from neuronal damage. Neuronal histamine is also involved in the pain perception. Drugs that increase brain and spinal histamine concentrations have antinociceptive properties. Histaminergic drugs, most importantly histamine H3 receptors ligands, have shown efficacy in many animal models of the above-mentioned disorders. Ongoing clinical trials will reveal the efficacy and safety of these drugs in the treatment of human patients. PMID:21618891

  10. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  11. Factors affecting sporoplasm release in Kudoa septempunctata.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Phil; Zenke, Kosuke; Yokoyama, Hiroshi; Yoshinaga, Tomoyoshi

    2015-02-01

    The myxosporean parasite Kudoa septempunctata has been isolated from cultured olive flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) and was recently identified as a cause of food poisoning in humans. Since the sporoplasm plays an important role in causing diarrhea by invading intestinal cells, the specific factors affecting the release of sporoplasm from spores should be determined. Thus, we investigated the effect of digestive and serum enzymes, fetal bovine serum (FBS), temperature, and the role of glucose in cell culture media on the release of sporoplasm. Sporoplasm release was observed in the groups treated with FBS and media containing glucose. In addition, 1,10-phenanthroline inhibited the release of sporoplasm in the FBS medium. These results indicate that K. septempunctata uses glucose for releasing its sporoplasm and that zinc or metalloprotease is related to the release mechanism. The present study provides important information for the development of agents to prevent sporoplasm release and the consequent food poisoning caused by K. septempunctata. PMID:25563617

  12. Histamine release by exocytosis from rat mast cells on reduction of extracellular sodium: a secretory response inhibited by calcium, strontium, barium or magnesium.

    PubMed Central

    Cochrane, D E; Douglas, W W

    1976-01-01

    1. Histamine release from peritoneal mast cells of the rat was stimulated when the cells were exposed for 10 min to sodium-deficient media where all NaCl had been replaced by KC1, RbC1, glucose, sucrose, mannitol, or Tris, provided calcium was less than about 0-5 mM. 2. Light and electron microscopy showed the response to be exocytosis. 3. The chelating agents, EDTA and EGTA, abolished the response to sodium lack and their inhibitory effects were reversed by re-incubating cells with calcium but not magnesium. 4. The response was inhibited by dinitrophenol combined with glucose-deprivation. 5. The response was inversely related to the concentrations of sodium and calcium below 137-5 and 0-5 mM respectively. 6. The related alkaline earth metals, barium, strontium, and magnesium, resembled calcium in inhibiting the response to sodium lack. 7. No secretory response was seen when the cells were exposed for 10 min to calcium-free medium in which lithium replaced sodium. Exposure to this medium for 60 min, however, elicited secretion. 8. It is concluded that when extracellular calcium is low, a reduction in extracellular sodium induces a conventional exocytotic secretory response dependent on energy and cellular calcium. It is suggested that sodium lack may mobilize calcium from a cellular site possibly the inner aspect of the plasma membrane. Images A B C D E F G H PMID:59804

  13. Piecemeal degranulation of mast cells in the inflammatory eyelid lesions of interleukin-4 transgenic mice. Evidence of mast cell histamine release in vivo by diamine oxidase-gold enzyme-affinity ultrastructural cytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Dvorak, A M; Tepper, R I; Weller, P F; Morgan, E S; Estrella, P; Monahan-Earley, R A; Galli, S J

    1994-06-15

    We used light and electron microscopy to analyze the eyelid inflammation that develops in transgenic mice that overexpress interleukin-4 (IL-4; Tepper et al, Cell 62:457, 1990). Analysis of alkaline Giemsa-stained plastic sections examined by light microscopy (Dvorak et al, J Exp Med 132:558, 1970), as well as by routine transmission electron microscopy, indicated that the mast cells in the inflammatory eyelid lesions were undergoing piecemeal degranulation, a form of secretion in which the cells' cytoplasmic granules exhibit characteristic morphologic changes that are thought to be associated with the prolonged, vesicle-mediated release of the granules' constituents. Moreover, by using a newly reported enzyme affinity-gold method, which stains histamine based on binding to diamine oxidase-gold (Dvorak et al, J Histochem Cytochem 41:787, 1993), we show that these activated mast cells had released much of their histamine content. The eyelid lesions also exhibited increased numbers of mast cells; interstitial fibrosis, particularly around cutaneous nerves and blood vessels; activated fibroblasts; focal axonal damage; venules with endothelial cells containing numerous vesiculo-vacuolar organelles; and infiltrates of neutrophils and eosinophils. Our findings illustrate that overexpression of the IL-4 gene in vivo can result in eyelid lesions associated with piecemeal degranulation of mast cells, as well as tissue fibrosis and a variety of other pathologic changes. These results also represent the first direct morphologic evidence for histamine secretion by mast cells in vivo. PMID:7515717

  14. Sample taking problems in measuring actual histamine levels of human gastroduodenal mucosa: specific and general relevance in clinical trials on peptic ulcer pathogenesis and selective proximal vagotomy.

    PubMed Central

    Thon, K P; Lorenz, W; Ohmann, C; Weber, D; Rohde, H; Röher, H D

    1985-01-01

    Changes in histamine storage in the oxyntic mucosa of duodenal ulcer patients and their reversal by vagotomy and the histamine H2-antagonist cimetidine supported the hypothesis that histamine could be a causal factor in peptic ulcer pathogenesis. The specificity of these findings was impaired by problems in biopsy taking, however, and in the preparative steps before measuring the actual histamine contents in all parts of the gastric mucosa and in the duodenum. A prospective trial was carried out in 190 patients to identify these sources of bias and to overcome them by appropriate study designs. Usually a direct correlation was found between weight of biopsy and mucosal histamine content. This problem was solved by selecting a biopsy forceps producing smaller variations in sample size, by limiting the time of cold ischaemia to four to five minutes only and by taking three biopsy specimens for each single histamine value. The actual histamine content of mucosal biopsies remained constant for about four to five minutes only. The 'disappearance' rate was faster in control subjects than in duodenal ulcer patients. Hence by variation of the cold ischaemia time any artefacts of differences between mucosal histamine levels in controls and duodenal ulcer patients could be produced. Using the optimised sample taking procedure mucosal histamine contents of several gastric regions and the duodenal bulb were measured in 24 patients with duodenal ulcer, after selective proximal vagotomy without drainage and in control subjects without any stomach disease (randomised controlled trial). The histamine content was lower in all parts of the upper gastrointestinal tract in duodenal ulcer patients than in controls and was raised again in all regions after selective proximal vagotomy. As the most likely hypothesis it is suggested that vagal reflexes with afferent fibres coming from the oxyntic mucosa stimulate histamine release in duodenal ulcer patients by efferent peptidergic neurones

  15. THE RESPONSE OF A HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELL LINE TO HISTAMINE: INTRACELLULAR CALCIUM CHANGES AND EXTRACELLULAR RELEASE OF INFLAMMATORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The contribution of airway epithelium-derived factors to inflammation and tissue repair is unclear. ecause human airway epithelia are infrequently available for in vitro studies, transformed epithelial cell lines are of interest as models. e therefore investigated the response of...

  16. Histamine and antihistamines in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Winbery, Stephen L; Lieberman, Philip L

    2002-01-01

    Anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions are potentially fatal. These disorders are sometimes iatrogenic, and increase with increased exposure to drugs, synthetic substances, and medical procedures. Non-IgE-mediated anaphylactoid reactions are common in medical settings and are clinically indistinguishable from anaphylaxis. These reactions may be unrecognized if a rigid classic definition of anaphylaxis is used. Histamine is a primary mediator of anaphylaxis and signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis can be reproduced by histamine infusion. Histamine triggers a cascade of inflammatory mediators and modulates its own release. H1-antihistamines are adjunctive treatment therapy for acute anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, in which many mediators of inflammation are involved. Compared with epinephrine, the first-response medication of choice, antihistamines have a slow onset of action, and they cannot block events that occur subsequent to histamine binding to its receptors. Antihistamines are an important component of regimens for the prevention of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions in patients at risk, and may eventually have more widespread application in the perioperative setting. In some instances, such as with exercise-induced anaphylaxis and reactions to latex in sensitized individuals, prophylaxis regimens are not always effective. H2-antagonists are not detrimental in the therapy of anaphylaxis and many studies show a favorable outcome when combining H1- and H2-antagonist therapy for prophylaxis. They should be added to therapy at the discretion of the treating physician. Because of decreased antimuscarinic and central nervous system side effects, the newer antihistamines can be given in high doses, allowing more complete blockade of histamine receptors. These agents should lead to a reevaluation of the usefulness of antihistamines in both the treatment of acute anaphylaxis and in prophylactic regimens. The unavailability of parenterally administered

  17. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  18. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  19. Histamine and Skin Barrier: Are Histamine Antagonists Useful for the Prevention or Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis?

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Yoshida, Takeshi; Fridy, Sade; Park, Joo-Eun S.; Kuo, I.-Hsin; Beck, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD), the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by an overactive immune response to a host of environmental allergens and dry, itchy skin. Over the past decade important discoveries have demonstrated that AD develops in part from genetic and/or acquired defects in the skin barrier. Histamine is an aminergic neurotransmitter involved in physiologic and pathologic processes such as pruritus, inflammation, and vascular leak. Enhanced histamine release has been observed in the skin of patients with AD and antihistamines are often prescribed for their sedating and anti-itch properties. Recent evidence suggests that histamine also inhibits the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and impairs the skin barrier, raising the question whether histamine might play a role in AD barrier impairment. This, coupled with the notion that histamine’s effects mediated through the recently identified histamine receptor H4R, may be important in allergic inflammation, has renewed interest in this mediator in allergic diseases. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in AD and skin barrier function. PMID:26239353

  20. Central corticotropin releasing factor and social stress

    PubMed Central

    Backström, Tobias; Winberg, Svante

    2013-01-01

    Social interactions are a main source of stress in vertebrates. Social stressors, as well as other stressors, activate the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis resulting in glucocorticoid release. One of the main components of the HPA axis is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). The neuropeptide CRF is part of a peptide family including CRF, urocortin 1–3, urotensin 1–3, and sauvagine. The actions of the CRF family are mediated by at least two different receptors with different anatomical distribution and affinities for the peptides. The CRF peptides affect several behavioral and physiological responses to stress including aggression, feeding, and locomotor activity. This review will summarize recent research in vertebrates concerning how social stress interacts with components of the CRF system. Consideration will be taken to the different models used for social stress ranging from social isolation, dyadic interactions, to group dominance hierarchies. Further, the temporal effect of social stressor from acute, intermittent, to chronic will be considered. Finally, strains selected for specific behavior or physiology linked to social stress will also be discussed. PMID:23847465

  1. P-selectin anchors newly released ultralarge von Willebrand factor multimers to the endothelial cell surface.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Arnoldo; Moake, Joel L; Bernardo, Aubrey; Ball, Chalmette; Wang, Yongtao; Arya, Maneesh; Nolasco, Leticia; Turner, Nancy; Berndt, Michael C; Anvari, Bahman; López, José A; Dong, Jing-Fei

    2004-03-15

    von Willebrand factor (VWF) released from endothelium is ultralarge (UL) and hyperreactive. If released directly into plasma, it can spontaneously aggregate platelets, resulting in systemic thrombosis. This disastrous consequence is prevented by the ADAMTS13 (ADisintegrin and Metalloprotease with ThromboSpondin motif) cleavage of ULVWF into smaller, less active forms. We previously showed that ULVWF, on release, forms extremely long stringlike structures. ADAMTS13 cleaves these strings under flow significantly faster than it does under static conditions. As ULVWF tethering to endothelium is important for its rapid proteolysis, we investigated 2 molecules for their potential to anchor the ULVWF strings: P-selectin and integrin alpha v beta 3. We demonstrated that P-selectin anchors ULVWF to endothelium by several means. First, Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing P-selectin specifically adhered to immobilized ULVWF and ULVWF-coated beads to immobilized P-selectin. Second, an anti-VWF antibody coimmunoprecipitates P-selectin from the histamine-activated endothelial cells. Third, P-selectin antibody or soluble P-selectin, but not a alpha v beta 3 antibody, RGDS peptide, or heparin, blocked the formation of ULVWF strings. Fourth, P-selectin expression was in clusters predominantly along the ULVWF strings. Finally, the strength of the minimal ULVWF-P-selectin bond was measured to be 7.2 pN. We, therefore, conclude that P-selectin may anchor ULVWF strings to endothelial cells and facilitate their cleavage by ADAMTS13. PMID:14630802

  2. Histamine action in paraquat-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lindenschmidt, R C; Selig, W M; Patterson, C E; Verburg, K M; Henry, D P; Forney, R B; Rhoades, R A

    1986-02-01

    We investigated direct histamine release and its effects in edema formation following paraquat (PQ) injury in a blood-free, perfused rat lung preparation. Under control conditions, perfusate histamine levels from the lung averaged 9.5 +/- 1.4 ng/ml. Lungs perfused with paraquat (1 mM) showed marked increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (133%), airway pressure (74%), alveolarcapillary protein flux (200%), and lung weight (38%). Prior to any detectable lung weight or pressure changes, PQ caused a 300% increase in perfusate histamine. Diphenhydramine (1.0 X 10(-5) M), a specific H1-histamine receptor antagonist, blocked the increased protein flux that followed PQ administration and significantly delayed edema. Furthermore, diphenhydramine attenuated the rise in PGF2 alpha. Conversely, histamine release was partially attenuated by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, at 2.4 X 10(-5) M, the same level that we had previously shown to block an early rise in PGF2 alpha and the onset of edema after PQ. These data show that the increased alveolar-capillary protein flux that occurred with PQ injury was attenuated by an H1-receptor antagonist and suggest that histamine is a primary mediator in paraquat-induced injury and that histamine subsequently stimulates prostaglandin release. PMID:3456218

  3. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  4. Inhibition of histidine decarboxylase ablates the autocrine tumorigenic effects of histamine in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Heather; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Onori, Paolo; White, Mellanie; Gaudio, Eugenio; Francis, Taylor; Greene, John F; Tran, Steve; Meininger, Cynthia J; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Background In several tumours the endogenous activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme stimulating histamine synthesis, sustains the autocrine trophic effect of histamine on cancer progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is a biliary cancer with limited treatment options. Histamine interacts with four G-protein coupled receptors, H1–H4 histamine receptors (HRs). Objective To determine the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition of histamine synthesis (by modulation of HDC) on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Methods In vitro studies were performed using multiple human cholangiocarcinoma lines. The expression levels of the histamine synthetic machinery and HRs were evaluated along with the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition on cholangiocarcinoma proliferation. A xenograft tumour model was used to measure tumour volume after treatment with histamine or inhibition of histamine synthesis by manipulation of HDC. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was measured in cholangiocarcinoma cells concomitant with the evaluation of the expression of CD31 in endothelial cells in the tumour microenvironment. Results Cholangiocarcinoma cells display (1) enhanced HDC and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression resulting in increased histamine secretion; and (2) increased expression of H1–H4 HRs. Inhibition of HDC and antagonising H1HR decreased histamine secretion in Mz-ChA-1 cells. Long-term treatment with histamine increased proliferation and VEGF expression in cholangiocarcinoma that was blocked by HDC inhibitor and the H1HR antagonist. In nude mice, histamine increased tumour growth (up to 25%) and VEGF expression whereas inhibition of histamine synthesis (by reduction of HDC) ablated the autocrine stimulation of histamine on tumour growth (~80%) and VEGF expression. No changes in angiogenesis (evaluated by changes in CD31 immunoreactivity) were detected in the in vivo treatment groups. Conclusion The novel concept that an autocrine loop

  5. Histamine in foods: its possible role in non-allergic adverse reactions to ingestants.

    PubMed

    Malone, M H; Metcalfe, D D

    1986-01-01

    Histamine is well recognized as a product of both mast cells and basophils. Its release from these sources in IgE-mediated reactions unquestionably contributes to the allergic response. It is often stated that ingestion of foods rich in histamine can result in absorption of sufficient histamine to provoke signs and symptoms reminiscent of an allergic reaction. A review of literature relevant to this issue suggests that certain foods do indeed contain histamine as measured by current methodology. Further, histamine ingestion in excess of 36 to 250 mg may or may not result in a clinical response which includes abdominal complaints, feelings of warmth, flushing and headache. Taken together, this evidence supports the hypothesis that ingestion of large amounts of histamine-containing foods or foods which contain the histamine precursor, histidine, under some circumstances can result in adverse reactions. PMID:3302658

  6. Effects of Histamine on Light Responses of Amacrine Cells in Tiger Salamander Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongchun; Satoh, Hiromasa; Vila, Alejandro; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Using immunofluorescence, we showed that histamine receptor 1 is expressed by horizontal cell axons and a subset of amacrine cells in the tiger salamander retina. The effects of histamine on light responses of amacrine cells were studied in slice preparations. Histamine modulated the light responses of many salamander amacrine cells, depending upon the morphological type. The most pronounced effects of histamine were decreases in the light responses of broadly stratified amacrine cells, particularly those having medium-sized dendritic field diameters. To determine whether the effects of histamine were direct, Co++ was substituted for Ca++ in the extracellular medium to block synaptic transmission. Histamine still affected broadly stratified amacrine cells, but not narrowly stratified amacrine cells under these conditions. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitory interactions between strata of the IPL and within the classical receptive fields of the ganglion cells would be particularly sensitive to histamine released from retinopetal axons. PMID:20878231

  7. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  8. Dissociated effects of corticotropin-releasing factor on acid secretion and blood flow.

    PubMed

    Thiefin, G; Leung, F W; Tache, Y; Guth, P H

    1989-02-01

    Peripherally administered corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) inhibits gastric acid secretion in the rat via unknown mechanisms. Because intravenous CRF can produce marked systemic hypotension, the hypothesis that its antisecretory effect is due to a reduction in gastric mucosal blood flow (MBF) was tested. Corpus MBF was measured by hydrogen gas clearance in fasted, urethan-anesthetized rats. CRF (15 nmol.kg-1.h-1 iv) had no significant effect on MBF but significantly decreased systemic blood pressure (BP) by 21.8 +/- 3.4%. This dose of CRF significantly decreased acid secretion stimulated by 40 micrograms.kg-1.h-1 pentagastrin iv but did not decrease MBF despite a 30.3 +/- 2.3% decrease in BP. To avoid the confounding effect of systemic hypotension on MBF, close gastric intra-arterial infusions were performed. CRF (1.7 nmol/h ia) had no effect on BP and did not increase MBF. CRF (3.4 nmol/h ia) slightly decreased BP without modifying MBF. In contrast, histamine (200 micrograms/h ia) significantly increased MBF by 58 +/- 11%. We conclude that 1) the peripheral antisecretory effect of CRF is not related to a decrease in MBF, 2) the maintenance of MBF during CRF-induced hypotension is not due to a direct vasodilator effect of CRF on the gastric microvasculature. PMID:2784035

  9. Functional Profiling of 2-Aminopyrimidine Histamine H4 Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Tichenor, Mark S; Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer D; Savall, Brad M

    2015-09-24

    Histamine is an important endogenous signaling molecule that is involved in a number of physiological processes including allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion, neurotransmitter release, and inflammation. The biological effects of histamine are mediated by four histamine receptors with distinct functions and distribution profiles (H1-H4). The most recently discovered histamine receptor (H4) has emerged as a promising drug target for treating inflammatory diseases. A detailed understanding of the role of the H4 receptor in human disease remains elusive, in part because low sequence similarity between the human and rodent H4 receptors complicates the translation of preclinical pharmacology to humans. This review provides an overview of H4 drug discovery programs that have studied cross-species structure-activity relationships, with a focus on the functional profiling of the 2-aminopyrimidine chemotype that has advanced to the clinic for allergy, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25993395

  10. Dexmedetomidine Modulates Histamine-induced Ca2+ Signaling and Pro-inflammatory Cytokine Expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dongki

    2015-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine is a sedative and analgesic agent that exerts its effects by selectively agonizing α2 adrenoceptor. Histamine is a pathophysiological amine that activates G protein-coupled receptors, to induce Ca2+ release and subsequent mediate or progress inflammation. Dexmedetomidine has been reported to exert inhibitory effect on inflammation both in vitro and in vivo studies. However, it is unclear that dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced signaling and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. This study was carried out to assess how dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced Ca2+ signaling and regulates the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes encoding interleukin (IL)-6 and -8. To elucidate the regulatory role of dexmedetomidine on histamine signaling, HeLa cells and human salivary gland cells which are endogenously expressed histamine 1 receptor were used. Dexmedetomidine itself did not trigger Ca2+ peak or increase in the presence or absence of external Ca2+. When cells were stimulated with histamine after pretreatment with various concentrations of dexmedetomidine, we observed inhibited histamine-induced [Ca2+]i signal in both cell types. Histamine stimulated IL-6 mRNA expression not IL-8 mRNA within 2 hrs, however this effect was attenuated by dexmedetomidine. Collectively, these findings suggest that dexmedetomidine modulates histamine-induced Ca2+ signaling and IL-6 expression and will be useful for understanding the antagonistic properties of dexmedetomidine on histamine-induced signaling beyond its sedative effect. PMID:26330753

  11. Does Oenococcus oeni produce histamine?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moruno, Emilia; Muñoz, Rosario

    2012-07-01

    The presence of histamine in wine and other fermented foods may pose a toxicological risk for consumers. Production of histamine by Oenococcus oeni, which is the main agent of malolactic fermentation in wine and thus very important for the wine industry, has been extensively analyzed with contradictory results. If histamine production by O. oeni strains is a widespread trait, enological practices will be affected and the use of non-producing commercial O. oeni starters should be strongly recommended to avoid histamine production during winemaking. However, a review of published data showed that most evidence strongly supports the view that O. oeni is not responsible for histamine production in wine. We therefore propose the adoption of common analytical methods and the introduction of publicly-available validated histamine-producing O. oeni reference strains as a common positive control in assays to resolve this important issue. PMID:22652194

  12. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils

    PubMed Central

    MADAN, T; KISHORE, U; SHAH, A; EGGLETON, P; STRONG, P; WANG, J Y; AGGRAWAL, S S; SARMA, P U; REID, K B M

    1997-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  13. Lung surfactant proteins A and D can inhibit specific IgE binding to the allergens of Aspergillus fumigatus and block allergen-induced histamine release from human basophils.

    PubMed

    Madan, T; Kishore, U; Shah, A; Eggleton, P; Strong, P; Wang, J Y; Aggrawal, S S; Sarma, P U; Reid, K B

    1997-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is an opportunistic fungal pathogen which, in the immunocompetent host, causes allergic disorders such as allergic rhinitis, allergic sinusitis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, and allergic bronchopulmonary Aspergillosis (ABPA). In the present study, the interaction of 3-week culture filtrate (3wcf) allergens and various purified glycosylated and non-glycosylated allergens of A. fumigatus with lung surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, was investigated. Purified SP-A and SP-D, isolated from human bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, bound to the 3wcf allergens and purified allergens, gp55 and gp45, in a carbohydrate-specific and calcium-dependent manner. Both SP-A and SP-D did not bind to deglycosylated allergens, suggesting that the ability of SP-A and SP-D to bind certain allergens is mediated through their carbohydrate recognition domains, interacting with the carbohydrate residues on the allergen. Both SP-A and SP-D could inhibit the ability of allergen-specific IgE from Aspergillosis patients to bind these allergens, suggesting that SP-A and SP-D may be involved in the modulation of allergic sensitization and/or development of allergic reactions. The view that SP-A and SP-D play a protective role against airborne allergens is further supported by the demonstration of their ability to inhibit A. fumigatus allergen-induced histamine release from allergic patients' basophils. PMID:9367408

  14. Histamine pharmacology: four years on

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    The histamine field has moved on rapidly in the last four years, with expansion in roles and clinical development, particularly in the newest two of four histamine receptors. This themed volume is a testament to this expansion with 16 original and review articles spanning a wide spectrum of histamine-related topics, with therapeutic translational relevance to addiction, dementias, anxiety disorders, cancers, vestibular disorders, migraine and autoimmune disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23944741

  15. Tetrahydroxystilbene Glucoside Improves Neurotrophic Factors Release in Cultured Astroglia.

    PubMed

    Lin, FengQin; Zhou, YanZhen; Shi, WanLan; Wan, YanYing; Zhang, ZeGang; Zhang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydroxystilbene glucoside (TSG), one of the main ingredients of Polygonum multiflorum, has a great number of beneficial effects for health including anti-oxidant, free radicalscavenging and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the potential effects of TSG on neurotrophic factors release remain unclear. In this study, rat primary astroglia cultures were applied to investigate TSG-mediated neurotrophic effects. The protein levels and production of glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) in astroglia and the culture medium were determined by western blotting assay and ELISA, respectively. Results indicated that TSG increased the production of neurotrophic factors in a concentration-dependent manner. At different time points of TSG treatment, the BDNF and NGF production in the culture medium was increased 48 h after treatment, while GDNF secretion was initially induced 24 h after TSG treatment. Consistent with the neurotrophic factors release, TSG significantly increased the BDNF, GDNF and NGF protein expressions in astroglia. Furthermore, TSG significantly induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and a specific ERK inhibitor-U0126 inhibited TSG-mediated secretion of BDNF, GDNF and NGF. Overall, this study demonstrated that TSG induces astroglia-derived neurotrophic factors release, suggesting TSG might hold a therapeutic potential for neurological disorders. PMID:26295829

  16. Histamine: an undercover agent in multiple rare diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Melgarejo, Esther; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine performing pleiotropic effects in humans, involving tasks within the immune and neuroendocrine systems, neurotransmission, gastric secretion, cell life and death, and development. It is the product of the histidine decarboxylase activity, and its effects are mainly mediated through four different G-protein coupled receptors. Thus, histamine-related effects are the results of highly interconnected and tissue-specific signalling networks. Consequently, alterations in histamine-related factors could be an important part in the cause of multiple rare/orphan diseases. Bearing this hypothesis in mind, more than 25 rare diseases related to histamine physiopathology have been identified using a computationally assisted text mining approach. These newly integrated data will provide insight to elucidate the molecular causes of these rare diseases. The data can also help in devising new intervention strategies for personalized medicine for multiple rare diseases. PMID:22435405

  17. Histamine: an undercover agent in multiple rare diseases?

    PubMed

    Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Melgarejo, Esther; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2012-09-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine performing pleiotropic effects in humans, involving tasks within the immune and neuroendocrine systems, neurotransmission, gastric secretion, cell life and death, and development. It is the product of the histidine decarboxylase activity, and its effects are mainly mediated through four different G-protein coupled receptors. Thus, histamine-related effects are the results of highly interconnected and tissue-specific signalling networks. Consequently, alterations in histamine-related factors could be an important part in the cause of multiple rare/orphan diseases. Bearing this hypothesis in mind, more than 25 rare diseases related to histamine physiopathology have been identified using a computationally assisted text mining approach. These newly integrated data will provide insight to elucidate the molecular causes of these rare diseases. The data can also help in devising new intervention strategies for personalized medicine for multiple rare diseases. PMID:22435405

  18. Kinetics of Stop Codon Recognition by Release Factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Hetrick, Byron; Lee, Kristin; Joseph, Simpson

    2009-01-01

    Recognition of stop codons by class I release factors is a fundamental step in the termination phase of protein synthesis. Since premature termination is costly to the cell, release factors have to efficiently discriminate between stop and sense codons. In order to understand the mechanism of discrimination between stop and sense codons, we developed a new, pre-steady state kinetic assay to monitor the interaction of RF1 with the ribosome. Our results show that RF1 associates with similar association rate constants to ribosomes programmed with a stop or sense codons. However, dissociation of RF1 from sense codons is as much as three orders of magnitude faster than from stop codons. Interestingly, the affinity of RF1 for ribosomes programmed with different sense codons does not correlate with the defects in peptide release. Thus, discrimination against sense codons is achieved, both, by increasing the dissociation rates and by decreasing the rate of peptide release. These results suggest that sense codons inhibit conformational changes necessary for RF1 to stably bind to the ribosome and catalyze peptide release. PMID:19874047

  19. Controlled release of growth factors for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Libiao; Zhou, Xinwei; Xu, Yufan; Zhang, Weiming; Liu, Cheng-Hsien; Wang, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01

    How to release growth factors (GFs) scientifically to promote stem cell proliferation and differentiation is one of the most significant research focuses in the field of regenerative medicine. In a controlled release system, growth factors, extracellular matrices or biomaterial carriers, and sometimes stem cells together form a geometric entirety. Biomaterial carriers provide GFs with a support structure to be adhered, immobilized, encapsulated or/and protected. As a unity, the release rate and rhythm of GFs on cells are normally very delicate and precise. Up to now, the best strategy for clinical applications is the combination systems that encapsulate GFs in microspheres, particularly the nano- or micro-encapsulation techniques integrated GFs with biomaterial carriers. In this mini review, we summarize the current progress in GF delivery systems for regenerative medicine and provide an outlook on two main aspects: one is the classes of stem cells and GFs that have been used frequently in regenerative medicine, including their respective application conditions and functions; the other is the controlled GF release systems, in which various GFs are released orderly and continuously without diffusing simply and rapidly, including their respective opportunities and challenges. PMID:25594403

  20. Investigation of the role of histamine in antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in the ascaris-hypersensitive dog.

    PubMed Central

    Krell, R D

    1978-01-01

    1 Aerosol administration of ascaris antigen to the airways of ascaris-hypersensitive dogs provoked increases in pulmonary resistance (Rp) and decreases in dynamic lung compliance (Cdyn). These changes in pulmonary mechanics were not inhibited by the histamine H1-receptor antagonists, diphenhydramine or mepyramine. 2 Increases in Rp and decreases in Cdyn induced by a histamine aerosol were markedly or totally inhibited by comparable doses of these H1-antihistamines. 3 Doses of antigen which produced pathophysiological pulmonary responses failed to produce a detectable histamine release from the cardiopulmonary system in vivo. Aerosol antigen provocation, equivalent to 5 to 9 times greater than that which produced substantial pathophysiological pulmonary responses, did cause histamine release in vivo. 4 The canine cardiopulmonary system showed only a modest ability to remove and/or degrade circulating histamine. 5 It is concluded that histamine may not play a major role in mediating the acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in the ascaris-hypersensitive dog. PMID:26444

  1. Release characteristics of encapsulated formulations incorporating plant growth factors.

    PubMed

    Wybraniec, Slawomir; Schwartz, Liliana; Wiesman, Zeev; Markus, Arie; Wolf, David

    2002-05-01

    The release characteristics of encapsulated formulations containing a combination of plant growth factors (PGF)--plant hormones (IBA, paclobutrazol), nutrients (fertilizers, microelements), and fungicide (prochloraz)--were studied. The formulations were prepared by encapsulating the active ingredients in a polyethylene matrix and, in some cases, subsequently coating the product with polyurethane. Dissolution experiments were carried out with both coated and non-coated formulations to determine the sustained release patterns of the active ingredients. The PGF controlled-release systems obtained have been shown to promote development of root systems, vegetative growth, and reproductive development in cuttings, potted plants, or garden plants of various plant species. These beneficial effects are attributable to the lasting and balanced PGF availability provided by these systems. PMID:12009194

  2. [The histamine-free diet].

    PubMed

    Wantke, F; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    1993-08-01

    Food intolerance is not IgE-mediated but caused by histamine. A diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diaminoxidase is suspected to be the reason. The therapeutic efficacy of a histamine-free diet was evaluated in 100 patients with food intolerance and allergic diseases, who were required to avoid fish, cheese, hardcured sausage, pickled cabbage, wine and beer for 4 weeks. Considerable improvement was observed in 57 patients, 15 of whom had total remission. The most striking treatment results were obtained in food or wine intolerance (80% P < 0.05; treatment of choice), bronchial asthma (80%), headache (64%) and urticaria (58%). After ingestion of food rich in histamine clearcut recurrence of atopic eczema was seen in 50% of the patients affected. Histamine plays a major part in food and wine intolerance. Histamine in food causes worsening of symptoms in atopics and patients suffering from headache. The results obtained indicate a deficiency of diaminoxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. Histamine levels in alcoholic beverages should be displayed on the labels. PMID:8376104

  3. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107118

  4. Growth hormone releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in human milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1986-03-28

    The presence of immunoreactive growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) in human milk has been demonstrated. By using sequential high performance liquid chromatography, it has been shown that most of the immunoreactivity co-elutes with the synthetic, hypothalamic-like, GRF (1-40). The concentrations of GRF detected (between 152 and 432 pg GRF/ml milk) exceed several fold its values in plasma. PMID:3083812

  5. Histamine elevates the expression of Ets-1, a protooncogen in human melanoma cell lines through H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hegyesi, Hargita; Horváth, Barnabás; Pállinger, Eva; Pós, Zoltán; Molnár, Viktor; Falus, András

    2005-04-25

    Histamine is known to act, at least in part, as a growth factor for several cell types, and as production of this biogen amine has been found to accelerate the rate of tissue proliferation in wound repair, embryogenesis and malignant growth. Abundant experimental and clinical data suggest that histamine augments in vivo tumour cell proliferation via histamine H2 receptors (H2R). Here, we report that exogenously added histamine stimulates Ets-1 (v-ets erythroblastosis virus E26 oncogene homolog 1) synthesis in human melanoma cells. Involvement of histamine receptors in the histamine induced ets-1 expression has been also studied. Our data show that these newly recognized actions of histamine are mediated by the H2R. Modification of local protooncogen Ets-1 level is likely being involved in the regulation of melanoma growth. PMID:15848191

  6. Blood histamine concentrations are not elevated in humans with septic shock

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.; Kaliner, M.; Shelhamer, J.H.; Parrillo, J.E.

    1989-01-01

    Histamine has been suggested as an important mediator of the cardiovascular abnormalities during septic shock. To determine if blood histamine levels were increased during human sepsis and septic shock, plasma histamine was measured using a very sensitive radioenzyme assay employing histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) in the following patient groups: normal controls (n = 76), nonseptic critically ill (n = 12), nonseptic shock (n = 2), sepsis without shock (n = 28), and septic shock (n = 41). Using this enzyme binding assay, all these groups had similar, normal plasma histamine concentrations, except those patients with septic shock whose mean histamine measurements were significantly reduced (p less than .002). This decrease was found to be due to an artifact of the assay: plasma contained a circulating inhibitor that falsely lowered the measured histamine level. Fractionation of septic shock plasma using molecular exclusion membranes and gel filtration revealed a 5000 MW inhibitory factor. After removal of this inhibitor from plasma, septic shock plasma histamine levels were normal. Thus, septic shock patients may have a circulating inhibitor of the HNMT enzyme, but plasma histamine concentrations are normal. Histaminemia is unlikely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of septic shock in humans.

  7. Histamine-HisCl1 receptor axis regulates wake-promoting signals in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yangkyun; Jang, Donghoon; Sonn, Jun Young; Choe, Joonho

    2013-01-01

    Histamine and its two receptors, histamine-gated chloride channel subunit 1 (HisCl1) and ora transientless (Ort), are known to control photoreception and temperature sensing in Drosophila. However, histamine signaling in the context of neural circuitry for sleep-wake behaviors has not yet been examined in detail. Here, we obtained mutant flies with compromised or enhanced histamine signaling and tested their baseline sleep. Hypomorphic mutations in histidine decarboxylase (HDC), an enzyme catalyzing the conversion from histidine to histamine, caused an increase in sleep duration. Interestingly, hisCl1 mutants but not ort mutants showed long-sleep phenotypes similar to those in hdc mutants. Increased sleep duration in hisCl1 mutants was rescued by overexpressing hisCl1 in circadian pacemaker neurons expressing a neuropeptide pigment dispersing factor (PDF). Consistently, RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of hisCl1 in PDF neurons was sufficient to mimic hisCl1 mutant phenotypes, suggesting that PDF neurons are crucial for sleep regulation by the histamine-HisCl1 signaling. Finally, either hisCl1 mutation or genetic ablation of PDF neurons dampened wake-promoting effects of elevated histamine signaling via direct histamine administration. Taken together, these data clearly demonstrate that the histamine-HisCl1 receptor axis can activate and maintain the wake state in Drosophila and that wake-activating signals may travel via the PDF neurons. PMID:23844178

  8. Role of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Gastrointestinal Permeability

    PubMed Central

    Rodiño-Janeiro, Bruno K; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Pigrau, Marc; Lobo, Beatriz; Vicario, María; Santos, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The interface between the intestinal lumen and the mucosa is the location where the majority of ingested immunogenic particles face the scrutiny of the vast gastrointestinal immune system. Upon regular physiological conditions, the intestinal micro-flora and the epithelial barrier are well prepared to process daily a huge amount of food-derived antigens and non-immunogenic particles. Similarly, they are ready to prevent environmental toxins and microbial antigens to penetrate further and interact with the mucosal-associated immune system. These functions promote the development of proper immune responses and oral tolerance and prevent disease and inflammation. Brain-gut axis structures participate in the processing and execution of response signals to external and internal stimuli. The brain-gut axis integrates local and distant regulatory networks and super-systems that serve key housekeeping physiological functions including the balanced functioning of the intestinal barrier. Disturbance of the brain-gut axis may induce intestinal barrier dysfunction, increasing the risk of uncontrolled immunological reactions, which may indeed trigger transient mucosal inflammation and gut disease. There is a large body of evidence indicating that stress, through the brain-gut axis, may cause intestinal barrier dysfunction, mainly via the systemic and peripheral release of corticotropin-releasing factor. In this review, we describe the role of stress and corticotropin-releasing factor in the regulation of gastrointestinal permeability, and discuss the link to both health and pathological conditions. PMID:25537677

  9. Controlled growth factor release from synthetic extracellular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuen Yong; Peters, Martin C.; Anderson, Kenneth W.; Mooney, David J.

    2000-12-01

    Polymeric matrices can be used to grow new tissues and organs, and the delivery of growth factors from these matrices is one method to regenerate tissues. A problem with engineering tissues that exist in a mechanically dynamic environment, such as bone, muscle and blood vessels, is that most drug delivery systems have been designed to operate under static conditions. We thought that polymeric matrices, which release growth factors in response to mechanical signals, might provide a new approach to guide tissue formation in mechanically stressed environments. Critical design features for this type of system include the ability to undergo repeated deformation, and a reversible binding of the protein growth factors to polymeric matrices to allow for responses to repeated stimuli. Here we report a model delivery system that can respond to mechanical signalling and upregulate the release of a growth factor to promote blood vessel formation. This approach may find a number of applications, including regeneration and engineering of new tissues and more general drug-delivery applications.

  10. In vitro effect of histamine and histamine H1 and H2 receptor antagonists on cellular proliferation of human malignant melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, J L; Akhter, J; Morris, D L

    1996-04-01

    Histamine is an established growth factor for gastric and colorectal cancer. Contradictory data for response of melanoma to histamine have been reported. Our aims were to determine the effect of histamine and H1 and H2 receptor antagonists on cell growth and cyclic AMP production. Four human melanoma cell lines were cultured with a range of concentrations of histamine, and with the H2 receptor antagonists cimetidine, ranitidine or famotidine, or the H1 receptor antagonist diphenhydramine. Cellular proliferation was measured by the uptake of [3H]-thymidine. Cyclic AMP production was also measured to determine the receptor status of the cell lines. Histamine significantly stimulated growth in two of four cell lines, with maximal stimulation at 1 x 10(-8) M. This effect was inhibited by all four antagonists in a dose-dependent manner. Histamine [10(-7) to 10(-4) M] also induced a dose-dependent increase in cyclic AMP production in the two histamine-responsive cell lines, suggesting that these cell lines express H2 receptors. We conclude that there may be a role for histamine receptor antagonists in melanoma treatment and that further investigation is warranted. PMID:8791266

  11. Interactions of release factor RF3 with the translation machinery.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael

    2015-08-01

    The bacterial release factor RF3 is a GTPase that has been implicated in multiple, incompletely understood steps of protein synthesis. This study explores the genetic interaction of RF3 with other components of the translation machinery. RF3 contributes to translation termination by recycling the class I release factors RF1 and RF2 off post-termination ribosomes. RF3 has also been implicated in dissociation of peptidyl-tRNAs from elongating ribosomes and in a post-peptidyltransferase quality control (post-PT QC) mechanism that selectively terminates ribosomes carrying erroneous peptides. A majority of the in vivo studies on RF3 have been carried out in K-12 strains of Escherichia coli which carry a partially defective RF2 protein with an Ala to Thr substitution at position 246. Here, the contribution of the K-12 specific RF2 variant to RF3 activities has been investigated. Strain reconstruction experiments in both E. coli and Salmonella enterica demonstrate that defects in termination and post-PT QC that are associated with RF3 loss, as well as phenotypes uncovered by phenotypic profiling, are all substantially ameliorated when the incompletely active K-12-specific RF2 protein is replaced by a fully active Ala246 RF2. These results indicate that RF3 loss is well tolerated in bacteria with fully active class I release factors, but that many of the previously reported phenotypes for RF3 deletion strains have been compromised by the presence of a partially defective RF2. PMID:25636454

  12. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with a Low-histamine Diet.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bo Young; Cho, Soo Ick; Ahn, In Su; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2011-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has numerous trigger factors. The question of whether foods can aggravate AD remains open to debate. Although a number of published papers have detailed the relationship between food allergies and AD, little research has examined the question of how food intolerance affects AD. For the purposes of this study, a six-year-old Korean boy with AD was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of the possibility of food, particularly pork, as a triggering factor in his skin disease. He had a history of worsening of symptoms when eating pork. Total serum IgE concentration was 157 IU/ml. House dust was class 2.2 (1.5 IU/ml) in MAST. All other MAST items were negative. In an oral food challenge test, he showed a positive result after eating 200 g of pork, but did not show a positive result after eating 60 g of pork. After discharge, we attempted to keep him on a balanced diet that included various types of food and prohibited him from eating food that contains a high level of histamine. After keeping the patient on a balanced and low-histamine dietary regimen, his AD symptoms showed improvement and have not worsened for more than seven months. A low-histamine, balanced diet could be helpful for AD patients having symptoms that resemble histamine intolerance in which their AD symptoms worsened after intake of histamine-rich foods, but in which food allergy tests are negative. PMID:22028584

  13. Endogenous Histamine and Cortisol Levels in Subjects with Different Histamine N-Methyltransferase C314T Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Jusko, William J.; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Chen, Guo-Lin; Guo, Dong; Zhou, Gan; Spratlin, Vicky E.; Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) catalyzes the methylation of histamine and plays an important role in histamine biotransformation in bronchial epithelium. Enzymatic activity of HNMT has been shown to be regulated by genetic factors, including polymorphisms in the HNMT gene. In this pilot study we determined endogenous levels of histamine and Cortisol in plasma and whole blood samples from subjects with different genotypes for the HNMT C314T polymorphism, and investigated whether these parameters differed between individuals with the HNMT CC genotype and those with the CT genotype. Methods Blood samples were collected from 48 unrelated volunteers (36 males, 12 females), aged 21-40 years, who participated in the study. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to determine HNMTC314T genotypes. Erythrocyte HNMT activity was determined as well as plasma and whole blood levels of histamine and Cortisol. Two-group comparisons of the various parameters were analyzed by Blocked Wilcoxon test and Wilcoxon Rank Sum test as appropriate. Results Thirty-seven subjects (24 Caucasians, three African Americans, one Middle Eastern, five Indians, three Chinese, and one Filipino) were found to have the homozygous CC genotype. Ten subjects (eight Caucasians, one Middle Eastern, and one Chinese) were heterozygous and one individual (Pakistani) was homozygous for the variant 314T allele. The frequency of HNMT CT heterozygotes in the small Caucasian cohort was 0.125. Median enzyme activity was significantly lower in subjects with the heterozygous CT genotype than in those with the homozygous CC genotype (485 vs 631 U/mL of red blood cells; p = 0.023). A broad range of histamine levels in plasma and whole blood was observed for all subjects. Whereas the median plasma histamine level was found to be higher in heterozygotes for the wild-type 314C allele than homozygotes (3.32 vs 2.30 nmol/L; p = 0.021), there was no difference between the two groups in

  14. The histamine content of oriental foods.

    PubMed

    Chin, K W; Garriga, M M; Metcalfe, D D

    1989-05-01

    Several of the symptoms of scombroid poisoning (i.e. histamine toxicity) resemble those observed in people suffering from Chinese restaurant syndrome. Therefore, the histamine content of representative Chinese cuisine, which included 31 common dishes, 12 condiments and 12 basic ingredients from several sources, was measured using a sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay. A further enzymatic procedure involving diamine oxidase was used to verify that the substance measured was histamine. A total of 184 assays were performed on 57 samples in the study. High levels of histamine were found in the cheeses, which were used as positive controls (863.6 micrograms histamine/g blue cheese and 107.4 micrograms histamine/g Parmesan cheese), and in some common condiments, including tamari (2392.2 micrograms histamine/g sample) and one brand of soy sauce (220.4 micrograms histamine/g sample). The histamine content of four condiments and three common dishes was over 10 micrograms histamine/g sample, while four condiments and 16 common dishes contained less than 1 microgram histamine/g sample. Calculations involving representative amounts of food that can be consumed at a typical oriental meal suggest that, in some cases, histamine intake may approach toxic levels. The results are discussed with regard to the possible role of histamine in reactions associated with restaurant meals. PMID:2744659

  15. Activation of histamine H4 receptors decreases epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition progress by inhibiting transforming growth factor-β1 signalling pathway in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wen-Ke; Hu, Jing; Li, Teng; Meng, Jing-Ru; Ma, Xue; Yin, Sun-Jun; Zhao, Can-Hu; He, Gong-Hao; Xu, Gui-Li

    2014-04-01

    Previous investigations found that epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) was an important character of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and it was also suggested that histamine H4 receptors may have a role in preventing EMT progress in certain kind of tumours. However, the effect of H4 receptor activation on EMT progress of NSCLC and its potential mechanisms remain unclear. Therefore, we performed both in vitro and in vivo experiments to explore the effects of specific H4 receptor agonist 4-methylhistamine and antagonist JNJ7777120 on EMT progress. We showed the expression of H4 receptors in NSCLC and found that 4-methylhistamine increased the expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin and decreased the expression of Vimentin, the mesenchymal marker, in both NSCLC cell lines and xenograft NSCLC tumours. Pretreatment with JNJ7777120 or H4 receptor gene silencing decreased while overexpression of H4 receptors facilitated this effect of 4-methylhistamine. Furthermore, we showed that down-regulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) was the secondary signalling after H4 receptor activation, which in turn resulted in inactivation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) pathway and down-regulation of several important EMT inducing factors such as ZEB1, Snail and Slug. In conclusion, these findings revealed the anti-EMT effect of histamine H4 receptor activation in NSCLC, which provide novel insight into the development mechanism of NSCLC; and H4 receptors may be a new therapeutic target for NSCLC treatment. PMID:24447834

  16. Signaling mechanism underlying the histamine-modulated action of hypoglossal motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zi-Long; Wu, Xu; Luo, Yan-Jia; Wang, Lu; Qu, Wei-Min; Li, Shan-Qun; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2016-04-01

    Histamine, an important modulator of the arousal states of the central nervous system, has been reported to contribute an excitatory drive at the hypoglossal motor nucleus to the genioglossus (GG) muscle, which is involved in the pathogenesis of obstructive sleep apnea. However, the effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs) and the underlying signaling mechanisms have remained elusive. Here, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were conducted using neonatal rat brain sections, which showed that histamine excited HMNs with an inward current under voltage-clamp and a depolarization membrane potential under current-clamp via histamine H1 receptors (H1 Rs). The phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 blocked H1 Rs-mediated excitatory effects, but protein kinase A inhibitor and protein kinase C inhibitor did not, indicating that the signal transduction cascades underlying the excitatory action of histamine on HMNs were H1 R/Gq/11 /phospholipase C/inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3 ). The effects of histamine were also dependent on extracellular Na(+) and intracellular Ca(2+) , which took place via activation of Na(+) -Ca(2+) exchangers. These results identify the signaling molecules associated with the regulatory effect of histamine on HMNs. The findings of this study may provide new insights into therapeutic approaches in obstructive sleep apnea. We proposed the post-synaptic mechanisms underlying the modulation effect of histamine on hypoglossal motoneuron. Histamine activates the H1 Rs via PLC and IP3 , increases Ca(2+) releases from intracellular stores, promotes Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) efflux via the NCXs, and then produces an inward current and depolarizes the neurons. Histamine modulates the excitability of HMNs with other neuromodulators, such as noradrenaline, serotonin and orexin. We think that these findings should provide an important new direction for drug development for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. PMID:26811198

  17. Developmental roles of brain histamine.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Sundvik, Maria; Karlstedt, Kaj

    2014-03-01

    Histamine appears early during brain development, has been shown to regulate fetal and adult brain-derived stem cells in a receptor type-dependent manner, and has widespread actions on systems involved in arousal and movement. Developmental studies in both rodents and zebrafish have elucidated the spatiotemporal patterning of the histaminergic system and, in zebrafish, have revealed the mechanisms whereby histamine regulates the number of hypocretin/orexin (hcrt) neurons, which in turn may regulate the number of histaminergic cells. Recent demonstrations of increased numbers of histaminergic neurons in patients with narcolepsy highlight the importance, for our understanding of both normal and pathological brain function, of understanding these interactions. Here, we review recent research into the developmental roles of histamine and suggest key areas for future research. PMID:24486025

  18. Sugarcane transgenics expressing MYB transcription factors show improved glucose release

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Poovaiah, Charleson R.; Bewg, William P.; Lan, Wu; Ralph, John; Coleman, Heather D.

    2016-07-15

    In this study, sugarcane, a tropical C4 perennial crop, is capable of producing 30-100 tons or more of biomass per hectare annually. The lignocellulosic residue remaining after sugar extraction is currently underutilized and can provide a significant source of biomass for the production of second-generation bioethanol. As a result, MYB31 and MYB42 were cloned from maize and expressed in sugarcane with and without the UTR sequences. The cloned sequences were 98 and 99 % identical to the published nucleotide sequences. The inclusion of the UTR sequences did not affect any of the parameters tested. There was little difference in plantmore » height and the number of internodes of the MYB-overexpressing sugarcane plants when compared with controls. MYB transgene expression determined by qPCR exhibited continued expression in young and maturing internodes. MYB31 downregulated more genes within the lignin biosynthetic pathway than MYB42. MYB31 and MYB42 expression resulted in decreased lignin content in some lines. All MYB42 plants further analyzed showed significant increases in glucose release by enzymatic hydrolysis in 72 h, whereas only two MYB31 plants released more glucose than control plants. This correlated directly with a significant decrease in acid-insoluble lignin. Soluble sucrose content of the MYB42 transgenic plants did not vary compared to control plants. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the use of MYB transcription factors to improve the production of bioethanol from sugarcane bagasse remaining after sugar extraction.« less

  19. Functional characteristics of histamine receptor-bearing mononuclear cells. I. Selective production of lymphocyte chemoattractant lymphokines with histamine used as a ligand.

    PubMed

    Center, D M; Cruikshank, W W; Berman, J S; Beer, D J

    1983-10-01

    Mitogens and antigens have been the traditional ligands for activating lymphocytes in vitro for the elaboration of lymphokines. Recently, histamine, by interaction with histamine-type 2 receptors on T lymphocytes, has been found to induce the production of one lymphokine, histamine-induced suppressor factor (HSF), that inhibits lymphocyte proliferation and lymphokine production in vitro. Because the biologic effects of HSF appear to be confined to alterations in lymphocyte function, we assessed the ability of soluble products of histamine-stimulated human blood mononuclear cells to affect another lymphocyte function, motility. Utilizing a modified Boyden chamber assay to assess lymphocyte migration, we identified chemoattractant activity for human blood and rat splenic T lymphocytes in histamine-induced mononuclear cell supernatants. No neutrophil or monocyte chemoattractant activity was present. Sephadex G-100 gel filtration of histamine-induced supernatants showed the lymphotactic activity eluted with a 56,000 m.w. This activity was cationic as determined by its elution pattern from a Sephadex QAE anion exchange matrix with a single pl of 9.0 to 9.4 determined by isoelectric focusing in sucrose. Its biologic activity is predominantly chemokinetic in nature, is stable to heating at 56 degrees C for 30 min, but is sensitive to the effects of trypsin and neuraminidase. These physicochemical and functional characteristics establish it as identical to a recently described concanavalin A-induced (Con A) lymphotactic lymphokine (LCF). Mononuclear cells that did not adhere to a histamine affinity matrix were unable to produce LCF when subsequently stimulated with histamine or Con A. Mononuclear cells incubated with histamine and diphenhydramine produced LCF; the addition of cimetidine eliminated LCF production. In fact, supernatants from cells incubated with histamine and cimetidine significantly inhibited lymphocyte migration, a phenomenon explainable by the two regions

  20. Histamine receptor signaling in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2016-07-01

    Histamine modulates several aspects of energy homeostasis. By activating histamine receptors in the hypothalamus the bioamine influences thermoregulation, its circadian rhythm, energy expenditure and feeding. These actions are brought about by activation of different histamine receptors and/or the recruitment of distinct neural pathways. In this review we describe the signaling mechanisms activated by histamine in the hypothalamus, the evidence for its role in modulating energy homeostasis as well as recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and neural network mechanisms involved. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107117

  1. Factors controlling phosphorus release from sediments in coastal archipelago areas.

    PubMed

    Puttonen, Irma; Kohonen, Tuula; Mattila, Johanna

    2016-07-15

    In coastal archipelago areas of the northern Baltic Sea, significantly higher phosphate concentrations (6.0±4.5μmol/l, mean±SD) were measured in water samples close to the sediment surface compared with those from 1m above the seafloor (1.6±2.0μmol/l). The results indicated notable phosphate release from sediments under the bottom water oxygen concentrations of up to 250μmol/l, especially in areas that had experienced recent temporal fluctuation between oxic and hypoxic/anoxic conditions. No single factor alone was found to control the elevated PO4-P concentrations in the near-bottom water. In addition to the oxygen in the water, the contents of potentially mobile phosphorus fractions, grain-size, the organic content at the sediment surface, and the water depth were all important factors controlling the internal loading of phosphorus. The complexity of this process needs to be accounted for in assessments of the internal loading of phosphorus and in potential mitigation plans. PMID:27184132

  2. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF): immunocytochemical localization and radioimmunoassay (RIA). [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vigh, S.; Merchenthaler, I.; Torres-Aleman, I.; Sueiras-Diaz, J.; Coy, D.; Carter, W.H.; Petrusz, P.; Schally, A.V.

    1982-11-29

    Two fragments of the amino acid sequence corresponding to ovine corticotropin releasing factor (CRF 37-41 and CRF 22-41), as well as the full sequence of 41 residues (CRF 1-41), synthesized in our laboratories by solid-phase methods, were coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA) with glutaraldehyde. New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with the emulsified mixtures of peptide-BSA conjugates and Freund's adjuvant as immunogens. The specificity of the generated antibodies was studied by agar-gel diffusion, absorption tests in the immunohistochemical system, and with the aid of displacement curves in RIA. /sup 125/I-Tyr(35)-CRF 36-41 and /sup 125/I-Tyr(0)-CRF 1-41 were used as radioligands in the RIA. The minimum detectable dose was 20 pg. The linearity observed in RIA for immunoreactive CRF in extracts of rat hypothalami, together with the immunocytochemical findings in the rat brain, indicate the presence of substance(s) immunologically indistinguishable from CRF. Immunohistochemistry with the peroxidase-antiperoxidase (PAP) technique detected the following CRF-immunoreactive structures in vibratome sections of hypothalami of colchicine-treated rats: CRF-containing cell bodies were observed mainly in smaller neurons of the paraventricular nucleus. CRF-positive nerve fibers and/or terminals were present in the external zone of the median eminence, with some immunoreactive CRF also present in the internal zone. The CRF-positive terminals were localized in the central regions of the median eminence. Data reinforce the view that this polypeptide plays a physiological role in the control of ACTH release.

  3. Satiety factor oleoylethanolamide recruits the brain histaminergic system to inhibit food intake.

    PubMed

    Provensi, Gustavo; Coccurello, Roberto; Umehara, Hayato; Munari, Leonardo; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Galeotti, Nicoletta; Nosi, Daniele; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Moles, Anna; Blandina, Patrizio; Passani, Maria Beatrice

    2014-08-01

    Key factors driving eating behavior are hunger and satiety, which are controlled by a complex interplay of central neurotransmitter systems and peripheral stimuli. The lipid-derived messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) is released by enterocytes in response to fat intake and indirectly signals satiety to hypothalamic nuclei. Brain histamine is released during the appetitive phase to provide a high level of arousal in anticipation of feeding, and mediates satiety. However, despite the possible functional overlap of satiety signals, it is not known whether histamine participates in OEA-induced hypophagia. Using different experimental settings and diets, we report that the anorexiant effect of OEA is significantly attenuated in mice deficient in the histamine-synthesizing enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC-KO) or acutely depleted of histamine via interocerebroventricular infusion of the HDC blocker α-fluoromethylhistidine (α-FMH). α-FMH abolished OEA-induced early occurrence of satiety onset while increasing histamine release in the CNS with an H3 receptor antagonist-increased hypophagia. OEA augmented histamine release in the cortex of fasted mice within a time window compatible to its anorexic effects. OEA also increased c-Fos expression in the oxytocin neurons of the paraventricular nuclei of WT but not HDC-KO mice. The density of c-Fos immunoreactive neurons in other brain regions that receive histaminergic innervation and participate in the expression of feeding behavior was comparable in OEA-treated WT and HDC-KO mice. Our results demonstrate that OEA requires the integrity of the brain histamine system to fully exert its hypophagic effect and that the oxytocin neuron-rich nuclei are the likely hypothalamic area where brain histamine influences the central effects of OEA. PMID:25049422

  4. [Research advances in the controlled release of growth factor related to blood vessel tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Yuan, Xiaoyan; Yao, Kangde

    2006-08-01

    Growth factors play an important role in cell adhesion and proliferation as well as in tissue regeneration. By incorporating growth factors into polymer scaffolds, controlled release of them can be performed. The release mechanism is varied with the incorporation methods. In this paper, the latest advances in the controlled release of growth factors by blending, hydrogel, microsphere embedding and chemical bonding are reviewed. The potential application of ultrafine fibric embedding in growth factor delivery is described as well. PMID:17002137

  5. Effect of inhaled ozone on lung histamine in conscious guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, R.L.; Gold, W.M.

    1987-04-01

    The effect of short-term ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure on pulmonary mast cell function was examined. Guinea pigs were continuously exposed to 1.0 ppm O/sub 3/ for 2, 4, and 8 hr. O/sub 3/ exposure produced a significant decrease in lung histamine concentration. Two-hour exposure to O/sub 3/ caused a 22.4 +/- 7.0% decrease in lung histamine concentration compared with controls. Ozone exposures of 4 and 8 hr caused lung histamine concentrations to decrease by 43.7 +/- 7.7 and 49.0 +/- 7.5%, respectively, without significant changes in lung water or protein, or evidence of cytotoxicity. These results suggest that O/sub 3/ or its metabolites affect pulmonary mast cell function by stimulating the release of histamine from the lung.

  6. The effect of indomethacin on the kinetics of histamine, 48/80 and antigen wealing.

    PubMed Central

    Humphreys, F; Shuster, S

    1990-01-01

    1. The kinetics of weal formation and disappearance following intradermal injection of histamine, compound 48/80 and antigen were measured in indomethacin and inert geltreated human forearm skin. 2. Rates of formation went in descending order for histamine, 48/80 and antigen; rate constants of disappearance for equal sized weals were the same for histamine and 48/80 but were much less for antigen. The corresponding half-lives were 77, 73 and 160 min for histamine, 48/80 and antigen weal disappearance respectively. 3. Cyclo-oxygenase inhibition by topical indomethacin had no effect either on the immediate weal and flare responses or on the rates of formation and disappearance of the weals. 4. These findings together with previous studies using H1-receptor antagonists indicate that 48/80 acts by histamine release but that antigen releases both histamine and an additional material or materials which are not related to cyclo-oxygenase activity. 5. Exacerbation of chronic idiopathic urticaria by cyclo-oxygenase inhibitors is therefore likely to be part of the urticarial disease process. PMID:2106336

  7. Distribution of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors in primate brain

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.A.; Jacobowitz, D.M.; Hauger, R.L.; Catt, K.J.; Aguilera, G.

    1986-03-01

    The distribution and properties of receptors for corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) were analyzed in the brain of cynomolgus monkeys. Binding of (/sup 125/I)tyrosine-labeled ovine CRF to frontal cortex and amygdala membrane-rich fractions was saturable, specific, and time- and temperature-dependent, reaching equilibrium in 30 min at 23/sup 0/C. Scatchard analysis of the binding data indicated one class of high-affinity sites with a K/sub d/ of 1 nM and a concentration of 125 fmol/mg. As in the rat pituitary and brain, CRF receptors in monkey cerebral cortex and amygdala were coupled to adenylate cyclase. Autoradiographic analysis of specific CRF binding in brain sections revealed that the receptors were widely distributed in the cerebral cortex and limbic system. Receptor density was highest in the pars tuberalis of the pituitary and throughout the cerebral cortex, specifically in the prefrontal, frontal, orbital, cingulate, insular, and temporal areas, and in the cerebellar cortex. A low binding density was present in the superior colliculus, locus coeruleus, substantia gelatinosa, preoptic area, septal area, and bed nucleus of the stria terminalis. These data demonstrate that receptors for CRF are present within the primate brain at areas related to the central control of visceral function and behavior, suggesting that brain CRF may serve as a neurotransmitter in the coordination of endocrine and neural mechanisms involved in the response to stress.

  8. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H.; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  9. Electrospinning Growth Factor Releasing Microspheres into Fibrous Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Tonya J.; Sundararaghavan, Harini G.

    2014-01-01

    This procedure describes a method to fabricate a multifaceted substrate to direct nerve cell growth. This system incorporates mechanical, topographical, adhesive and chemical signals. Mechanical properties are controlled by the type of material used to fabricate the electrospun fibers. In this protocol we use 30% methacrylated Hyaluronic Acid (HA), which has a tensile modulus of ~500 Pa, to produce a soft fibrous scaffold. Electrospinning on to a rotating mandrel produces aligned fibers to create a topographical cue. Adhesion is achieved by coating the scaffold with fibronectin. The primary challenge addressed herein is providing a chemical signal throughout the depth of the scaffold for extended periods. This procedure describes fabricating poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microspheres that contain Nerve Growth Factor (NGF) and directly impregnating the scaffold with these microspheres during the electrospinning process. Due to the harsh production environment, including high sheer forces and electrical charges, protein viability is measured after production. The system provides protein release for over 60 days and has been shown to promote primary nerve cell growth. PMID:25178038

  10. Conformational thermostabilisation of corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1.

    PubMed

    Kean, James; Bortolato, Andrea; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Marshall, Fiona H; Jazayeri, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Recent technical advances have greatly facilitated G-protein coupled receptors crystallography as evidenced by the number of successful x-ray structures that have been reported recently. These technical advances include novel detergents, specialised crystallography techniques as well as protein engineering solutions such as fusions and conformational thermostabilisation. Using conformational thermostabilisation, it is possible to generate variants of GPCRs that exhibit significantly increased stability in detergent micelles whilst preferentially occupying a single conformation. In this paper we describe for the first time the application of this technique to a member of a class B GPCR, the corticotropin releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF1R). Mutational screening in the presence of the inverse agonist, CP-376395, resulted in the identification of a construct with twelve point mutations that exhibited significantly increased thermal stability in a range of detergents. We further describe the subsequent construct engineering steps that eventually yielded a crystallisation-ready construct which recently led to the solution of the first x-ray structure of a class B receptor. Finally, we have used molecular dynamic simulation to provide structural insight into CRF1R instability as well as the stabilising effects of the mutants, which may be extended to other class B receptors considering the high degree of structural conservation. PMID:26159865

  11. Effects of multivalent histamine supported on gold nanoparticles: activation of histamine receptors by derivatized histamine at subnanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gasiorek, Friederike; Pouokam, Ervice; Diener, Martin; Schlecht, Sabine; Wickleder, Mathias S

    2015-10-21

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles with a functionalized ligand shell were synthesized and used as new histamine receptor agonists. Mercaptoundecanoic acid moieties were attached to the surface of the nanoparticles and derivatized with native histamine. The multivalent presentation of the immobilized ligands carried by the gold nanoparticles resulted in extremely low activation concentrations for histamine receptors on rat colonic epithelium. As a functional read-out system, chloride secretion resulting from stimulation of neuronal and epithelial histamine H1 and H2 receptors was measured in Ussing chamber experiments. These responses were strictly attributed to the histamine entities as histamine-free particles Au-MUDOLS or the monovalent ligand AcS-MUDA-HA proved to be ineffective. The vitality of the tissues used was not impaired by the nanoparticles. PMID:26289108

  12. Pharmacological Evidence that Histamine H3 Receptors Mediate Histamine-Induced Inhibition of the Vagal Bradycardic Out-flow in Pithed Rats.

    PubMed

    García, Mónica; García-Pedraza, José Ángel; Villalón, Carlos M; Morán, Asunción

    2016-02-01

    In vivo stimulation of cardiac vagal neurons induces bradycardia by acetylcholine (ACh) release. As vagal release of ACh may be modulated by autoreceptors (muscarinic M2 ) and heteroreceptors (including serotonin 5-HT1 ), this study has analysed the pharmacological profile of the receptors involved in histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats. For this purpose, 180 male Wistar rats were pithed, artificially ventilated and pre-treated (i.v.) with 1 mg/kg atenolol, followed by i.v. administration of physiological saline (1 ml/kg), histamine (10, 50, 100 and 200 μg/kg) or the selective histamine H1 (2-pyridylethylamine), H2 (dimaprit), H3 (methimepip) and H4 (VUF 8430) receptor agonists (1, 10, 50 and 100 μg/kg each). Under these conditions, electrical stimulation (3, 6 and 9 Hz; 15 ± 3 V and 1 ms) of the vagus nerve resulted in frequency-dependent bradycardic responses, which were (i) unchanged during the infusions of saline, 2-pyridylethylamine, dimaprit or VUF 8430; and (ii) dose-dependently inhibited by histamine or methimepip. Moreover, the inhibition of the bradycardia caused by 50 μg/kg of either histamine or methimepip (which failed to inhibit the bradycardic responses to i.v. bolus injections of acetylcholine; 1-10 μg/kg) was abolished by the H3 receptor antagonist JNJ 10181457 (1 mg/kg, i.v.). In conclusion, our results suggest that histamine-induced inhibition of the vagal bradycardic out-flow in pithed rats is mainly mediated by pre-junctional activation of histamine H3 receptors, as previously demonstrated for the vasopressor sympathetic out-flow and the vasodepressor sensory CGRPergic (calcitonin gene-related peptide) out-flow. PMID:26301462

  13. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  14. Stress-Derived Corticotropin Releasing Factor Breaches Epithelial Endotoxin Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yong; Geng, Xiao-Rui; Yang, Gui; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Zheng, Peng-Yuan; Yang, Ping-Chang

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Loss of the endotoxin tolerance of intestinal epithelium contributes to a number of intestinal diseases. The etiology is not clear. Psychological stress is proposed to compromise the intestinal barrier function. The present study aims to elucidate the role of the stress-derived corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in breaching the established intestinal epithelial endotoxin tolerance. Methods Epithelial cells of HT-29, T84 and MDCK were exposed to lipopolysaccharide to induce the endotoxin tolerance; the cells were then stimulated with CRF. The epithelial barrier function was determined using as indicators of the endotoxin tolerant status. A water-avoid stress mouse model was employed to test the role of CRF in breaching the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestine. Results The established endotoxin tolerance in the epithelial cell monolayers was broken down by a sequent exposure to CRF and LPS manifesting a marked drop of the transepithelial resistance (TER) and an increase in the permeability to a macromolecular tracer, horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The exposure to CRF also increased the expression of Cldn2 in the epithelial cells, which could be mimicked by over expression of TLR4 in epithelial cells. Over expression of Cldn2 resulted in low TER in epithelial monolayers and high permeability to HRP. After treating mice with the 10-day chronic stress, the intestinal epithelial barrier function was markedly compromised, which could be prevented by blocking either CRF, or TLR4, or Cldn2. Conclusions Psychological stress-derived CRF can breach the established endotoxin tolerance in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:23840363

  15. Involvement of histamine in endothelium-dependent relaxation of mesenteric lymphatic vessels

    PubMed Central

    Nizamutdinova, Irina Tsoy; Maejima, Daisuke; Nagai, Takashi; Bridenbaugh, Eric; Thangaswamy, Sangeetha; Chatterjee, Victor; Meininger, Cynthia J.; Gashev, Anatoliy A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The knowledge of the basic principles of lymphatic function, still remains, to a large degree, rudimentary and will require significant research efforts. Recent studies of the physiology of the mesenteric lymphatic vessels (MLVs) suggested the presence of an endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) other than nitric oxide. In this study we tested the hypothesis that lymphatic endothelium-derived histamine relaxes MLVs. Methods We measured and analyzed parameters of lymphatic contractility in isolated and pressurized rat mesenteric lymphatic vessels under control conditions and after pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide by Nω-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME, 100 μM) or/and histamine production by α-methyl-DL-histidine dihydrochloride (α-MHD, 10 μM). Effectiveness of α-MHD was confirmed immunohistochemically. We also used immunohistochemical labeling and western blot analysis of the histamine-producing enzyme, histidine decarboxylase (HDC). Additionally we blocked HDC protein expression in MLVs by transient transfection with vivo-morpholino oligos. Results We found that only combined pharmacological blockade of nitric oxide and histamine production completely eliminates flow-dependent relaxation of lymphatic vessels, thus confirming a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. We also confirmed the presence of histidine decarboxylase and histamine inside lymphatic endothelial cells. Conclusions Our study supports a role for histamine as an EDRF in MLVs. PMID:24750494

  16. Histamine Modulates Sweating and Affects Clinical Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aya; Tani, Saki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Many factors such as food or environmental allergens, bacteria, fungi, and mental stress aggravate the condition of atopic dermatitis (AD) eczema. Sweating can also exacerbate AD, and patients are aware of that. In the past, it has been reported that contamination of skin surface antigens by sweat induces acute allergic reactions and that sweating functions of AD patients via axonal reflexes are decreased. Histamine demonstrably inhibits acetylcholine-induced sweating in both mice and humans via histamine H1 receptor-mediated signaling. In sweat glands, acetylcholine inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a kinase involved in endocytosis and secretion, whereas simultaneous stimulation with histamine activates GSK3β and inhibits sweat secretion. Thus, histamine might be involved in the mechanism of abnormal skin dryness in patients with AD via decreasing sweat secretion. On another front, some patients secrete sweat normally. Patients with regular sweating are prone to develop skin disorders such as papules or erythema by residual sweat left on the skin surface. Patients with decreased sweating are prone to develop disorders characterized by xerosis, lichenoid changes, prurigo by elevated skin temperature, skin dryness, and compromised skin conditions. Careful inspection of skin manifestations provides a good indication of a patient's ability to sweat. PMID:27584962

  17. Regulation of renin release by local and systemic factors.

    PubMed

    Schweda, F; Kurtz, A

    2011-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is critically involved in the regulation of the salt and volume status of the body and blood pressure. The activity of the RAS is controlled by the protease renin, which is released from the renal juxtaglomerular epithelioid cells into the circulation. Renin release is regulated in negative feedback-loops by blood pressure, salt intake, and angiotensin II. Moreover, sympathetic nerves and renal autacoids such as prostaglandins and nitric oxide stimulate renin secretion. Despite numerous studies there remained substantial gaps in the understanding of the control of renin release at the organ or cellular level. Some of these gaps have been closed in the last years by means of gene-targeted mice and advanced imaging and electrophysiological methods. In our review, we discuss these recent advances together with the relevant previous literature on the regulation of renin release. PMID:22128405

  18. Histamine Recycling Is Mediated by CarT, a Carcinine Transporter in Drosophila Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ying; An, Futing; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Borycz, Janusz; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is an important chemical messenger that regulates multiple physiological processes in both vertebrate and invertebrate animals. Even so, how glial cells and neurons recycle histamine remains to be elucidated. Drosophila photoreceptor neurons use histamine as a neurotransmitter, and the released histamine is recycled through neighboring glia, where it is conjugated to β-alanine to form carcinine. However, how carcinine is then returned to the photoreceptor remains unclear. In an mRNA-seq screen for photoreceptor cell-enriched transporters, we identified CG9317, an SLC22 transporter family protein, and named it CarT (Carcinine Transporter). S2 cells that express CarT are able to take up carcinine in vitro. In the compound eye, CarT is exclusively localized to photoreceptor terminals. Null mutations of cart alter the content of histamine and its metabolites. Moreover, null cart mutants are defective in photoreceptor synaptic transmission and lack phototaxis. These findings reveal that CarT is required for histamine recycling at histaminergic photoreceptors and provide evidence for a CarT-dependent neurotransmitter trafficking pathway between glial cells and photoreceptor terminals. PMID:26713872

  19. Involvement of the dorsal hippocampal dopamine D2 receptors in histamine-induced anxiogenic-like effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Piri, Morteza; Ayazi, Elham; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza

    2013-08-29

    Anxiety-related behaviors increase histamine and dopamine release in the brain. On the other hand, central histamine counteracts reward and reinforcement processes mediated by the mesolimbic dopamine system. We investigated the effects of the histaminergic system and dopamine D2 receptors agents and their interactions on anxiety-related behaviors using the elevated plus-maze (EPM). The intra-hippocampal (Intra-CA1) microinjection of histamine (10 μg/mouse) decreased the percentage of open arm time (%OAT) and open arm entries (%OAE) but not the locomotor activity, indicating an anxiogenic-like response. Quinpirole (0.5 and 2 μg/mouse) or sulpiride (0.3 and 1 μg/mouse) when injected into the dorsal hippocampus also induced anxiety-like behavior, however, the drugs reversed the anxiogenic response induced by the effective dose of histamine (10 μg/mouse). Taken together and under the present experimental design, our results indicate that activation of the dorsal hippocampal histaminergic receptors causes anxiety-like behaviors altered by dopamine D2 receptor agonist and antagonist. Histamine can decrease dopaminergic tone in the dorsal hippocampus through decreasing the endogenous dopamine release, whereas quinpirole does the same via the postsynaptic DA receptors' activation. Sulpiride however renders the same effect through autoreceptors' blockade and potentiated dopamine transmission. Thus, quinpirole and sulpiride seem to compensate the effects of the intra-CA1 injection of exogenous histamine, and tend to exert anxiolytic effects in the presence of histamine. PMID:23872092

  20. Lipoprotein Release by Bacteria: Potential Factor in Bacterial Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Niesel, David W.; Peterson, Johnny W.; Klimpel, Gary R.

    1998-01-01

    Lipoprotein (LP) is a major component of the outer membrane of bacteria in the family Enterobacteriaceae. LP induces proinflammatory cytokine production in macrophages and lethal shock in LPS-responsive and -nonresponsive mice. In this study, the release of LP from growing bacteria was investigated by immuno-dot blot analysis. An immuno-dot blot assay that could detect LP at levels as low as 100 ng/ml was developed. By using this assay, significant levels of LP were detected in culture supernatants of growing Escherichia coli cells. During mid-logarithmic growth, approximately 1 to 1.5 μg of LP per ml was detected in culture supernatants from E. coli. In contrast, these culture supernatants contained 5 to 6 μg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). LP release was not unique to E. coli. Salmonella typhimurium, Yersinia enterocolitica, and two pathogenic E. coli strains also released LP during in vitro growth. Treatment of bacteria with the antibiotic ceftazidime significantly enhanced LP release. Culture supernatants from 5-h cultures of E. coli were shown to induce in vitro production of interleukin-6 (IL-6) by macrophages obtained from LPS-nonresponsive C3H/HeJ mice. In contrast, culture supernatants from an E. coli LP-deletion mutant were significantly less efficient at inducing IL-6 production in C3H/HeJ macrophages. These results suggest, for the first time, that LP is released from growing bacteria and that this released LP may play an important role in the induction of cytokine production and pathologic changes associated with gram-negative bacterial infections. PMID:9784522

  1. The Presence of Histamine and a Histamine Receptor in the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jarreau; LaFleur, Kisha; Mantone, Daniel; Boisette, Beatrix; Harris, Ave; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, a biogenic amine, is a neurotransmitter in neurons and sensory receptors in invertebrates. Histamine has rarely been reported in bivalves. We used HPLC with pre-column derivatization using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) as a fluorescent labeling agent to measure histamine in ganglia, and peripheral tissues of the oyster Crassostrea virginica. We also used Western Blot technique to look for the presence of a histamine receptor in the mantle rim. HPLC results found histamine present in ng amounts in both the cerebral and visceral ganglia, as well as the mantle rim and other peripheral tissues of C. virginica. The study confirms and quantifies histamine as an endogenous biogenic amine in C. virginica in the nervous system and innervated organs. Western Blot technique also identified a histamine H2-like receptor present in sensory tissue of the oyster's mantle rim. PMID:26120600

  2. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  3. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  4. 21 CFR 522.1083 - Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria toxoid conjugate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria... HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor analog-diphtheria...

  5. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  6. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  7. Diets High in Heat-Treated Soybean Meal Reduce the Histamine-Induced Epithelial Response in the Colon of Weaned Piglets and Increase Epithelial Catabolism of Histamine

    PubMed Central

    Kröger, Susan; Pieper, Robert; Schwelberger, Hubert G.; Wang, Jing; Villodre Tudela, Carmen; Aschenbach, Jörg R.; Van Kessel, Andrew G.; Zentek, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We examined the influence of dietary fermentable protein (fCP) and fermentable carbohydrates (fCHO) on the colonic epithelial response to histamine in pigs. Thirty-two weaned piglets were fed 4 diets in a 2 × 2 factorial design with low fCP/low fCHO, low fCP/high fCHO, high fCP/low fCHO and high fCP/high fCHO. After 21-23 days, the pigs were killed and tissue from the proximal colon was stimulated with carbachol, histamine, PGE2 or sodium hydrogen sulphide in Ussing chambers. Changes in short-circuit current and tissue conductance were measured. Diamine oxidase, histamine N-methyltransferase, stem cell growth factor receptor, Fc-epsilon receptor I and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene expression was determined. Activities of diamine oxidase and histamine N-methyltransferase and numbers of colonic mast cells were measured. The change in the short-circuit current in response to histamine was lower (P = 0.002) and tended to be lower for PGE2 (P = 0.053) in high fCP groups compared to low fCP groups, irrespective of fCHO. Additionally, the change in tissue conductance after the application of histamine was lower (P = 0.005) in the high fCP groups. The expression of histamine N-methyltransferase mRNA (P = 0.033) and the activities of diamine oxidase (P = 0.001) and histamine N-methyltransferase (P = 0.006) were higher with high fCP in comparison with low fCP. The expression of mast cell markers, stem cell growth factor receptor (P = 0.005) and Fc-epsilon receptor I (P = 0.049) was higher with high fCP diets compared to diets low in fCP, whereas the mast cell count did not differ between groups. The expression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator was reduced (P = 0.001) with high fCP diets compared to low fCP diets. The lower epithelial response to histamine and PGE2 and elevated epithelial histamine inactivation suggests an adaptation to high fCP diets. PMID:24260435

  8. Growth-Factor Nanocapsules That Enable Tunable Controlled Release for Bone Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Tian, Haijun; Du, Juanjuan; Wen, Jing; Liu, Yang; Montgomery, Scott R; Scott, Trevor P; Aghdasi, Bayan; Xiong, Chengjie; Suzuki, Akinobu; Hayashi, Tetsuo; Ruangchainikom, Monchai; Phan, Kevin; Weintraub, Gil; Raed, Alobaidaan; Murray, Samuel S; Daubs, Michael D; Yang, Xianjin; Yuan, Xu-Bo; Wang, Jeffrey C; Lu, Yunfeng

    2016-08-23

    Growth factors are of great potential in regenerative medicine. However, their clinical applications are largely limited by the short in vivo half-lives and the narrow therapeutic window. Thus, a robust controlled release system remains an unmet medical need for growth-factor-based therapies. In this research, a nanoscale controlled release system (degradable protein nanocapsule) is established via in situ polymerization on growth factor. The release rate can be finely tuned by engineering the surface polymer composition. Improved therapeutic outcomes can be achieved with growth factor nanocapsules, as illustrated in spinal cord fusion mediated by bone morphogenetic protein-2 nanocapsules. PMID:27227573

  9. Anti-histaminic potential of fractions from Hedranthera barteri [(Hook F.) Pichon] root in laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Onasanwo, S A; Singh, G D; Olaleye, S B; Singh, S; Johri, R K

    2010-01-01

    Hedranthera barteri, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-nociceptive activity, anti-histaminic activityL. (HB) is used in the treatment of painful conditions and oedema amongst its folkloric use. The hexane and ethyl acetate fractions of the root of H. barteri were investigated for anti-nociceptive and antiinflammatory properties and probable mechanism of action. Hot plate, tail flick, formalin-induced oedema and acetic acidinduced writhing tests were employed to investigate the anti-nociceptive activity while the anti-inflammatory activity was investigated using carrageenan-induced paw oedema. Anti-histaminic potential of HB root extracts on the rat peritoneal mast cells (RPMCs) was explored through pectrofluorometric method. The root was screened for its phytochemical components. The HB root contains alkaloids,cardenolides and saponins. HXHBR exhibited higher anti-inflammatory potentials (P <0.001). HXHBR dose-dependently (P <0.01) reduced the histamine release from the rat peritoneal mast cells which is comparable with a standard anti-histaminic drug, ketotifen. These results showed that EAHBR and HXHBR possess anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities, and suggested its mechanism of action through the inhibition of histamine, an inflammatory mediator, usually released during the early phase of allergic responses and chronic phase of inflammatory pain. Flavonoids, alkaloids and/or saponins present in HB root may be responsible for its anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:22314901

  10. Methods for preclinical assessment of antipruritic agents and itch mechanisms independent of mast-cell histamine.

    PubMed

    Kuraishi, Yasushi

    2015-01-01

    Itch is a sensation that provokes a desire to scratch. Mast-cell histamine was thought to be a key itch mediator. However, histamine and mast-cell degranulation were reported not to elicit scratching in animals. It was difficult to investigate the pathophysiology of itching and to evaluate the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents in the early 1990 s. We showed that hind-paw scratching and biting were elicited by stimulation with pruritogenic agents in mice. Those results demonstrated for the first time that cutaneous itching could be evaluated behaviorally in animals. We established various animal models of pathological itch of the skin (dry skin, mosquito allergy, surfactant-induced pruritus, and herpes zoster) and mucus membranes (pollen allergy). Mast-cell histamine did not play a key role in itching in any animal model examined except for the pollen allergy model. Histamine is not an exclusive itch mediator of mast cells; tryptase and leukotriene B4 released from mast cells also act as itch mediators. Epidermal keratinocytes release several itch mediators, such as leukotriene B4, sphingosylphosphorylcholine, thromboxane A2, nociceptin, nitric oxide, and histamine, which may play important roles in pathological itching. Appropriate animal models of pathological itching are needed for pharmacological evaluation of the antipruritic efficacy of chemical agents. PMID:25947907

  11. Research Advances in Tissue Engineering Materials for Sustained Release of Growth Factors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hai-yang; Wu, Jiang; Zhu, Jing-jing; Xiao, Ze-cong; He, Chao-chao; Shi, Hong-xue; Li, Xiao-kun; Yang, Shu-lin; Xiao, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Growth factors are a class of cytokines that stimulate cell growth and are widely used in clinical practice, such as wound healing, revascularization, bone repair, and nervous system disease. However, free growth factors have a short half-life and are instable in vivo. Therefore, the search of excellent carriers to enhance sustained release of growth factors in vivo has become an area of intense research interest. The development of controlled-release systems that protect the recombinant growth factors from enzymatic degradation and provide sustained delivery at the injury site during healing should enhance the growth factor's application in tissue regeneration. Thus, this study reviews current research on commonly used carriers for sustained release of growth factors and their sustained release effects for preservation of their bioactivity and their accomplishment in tissue engineering approaches. PMID:26347885

  12. A mixture of anatase and rutile TiO2 nanoparticles induces histamine secretion in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histamine released from mast cells, through complex interactions involving the binding of IgE to FcεRI receptors and the subsequent intracellular Ca2+ signaling, can mediate many allergic/inflammatory responses. The possibility of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs), a nanomaterial pervasively used in nanotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, to directly induce histamine secretion without prior allergen sensitization has remained uncertain. Results TiO2 NP exposure increased both histamine secretion and cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]C) in a dose dependent manner in rat RBL-2H3 mast cells. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ levels resulted primarily from an extracellular Ca2+ influx via membrane L-type Ca2+ channels. Unspecific Ca2+ entry via TiO2 NP-instigated membrane disruption was demonstrated with the intracellular leakage of a fluorescent calcein dye. Oxidative stress induced by TiO2 NPs also contributed to cytosolic Ca2+ signaling. The PLC-IP3-IP3 receptor pathways and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) were responsible for the sustained elevation of [Ca2+]C and histamine secretion. Conclusion Our data suggests that systemic circulation of NPs may prompt histamine release at different locales causing abnormal inflammatory diseases. This study provides a novel mechanistic link between environmental TiO2 NP exposure and allergen-independent histamine release that can exacerbate manifestations of multiple allergic responses. PMID:22260553

  13. Histamine intolerance-like symptoms in healthy volunteers after oral provocation with liquid histamine.

    PubMed

    Wöhrl, Stefan; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Focke, Margarete; Rappersberger, Klemens; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2004-01-01

    Histamine in food at non-toxic doses has been proposed to be a major cause of food intolerance causing symptoms like diarrhea, hypotension, headache, pruritus and flush ("histamine intolerance"). Histamine-rich foods such as cheese, sausages, sauerkraut, tuna, tomatoes, and alcoholic beverages may contain histamine up to 500 mg/kg. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 10 healthy females (age range 22-36 years, mean 29.1 +/- 5.4) who were hospitalized and challenged on two consecutive days with placebo (peppermint tea) or 75 mg of pure histamine (equaling 124 mg histamine dihydrochloride, dissolved in peppermint tea). Objective parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, peak flow) as well as a total clinical symptom score using a standardized protocol were recorded at baseline, 10, 20, 40, 80 minutes, and 24 hours. The subjects received a histamine-free diet also low in allergen 24 hours before hospitalization and over the whole observation period. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 10, 20, 40, and 80 minutes, and histamine and the histamine-degrading enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO) were determined. After histamine challenge, 5 of 10 subjects showed no reaction. One individual experienced tachycardia, mild hypotension after 20 minutes, sneezing, itching of the nose, and rhinorrhea after 60 minutes. Four subjects experienced delayed symptoms like diarrhea (4x), flatulence (3x), headache (3x), pruritus (2x) and ocular symptoms (1x) starting 3 to 24 hours after provocation. No subject reacted to placebo. No changes were observed in histamine and DAO levels within the first 80 minutes in non-reactors as well as reactors. There was no difference in challenge with histamine versus challenge with placebo. We conclude that 75 mg of pure liquid oral histamine--a dose found in normal meals--can provoke immediate as well as delayed symptoms in 50% of healthy females without a history of food intolerance. PMID:15603203

  14. Histamine influences body temperature by acting at H1 and H3 receptors on distinct populations of preoptic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Ghochani, Yasmin; Klaus, Joseph; Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2010-01-01

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus (PO/AH), a region that contains neurons that control thermoregulation, is the main locus at which histamine affects body temperature. Here we report that histamine reduced the spontaneous firing rate of GABAergic preoptic neurons by activating H3 subtype histamine receptors. This effect involved a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and was not dependent on synaptic activity. Furthermore, a population of nonGABAergic neurons was depolarized and their firing rate was enhanced by histamine acting at H1 subtype receptors. In our experiments, activation of the H1R receptors was linked to the PLC pathway and Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This depolarization persisted in TTX or when fast synaptic potentials were blocked indicating that it represents a postsynaptic effect. Single-cell reverse transcription –PCR analysis revealed expression of H3 receptors in a population of GABAergic neurons while H1 receptors were expressed in nonGABAergic cells. Histamine applied in the median preoptic nucleus induced a robust, long lasting hyperthermia effect that was mimicked by either H1 or H3 histamine receptor subtype specific agonists. Our data indicate that histamine modulates the core body temperature by acting at two distinct populations of preoptic neurons which express H1 and H3 receptor subtypes, respectively. PMID:20335473

  15. Histamine influences body temperature by acting at H1 and H3 receptors on distinct populations of preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Lundius, Ebba Gregorsson; Sanchez-Alavez, Manuel; Ghochani, Yasmin; Klaus, Joseph; Tabarean, Iustin V

    2010-03-24

    The preoptic area/anterior hypothalamus, a region that contains neurons that control thermoregulation, is the main locus at which histamine affects body temperature. Here we report that histamine reduced the spontaneous firing rate of GABAergic preoptic neurons by activating H3 subtype histamine receptors. This effect involved a decrease in the level of phosphorylation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase and was not dependent on synaptic activity. Furthermore, a population of non-GABAergic neurons was depolarized, and their firing rate was enhanced by histamine acting at H1 subtype receptors. In our experiments, activation of the H1R receptors was linked to the PLC pathway and Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores. This depolarization persisted in TTX or when fast synaptic potentials were blocked, indicating that it represents a postsynaptic effect. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of H3 receptors in a population of GABAergic neurons, while H1 receptors were expressed in non-GABAergic cells. Histamine applied in the median preoptic nucleus induced a robust, long-lasting hyperthermia effect that was mimicked by either H1 or H3 histamine receptor subtype-specific agonists. Our data indicate that histamine modulates the core body temperature by acting at two distinct populations of preoptic neurons that express H1 and H3 receptor subtypes, respectively. PMID:20335473

  16. The release of a non-prostanoid inhibitory factor from rabbit bronchus detected by co-axial bioassay.

    PubMed Central

    Spina, D.; Page, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    1. Methacholine relaxed phenylephrine-contracted aorta of the rat with the endothelium intact. This effect was inhibited by haemoglobin, methylene blue, gossypol, phenidone and L-NG-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME). Rat aorta denuded of endothelium failed to relax in response to methacholine, histamine and the peptidoleukotrienes C4, D4 and E4. 2. Methacholine and histamine but not leukotrienes C4, D4 and E4 relaxed phenylephrine-contracted rat aorta without endothelium when surrounded by rabbit epithelium-intact bronchus. The muscarinic antagonist atropine antagonized the methacholine-induced relaxation. 3. Removal of the epithelium either mechanically or chemically, abolished methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. These data indicate that the epithelium is responsible for the observed relaxant effect to methacholine and histamine. 4. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin, the phospholipase A2 inhibitor, mepacrine and the lipoxygenase inhibitor, nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), failed to inhibit methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. This indicates that the epithelium-derived inhibitory factor (EpDIF) is not a product of the cyclo-oxygenase or lipoxygenase pathway or a product derived from activation of phospholipase A2. 5. Haemoglobin, methylene blue, phenidone, gossypol and L-NAME failed to inhibit the relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay. These results demonstrate that EpDIF detected in the co-axial bioassay is not endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) or nitric oxide. Similarly, catalase was without effect. 6. EpDIF is unlikely to be a peptide since papain and alpha-chymotrypsin failed to alter the methacholine-induced relaxation of rat aorta in the co-axial bioassay.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 3 PMID:1855118

  17. Sequence comparison of new prokaryotic and mitochondrial members of the polypeptide chain release factor family predicts a five-domain model for release factor structure.

    PubMed Central

    Pel, H J; Rep, M; Grivell, L A

    1992-01-01

    We have recently reported the cloning and sequencing of the gene for the mitochondrial release factor mRF-1. mRF-1 displays high sequence similarity to the bacterial release factors RF-1 and RF-2. A database search for proteins resembling these three factors revealed high similarities to two amino acid sequences deduced from unassigned genomic reading frames in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The amino acid sequence derived from the Bacillus reading frame is 47% identical to E.coli and Salmonella typhimurium RF-2, strongly suggesting that it represents B.subtilis RF-2. Our comparison suggests that the expression of the B.subtilis gene is, like that of the E.coli and S. typhimurium RF-2 genes, autoregulated by a stop codon dependent +1 frameshift. A comparison of prokaryotic and mitochondrial release factor sequences, including the putative B.subtilis RF-2, leads us to propose a five-domain model for release factor structure. Possible functions of the various domains are discussed. PMID:1408743

  18. Growth factor delivery: How surface interactions modulate release in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    King, William J.; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial scaffolds have been extensively used to deliver growth factors to induce new bone formation. The pharmacokinetics of growth factor delivery has been a critical regulator of their clinical success. This review will focus on the surface interactions that control the non-covalent incorporation of growth factors into scaffolds and the mechanisms that control growth factor release from clinically relevant biomaterials. We will focus on the delivery of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 from materials currently used in the clinical practice, but also suggest how general mechanisms that control growth factor incorporation and release delineated with this growth factor could extend to other systems. A better understanding of the changing mechanisms that control growth factor release during the different stages of preclinical development could instruct the development of future scaffolds for currently untreatable injuries and diseases. PMID:22433783

  19. FACTORS RELATING TO THE RELEASE OF STACHYBOTRYS CHARTARUM SPORES FROM CONTAMINATED SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes preliminary results of a research project to determine the factors that control the release of S. chartarum spores from a contaminated source and test ways to reduce spore release and thus exposure. As anticipated, S. chartarum spore emissions from gypsum boar...

  20. Histamine induces Toll-like receptor 2 and 4 expression in endothelial cells and enhances sensitivity to Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell wall components

    PubMed Central

    Talreja, Jaya; Kabir, Mohammad H; Filla, Michael B; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2004-01-01

    Histamine is a major inflammatory molecule released from the mast cell, and is known to activate endothelial cells. However, its ability to modulate endothelial responses to bacterial products has not been evaluated. In this study we determined the ability of histamine to modulate inflammatory responses of endothelial cells to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cell wall components and assessed the role of Toll-like receptors (TLR) 2 and 4 in the co-operation between histamine and bacterial pathogens. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), lipoteichoic acid (LTA), or peptidoglycan (PGN) in the presence or absence of histamine, and the expression and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6), and NF-κB translocation were determined. The effect of histamine on the expression of mRNA and proteins for TLR2 and TLR4 was also evaluated. Incubation of HUVEC with LPS, LTA and PGN resulted in marked enhancement of IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 secretion. Histamine alone markedly enhanced IL-6 mRNA expression in HUVEC, but it did not stimulate proportional IL-6 release. When HUVEC were incubated with LPS, LTA, or PGN in the presence of histamine marked amplification of both IL-6 production and mRNA expression was noted. HUVEC constitutively expressed TLR2 and TLR4 mRNA and proteins, and these were further enhanced by histamine. The expression of mRNAs encoding MD-2 and MyD88, the accessory molecules associated with TLR signalling, were unchanged by histamine treatment. These results demonstrate that histamine up-regulates the expression of TLR2 and TLR4 and amplifies endothelial cell inflammatory responses to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial components. PMID:15379983

  1. Histamine H4 receptor antagonists for the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wai L

    2014-08-01

    Since its initial discovery by Sir Henry Dale and Patrick Laidlaw in 1910, the biogenic amine histamine has been one of the most widely researched molecules in science. H4R, the newest member of the histamine receptor family, was first identified at the turn of the millennium. Its predominant expression on inflammatory cells and lymphoid tissues, coupled with a key role in processes ranging from chemotaxis to cytokine release, suggests it could command an important role in immune and inflammatory responses. PMID:24859018

  2. Protective Factors for Violence among Released Prisoners--Effects over Time and Interactions with Static Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ullrich, Simone; Coid, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Objective: There is a substantial body of research on risk factors for violent behavior in adulthood but little empirical study of protective factors and desistance. Method: This study aimed to investigate the protective effects of factors hypothesized to reduce violent reoffending among a sample of 800 male prisoners following release into the…

  3. Effect of a bovine hypothalamic factor on the release and biosynthesis of growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, T; Sawano, S; Yamasaki, M

    1977-02-01

    Partial purification of growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor (GRF) by acid extraction followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-25 has been attained from bovine hypothalami. When rat pituitaries were incubated in 2 ml Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate-glucose (KRBG) medium, a stimulatory effect of the GRF fraction on immunoreactive GH (IR-GH) release was observed, while that of the factor neither on GH synthesis nor release of the synthesized GH was demonstrated. Stimulation of the GH release was exerted maximally within 30 min of incubation. Cycloheximide and actinomycin D, at a concentration which inhibited protein and RNA synthesis to less than 5 and 20% of the control, respectively, were without effect on the stimulatory action of the factor on GH release. On the other hand, stimulation of GH synthesis was observed under incubation in 0.3 ml medium with the factor and enhancing effect of the factor on the IR-GH release was undetectable. These results suggest that stimulation of the release and synthesis of GH mediated by the hypothalamic GRF fraction is under influence of the pool size of incubation media. PMID:324757

  4. Effects of two histamine-N-methyltransferase inhibitors, SKF 91488 and BW 301 U, in rodent antinociception.

    PubMed

    Malmberg-Aiello, P; Lamberti, C; Ipponi, A; Hänninen, J; Ghelardini, C; Bartolini, A

    1997-03-01

    We have previously reported that the histaminergic system is involved in the control of pain perception, and that substances able to enhance histamine brain levels, such as the histamine-N-methyltransferase inhibitor, metoprine, induce antinociception. In the present study, in order to corroborate the idea of inducing antinociception by inhibiting histamine catabolism, the effects of a noncompetitive histamine-N-methyltransferase inhibitor. SKF 91488, were studied in rodents by means of tests inducing three different kinds of noxious stimuli: thermal (mouse hot plate), chemical (mouse abdominal constrictions) and mechanical (rat paw pressure). The ability to react to noxious stimuli was assessed by the rota-rod test. In addition, a competitive inhibitor of the histamine catabolism enzyme, BW 301 U, was studied in the hot plate test. SKF 91488 (30, 50 and 100 micrograms per animal i.c.v.) raised dose-dependently the pain threshold in all three tests. To verify whether SKF 91488-induced antinociception is due to inhibition of histamine-N-methyltransferase, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine, described to block histamine release and synthesis by stimulating the histamine H3-autoreceptor and activating the negative feed-back mechanism, was used. When administered at doses which do not alter the pain threshold per se, 0.5 microgram per rat i.c.v. or 10 mg kg-1 i.p. in mice, (R)-alpha-methylhistamine was able to antagonize significantly the antinociceptive effect induced by 30 micrograms per animal i.c.v. of SKF 91488. BW 301 U (30 and 100 mg kg-1 i.p.) showed a dose-dependent, long-lasting antinociception, which was also antagonized by pretreatment with (R)-alpha-methylhistamine. The present data show that the antinociceptive effect previously described for metoprine is not restricted to this molecule, but is also shared by other histamine-N-methyl-transferase inhibitors. This generalization provides further evidence to the importance of the histaminergic system in pain control

  5. Controllable mineral coatings on scaffolds as carriers for growth factor release for bone tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saurez-Gonzalez, Darilis

    The work presented in this document, focused on the development and characterization of mineral coatings on scaffold materials to serve as templates for growth factor binding and release. Mineral coatings were formed using a biomimetic approach that consisted in the incubation of scaffolds in modified simulated body fluids (mSBF). To modulate the properties of the mineral coating, which we hypothesized would dictate growth factor release, we used carbonate (HCO3) concentration in mSBF of 4.2 mM, 25mM, and 100mM. Analysis of the mineral coatings formed using scanning electron microscopy indicated growth of a continuous layer of mineral with different morphologies. X-ray diffraction analysis showed peaks associated with hydroxyapatite. FTIR data confirmed the substitution of HCO3 in the mineral. As the extent of HCO3 substitution increased, the coating exhibited more rapid dissolution kinetics in an environment deficient in calcium and phosphate. The mineral coatings provided an effective mechanism for bioactive growth factor binding and release. Peptide versions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) were bound with efficiencies up to 90% to mineral-coated PCL scaffolds. Recombinant human vascular endothelial growth factor (rhVEGF) also bound to mineral coated scaffolds with lower efficiency (20%) and released with faster release kinetics compared to peptides growth factor. Released rhVEGF induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) proliferation in vitro and enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in an intramuscular sheep model. In addition to the use the mineral coatings for single growth factor release, we expanded the concept and bound both an angiogenic (rhVEGF) and osteogenic (mBMP2) growth factor by a simple double dipping process. Sustained release of both growth factors was demonstrated for over 60 days. Released rhVEGF enhanced blood vessel formation in vivo in sheep and its biological activity was

  6. Growth-promoting action and growth factor release by different platelet derivatives.

    PubMed

    Passaretti, F; Tia, M; D'Esposito, V; De Pascale, M; Del Corso, M; Sepulveres, R; Liguoro, D; Valentino, R; Beguinot, F; Formisano, P; Sammartino, G

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Platelet derivatives are commonly used in wound healing and tissue regeneration. Different procedures of platelet preparation may differentially affect growth factor release and cell growth. Preparation of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is accompanied by release of growth factors, including platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), and several cytokines. When compared with the standard procedure for platelet-rich plasma (PRP), PRF released 2-fold less PDGF, but >15-fold and >2-fold VEGF and TGFβ1, respectively. Also, the release of several cytokines (IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IFNγ, MIP-1α, MIP-1β and TNFα) was significantly increased in PRF-conditioned medium (CM), compared to PRP-CM. Incubation of both human skin fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) with PRF-derived membrane (mPRF) or with PRF-CM enhanced cell proliferation by >2-fold (p<0.05). Interestingly, PRP elicited fibroblast growth at a higher extent compared to PRF. At variance, PRF effect on HUVEC growth was significantly greater than that of PRP, consistent with a higher concentration of VEGF in the PRF-CM. Thus, the procedure of PRP preparation leads to a larger release of PDGF, as a possible result of platelet degranulation, while PRF enhances the release of proangiogenic factors. PMID:23855408

  7. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Bruggeman, Kiara F; Rodriguez, Alexandra L; Parish, Clare L; Williams, Richard J; Nisbet, David R

    2016-09-23

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine. PMID:27517970

  8. Temporally controlled release of multiple growth factors from a self-assembling peptide hydrogel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruggeman, Kiara F.; Rodriguez, Alexandra L.; Parish, Clare L.; Williams, Richard J.; Nisbet, David R.

    2016-09-01

    Protein growth factors have demonstrated great potential for tissue repair, but their inherent instability and large size prevents meaningful presentation to biologically protected nervous tissue. Here, we create a nanofibrous network from a self-assembling peptide (SAP) hydrogel to carry and stabilize the growth factors. We significantly reduced growth factor degradation to increase their lifespan by over 40 times. To control the temporal release profile we covalently attached polysaccharide chitosan molecules to the growth factor to increase its interactions with the hydrogel nanofibers and achieved a 4 h delay, demonstrating the potential of this method to provide temporally controlled growth factor delivery. We also describe release rate based analysis to examine the growth factor delivery in more detail than standard cumulative release profiles allow and show that the chitosan attachment method provided a more consistent release profile with a 60% reduction in fluctuations. To prove the potential of this system as a complex growth factor delivery platform we demonstrate for the first time temporally distinct release of multiple growth factors from a single tissue specific SAP hydrogel: a significant goal in regenerative medicine.

  9. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  10. Nitric Oxide and Histamine Signal Attempts to Swallow: A Component of Learning that Food Is Inedible in "Aplysia"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katzoff, Ayelet; Miller, Nimrod; Susswein, Abraham J.

    2010-01-01

    Memory that food is inedible in "Aplysia" arises from training requiring three contingent events. Nitric oxide (NO) and histamine are released by a neuron responding to one of these events, attempts to swallow food. Since NO release during training is necessary for subsequent memory and NO substitutes for attempts to swallow, it was suggested that…

  11. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  12. Histamine derived from probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri suppresses TNF via modulation of PKA and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Carissa M; Hong, Teresa; van Pijkeren, Jan Peter; Hemarajata, Peera; Trinh, Dan V; Hu, Weidong; Britton, Robert A; Kalkum, Markus; Versalovic, James

    2012-01-01

    Beneficial microbes and probiotic species, such as Lactobacillus reuteri, produce biologically active compounds that can modulate host mucosal immunity. Previously, immunomodulatory factors secreted by L. reuteri ATCC PTA 6475 were unknown. A combined metabolomics and bacterial genetics strategy was utilized to identify small compound(s) produced by L. reuteri that were TNF-inhibitory. Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography-high performance liquid chromatography (HILIC-HPLC) separation isolated TNF-inhibitory compounds, and HILIC-HPLC fraction composition was determined by NMR and mass spectrometry analyses. Histamine was identified and quantified in TNF-inhibitory HILIC-HPLC fractions. Histamine is produced from L-histidine via histidine decarboxylase by some fermentative bacteria including lactobacilli. Targeted mutagenesis of each gene present in the histidine decarboxylase gene cluster in L. reuteri 6475 demonstrated the involvement of histidine decarboxylase pyruvoyl type A (hdcA), histidine/histamine antiporter (hdcP), and hdcB in production of the TNF-inhibitory factor. The mechanism of TNF inhibition by L. reuteri-derived histamine was investigated using Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-activated human monocytoid cells. Bacterial histamine suppressed TNF production via activation of the H(2) receptor. Histamine from L. reuteri 6475 stimulated increased levels of cAMP, which inhibited downstream MEK/ERK MAPK signaling via protein kinase A (PKA) and resulted in suppression of TNF production by transcriptional regulation. In summary, a component of the gut microbiome, L. reuteri, is able to convert a dietary component, L-histidine, into an immunoregulatory signal, histamine, which suppresses pro-inflammatory TNF production. The identification of bacterial bioactive metabolites and their corresponding mechanisms of action with respect to immunomodulation may lead to improved anti-inflammatory strategies for chronic immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22384111

  13. Influence of the hippocampus on amino acid utilizing and cholinergic neurons within the nucleus accumbens is promoted by histamine via H1 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, M M; Prast, H; Philippu, A

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose The influence of the neurotransmitter histamine on spontaneous and stimulation-evoked release of glutamate, aspartate, GABA and ACh in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) was investigated in vivo. Experimental Approach Using the push–pull superfusion technique, histaminergic compounds were applied to the NAc and neurotransmitter release was assessed. In some experiments, the fornix/fimbria of the hippocampus was electrically stimulated by a microelectrode and evoked potentials were monitored in the NAc. Key Results Superfusion of the NAc with the H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (50 μM) decreased spontaneous outflow of glutamate, aspartate and ACh, while release of GABA remained unaffected. Superfusion with histamine elevated release of ACh, without influencing that of the amino acids. Electrical stimulation of the fornix/fimbria enhanced the output of amino acids and ACh within the NAc. The evoked outflow of glutamate and ACh was diminished on superfusion with triprolidine, while release of aspartate and GABA was not affected. Superfusion of the NAc with histamine intensified the stimulation-evoked release of glutamate and Ach. Histamine also elevated the stimulation-induced release of aspartate, without influencing that of GABA. Presuperfusion with triprolidine abolished the reinforced effect of histamine on stimulation-evoked transmitter release within the NAc. Conclusion and Implications Neuronal histamine activates H1 receptors and increases spontaneous release of glutamate, aspartate and ACh within the NAc. Stimulation of the hippocampal fornix/fimbria tract also enhances release of glutamate and ACh within the NAc and this effect is intensified by H1 receptor stimulation within the NAc. The latter effects, which are mediated by hippocampal afferences, might play an important role in mnemonic performance and in emotional processes such as anxiety and stress disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine

  14. Scaffolds for Controlled Release of Cartilage Growth Factors.

    PubMed

    Morille, Marie; Venier-Julienne, Marie-Claire; Montero-Menei, Claudia N

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, cell-based therapies using adult stem cells have attracted considerable interest in regenerative medicine. A tissue-engineered construct for cartilage repair should provide a support for the cell and allow sustained in situ delivery of bioactive factors capable of inducing cell differentiation into chondrocytes. Pharmacologically active microcarriers (PAMs), made of biodegradable and biocompatible poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide acid) (PLGA), are a unique system which combines these properties in an adaptable and simple microdevice. This device relies on nanoprecipitation of proteins encapsulated in polymeric microspheres with a solid in oil in water emulsion-solvent evaporation process, and their subsequent coating with extracellular matrix protein molecules. Here, we describe their preparation process, and some of their characterization methods for an application in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:26445838

  15. Polymethylmethacrylate-induced release of bone-resorbing factors

    SciTech Connect

    Herman, J.H.; Sowder, W.G.; Anderson, D.; Appel, A.M.; Hopson, C.N. )

    1989-12-01

    A pseudomembranous structure that has the histological characteristics of a foreign-body-like reaction invariably develops at the bone-cement interface in the proximity of resorption of bone around aseptically loosened cemented prostheses. This study was an attempt to implicate polymethylmethacrylate in this resorptive process. Unfractionated peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (consisting of lymphocytes and monocytes) and surface-adherent cells (monocyte-enriched) were prepared from control subjects who did and did not have clinical evidence of osteoarthrosis and from patients who had osteoarthrosis and were having a revision for failure of a cemented hip or knee implant. Cells were cultured for varying periods in the presence and absence of nonpolymerized methacrylate (one to two-micrometer spherules), pulverized polymerized material, or culture chambers that were pre-coated with polymerized cement. Conditioned media that were derived from both methacrylate-stimulated cell populations were shown to contain specific bone-resorbing mediators (interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor, or prostaglandin E2) and to directly affect bone resorption in 45Ca-labeled murine limb-bone assays.

  16. Mast Cells Synthesize, Store, and Release Nerve Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, A.; Buriani, A.; dal Toso, R.; Fabris, M.; Romanello, S.; Aloe, L.; Levi-Montalcini, R.

    1994-04-01

    Mast cells and nerve growth factor (NGF) have both been reported to be involved in neuroimmune interactions and tissue inflammation. In many peripheral tissues, mast cells interact with the innervating fibers. Changes in the behaviors of both of these elements occur after tissue injury/inflammation. As such conditions are typically associated with rapid mast cell activation and NGF accumulation in inflammatory exudates, we hypothesized that mast cells may be capable of producing NGF. Here we report that (i) NGF mRNA is expressed in adult rat peritoneal mast cells; (ii) anti-NGF antibodies clearly stain vesicular compartments of purified mast cells and mast cells in histological sections of adult rodent mesenchymal tissues; and (iii) medium conditioned by peritoneal mast cells contains biologically active NGF. Mast cells thus represent a newly recognized source of NGF. The known actions of NGF on peripheral nerve fibers and immune cells suggest that mast cell-derived NGF may control adaptive/reactive responses of the nervous and immune systems toward noxious tissue perturbations. Conversely, alterations in normal mast cell behaviors may provoke maladaptive neuroimmune tissue responses whose consequences could have profound implications in inflammatory disease states, including those of an autoimmune nature.

  17. Human growth hormone (GH)-releasing factor stimulates and somatostatin inhibits the release of rat GH variants.

    PubMed

    Yokoya, S; Friesen, H G

    1986-11-01

    Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) was used for the analysis of proteins secreted by male rat pituitary cells in monolayer culture in the presence of 10 nM human GH-releasing factor (hGRF) or 30 nM somatostatin (SRIF) or in the absence of these factors. More than 300 medium proteins were reproducibly detected either by fluorographic autoradiography or by silver staining. Immunoreactivity of each protein was examined after 2D PAGE followed by Western blotting and immunostaining with affinity-purified antirat GH (rGH) antibody. While there was a cluster of immunoreactive spots in the GH dimer range (40,000-50,000 mol wt), at least 16 medium proteins of mol wt 22,000 or less were also stained. Among these 16 proteins the release of 15 was stimulated and the release of 14 was inhibited by hGRF and SRIF, respectively. On the other hand, there were 3 proteins of approximate mol wt 16,000 whose secretion was regulated in a coordinate manner as rGH by the hypothalamic factors but which did not cross-react with anti-rGH antibodies. The increase or decrease in the radioactivity of each protein spot obtained from media after pituitary cells were incubated with [35S]methionine and hypothalamic factors was analyzed statistically. A pulse-chase study suggested that at least 7 of the hormonally regulated proteins, including rGH, were synthesized very rapidly. Finally, the 2D PAGE analysis of cell-free translation products of messenger RNA derived from male rat anterior pituitaries revealed the presence of about 40 rGH-immunoreactive proteins which included pre-GH. These data suggest that there are multiple forms of rGH-variants or rGH-related proteins. The biological significance(s) of all the rGH immunoreactive proteins and of the GRF- and SRIF-regulated pituitary proteins remains unclear. It is evident that a number of these proteins are synthesized and released rapidly by pituitary cells in culture. Furthermore, the presence of multiple genes for

  18. Protective effect of histamine microinjected into the cerebellar fastigial nucleus on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage in rats

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Xiao; Tang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jianfu; Chen, Ke; Zhang, Yanming; Wang, Changcheng; Fei, Sujuan; Zhu, Jinzhou; Zhu, Shengping; Liu, Zhangbo; Li, Tingting; Lv, Shengxiang; Liang, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Aims: We investigated the effffects and the possible mechanism of microinjection of histamine into cerebellar fastigial nucleus (FN) on stress-induced gastric mucosal damage (SGMD) in rats. The effect of microinjection of histamine into FN on SGMD was observed. Methods: The model of SGMD was established by restraint and water (21 ± 1°C)-immersion (RWI) for 3 h in rats. The gastric mucosal damage index indicated the severity of SGMD. Western blotting was performed to assess gastric mucosal cell apoptosis and proliferation. Results: We observed that histamine microinjection into the FN markedly attenuated SGMD in a dose-dependent manner, and was prevented by pre-treatment with the ranitidine (a selective histamine H2 receptor antagonist) into the FN. The effect of histamine was abolished by pre-treatment with 3-MPA (a glutamic acid decarboxylase antagonist) into the FN. There was a decrease in the discharge frequency of greater splanchnic nerve, and an increase in gastric mucosal blood flow after histamine injection into the FN. Additionally, anti-apoptotic and anti-oxidative factors of gastric mucosa might be involved in this process. Conclusion: The exogenous histamine in FN participates in the regulation of SGMD, and our results may help to provide new ideas on the treatment of gastroenterological diseases. PMID:26550464

  19. Studies of the nature of the interaction between vasopressin and corticotropin-releasing factor on adrenocorticotropin release in the rat.

    PubMed

    Rivier, C; Rivier, J; Mormede, P; Vale, W

    1984-09-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) acts on vasoconstriction and diuresis through two different types of receptors (V1 and V2, respectively). Since AVP also modifies ACTH release, we have attempted to determine which class of receptors mediates the capacity of AVP to increase ACTH secretion and to potentiate the effect of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) on the pituitary using two AVP antagonists: [1-deaminopenicillamine-2-(O-methyl)tyrosine]arginine-vasopressin [dPTyr(Me)-AVP], which blocks V1 receptors, and [1-beta-mercapto-beta,beta-cyclopentamethylene propionic acid)2-D-leucine-4-valine]arginine vasopressin [d(CH2)5DLeuValAVP], which interferes with V2 receptors. dPTyr(Me)AVP, but not d(CH2)5DLeuValAVP, inhibited the ACTH-releasing as well as the CRF-potentiating effects of both AVP and its antidiuretic analog [1-deamino-8-D-arginine]vasopressin (dDAVP). These results suggest that the actions of AVP and dDAVP on the corticotrophs is primarily mediated through V1 (pressor-like) receptors. PMID:6086290

  20. Psycho-Social Factors as Predictors of Success in a Work-Release Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brahen, Leonard S.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Investigates the significance of social and environmental factors as predictors of the rehabilitative potential of an inmate. Work history must be used as a whole. The more recent a good history, the more successful an inmate's jail record. Work factors may aid in selecting narcotics-addicted inmates for work-release programs. (Author/BEF)

  1. Atrial distension of isolated rabbit hearts and release of atrial natriuretic factor

    SciTech Connect

    Synhorst, D.P.; Gutkowska, J. Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec )

    1988-08-01

    Interventions that increase atrial pressures in humans or laboratory animals release atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) into the circulation. The authors studied the relation between distension of the right or left atrium and release of ANF in retrograde-perfused isolated rabbit hearts. A fluid-filled balloon within the right or left atrium was inflated to a mean pressure of 5, 10, 15, or 20 mmHg, and ANF in the cardiac effluent was measured by radioimmunoassay. The slope of the regression line relating ANF release to atrial distending pressure was steeper for the left than right atrium, indicating that, at comparable increases in mean pressures, the left atrium releases more ANF than does the right atrium. Left atrial tissue concentration ANF was greater than right atrial. In contrast to previous studies showing right atrial dominance in rats, the left atria of isolated, perfused rabbit hearts contain more ANF and release more in response to atrial distension.

  2. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G. H.; Roholl, P. J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; Den Otter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for their in vitro sensitivity to histamine and histamine antagonists. Four continuous glioma cell lines were used to confirm the glioma-specificity of the effects observed in the primary cell lines. In low serum concentration (0 or 1%) the growth of 5/9 primary glioma-derived cultures could be stimulated with 0.2 mM histamine, and in 4/5 cases with 0.2 microM histamine. One mM of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine could inhibit the growth of 4/5 primary glioma cultures when tested in 1% human AB serum, and of 6/13 cases when tested in 1% FCS. Lower concentrations (down to 1 microM) were less effective. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine gave variable results. The specificity of the effects is indicated by the absence of a generalised toxic effect, by the observation that the antagonist-induced inhibition could be reversed with histamine, and by the correlation of the obtained cimetidine-induced growth inhibition with the maximal growth rate of the primary cell lines in 10% FCS. The observed cimetidine-induced inhibition of the in vitro proliferation of gliomas suggests that cimetidine is a relevant candidate for the in vivo growth inhibition of these tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8353038

  3. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  4. Control of angiogenesis by galectins involves the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  5. Control of Angiogenesis by Galectins Involves the Release of Platelet-Derived Proangiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    Etulain, Julia; Negrotto, Soledad; Tribulatti, María Virginia; Croci, Diego Omar; Carabelli, Julieta; Campetella, Oscar; Rabinovich, Gabriel Adrián; Schattner, Mirta

    2014-01-01

    Platelets contribute to vessel formation through the release of angiogenesis-modulating factors stored in their α-granules. Galectins, a family of lectins that bind β-galactoside residues, are up-regulated in inflammatory and cancerous tissues, trigger platelet activation and mediate vascularization processes. Here we aimed to elucidate whether the release of platelet-derived proangiogenic molecules could represent an alternative mechanism through which galectins promote neovascularization. We show that different members of the galectin family can selectively regulate the release of angiogenic molecules by human platelets. Whereas Galectin (Gal)-1, -3, and -8 triggered vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) release, only Gal-8 induced endostatin secretion. Release of VEGF induced by Gal-8 was partially prevented by COX-1, PKC, p38 and Src kinases inhibitors, whereas Gal-1-induced VEGF secretion was inhibited by PKC and ERK blockade, and Gal-3 triggered VEGF release selectively through a PKC-dependent pathway. Regarding endostatin, Gal-8 failed to stimulate its release in the presence of PKC, Src and ERK inhibitors, whereas aspirin or p38 inhibitor had no effect on endostatin release. Despite VEGF or endostatin secretion, platelet releasates generated by stimulation with each galectin stimulated angiogenic responses in vitro including endothelial cell proliferation and tubulogenesis. The platelet angiogenic activity was independent of VEGF and was attributed to the concerted action of other proangiogenic molecules distinctly released by each galectin. Thus, secretion of platelet-derived angiogenic molecules may represent an alternative mechanism by which galectins promote angiogenic responses and its selective blockade may lead to the development of therapeutic strategies for angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:24788652

  6. The effect of histamine on the oxidative burst of HL60 cells before and after exposure to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ching, T L; Koelemij, J G; Bast, A

    1995-03-01

    During an inflammation neutrophils are stimulated to produce reactive oxygen species (ROS). These ROS induce the release of histamine from mast cells, which are also present at the inflammation site. In this study dibutyryl cAMP differentiated HL60 cells are used as a model for human neutrophils. The effect of histamine on formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fmlp) stimulated cells is examined. Except for histamine also an accumulation of ROS takes place at the inflammation site and we investigated if ROS can influence the response of the stimulated HL60 cells. It is found that 10(-3) M histamine can inhibit the fmlp induced superoxide anion radical production. This occurs partly via an H2 receptor because H2 antagonists like famotidine, mifentidine and ranitidine could partially antagonize this effect of histamine. When HL60 cells are exposed to hydrogen peroxide or hypochlorous acid (20 min), an increased fmlp response is found while the inhibiting effect of histamine remains unchanged. PMID:7552580

  7. The histamine H4 receptor is a potent inhibitor of adhesion-dependent degranulation in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dib, Karim; Perecko, Tomas; Jenei, Veronika; McFarlane, Cheryl; Comer, David; Brown, Vanessa; Katebe, Mwape; Scheithauer, Torsten; Thurmond, Robin L; Chazot, Paul L; Ennis, Madeleine

    2014-09-01

    The histamine H4 receptor regulates the inflammatory response. However, it is not known whether this receptor has a functional role in human neutrophils. We found that fMLP (1 μM), but not histamine (0.1-1 μM), induced Mac-1-dependent adhesion, polarization, and degranulation (release of lactoferrin). A pretreatment of neutrophils with histamine (0.001-1 μM) or JNJ 28610244 (0.1-10 μM), a specific H4 receptor agonist, led to inhibition of degranulation. Total inhibition of degranulation was obtained with 0.1 μM histamine and 10 μM JNJ 28610244. Furthermore, such inhibition by histamine of degranulation was reversed by JNJ 7777120 and JNJ 28307474, two selective H4 receptor antagonists. However, neither histamine nor the H4 receptor agonist JNJ 28610244 prevented fMLP-induced, Mac-1-dependent adhesion, indicating that the H4 receptor may block signals emanating from Mac-1-controlling degranulation. Likewise, engagement of the H4 receptor by the selective agonist JNJ 28610244 blocked Mac-1-dependent activation of p38 MAPK, the kinase that controls neutrophil degranulation. We also show expression of the H4 receptor at the mRNA level in ultrapure human neutrophils and myeloid leukemia PLB-985 cells. We concluded that engagement of this receptor by selective H4 receptor agonists may represent a good, therapeutic approach to accelerate resolution of inflammation. PMID:24799603

  8. Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Charles; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-02-01

    Histamine fish poisoning, also known as scombroid poisoning, is the most common cause of ichythyotoxicosis worldwide and results from the ingestion of histamine-contaminated fish in the Scombroidae and Scomberesocidae families, including mackerel, bonito, albacore, and skipjack. This disease was first described in 1799 in Britain and re-emerged in the medical literature in the 1950s when outbreaks were reported in Japan. The symptoms associated with histamine fish poisoning are similar to that of an allergic reaction. In fact, such histamine-induced reactions are often misdiagnosed as IgE-mediated fish allergy. Indeed, histamine fish poisoning is still an underrecognized disease. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of scombroid disease. Because more than 80% of fish consumed in the USA is now imported from other countries, the disease is intimately linked with the global fish trade (National Marine Fisheries Service, 2012). Preventing future scombroid outbreaks will require that fishermen, public health officials, restaurant workers, and medical professionals work together to devise international safety standards and increase awareness of the disease. The implications of scombroid poisoning go far beyond that of fish and have broader implications for the important issues of food safety. PMID:25876709

  9. New insights into the role of histamine in subventricular zone-olfactory bulb neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Eiriz, Maria F.; Valero, Jorge; Malva, João O.; Bernardino, Liliana

    2014-01-01

    The subventricular zone (SVZ) contains neural stem cells (NSCs) that generate new neurons throughout life. Many brain diseases stimulate NSCs proliferation, neuronal differentiation and homing of these newborns cells into damaged regions. However, complete cell replacement has never been fully achieved. Hence, the identification of proneurogenic factors crucial for stem cell-based therapies will have an impact in brain repair. Histamine, a neurotransmitter and immune mediator, has been recently described to modulate proliferation and commitment of NSCs. Histamine levels are increased in the brain parenchyma and at the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) upon inflammation and brain injury, thus being able to modulate neurogenesis. Herein, we add new data showing that in vivo administration of histamine in the lateral ventricles has a potent proneurogenic effect, increasing the production of new neuroblasts in the SVZ that ultimately reach the olfactory bulb (OB). This report emphasizes the multidimensional effects of histamine in the modulation of NSCs dynamics and sheds light into the promising therapeutic role of histamine for brain regenerative medicine. PMID:24982610

  10. The ROP vesicle release factor is required in adult Drosophila glia for normal circadian behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Fanny S.; Jackson, F. Rob

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that endocytosis and/or vesicle recycling mechanisms are essential in adult Drosophila glial cells for the neuronal control of circadian locomotor activity. In this study, our goal was to identify specific glial vesicle trafficking, recycling, or release factors that are required for rhythmic behavior. From a glia-specific, RNAi-based genetic screen, we identified eight glial factors that are required for normally robust circadian rhythms in either a light-dark cycle or in constant dark conditions. In particular, we show that conditional knockdown of the ROP vesicle release factor in adult glial cells results in arrhythmic behavior. Immunostaining for ROP reveals reduced protein in glial cell processes and an accumulation of the Par Domain Protein 1ε (PDP1ε) clock output protein in the small lateral clock neurons. These results suggest that glia modulate rhythmic circadian behavior by secretion of factors that act on clock neurons to regulate a clock output factor. PMID:26190976

  11. Stimulation and inhibition of corticotrophin releasing factor secretion by beta endorphin.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, J C

    1986-01-01

    The influence of beta-endorphin on the secretion of corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF) by isolated rat hypothalami in vitro was studied. beta-Endorphin (10(-11)-10(-10) M) caused dose-related increases in the CRF contents of the hypothalami and of the medium in which they were incubated. Its effects were antagonized by naloxone (10(-8)-10(-7) M). In contrast, in higher concentrations (10(-7) - 10(-5) M), it reduced, in a dose-dependent manner, both the spontaneous release of CRF from the hypothalami and the release which normally occurred in response to acetylcholine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, morphine, met-enkephalin and leu-enkephalin. The inhibition of CRF release was associated with a rise in the tissue content of the hormone and was not blocked readily by naloxone. The results support the concept that opioid substances may be involved in the control of hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical function. PMID:2936971

  12. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  13. Affinity of pyridylalkylamines for nicotinic, muscarinic and histaminic recognition sites in brain tissue preparations.

    PubMed

    Repond, C; Pratt, J A; Stolerman, I P; Mayer, J M; Jenner, P; Marsden, C D; Testa, B

    1986-08-01

    The affinity of 15 regioisomeric and homologous pyridylalkylamines was examined in brain preparations for nicotinic, muscarinic, and H1-histaminic binding sites as labeled by [3H]-nicotine, [3H]-dexetimide and [3H]-mepyramine, respectively. Overall, the compounds show a clear selectivity for the nicotinic versus muscarinic binding sites, and a weak affinity for the H1-histaminic sites. Variations in affinity appear to be partly influenced by steric factors (such as position of attachment, length and rigidity of side-chain) and marginally by lipophilicity. PMID:3778556

  14. 77 FR 4227 - Implantation or Injectable Dosage Form New Animal Drugs; Gonadotropin Releasing Factor Analog...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... regulations in 21 CFR 522.1083 are amended to reflect the approval. In accordance with the freedom of... CFR part 522 continues to read as follows: Authority: 21 U.S.C. 360b. 0 2. In Sec. 522.1083, revise paragraphs (c)(1) and (c)(3) to read as follows: Sec. 522.1083 Gonadotropin releasing factor...

  15. Klebsiella pneumoniae Produces No Histamine: Raoultella planticola and Raoultella ornithinolytica Strains Are Histamine Producers

    PubMed Central

    Kanki, Masashi; Yoda, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Teizo; Shibata, Tadayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Histamine fish poisoning is caused by histamine-producing bacteria (HPB). Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca are the best-known HPB in fish. However, 22 strains of HPB from fish first identified as K. pneumoniae or K. oxytoca by commercialized systems were later correctly identified as Raoultella planticola (formerly Klebsiella planticola) by additional tests. Similarly, five strains of Raoultella ornithinolytica (formerly Klebsiella ornithinolytica) were isolated from fish as new HPB. R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica strains were equal in their histamine-producing capabilities and were determined to possess the hdc genes, encoding histidine decarboxylase. On the other hand, a collection of 61 strains of K. pneumoniae and 18 strains of K. oxytoca produced no histamine. PMID:12089029

  16. UVB Generates Microvesicle Particle Release in Part Due to Platelet-activating Factor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Bihl, Ji C; Rapp, Christine M; Chen, Yanfang; Travers, Jeffrey B

    2016-05-01

    The lipid mediator platelet-activating factor (PAF) and oxidized glycerophosphocholine PAF agonists produced by ultraviolet B (UVB) have been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in UVB-mediated processes, from acute inflammation to delayed systemic immunosuppression. Recent studies have provided evidence that microvesicle particles (MVPs) are released from cells in response to various signals including stressors. Importantly, these small membrane fragments can interact with various cell types by delivering bioactive molecules. The present studies were designed to test if UVB radiation can generate MVP release from epithelial cells, and the potential role of PAF receptor (PAF-R) signaling in this process. We demonstrate that UVB irradiation of the human keratinocyte-derived cell line HaCaT resulted in the release of MVPs. Similarly, treatment of HaCaT cells with the PAF-R agonist carbamoyl PAF also generated equivalent amounts of MVP release. Of note, pretreatment of HaCaT cells with antioxidants blocked MVP release from UVB but not PAF-R agonist N-methyl carbamyl PAF (CPAF). Importantly, UVB irradiation of the PAF-R-negative human epithelial cell line KB and KB transduced with functional PAF-Rs resulted in MVP release only in PAF-R-positive cells. These studies demonstrate that UVB can generate MVPs in vitro and that PAF-R signaling appears important in this process. PMID:26876152

  17. [Mechanism of production and release of tumor necrosis factor implicated in inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Hide, Izumi

    2003-03-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is a potent inflammatory cytokine involved in many pathophysiological conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and Crohn's disease. Despite recent evidence regarding signal transduction via TNF receptor and its biological actions, the mechanism of TNF release remains poorly understood. To clarify how production and release of TNF are regulated, we focused on mast cells and microglia which are involved in allergic inflammation and brain damage or recovery, respectively. In RBL-2H3 mast cells, anti-allergic drugs including azelastine inhibited the release of TNF more potently than degranulation in response to antigen or ionomycin. It was also demonstrated that TNF releasing steps are regulated via the PKC alpha-dependent pathway. Furthermore, Rho GTPases, possibly Rac, were shown to be involved in antigen-induced TNF transcription through activating PKC beta I. In cultured rat brain microglia, we found that extracellular ATP triggers the release of TNF via the P2X7 receptor. ERK and JNK are also involved in ATP-induced TNF transcription, while p38 regulates the transport of TNF mRNA from the nucleus to the cytosol. Additionally, JNK and p38, but not ERK, are activated via the P2X7 receptor. A better understanding of the specific pathways that regulate TNF release for each effector cell may offer further possible therapeutic targets for inflammatory diseases. PMID:12673950

  18. Neutrophil chemotactic factor release and neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, A.A.; Rose, A.H.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W.

    1988-09-01

    Alveolar neutrophil accumulation occurs in asbestosis. To evaluate a possible role for release of neutrophil chemotactic factor (NCF) in the pathogenesis of asbestosis, spontaneous NCF release from alveolar macrophages obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in eight individuals with asbestosis, 13 asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, and five control subjects has been studied. Alveolar macrophages were incubated in medium (four hours; 37 degrees C), and neutrophil responses to the supernatants were assayed in a microchemotaxis chamber. Alveolar macrophages from subjects with asbestosis released more NCF (97 +/- 19 neutrophils per high-power field (N/HPF)) than controls (3 +/- 1 N/HPF; p less than 0.01). Alveolar macrophages from individuals with asbestos exposure and increased BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 7) released more NCF (93 +/- 24 N/HPF) than individuals with asbestos exposure and normal BAL neutrophil proportions (n = 6; 11 +/- 6 N/HPF; p less than 0.02). The results show that spontaneous NCF release occurs in asbestosis and that NCF release is associated with neutrophil alveolitis in asbestos-exposed individuals without asbestosis, suggesting a pathogenic role for NCF in mediating this neutrophil alveolitis. The results of the study also suggest that the presence of crackles is a better predictor of the presence of neutrophil alveolitis than is an abnormal chest x-ray film.

  19. Novel function of histamine signaling in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis: Histamine H1 receptors protect and H2 receptors accelerate atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Sohsuke; Wang, Ke-Yong; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki

    2015-02-01

    Histamine is not only essential for acute inflammatory reactions, but it also participates in a chronic inflammatory disorder. We generated apolipoprotein E (apoE) and histamine receptors (HHRs), including the major H1 and H2 receptors (HH1R, HH2R) double knockout mice (DKO) to clarify the role of HHRs in hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, in which apoE-KO and DKO mice were fed a high cholesterol diet. We found that pronounced hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerotic progression occurred in HH1R/apoE-DKO mice, but in HH2R/apoE-DKO mice less atherosclerosis, despite pro-atherogenic serum cholesterol levels compared with apoE-KO mice. Furthermore, the increased expressions of scavenger receptors (SRs), such as SR-A, CD36 and lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor 1 (LOX-1), nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB), monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1), matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or liver X receptor (LXR)-related inflammatory signaling factors, were consistent with the pro-atherogenic phenotype of HH2R/apoE-DKO mice. We hypothesize that histamine/HH1R and HH2R signaling has conflicting innate functions, inflammatory/atherogenic and anti-inflammatory/anti-atherogenic actions, and that there are innate links between histamine signaling and hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis, independently of serum cholesterol metabolism. Specific histamine signaling blockers, in particular, HH2R blockers, are a possible novel therapeutic target for hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis. PMID:25581821

  20. Effect of growth hormone-releasing factor on growth hormone release in children with radiation-induced growth hormone deficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Lustig, R.H.; Schriock, E.A.; Kaplan, S.L.; Grumbach, M.M.

    1985-08-01

    Five male children who received cranial irradiation for extrahypothalamic intracranial neoplasms or leukemia and subsequently developed severe growth hormone (GH) deficiency were challenged with synthetic growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF-44), in an attempt to distinguish hypothalamic from pituitary dysfunction as a cause of their GH deficiency, and to assess the readily releasable GH reserve in the pituitary. In response to a pulse of GRF-44 (5 micrograms/kg intravenously), mean peak GH levels rose to values higher than those evoked by the pharmacologic agents L-dopa or arginine (6.4 +/- 1.3 ng/mL v 1.5 +/- 0.4 ng/mL, P less than .05). The peak GH value occurred at a mean of 26.0 minutes after administration of GRF-44. These responses were similar to those obtained in children with severe GH deficiency due to other etiologies (peak GH 6.3 +/- 1.7 ng/mL, mean 28.0 minutes). In addition, there was a trend toward an inverse relationship between peak GH response to GRF-44 and the postirradiation interval. Prolactin and somatomedin-C levels did not change significantly after the administration of a single dose of GRF-44. The results of this study support the hypothesis that cranial irradiation in children can lead to hypothalamic GRF deficiency secondary to radiation injury of hypothalamic GRF-secreting neurons. This study also lends support to the potential therapeutic usefulness of GRF-44 or an analog for GH deficiency secondary to cranial irradiation.

  1. Histamine 1 Receptor Blockade Enhances Eosinophil-Mediated Clearance of Adult Filarial Worms

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Ellen Mueller; Morris, Christopher P.; Hübner, Marc P.; Mitre, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Filariae are tissue-invasive nematodes that cause diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. The goal of this study was to characterize the role of histamine during Litomosoides sigmodontis infection of BALB/c mice, a murine model of filariasis. Time course studies demonstrated that while expression of histidine decarboxylase mRNA increases throughout 12 weeks of infection, serum levels of histamine exhibit two peaks—one 30 minutes after primary infection and one 8 weeks later. Interestingly, mice treated with fexofenadine, a histamine receptor 1 inhibitor, demonstrated significantly reduced worm burden in infected mice compared to untreated infected controls. Although fexofenadine-treated mice had decreased antigen-specific IgE levels as well as lower splenocyte IL-5 and IFNγ production, they exhibited a greater than fourfold rise in eosinophil numbers at the tissue site where adult L. sigmodontis worms reside. Fexofenadine-mediated clearance of L. sigmodontis worms was dependent on host eosinophils, as fexofenadine did not decrease worm burdens in eosinophil-deficient dblGATA mice. These findings suggest that histamine release induced by tissue invasive helminths may aid parasite survival by diminishing eosinophilic responses. Further, these results raise the possibility that combining H1 receptor inhibitors with current anthelmintics may improve treatment efficacy for filariae and other tissue-invasive helminths. PMID:26204515

  2. Mast Cell Proteases 6 and 7 Stimulate Angiogenesis by Inducing Endothelial Cells to Release Angiogenic Factors

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Devandir Antonio; Borges, Antonio Carlos; Santana, Ana Carolina; Oliver, Constance; Jamur, Maria Célia

    2015-01-01

    Mast cell proteases are thought to be involved with tumor progression and neo-vascularization. However, their exact role is still unclear. The present study was undertaken to further elucidate the function of specific subtypes of recombinant mouse mast cell proteases (rmMCP-6 and 7) in neo-vascularization. SVEC4-10 cells were cultured on Geltrex® with either rmMCP-6 or 7 and tube formation was analyzed by fluorescence microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Additionally, the capacity of these proteases to induce the release of angiogenic factors and pro and anti-angiogenic proteins was analyzed. Both rmMCP-6 and 7 were able to stimulate tube formation. Scanning electron microscopy showed that incubation with the proteases induced SVEC4-10 cells to invade the gel matrix. However, the expression and activity of metalloproteases were not altered by incubation with the mast cell proteases. Furthermore, rmMCP-6 and rmMCP-7 were able to induce the differential release of angiogenic factors from the SVEC4-10 cells. rmMCP-7 was more efficient in stimulating tube formation and release of angiogenic factors than rmMCP-6. These results suggest that the subtypes of proteases released by mast cells may influence endothelial cells during in vivo neo-vascularization. PMID:26633538

  3. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of histamine response measured by histamine iontophoresis laser Doppler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jones, Bridgette L; Roberts, Jessica K; Sherwin, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    The epicutaneous histamine (EH) test is the current gold standard method for the clinical evaluation of allergic conditions. However, the EH method is limited in providing an objective and qualitative assessment of histamine pharmacodynamic response. The histamine iontophoresis with laser Doppler (HILD) monitoring method, an alternative method, allows a fixed dose of histamine to be delivered and provides an objective, continuous, and dynamic measurement of histamine epicutaneous response in children and adults. However, due to the high sampling frequency (up to 40 Hz), the output files are usually too cumbersome to be directly used for further analysis. In this study, we developed an averaging algorithm that efficiently reduces the HILD data in size. The reduced data was further analyzed and a population linked effect pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the local histamine response. The model consisted of a one-compartment PK model and a direct-response fractional maximum effect (Emax) model. The parameter estimates were obtained as follows: absorption rate constant (ka), 0.094/min; absorption lag time (Tlag), 2.72 min; partitioning clearance from local depot to systemic circulation (CLpar), 0.0006 L/min; baseline effect (E0), 13.1 flux unit; Emax, 13.4; concentration at half maximum effect (EC50) 31.1 mg/L. Covariate analysis indicated that age and race had significant influence on Tlag and EC50, respectively. PMID:27307292

  4. Histamine metabolism in cluster headache and migraine. Catabolism of 14C histamine.

    PubMed

    Sjaastad, O; Sjaastad, O V

    1977-09-12

    Various parameters of histamine metabolism were studied in patients with migraine, cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania. These included urinary excretion of radioactivity and of 14C histamine and its metabolites, exhaled 14CO2 and fecal radioactivity after oral as well as subcutaneous administration of radioactive histamine. No marked deviation from the normal was found except in one patient with the cluster headache variant, chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, in whom an aberration in 14C histamine degradation seemed to be present. Only minute quantities of the 14C histamine metabolite C14 imidazoleacetic acid riboside seemed to be formed during a period with severe paroxysms. During a symptom-free period no deviation from normal was observed. The most likely explanation for this finding seems to be a defect in the conversion of imidazoleacetic acid to its riboside. This defect may possibly explain the increased urinary excretion of histamine in this particular patient. The relationship of this metabolic aberration to the production of headache still remains dubious for various reasons. PMID:72800

  5. Altered gastric chief cell lineage differentiation in histamine-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Koji; Weis, Victoria; Wang, Timothy C; Falus, András; Goldenring, James R

    2009-06-01

    The orderly differentiation of cell lineages within gastric glands is regulated by a complicated interplay of local mucosal growth factors and hormones. Histamine secreted from enterochromaffin-like cells plays an important role in not only stimulated gastric acid secretion but also coordination of intramucosal growth and lineage differentiation. We have examined histidine-decarboxylase (HDC)-deficient mice, which lack endogenous histamine synthesis, to evaluate the influence of histamine on differentiation of fundic mucosal lineages and the development of metaplasia following induction of acute oxyntic atrophy. Stomachs from HDC-deficient mice and wild-type mice were evaluated at 8 wk and 12 mo of age. DMP-777 was administrated orally to 6-wk-old mice for 1 to 14 days. Sections of gastric mucosa were stained with antibodies against Mist1, intrinsic factor, H/K-ATPase, trefoil factor 2 (TFF2), chromogranin A, and Ext1 and for the cell cycle marker phospho-histone H3. HDC-deficient mice at 8 wk of age demonstrated a prominent increase in chief cells expressing Mist1 and intrinsic factor. Importantly Mist1-positive mature chief cells were present in the midgland region as well as at the bases of fundic glands, indicating a premature differentiation of chief cells. Mice dually deficient for both HDC and gastrin showed a normal distribution of chief cells in fundic glands. Treatment of HDC-deficient mice with DMP-777 led to loss of parietal cells and an accelerated and exaggerated emergence of mucous cell metaplasia with the presence of dual intrinsic factor and TFF2-expressing cells throughout the gland length, indicative of the emergence of spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) from chief cells. These findings indicate that histamine, in concert with gastrin, regulates the appropriate differentiation of chief cells from mucous neck cells as they migrate toward the bases of fundic glands. Nevertheless, histamine is not required for emergence of SPEM

  6. Bilirubin release induced by tumor necrosis factor in combination with galactosamine is toxic to mice.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, W; Libert, C

    2003-08-01

    Application of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) in combination with galactosamine (GalN) in mice causes severe apoptosis of hepatocytes, resulting in complete destruction of the liver. Administration of high levels of unconjugated bilirubin and abnormally high production of unconjugated bilirubin have been reported to cause liver damage and are associated with several human pathologies. Serum alanine aminotransferase as well as total and direct bilirubin levels in mice were determined. Bilirubin levels are shown to significantly increase after a challenge with TNF/GalN in mice. Pretreatment with a heme oxygenase-1 inhibitor significantly prevents this release in bilirubin and offers significant protection against TNF/GalN-induced lethality. A correlation between the release of unconjugated bilirubin and the toxicity accompanied with this release is provided. PMID:12906872

  7. Identification of two H3-histamine receptor subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    West, R.E. Jr.; Zweig, A.; Shih, N.Y.; Siegel, M.I.; Egan, R.W.; Clark, M.A. )

    1990-11-01

    The H3-histamine receptor provides feedback inhibition of histamine synthesis and release as well as inhibition of other neurotransmitter release. We have characterized this receptor by radioligand binding studies with the H3 agonist N alpha-(3H)methylhistamine ((3H)NAMHA). The results of (3H)NAMHA saturation binding and NAMHA inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding were consistent with an apparently single class of receptors (KD = 0.37 nM, Bmax = 73 fmol/mg of protein) and competition assays with other agonists and the antagonists impromidine and dimaprit disclosed only a single class of sites. In contrast, inhibition of (3H)NAMHA binding by the specific high affinity H3 antagonist thioperamide revealed two classes of sites (KiA = 5 nM, BmaxA = 30 fmol/mg of protein; KiB = 68 nM, BmaxB = 48 fmol/mg of protein). Burimamide, another antagonist that, like thioperamide, contains a thiourea group, likewise discriminated between two classes of sites. In addition to differences between some antagonist potencies for the two receptors, there is a differential guanine nucleotide sensitivity of the two. The affinity of the H3A receptor for (3H) NAMHA was reduced less than 2-fold, whereas (3H)NAMHA binding to the H3B receptor was undetectable in the presence of guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). The distinction between H3A and H3B receptor subtypes, the former a high affinity and the latter a low affinity thioperamide site, draws support from published in vitro data.

  8. Induction of release of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes by staphylococci and staphylococcal peptidoglycans.

    PubMed Central

    Timmerman, C P; Mattsson, E; Martinez-Martinez, L; De Graaf, L; Van Strijp, J A; Verbrugh, H A; Verhoef, J; Fleer, A

    1993-01-01

    The role of cytokines in gram-positive infections is still relatively poorly defined. The purpose of this study was to establish whether or not intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans and peptidoglycan components derived from staphylococci are capable of stimulating the release of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) by human monocytes. We show here that intact staphylococci and purified peptidoglycans, isolated from three Staphylococcus epidermidis and three S. aureus strains, were indeed able to induce secretion of TNF by human monocytes in a concentration-dependent fashion. TNF release was detected by both enzyme immunoassay and the L929 fibroblast bioassay. In the enzyme immunoassay, a minimal concentration of peptidoglycan of 1 micrograms/ml was required to detect TNF release by monocytes, whereas in the bioassay a peptidoglycan concentration of 10 micrograms/ml was needed to detect a similar amount of TNF release. Peptidoglycan components such as the stem peptide, tetra- and pentaglycine, and muramyl dipeptide were unable to induce TNF release from human monocytes. PMID:8406805

  9. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Release Following Electrical Stimulation in Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Liebano, Richard Eloin; Machado, Aline Fernanda Perez

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Angiogenesis is an important phenomenon involved in the healing of chronic wounds, and it is mainly mediated by the release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from endothelial cells. Electrical stimulation (ES) is a well-documented treatment used to assist the healing of chronic wounds. Due to the importance of VEGF in the healing process, and the need to know the mechanisms of action of ES involved in the process, this report aimed to determine by a literature review whether the VEGF release occurs following ES in human subjects. Recent Advances: The findings of this literature review suggest that ES releases VEGF, and this effect may be responsible for promoting angiogenesis after ES. Critical Issues: Despite the findings of this literature review on the release of VEGF by ES on wound healing are promising, a large number of studies are needed to confirm such effects. Future Directions: Further studies should be conducted to identify the best parameters and treatment schedule of ES to be used for the VEGF release. PMID:24761350

  10. Material-mediated proangiogenic factor release pattern modulates quality of regenerated blood vessels.

    PubMed

    Rich, Max H; Lee, Min Kyung; Baek, Kwanghyun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Dong Hyun; Millet, Larry J; Bashir, Rashid; Kong, Hyunjoon

    2014-12-28

    Hydrogels designed to sustainably release bioactive molecules are extensively used to enhance tissue repair and regenerative therapies. Along this line, numerous efforts are made to control the molecular release rate and amount. In contrast, few efforts are made to control the molecular release pattern, and, subsequently, modulate the spatial organization of newly forming tissues, including blood vessels. Therefore, using a hydrogel printed to release vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into a pre-defined pattern, this study demonstrates that spatial distribution of VEGF is important in guiding growth direction of new blood vessels, and also in retaining the structural integrity of pre-existing vasculature. Guided by a computational model, we fabricated a patch composed of micro-sized VEGF-releasing poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel cylinders using an ink-jet printer. Interestingly, hydrogel printed with computationally optimized spacing created anisotropically aligned vasculature exclusively when the printed gel pattern was placed parallel to pre-existing blood vessels. In contrast, vascular sprouting from placing the printed gel pattern perpendicular to pre-existing vessels resulted in deformation and structural disintegration of the original vasculature. We envision that this study will be useful to better understand angiogenesis-modulated neovascularization and further improve the treatment quality for various wounds and tissue defects. PMID:25450405

  11. Nerve growth factor released from a novel PLGA nerve conduit can improve axon growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Keng-Min; Shea, Jill; Gale, Bruce K.; Sant, Himanshu; Larrabee, Patti; Agarwal, Jay

    2016-04-01

    Nerve injury can occur due to penetrating wounds, compression, traumatic stretch, and cold exposure. Despite prompt repair, outcomes are dismal. In an attempt to help resolve this challenge, in this work, a poly-lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) nerve conduit with associated biodegradable drug reservoir was designed, fabricated, and tested. Unlike current nerve conduits, this device is capable of fitting various clinical scenarios by delivering different drugs without reengineering the whole system. To demonstrate the potential of this device for nerve repair, a series of experiments were performed using nerve growth factor (NGF). First, an NGF dosage curve was developed to determine the minimum NGF concentration for optimal axonal outgrowth on chick dorsal root ganglia (DRG) cells. Next, PLGA devices loaded with NGF were evaluated for sustained drug release and axon growth enhancement with the released drug. A 20 d in vitro release test was conducted and the nerve conduit showed the ability to meet and maintain the minimum NGF requirement determined previously. Bioactivity assays of the released NGF showed that drug released from the device between the 15th and 20th day could still promote axon growth (76.6-95.7 μm) in chick DRG cells, which is in the range of maximum growth. These novel drug delivery conduits show the ability to deliver NGF at a dosage that efficiently promotes ex vivo axon growth and have the potential for in vivo application to help bridge peripheral nerve gaps.

  12. Influence of landscape factors on the net release rate of nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashuri, F.; Meixner, F. X.; Andreae, M. O.

    2009-04-01

    One of the most important sources of atmospheric nitric oxide (NO) are soils, which contribute approx. 30% (± 20%) to the total global NOX source. It is an ubiquitous soil characteristic that they produce and consume NO through microbial processes (mainly nitrification, but also denitrification). Meanwhile, it is state-of-the-art knowledge, that NO emissions from soils are macroscopically controlled by soil moisture, soil temperature and soil nutrient content, the so-called proximal influencing factors. However, proximal factors are influenced and/or controlled by so-called distal factors, i.e. landscape factors, like soil type, land use, vegetation cover, climate conditions, and more. To investigate the relations between proximal and distal factors and the net NO release, we have taken soil samples from the "Hattenheim" catchment, some 20 km west of Mainz, Germany. The 10 km2 catchment ranges between 80 and 620 m a.s.l. and comprises five different land use classes, namely crop fields, vineyards, grassland, deciduous forest, and mixed forest. In 2002 (October and December), as well as in 2003 (March, June, August, October) we have collected several hundreds of soil samples from these land use types (1-8 sampling plots per land use class), in order to address the seasonal variability of the selected soils. Accompanying measurements on all soil samples comprised contents of ammonium and nitrate, C/N ratio, loss of ignition, pH, and soil texture). Sieved (2 or 4 mm) sub-samples of original composite soil samples (each consisting of at least 10 core samples taken from the top 5cm of the soil) were incubated in a 1 L cuvette in the laboratory. The soil containing cuvette was then used as a dynamic chamber to measure the net release rate of NO at 25˚ C, covering the entire soil moisture range (0-100%) and two different headspace NO concentrations. From these laboratory studies, parameterization of the net NO release rate in terms of soil moisture was derived. We

  13. Identification of the major fibroblast growth factors released spontaneously in inflammatory arthritis as platelet derived growth factor and tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, S C; Por, S B; Penny, R; Richter, M; Shelley, L; Breit, S N

    1991-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and proliferation of a number of important elements within the joint including the synovial fibroblasts. Elevated levels of a number of cytokines such as Il-1, IL-2, IL-6, interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma), transforming growth factor-beta and tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) have been detected in the synovial fluid of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory arthritides. It seems likely that local release of such mediators may be responsible for the proliferation and overgrowth of connective tissue elements in these disorders. In order to ascertain whether there was evidence to suggest local production or release of fibroblast growth factors in the joint in inflammatory arthritis, and to determine their identity, cells were obtained from the synovial fluid of 15 patients with chronic inflammatory arthritides. All subjects' synovial fluid cells spontaneously released growth factor activity for fibroblasts. This was present in large amounts, being detectable in culture supernatants diluted to a titre of at least 1/625. By a series of depletion experiments using solid-phase bound antibodies to cytokines, it was possible to demonstrate that this activity was due to TNF-alpha and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Thus, this study showed for the first time that functionally active PDGF was released from synovial fluid cells. Both PDGF and TNF-alpha appeared to contribute in approximately equal amounts to this fibroblast growth factor activity, and were synergistic in effect. Thus this study provides evidence for the local production and release of these two cytokines and suggests that together they are the dominant factors in fibroblast proliferation within the synovial cavity. PMID:1914237

  14. Studies on the biological effects of ozone: 10. Release of factors from ozonated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Valacchi, G; Bocci, V

    1999-01-01

    In a previous work we have shown that heparin, in the presence of ozone (O3), promotes a dose-dependent platelet aggregation, while after Ca2+ chelation with citrate, platelet aggregation is almost negligible. These results led us to think that aggregation may enhance the release of platelet components. We have here shown that indeed significantly higher amount of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are released in a dose-dependent manner after ozonation of heparinised platelet-rich plasma samples. These findings may explain the enhanced healing of torpid ulcers in patients with chronic limb ischemia treated with O3 autohaemoteraphy (O3-AHT). PMID:10704074

  15. Influence of Formulation Factors and Compression Force on Release Profile of Sustained Release Metoprolol Tablets using Compritol® 888ATO as Lipid Excipient

    PubMed Central

    Patere, Shilpa N.; Kapadia, Chhanda J.; Nagarsenker, Mangal S.

    2015-01-01

    Tablets containing metoprolol succinate and Compritol® 888ATO in the ratio of 1:2 yielded the desired sustained release profile in phosphate buffer pH 6.8 when evaluated using USP type II paddle apparatus and was selected as the optimized formulation. Robustness of optimized formulation was assessed by studying the effect of factors like varying source of metoprolol succinate and Compritol® 888ATO, compression force and hydroalcoholic dissolution medium on the release profile. No significant difference (P>0.05) in release profile was observed when metoprolol succinate from three different sources and Compritol® 888ATO from two different batches were used. Release profile of sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate in media containing various concentrations of ethanol was comparable with media devoid of ethanol as evaluated by f2 test. This indicated that release profile of sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate was reliable with no significant change due to variation in source of active pharmaceutical ingredient, particularly due to particle size distribution. Sustained release tablets of metoprolol succinate yielded release pattern within specifications irrespective of presence or absence of ethanol in the medium indicating that release properties of Compritol® 888ATO matrix are not affected by ethanol. Tablets compressed at compression force of <100 kg/cm2 exhibited low hardness with total porosity of 15.39% and significantly increased (P<0.05) metoprolol succinate release as compared to tablets compressed at 2000 kg/cm2 with 6.90% of total porosity revealing influence of compression force. Compritol® 888ATO holds great potential in providing reliable and controlled release profile of highly water soluble metoprolol succinate. PMID:26798179

  16. Macrophage activation by factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes: Potential role of HMGB1

    SciTech Connect

    Dragomir, Ana-Cristina; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2011-06-15

    Toxic doses of acetaminophen (AA) cause hepatocellular necrosis. Evidence suggests that activated macrophages contribute to the pathogenic process; however, the factors that activate these cells are unknown. In these studies, we assessed the role of mediators released from AA-injured hepatocytes in macrophage activation. Treatment of macrophages with conditioned medium (CM) collected 24 hr after treatment of mouse hepatocytes with 5 mM AA (CM-AA) resulted in increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Macrophage expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and catalase mRNA was also upregulated by CM-AA, as well as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and 12/15-lipoxygenase (LOX). CM-AA also upregulated expression of the proinflammatory chemokines, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2. The effects of CM-AA on expression of COX-2, MIP-1{alpha} and MIP-2 were inhibited by blockade of p44/42 MAP kinase, suggesting a biochemical mechanism mediating macrophage activation. Hepatocytes injured by AA were found to release HMGB1, a potent macrophage activator. This was inhibited by pretreatment of hepatocytes with ethyl pyruvate (EP), which blocks HMGB1 release. EP also blocked CM-AA induced ROS production and antioxidant expression, and reduced expression of COX-2, but not MIP-1{alpha} or MIP-2. These findings suggest that HMGB1 released by AA-injured hepatocytes contributes to macrophage activation. This is supported by our observation that expression of the HMGB1 receptor RAGE is upregulated in macrophages in response to CM-AA. These data indicate that AA-injured hepatocytes contribute to the inflammatory environment in the liver through the release of mediators such as HMGB1. Blocking HMGB1/RAGE may be a useful approach to limiting classical macrophage activation and AA-induced hepatotoxicity. - Research Highlights: > These studies analyze macrophage activation by mediators released from acetaminophen-damaged hepatocytes. > Factors released from acetaminophen-injured hepatocytes induce

  17. Role of arachidonic acid metabolism on corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-release induced by interleukin-1 from superfused rat hypothalami.

    PubMed

    Cambronero, J C; Rivas, F J; Borrell, J; Guaza, C

    1992-07-01

    The present work shows that the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-releasing activity of interleukin-1 (IL-1) is partially inhibited by a phospholipase A2 (mepacrine) or a cyclooxygenase (indomethacin) inhibitor, but is not affected by inhibition of the lypoxygenase pathway with norhydroguaiaretic acid. These results indicate that the metabolism of arachidonic acid plays an important role as mediator of the effects of IL-1 on CRF release. It is also shown that products of the cyclooxygenase activity such as prostaglandins can stimulate CRF secretion by a direct action on the hypothalamus. Whereas PGE2 failed to induce increases on CRF release, PGF2 alpha stimulated in a dose-dependent manner (21-340 nM), the CRF release from continuous perifused hypothalami. It is suggested that PGF2 alpha could be involved as a messenger in the hypothalamic CRF secretion induced by IL-1. PMID:1619039

  18. The effects of human corticotrophin releasing factor on motor and cognitive deficits after impact acceleration injury.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, A; Marmarou, C; Marmarou, A

    2000-10-01

    Corticotrophin releasing factor has been shown in several models of tissue injury to be an effective treatment for edema. In a previous study we demonstrated this ability in two models of traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to assess whether human corticotrophin releasing factor (hCRF) could additionally improve motor and cognitive deficits. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomised into five groups and injured with the Impact Acceleration Model of TBI. Groups I and II received sham injury followed by treatment with either drug vehicle or 100 micrograms kg-1 hCRF respectively. Group III was injured with no treatment; Group IV animals were injured and treated with 50 micrograms kg-1 hCRF and Group V were injured and treated with 100 micrograms kg-1 hCRF. Animals were assessed both before and after injury with a battery of standardised neuropsychological tests including the Morris Water Maze, the Beam Walk Test, the Beam Balance Test and the Inclined Plane Test. Both 50 micrograms kg-1 and 100 micrograms kg-1 hCRF caused significant improvements in motor and cognitive functioning, confirming that in addition to edema-reducing properties, human corticotrophin releasing factor is also capable of improving motor and cognitive functioning. Given the beneficial experimental effects of this compound, hCRF may be a useful clinical treatment, which requires formal evaluation. PMID:11091970

  19. Comprehensive Analysis of Stop Codon Usage in Bacteria and Its Correlation with Release Factor Abundance*

    PubMed Central

    Korkmaz, Gürkan; Holm, Mikael; Wiens, Tobias; Sanyal, Suparna

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of stop codon usage in bacteria by analyzing over eight million coding sequences of 4684 bacterial sequences. Using a newly developed program called “stop codon counter,” the frequencies of the three classical stop codons TAA, TAG, and TGA were analyzed, and a publicly available stop codon database was built. Our analysis shows that with increasing genomic GC content the frequency of the TAA codon decreases and that of the TGA codon increases in a reciprocal manner. Interestingly, the release factor 1-specific codon TAG maintains a more or less uniform frequency (∼20%) irrespective of the GC content. The low abundance of TAG is also valid with respect to expression level of the genes ending with different stop codons. In contrast, the highly expressed genes predominantly end with TAA, ensuring termination with either of the two release factors. Using three model bacteria with different stop codon usage (Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium smegmatis, and Bacillus subtilis), we show that the frequency of TAG and TGA codons correlates well with the relative steady state amount of mRNA and protein for release factors RF1 and RF2 during exponential growth. Furthermore, using available microarray data for gene expression, we show that in both fast growing and contrasting biofilm formation conditions, the relative level of RF1 is nicely correlated with the expression level of the genes ending with TAG. PMID:25217634

  20. Control of gastric acid secretion. Histamine H2-receptor antagonists and H+K(+)-ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shamburek, R D; Schubert, M L

    1992-09-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by an intricate interplay of neural (acetylcholine), hormonal (gastrin), and paracrine (histamine, somatostatin) mechanisms. Receptors for each of these agents and the signal transduction pathways to which these receptors are coupled have been identified on the parietal cell. The stimulatory effect of acetylcholine and gastrin is mediated by an increase in cytosolic calcium, whereas that of histamine is mediated by activation of adenylate cyclase and generation of cAMP. Strong potentiation between histamine and either gastrin or acetylcholine reflects postreceptor interaction between the distinct pathways as well as the ability of acetylcholine and gastrin to release histamine from mucosal ECL cells. The inhibitory effects of somatostatin on acid secretion are mediated by receptors coupled by guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. All the pathways converge on and modulate the activity of the luminal enzyme, H+K(+)-ATPase, the proton pump of the parietal cell. Precise information on the mechanisms involved in gastric acid secretion has led to the development of potent drugs capable of inhibiting acid secretion. These include competitive antagonists that interact with stimulatory receptors (e.g., histamine H2-receptor antagonists) as well as noncompetitive inhibitors of H+K(+)-ATPase (e.g., omeprazole). The histamine H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, and nizatidine) continue as first-line therapy for peptic ulcer disease and are effective in preventing relapse. Although they are generally well tolerated, histamine H2-receptor antagonists may cause untoward CNS, cardiac, and endocrine effects as well as interference with the absorption, metabolism, and elimination of various drugs. Omeprazole is a weak base that reaches the parietal cell through the bloodstream, diffuses through the cytoplasm, and becomes activated and trapped as a sulfenamide in the acidic

  1. Effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide, helodermin and galanin on responses of guinea-pig lung parenchyma to histamine, acetylcholine and leukotriene D4.

    PubMed Central

    Conroy, D. M.; Samhoun, M. N.; Piper, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    1. The effect of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was studied on the contractile response of guinea-pig lung parenchymal strips (GPP) induced by bronchoconstrictor agonists, such as leukotriene D4 (LTD4), histamine and acetylcholine (ACh). This effect of VIP was compared with helodermin, a peptide that is structurally related to VIP, and galanin, another neuropeptide that is thought to co-exist with VIP. 2. VIP (10 nM) induced a potent and reversible inhibition of the contractions of GPP induced by LTD4 (1-30 pmol) but did not affect those due to ACh (1-100 nmol) or histamine (1-30 nmol). A ten fold higher concentration of VIP (100 nM) did not further inhibit LTD4-induced responses or reduce those induced by histamine or ACh. 3. Helodermin (10 nM) had a similar inhibitory effect on contractions of GPP induced by LTD4 (3-30 pmol) but did not affect contractions induced by histamine (1-10 nmol). 4. Indomethacin (2.8 microM) and salbutamol (10 nM) significantly reduced responses elicited by LTD4 and histamine but not those due to ACh. A ten fold higher concentration of salbutamol (100 nM) further inhibited the contractions due to LTD4 and histamine and at this concentration responses induced by ACh were inhibited. 5. VIP (10 nM) and helodermin (10 nM) significantly reduced the LTD4-induced release of thromboxane A2 (TXA2), measured as TxB2 by radioimmunoassay, from GPP. The smaller release of TxA2 induced by histamine was not significantly reduced in the presence of VIP. 6. In comparative studies, galanin (10-100 nM) did not affect contractions of GPP induced by either LTD4, histamine or ACh.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1725762

  2. Factors released from endocardium of the ferret and pig modulate myocardial contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, J A; Shah, A M; Lewis, M J

    1991-01-01

    1. In isolated heart muscle preparations, selective removal of the endocardium results in a characteristic and unusual negative inotropic effect. Possible mechanisms for this effect were investigated in this study. 2. In endocardium-intact preparations of ferret papillary muscle, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, sodium nitroprusside, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and substance P each induced changes in contractile behaviour similar to selective endocardial removal, and each significantly elevated myocardial cyclic GMP levels. Substance P failed to elevate myocardial cyclic GMP levels following removal of endocardium or in the presence of haemoglobin, suggesting that it may act by releasing endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) from endocardium. However, there was no change in myocardial cyclic GMP levels following endocardium removal alone. 3. In cascade bioassay experiments, it was confirmed that porcine cultured endocardial cells released an unstable humoral agent whose effects on an endothelium-denuded pig coronary artery were indistinguishable from EDRF. 4. The negative inotropic effects of endocardium removal were reversed in bioassay experiments where an endocardium-denuded papillary muscle was exposed to the effluent from a column of porcine cultured endocardial cells on microcarrier beads. This demonstrates for the first time the release of a 'contraction prolonging factor' from endocardium, the tonic release of which would explain the negative inotropic effect of endocardium removal. 5. It is concluded that elevation of ferret papillary muscle cyclic GMP (as for example with EDRF) produces changes in contractile performance similar to those induced by endocardium removal. We also demonstrate that superfused porcine cultured endocardial cells release a humoral agent (provisionally named 'endocardin') which causes reversal of the changes in mechanical properties seen after endocardial removal. PMID:1716674

  3. Characterization of α-taxilin as a novel factor controlling the release of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Elgner, Fabian; Donnerhak, Christian; Ren, Huimei; Medvedev, Regina; Schreiber, André; Weber, Lorenz; Heilmann, Markus; Ploen, Daniela; Himmelsbach, Kiyoshi; Finkernagel, Malin; Klingel, Karin; Hildt, Eberhard

    2016-01-15

    Although it is well established that the release of HCV (hepatitis C virus) occurs through the secretory pathway, many aspects concerning the control of this process are not yet fully understood. α-Taxilin was identified as a novel binding partner of syntaxin-4 and of other members of the syntaxin family, which are part of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) complexes and so are involved in intracellular vesicle traffic. Since α-taxilin prevents t-SNARE (target SNARE) formation by binding exclusively to free syntaxin-4, it exerts an inhibitory effect on the vesicular transport. HCV-replicating Huh7.5 cells and HCV-infected primary human hepatocytes and liver samples of patients suffering from chronic HCV contain significantly less α-taxilin compared with the controls. HCV impairs the expression of α-taxilin via NS5A-dependent interruption of the Raf/MEK [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase)/ERK (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase) kinase] signal transduction cascade. Moreover, the half-life of α-taxilin is significantly reduced in HCV-replicating cells. Whereas modulation of α-taxilin expression does not significantly affect genome replication, the overexpression of α-taxilin prevents the release of HCV. In contrast with this, silencing of α-taxilin expression leads to increased release of infectious viral particles. This is due to the negative effect of α-taxilin on t-SNARE formation that leads to impaired vesicular trafficking. Accordingly, overexpression of the t-SNARE component syntaxin-4 increases release of HCV, whereas silencing leads to an impaired release. These data identify α-taxilin as a novel factor that controls the release of HCV and reveal the mechanism by which HCV controls the activity of α-taxilin. PMID:26527738

  4. The Transcription Factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 Controls Border-Like Cell Release1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Karve, Rucha

    2016-01-01

    The root cap covers the tip of the root and functions to protect the root from environmental stress. Cells in the last layer of the root cap are known as border cells, or border-like cells (BLCs) in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). These cells separate from the rest of the root cap and are released from its edge as a layer of living cells. BLC release is developmentally regulated, but the mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we show that the transcription factor NIN-LIKE PROTEIN7 (NLP7) is required for the proper release of BLCs in Arabidopsis. Mutations in NLP7 lead to BLCs that are released as single cells instead of an entire layer. NLP7 is highly expressed in BLCs and is activated by exposure to low pH, a condition that causes BLCs to be released as single cells. Mutations in NLP7 lead to decreased levels of cellulose and pectin. Cell wall-loosening enzymes such as CELLULASE5 (CEL5) and a pectin lyase-like gene, as well as the root cap regulators SOMBRERO and BEARSKIN1/2, are activated in nlp7-1 seedlings. Double mutant analysis revealed that the nlp7-1 phenotype depends on the expression level of CEL5. Mutations in NLP7 lead to an increase in susceptibility to a root-infecting fungal pathogen. Together, these data suggest that NLP7 controls the release of BLCs by acting through the cell wall-loosening enzyme CEL5. PMID:27221617

  5. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  6. Outrage Factors in Government Press Releases of Food Risk and Their Influence on News Media Coverage.

    PubMed

    Ju, Youngkee; Lim, Jeongsub; Shim, Minsun; You, Myoungsoon

    2015-08-01

    An appropriate level of risk perception should be a critical issue in modern "risk society." There have been many studies on the influences on risk perception. This study investigates whether risk communication scholar Dr. Peter Sandman's outrage factors intensify journalistic attention to health risks from food consumption. A content analysis of a health institution's press releases was conducted to examine 15 outrage factors of food risks conveyed in the governmental risk communication. In addition, the news stories covering the food risks informed by the press releases were calculated to evaluate the relation between outrage factors of a risk and the number of news stories covering the risk. Results showed that controllability was the most salient outrage factor, followed by trust, voluntariness, familiarity, and human origin; the greater the outrage score of a risk, the more news stories of the risk. For individual outrage factors, a risk with an implication of catastrophic potential was associated with an increase of news stories. Food providers' distrustful behaviors also influenced journalistic attention to the food risks. The implication of the findings to health message designers is discussed. PMID:26065830

  7. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors

    PubMed Central

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin’ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  8. Anti-inflammatory drugs for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: focus on skeletal muscle-releasing factors.

    PubMed

    Miyatake, Shouta; Shimizu-Motohashi, Yuko; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), an incurable and a progressive muscle wasting disease, is caused by the absence of dystrophin protein, leading to recurrent muscle fiber damage during contraction. The inflammatory response to fiber damage is a compelling candidate mechanism for disease exacerbation. The only established pharmacological treatment for DMD is corticosteroids to suppress muscle inflammation, however this treatment is limited by its insufficient therapeutic efficacy and considerable side effects. Recent reports show the therapeutic potential of inhibiting or enhancing pro- or anti-inflammatory factors released from DMD skeletal muscles, resulting in significant recovery from muscle atrophy and dysfunction. We discuss and review the recent findings of DMD inflammation and opportunities for drug development targeting specific releasing factors from skeletal muscles. It has been speculated that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs targeting specific inflammatory factors are more effective and have less side effects for DMD compared with steroidal drugs. For example, calcium channels, reactive oxygen species, and nuclear factor-κB signaling factors are the most promising targets as master regulators of inflammatory response in DMD skeletal muscles. If they are combined with an oligonucleotide-based exon skipping therapy to restore dystrophin expression, the anti-inflammatory drug therapies may address the present therapeutic limitation of low efficiency for DMD. PMID:27621596

  9. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. PMID:26939881

  10. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor produced and released from artery and vein is nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Ignarro, L.J.; Buga, G.M.; Wood, K.S.; Byrns, R.E.; Chaudhuri, G.

    1987-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) is responsible for the vascular smooth muscle relaxation elicited by endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF). EDRF is an unstable humoral substance released from artery and vein that mediates the action of endothelium-dependent vasodilators. NO is and unstable endothelium-independent vasodilator that is released from vasodilator drugs such as nitroprusside and glyceryl trinitrate. The authors have repeatedly observed that the actions of NO on vascular smooth muscle closely resemble those of EDRF. In the present study the vascular effects of EDRF released from perfused bovine intrapulmonary artery and vein were compared with the effects of NO delivered by superfusion over endothelium-denuded arterial and venous strips arranged in a cascade. EDRF was indistinguishable from NO in that both were labile inactivated by pyrogallol or superoxide anion, stabilized by superoxide dismutase, and inhibited by oxyhemoglobin or potassium. Both EDRF and NO produced comparable increases in cyclic GMP accumulation in artery and vein, and this cyclic GMP accumulation was inhibited by pyrogallol, oxyhemoglobin, potassium, and methylene blue. EDRF was identified chemically as NO, or a labile nitroso species, by two procedures. Thus, EDRF released from artery and vein possesses identical and biological and chemical properties as NO.

  11. Increased histamine sensitivity in mice after administration of endotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, R K; Munoz, J J

    1977-01-01

    CFW mice given submicrogram doses of endotoxins intravenously became highly susceptible to the lethal effects of 0.5 mg of histamine given intraperitoneally 1 to 2 h later. The histamine-sensitizing effects of the endotoxins were transitory and disappeared within 6 to 8 h. L-Epinephrine administered intravenously immediately after histamine challenge protected mice from death, but aterenol and isoproterenol were ineffective. The histamine-sensitizing effect in endotoxins was precipitated by anti-endotoxin sera with a concomitant eightfold loss in activity. However, dissociation of the immune complex in 0.25 M acetic acid fully restored histamine-sensitizing activity. The transitory nature of the hypersensitivity produced by endotoxin and the high heat resistance of the active material prove that it is different from the histamine-sensitizing effects of pertussigen. PMID:188767

  12. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  13. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration. PMID:22070192

  14. Calcium-Alginate Hydrogel-Encapsulated Fibroblasts Provide Sustained Release of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Nicola C.; Shelton, Richard M.; Henderson, Deborah J.

    2013-01-01

    Vascularization of engineered or damaged tissues is essential to maintain cell viability and proper tissue function. Revascularization of the left ventricle (LV) of the heart after myocardial infarction is particularly important, since hypoxia can give rise to chronic heart failure due to inappropriate remodeling of the LV after death of cardiomyocytes (CMs). Fibroblasts can express vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which plays a major role in angiogenesis and also acts as a chemoattractant and survival factor for CMs and cardiac progenitors. In this in vitro model study, mouse NIH 3T3 fibroblasts encapsulated in 2% w/v Ca-alginate were shown to remain viable for 150 days. Semiquantitative reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and immunohistochemistry demonstrated that over 21 days of encapsulation, fibroblasts continued to express VEGF, while enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay showed that there was sustained release of VEGF from the Ca-alginate during this period. The scaffold degraded gradually over the 21 days, without reduction in volume. Cells released from the Ca-alginate at 7 and 21 days as a result of scaffold degradation were shown to retain viability, to adhere to fibronectin in a normal manner, and continue to express VEGF, demonstrating their potential to further contribute to maintenance of cardiac function after scaffold degradation. This model in vitro study therefore demonstrates that fibroblasts encapsulated in Ca-alginate provide sustained release of VEGF. PMID:23082964

  15. Cyclic strain alters the expression and release of angiogenic factors by human tendon cells.

    PubMed

    Mousavizadeh, Rouhollah; Khosravi, Shahram; Behzad, Hayedeh; McCormack, Robert G; Duronio, Vincent; Scott, Alex

    2014-01-01

    Angiogenesis is associated with the tissue changes underlying chronic overuse tendinopathy. We hypothesized that repetitive, cyclic loading of human tendon cells would lead to increased expression and activity of angiogenic factors. We subjected isolated human tendon cells to overuse tensile loading using an in vitro model (1 Hz, 10% equibiaxial strain). We found that mechanically stimulated human tendon cells released factors that promoted in vitro proliferation and tube formation by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). In response to cyclic strain, there was a transient increase in the expression of several angiogenic genes including ANGPTL4, FGF-2, COX-2, SPHK1, TGF-alpha, VEGF-A and VEGF-C, with no change in anti-angiogenic genes (BAI1, SERPINF1, THBS1 and 2, TIMP1-3). Cyclic strain also resulted in the extracellular release of ANGPTL4 protein by tendon cells. Our study is the first report demonstrating the induction of ANGPTL4 mRNA and release of ANGPTL4 protein in response to cyclic strain. Tenocytes may contribute to the upregulation of angiogenesis during the development of overuse tendinopathy. PMID:24824595

  16. Multiple conversion between the genes encoding bacterial class-I release factors

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Sohta A.; Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria require two class-I release factors, RF1 and RF2, that recognize stop codons and promote peptide release from the ribosome. RF1 and RF2 were most likely established through gene duplication followed by altering their stop codon specificities in the common ancestor of extant bacteria. This scenario expects that the two RF gene families have taken independent evolutionary trajectories after the ancestral gene duplication event. However, we here report two independent cases of conversion between RF1 and RF2 genes (RF1-RF2 gene conversion), which were severely examined by procedures incorporating the maximum-likelihood phylogenetic method. In both cases, RF1-RF2 gene conversion was predicted to occur in the region encoding nearly entire domain 3, of which functions are common between RF paralogues. Nevertheless, the ‘direction’ of gene conversion appeared to be opposite from one another—from RF2 gene to RF1 gene in one case, while from RF1 gene to RF2 gene in the other. The two cases of RF1-RF2 gene conversion prompt us to propose two novel aspects in the evolution of bacterial class-I release factors: (i) domain 3 is interchangeable between RF paralogues, and (ii) RF1-RF2 gene conversion have occurred frequently in bacterial genome evolution. PMID:26257102

  17. Synthesis of New Thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidines as Corticotropin Releasing Factor Modulators

    PubMed Central

    Kuppast, Bhimanna; Spyridaki, Katerina; Lynch, Christophina; Hu, Yueshan; Liapakis, George; Davies, Gareth E.; Fahmy, Hesham

    2015-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neurohormone that plays a crucial role in integrating the body’s overall response to stress. It appears necessary and sufficient for the organism to mount functional, physiological and endocrine responses to stressors. CRF is released in response to various triggers such as chronic stress. The role of CRF and its involvement in these neurological disorders suggest that new drugs that can target the CRF function or bind to its receptors may represent a new development of neuropsychiatric medicines to treat various stress-related disorders including depression, anxiety and addictive disorders. Based on pharmacophore of the CRF1 receptor antagonists, a new series of thiazolo[4,5-d] pyrimidines were synthesized as Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor modulators and the prepared compounds carry groups shown to produce optimum binding affinity to CRF receptors. Twenty two compounds were evaluated for their CRF1 receptor binding affinity in HEK 293 cell lines and two compounds 5o and 5s showed approximately 25% binding affinity to CRF1 receptors. Selected compounds (5c and 5f) were also evaluated for their effect on expression of genes associated with depression and anxiety disorders such as CRF1, CREB, MAO-A, SERT, NPY, DatSLC6a3, and DBH and significant upregulation of CRF1 mRNA has been observed with compound 5c. PMID:25059547

  18. Synthesis of new thiazolo[4,5-d]pyrimidines as Corticotropin releasing factor modulators.

    PubMed

    Kuppast, Bhimanna; Spyridaki, Katerina; Lynch, Christophina; Hu, Yueshan; Liapakis, George; Davies, Gareth E; Fahmy, Hesham

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a neurohormone that plays a crucial role in integrating the body's overall response to stress. It appears necessary and sufficient for the organism to mount functional, physiological and endocrine responses to stressors. CRF is released in response to various triggers such as chronic stress. The role of CRF and its involvement in these neurological disorders suggest that new drugs that can target the CRF function or bind to its receptors may represent a new development of neuropsychiatric medicines to treat various stress-related disorders including depression, anxiety and addictive disorders. Based on pharmacophore of the CRF1 receptor antagonists, a new series of thiazolo[4,5-d] pyrimidines were synthesized as Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptor modulators and the prepared compounds carry groups shown to produce optimum binding affinity to CRF receptors. Twenty two compounds were evaluated for their CRF1 receptor binding affinity in HEK 293 cell lines and two compounds 5o and 5s showed approximately 25% binding affinity to CRF1 receptors. Selected compounds (5c and 5f) were also evaluated for their effect on expression of genes associated with depression and anxiety disorders such as CRF1, CREB1, MAO-A, SERT, NPY, DatSLC6a3, and DBH and significant upregulation of CRF1 mRNA has been observed with compound 5c. PMID:25059547

  19. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2015-02-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatic crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was increased by 2.4-fold compared with that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed compared to

  20. Injectable gelatin derivative hydrogels with sustained vascular endothelial growth factor release for induced angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Tiejun; Ding, Chen; Ma, Chi; Sun, Hongchen; Li, Shirong; Liu, Xiaohua

    2014-01-01

    Injectable biomaterials are attractive for soft tissue regeneration because they are handled in a minimally invasive manner and can easily adapt to complex defects. However, inadequate vascularization of the injectable constructs has long been a barrier, leading to necrosis or volume reduction after implantation. In this work, we developed a three-step process to synthesize injectable gelatin-derived hydrogels that are capable of controlling growth factor delivery to induce angiogenesis. In our approach, tyramine was first introduced into gelatin chains to provide enzymatical crosslinking points for gel formation after injection. Next, heparin, a polysaccharide with binding domains to many growth factors, was covalently linked to the tyramine-modified gelatin. Finally, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was incorporated into the gelatin derivative by binding with the heparin in the gelatin derivative, and an injectable gel with controlled VEGF release was formed by an enzymatic catalytic reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The gelation time, mechanical properties and degradation of the gel was readily tailored by the gelatin concentration and the ratio of H2O2/HRP. Binding VEGF to heparin stabilizes this growth factor, protects it from denaturation and proteolytic degradation, and subsequently prolongs the sustained release. An in vitro release study and bioactivity assay indicated that the VEGF was released in a sustained manner with high bioactivity for over 3 weeks. Furthermore, a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and animal experiments were performed to evaluate in vivo bioactivity of the VEGF released from the hydrogels. After 5 days of incubation on CAM, the number of blood vessels surrounding the heparin-modified hydrogels was 2.4-fold increase than that of the control group. Deeper and denser cell infiltration and angiogenesis in the heparin-modified gelatin/VEGF gels were observed than in the controls

  1. Insufficient intake of L-histidine reduces brain histamine and causes anxiety-like behaviors in male mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeo; Nakamura, Tadaho; Shibakusa, Tetsuro; Sugita, Mayu; Naganuma, Fumito; Iida, Tomomitsu; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb; Harada, Ryuichi; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2014-10-01

    L-histidine is one of the essential amino acids for humans, and it plays a critical role as a component of proteins. L-histidine is also important as a precursor of histamine. Brain histamine is synthesized from L-histidine in the presence of histidine decarboxylase, which is expressed in histamine neurons. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the importance of dietary L-histidine as a precursor of brain histamine and the histaminergic nervous system. C57BL/6J male mice at 8 wk of age were assigned to 2 different diets for at least 2 wk: the control (Con) diet (5.08 g L-histidine/kg diet) or the low L-histidine diet (LHD) (1.28 g L-histidine/kg diet). We measured the histamine concentration in the brain areas of Con diet-fed mice (Con group) and LHD-fed mice (LHD group). The histamine concentration was significantly lower in the LHD group [Con group vs. LHD group: histamine in cortex (means ± SEs): 13.9 ± 1.25 vs. 9.36 ± 0.549 ng/g tissue; P = 0.002]. Our in vivo microdialysis assays revealed that histamine release stimulated by high K(+) from the hypothalamus in the LHD group was 60% of that in the Con group (P = 0.012). However, the concentrations of other monoamines and their metabolites were not changed by the LHD. The open-field tests showed that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the central zone (87.6 ± 14.1 vs. 50.0 ± 6.03 s/10 min; P = 0.019), and the light/dark box tests demonstrated that the LHD group spent a shorter amount of time in the light box (198 ± 8.19 vs. 162 ± 14.1 s/10 min; P = 0.048), suggesting that the LHD induced anxiety-like behaviors. However, locomotor activity, memory functions, and social interaction did not differ between the 2 groups. The results of the present study demonstrated that insufficient intake of histidine reduced the brain histamine content, leading to anxiety-like behaviors in the mice. PMID:25056690

  2. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  3. Immunostimulating activities of the novel peptidomimetic L-glutamyl-histamine

    PubMed Central

    Babizhayev, M A; Semiletov, Y A; Lul’kin, Y A; Sakina, N L; Savel’yeva, E L; Alimbarova, L M; Barinskii, I P

    2005-01-01

    An original representative of histamine-containing peptidomimetics L-glutamyl-histamine (L-Glu-Hist) was synthesized and characterized as a cytokine mimic leading to cellular responses of improved specificity. The energy-minimized 3-D conformations of L-Glu-Hist derived from its chemical structure resulted in stabilization for Fe2+ chelating complexes. L-Glu-Hist accelerated the decrease of ferrous iron in the ferrous sulphate solution in a concentration-dependent mode and showed the ferroxidase-like activity at concentrations less than 3 mm in the phenanthroline assay, whereas in the concentration range 3–20 mm L-Glu-Hist restricted the availability of Fe2+ to phenanthroline due to binding of ferrous ions in chelating complexes. L-Glu-Hist showed a stimulatory effect on phosphatidylcholine liposomal peroxidation (LPO) catalysed by the superoxide anion radical ()-generating system (Fe2++ ascorbate) at low (less or about 1 mm) L-Glu-Hist concentrations and both revealed the inhibitory effect on LPO in this system of high (∼ 10 mm) L-Glu-Hist concentration. L-Glu-Hist released in concentrations which stimulated [3H]-thymidine incorporation into DNA and proliferation of mouse spleen lymphocytes and mononuclear cells from human blood. The structural peptide-like analogues of L-Glu-Hist such as L-Glu-Trp, carcinine (β-alanylhistamine), but not L-Pro-Glu-Trp were active in stimulating thymidine incorporation and in inducing proliferation of mononuclear cells compared to mitogen concanavalin A at doses 2·5–25·0 µg/ml. Our data provide evidence that L-Glu-Hist may act as a very fast and sensitive trigger for lymphocyte proliferation and immunoregulation. PMID:15730390

  4. Facile method to prepare silk fibroin/hyaluronic acid films for vascular endothelial growth factor release.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Juan; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Xunwei; Shi, Lijun; Zhu, Jun; Wei, Daixu; Zhong, Jian; Sun, Gang; He, Dannong

    2016-06-01

    A facile approach was proposed to prepare silk fibroin (SF) and hyaluronic acid (HA) composite films from aqueous solution without crosslinking or any post treatment. Only by controlling the HA content and film formation temperature during the film casting, the HA/SF films with different composition were prepared. The films were then characterized by structural characteristics, thermal stability, morphology, water stability, water absorption, mechanical properties. After immersing in water for 24h, all of the films showed good structural integrity. The degradation rate of the HA/SF films in protease XIV can be controlled by changing the film formation temperature and HA content. Decreasing the temperature and adding HA resulted in the rapid release of VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) from the HA/SF films. Overall, the 5% HA/SF films formed at 37°C with more rapid VEGF release exhibited great potential in drug delivery, especially when the rapid vascularization was needed. PMID:27083373

  5. Histamine operates Cl -gated channels in crayfish neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Cebada, Jorge; García, Ubaldo

    2007-11-01

    We describe a histamine-activated Cl(-) conductance in the X-organ neurons from crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, which has comparable properties to the homomultimeric histamine-gated ion channels described in Drosophila. Topical application of histamine inhibited spontaneous neuronal firing in the X-organ sinus gland tract, concomitant with an increase in the membrane conductance. In X-organ neurons in culture and under voltage-clamp conditions, histamine evoked outward currents at -40 mV that reversed at the Cl(-) equilibrium potential. Histamine sensitivity in these neurons had a half-maximal response (EC(50))=3.3+/-1 micromol l(-1), with a Hill number of 2.6+/-0.4. The histamine-evoked current was blocked by tiotidine, cimetidine, ranitidine and 256+/-11 and 483+/-11 micromol l(-1), respectively) and d-tubocurarine (IC(50)=21+/-2 micromol l(-1)), but was insensitive to picrotoxin, bicuculline and strychnine. Neither GABA nor glutamate was capable of desensitizing the histamine response, indicating that histamine activates a particular Cl(-) conductance. The presence of immunoreactive neurons to histamine in the medulla terminalis with axonal projections to the neuropile suggests a possible histaminergic modulation of the X-organ sinus gland system. PMID:17981864

  6. Decrease in blood histamine in drug-treated parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Coelho, M H; Silva, I J; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1991-04-01

    Blood histamine and serum histaminase activity were determined in a group of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and in a group of healthy controls. Untreated PD patients present significantly higher blood histamine than normal controls. Therapy with L-dopa + cardidopa results in a significant decrease in blood histamine. This decrease becomes more accentuated when anticholinergics are added to this therapy. No significant changes were detected in plasma histaminase. The authors suggest, as a hypothesis, that the CNS contributes to blood histamine concentration and that its rise is the result of increased neuronal destruction. PMID:1910360

  7. Inhibition by somatostatin (growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone, GH-RIH) of gastric acid and pepsin and G-cell release of gastrin.

    PubMed Central

    Barros D'sa, A A; Bloom, S R; Baron, J H

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin (cyclic growth-hormone release-inhibiting hormone--GH-RIH) was infused into dogs with gastric fistulae. Somatostatin inhibited gastric acid response to four gastric stimulants--insulin, food, histamine, and pentagastrin. Histamine- and pentagastrin-stimulated pepsins were inhibited similarly to inhibition of acid. Somatostatin inhibited the gastrin response to insulin and food. PMID:348581

  8. A novel collagen/platelet-rich plasma (COL/PRP) scaffold: preparation and growth factor release analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiujie; Wang, Jingwei; Ren, Mingguang; Li, Lifeng; Wang, Qingwen; Hou, Xiaohua

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been widely used in clinical practice for more than 20 years because it causes the release of many growth factors. However, the burst release pattern and short release period of PRP have become obstacles to its application. An optimal controllable release system is an urgent need for researchers. This study investigated whether collagen/PRP (COL/PRP) scaffolds can serve as a vehicle for the controllable release of growth factors. We fabricated a novel scaffold that integrates PRP activated by thrombin or collagen into type I collagen. The mechanical properties, cytotoxicity, and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) content were evaluated. Our results demonstrate that the COL/PRP scaffolds were not cytotoxic to L-929 fibroblasts. The PDGF and FGF content in the thrombin group was at a higher level and lasted for a long period of time. Collagen and thrombin played the same role in the release of TGF-β1 and VEGF. These data suggest that the novel COL/PRP scaffolds provide a carrier for the controllable release of growth factors and may be used in tissue- regenerative therapies. PMID:26951554

  9. Pharmacological studies with SK&F 93944 (temelastine), a novel histamine H1-receptor antagonist with negligible ability to penetrate the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, E. A.; Griffiths, R.; Harvey, C. A.; Owen, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    SK&F 93944 (temelastine), a novel histamine H1-receptor antagonist, has been studied in a variety of in vitro and in vivo test systems. SK&F 93944 was a competitive antagonist of histamine-induced contractions of guinea-pig ileum with a pA2 of 9.55 and a weak, non-competitive, inhibitor of the effects of histamine on guinea-pig atrium. In anaesthetized guinea-pigs SK&F 93944 displaced histamine bronchoconstriction dose-response curves at doses which had negligible effects on histamine tachycardia. In anaesthetized cats SK&F 93944 antagonized depressor responses to the histamine H1-receptor agonists, 2-(2-aminoethyl)pyridine and betahistine, at doses which had no effects on responses to the histamine H2-receptor agonist, dimaprit. Oral pretreatment with SK&F 93944 in conscious rats and guinea-pigs afforded protection versus the response to intradermal histamine injection. Comparative studies in each of the test systems showed that SK&F 93944 was of comparable or significantly greater potency than the standard compound, mepyramine. SK&F 93944 was found to be a weak, non-competitive antagonist of carbachol on the guinea-pig ileum but was devoid of measurable anticholinergic activity in vivo. Studies on the penetration of [14C]-SK&F 93944, labelled either in the isocytosine ring or in the butyl chain, showed that brain concentrations were very low when compared with the steady-state blood concentrations. In contrast, brain concentrations of [3H]-mepyramine exceeded blood concentrations by a factor of approximately 3. SK&F 93944 may have an advantage over classical histamine H1-receptor antagonists in that it is likely to be devoid of untoward effects on the central nervous system. PMID:2879585

  10. Aptamer-functionalized superporous hydrogels for sequestration and release of growth factors regulated via molecular recognition.

    PubMed

    Battig, Mark R; Huang, Yike; Chen, Niancao; Wang, Yong

    2014-09-01

    While the discovery of highly potent biologics has led to the development of promising therapies for various human diseases, biologics can cause severe toxicity if delivered inappropriately. Thus, great efforts have been made to synthesize polymeric systems for safe and efficient delivery of biologics. However, the application of polymeric delivery systems is often limited by problems such as harsh reaction conditions, low drug sequestration efficiency, and difficult drug release regulation. This study was aimed at developing a superporous material system with a hydrogel and an aptamer to overcome these challenges. The results have shown that the superporous hydrogel is capable of instantaneously and fully sequestering a large amount of growth factors, owing to the presence of superporous architectures and aptamers. Moreover, the sequestering and loading procedure does not involve any harsh conditions. The release kinetics of growth factors can be molecularly modulated by either changing the binding affinity of the aptamer or by using a triggering effector. Therefore, this study presents a promising superporous material for the delivery of highly potent biologics such as growth factors for clinical applications. PMID:24954732

  11. Impact of human amniotic membrane preparation on release of angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Wolbank, S; Hildner, F; Redl, H; van Griensven, M; Gabriel, C; Hennerbichler, S

    2009-12-01

    Preserved amniotic membrane (AM) has been used in the field of ophthalmology and wound care due to its bacteriostatic, antiphlogistic, protease-inhibiting, re-epithelialization, wound-protecting and scar formation-reducing properties. Typically, AM is applied after banking in a glycerol-preserved or freeze-dried state. Cell viabilities in different forms of preparation vary substantially, which in consequence may also be reflected in the amount and type of growth factors released from the preserved material. Therefore, we characterized the angiogenic factor (AF) profile released from different AM preparations. For this, medium was conditioned with non-preserved, glycerol- and cryo-preserved AM for 48 h, which was screened for AFs using a protein array system. In parallel, the preparations were tested for cell viability. Non-preserved as well as cryo-preserved AM maintained viabilities at 106.5 +/- 23.9% and 21.9 +/- 23.3%, respectively, whereas glycerol-preserved AM was found to be non-viable. Of the 20 investigated factors, high levels of angiogenin, GRO, IL-6/8, TIMP-1/2 and MCP-1 and low levels of EGF, IFNgamma, IGF-1, leptin, RANTES, TGFbeta1 and thrombopoietin were identified to be secreted from non-preserved AM. Cryo-preserved AM secreted high levels of IL-8, intermediate levels of GRO and TIMP-1/2 but only low levels of angiogenin, IFNgamma, IL-6 and MCP-1 and no detectable EGF, IGF-1, leptin, RANTES, TGFbeta1 and thrombopoietin. After banking in glycerol, AM releases only minute amounts of TIMP-1/2. Along with viability, the AF profile of amniotic membrane largely depends on the preparation method applied for banking. This should be considered for selection of an AM product for a specific clinical application. PMID:19701933

  12. Involvement of histamine H4 and H1 receptors in scratching induced by histamine receptor agonists in Balb C mice.

    PubMed

    Bell, J K; McQueen, D S; Rees, J L

    2004-05-01

    The role of histamine H(1), H(2), H(3) and H(4) receptors in acute itch induced by histamine was investigated in female BalbC mice. Scratching was induced by intradermal injections of pruritogen into the back of the neck and "itch" assessed by quantifying the scratching evoked. Histamine (0.03-80 micromol), histamine-trifluoromethyl-toluidine (HTMT, H(1) agonist, 0.002-2 micromol), clobenpropit (H(4) agonist, H(3) antagonist, 0.002-0.6 micromol) and to a lesser extent imetit (H(3)/H(4) agonist, 0.03-3 micromol) all induced dose-dependent scratching. Dimaprit (H(2) agonist, 0.04-40 micromol) did not cause scratching. Mepyramine (H(1) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced scratching evoked by histamine and HTMT, but not that caused by H(3) or H(4) agonists. Thioperamide (H(3)/H(4) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced scratching induced by histamine, H(3) and H(4) agonists, but not that caused by HTMT. The non-sedating H(1) antagonist, terfenadine, also significantly reduced the scratching induced by the H(1) agonist, HTMT. Cimetidine (H(2) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) did not affect histamine-induced scratching. These results indicate that activation of histamine H(4) receptors causes itch in mice, in addition to the previously recognised role for H(1) receptors in evoking itch. Histamine H(4) receptor antagonists therefore merit investigation as antipruritic agents. PMID:15066908

  13. Delivery of Alginate Scaffold Releasing Two Trophic Factors for Spinal Cord Injury Repair

    PubMed Central

    Grulova, I.; Slovinska, L.; Blaško, J.; Devaux, S.; Wisztorski, M.; Salzet, M.; Fournier, I.; Kryukov, O.; Cohen, S.; Cizkova, D.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) has been implicated in neural cell loss and consequently functional motor and sensory impairment. In this study, we propose an alginate -based neurobridge enriched with/without trophic growth factors (GFs) that can be utilized as a therapeutic approach for spinal cord repair. The bioavailability of key GFs, such as Epidermal Growth factor (EGF) and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF) released from injected alginate biomaterial to the central lesion site significantly enhanced the sparing of spinal cord tissue and increased the number of surviving neurons (choline acetyltransferase positive motoneurons) and sensory fibres. In addition, we document enhanced outgrowth of corticospinal tract axons and presence of blood vessels at the central lesion. Tissue proteomics was performed at 3, 7 and 10 days after SCI in rats indicated the presence of anti-inflammatory factors in segments above the central lesion site, whereas in segments below, neurite outgrowth factors, inflammatory cytokines and chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan of the lectican protein family were overexpressed. Collectively, based on our data, we confirm that functional recovery was significantly improved in SCI groups receiving alginate scaffold with affinity-bound growth factors (ALG +GFs), compared to SCI animals without biomaterial treatment. PMID:26348665

  14. Dual-stage growth factor release within 3D protein-engineered hydrogel niches promotes adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood-Goodwin, Midori; Teasley, Eric S.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2014-01-01

    Engineered biomimetic microenvironments from hydrogels are an emerging strategy to achieve lineage-specific differentiation in vitro. In addition to recapitulating critical matrix cues found in the native three-dimensional (3D) niche, the hydrogel can also be designed to deliver soluble factors that are present within the native inductive microenvironment. We demonstrate a versatile materials approach for the dual-stage delivery of multiple soluble factors within a 3D hydrogel to induce adipogenesis. We use a Mixing-Induced Two-Component Hydrogel (MITCH) embedded with alginate microgels to deliver two pro-adipogenic soluble factors, fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF-1) and bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP-4) with two distinct delivery profiles. We show that dual-stage delivery of FGF-1 and BMP-4 to human adipose-derived stromal cells (hADSCs) significantly increases lipid accumulation compared with the simultaneous delivery of both growth factors together. Furthermore, dual-stage growth factor delivery within a 3D hydrogel resulted in substantially more lipid accumulation compared to identical delivery profiles in 2D cultures. Gene expression analysis shows upregulation of key adipogenic markers indicative of brown-like adipocytes. These data suggest that dual-stage release of FGF-1 and BMP-4 within 3D microenvironments can promote the in vitro development of mature adipocytes. PMID:25309741

  15. Injectable Biodegradable Polyurethane Scaffolds with Release of Platelet-derived Growth Factor for Tissue Repair and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hafeman, Andrea E.; Li, Bing; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this work was to investigate the effects of triisocyanate composition on the biological and mechanical properties of biodegradable, injectable polyurethane scaffolds for bone and soft tissue engineering. Methods Scaffolds were synthesized using reactive liquid molding techniques, and were characterized in vivo in a rat subcutaneous model. Porosity, dynamic mechanical properties, degradation rate, and release of growth factors were also measured. Results Polyurethane scaffolds were elastomers with tunable damping properties and degradation rates, and they supported cellular infiltration and generation of new tissue. The scaffolds showed a two-stage release profile of platelet-derived growth factor, characterized by a 75% burst release within the first 24 h and slower release thereafter. Conclusions Biodegradable polyurethanes synthesized from triisocyanates exhibited tunable and superior mechanical properties compared to materials synthesized from lysine diisocyanates. Due to their injectability, biocompatibility, tunable degradation, and potential for release of growth factors, these materials are potentially promising therapies for tissue engineering. PMID:18516665

  16. Neuroendocrine Control of the Gut During Stress: Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Signaling Pathways in the Spotlight

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress’s impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems. PMID:18928406

  17. Performance of optimized noncanonical amino acid mutagenesis systems in the absence of release factor 1.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yunan; Lajoie, Marc J; Italia, James S; Chin, Melissa A; Church, George M; Chatterjee, Abhishek

    2016-05-24

    Site-specific incorporation of noncanonical amino acids (ncAAs) into proteins expressed in E. coli using UAG-suppression competes with termination mediated by release factor 1 (RF1). Recently, unconditional deletion of RF1 was achieved in a genomically recoded E. coli (C321), devoid of all endogenous UAG stop codons. Here we evaluate the efficiency of ncAA incorporation in this strain using optimized suppression vectors. Even though the absence of RF1 does not benefit the suppression efficiency of a single UAG codon, multi-site incorporation of a series of chemically distinct ncAAs was significantly improved. PMID:27027374

  18. Neuroendocrine control of the gut during stress: corticotropin-releasing factor signaling pathways in the spotlight.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Stress affects the gastrointestinal tract as part of the visceral response. Various stressors induce similar profiles of gut motor function alterations, including inhibition of gastric emptying, stimulation of colonic propulsive motility, and hypersensitivity to colorectal distension. In recent years, substantial progress has been made in our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of stress's impact on gut function. Activation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling pathways mediates both the inhibition of upper gastrointestinal (GI) and the stimulation of lower GI motor function through interaction with different CRF receptor subtypes. Here, we review how various stressors affect the gut, with special emphasis on the central and peripheral CRF signaling systems. PMID:18928406

  19. Histamine resets the circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus through the H1R-CaV 1.3-RyR pathway in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Sik; Kim, Young-Beom; Kim, Woong Bin; Yoon, Bo-Eun; Shen, Feng-Yan; Lee, Seung Won; Soong, Tuck-Wah; Han, Hee-Chul; Colwell, Christopher S; Lee, C Justin; Kim, Yang In

    2015-10-01

    Histamine, a neurotransmitter/neuromodulator implicated in the control of arousal state, exerts a potent phase-shifting effect on the circadian clock in the rodent suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). In this study, the mechanisms by which histamine resets the circadian clock in the mouse SCN were investigated. As a first step, Ca(2+) -imaging techniques were used to demonstrate that histamine increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i ) in acutely dissociated SCN neurons and that this increase is blocked by the H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist pyrilamine, the removal of extracellular Ca(2+) and the L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker nimodipine. The histamine-induced Ca(2+) transient is reduced, but not blocked, by application of the ryanodine receptor (RyR) blocker dantrolene. Immunohistochemical techniques indicated that CaV 1.3 L-type Ca(2+) channels are expressed mainly in the somata of SCN cells along with the H1R, whereas CaV 1.2 channels are located primarily in the processes. Finally, extracellular single-unit recordings demonstrated that the histamine-elicited phase delay of the circadian neural activity rhythm recorded from SCN slices is blocked by pyrilamine, nimodipine and the knockout of CaV 1.3 channel. Again, application of dantrolene reduced but did not block the histamine-induced phase delays. Collectively, these results indicate that, to reset the circadian clock, histamine increases [Ca(2+) ]i in SCN neurons by activating CaV 1.3 channels through H1R, and secondarily by causing Ca(2+) -induced Ca(2+) release from RyR-mediated internal stores. PMID:26215659

  20. Development of a homogeneous binding assay for histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Crane, Kathy; Shih, Daw-Tsun

    2004-12-01

    Histamine is critically involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes through its actions at different receptors. Thus, histamine receptors have been actively pursued as therapeutic targets in the pharmaceutical industry for the treatment of a variety of diseases. There are currently four histamine receptors that have been cloned, all of which are G protein-coupled receptors. Studies from both academia and pharmaceutical companies have identified compounds that modulate the function of specific histamine receptors. These efforts led to the successful introduction of histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonists for the treatment of allergy and excess gastric acid secretion, respectively. Histamine H(3) receptor ligands are currently under investigation for the treatment of obesity and neurological disorders. The recently identified histamine H(4) receptor is preferentially expressed in the immune tissues, suggesting a potential role in normal immune functions and possibly in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Even with the long history of histamine research and the important applications of histamine receptor ligands, assays to measure the affinity of compounds binding to histamine receptors are still routinely analyzed using a filtration assay, a very low-throughput assay involving washing and filtration steps. This article describes a simple, robust, and homogeneous binding assay based on the scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology that provides results equivalent to those obtained using the more complex filtration assay. The SPA format is easily adapted to high-throughput screening because it is amenable to automation. In summary, this technique allows high-throughput screening of compounds against multiple histamine receptors and, thus, facilitates drug discovery efforts. PMID:15519569

  1. Pathological changes in platelet histamine oxidases in atopic eczema

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Gruia

    1993-01-01

    Increased plasma histamine levels were associated with significantly lowered diamine and type B monoamine oxidase activities in platelet-rich plasma of atopic eczema (AE) patients. The diamine oxidase has almost normal cofactor levels (pyridoxal phosphate and Cu2+) but the cofactor levels for type B monoamine oxidase (flavin adenine dinucleotide and Fe2+) are lowered. The biogenic amines putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and serotonin in the sera, as well as dopamine and epinephrine in EDTA-plasma were found to be normal. It is unlikely, therefore, that these amines are responsible for the decreased activities of monoamine and diamine oxidase in these patients. The most likely causative factors for the inhibition of the diamine oxidase are nicotine, alcohol, food additives and other environmental chemicals, or perhaps a genetic defect of the diamine oxidase. PMID:18475554

  2. Orexin–Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Receptor Heteromers in the Ventral Tegmental Area as Targets for Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Gemma; Quiroz, César; Moreno-Delgado, David; Sierakowiak, Adam; McDowell, Kimberly; Moreno, Estefanía; Rea, William; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Aguinaga, David; Howell, Lesley A.; Hausch, Felix; Cortés, Antonio; Mallol, Josefa; Casadó, Vicent; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I.

    2015-01-01

    Release of the neuropeptides corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and orexin-A in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) play an important role in stress-induced cocaine-seeking behavior. We provide evidence for pharmacologically significant interactions between CRF and orexin-A that depend on oligomerization of CRF1 receptor (CRF1R) and orexin OX1 receptors (OX1R). CRF1R–OX1R heteromers are the conduits of a negative crosstalk between orexin-A and CRF as demonstrated in transfected cells and rat VTA, in which they significantly modulate dendritic dopamine release. The cocaine target σ1 receptor (σ1R) also associates with the CRF1R–OX1R heteromer. Cocaine binding to the σ1R–CRF1R–OX1R complex promotes a long-term disruption of the orexin-A–CRF negative crosstalk. Through this mechanism, cocaine sensitizes VTA cells to the excitatory effects of both CRF and orexin-A, thus providing a mechanism by which stress induces cocaine seeking. PMID:25926444

  3. Histamine induces the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 in human astrocytic cultures via H1-receptor subtype.

    PubMed

    Patel, Aarti; Vasanthan, Vishnu; Fu, Wen; Fahlman, Richard P; MacTavish, David; Jhamandas, Jack H

    2016-05-01

    Accumulation of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein within the brain is a neuropathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease (AD). One strategy to facilitate Aβ clearance from the brain is to promote Aβ catabolism. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), a member of the family of Zn(+2)-containing endoproteases, known to be expressed and secreted by astrocytes, is capable of degrading Aβ. Histamine, a major aminergic brain neurotransmitter, stimulates the production of MMP-9 in keratinocytes through the histamine H1 receptor (H1R). In the present study, we show that histamine evokes a concentration- and calcium-dependent release of MMP-9 from human astrocytic U373 cells and primary cultures of human and rat astrocytes through the H1R subtype. Activation of H1R on astrocytes elevated intracellular levels of Ca(2+) that was accompanied by time-dependent increases in MAP kinase p44/p42 and PKC. In-cell western blots revealed dose-dependent increases in both enzymes, confirming involvement of these signal transduction pathways. We next investigated the extent of recombinant human MMP-9 (rhMMP-9) proteolytic activity on soluble oligomeric Aβ (soAβ). Mass spectrometry demonstrated time-dependent cleavage of soAβ (20 μM), but not another amyloidogenic protein amylin, upon incubation with rhMMP-9 (100 nM) at 1, 4 and 17 h. Furthermore, Western blots showed a shift in soAβ equilibrium toward lower order, less toxic monomeric species. In conclusion, both MAPK p44/p42 and PKC pathways appear to be involved in histamine-upregulated MMP-9 release via H1Rs in astrocytes. Furthermore, MMP-9 appears to cleave soAβ into less toxic monomeric species. Given the key role of histamine in MMP-9 release, this neurotransmitter may serve as a potential therapeutic target for AD. PMID:25682263

  4. Effects of the Histamine 1 Receptor Antagonist Cetirizine on the Osteoporotic Phenotype in H(+) /K(+) ATPase Beta Subunit KO Mice.

    PubMed

    Aasarød, Kristin M; Stunes, Astrid K; Mosti, Mats P; Ramezanzadehkoldeh, Masoud; Viggaklev, Bjørn I; Reseland, Janne E; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Fossmark, Reidar; Syversen, Unni

    2016-09-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest increased fracture risk in patients using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). We have previously shown that the H(+) /K(+) ATPase beta subunit knockout (KO) mouse, which is a model of PPI-use, have lower bone mineral density (BMD) and impaired bone quality compared to wild type (WT) mice. Like PPI users, these KO mice display elevated gastric pH and hypergastrinemia, which in turn stimulates gastric histamine release. Previous studies have suggested a negative effect of histamine on bone, thus, we wanted to study whether a histamine 1 receptor (H1R) antagonist could improve bone quality in KO mice. Female KO and WT mice aged 8 weeks received either an H1R antagonist (cetirizine) or polyethylene glycol (PEG) for 6 months. At the end of the study, KO mice displayed elevated plasma histamine levels compared to WT. As demonstrated previously, the KO mice also exhibited lower whole body BMD, reduced mechanical bone strength, and impaired bone quality assessed by μCT. No significant differences, however, were found between the KO groups receiving cetirizine or PEG for any of the measured bone parameters. In vitro gene expression analyses of histamine receptors revealed the presence of H1R and H2R both in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and H3R in late stage osteoblasts. In conclusion, administration of the H1R antagonist cetirizine in a concentration of 3 mg/kg did not rescue the osteoporotic phenotype in H(+) /K(+) ATPase beta subunit KO mice. It can, however, not be ruled out that histamine may influence bone via other receptors. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2089-2096, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26869358

  5. Outer mitochondrial membrane localization of apoptosis-inducing factor: mechanistic implications for release

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Yingfei; Frydenlund, Didrik S; Ottersen, Ole Petter; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death (known as parthanatos) plays a pivotal role in many clinically important events including ischaemia/reperfusion injury and glutamate excitotoxicity. A recent study by us has shown that uncleaved AIF (apoptosis-inducing factor), but not calpain-hydrolysed truncated-AIF, was rapidly released from the mitochondria during parthanatos, implicating a second pool of AIF that might be present in brain mitochondria contributing to the rapid release. In the present study, a novel AIF pool is revealed in brain mitochondria by multiple biochemical analyses. Approx. 30% of AIF loosely associates with the outer mitochondrial membrane on the cytosolic side, in addition to its main localization in the mitochondrial intermembrane space attached to the inner membrane. Immunogold electron microscopic analysis of mouse brain further supports AIF association with the outer, as well as the inner, mitochondrial membrane in vivo. In line with these observations, approx. 20% of uncleaved AIF rapidly translocates to the nucleus and functionally causes neuronal death upon NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate) treatment. In the present study we show for the first time a second pool of AIF in brain mitochondria and demonstrate that this pool does not require cleavage and that it contributes to the rapid release of AIF. Moreover, these results suggest that this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF is sufficient to cause cell death during parthanatos. Interfering with the release of this outer mitochondrial pool of AIF during cell injury paradigms that use parthanatos hold particular promise for novel therapies to treat neurological disorders. PMID:19863494

  6. A sauvagine/corticotropin-releasing factor receptor expressed in heart and skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kishimoto, T; Pearse, R V; Lin, C R; Rosenfeld, M G

    1995-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) mediates many critical aspects of the physiological response to stress. These effects are elicited by binding to specific high-affinity receptors, which are coupled to guanine nucleotide stimulatory factor (Gs)-response pathways. Recently, a gene encoding a receptor for CRF, expressed in pituitary and the central nervous system (PC-CRF receptor), was isolated and characterized. Here we report the identification and characterization of a second, distinct CRF receptor that is expressed primarily in heart and skeletal muscle and exhibits a specific ligand preference and antagonist sensitivity compared with the PC-CRF receptor. We refer to this second receptor as the heart/muscle (HM)-CRF receptor. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 4 PMID:7755719

  7. Histamine and histamine receptors in Tourette syndrome and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

    PubMed

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    The potential contributions of dysregulation of the brain's histaminergic modulatory system to neuropsychiatric disease, and the potential of histamine-targeting medications as therapeutic agents, are gradually coming into focus. The H3R receptor, which is expressed primarily in the central nervous system, is a promising pharmacotherapeutic target. Recent evidence for a contribution of histamine dysregulation to Tourette syndrome and tic disorders is particularly strong; although specific mutations in histamine-associated genes are rare, they have led to informative studies in animal models that may pave the way for therapeutic advances. A controlled study of an H3R antagonist in Tourette syndrome is ongoing. Preclinical studies of H3R antagonists in schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, and narcolepsy have all shown promise. Recently reported controlled studies have been disappointing in schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder, but the H3R antagonist pitolisant shows promise in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness and is currently under regulatory review for these conditions. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26282120

  8. Functional characterization of polypeptide release factor 1b in the ciliate Euplotes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Chai, Baofeng; Wang, Wei; Liang, Aihua

    2010-12-01

    In higher eukaryotes, RF-I (class I release factor) [eRF1 (eukaryotic release factor 1)] is responsible for stop codon recognition and promotes nascent polypeptide release from the ribosome. Interestingly, two class I RFs, eRF1a and eRF1b, have been identified among the ciliates Euplotes, which are variant code organisms. In the present study, we analysed the comparative expression of eRF1a and eRF1b in Euplotes cells, demonstrating that the expression of eRF1b was higher than that of eRF1a. An interaction between eRF1b and eRF3 was confirmed, suggesting that an eRF1b function is facilitated by eRF3. Co-localization of both eRF1s indicated that they function in the same subcellular location in Euplotes cells. We also analysed the characteristics of stop codon discrimination by eRF1b. Like eRF1a, eRF1b recognized UAA and UAG as stop codons, but not UGA. This finding disagreed with the deduced characteristics of eRF1a/eRF1b from the classic hypothesis of 'anticodon-mimicry' proposed by Muramatsu et al. [Muramatsu, Heckmann, Kitanaka and Kuchino (2001) FEBS Lett. 488, 105-109]. Mutagenesis experiments indicated that the absolutely conserved amino acid motif 'G31T32' (numbered as for human eRF1) in eRF1b was the key to efficient stop codon recognition by eRF1b. In conclusion, these findings support and improve the 'cavity model' of stop codon discrimination by eRF1 proposed by Bertram et al. [Bertram, Bell, Ritchie, Fullerton and Stansfield (2000) RNA 6, 1236-1247] and Inagaki et al. [Inagaki, Blouin, Doolittle and Roger (2002) Nucleic Acids Res. 30, 532-544]. PMID:20136636

  9. Recognition of the amber UAG stop codon by release factor RF1

    SciTech Connect

    Korostelev, Andrei; Zhu, Jianyu; Asahara, Haruichi; Noller, Harry F.

    2010-08-23

    We report the crystal structure of a termination complex containing release factor RF1 bound to the 70S ribosome in response to an amber (UAG) codon at 3.6-{angstrom} resolution. The amber codon is recognized in the 30S subunit-decoding centre directly by conserved elements of domain 2 of RF1, including T186 of the PVT motif. Together with earlier structures, the mechanisms of recognition of all three stop codons by release factors RF1 and RF2 can now be described. Our structure confirms that the backbone amide of Q230 of the universally conserved GGQ motif is positioned to contribute directly to the catalysis of the peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis reaction through stabilization of the leaving group and/or transition state. We also observe synthetic-negative interactions between mutations in the switch loop of RF1 and in helix 69 of 23S rRNA, revealing that these structural features interact functionally in the termination process. These findings are consistent with our proposal that structural rearrangements of RF1 and RF2 are critical to accurate translation termination.

  10. Crystal Structure of a Translation Termination Complex Formed With Release Factor RF2

    SciTech Connect

    Korostelev, A.; Asahara, H.; Lancaster, L.; Laurberg, M.; Hirschi, A.; Zhu, J.; Trakhanov, S.; Scott, W.G.; Noller, H.F.

    2009-05-20

    We report the crystal structure of a translation termination complex formed by the Thermus thermophilus 70S ribosome bound with release factor RF2, in response to a UAA stop codon, solved at 3 {angstrom} resolution. The backbone of helix -5 and the side chain of serine of the conserved SPF motif of RF2 recognize U1 and A2 of the stop codon, respectively. A3 is unstacked from the first 2 bases, contacting Thr-216 and Val-203 of RF2 and stacking on G530 of 16S rRNA. The structure of the RF2 complex supports our previous proposal that conformational changes in the ribosome in response to recognition of the stop codon stabilize rearrangement of the switch loop of the release factor, resulting in docking of the universally conserved GGQ motif in the PTC of the 50S subunit. As seen for the RF1 complex, the main-chain amide nitrogen of glutamine in the GGQ motif is positioned to contribute directly to catalysis of peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis, consistent with mutational studies, which show that most side-chain substitutions of the conserved glutamine have little effect. We show that when the H-bonding capability of the main-chain N-H of the conserved glutamine is eliminated by substitution with proline, peptidyl-tRNA esterase activity is abolished, consistent with its proposed role in catalysis.

  11. Histamine content, diamine oxidase activity and histamine methyltransferase activity in human tissues: fact or fictions?

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, R; Sattler, J; Lorenz, W; Stahlknecht, C D; Barth, H; Crombach, M; Weber, D

    1984-04-01

    To understand the role of histamine in the aetiology and pathogenesis of human diseases reliable data are urgently needed for the histamine content and for the activities of histamine-forming and -inactivating enzymes in human tissues. In order to make a substantial progress toward this aim a tissue-sampling programme during surgical interventions was carefully conceived and conducted. From March 1982 until January 1983 106 tissue specimens were taken from 56 patients who underwent surgery. Only healthy tissues, not injured or oedematous, and without adherent structures were taken by only one surgeon who was interested in this research and experienced in tissue preparation procedures in biochemistry. The times of 'warm' ischaemia during the operative procedures were visually estimated, the times between resection of the organs or specimens and deep-freezing of the tissues were precisely recorded. Compared to previous work in the literature and especially to our own work using the same assays for determination higher histamine contents were found in this study in most of the tissues, in particular in the gastrointestinal tract. Also the diamine oxidase activities were considerably higher in many organs, e.g. 3-4 times higher in the gastrointestinal tract when compared with those in publications of our group who used always the same analytical test. However, the histamine methyltransferase activities in this study were not at variance to those determined in previous investigations. Many of them were reported in this communication for the first time. Since the methods for histamine determination and those for measuring enzymic activities were not different in this study and in previous communications of our group we are convinced that the optimized tissue-sampling and -preparation techniques were responsible for the higher values in this communication. But the problem of the 'warm' ischaemia period could not be solved by sample-taking procedures of this type during

  12. Effects of histamine and its antagonists on murine T-cells and bone marrow-derived dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiufen; Zafar, Mohammad Ishraq; Gao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effects of histamine and its antagonists on the surface marker expression of dendritic cells (DCs) and the influence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), histamine, and histamine receptor antagonists on DCs and T-cells. The bone marrow was extracted from the femurs and tibiae of 6- to 8-week-old female Balb/c mice and cultured in medium containing penicillin, streptomycin, L-glutamine, fetal calf serum, or granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or with interleukin (IL)-4. The cells received three different doses of LPS and histamine, plus three different doses of descarboethoxyloratadine (DCL). We assayed the supernatant for various cytokines. The spleen cells of DO11.10 mice were examined by flow cytometry, which included labeling and sorting CD4+ T-cells, as well as coculture of DCs and T-cells with ovalbumin (OVA)323–339 peptide. Histamine or histamine plus DCL did not affect the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II, CD11c, CD11b, CD86, and CD80. However, GM-CSF increased the expression of all markers except CD80. Histamine increased interferon-γ production in GM-CSF + IL-4-cultured cells; it also enhanced IL-10 production, but suppressed IL-12 production in LPS-stimulated DCs with no DCL. Cimetidine inhibited IL-10 production and restored IL-12 secretion in LPS-treated DCs. LPS increased IL-10 and decreased IL-12 levels. GM-CSF + IL-4-generated DCs had a stronger stimulatory effect on DO11.10 T-cell proliferation than GM-CSF-generated DCs. Inducible costimulator ligand expression was higher in GM-CSF + IL-4- than in GM-CSF-generated DC groups after 2 days of coculture, but decreased 4 days later. IL-13 production was higher in bone marrow DCs generated with GM-CSF than in those generated with GM-CSF + IL-4. OVA-pulsed DCs and OVA-plus-DCL DCs showed increased IL-12 levels. OVA plus LPS increased both IL-10 and interferon-α. Although histamine or histamine receptor-1 antagonists did not influence DC LPS

  13. Histamine-induced itch and its relationship with pain.

    PubMed

    Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-01-01

    Itch is one of the major complications of skin diseases. Although there are various substances that induce itch or pruritus, it is evident that histamine is the best known endogenous agent that evokes itch. Even though histamine-induced itch has been studied for some time, the underlying mechanism of itch is just beginning to emerge. Although various downstream signaling pathways of histamine receptors have been revealed, more studies are required to determine the cause of histamine-induced itch. It appears that itch and pain involve different neuronal pathways. Pain generally inhibits itch, which indicates an inter-communication between the two. Complex interactions between itch and pain may be expected based on reports on disease states and opioids. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanism and the pharmacological aspects of histamine-induced itch. Especially, the underlying mechanism of TRPV1 (an anti-pruritus target) has been determined to some extent. PMID:18667087

  14. [Pseudo-allergies are due to histamine intolerance].

    PubMed

    Götz, M

    1996-01-01

    Numerous undesirable reactions to alcoholic beverages, foods, drugs and other substances are characterized by allergy-like signs and symptoms and yet show unambiguously negative allergy test results. Such persons should be assessed for evidence of histamine intolerance caused by histamine overload and/or diamine oxidase deficiency. Diamine oxidase is the main histamine degrading enzyme with a predominantly gut activity. This would explain why nutritional allergies are often primarily suspected. The clinical evidence for histamine intolerance is based on chronic headache, diarrhoea, vomiting, flush, urticaria, asthma-like symptoms, rhinitis and others. Histamine restricted food, supported if necessary by H1 antihistamine blockade are simple but highly efficacious measures as shown by us in large patient groups. Intolerance to red wine probably is the most outstanding clinical characteristic and a directed question must be included into any allergy history in order to avoid missing a very major diagnostic spectrum with good therapeutic maneuverability. PMID:9012205

  15. Quantitative Single-Cell Analysis of Signaling Pathways Activated Immediately Downstream of Histamine Receptor Subtypes.

    PubMed

    van Unen, Jakobus; Rashidfarrokhi, Ali; Hoogendoorn, Eelco; Postma, Marten; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Goedhart, Joachim

    2016-09-01

    Genetically encoded biosensors based on Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) can visualize responses of individual cells in real time. Here, we evaluated whether FRET-based biosensors provide sufficient contrast and specificity to measure activity of G-protein-coupled receptors. The four histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R, and H4R) respond to the ligand histamine by activating three canonical heterotrimeric G-protein-mediated signaling pathways with a reported high degree of specificity. Using FRET-based biosensors, we demonstrate that H1R activates Gαq. We also observed that H1R activates Gαi, albeit at a 10-fold lower potency. In addition to increasing cAMP levels, most likely via Gαs, we found that the H2R induces Gαq-mediated calcium release. The H3R and H4R activated Gαi with high specificity and a high potency. We demonstrate that a number of FRET sensors provide sufficient contrast to: 1) analyze the specificity of the histamine receptor subtypes for different heterotrimeric G-protein families with single-cell resolution, 2) probe for antagonist specificity, and 3) allow the measurement of single-cell concentration-response curves. PMID:27358232

  16. Controlled Release of Growth Factors on Allograft Bone in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, WonHyoung; Ren, Peigen; Fasching, Rainer; Goodman, Stuart B.

    2008-01-01

    Allografts are important alternatives to autografts for treating defects after major bone loss. Bone growth factors have both local autocrine and paracrine effects and regulate the growth, proliferation, and differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells. To study the effects of prolonged, continuous, local delivery of growth factors on bone growth, we developed a new microelectromechanical system (MEMS) drug delivery device. Bone marrow cells from mice were seeded on mouse allograft discs and cultured in osteogenic media with osteogenic protein 1 (OP-1) and/or basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2) delivered from MEMS devices for 6 weeks. We monitored bone formation by changes of bone volume using micro-CT scanning and release of osteocalcin using ELISA. The data suggest the MEMS devices delivered constant concentrations of OP-1 and FGF-2 to the media. Bone marrow cells grew on the allografts and increased bone volume. Addition of OP-1 increased bone formation whereas FGF-2 decreased bone formation. Local delivery of growth factors over a prolonged period modulated the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells on allograft bone. PMID:18509711

  17. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Diaz, Sergio; Johnson, Lance A.; DeKroon, Robert M.; Moreno-Navarrete, Jose M.; Alzate, Oscar; Fernandez-Real, Jose M.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Arbones-Mainar, Jose M.

    2014-01-01

    Impaired adipogenesis renders an adipose tissue unable to expand, leading to lipotoxicity and conditions such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. While factors important for adipogenesis have been studied extensively, those that set the limits of adipose tissue expansion remain undetermined. Feeding a Western-type diet to apolipoprotein E2 knock-in mice, a model of metabolic syndrome, produced 3 groups of equally obese mice: mice with normal glucose tolerance, hyperinsulinemic yet glucose-tolerant mice, and prediabetic mice with impaired glucose tolerance and reduced circulating insulin. Using proteomics, we compared subcutaneous adipose tissues from mice in these groups and found that the expression of PTRF (polymerase I and transcript release factor) associated selectively with their glucose tolerance status. Lentiviral and pharmacologically overexpressed PTRF, whose function is critical for caveola formation, compromised adipocyte differentiation of cultured 3T3-L1cells. In human adipose tissue, PTRF mRNA levels positively correlated with markers of lipolysis and cellular senescence. Furthermore, a negative relationship between telomere length and PTRF mRNA levels was observed in human subcutaneous fat. PTRF is associated with limited adipose tissue expansion underpinning the key role of caveolae in adipocyte regulation. Furthermore, PTRF may be a suitable adipocyte marker for predicting pathological obesity and inform clinical management.—Perez-Diaz, S., Johnson, L. A., DeKroon, R. M., Moreno-Navarrete, J. M., Alzate, O., Fernandez-Real, J. M., Maeda, N., Arbones-Mainar, J. M. Polymerase I and transcript release factor (PTRF) regulates adipocyte differentiation and determines adipose tissue expandability. PMID:24812087

  18. Mechanisms of histamine stimulated secretion in rabbit ileal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Linaker, B D; McKay, J S; Higgs, N B; Turnberg, L A

    1981-11-01

    Histamine is present in high concentrations in the intestine and we investigated the possibility that it might have a role here in intestinal transport. When added to the basal side of rabbit ileal mucosa in vitro histamine (10(-4)M) induced a short-lived increase in electrical potential difference and short circuit current. It inhibited net chloride absorption but did not influence sodium transport. Alkali secretion, measured by a pH stat technique, was inhibited, suggesting that bicarbonate secretion was reduced. Both the electrical and ion flux responses to histamine were blocked by the H1 receptor blocker diphenhydramine, but not by the H2 receptor blocker cimetidine. The presence of specific H1 histamine receptors was further supported by shifts in the dose-response curve to histamine by four different concentrations of diphenhydramine. Calculation of a pA2 value from these "Schild' plots provided a figure of 7.85, which is similar to that for H1 receptors in other tissues. Aminoguanidine, a histaminase blocker, had no electrical effects alone but shifted the histamine dose response curve to the left. These studies indicate that histamine inhibits chloride absorption and alkali secretion, possibly by influencing a chloride/bicarbonate exchange process, through specific mucosal H1 receptors. Enhancement of histamine effects by a histaminase inhibitor suggests that histaminases are present in the intestinal mucosa and supports the possibility of a role for endogenous histamine in influencing ion transport. The observations indicate a mechanism by which absorption might be impaired in diseases in which histamine is liberated locally in the intestine. PMID:7308851

  19. Glutamatergic regulation of brain histamine neurons: In vivo microdialysis and electrophysiology studies in the rat.

    PubMed

    Fell, Matthew J; Flik, Gunnar; Dijkman, Ulrike; Folgering, Joost H A; Perry, Kenneth W; Johnson, Bryan J; Westerink, Ben H C; Svensson, Kjell A

    2015-12-01

    The interactions between the glutamatergic and the histaminergic systems in the brain are not fully understood. Here we studied histamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex and the posterior hypothalamus-tuberomamillary nucleus (PH-TMN) using in vivo microdialysis and electrophysiological recordings of histaminergc neurons in the PH-TMN in vivo to further address the mechanistic details of these interactions. We demonstrated that histaminergic activity was regulated by group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR 2 and 3) using systemic dosing with mGluR 2/3 agonist and antagonists and an mGluR 2 positive allosteric modulator. These interactions likely occur via direct modulation of glutamate release in the PH-TMN. The importance of circadian rhythm for histamine release was also shown using microdialysis studies with mGluR 2/3 compounds under light and dark conditions. Based on histamine release studies with NMDA and ketamine, we propose the existence of two sub-populations of NMDA receptors where one subtype is located on histaminergic cell bodies in the PH-TMN and the second on GABA-ergic neurons projecting to the PH-TMN. These subpopulations could be distinguished based on function, notably opposing actions were seen on histamine release in the medial prefrontal cortex of the rat. In summary, this paper provides evidence that the histaminergic system is closely regulated by glutamate neurons in multiple ways. In addition, this interaction depends to a great extent on the activity state of the subject. PMID:26100446

  20. Possible involvement of histamine, dopamine, and noradrenalin in the periaqueductal gray in electroacupuncture pain relief.

    PubMed

    Murotani, Tomotaka; Ishizuka, Tomoko; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Wang, Xiaoming; Mori, Kazu; Sasaki, Kazuro; Ishida, Torao; Yamatodani, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Acupuncture and electroacupuncture are used in pain relief; however, the mechanism underlying the analgesic effect of acupuncture is unclear. Several lines of evidence propose that the periaqueductal gray (PAG), which is one of the regions that contributes to the endogenous pain inhibitory system, is involved in the analgesic effect of acupuncture, and the region receives several neural projections such as histamine and noradrenalin and contains the dopamine cell bodies. The current study examined the effects of electroacupuncture at Zusanli (ST36) and Shangjuxu (ST37) acupoints, which are used for clinical pain control, on the release of neurotransmitters in the PAG in rats. Histamine and dopamine release was increased after pain stimulus, while the changes were completely abolished by electroacupuncture. Pain stimulus had no effect on noradrenalin release, but electroacupuncture increased its release. These findings indicate that acupuncture at Zusanli and Shangjuxu exerts an antinociceptive effect via the activation of neurons in the PAG and that the histaminergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenalinergic systems in the PAG are related to electroacupuncture-induced pain relief. PMID:19819232

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor family peptide signaling in feline bladder urothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Hanna-Mitchell, Ann T.; Wolf-Johnston, Amanda; Roppolo, James R.; Tony Buffington, C. A.; Birder, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing (CRF) factor plays a central role in the orchestration of behavioral and neuroendocrine responses to stress. The family of CRF-related peptides (CRF and paralogs: Urocortin (Ucn) -I,-II and -III) and associated receptors (CRF-R1 and CRF-R2) are also expressed in peripheral tissues such as the skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Local signaling may exert multiple effects of stress-induced exacerbation of many complex syndromes including psoriasis and visceral hypersensitivity. Interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS), a chronic visceral pain syndrome characterized by urinary frequency, urgency and pelvic pain, is reported to be exacerbated by stress. Functional changes in the epithelial lining of the bladder, a vital blood-urine barrier called the urothelium, may play a role in IC/PBS. This study investigated the expression and functional activity of CRF-related peptides in the urothelium of normal cats and cats with feline interstitial cystitis (FIC), a chronic idiopathic cystitis exhibiting similarities to humans diagnosed with IC/PBS. Western blots showed urothelial (UT) expression of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2. Enzyme immunoassay revealed release of endogenous ligands (CRF and Ucn) by UT cells in culture. Evidence of functional activation of CRF-R1 and CRF-R2 by receptor selective agonists (CRF and UCN3 respectively) was shown by: (1)-measurement of ATP release using the luciferin-luciferase assay and (2)-the use of membrane impermeant fluorescent dyes (FM dyes) for fluorescence microscopy to assess membrane exocytotic responses in real-time. Our findings show evidence of CRF-related peptide signaling in the urothelium. Differences in functional responses between FIC and normal UT indicate that this system is altered in IC/PBS. PMID:24829219

  2. Neurotoxic factors released by stimulated human monocytes and THP-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Moonhee; Suk, Kyoungho; Kang, Yunhee; McGeer, Edith; McGeer, Patrick L

    2011-07-11

    Activated monocytes/macrophages are known to release toxic materials. Identification of these materials is important for developing more effective treatments for inflammatory disorders where self attack occurs. We stimulated human monocytes and THP-1 cells with LPS/IFNγ and measured the toxic effects of their conditioned media against differentiated human NT-2 cells. Their cytotoxicity, as measured by LDH release, was reduced by half when their conditioned media was passed through a 3kDa cutoff filter, indicating an equal division between high and low molecular weight materials. When the high molecular weight components tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and IL-6 were removed from the conditioned medium by specific antibodies, the toxicity was reduced by 37-38%. When prostaglandin production was blocked by treatment with the COX inhibitors acetylsalicylic acid and ibuprofen, toxicity was reduced by 15-16%. When oxygen free radical production was blocked by the NADPH inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) the toxicity was reduced by 17-18%. Treatment with the nitric oxide scavenger carboxy-phenyl-tetramethylimidazolineoxyl-oxide, or the NOS inhibitor N(G)-monomethylene-l-arginine, attenuated the toxicity by about 20%. Removal of released glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase also attenuated the toxicity by 12-13%. In combination, these treatments reduced the toxicity by approximately 50% accounting for the low molecular weight component toxicity. About 10% of the overall toxicity, which was associated with the high molecular weight component, was not identified. Optimal antiinflammatory therapy may require combined suppression of these identified toxin-generating pathways as well as relatively minor pathways yet to be identified. PMID:21640980

  3. Promoted growth of murine hair follicles through controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2002-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate whether or not the controlled release of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is effective in promoting the hair follicle growth of mice in second anagen of hair cycle. VEGF was incorporated into a biodegradable collagen hydrogel for its controlled release. Following implantation of the collagen hydrogel incorporating 0 or 2 microg of VEGF and injection of 0 or 2 microg of VEGF in the solution form into the back subcutis of mice, the hair follicle growth was evaluated photometrically and histologically in terms of the skin color of reverse side of the implanted or injected site, the skin thickness, and the area occupied by hair follicle tissue. Ten days later, the skin color of mice implanted with the collagen hydrogel incorporating 2 microg of VEGF was significantly darker than that injected with 2 pg of VEGF. The collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF increased the hair follicle area at the implanted site to a significantly greater extent than other agents while significant angiogenetic effect in the skin tissue was observed. VEGF-free, empty collagen hydrogels did not affect the skin darkness, hair follicle growth, and the angiogenesis. Moreover, the hair shaft length was significantly elongated by the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF, in marked contrast to other agents. Immunohistolchemicalstaining with proliferating cell nuclear antigen revealed that the collagen hydrogel incorporating VEGF promoted the proliferation of cells around the hair follicle more frequently than free VEGF. We concluded that the controlled release of VEGF more positively acted on the hair growth cycle of mice for hair growth than the injection of free VEGF. PMID:12013184

  4. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor enhances GABA release probability and nonuniform distribution of N- and P/Q-type channels on release sites of hippocampal inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, Pietro; Hernandez-Guijo, Jesus-Miguel; Carabelli, Valentina; Carbone, Emilio

    2005-03-30

    Long-lasting exposures to brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) accelerate the functional maturation of GABAergic transmission in embryonic hippocampal neurons, but the molecular bases of this phenomenon are still debated. Evidence in favor of a postsynaptic site of action has been accumulated, but most of the data support a presynaptic site effect. A crucial issue is whether the enhancement of evoked IPSCs (eIPSCs) induced by BDNF is attributable to an increase in any of the elementary parameters controlling neurosecretion, namely the probability of release, the number of release sites, the readily releasable pool (RRP), and the quantal size. Here, using peak-scaled variance analysis of miniature IPSCs, multiple probability fluctuation analysis, and cumulative amplitude analysis of action potential-evoked postsynaptic currents, we show that BDNF increases release probability and vesicle replenishment with little or no effect on the quantal size, the number of release sites, the RRP, and the Ca2+ dependence of eIPSCs. BDNF treatment changes markedly the distribution of Ca2+ channels controlling neurotransmitter release. It enhances markedly the contribution of N- and P/Q-type channels, which summed to >100% ("supra-additivity"), and deletes the contribution of R-type channels. BDNF accelerates the switch of presynaptic Ca2+ channel distribution from "segregated" to "nonuniform" distribution. This maturation effect was accompanied by an uncovered increased control of N-type channels on paired-pulse depression, otherwise dominated by P/Q-type channels in untreated neurons. Nevertheless, BDNF preserved the fast recovery from depression associated with N-type channels. These novel presynaptic BDNF actions derive mostly from an enhanced overlapping and better colocalization of N- and P/Q-type channels to vesicle release sites. PMID:15800191

  5. Effects of rat growth hormone (rGH)-releasing factor and somatostatin on the release and synthesis of rGH in dispersed pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fukata, J.; Diamond, D.J.; Martin, J.B.

    1985-08-01

    The effects of rat hypothalamic GH-releasing factor (GRF) and somatostatin (SRIF) on the release and biosynthesis of rat GH were studied by RIA and quantitative immunoprecipitation using monolayer cultures of rat anterior pituitary cells. In kinetic studies, GRF stimulation of GH release appeared at the first sampling time (20-min incubation) and the effect began to diminish after 2-h incubation with GRF. On the other hand, total (cell plus medium) content of GH significantly increased only after 24-h incubation. To examine the GH-synthesizing effect of GRF more directly, newly synthesized GH labeled by (TVS)methionine during incubation with GRF was quantified by immunoprecipitation. The amount of immunoprecipitable GH increased significantly and specifically also only after 24-h incubation. When GH pools were labeled with (TVS)methionine under different schedules, the basal release of newly synthesized GH, which was labeled for 1 h immediately before chase incubation was lower during the first 15 min than stored GH which had been labeled earlier. Basal newly synthesized GH secretion exceeded stored GH secretion after 30 min. In this system, SRIF suppressed both the basal and stimulated release of GH but did not modify GH biosynthesis under either condition. Newly synthesized GH showed significant degradation during 24-h incubation; neither GRF nor SRIF affected the rate of GH degradation during the same incubation period.

  6. Expression of corticotropin-releasing factor in inflamed tissue is required for intrinsic peripheral opioid analgesia.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, M; Mousa, S A; Zhang, Q; Carter, L; Stein, C

    1996-01-01

    Immune cell-derived opioid peptides can activate opioid receptors on peripheral sensory nerves to inhibit inflammatory pain. The intrinsic mechanisms triggering this neuroimmune interaction are unknown. This study investigates the involvement of endogenous corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). A specific stress paradigm, cold water swim (CWS), produces potent opioid receptor-specific antinociception in inflamed paws of rats. This effect is dose-dependently attenuated by intraplantar but not by intravenous alpha-helical CRF. IL-1 receptor antagonist is ineffective. Similarly, local injection of antiserum against CRF, but not to IL-1, dose-dependently reverses this effect. Intravenous anti-CRF is only inhibitory at 10(4)-fold higher concentrations and intravenous CRF does not produce analgesia. Pretreatment of inflamed paws with an 18-mer 3'-3'-end inverted CRF-antisense oligodeoxynucleotide abolishes CWS-induced antinociception. The same treatment significantly reduces the amount of CRF extracted from inflamed paws and the number of CRF-immunostained cells without affecting gross inflammatory signs. A mismatch oligodeoxynucleotide alters neither the CWS effect nor CRF immunoreactivity. These findings identify locally expressed CRF as the predominant agent to trigger opioid release within inflamed tissue. Endogenous IL-1, circulating CRF or antiinflammatory effects, are not involved. Thus, an intact immune system plays an essential role in pain control, which is important for the understanding of pain in immunosuppressed patients with cancer or AIDS. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8650225

  7. Corticotropin-releasing factor-related peptides, serotonergic systems, and emotional behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fox, James H.; Lowry, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is a 41-amino acid neuropeptide that is involved in stress-related physiology and behavior, including control of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Members of the CRF family of neuropeptides, including urocortin 1 (UCN 1), UCN 2, and UCN 3, bind to the G protein-coupled receptors, CRF type 1 (CRF1) and CRF2 receptors. In addition, CRF binding protein (CRFBP) binds both CRF and UCN 1 and can modulate their activities. There are multiple mechanisms through which CRF-related peptides may influence emotional behavior, one of which is through altering the activity of brainstem neuromodulatory systems, including serotonergic systems. CRF and CRF-related peptides act within the dorsal raphe nucleus (DR), the major source for serotonin (5-HT) in the brain, to alter the neuronal activity of specific subsets of serotonergic neurons and to influence stress-related behavior. CRF-containing axonal fibers innervate the DR in a topographically organized manner, which may contribute to the ability of CRF to alter the activity of specific subsets of serotonergic neurons. CRF and CRF-related peptides can either increase or decrease serotonergic neuronal firing rates and serotonin release, depending on their concentrations and on the specific CRF receptor subtype(s) involved. This review aims to describe the interactions between CRF-related peptides and serotonergic systems, the consequences for stress-related behavior, and implications for vulnerability to anxiety and affective disorders. PMID:24065880

  8. Brainstem Reticulospinal Neurons are Targets for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor-Induced Locomotion in Roughskin Newts

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Catherine S.; Dolence, E. Kurt; Rose, James D.

    2009-01-01

    Stress-induced release or central administration of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) enhances locomotion in a wide range of vertebrates, including the roughskin newt, Taricha granulosa. Although CRF’s stimulatory actions on locomotor behavior are well established, the target neurons through which CRF exerts this effect remain unknown. To identify these target neurons, we utilized a fluorescent conjugate of CRF (CRF-TAMRA 1) to track this peptide’s internalization into reticulospinal and other neurons in the medullary reticular formation (MRF), a region critically involved in regulating locomotion. Epifluorescent and confocal microscopy revealed that CRF-TAMRA 1 was internalized by diverse MRF neurons, including reticulospinal neurons retrogradely labeled with Cascade Blue dextran. In addition, we immunohistochemically identified a distinct subset of serotonin-containing neurons, located throughout the medullary raphé, that also internalized the fluorescent CRF-TAMRA 1 conjugate. Chronic single-unit recordings obtained from microwire electrodes in behaving newts revealed that intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of CRF-TAMRA 1 increased medullary neuronal firing and that appearance of this firing was associated with, and strongly predictive of, episodes of CRF-induced locomotion. Furthermore, icv administered CRF-TAMRA 1 produced behavioral and neurophysiological effects identical to equimolar doses of unlabeled CRF. Collectively, these findings provide the first evidence that CRF directly targets reticulospinal and serotonergic neurons in the MRF and indicate that CRF may enhance locomotion via direct effects on the hindbrain, including the reticulospinal system. PMID:19968991

  9. Polypeptide release factors and stop codon recognition in the apicoplast and mitochondrion of Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Vaishya, Suniti; Kumar, Vikash; Gupta, Ankit; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Habib, Saman

    2016-06-01

    Correct termination of protein synthesis would be a critical step in translation of organellar open reading frames (ORFs) of the apicoplast and mitochondrion of the malaria parasite. We identify release factors (RFs) responsible for recognition of the UAA and UGA stop-codons of apicoplast ORFs and the sole UAA stop-codon that terminates translation from the three mitochondrial ORFs. A single nuclear-encoded canonical RF2, PfRF2Api , localizes to the apicoplast. It has a conserved tripeptide motif (SPF) for stop-codon recognition and is sufficient for peptidyl-tRNA hydrolysis (PTH) from both UAA and UGA. Two RF family proteins are targeted to the parasite mitochondrion; a canonical RF1, PfRF1Mit , with a variant codon-recognition motif (PxN instead of the conserved RF1 PxT) is the major peptidyl-hydrolase with specific recognition of the UAA codon relevant to mitochondrial ORFs. Mutation of the N residue of the PfRF1Mit PxN motif and two other conserved residues of the codon recognition domain lowers PTH activity from pre-termination ribosomes indicating their role in codon-recognition. The second RF imported by the mitochondrion is the non-canonical PfICT1 that functions as a dimer and mediates codon nonspecific peptide release. Our results help delineate a critical step in organellar translation in Plasmodium, which is an important target for anti-malarials. PMID:26946524

  10. Controlled-release of epidermal growth factor from cationized gelatin hydrogel enhances corneal epithelial wound healing.

    PubMed

    Hori, Kuniko; Sotozono, Chie; Hamuro, Junji; Yamasaki, Kenta; Kimura, Yu; Ozeki, Makoto; Tabata, Yasuhiko; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2007-04-01

    We designed a new ophthalmic drug-delivery system for epidermal growth factor (EGF) from the biodegradable hydrogel of cationized gelatin. We placed a cationized gelatin hydrogel (CGH) with incorporated (125)I-labelled EGF in the conjunctival sac of mice and measured the residual radioactivity at different times to evaluate the in vivo profile of EGF release. Approximately 60-67% and 10-12% of EGF applied initially remained 1 and 7 days after application, respectively; whereas EGF delivered in topically applied solution or via EGF impregnation of soft contact lenses disappeared within the first day. We also placed CGH films with 5.0 mug of incorporated EGF on round corneal defects in rabbits to evaluate the healing process using image analysis software and to assess epithelial proliferation immunohistochemically by counting the number of Ki67-positive cells. The application of a CGH film with incorporated EGF resulted in a reduction in the epithelial defect in rabbit corneas accompanied by significantly enhanced epithelial proliferation compared with the reduction seen after the topical application of EGF solution or the placement of an EGF-free CGH film. The controlled release of EGF from a CGH placed over a corneal epithelial defect accelerated ocular surface wound healing. PMID:17289206

  11. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described. PMID:22202103

  12. Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches.

    PubMed

    Wantke, F; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    1993-12-01

    Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. PMID:10779289

  13. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  14. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R.; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H.; Madrid, Rodolfo

    2013-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1G93A) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PCNa), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Nav) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1G93A. These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1G93A on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  15. Knockdown of corticotropin-releasing factor 1 receptors in the ventral tegmental area enhances conditioned fear.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nicola A; Ganella, Despina E; Bathgate, Ross A D; Chen, Alon; Lawrence, Andrew J; Kim, Jee Hyun

    2016-09-01

    The neuropeptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) coordinates the physiological and behavioural responses to stress. CRF receptors are highly expressed in the ventral tegmental area (VTA), an important region for motivated behaviour. Therefore, we examined the role of CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) in the VTA in conditioned fear, using a viral-mediated RNA interference approach. Following stereotaxic injection of a lentivirus that contained either shCRF-R1 or a control sequence, mice received tone-footshock pairings. Intra-VTA shCRF-R1 did not affect tone-elicited freezing during conditioning. Once conditioned fear was acquired, however, shCRF-R1 mice consistently showed stronger freezing to the tone even after extinction and reinstatement. These results implicate a novel role of VTA CRF-R1 in conditioned fear, and suggest how stress may modulate aversive learning and memory. PMID:27397862

  16. A specific radioimmunoassay for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) using synthetic ovine CRF. [Rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Murakami, K.; Ohno, N.; Kageyama, J.; Aoki, Y.; Takahara, J.; Ota, Z.

    1983-02-28

    This newly developed specific radioimmunoassay for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) had a sensitivity range of 25 pg/tube to 4 ng/tube. Intra and interassay coefficients of variation were 4.6% and 9.8%, respectively. Rat median eminence extracts showed a parallel dose response curve with synthetic ovine CRF and a significant cross reaction was not evident with other tested neuropeptides. The highest mean levels of CRF were found in the median eminence (6.61 ng/mg proparaventricular nucleus, dorsomedial nucleus, suprachiasmatic nucleus and ventromedial nucleus. The immunoreactive CRF of the rat medial basal hypothalamus coeluted with bioassayable CRF and with iodinated CRF on Sephadex G-75 chromatography. The results indicate that rat hypothalamus contains a CRF similar to ovine CRF.

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor peptide antagonists: design, characterization and potential clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Rivier, Jean E.; Rivier, Catherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Elusive for more than half a century, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) was finally isolated and characterized in 1981 from ovine hypothalami and shortly thereafter, from rat brain. Thirty years later, much has been learned about the function and localization of CRF and related family members (Urocortins 1, 2 and 3) and their 2 receptors, CRF receptor type 1 (CRFR1) and CRF receptor type 2 (CRFR2). Here, we report the stepwise development of peptide CRF agonists and antagonists, which led to the development of the CRFR1 agonist Stressin1; the long-acting antagonists Astressin2-B which is specific for CRFR2; and Astressin B, which binds to both CRFR1 and CRFR2. This analog has potential for the treatment of CRF-dependent diseases in the periphery, such as irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:24269930

  18. Applications of human factors engineering to LNG release prevention and control

    SciTech Connect

    Shikiar, R.; Rankin, W.L.; Rideout, T.B.

    1982-06-01

    The results of an investigation of human factors engineering and human reliability applications to LNG release prevention and control are reported. The report includes a discussion of possible human error contributions to previous LNG accidents and incidents, and a discussion of generic HF considerations for peakshaving plants. More specific recommendations for improving HF practices at peakshaving plants are offered based on visits to six facilities. The HF aspects of the recently promulgated DOT regulations are reviewed, and recommendations are made concerning how these regulations can be implemented utilizing standard HF practices. Finally, the integration of HF considerations into overall system safety is illustrated by a presentation of human error probabilities applicable to LNG operations and by an expanded fault tree analysis which explicitly recognizes man-machine interfaces.

  19. Cognitive disruptions in stress-related psychiatric disorders: A role for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF).

    PubMed

    Bangasser, Debra A; Kawasumi, Yushi

    2015-11-01

    This article is part of a Special Issue "SBN 2014". Stress is a potential etiology contributor to both post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and major depression. One stress-related neuropeptide that is hypersecreted in these disorders is corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Dysregulation of CRF has long been linked to the emotion and mood symptoms that characterize PTSD and depression. However, the idea that CRF also mediates the cognitive disruptions observed in patients with these disorders has received less attention. Here we review literature indicating that CRF can alter cognitive functions. Detailed are anatomical studies revealing that CRF is poised to modulate regions required for learning and memory. We also describe preclinical behavioral studies that demonstrate CRF's ability to alter fear conditioning, impair memory consolidation, and alter a number of executive functions, including attention and cognitive flexibility. The implications of these findings for the etiology and treatment of the cognitive impairments observed in stress-related psychiatric disorders are described. PMID:25888454

  20. Role of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor in Drug Addiction: Potential for Pharmacological Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Logrip, Marian L.; Koob, George F.; Zorrilla, Eric P.

    2012-01-01

    Drug dependence is a chronically relapsing disorder that places an enormous strain on healthcare systems. For treatments to have long-term clinical value, they must address the causes of relapse. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide central to the stress response, may be one key to solving the relapse cycle. CRF is hypothesized to mediate the elevated anxiety and negative emotional states experienced during the development of dependence. This review summarizes existing data on changes in the CRF system produced by drugs of abuse and the function of CRF receptors in regulating behavioural responses to drugs of abuse, with an emphasis on drug dependence. Drug-induced changes in neuronal excitability throughout the limbic system, as well as the reversal of these neuroadaptations by CRF receptor antagonists, are also addressed. CRF receptor antagonists, by reducing the motivational effects of drug withdrawal and protracted abstinence, are proposed to be novel therapeutic targets for drug abuse and addiction. PMID:21425881

  1. Regulation of release factor expression using a translational negative feedback loop: a systems analysis.

    PubMed

    Betney, Russell; de Silva, Eric; Mertens, Christina; Knox, Yvonne; Krishnan, J; Stansfield, Ian

    2012-12-01

    The essential eukaryote release factor eRF1, encoded by the yeast SUP45 gene, recognizes stop codons during ribosomal translation. SUP45 nonsense alleles are, however, viable due to the establishment of feedback-regulated readthrough of the premature termination codon; reductions in full-length eRF1 promote tRNA-mediated stop codon readthrough, which, in turn, drives partial production of full-length eRF1. A deterministic mathematical model of this eRF1 feedback loop was developed using a staged increase in model complexity. Model predictions matched the experimental observation that strains carrying the mutant SUQ5 tRNA (a weak UAA suppressor) in combination with any of the tested sup45(UAA) nonsense alleles exhibit threefold more stop codon readthrough than that of an SUQ5 yeast strain. The model also successfully predicted that eRF1 feedback control in an SUQ5 sup45(UAA) mutant would resist, but not completely prevent, imposed changes in eRF1 expression. In these experiments, the introduction of a plasmid-borne SUQ5 copy into a sup45(UAA) SUQ5 mutant directed additional readthrough and full-length eRF1 expression, despite feedback. Secondly, induction of additional sup45(UAA) mRNA expression in a sup45(UAA) SUQ5 strain also directed increased full-length eRF1 expression. The autogenous sup45 control mechanism therefore acts not to precisely control eRF1 expression, but rather as a damping mechanism that only partially resists changes in release factor expression level. The validated model predicts that the degree of feedback damping (i.e., control precision) is proportional to eRF1 affinity for the premature stop codon. The validated model represents an important tool to analyze this and other translational negative feedback loops. PMID:23104998

  2. Regulation of release factor expression using a translational negative feedback loop: A systems analysis

    PubMed Central

    Betney, Russell; de Silva, Eric; Mertens, Christina; Knox, Yvonne; Krishnan, J.; Stansfield, Ian

    2012-01-01

    The essential eukaryote release factor eRF1, encoded by the yeast SUP45 gene, recognizes stop codons during ribosomal translation. SUP45 nonsense alleles are, however, viable due to the establishment of feedback-regulated readthrough of the premature termination codon; reductions in full-length eRF1 promote tRNA-mediated stop codon readthrough, which, in turn, drives partial production of full-length eRF1. A deterministic mathematical model of this eRF1 feedback loop was developed using a staged increase in model complexity. Model predictions matched the experimental observation that strains carrying the mutant SUQ5 tRNA (a weak UAA suppressor) in combination with any of the tested sup45UAA nonsense alleles exhibit threefold more stop codon readthrough than that of an SUQ5 yeast strain. The model also successfully predicted that eRF1 feedback control in an SUQ5 sup45UAA mutant would resist, but not completely prevent, imposed changes in eRF1 expression. In these experiments, the introduction of a plasmid-borne SUQ5 copy into a sup45UAA SUQ5 mutant directed additional readthrough and full-length eRF1 expression, despite feedback. Secondly, induction of additional sup45UAA mRNA expression in a sup45UAA SUQ5 strain also directed increased full-length eRF1 expression. The autogenous sup45 control mechanism therefore acts not to precisely control eRF1 expression, but rather as a damping mechanism that only partially resists changes in release factor expression level. The validated model predicts that the degree of feedback damping (i.e., control precision) is proportional to eRF1 affinity for the premature stop codon. The validated model represents an important tool to analyze this and other translational negative feedback loops. PMID:23104998

  3. Wireless fast-scan cyclic voltammetry measurement of histamine using WINCS -- a proof-of-principle study

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Su-Youne; Jay, Taylor; Muñoz, Joel; Kim, Inyong; Lee, Kendall H.

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is among the most poorly understood biogenic amines, yet the histaminergic system spreads throughout the brain and has been implicated in functions as diverse as homeostasis and synaptic plasticity. Not surprisingly then, it has been linked to a number of conditions including minimally conscious state, persistent vegetative state, epilepsy, addiction, cluster headache, essential tremor, and Parkinson’s disease. We have previously reported that the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensing (WINCS) system can monitor dopamine, serotonin, and adenosine using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV). Here, we demonstrate the expanded capability of the WINCS system to measure histamine. The optimal FSCV waveform was determined to be a triangle wave scanned between −0.4 and +1.4 V at a rate of 400 V/s applied at 10 Hz. Using this optimized FSCV parameter, we found histamine release was induced by high frequency electrical stimulation at the tuberomammillary nucleus in rat brain slices. Our results suggest that the WINCS system can provide reliable, high fidelity measurements of histamine, consistently showing oxidative currents at +1.3 V, a finding that may have important clinical implications. PMID:22416270

  4. Pyridinium derivatives of histamine are potent activators of cytosolic carbonic anhydrase isoforms I, II and VII.

    PubMed

    Dave, Khyati; Scozzafava, Andrea; Vullo, Daniela; Supuran, Claudiu T; Ilies, Marc A

    2011-04-21

    A series of positively-charged derivatives has been prepared by reaction of histamine with substituted pyrylium salts. These pyridinium histamine derivatives were investigated as activators of the zinc enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA, EC 4.2.1.1) and more precisely the human isoforms hCA I, II and VII. Activities from the subnanomolar to the micromolar range were detected for these compounds as activators of the three isoforms, confirming the validity of current and previous designs. The substitution pattern at the pyridinium ring was the main factor influencing activity, the three isoforms showing different structural requirements for good activity, related with the number of pyridinium substituting groups and their nature, among various alkyl, phenyl and para-substituted styryl moieties. We were successful in identifying nanomolar potent and selective activators for each isozyme and also activators with a relatively good activity against all isozymes tested--valuable lead compounds for physiology and pathology studies involving these isozymes. PMID:21369613

  5. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system. PMID:26100750

  6. Novel Roles for Kv7 Channels in Shaping Histamine-Induced Contractions and Bradykinin-Dependent Relaxations in Pig Coronary Arteries

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xingjuan; Li, Wennan; Hiett, S. Christopher; Obukhov, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    -contracted CAs. We propose that in CAs, a decreased expression or a loss of function of Kv7 channels may lead to sustained histamine-induced contractions and reduced endothelium-dependent relaxation, both risk factors for coronary spasm. PMID:26844882

  7. Functional Impact of Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Exposure on Tau Phosphorylation and Axon Transport

    PubMed Central

    Le, Michelle H.; Weissmiller, April M.; Monte, Louise; Lin, Po Han; Hexom, Tia C.; Natera, Orlangie; Wu, Chengbiao; Rissman, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Stress exposure or increased levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) induce hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P) in rodent models, a process that is dependent on the type-1 CRF receptor (CRFR1). Although these preclinical studies on stress-induced tau-P provide mechanistic insight for epidemiological work that identifies stress as a risk factor for Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the actual impact of stress-induced tau-P on neuronal function remains unclear. To determine the functional consequences of stress-induced tau-P, we developed a novel mouse neuronal cell culture system to explore the impact of acute (0.5hr) and chronic (2hr) CRF treatment on tau-P and integral cell processes such as axon transport. Consistent with in vivo reports, we found that chronic CRF treatment increased tau-P levels and caused globular accumulations of phosphorylated tau in dendritic and axonal processes. Furthermore, while both acute and chronic CRF treatment led to significant reduction in CREB activation and axon transport of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), this was not the case with mitochondrial transport. Acute CRF treatment caused increased mitochondrial velocity and distance traveled in neurons, while chronic CRF treatment modestly decreased mitochondrial velocity and greatly increased distance traveled. These results suggest that transport of cellular energetics may take priority over growth factors during stress. Tau-P was required for these changes, as co-treatment of CRF with a GSK kinase inhibitor prevented CRF-induced tau-P and all axon transport changes. Collectively, our results provide mechanistic insight into the consequences of stress peptide-induced tau-P and provide an explanation for how chronic stress via CRF may lead to neuronal vulnerability in AD. PMID:26790099

  8. Factors influencing immediate post-release survival of spectacled eiders following surgical implantation of transmitters with percutaneous antennae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexson, Matthew G.; Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Spriggs, Maria; Myers, Gwen E.

    2014-01-01

    Surgically implanted transmitters are a common method for tracking animal movements. Immediately following surgical implantation, animals pass through a critical recovery phase when behaviors may deviate from normal and the likelihood of individual survival may be reduced. Therefore, data collected during this period may be censored to minimize bias introduced by surgery-related behaviors or mortality. However, immediate post-release mortalities negate a sampling effort and reduce the amount of data potentially collected after the censoring period. Wildlife biologists should employ methods to support an animal’s survival through this period, but factors contributing to immediate post-release survival have not been formally assessed. We evaluated factors that potentially influenced the immediate post-release survival of 56 spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri) marked with coelomically implanted satellite transmitters with percutaneous antennae in northern Alaska in 2010 and 2011. We modeled survival through the first 14 days following release and assessed the relative importance and effect of 15 covariates hypothesized to influence survival during this immediate post-release period. Estimated daily survival rate increased over the duration of the immediate post-release period; the probability of mortality was greatest within the first 5 days following release. Our top-ranking model included the effect of 2 blood analytes, pH and hematocrit, measured prior to surgical implantation of a transmitter. We found a positive response to pH; eiders exhibiting acidemia (low pH) prior to surgery were less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. We found a curvilinear response to hematocrit; eiders exhibiting extremely low or high pre-surgery hematocrit were also less likely to survive the immediate post-release period. In the interest of maximizing the survival of marked birds following release, hematological data obtained prior to surgical implantation of

  9. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  10. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  11. Insulin/IGF signaling in Drosophila and other insects: factors that regulate production, release and post-release action of the insulin-like peptides.

    PubMed

    Nässel, Dick R; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Insulin, insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin-like peptides (ILPs) are important regulators of metabolism, growth, reproduction and lifespan, and mechanisms of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS) have been well conserved over evolution. In insects, between one and 38 ILPs have been identified in each species. Relatively few insect species have been investigated in depth with respect to ILP functions, and therefore we focus mainly on the well-studied fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster. In Drosophila eight ILPs (DILP1-8), but only two receptors (dInR and Lgr3) are known. DILP2, 3 and 5 are produced by a set of neurosecretory cells (IPCs) in the brain and their biosynthesis and release are controlled by a number of mechanisms differing between larvae and adults. Adult IPCs display cell-autonomous sensing of circulating glucose, coupled to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms for DILP release. The glucose-mediated DILP secretion is modulated by neurotransmitters and neuropeptides, as well as by factors released from the intestine and adipocytes. Larval IPCs, however, are indirectly regulated by glucose-sensing endocrine cells producing adipokinetic hormone, or by circulating factors from the intestine and fat body. Furthermore, IIS is situated within a complex physiological regulatory network that also encompasses the lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone and juvenile hormone. After release from IPCs, the ILP action can be modulated by circulating proteins that act either as protective carriers (binding proteins), or competitive inhibitors. Some of these proteins appear to have additional functions that are independent of ILPs. Taken together, the signaling with multiple ILPs is under complex control, ensuring tightly regulated IIS in the organism. PMID:26472340

  12. Corticotropin-releasing Factor in the Dorsal Raphe Nucleus: Linking Stress Coping and Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Rita J.; Lucki, Irwin; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Addiction and stress are linked at multiple levels. Drug abuse is often initiated as a maladaptive mechanism for coping with stress. It is maintained in part by negative reinforcement to prevent the aversive consequences of stress associated with abstinence. Finally, stress is a major factor leading to relapse in subjects in which drug seeking behavior has extinguished. These associations imply overlapping or converging neural circuits and substrates that underlie the processes of addiction and the expression of the stress response. Here we discuss the major brain serotonin (5-HT) system, the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN)-5-HT system as a point of convergence that links these processes and how the stress-related neuropeptide, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) directs this by a bimodal regulation of DRN neuronal activity. The review begins by describing a structural basis for CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system. This is followed by a review of the effects of CRF and stress on DRN function based on electrophysiological and microdialysis studies. The concept that multiple CRF receptor subtypes in the DRN facilitate distinct coping behaviors is reviewed with recent evidence for a unique cellular mechanism by which stress history can determine the type of coping behavior. Finally, work on CRF regulation of the DRN-5-HT system is integrated with literature on the role of 5-HT-dopamine interactions in addiction. PMID:19800322

  13. Rapid release of growth factors regenerates force output in volumetric muscle loss injuries.

    PubMed

    Grasman, Jonathan M; Do, Duc M; Page, Raymond L; Pins, George D

    2015-12-01

    A significant challenge in the design and development of biomaterial scaffolds is to incorporate mechanical and biochemical cues to direct organized tissue growth. In this study, we investigated the effect of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) loaded, crosslinked fibrin (EDCn-HGF) microthread scaffolds on skeletal muscle regeneration in a mouse model of volumetric muscle loss (VML). The rapid, sustained release of HGF significantly enhanced the force production of muscle tissue 60 days after injury, recovering more than 200% of the force output relative to measurements recorded immediately after injury. HGF delivery increased the number of differentiating myoblasts 14 days after injury, and supported an enhanced angiogenic response. The architectural morphology of microthread scaffolds supported the ingrowth of nascent myofibers into the wound site, in contrast to fibrin gel implants which did not support functional regeneration. Together, these data suggest that EDCn-HGF microthreads recapitulate several of the regenerative cues lost in VML injuries, promote remodeling of functional muscle tissue, and enhance the functional regeneration of skeletal muscle. Further, by strategically incorporating specific biochemical factors and precisely tuning the structural and mechanical properties of fibrin microthreads, we have developed a powerful platform technology that may enhance regeneration in other axially aligned tissues. PMID:26344363

  14. Interaction of vasoactive substances released by platelet-activating factor in the rat perfused heart.

    PubMed Central

    Hu, W. M.; Man, R. Y.

    1991-01-01

    1. The coronary vascular effects of platelet-activating factor (PAF) have been intensively studied and it has been proposed that they are mediated by the release of vasoactive substances. In this study, a cascade perfusion model using two rat perfused hearts was developed to investigate the properties of PAF-released vasoactive substances and the interplay of these substances. The properties of the vasoactive substances after an injection of PAF (100 pmol) in the rat perfused heart were examined by collecting the effluent from the first heart for the perfusion of a second (recipient) heart. The presence of vasoconstrictor substances in the effluent was characterized by an increase in the perfusion pressure of the recipient heart. 2. Previous exposure of the recipient heart of PAF (100 pmol) abolished the response of the heart to subsequent administration of PAF, but did not affect the response of the recipient heart to the effluent. This suggested that the coronary vasoconstrictor response of the recipient heart was not due to the presence of PAF in the effluent but to other vasoactive substances. 3. Pretreatment of the recipient heart with the leukotriene receptor antagonist, L-649,923 (5 microM), partially reduced the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. Pretreatment of the first heart with indomethacin (2.8 microM) also partially reduced the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. The combination of indomethacin pretreatment of the first heart and L-649,923 pretreatment of the recipient heart completely abolished the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent suggesting that both prostaglandins and leukotrienes are involved in the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent. 4. Pretreatment of both hearts with L-649,923 or the first heart with the leukotriene synthesis inhibitor (MK-886, 10 microM) completely abolished the vasoconstrictor effect of the effluent.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1810604

  15. Delta opioid receptors colocalize with corticotropin releasing factor in hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    The hippocampal formation (HF) is an important site at which stress circuits and endogenous opioid systems intersect, likely playing a critical role in the interaction between stress and drug addiction. Prior study findings suggest that the stress-related neuropeptide corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and the delta opioid receptor (DOR) may localize to similar neuronal populations within HF lamina. Here, hippocampal sections of male and cycling female adult Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for immunolabeling using antisera directed against the DOR and CRF peptide, as well as interneuron subtype markers somatostatin or parvalbumin, and analyzed by fluorescence and electron microscopy. Both DOR- and CRF-labeling was observed in interneurons in the CA1, CA3, and dentate hilus. Males and normal cycling females displayed a similar number of CRF immunoreactive neurons co-labeled with DOR and a similar average number of CRF-labeled neurons in the dentate hilus and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3. In addition, 70% of DOR/CRF dual-labeled neurons in the hilar region co-labeled with somatostatin, suggesting a role for these interneurons in regulating perforant path input to dentate granule cells. Ultrastructural analysis of CRF-labeled axon terminals within the hilar region revealed that proestrus females have a similar number of CRF-labeled axon terminals that contain DORs compared to males but an increased number of CRF-labeled axon terminals without DORs. Taken together, these findings suggest that while DORs are anatomically positioned to modulate CRF immunoreactive interneuron activity and CRF peptide release, their ability to exert such regulatory activity may be compromised in females when estrogen levels are high. PMID:21277946

  16. Donepezil, an acetylcholine esterase inhibitor, and ABT-239, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, require the integrity of brain histamine system to exert biochemical and procognitive effects in the mouse.

    PubMed

    Provensi, Gustavo; Costa, Alessia; Passani, M Beatrice; Blandina, Patrizio

    2016-10-01

    Histaminergic H3 receptors (H3R) antagonists enhance cognition in preclinical models and modulate neurotransmission, in particular acetylcholine (ACh) release in the cortex and hippocampus, two brain areas involved in memory processing. The cognitive deficits seen in aging and Alzheimer's disease have been associated with brain cholinergic deficits. Donepezil is one of the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor approved for use across the full spectrum of these cognitive disorders. We addressed the question if H3R antagonists and donepezil require an intact histamine neuronal system to exert their procognitive effects. The effect of the H3R antagonist ABT-239 and donepezil were evaluated in the object recognition test (ORT), and on the level of glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) phosphorylation in normal and histamine-depleted mice. Systemic administration of ABT-239 or donepezil ameliorated the cognitive performance in the ORT. However, these compounds were ineffective in either genetically (histidine decarboxylase knock-out, HDC-KO) or pharmacologically, by means of intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the HDC irreversible inhibitor a-fluoromethylhistidine (a-FMHis), histamine-deficient mice. Western blot analysis revealed that ABT-239 or donepezil systemic treatments increased GSK-3β phosphorylation in cortical and hippocampal homogenates of normal, but not of histamine-depleted mice. Furthermore, administration of the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 that blocks GSK-3β phosphorylation, prevented the procognitive effects of both drugs in normal mice. Our results indicate that both donepezil and ABT-239 require the integrity of the brain histaminergic system to exert their procognitive effects and strongly suggest that impairments of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β intracellular pathway activation is responsible for the inefficacy of both drugs in histamine-deficient animals. PMID:27291828

  17. Histamine acting on H1 receptor promotes inhibition of proliferation via PLC, RAC, and JNK-dependent pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Notcovich, Cintia; Diez, Federico; Tubio, Maria Rosario; Baldi, Alberto; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.; Davio, Carlos; Shayo, Carina

    2010-02-01

    It is well established that histamine modulates cell proliferation through the activation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is known to couple to phospholipase C (PLC) activation via Gq. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether H1R activation modulates Rho GTPases, well-known effectors of Gq/G{sub 11}-coupled receptors, and whether such modulation influences cell proliferation. Experiments were carried out in CHO cells stably expressing H1R (CHO-H1R). By using pull-down assays, we found that both histamine and a selective H1R agonist activated Rac and RhoA in a time- and dose-dependent manner without significant changes in the activation of Cdc42. Histamine response was abolished by the H1R antagonist mepyramine, RGS2 and the PLC inhibitor U73122, suggesting that Rac and RhoA activation is mediated by H1R via Gq coupling to PLC stimulation. Histamine caused a marked activation of serum response factor activity via the H1R, as determined with a serum-responsive element (SRE) luciferase reporter, and this response was inhibited by RhoA inactivation with C3 toxin. Histamine also caused a significant activation of JNK which was inhibited by expression of the Rac-GAP {beta}2-chimaerin. On the other hand, H1R-induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by U73122 but not affected by C3 or {beta}2-chimaerin, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on PLC and independent of RhoA or Rac. [{sup 3}H]-Thymidine incorporation assays showed that both histamine and the H1R agonist inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and that the effect was independent of RhoA but partially dependent on JNK and Rac. Our results reveal that functional coupling of the H1R to Gq-PLC leads to the activation of RhoA and Rac small GTPases and suggest distinct roles for Rho GTPases in the control of cell proliferation by histamine.

  18. The role of histamine H1 and H4 receptors in atopic dermatitis: from basic research to clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ohsawa, Yusuke; Hirasawa, Noriyasu

    2014-12-01

    Histamine plays important roles in inflammation and nervous irritability in allergic disorders, including atopic dermatitis (AD). It has been shown to regulate the expression of pruritic factors, such as nerve growth factor and semaphorin 3A, in skin keratinocytes via histamine H1 receptor (H1R). Furthermore, H1R antagonist reduced the level of IL-31, a cytokine involving the skin barrier and pruritus, in chronic dermatitis lesions in NC/Nga mice and patients with AD. Histamine plays roles in the induction of allergic inflammation by activating eosinophils, mast cells, basophils, and Th2 cells via histamine H4 receptor (H4R). H4R, in addition to H1R, is expressed on sensory neurons, and a decrease in scratching behaviors was observed in H4R-deficient mice and mice treated with a H4R antagonist. We found that the combined administration of H1R and H4R antagonists inhibited the itch response and chronic allergic inflammation, and had a pharmacological effect similar to that of prednisolone. Although the oral administration of H1R antagonists is widely used to treat AD, it is not very effective. In contrast, JNJ39758979, a novel H4R antagonist, had marked effects against pruritus in Japanese patients with AD in a phase II clinical trial. Next generation antihistaminic agents possessing H1R and H4R antagonistic actions may be a potent therapeutic drug for AD. PMID:25249063

  19. Effect of corticotropin-releasing factor-binding protein on prostaglandin release from cultured maternal decidua and on contractile activity of human myometrium in vitro.

    PubMed

    Petraglia, F; Benedetto, C; Florio, P; D'Ambrogio, G; Genazzani, A D; Marozio, L; Vale, W

    1995-10-01

    Human placenta and uterine tissues are sites of production and local action of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The recent evidence that CRF-binding protein (CRF-BP), a protein that blocks CRF-induced pituitary ACTH release, is produced by placental tissues suggested the present study to investigate the effects of CRF-BP on prostaglandin release and contractile activity of myometrial strips. Primary cultures of decidual cells were prepared using tissue collected from healthy women undergoing cesarean delivery at term. Mechanical and enzymatic cell dispersions were carried out, and experiments were performed 24-28 h after cell plating. The prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) concentration in cultured medium was measured by RIA. Myometrial strips were obtained from the upper edge of the uterine incision during elective cesarean section at term. Dissected free of connective tissue, strips were mounted in a 30-mL two-chamber organ bath containing oxygenated Tyrode's buffer (37 C) and connected to a two-channel isometric smooth muscle transducer. Cultured decidual cells collected at term significantly increased the release of PGE2 in the presence of CRF (P < 0.01). The addition of CRF-BP did not significantly modify PGE2 release, but completely reversed the effect of CRF. When human myometrial strips were incubated in the presence of CRF and PGF2 alpha, a significant increase in contractile activity was observed (P < 0.01); preincubation with CRF-BP prevented the increased contractile activity induced by CRF. The present data show that CRF-BP is able to counteract the biological effect of CRF on human pregnancy endometrium and myometrium and suggest that CRF-BP may be a regulatory protein that plays a role in the local function of uterine tissues during pregnancy. PMID:7559899

  20. The metabolism of histamine in the Drosophila optic lobe involves an ommatidial pathway: β-alanine recycles through the retina

    PubMed Central

    Borycz, Janusz; Borycz, Jolanta A.; Edwards, Tara N.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Meinertzhagen, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Flies recycle the photoreceptor neurotransmitter histamine by conjugating it to β-alanine to form β-alanyl-histamine (carcinine). The conjugation is regulated by Ebony, while Tan hydrolyses carcinine, releasing histamine and β-alanine. In Drosophila, β-alanine synthesis occurs either from uracil or from the decarboxylation of aspartate but detailed roles for the enzymes responsible remain unclear. Immunohistochemically detected β-alanine is present throughout the fly’s entire brain, and is enhanced in the retina especially in the pseudocone, pigment and photoreceptor cells of the ommatidia. HPLC determinations reveal 10.7 ng of β-alanine in the wild-type head, roughly five times more than histamine. When wild-type flies drink uracil their head β-alanine increases more than after drinking l-aspartic acid, indicating the effectiveness of the uracil pathway. Mutants of black, which lack aspartate decarboxylase, cannot synthesize β-alanine from l-aspartate but can still synthesize it efficiently from uracil. Our findings demonstrate a novel function for pigment cells, which not only screen ommatidia from stray light but also store and transport β-alanine and carcinine. This role is consistent with a β-alanine-dependent histamine recycling pathway occurring not only in the photoreceptor terminals in the lamina neuropile, where carcinine occurs in marginal glia, but vertically via a long pathway that involves the retina. The lamina’s marginal glia are also a hub involved in the storage and/or disposal of carcinine and β-alanine. PMID:22442379

  1. Photodynamic treatment with zinc poly-substituted phthalocyanines causes the release of tissue factor in an endothelial cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruse-Sawyer, Janet E.; Dixon, B.; Griffiths, John; Brown, Stanley B.

    1996-12-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is not expressed by endothelial cells unless they have ben perturbed. Identifying the extrinsic pathway of coagulation as the process involved in clot formation demonstrated that PDT induces release of TF by endothelial cells. EAhy 926 cells were incubated with 10 (mu) g ml-1 of photosensitizer for 24 h prior to illumination at 40 J cm-2. A clotting assay was then performed. PDT caused a significant reduction in clotting time. This was repeated using factor VII- or X-deficient serum. In factor VII-deficient serum there was no difference between treated and untreated cells. There was no clot formation with any cells in the presence of factor x- deficient serum. The data indicate that PDT-induced procoagulation activity is via the extrinsic pathway of coagulation and results from direct initiation of endothelial cells to release tissue factor.

  2. Sequential Engagement of FcεRI on Mast Cells and Basophil Histamine H4 Receptor and FcεRI in Allergic Rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Yoshiki; Jia, Yi; Domenico, Joanne; Joetham, Anthony; Karasuyama, Hajime; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Gelfand, Erwin W.

    2012-01-01

    Histamine H4 receptor (H4R)-deficient mice (H4R−/−), H4R antagonist-treated WT mice, and WT mice depleted of basophils failed to develop early (EPR) or late phase (LPR) nasal responses following allergen sensitization and challenge. Basophil transfer from WT but not H4R−/− mice restored the EPR and LPR in H4R−/− mice. Following passive sensitization with OVA-specific IgE, FcεRI−/− recipients of WT basophils plus OVA and histamine developed an EPR and LPR. OVA-IgE passively sensitized FcεRI−/− recipients of H4R−/− basophils and OVA and histamine challenge failed to develop an EPR or LPR, and basophils were not detected in nasal tissue. In contrast, recipients of basophils from IL-13−/− and IL-4−/−/IL-13−/− mice developed an EPR but not LPR. These results demonstrate the development of allergic rhinitis proceeded in two distinct stages: histamine release from FcεRI-activated mast cells, followed by histamine-mediated recruitment of H4R-expressing basophils to the nasal cavity and activation through FcεRI. PMID:23241885

  3. Capillary zone electrophoretic determination of histamine in fish.

    PubMed

    Mopper, B; Sciacchitano, C J

    1994-01-01

    Histamine, the principal causative agent in scombroid food poisoning, was analyzed in seafood by a new, rapid, and sensitive method using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection at 210 nm. Incurred histamine in methanolic fish extracts migrated within 4 min in a fused silica capillary filled with 0.02 M citrate buffer, pH 2.5, under an applied potential of 375 V/cm. The analytical response was linear from 0.5 to 100 ppm histamine (correlation coefficient, r = 0.999). The coefficients of variation for migration time and peak area response were < 1 and < 3%, respectively. Recovery of histamine in fortified fish composites was satisfactory. CZE was considered for alternative application in seafood speciation. PMID:8069116

  4. Quality assurance of histamine analysis in fresh and canned fish.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Warlley P; Silva, Tarliane M; Guidi, Letícia R; Tette, Patrícia A S; Byrro, Ricardo M D; Santiago-Silva, Paula; Fernandes, Christian; Gloria, Maria Beatriz A

    2016-11-15

    Histamine determination is relevant for fish safety, quality and trade. Recently a study by the European Union (EU) compared the Codex and the EU mandated methods for the analysis of histamine and observed that they underestimated and overestimated the results, respectively. To solve this problem, a simple and efficient procedure for the extraction and quantification of histamine by ion-pair HPLC method with post-column derivatization and fluorimetric detection is proposed. It was optimized and validated for the analysis of histamine in fish. The method attended the performance criteria established by Commission Decision 2002/657/CE. The method was also submitted to proficiency testing; uncertainty was calculated; and the stability of solutions and standards was investigated. There was no matrix effect. The LOD, LOQ, CCα and CCβ were fit for the purpose. The method was successfully used in the analyses of freshwater fish and fresh and canned tuna. PMID:27283612

  5. Modulation of neutrophil oxidative burst via histamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Číž, M; Lojek, A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine has the ability to influence the activity of immune cells including neutrophils and plays a pivotal role in inflammatory processes, which are a complex network of cellular and humoral events. One of the main functions manifested by activated neutrophils is oxidative burst, which is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species; therefore, the effects of histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the oxidative burst of neutrophils is reviewed. A role for the well-characterized histamine H1 and H2 receptors in this process is discussed and compared to that of the recently discovered H4 receptor. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23336732

  6. Studies on the possible role of brain histamine in behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, M. C.; Maickel, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The possible role of brain histamine in behavioural performance was studied in rats using thirst-induced water consumption, continuous (Sidman) avoidance, and reinforcement withdrawal test systems. 2. Parenteral administration of a variety of antihistamines to rats decreased thirst-induced water consumption; this effect could be antagonized by administration of histamine directly into the brain by a ventricular cannula. 3. When intraventricular doses of histamine were administered to rats at weekly intervals, an adaptation was seen in the effects of the amine on continuous avoidance behaviour. With succeeding doses, the initial period of depression of avoidance responding was shortened and the subsequent rebound stimulation disappeared. 4. The results support the hypothesis that histamine in the brain is involved in several behavioural phenomena. PMID:4402743

  7. Involvement of histamine receptors in SAPK/JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Radhika D; Khan, Manzoor M

    2012-06-01

    Histamine is a mediator of inflammation in allergic disease and asthma. Stress activated protein kinases/c-jun N-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK) are involved in asthma. This study examined the role of histamine receptors on the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK in splenocytes. C57BL/6 mice splenocytes were treated with histamine (10⁻⁴ M to 10⁻¹¹ M), and its selective receptor agonists, phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was used as a positive control, and phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK was determined. Histamine (10⁻⁴ M-10⁻⁸ M) inhibited phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK. H1R agonist betahistine (10⁻⁵ M) decreased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation and H2R agonist amthamine (10⁻⁵ M) did not show any significant effect. However, H3R agonist methimepip (10⁻⁶ M) and H4R agonist 4-methyl histamine (10⁻⁶ M), increased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. We used TNFα knockout mice to determine if histamine regulated SAPK/JNK phosphorylation via TNFα. While the effects of histamine and H1 agonists were similar to that of wild type mice in inhibiting the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK, the effects of H3 and H4 agonists differed in TNFα knockout mice splenocytes. Activation of H3 receptors decreased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in TNFα knockout mice, as opposed to an increase in wild type mice, whereas H4 agonist did not show any significant effect on the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK. This data showed that histamine acting through H4 receptors caused the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK via TNFα. The role of H4 receptors in pro-inflammatory response is intriguing. PMID:22487127

  8. Recent advances in molecular pharmacology of the histamine systems: physiology and pharmacology of histamine H3 receptor: roles in feeding regulation and therapeutic potential for metabolic disorders.

    PubMed

    Tokita, Shigeru; Takahashi, Kazuhiko; Kotani, Hidehito

    2006-05-01

    Histamine H3 receptors (H3Rs) are autoreceptors that negatively regulate the release of histamine and other neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine, dopamine, and acetylcholine in the central nervous system (CNS). Consistent with the wide-spread projection of histaminergic neurons from the lateral hypothalamus, H3Rs are widely distributed in the CNS and are believed to play a variety of physiological roles, including regulation of feeding, arousal, cognition, pain, and endocrine systems. To further understand the physiological roles of H3Rs in vivo, we produced H3R knockout (H3R-/-) mice and found that H3R-/- mice displayed hyperphagia and late-onset obesity associated with hyperinsulinemia and leptinemia, the fundamental marks of metabolic syndromes. A series of non-imidazole H3R antagonists/inverse agonists with improved selectivity and potency have been developed and were found to regulate feeding and body weight gain in laboratory animals. Taken together, these observations suggest that H3Rs are involved in the regulation of feeding behavior and body weight. Several H3R inverse agonists targeting cognitive disorders and dementia have entered clinical trials. These trials will give critical information about the physiological functions of H3Rs in humans. PMID:16648667

  9. Factors controlling nitrogen release from two forested catchments with contrasting hydrochemical responses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christopher, S.F.; Mitchell, M.J.; McHale, M.R.; Boyer, E.W.; Burns, Douglas A.; Kendall, C.

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying biogeochemical cycles of nitrogen (N) and the associated fluxes to surface waters remains challenging, given the need to deal with spatial and temporal variability and to characterize complex and heterogeneous landscapes. We focused our study on catchments S14 and S15 located in the Adirondack Mountains of New York, USA, which have similar topographic and hydrologic characteristics but contrasting stream nitrate (NO3- ) concentrations. We characterized the mechanisms by which NO3- reaches the streams during hydrological events in these catchments, aiming to reconcile our field data with our conceptual model of factors that regulate nutrient exports from forested catchments. Combined hydrometric, chemical and isotopic (??18O-H2O) data showed that the relative contributions of both soil and ground water sources were similar between the two catchments. Temporal patterns of stream chemistry were markedly different between S14 and S15, however, because the water sources in the two catchments have different solute concentrations. During late summer/fall, the largest source of NO3- in S14 was till groundwater, whereas shallow soil was the largest NO3- source in S15. NO3- concentrations in surface water decreased in S14, whereas they increased in S15 because an increasing proportion of stream flow was derived from shallow soil sources. During snowmelt, the largest sources of NO3- were in the near-surface soil in both catchments. Concentrations of NO3- increased as stream discharge increased and usually peaked before peak discharge, when shallow soil water sources made the largest contribution to stream discharge. The timing of peaks in stream NO3- concentrations was affected by antecedent moisture conditions. By elucidating the factors that affect sources and transport of N, including differences in the soil nutrient cycling and hydrological characteristics of S14 and S15, this study contributes to the overall conceptualization of NO3- release from temperate

  10. Entrapment of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in a succinylated chitosan nanoparticle delivery system and release profile.

    PubMed

    Butko, Alison; Bonat Celli, Giovana; Paulson, Allan; Ghanem, Amyl

    2016-07-01

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) helps to regulate the proliferation and migration of fibroblasts, the proliferation of endothelial cells, and aids the development of angiogenesis. Its in vivo half-life is on the order of minutes due to extensive degradation and inactivation, which could be potentially reduced by controlled release vehicles. In this study, bFGF was entrapped into chitosan (CS) and N-succinyl-chitosan (SC) nanoparticles, with and without heparin, at two levels of initial loading, followed by further characterization of the particles. Release studies were conducted using radiolabeled bFGF-loaded nanoparticles. Both types of nanoparticles loaded similar amounts of bFGF (60.2 and 68.6% for CS and SC, respectively). The release profile varied greatly among the samples, and a burst release was observed in most cases, with the release amount approaching its final value in the first 6 h. The final amount released varied from 1.5 to 18% of the amount of bFGF-entrapped. The concomitant encapsulation of heparin and the use of SC as a nanoparticle matrix contributed to the largest amount of bFGF release (18%) over the time investigated. PMID:27146359

  11. Corticotropin Releasing Factor: A Key Role in the Neurobiology of Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Zorrilla, Eric P.; Logrip, Marian L.; Koob, George F.

    2014-01-01

    Drug addiction is a chronically relapsing disorder characterized by loss of control over intake and dysregulation of stress-related brain emotional systems. Since the discovery by Wylie Vale and his colleagues of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the structurally-related urocortins, CRF systems have emerged as mediators of the body’s response to stress. Relatedly, CRF systems have a prominent role in driving addiction via actions in the central extended amygdala, producing anxiety-like behavior, reward deficits, excessive, compulsive-like drug self-administration and stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking. CRF neuron activation in the medial prefrontal cortex may also contribute to the loss of control. Polymorphisms in CRF system molecules are associated with drug use phenotypes in humans, often in interaction with stress history. Drug discovery efforts have yielded brain-penetrant CRF1 antagonists with activity in preclinical models of addiction.. The results support the hypothesis that brain CRF-CRF1 systems contribute to the etiology and maintenance of addiction. PMID:24456850

  12. Corticorelin, a synthetic human corticotropin-releasing factor analog, for the treatment of peritumoral brain edema.

    PubMed

    Panickar, Kiran S

    2010-12-01

    Corticorelin is a synthetic analog of the naturally occurring human peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). Several studies have indicated the ability of CRF to reduce the brain edema caused by brain tumors. Peritumoral brain edema (PBE), caused by an intracerebral tumor, manifests several features of vasogenic edema, which is a type of edema characterized by disruption of the blood-brain barrier. Traditionally, PBE has been treated using corticosteroids, primarily dexamethasone. Introduced more than four decades ago, dexamethasone revolutionized the treatment of PBE, but the side effects and withdrawal symptoms associated with corticosteroids propelled the investigation of other drugs. Clinical trials with the synthetic human CRF (hCRF) corticorelin (Xerecept, NEU-3002; Celtic Pharmaceutical Holdings) have indicated that this drug has a distinct advantage over classical corticosteroids in the treatment of PBE. Fewer and/or milder side effects have been reported for corticorelin compared with dexamethasone, although at higher doses of corticorelin several side effects, including hypotension and transient flushing, have been reported. Nevertheless, corticorelin was reasonably well tolerated in patients and healthy volunteers, and may be a good candidate for reducing PBE and associated neural damage, as well as improving neurological symptoms. PMID:21154169

  13. Molecular Recognition of Corticotropin releasing Factor by Its G protein-coupled Receptor CRFR1

    SciTech Connect

    Pioszak, Augen A.; Parker, Naomi R.; Suino-Powell, Kelly; Xu, H. Eric

    2009-01-15

    The bimolecular interaction between corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), a neuropeptide, and its type 1 receptor (CRFR1), a class B G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), is crucial for activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in response to stress, and has been a target of intense drug design for the treatment of anxiety, depression, and related disorders. As a class B GPCR, CRFR1 contains an N-terminal extracellular domain (ECD) that provides the primary ligand binding determinants. Here we present three crystal structures of the human CRFR1 ECD, one in a ligand-free form and two in distinct CRF-bound states. The CRFR1 ECD adopts the alpha-beta-betaalpha fold observed for other class B GPCR ECDs, but the N-terminal alpha-helix is significantly shorter and does not contact CRF. CRF adopts a continuous alpha-helix that docks in a hydrophobic surface of the ECD that is distinct from the peptide-binding site of other class B GPCRs, thereby providing a basis for the specificity of ligand recognition between CRFR1 and other class B GPCRs. The binding of CRF is accompanied by clamp-like conformational changes of two loops of the receptor that anchor the CRF C terminus, including the C-terminal amide group. These structural studies provide a molecular framework for understanding peptide binding and specificity by the CRF receptors as well as a template for designing potent and selective CRFR1 antagonists for therapeutic applications.

  14. Corticotropin-releasing factor: a possible key to gut dysfunction in the critically ill.

    PubMed

    Hill, Lauren T; Kidson, Susan H; Michell, William L

    2013-01-01

    Critically ill patients frequently display unexplained or incompletely explained features of gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, including gastric stasis, ileus, and diarrhea. This makes nutrition delivery challenging, and may contribute to poor outcomes. The typical bowel dysfunction seen in severely ill patients includes retarded gastric emptying, unsynchronized intestinal motility, and intestinal hyperpermeability. These functional changes appear similar to the corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-mediated bowel dysfunctions associated with stress of various types and some GI disorders and diseases. CRF has been shown to be present within the GI tract and its action on CRF receptors within the gut have been shown to reduce gastric emptying, alter intestinal motility, and increase intestinal permeability. However, the precise role of CRF in the GI dysfunction in critical illness remains unclear. In this short review, we provide an update on GI dysfunction during stress and review the possible role of CRF in the aetiology of gut dysfunction. We suggest that activation of CRF signaling pathways in critical illness might be key to understanding the mechanisms underlying the gut dysfunction that impairs enteral feeding in the intensive care unit. PMID:23484741

  15. Structural study of human growth hormone-releasing factor fragment (1?29) by vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, P.; Molina, M.; Lasagabaster, A.

    1995-05-01

    The conformational structure of fragment 1-29 of human growth hormone releasing factor, hGHRF (1-29), in aqueous solution and in the solid state is investigated by infrared and Raman spectroscopy. The polypeptide backbone is found to be unordered in the solid state. However, the spectra of the peptide prepared as 5% (w/w) aqueous solutions show that approximately 28% of the peptide is involved in intermolecular β-sheet aggregation. The remainder of the peptide exists largely as disordered and β-sheet conformations with a small portion of α-helices. Tyrosine residues are found to be exposed to the solvent. The secondary structures are quantitatively examined through infrared spectroscopy, the conformational percentages being near those obtained by HONDAet al. [ Biopolymers31, 869 (1991)] using circular dichroism. The fast hydrogen/deuterium exchange in peptide groups and the absence of any NMR sign indicative of ordered structure [ G. M. CLOREet al., J. Molec. Biol.191, 553 (1986)] support that the solution conformations of the non-aggregated peptide interconvert in dynamic equilibrium. Some physiological advantages that may derive from this conformational flexibility are also discussed

  16. Slow release of ions from internalized silver nanoparticles modifies the epidermal growth factor signaling response.

    PubMed

    Comfort, Kristen K; Maurer, Elizabeth I; Hussain, Saber M

    2014-11-01

    Due to their distinctive physiochemical properties, including a robust antibacterial activity and plasmonic capability, hundreds of consumer and medical products contain colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). However, even at sub-toxic dosages, AgNPs are able to disrupt cell functionality, through a yet unknown mechanism. Moreover, internalized AgNPs have the potential to prolong this disruption, even after the removal of excess particles. In the present study, we evaluated the impact, mechanism of action, and continual effects of 50 nm AgNP exposure on epidermal growth factor (EGF) signal transduction within a human keratinocyte (HaCaT) cell line. After AgNP expose, EGF signaling was initially obstructed due to the dissolution of particles into silver ions. However, at longer durations, the internalized AgNPs increased EGF signaling activity. This latter behavior correlated to sustained HaCaT stress, believed to be maintained through the continual dissolution of internalized AgNPs. This study raises concerns that even after exposure ceases, the retained nanomaterials are capable of acting as a slow-release mechanism for metallic ions; continually stressing and modifying normal cellular functionality. PMID:25260222

  17. Maternal profiling of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 deficient mice in association with restraint stress

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna, Kimberly L.; Stevenson, Sharon A.; Gammie, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Mice deficient in corticotropin releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF2) (C57BL/6J:129Sv background) exhibit impaired maternal defense (protection of offspring) and are more reactive to stressors than wild-type mice. To further understand CRF2’s role in maternal behavior, we crossed the knockout mice with a line bred for high maternal defense that also has elevated maternal care relative to inbred lines. Maternal care was normal in knockout mice (relative to wild-type). Maternal defense was impaired as previously observed. Exposure to a mild stressor (15 min restraint) did not trigger deficits in maternal defense in either genotype as determined by a two-way repeated measures ANOVA analysis. However, when examining difference scores between unrestrained and restrained conditions, knockout mice exhibited significant decreases in maternal defense with stress, suggesting knockouts are more susceptible to a mild stressor’s effects. To gain possible insights into brain activity differences between WT and KO mice, we examined c-Fos expression in association with stress. Unrestrained KO mice exhibited significantly lower c-Fos levels relative to unrestrained WT mice in 9 regions, including lateral septum and periaqueductal gray. For WT mice, restraint stress triggered c-Fos activity increases in 3 regions while for KO mice, restraint stress triggered c-Fos increases in 16 regions. Taken together, our results suggest both altered behavioral and c-Fos responses to stress in lactating CRF2 KO mice. PMID:18817761

  18. Corticotropin releasing factor excites neurons of posterior hypothalamic nucleus to produce tachycardia in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gao, He-Ren; Zhuang, Qian-Xing; Li, Bin; Li, Hong-Zhao; Chen, Zhang-Peng; Wang, Jian-Jun; Zhu, Jing-Ning

    2016-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), a peptide hormone involved in the stress response, holds a key position in cardiovascular regulation. Here, we report that the central effect of CRF on cardiovascular activities is mediated by the posterior hypothalamic nucleus (PH), an important structure responsible for stress-induced cardiovascular changes. Our present results demonstrate that CRF directly excites PH neurons via two CRF receptors, CRFR1 and CRFR2, and consequently increases heart rate (HR) rather than the mean arterial pressure (MAP) and renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA). Bilateral vagotomy does not influence the tachycardia response to microinjection of CRF into the PH, while β adrenergic receptor antagonist propranolol almost totally abolishes the tachycardia. Furthermore, microinjecting CRF into the PH primarily increases neuronal activity of the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) and rostral ventromedial medulla (RVMM), but does not influence that of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMNV). These findings suggest that the PH is a critical target for central CRF system in regulation of cardiac activity and the PH-RVLM/RVMM-cardiac sympathetic nerve pathways, rather than PH-DMNV-vagus pathway, may contribute to the CRF-induced tachycardia. PMID:26831220

  19. Multi-facets of Corticotropin-releasing Factor in Modulating Inflammation and Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Im, Eunok

    2015-01-01

    The family of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) composed of 4 ligands including CRF, urocortin (Ucn) 1, Ucn2, and Ucn3 is expressed both in the central nervous system and the periphery including the gastrointestinal tract. Two different forms of G protein coupled receptors, CRF1 and CRF2, differentially recognize CRF family members, mediating various biological functions. A large body of evidence suggests that the CRF family plays an important role in regulating inflammation and angiogenesis. Of particular interest is a contrasting role of the CRF family during inflammatory processes. The CRF family can exert both pro-and anti-inflammatory functions depending on the type of receptors, the tissues, and the disease phases. In addition, there has been a growing interest in a possible role of the CRF family in angiogenesis. Regulation of angiogenesis by the CRF family has been shown to modulate endogenous blood vessel formation, inflammatory neovascularization and cardiovascular function. This review outlines the effect of the CRF family and its receptors on 2 major biological events: inflammation and angiogenesis, and provides a possibility of their application for the treatment of inflammatory vascular diseases. PMID:25540945

  20. Laminar flow of constant-flux released gravity currents: Friction factor-Reynolds number relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testik, Firat; Yilmaz, Nazli; Chowdhury, Mijanur

    2012-11-01

    This study aims to provide a relationship for the friction factor, Cf, in terms of the Reynolds number, Re, for two-dimensional constant-flux release gravity currents during viscous-buoyancy propagation phase. Motivation of this study was related to the pipeline disposal of high-concentration dredged fluid-mud. Such disposal operations form non-Newtonian gravity currents that propagate over the coastal seafloor. Our theoretical and experimental analysis resulted in Cf-Re relationships for both Newtonian (e.g. saline solution) and power-law (e.g. non-Newtonian fluid mud) fluids. A large number of experiments were conducted with different concentrations of both fluid mud mixtures (Kaolinite clay mixed with tap water) and saline solutions in a laboratory tank [dimensions: 4.3 m × 0.25 m × 0.5 m]. In the experiments, different depths of ambient fluid (tap water) were considered. To determine the experimental Cf values for the viscous-buoyancy propagation phase, theoretical analysis was conducted to relate Cf to the experimental measurables. Based upon experimental observations, Cf is shown to relate to Re of the gravity currents inversely for both Newtonian and power-law fluids. While Newtonian gravity currents revealed a single value of the constant of proportionality for the Cf-Re relationship, power-law gravity currents revealed multiple values of the constant of proportionality that depends on the fluid-mud concentration.

  1. Corticotropin-releasing factor secretion from dendritic cells stimulated by commensal bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Hojo, Mariko; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Tomeoku, Harumi; Koido, Shigeo; Asaoka, Daisuke; Nagahara, Akihito; Watanabe, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To study the production and secretion of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) by dendritic cells and the influence of commensal bacteria. METHODS: JAWSII cells (ATCC CRL-11904), a mouse dendritic cell line, were seeded into 24-well culture plates and grown for 3 d. Commensal bacterial strains of Clostridium clostrodiiforme (JCM1291), Bacteroides vulgatus (B. vulgatus) (JCM5856), Escherichia coli (JCM1649), or Fusobacterium varium (F. varium) (ATCC8501) were added to the cells except for the control well, and incubated for 2 h. After incubation, we performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the cultured medium and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction for the dendritic cells, and compared these values with controls. RESULTS: The level of CRF secretion by control dendritic cells was 40.4 ± 6.2 pg/mL. The CRF levels for cells incubated with F. varium and B. vulgatus were significantly higher than that of the control (P < 0.0001). CRF mRNA was present in the control sample without bacteria, and CRF mRNA levels in all samples treated with bacteria were above that of the control sample. F. varium caused the greatest increase in CRF mRNA expression. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that dendritic cells produce CRF, a process augmented by commensal bacteria. PMID:22046091

  2. Evolution of histamine oxidase activity for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Elena; Tonin, Fabio; Vasylieva, Natalia; Marinesco, Stephane; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2014-01-01

    Histamine is present to various degrees in many foods, and concentrations in fish samples are considered a good indicator of freshness and hygienic food quality. Seeking for innovative methods to quantify histamine in foods, we used a synthetic gene designed on the sequence of histamine oxidase from Arthrobacter crystallopoietes (HOD) as the starting point in this study to develop a biosensor. HOD was expressed in Escherichia coli cells with a yield of ∼7 mg protein/L of fermentation broth. Recombinant wild-type HOD oxidized histamine and tyramine whereas it was inactive toward putrescine and cadaverine (two amines present in fish samples). The putative residues involved in substrate binding were identified by an in silico docking procedure based on a model of the structure of HOD: site-saturation mutagenesis was performed on 8 positions. The most significant changes in kinetic properties were observed for the P143M HOD: this variant showed higher histamine affinity and lower substrate inhibition by tyramine than wild-type enzyme. Biosensor prototypes were produced using both the wild-type and the P143M variant HOD. These biosensors showed a good sensitivity and selectivity with respect to biogenic amines present in food specimens. Accordingly, the HOD-based biosensor was successfully used to assess histamine in fish samples, yielding values in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC analyses but in a few seconds and at a significantly lower cost per analysis. PMID:23995223

  3. Histamine inhibits differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yamagata, Kaoru; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sawamukai, Norifumi; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Sakata, Kei; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-07-31

    Histamine and TGF-β, major mediators secreted by mast cells, are involved in skin inflammation and play critical roles in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. However, the roles of signaling mechanisms in the development of skin fibrosis remain largely unclear. Here we show that histamine suppressed the expression of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a marker of myofibroblasts, induced by TGF-β1 in skin fibroblasts. Histamine H1-receptor (H1R), but not H2-receptor (H2R) or H4-receptor (H4R), was expressed on skin fibroblasts at both mRNA and protein levels. Interestingly, an H1R antagonist, but not H2R or H4R antagonists, antagonized the histamine-mediated suppression of αSMA expression by TGF-β1. Correspondingly, phosphorylated Smad2 was detected after treatment with TGF-β1, whereas the addition of histamine inhibited this phosphorylation. Taken together, histamine-H1R decreased TGF-β1-mediated Smad2 phosphorylation and inhibited differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. PMID:26036574

  4. Albizia lebbeck suppresses histamine signaling by the inhibition of histamine H1 receptor and histidine decarboxylase gene transcriptions.

    PubMed

    Nurul, Islam Mohammed; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Shahriar, Masum; Venkatesh, Pichairajan; Maeyama, Kazutaka; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Hattori, Masashi; Choudhuri, Mohamed Sahabuddin Kabir; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Histamine plays major roles in allergic diseases and its action is mediated mainly by histamine H(1) receptor (H1R). We have demonstrated that histamine signaling-related H1R and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) genes are allergic diseases sensitive genes and their expression level affects severity of the allergic symptoms. Therefore, compounds that suppress histamine signaling should be promising candidates as anti-allergic drugs. Here, we investigated the effect of the extract from the bark of Albizia lebbeck (AL), one of the ingredients of Ayruvedic medicines, on H1R and HDC gene expression using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) sensitized allergy model rats and HeLa cells expressing endogenous H1R. Administration of the AL extract significantly decreased the numbers of sneezing and nasal rubbing. Pretreatment with the AL extract suppressed TDI-induced H1R and HDC mRNA elevations as well as [(3)H]mepyramine binding, HDC activity, and histamine content in the nasal mucosa. AL extract also suppressed TDI-induced up-regulation of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA. In HeLa cells, AL extract suppressed phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate- or histamine-induced up-regulation of H1R mRNA. Our data suggest that AL alleviated nasal symptoms by inhibiting histamine signaling in TDI-sensitized rats through suppression of H1R and HDC gene transcriptions. Suppression of Th2-cytokine signaling by AL also suggests that it could affect the histamine-cytokine network. PMID:21782040

  5. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger Iii, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-03-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications. PMID:26030682

  6. Cellular mechanisms regulating activity-dependent release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, Agnieszka; Katz, David M

    2002-12-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in activity-dependent modifications of neuronal connectivity and synaptic strength, including establishment of hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP). To shed light on mechanisms underlying BDNF-dependent synaptic plasticity, the present study was undertaken to characterize release of native BDNF from newborn rat hippocampal neurons in response to physiologically relevant patterns of electrical field stimulation in culture, including tonic stimulation at 5 Hz, bursting stimulation at 25 and 100 Hz, and theta-burst stimulation (TBS). Release was measured using the ELISA in situ technique, developed in our laboratory to quantify secretion of native BDNF without the need to first overexpress the protein to nonphysiological levels. Each stimulation protocol resulted in a significant increase in BDNF release that was tetrodotoxin sensitive and occurred in the absence of glutamate receptor activation. However, 100 Hz tetanus and TBS, stimulus patterns that are most effective in inducing hippocampal LTP, were significantly more effective in releasing native BDNF than lower-frequency stimulation. For all stimulation protocols tested, removal of extracellular calcium, or blockade of N-type calcium channels, prevented BDNF release. Similarly, depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin and treatment with dantrolene, an inhibitor of calcium release from caffeine-ryanodine-sensitive stores, markedly inhibited activity-dependent BDNF release. Our results indicate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of hippocampal neuronal activity. The dual requirement for calcium influx through N-type calcium channels and calcium mobilization from intracellular stores strongly implicates a role for calcium-induced calcium release in activity-dependent BDNF secretion. PMID:12451139

  7. Activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor from primary sensory neurons detected by ELISA in situ.

    PubMed

    Balkowiec, A; Katz, D M

    2000-10-01

    To define activity-dependent release of endogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), we developed an in vitro model using primary sensory neurons and a modified ELISA, termed ELISA in situ. Dissociate cultures of nodose-petrosal ganglion cells from newborn rats were grown in wells precoated with anti-BDNF antibody to capture released BDNF, which was subsequently detected using conventional ELISA. Conventional ELISA alone was unable to detect any increase in BDNF concentration above control values following chronic depolarization with 40 mM KCl for 72 hr. However, ELISA in situ demonstrated a highly significant increase in BDNF release, from 65 pg/ml in control to 228 pg/ml in KCl-treated cultures. The efficacy of the in situ assay appears to be related primarily to rapid capture of released BDNF that prevents BDNF binding to the cultured cells. We therefore used this approach to compare BDNF release from cultures exposed for 30 min to either continuous depolarization with elevated KCl or patterned electrical field stimulation (50 biphasic rectangular pulses of 25 msec, at 20 Hz, every 5 sec). Short-term KCl depolarization was completely ineffective at evoking any detectable release of BDNF, whereas patterned electrical stimulation increased extracellular BDNF levels by 20-fold. In addition, the magnitude of BDNF release was dependent on stimulus pattern, with high-frequency bursts being most effective. These data indicate that the optimal stimulus profile for BDNF release resembles that of other neuroactive peptides. Moreover, our findings demonstrate that BDNF release can encode temporal features of presynaptic neuronal activity. PMID:11007900

  8. Relationship between histamine and physiological changes during the early response to nasal antigen provocation.

    PubMed

    Baroody, F M; Ford, S; Proud, D; Kagey-Sobotka, A; Lichtenstein, L; Naclerio, R M

    1999-02-01

    To investigate the temporal relationships of mediator release and physiological changes during the early response to allergen, we challenged allergic individuals intranasally with antigen and followed their responses. This was done by using small filter paper disks to challenge one nostril and collect secretions from both the challenged and the contralateral nostril, thus enabling us to evaluate the nasonasal reflex. There was a significant increase in sneezing after allergen challenge that peaked within 2 min and returned to baseline. The weights of nasal secretions as well as nasal symptoms increased immediately and remained significantly elevated for 20 min in both nostrils. Nasal airway resistance increased slowly, reaching its peak at approximately 6 min after challenge on the ipsilateral side, but it did not change on the contralateral side. Histamine levels peaked 30 s after removal of the allergen disk on the side of challenge, whereas albumin levels peaked after those of histamine. Lactoferrin paralleled the increase in secretion weights and occurred in both nostrils. Increasing doses of antigen produced dose-dependent increases in all parameters, whereas control challenges produced no response. These studies describe a human model for the evaluation of the allergic response that is capable of simultaneously measuring mediator release and the physiological response, including the nasonasal reflex. This model should prove useful in studying the mechanism of allergic rhinitis in humans. PMID:9931205

  9. Eukaryotic release factor 1-2 affects Arabidopsis responses to glucose and phytohormones during germination and early seedling development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Germination and early seedling development are coordinately regulated by glucose and phytohormones such as ABA, GA and ethylene. However, the molecules that affect plant responses to glucose and phytohormones remain to be fully elucidated. Eukaryotic release factor 1 (eRF1) is responsible for recogn...

  10. Eukaryotic release factor 1-2 is involved in GA signaling pathway and regulates cell elongation in petioles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic release factor 1 (eRF1) is responsible for recognition of the stop codons in mRNAs during protein synthesis. Accumulating evidence indicates that eRF1 functions in other processes in addition to translation termination. The physiological role of eRF1-2, a member of eRF1 family, was examin...

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization, photochemical and photophysical properties and biological activities of ruthenium complexes with mono- and bi-dentate histamine ligand.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Carolina R; de Aguiar, Inara; Camilo, Mariana R; Lima, Márcia V S; Ito, Amando S; Baptista, Maurício S; Pavani, Christiane; Venâncio, Tiago; Carlos, Rose M

    2012-06-14

    The monodentate cis-[Ru(phen)(2)(hist)(2)](2+)1R and the bidentate cis-[Ru(phen)(2)(hist)](2+)2A complexes were prepared and characterized using spectroscopic ((1)H, ((1)H-(1)H)COSY and ((1)H-(13)C)HSQC NMR, UV-vis, luminescence) techniques. The complexes presented absorption and emission in the visible region, as well as a tri-exponential emission decay. The complexes are soluble in aqueous and non-aqueous solution with solubility in a buffer solution of pH 7.4 of 1.14 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) for (1R + 2A) and 6.43 × 10(-4) mol L(-1) for 2A and lipophilicity measured in an aqueous-octanol solution of -1.14 and -0.96, respectively. Photolysis in the visible region in CH(3)CN converted the starting complexes into cis-[Ru(phen)(2)(CH(3)CN)(2)](2+). Histamine photorelease was also observed in pure water and in the presence of BSA (1.0 × 10(-6) mol L(-1)). The bidentate coordination of the histamine to the ruthenium center in relation to the monodentate coordination increased the photosubstitution quantum yield by a factor of 3. Pharmacological studies showed that the complexes present a moderate inhibition of AChE with an IC(50) of 21 μmol L(-1) (referred to risvagtini, IC(50) 181 μmol L(-1) and galantamine IC(50) 0.006 μmol L(-1)) with no appreciable cytotoxicity toward to the HeLa cells (50% cell viability at 925 μmol L(-1)). Cell uptake of the complexes into HeLa cells was detected by fluorescence confocal microscopy. Overall, the observation of a luminescent complex that penetrates the cell wall and has low cytotoxicity, but is reactive photochemically, releasing histamine when irradiated with visible light, are interesting features for application of these complexes as phototherapeutic agents. PMID:22539182

  12. Efficient Approaches to S-alkyl-N-alkylisothioureas and Application to Novel Histamine H3R Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoneyama, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Yamatodani, Atsushi; Harusawa, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    S-Alkyl-N-alkylisothiourea compounds, which contain various cyclic amines, were synthesized using 3-phenylpropionyl isothiocyanate (PPI) to discover novel non-imidazole histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonists. The synthetic route was improved remarkably by using 2-nitrophenylacetyl isothiocyanate (NPAI). Among the synthesized compounds, N-[4-(4-chlorophenyl)butyl]-S-[3-piperidin-1-yl)propyl]isothiourea (1k, OUP-186) exhibited potent and selective antagonism against human H3R but not human H4R, in vitro. Of particular interest, they did not show antagonism for the histamine release in rat brain microdialysis in vivo, suggesting species-selective differences in antagonist affinities. Furthermore, in silico docking studies of OUP-186 and its C2-homolog (OUP-181) in human/rat H3Rs suggested that the structural difference of antagonist-docking sites between human and rat H3Rs was attributable to the Ala122/Val122 mutation. PMID:27592826

  13. Effect of centrifugation time on growth factor and MMP release of an experimental platelet-rich fibrin-type product.

    PubMed

    Eren, Gülnihal; Gürkan, Ali; Atmaca, Harika; Dönmez, Ayhan; Atilla, Gül

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) has a controlled release of growth factors due to the fibrin matrix structure. Different centrifugation protocols were suggested for PRF preparation. Since the derivation method of PRF can alter its contents, in the present study it is aimed to investigate the cell contents and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and-8 release from experimental PRF-type membranes obtained with different centrifugation times at 400 gravity. Three blood samples were collected from 20 healthy non-smoker volunteers. One tube was used for whole blood analyses. The other two tubes were centrifuged at 400 g for 10 minutes (group A) or 12 minutes (group B). Each experimental PRF-type membrane was placed in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM)and at 1, 24 and 72 hours, TGF-β1, PDGF-AB, VEGF, MMP-1 and -8 release amounts were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The blood cell count of membranes was determined by subtracting plasma supernatant and red blood cell (RBC) mixture from the whole blood cell counts. At 72 hours, the VEGF level of group B was statistically higher than that of group A (p = 0.040). The centrifugation time was not found to influence the release of other growth factors, enzymes and cell counts. Within the limits of the present study, it might be suggested that centrifugation time at a constant gravity has a significant effect on the VEGF levels released from experimental PRF-type membrane. It can be concluded that due to the importance of VEGF in the tissue healing process, membranes obtained at 12-minute centrifugation time may show a superior potential in wound healing. PMID:26830681

  14. Magnetic field-responsive release of transforming growth factor beta 1 from heparin-modified alginate ferrogels.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwi; Park, Honghyun; Lee, Jae Won; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2016-10-20

    Stimuli-responsive polymeric systems have been widely used for various drug delivery and tissue engineering applications. Magnetic stimulation can be also exploited to regulate the release of pharmaceutical drugs, growth factors, and cells from hydrogels in a controlled manner, on-demand. In the present study, alginate ferrogels containing iron oxide nanoparticles were fabricated via ionic cross-linking, and their various characteristics were investigated. The deformation of the ferrogels was dependent on the polymer concentration, calcium concentration, iron oxide concentration, and strength of magnetic field. To modulate the release of transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) under magnetic stimulation, alginate was chemically modified with heparin, as TGF-β1 has a heparin-binding domain. Alginate was first modified with ethylenediamine, and heparin was then conjugated to the ethylenediamine-modified alginate via carbodiimide chemistry. Conjugation of heparin to alginate was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Sustained release of TGF-β1 from alginate-g-heparin ferrogels was achieved, and application of a magnetic field to the ferrogels regulated TGF-β1 release, resultantly enhancing chondrogenic differentiation of ATDC5 cells, which were used as a model chondrogenic cell line. Alginate-based ferrogels that release drugs in a controlled manner may therefore be useful in many biomedical applications. PMID:27474590

  15. Secretion of corticotrophin releasing factor from the adrenal during splanchnic nerve stimulation in conscious calves.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1988-01-01

    1. The output of corticotrophin releasing factor-like immunoreactivity (CRF) from the adrenal gland has been investigated using the 'adrenal clamp' technique in conscious calves. 2. Stimulation of the peripheral end of the splanchnic nerve for 10 min increased the mean output of CRF progressively, so that it had risen by about twentyfold, to a peak incremental value of 24 +/- 4 pmol min-1 kg-1 at 10 min. This response was significantly increased by stimulating in bursts at 40 Hz for 1 s at 10 s intervals, which raised the mean CRF output by 44 +/- 7 pmol min-1 kg-1 at 10 min (P less than 0.05). 3. The mean output of adrenaline and noradrenaline rose more abruptly in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation with peak incremental values realized within 2.5 min. However, the ratios of adrenal CRF to catecholamine output were closely similar during the later stages of stimulation (7.5-10 min). There was a similarly abrupt rise in adrenal cortisol output in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation which was, nevertheless, linearly related to arterial plasma ACTH concentration throughout. 4. In hypophysectomized calves, administration of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH1-24) at a dose of 5 ng min-1 kg-1 reduced the output of adrenal CRF in response to splanchnic nerve stimulation by about 50% (P less than 0.05). 5. CRF isolated from adrenal venous effluent plasma, collected both at rest and during splanchnic nerve stimulation, was separated by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography and found to elute in a position identical to that of human 41CRF. This suggests that adrenal CRF is structurally closely similar to its pituitary counterpart. PMID:2843642

  16. Coevolution between Stop Codon Usage and Release Factors in Bacterial Species.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yulong; Wang, Juan; Xia, Xuhua

    2016-09-01

    Three stop codons in bacteria represent different translation termination signals, and their usage is expected to depend on their differences in translation termination efficiency, mutation bias, and relative abundance of release factors (RF1 decoding UAA and UAG, and RF2 decoding UAA and UGA). In 14 bacterial species (covering Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Spirochetes) with cellular RF1 and RF2 quantified, UAA is consistently over-represented in highly expressed genes (HEGs) relative to lowly expressed genes (LEGs), whereas UGA usage is the opposite even in species where RF2 is far more abundant than RF1. UGA usage relative to UAG increases significantly with PRF2 [=RF2/(RF1 + RF2)] as expected from adaptation between stop codons and their decoders. PRF2 is > 0.5 over a wide range of AT content (measured by PAT3 as the proportion of AT at third codon sites), but decreases rapidly toward zero at the high range of PAT3 This explains why bacterial lineages with high PAT3 often have UGA reassigned because of low RF2. There is no indication that UAG is a minor stop codon in bacteria as claimed in a recent publication. The claim is invalid because of the failure to apply the two key criteria in identifying a minor codon: (1) it is least preferred by HEGs (or most preferred by LEGs) and (2) it corresponds to the least abundant decoder. Our results suggest a more plausible explanation for why UAA usage increases, and UGA usage decreases, with PAT3, but UAG usage remains low over the entire PAT3 range. PMID:27297468

  17. Deletion of Corticotropin-releasing Factor Binding Protein Selectively Impairs Maternal, but not Intermale Aggression

    PubMed Central

    Gammie, Stephen C.; Seasholtz, Audrey F.; Stevenson, Sharon A.

    2008-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by limiting endogenous actions of CRF or Ucn 1. To test this hypothesis, we crossed the deletion for CRF-BP into the mice selected for high maternal defense and evaluated offspring protection and other maternal behaviors. CRF-BP knockout (KO) mice exhibited significant deficits in maternal aggression relative to wild-type (WT) mice in three different measures. Other maternal features were almost identical between groups, including dam and pup weight, litter size, nursing time, and pup retrieval. Both groups performed similarly in a forced swim stress test and aggression in both groups was reduced following the swim test. Virgin KO female mice exhibited higher levels of anxiety-like behavior in terms of decreased time in the light portion of the light/dark box test. For males, no differences in light/dark box or swim test were found. However, increased anxiety-like behavior in male KO mice was identified in terms of contact and approach to a novel object both with and without previous exposure to the swim test. No differences in isolation induced resident intruder male aggression were found between groups. Together, these results indicate that loss of CRF-BP selectively impairs maternal, but not intermale aggression and that loss of the gene induces anxiety-like behavior in males and females, but there are sex differences in terms of how that anxiety is revealed. PMID:18929624

  18. Deletion of corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein selectively impairs maternal, but not intermale aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; Seasholtz, A F; Stevenson, S A

    2008-12-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) binding protein (CRF-BP) is a secreted protein that acts to bind and limit the activity of the neuropeptides, CRF and urocortin (Ucn) 1. We previously selected for high maternal defense (protection of offspring) in mice and found CRF-BP to be elevated in the CNS of selected mice. We also previously determined that both CRF and Ucn 1 are potent inhibitors of offspring protection when administered centrally. Thus, elevated CRF-BP could promote defense by limiting endogenous actions of CRF or Ucn 1. To test this hypothesis, we crossed the deletion for CRF-BP into the mice selected for high maternal defense and evaluated offspring protection and other maternal behaviors. CRF-BP knockout (KO) mice exhibited significant deficits in maternal aggression relative to wild-type (WT) mice in three different measures. Other maternal features were almost identical between groups, including dam and pup weight, litter size, nursing time, and pup retrieval. Both groups performed similarly in a forced swim stress test and aggression in both groups was reduced following the swim test. Virgin KO female mice exhibited higher levels of anxiety-like behavior in terms of decreased time in the light portion of the light/dark box test. For males, no differences in light/dark box or swim test were found. However, increased anxiety-like behavior in male KO mice was identified in terms of contact and approach to a novel object both with and without previous exposure to the swim test. No differences in isolation induced resident intruder male aggression were found between groups. Together, these results indicate that loss of CRF-BP selectively impairs maternal, but not intermale aggression and that loss of the gene induces anxiety-like behavior in males and females, but there are sex differences in terms of how that anxiety is revealed. PMID:18929624

  19. Mice overexpressing corticotropin-releasing factor show brain atrophy and motor dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Fleming, Sheila M.; Million, Mulugeta; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette; Wang, Lixin

    2010-01-01

    Chronic stress and persistently high glucocorticoid levels can induce brain atrophy. Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF)-overexpressing (OE) mice are a genetic model of chronic stress with elevated brain CRF and plasma corticosterone levels and Cushing’s syndrome. The brain structural alterations in the CRF-OE mice, however, are not well known. We found that adult male and female CRF-OE mice had significantly lower whole brain and cerebellum weights than their wild type (WT) littermates (347.7 ± 3.6 vs. 460.1 ± 4.3 and 36.3 ± 0.8 vs. 50.0 ± 1.3 mg, respectively) without sex-related difference. The epididymal/parametrial fat mass was significantly higher in CRF-OE mice. The brain weight was inversely correlated to epididymal/parametrial fat weight, but not to body weight. Computerized image analysis system in Nissl stained brain sections of female mice showed that the anterior cingulate and sensorimotor cortexes of CRF-OE mice were significantly thinner, and the volumes of the hippocampus, hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and amygdala were significantly reduced compared to WT, while the locus coeruleus showed a non-significant increase. Motor functions determined by beam crossing and gait analysis showed that CRF-OE mice took longer time and more steps to traverse a beam with more errors, and displayed reduced stride length compared to their WT littermates. These data show that CRF-OE mice display brain size reduction associated with alterations of motor coordination and an increase in visceral fat mass providing a novel animal model to study mechanisms involved in brain atrophy under conditions of sustained elevation of brain CRF and circulating glucocorticoid levels. PMID:20132869

  20. Corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) receptor signaling in the central nervous system: new molecular targets.

    PubMed

    Hauger, Richard L; Risbrough, Victoria; Brauns, Olaf; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2006-08-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and the related urocortin peptides mediate behavioral, cognitive, autonomic, neuroendocrine and immunologic responses to aversive stimuli by activating CRF(1) or CRF(2) receptors in the central nervous system and anterior pituitary. Markers of hyperactive central CRF systems, including CRF hypersecretion and abnormal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis functioning, have been identified in subpopulations of patients with anxiety, stress and depressive disorders. Because CRF receptors are rapidly desensitized in the presence of high agonist concentrations, CRF hypersecretion alone may be insufficient to account for the enhanced CRF neurotransmission observed in these patients. Concomitant dysregulation of mechanisms stringently controlling magnitude and duration of CRF receptor signaling also may contribute to this phenomenon. While it is well established that the CRF(1) receptor mediates many anxiety- and depression-like behaviors as well as HPA axis stress responses, CRF(2) receptor functions are not well understood at present. One hypothesis holds that CRF(1) receptor activation initiates fear and anxiety-like responses, while CRF(2) receptor activation re-establishes homeostasis by counteracting the aversive effects of CRF(1) receptor signaling. An alternative hypothesis posits that CRF(1) and CRF(2) receptors contribute to opposite defensive modes, with CRF(1) receptors mediating active defensive responses triggered by escapable stressors, and CRF(2) receptors mediating anxiety- and depression-like responses induced by inescapable, uncontrollable stressors. CRF(1) receptor antagonists are being developed as novel treatments for affective and stress disorders. If it is confirmed that the CRF(2) receptor contributes importantly to anxiety and depression, the development of small molecule CRF(2) receptor antagonists would be therapeutically useful. PMID:16918397

  1. MPZP: a novel small molecule corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor (CRF1) antagonist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Zhao, Yu; Fekete, Eva M; Funk, Cindy K; Wirsching, Peter; Janda, Kim D; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2008-02-01

    The extrahypothalamic stress peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system is an important regulator of behavioral responses to stress. Dysregulation of CRF and the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF(1)) system is hypothesized to underlie many stress-related disorders. Modulation of the CRF(1) system by non-peptide antagonists currently is being explored as a therapeutic approach for anxiety disorders and alcohol dependence. Here, we describe a new, less hydrophilic (cLogP approximately 2.95), small molecule, non-peptide CRF(1) antagonist with high affinity (K(i)=4.9 nM) and specificity for CRF(1) receptors: N,N-bis(2-methoxyethyl)-3-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-7-amine (MPZP). The compound was systemically administered to adult male rats in two behavioral models dependent on the CRF(1) system: defensive burying (0, 5, 20 mg/kg, n=6-11 for each dose) and alcohol dependence (0, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg, n=8 for each self-administration group). Acute administration of MPZP reduced burying behavior in the defensive burying model of active anxiety-like behavior. MPZP also attenuated withdrawal-induced excessive drinking in the self-administration model of alcohol dependence without affecting nondependent alcohol drinking or water consumption. The present findings support the proposed significance of the CRF(1) system in anxiety and alcohol dependence and introduce a promising new compound for further development in the treatment of alcohol dependence and stress-related disorders. PMID:18031798

  2. Sex- and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2- dependent actions of urocortin 1 during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hasdemir, Burcu; Mhaske, Pallavi; Paruthiyil, Sreenivasan; Garnett, Elizabeth A; Heyman, Melvin B; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Bhargava, Aditi

    2016-06-01

    We investigated whether corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 2 (CRF2) and its high-affinity agonist urocortin 1 (Ucn1) mediate sex-specific signaling and immune responses. Intrarectal trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid was used to induce experimental colitis in wild-type, CRF2 knockout (CRF2KO), and heterozygous (CRF2Ht) mice of both sexes. Changes in plasma extravasation, organ weight, survival, immune cell numbers, inflammatory cytokines, and the MAPK signaling pathway were assessed. Stored intestinal biopsies from patients with Crohn's disease (CD) and age- and sex-matched individuals without inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) were examined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy to characterize Ucn1 and CRF receptor expression. CRF2Ht mice of both sexes showed decreased survival during colitis compared with other genotypes. Ucn1 improved survival in male mice alone. Ucn1 restored colon length and spleen and adrenal weight and decreased colonic TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β levels in male CRF2Ht mice alone. CRF2Ht mice of both sexes showed decreased phosphorylation of MAPK p38 and heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) levels. Ucn1 restored p-Hsp27 levels in male CRF2Ht mice alone. Expression of the chaperone protein Hsp90 decreased during colitis, except in male CRF2Ht mice. Taken together, our data indicate that sex shows significant interaction with genotype and Ucn1 during colitis. Human duodenal and colonic biopsies revealed that sex-specific differences exist in levels of CRF receptors and Ucn1 expression in patients with CD compared with the matched non-IBD subjects. To conclude, Ucn1 mediates sex-specific immune and cellular signaling responses via CRF2, emphasizing the need for inclusion of females in preclinical studies. PMID:27053649

  3. Coevolution between Stop Codon Usage and Release Factors in Bacterial Species

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yulong; Wang, Juan; Xia, Xuhua

    2016-01-01

    Three stop codons in bacteria represent different translation termination signals, and their usage is expected to depend on their differences in translation termination efficiency, mutation bias, and relative abundance of release factors (RF1 decoding UAA and UAG, and RF2 decoding UAA and UGA). In 14 bacterial species (covering Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria and Spirochetes) with cellular RF1 and RF2 quantified, UAA is consistently over-represented in highly expressed genes (HEGs) relative to lowly expressed genes (LEGs), whereas UGA usage is the opposite even in species where RF2 is far more abundant than RF1. UGA usage relative to UAG increases significantly with PRF2 [=RF2/(RF1 + RF2)] as expected from adaptation between stop codons and their decoders. PRF2 is > 0.5 over a wide range of AT content (measured by PAT3 as the proportion of AT at third codon sites), but decreases rapidly toward zero at the high range of PAT3. This explains why bacterial lineages with high PAT3 often have UGA reassigned because of low RF2. There is no indication that UAG is a minor stop codon in bacteria as claimed in a recent publication. The claim is invalid because of the failure to apply the two key criteria in identifying a minor codon: (1) it is least preferred by HEGs (or most preferred by LEGs) and (2) it corresponds to the least abundant decoder. Our results suggest a more plausible explanation for why UAA usage increases, and UGA usage decreases, with PAT3, but UAG usage remains low over the entire PAT3 range. PMID:27297468

  4. Corticotropin-releasing factor enhances locomotion and medullary neuronal firing in an amphibian.

    PubMed

    Lowry, C A; Rose, J D; Moore, F L

    1996-03-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) administration has been shown to act centrally to enhance locomotion in rats and amphibians. In the present study we used an amphibian, the roughskin newt (Taricha granulosa), to characterize changes in medullary neuronal activity associated with CRF-induced walking and swimming in animals chronically implanted with fine-wire microelectrodes. Neuronal activity was recorded from the raphe and adjacent reticular region of the rostral medulla. Under baseline conditions most of the recorded neurons showed low to moderate amounts of neuronal activity during periods of immobility and pronounced increases in firing that were time-locked with episodes of walking. These neurons sometimes showed further increases in discharge during swimming. Injections of CRF but not saline into the lateral ventricle produced a rapidly appearing increase in walking and pronounced changes (mostly increases) in firing rates of the medullary neurons. CRF produced diverse changes in patterns of firing in different neurons, but for these neurons as a group, the effects of CRF showed a close temporal association with the onset and expression of the peptide's effect on locomotion. In neurons that were active exclusively during movement prior to CRF treatment, the post-CRF increase in firing was evident during episodes of walking; in other neurons that also were spontaneously active during immobility prior to CRF infusion, post-CRF activity changes were evident during immobility as well as during episodes of locomotion. Thus, a principal effect of CRF was to potentiate the level of neuronal firing in a population of medullary neurons with locomotor-related properties. Due to the route of administration CRF may have acted on multiple central nervous system sites to enhance locomotion, but the results are consistent with neurophysiological effects involving medullary locomotion-regulating neurons. PMID:8724179

  5. Molecular mechanisms of corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-induced calcium signaling.

    PubMed

    Gutknecht, Eric; Van der Linden, Ilse; Van Kolen, Kristof; Verhoeven, Kim F C; Vauquelin, Georges; Dautzenberg, Frank M

    2009-03-01

    The molecular mechanisms governing calcium signal transduction of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) receptors CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) stably expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells were investigated. Calcium signaling strictly depended on intracellular calcium sources, and this is the first study to establish a prominent contribution of the three major G-protein families to CRF receptor-mediated calcium signaling. Overexpression of Galpha(q/11) and Galpha(16) led to leftward shifts of the agonist concentration-response curves. Blockade of Galpha(q/11) proteins by the small interfering RNA (siRNA) technology partially reduced agonist-mediated calcium responses in CRF(1)- and CRF(2(a))-expressing HEK293 cells, thereby proving a contribution of the G(q) protein family. A small but significant inhibition of calcium signaling was recorded by pharmacological inhibition of G(i/o) proteins with pertussis toxin treatment. This effect was mediated by direct binding of Gbetagamma subunits to phospholipase C. G(i/o) inhibition also elevated cAMP responses in CRF receptor-overexpressing HEK293 cells and in Y79 retinoblastoma cells endogenously expressing human CRF(1) and CRF(2(a)) receptors, thereby demonstrating natural coupling of G(i) proteins to both CRF receptors. The strongest reduction of CRF receptor-mediated calcium mobilization was noted when blocking the G(s) signaling protein either by cholera toxin or by siRNA. It is noteworthy that simultaneous inhibition of two G-proteins shed light on the additive effects of G(s) and G(q) on the calcium signaling and, hence, that they act in parallel. On the other hand, G(i) coupling required prior G(s) activation. PMID:19098121

  6. A Transgenic Rat for Investigating the Anatomy and Function of Corticotrophin Releasing Factor Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Pomrenze, Matthew B.; Millan, E. Zayra; Hopf, F. Woodward; Keiflin, Ronald; Maiya, Rajani; Blasio, Angelo; Dadgar, Jahan; Kharazia, Viktor; De Guglielmo, Giordano; Crawford, Elena; Janak, Patricia H.; George, Olivier; Rice, Kenner C.; Messing, Robert O.

    2015-01-01

    Corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) is a 41 amino acid neuropeptide that coordinates adaptive responses to stress. CRF projections from neurons in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) to the brainstem are of particular interest for their role in motivated behavior. To directly examine the anatomy and function of CRF neurons, we generated a BAC transgenic Crh-Cre rat in which bacterial Cre recombinase is expressed from the Crh promoter. Using Cre-dependent reporters, we found that Cre expressing neurons in these rats are immunoreactive for CRF and are clustered in the lateral CeA (CeL) and the oval nucleus of the BNST. We detected major projections from CeA CRF neurons to parabrachial nuclei and the locus coeruleus, dorsal and ventral BNST, and more minor projections to lateral portions of the substantia nigra, ventral tegmental area, and lateral hypothalamus. Optogenetic stimulation of CeA CRF neurons evoked GABA-ergic responses in 11% of non-CRF neurons in the medial CeA (CeM) and 44% of non-CRF neurons in the CeL. Chemogenetic stimulation of CeA CRF neurons induced Fos in a similar proportion of non-CRF CeM neurons but a smaller proportion of non-CRF CeL neurons. The CRF1 receptor antagonist R121919 reduced this Fos induction by two-thirds in these regions. These results indicate that CeL CRF neurons provide both local inhibitory GABA and excitatory CRF signals to other CeA neurons, and demonstrate the value of the Crh-Cre rat as a tool for studying circuit function and physiology of CRF neurons. PMID:26733798

  7. Increased Tau Phosphorylation and Aggregation in Mice Overexpressing Corticotropin-Releasing Factor

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Shannon N.; Zhang, Cheng; Monte, Louise; Roe, Allyson D.; Rice, Kenner C.; Taché, Yvette; Masliah, Eliezer; Rissman, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Clinical and basic science research suggests that stress and/or changes in central stress signaling intermediates may be involved in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Although the links between stress and AD remain unsettled, data from our group and others have established that stress exposure in rodents may confer susceptibility to AD pathology by inducing hippocampal tau phosphorylation (tau-P). Work in our lab has shown that stress-induced tau-P requires activation of the type-1 corticotropin-releasing factor receptor (CRFR1). CRF overexpressing (CRF-OE) mice are a model of chronic stress that display cognitive impairment at 9–10 month of age. In this study we used 6–7 month old CRF-OE mice to examine whether sustained exposure to CRF and stress steroids would impact hippocampal tau-P and kinase activity in the presence or absence of the CRFR1-specific antagonist, R121919, given daily for 30 days. CRF-OE mice had significantly elevated tau-P compared to wild type (WT) mice at the AT8 (S202/T204), PHF-1 (S396/404), S262, and S422 sites. Treating CRF-OE mice with R121919 blocked phosphorylation at the AT8 (S202/T204) and PHF-1 (S396/404) sites, but not at the S262 and S422 sites and reduced phosphorylation of c-Jun N Terminal Kinase (JNK). Examination of hippocampal extracts from CRF-OE mice at the ultrastructural level revealed negatively stained round/globular aggregates that were positively labeled by PHF-1. These data suggest critical roles for CRF and CRFR1 in tau-P and aggregation and may have implications for the development of AD cognitive decline. PMID:25125464

  8. Plasticity in the brainstem vagal circuits controlling gastric motor function triggered by corticotropin releasing factor.

    PubMed

    Browning, Kirsteen N; Babic, Tanja; Toti, Luca; Holmes, Gregory M; Coleman, F Holly; Travagli, R Alberto

    2014-10-15

    Stress impairs gastric emptying, reduces stomach compliance and induces early satiety via vagal actions. We have shown recently that the ability of the anti-stress neuropeptide oxytocin (OXT) to modulate vagal brainstem circuits undergoes short-term plasticity via alterations in cAMP levels subsequent to vagal afferent fibre-dependent activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that the OXT-induced gastric response undergoes plastic changes in the presence of the prototypical stress hormone, corticotropin releasing factor (CRF). Whole cell patch clamp recordings showed that CRF increased inhibitory GABAergic synaptic transmission to identified corpus-projecting dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV) neurones. In naive brainstem slices, OXT perfusion had no effect on inhibitory synaptic transmission; following exposure to CRF (and recovery from its actions), however, re-application of OXT inhibited GABAergic transmission in the majority of neurones tested. This uncovering of the OXT response was antagonized by pretreatment with protein kinase A or adenylate cyclase inhibitors, H89 and di-deoxyadenosine, respectively, indicating a cAMP-mediated mechanism. In naive animals, OXT microinjection in the dorsal vagal complex induced a NO-mediated corpus relaxation. Following CRF pretreatment, however, microinjection of OXT attenuated or, at times reversed, the gastric relaxation which was insensitive to l-NAME but was antagonized by pretreatment with a VIP antagonist. Immunohistochemical analyses of vagal motoneurones showed an increased number of oxytocin receptors present on GABAergic terminals of CRF-treated or stressed vs. naive rats. These results indicate that CRF alters vagal inhibitory circuits that uncover the ability of OXT to modulate GABAergic currents and modifies the gastric corpus motility response to OXT. PMID:25128570

  9. Spontaneous and stimulated release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) from blood monocytes of miners with coal workers' pneumoconiosis.

    PubMed

    Borm, P J; Palmen, N; Engelen, J J; Buurman, W A

    1988-12-01

    It is generally accepted that fibrotic lung diseases are mediated by macrophage-derived cytokines. We investigated the release of the monokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) from blood monocytes in a group of 66 coal miners and 12 non-dust-exposed individuals. Twenty-seven miners had simple Coal Workers' Pneumoconiosis (CWP). Control miners (n = 39) were matched with respect to age, years underground, and smoking. Monocytes were assayed for TNF release, spontaneously or in response to soluble (endotoxin) or particulate (coal mine dust, silica) stimulation. TNF was measured with a TNF-specific ELISA. Monocytes of all subjects responded to stimulants by the release of TNF. Dust-exposed controls' monocytes revealed higher TNF release as compared to normal controls. The greatest discriminator between control miners and cases (CWP) was coal mine dust-induced TNF release. Interestingly, the largest difference was observed between controls and those cases with a small number of opacities (0/1, 1/0, 1/1, and 1/2), giving an odds ratio of 6.3 to find an individual with a "high" dust-induced TNF release in the patient group. PMID:2849351

  10. Serum histamine in Alzheimer's disease and multi-infarct dementia.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, R; Fernández-Novoa, L; Pérez-Trullén, J M; Franco-Maside, A; Alvarez, X A

    1992-11-01

    Recent data indicate that a neuroimmune reaction might be responsible in part for neuronal death and cognitive deterioration in senile dementia. The potential involvement of brain histamine (HA) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) in this process has been previously documented. We have studied the concentration of serum HA in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or multi-infarct dementia (MID) and in age-matched control subjects. Serum HA levels were significantly higher in AD (10.935 +/- 5.692 nM) and MID (8.521 +/- 3.44 nM) than in controls (5.533 +/- 2.567 nM) and correlated with mental performance as evaluated with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) (r = +0.493, p < 0.009). No correlation was found with cardiovascular parameters, cerebrovascular risk factors or age. Hyperactivation of the histaminergic system in AD at central and peripheral levels might reflect a neuroimmune reaction to brain tissue damage, a neurotrophic response, and/or a reactive process to regulate the IL-1 induced amyloid precursor protein (APP) overproduction. PMID:1294859

  11. Histamine H3 receptor in primary mouse microglia inhibits chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomomitsu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Matsuzawa, Takuro; Naganuma, Fumito; Nakamura, Tadaho; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Harada, Ryuichi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a physiological amine which initiates a multitude of physiological responses by binding to four known G-protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes as follows: histamine H1 receptor (H1 R), H2 R, H3 R, and H4 R. Brain histamine elicits neuronal excitation and regulates a variety of physiological processes such as learning and memory, sleep-awake cycle and appetite regulation. Microglia, the resident macrophages in the brain, express histamine receptors; however, the effects of histamine on critical microglial functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion have not been examined in primary cells. We demonstrated that mouse primary microglia express H2 R, H3 R, histidine decarboxylase, a histamine synthase, and histamine N-methyltransferase, a histamine metabolizing enzyme. Both forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and ATP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients were reduced by the H3 R agonist imetit but not the H2 R agonist amthamine. H3 R activation on two ubiquitous second messenger signalling pathways suggests that H3 R can regulate various microglial functions. In fact, histamine and imetit dose-dependently inhibited microglial chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Furthermore, we confirmed that microglia produced histamine in the presence of LPS, suggesting that H3 R activation regulate microglial function by autocrine and/or paracrine signalling. In conclusion, we demonstrate the involvement of histamine in primary microglial functions, providing the novel insight into physiological roles of brain histamine. PMID:25754956

  12. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors.

    PubMed

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Reitman, Marc L

    2016-02-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist-induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non-brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  13. Peripheral Adenosine A3 Receptor Activation Causes Regulated Hypothermia in Mice That Is Dependent on Central Histamine H1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Jesse Lea; Tosh, Dilip K.; Xiao, Cuiying; Piñol, Ramón A.; Chen, Zhoumou; Salvemini, Daniela; Gavrilova, Oksana; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine can induce hypothermia, as previously demonstrated for adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) agonists. Here we use the potent, specific A3AR agonists MRS5698, MRS5841, and MRS5980 to show that adenosine also induces hypothermia via the A3AR. The hypothermic effect of A3AR agonists is independent of A1AR activation, as the effect was fully intact in mice lacking A1AR but abolished in mice lacking A3AR. A3AR agonist–induced hypothermia was attenuated by mast cell granule depletion, demonstrating that the A3AR hypothermia is mediated, at least in part, via mast cells. Central agonist dosing had no clear hypothermic effect, whereas peripheral dosing of a non–brain-penetrant agonist caused hypothermia, suggesting that peripheral A3AR-expressing cells drive the hypothermia. Mast cells release histamine, and blocking central histamine H1 (but not H2 or H4) receptors prevented the hypothermia. The hypothermia was preceded by hypometabolism and mice with hypothermia preferred a cooler environmental temperature, demonstrating that the hypothermic state is a coordinated physiologic response with a reduced body temperature set point. Importantly, hypothermia is not required for the analgesic effects of A3AR agonists, which occur with lower agonist doses. These results support a mechanistic model for hypothermia in which A3AR agonists act on peripheral mast cells, causing histamine release, which stimulates central histamine H1 receptors to induce hypothermia. This mechanism suggests that A3AR agonists will probably not be useful for clinical induction of hypothermia. PMID:26606937

  14. Histidines, histamines and imidazoles as glycosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R A; Haines, A H; Chrystal, E J; Luszniak, M C

    1991-01-01

    This present study reports the ability of a range of derivatives of L-histidine, histamine and imidazole to act as inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase, yeast alpha-glucosidase and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The addition of a hydrophobic group to the basic imidazole nucleus greatly enhances binding to both the alpha- and beta-glucosidases. L-Histidine (beta-naphthylamide (Ki 17 microM) is a potent competitive inhibitor of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase as is omega-N-acetylhistamine (K1 35 microM), which inhibits the sweet-almond beta-glucosidase at least 700 times more strongly than either yeast alpha-glucosidase or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, and suggests potential for the development of selective reversible beta-glucosidase inhibitors. A range of hydrophobic omega-N-acylhistamines were synthesized and shown to be among the most potent inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase reported to date. PMID:2012615

  15. Factors Controlling Water Volumes and Release Rates in Martian Outflow Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Head, J. W.; Leask, H. J.; Ghatan, G.; Mitchell, K. L.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss estimates of water fluxes on Mars and suggest that many are overestimates. Even so, we can only explain very high martian outflow rates by either unusually permeable aquifer systems or sudden release of shallow concentrations of water.

  16. Cardiac and gastric effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists: no evidence for a correlation between lipophilicity and receptor affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Coruzzi, G.; Adami, M.; Pozzoli, C.; Giorgi, F.; Bertaccini, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of histamine H2 receptor antagonists with different lipophilicity were tested in cardiac and gastric assays in order to reveal possible differences in receptor affinity. Lipophilicity of the compounds was expressed as CLOG P (theoretically-determined logarithm of octanol:water partition coefficient) and log k' (logarithm of capacity factor, experimentally-determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography). 2. Aminopotentidine (APT) and iodoaminopotentidine (I-APT), which are both lipophilic compounds, behaved as insurmountable antagonists of histamine responses in rat isolated gastric fundus (pKB = 6.20 +/- 0.16 and 6.89 +/- 0.19, respectively) and guinea-pig isolated papillary muscle (pKB = 6.34 +/- 0.37 and 6.81 +/- 0.26, respectively). They were approximately as effective as ranitidine (RAN) in reducing histamine-induced acid secretion in the anaesthetized rat, ID50 values being 0.018 +/- 0.02, 0.020 +/- 0.03 and 0.036 +/- 0.01 mumol kg-1 i.v. for APT, I-APT and RAN, respectively. Both APT and I-APT had a significantly longer duration of action than RAN. 3. The hydrophilic compound, SK&F 92857, was inactive up to 10 microM in modifying histamine-induced acid secretion in the isolated rat stomach. In the papillary muscle, low concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of this compound produced a competitive antagonism of the histamine responses (pA2 value = 7.38 +/- 0.11), while a higher concentration (10 microM) significantly reduced the maximal response to histamine. 4. RAN competitively antagonized histamine effects with a comparable affinity in cardiac and gastric preparations (pA2 values were 6.42 +/- 0.09 and 6.78 +/- 0.38 in heart and stomach, respectively). 5. Results obtained in this study clearly showed that the discrepancies between gastric and cardiac effects observed for some H2 antagonists are not explained solely by differences in lipophilicity of compounds. Moreover, the significant correlation found between CLOG P and log k

  17. Hemodynamic performance and histamine levels after desmopressin acetate administration following cardiopulmonary bypass in adult patients.

    PubMed

    Jahr, J S; Marquez, J; Cottington, E; Cook, D R

    1991-04-01

    Sixteen patients undergoing cardiac surgical procedures were prospectively randomized into two groups to study the hemodynamic and histamine-releasing effects of desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) administration after cardiopulmonary bypass. Ten minutes after administration of protamine for reversal of heparin, DDAVP, 0.3 microgram/kg, was infused intravenously over 5 seconds in group 1, and the same dose of DDAVP was administered over 5 minutes as an infusion in group 2. There were no statistical differences between baseline values in groups 1 and 2. DDAVP decreased mean arterial pressure by 30% and 25% in groups 1 and 2 (69 +/- 5 mm Hg to 52 +/- 8 mm Hg, P less than 0.005, and 79 +/- 20 mm Hg to 55 +/- 8 mm Hg, P less than 0.005), respectively. The hypotension in both groups was related to decreases in systemic vascular resistance (1,616 +/- 262 dyne.s.cm-5 to 1,073 +/- 199 dyne.s.cm-5, P less than 0.005, and 1,850 +/- 541 dyne.s.cm-5 to 1,144 +/- 214 dyne.s.cm-5, P less than 0.005). Phenylephrine infusion successfully treated the DDAVP-induced hypotension in all patients. Arterial histamine levels at 3 and 5 minutes after infusion of DDAVP did not differ significantly from baseline values. It is concluded that DDAVP at 0.3 microgram/kg is a potent vasodilator when administered intravenously and that histamine is not involved in producing its hypotensive effects. PMID:1863724

  18. A study of factors affecting the release and transformation of mercury in hydroelectric reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Morrison, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    Due to increased mercury concentrations in fish in hydro-electric reservoirs after flooding, a study was carried out to evaluate the release and transformation of mercury due to vegetation and soil flooded as a result of reservoir creation. Samples of vegetation and soils were immersed in water and concentrations of total mercury, methylmercury, and nutrients were followed. The effect of anoxia, pH, and temperature on release and transformation were also examined. An existing dynamic model of decomposition of flooded materials in reservoirs was modified to include mercury release and transformation, and was calibrated to the experimental data. Amounts of total mercury released by the different substrates were of the same order of magnitude. Tree species contributed the greatest amounts of methylmercury per unit biomass, but the biomass used for these was twigs and foliage. Soil released significant amounts of mercury, but methylation was very low. The model was able to fit well for all substrates except lichen. The model can be adapted to proposed reservoirs to predict nutrient and mercury release and transformation.

  19. The histamine H4 receptor: from orphan to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a class A G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this new receptor and determine if it represented a viable drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on the function of histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists of the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation

  20. The histamine H4 receptor: from orphan to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Robin L

    2015-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a class A G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this new receptor and determine if it represented a viable drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on the function of histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists of the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation

  1. Receptor-mediated release of endothelium-derived relaxing factor and prostacyclin from bovine aortic endothelial cells is coupled

    SciTech Connect

    De Nucci, G.; Gryglewski, R.J.; Warner, T.D.; Vane, J.R. )

    1988-04-01

    Bovine aortic endothelial cells were grown on microcarrier beads and were perfused with Krebs-Ringer solution. Endothelium-derived relaxing factor (EDRF) was bioassayed on a cascade of four strips of rabbit aorta, and prostacyclin was analyzed by RIA of 6-oxo-prostaglandin F{sub 1{alpha}}. The endothelial cells released EDRF and prostacyclin when stimulated with bradykinin and its analogues, or with ADP, ATP, arachidonic acid, and phospholipase C. The detection of EDRF was potentiated by superoxide dismutase, and the relaxation of rabbit aortic strips induced by EDRF was antagonized by methylene blue. The release of EDRF and prostacyclin was inhibited by phorbol myristate acetate, R59022 (a diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor), and gentamycin. The authors suggest that the release of EDRF and prostacyclin is coupled and the initial common step is activation of a phospholipase C.

  2. The therapeutic potential of histamine receptor ligands in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Detlef; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-01

    In the intestine of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease concentrations of histamine are increased compared to healthy controls. Genetic ablation of histamine production in mice ameliorates the course of experimentally induced colitis. These observations and first pharmacological studies indicate a function of histamine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, a closer examination reveals that available data are highly heterogeneous, limiting the rational design of strategies addressing specific histamine receptor subtypes as possible target for pharmacological interaction. However, very recently first clinical data indicate that antagonism at the histamine receptor subtype H4 provides a beneficial effect in at least the skin. Here, we discuss the available data on histamine effects and histamine receptor subtype functions in inflammatory bowel disease with a special emphasis on the histamine H4-receptor. PMID:24929116

  3. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26025658

  4. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  5. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of Candidate PET Radioligands for Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Type-1 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lodge, Nicholas J.; Li, Yu-Wen; Chin, Frederick T.; Dischino, Douglas D.; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Deskus, Jeffrey A.; Mattson, Ronald J.; Imaizumo, Masao; Pieschl, Rick; Molski, Thaddeus F.; Fujita, Masahiro; Dulac, Heidi; Zaczek, Robert; Bronson, Joanne J.; Macor, John E.; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A radioligand for measuring the density of corticotrophin-releasing factor subtype-1 receptors (CRF1 receptors) in living animal and human brain with positron emission tomography (PET) would be a useful tool for neuropsychiatric investigations and the development of drugs intended to interact with this target. This study was aimed at discovery of such a radioligand from a group of CRF1 receptor ligands based on a core 3-(phenylamino)pyrazin-2(1H)-one scaffold. Methods CRF1 receptor ligands were selected for development as possible PET radioligands based on their binding potency at CRF receptors (displacement of [125I]CRF from rat cortical membranes), measured lipophilicity, autoradiographic binding profile in rat and rhesus monkey brain sections, rat biodistribution, and suitability for radiolabeling with carbon-11 or fluorine-18. Two identified candidates (BMS-721313 and BMS-732098) were labeled with fluorine-18. A third candidate (BMS-709460) was labeled with carbon-11 and all three radioligands were evaluated in PET experiments in rhesus monkey. CRF1 receptor density (Bmax) was assessed in rhesus brain cortical and cerebellum membranes with the CRF receptor ligand, [3H]BMS-728300. Results The three ligands selected for development showed high binding affinity (IC50 values, 0.3–8 nM) at CRF1 receptors and moderate lipophilicity (LogD, 2.8–4.4). [3H]BMS-728300 and the two 18F-labeled ligands showed region-specific binding in rat and rhesus monkey brain autoradiography, namely higher binding density in the frontal and limbic cortex, and cerebellum than in thalamus and brainstem. CRF1 receptor Bmax in rhesus brain was found to be 50–120 fmol/mg protein across cortical regions and cerebellum. PET experiments in rhesus monkey showed that the radioligands [18F]BMS-721313, [18F]BMS-732098 and [11C]BMS-709460 gave acceptably high brain radioactivity uptake but no indication of the specific binding as seen in vitro. Conclusions Candidate CRF1 receptor

  7. NMR solution structure and function of the C-terminal domain of eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor.

    PubMed

    Mantsyzov, Alexey B; Ivanova, Elena V; Birdsall, Berry; Alkalaeva, Elena Z; Kryuchkova, Polina N; Kelly, Geoff; Frolova, Ludmila Y; Polshakov, Vladimir I

    2010-06-01

    Termination of translation in eukaryotes is triggered by two polypeptide chain release factors, eukaryotic class 1 polypeptide chain release factor (eRF1) and eukaryotic class 2 polypeptide chain release factor 3. eRF1 is a three-domain protein that interacts with eukaryotic class 2 polypeptide chain release factor 3 via its C-terminal domain (C-domain). The high-resolution NMR structure of the human C-domain (residues 277-437) has been determined in solution. The overall fold and the structure of the beta-strand core of the protein in solution are similar to those found in the crystal structure. The structure of the minidomain (residues 329-372), which was ill-defined in the crystal structure, has been determined in solution. The protein backbone dynamics, studied using (15)N-relaxation experiments, showed that the C-terminal tail 414-437 and the minidomain are the most flexible parts of the human C-domain. The minidomain exists in solution in two conformational states, slowly interconverting on the NMR timescale. Superposition of this NMR solution structure of the human C-domain onto the available crystal structure of full-length human eRF1 shows that the minidomain is close to the stop codon-recognizing N-terminal domain. Mutations in the tip of the minidomain were found to affect the stop codon specificity of the factor. The results provide new insights into the possible role of the C-domain in the process of translation termination. PMID:20553496

  8. Release of platelet activating factor by the isolated kidney is not linked to the production of prostaglandins.

    PubMed

    Nies, A S; Tunney, A; Barden, A; Sturm, M; Vandongen, R

    1991-11-01

    In many isolated tissues, including glomerular mesangial cells and endothelial cells, the synthesis of platelet activating factor (PAF) occurs by remodeling the phospholipids so that the production of PAF results in the release of arachidonic acid with subsequent production of cyclooxygenase or lipoxygenase products. In some tissues, including the renal medulla, another pathway for PAF biosynthesis (the de novo pathway) has been found in which the production of PAF is not linked to the production of arachidonic acid products. We tested the hypothesis that the remodeling pathway was active in the release of PAF into renal venous effluent of the isolated kidney. Isolated rat kidneys perfused at constant flow with albumin-containing buffer were stimulated to produce prostaglandin by an infusion of angiotensin II or bradykinin. Some kidneys were also challenged with the calcium ionophore A23187. Perfusate was collected for bioassay of PAF and radioimmunoassay of prostaglandin (PG) E2; urine was collected for PAF bioassay. Angiotensin II (10(-9) to 10(-8) M) increased renal vascular resistance, and bradykinin (10(-8) to 10(-7) M) and A23187 (3 x 10(-6) M) reduced renal vascular resistance. PGE2 production was increased significantly by bradykinin and angiotensin II but not by A23187. Only A23187 increased the release of PAF into the perfusate. Urine PAF was not changed by any of the stimuli. These data indicate that the release of PGE2 by the isolated, perfused rat kidney can be dissociated from the release of PAF. The findings support the suggestion that PAF released by the kidney into the renal venous effluent is not produced by remodeling the lipids that are the source of renally released prostaglandins. PMID:1941608

  9. Release of tumor necrosis factor alpha by human peritoneal macrophages in response to toxic shock syndrome toxin-1.

    PubMed

    Buyalos, R P; Rutanen, E M; Tsui, E; Halme, J

    1991-08-01

    We examined the release in vitro of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) by peritoneal macrophages and peripheral blood monocytes following incubation with toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1). We obtained peritoneal macrophages from 22 women at laparoscopy and peripheral blood monocytes from four healthy women during both the midfollicular and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. The samples were incubated for 24 hours at 37 C with 10(-2)-10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 or 10(4) ng/mL of bacterial endotoxin. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha activity was determined with a bioassay using an actinomycin D-sensitized WEHI-164 murine fibrosarcoma cell line. Twenty-four-hour incubation with TSST-1 resulted in a dose-dependent release of TNF-alpha by both peritoneal macrophages (maximal response 554 +/- 97 U of activity) and peripheral blood monocytes (maximal response 478 +/- 81 U of activity). We observed enhanced TNF-alpha release by peritoneal macrophages from women with endometriosis, compared with those without endometriosis, at a concentration of 10(4) ng/mL of TSST-1 (704 +/- 134 versus 354 +/- 103 U of activity; P less than .05). These data support the theory that the metabolic and physiologic derangements of perimenstrual toxic shock syndrome may be partially mediated by TNF-alpha released by peritoneal macrophages as a result of exposure to TSST-1. PMID:2067760

  10. Beta-adrenergic modulation of the release of atrial natriuretic factor from rat cardiac atria in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, A.; Imada, T.; Takayanagi, B.; Inagami, T.

    1986-03-01

    Several stimulatory factors for the release of atrial natriuretic factor, such as atrial stretch, atrial pacing and vasopressin, have been reported. We studied the effects of the adrenergic nervous system on the release of ANF using an in vitro perfusion system. Right and left atria from Sprague-Dawley rats were quartered and perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution gassed with 95% CO/sub 2//5% O/sub 2/ at 37/sup 0/C. Perfusate factions were collected every 2 minutes. Fractions were collected 20 minutes before and for 2 hours during the administration of test agents. ANF was measured by radioimmunoassay. Within 10 minutes of exposure to 10/sup -6/M isoproterenol, ANF secretion fell to less than 50% of its baseline level. However, beta agonists showed a stimulatory effect of 4-5 fold. Carbachol, in a concentration of 10/sup -2/M was used to demonstrate the viability of the atria exposed to isoproterenol, and produced a stimulation of ANF release of 4-6 times the basal level. The adrenergic nervous system can modulate ANF release in vitro. Further studies are being performed with selective beta agonists and antagonists to elucidate these results.

  11. What Factors Are Related to Success on Conditional Release/Discharge? Findings from the New Orleans Forensic Aftercare Clinic: 2002–2013

    PubMed Central

    Manguno-Mire, Gina M.; Coffman, Kelly L.; DeLand, Sarah M.; Thompson, John W.; Myers, Leann

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the empirically based factors that predicted success on conditional release among a sample of individuals conditionally discharged in Louisiana. Not guilty by reason of insanity acquittees and individuals on conditional release/discharge for incompetency to stand trial were included in the study. Success on conditional release was defined as maintenance of conditional release during the study period. Recidivism (arrest on new charges) and incidents were empirically evaluated. Success on conditional release was maintained in over 70% of individuals. Recidivism was low, with only five arrests on new charges. Success on conditional release was predicted by financial resources, not having a personality disorder, and having fewer total incidents in the program. After controlling for the influence of other variables, having an incident on conditional release was predicted by a substance use diagnosis and being released from jail. Individuals conditionally released from jail showed fewer number of days to first incident (67 vs. 575 days) compared with individuals discharged from the hospital. These data provide support for the successful management of forensic patients in the community via conditional release, although they highlight specific factors that should be considered when developing community-based release programming. Conditional release programs should consider empirical factors in the development of risk assessment and risk management approaches to improve successful maintenance of community-based forensic treatment alternatives. PMID:25328070

  12. Dietary supplementation with zinc oxide decreases expression of the stem cell factor in the small intestine of weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Ou, Deyuan; Li, Defa; Cao, Yunhe; Li, Xilong; Yin, Jingdong; Qiao, Shiyan; Wu, Guoyao

    2007-12-01

    Dietary supplementation with a high level of zinc oxide (ZnO) has been shown to reduce the incidence of diarrhea in weanling pigs, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Intestinal-mucosal mast cells, whose maturation and proliferation is under the control of the stem cell factor (SCF), play an important role in the etiology of diarrhea by releasing histamine. The present study was conducted to test the novel hypothesis that supplementing ZnO to the diet for weanling piglets may inhibit SCF expression in the small intestine, thereby reducing the number of mast cells, histamine release, and diarrhea. In Experiment 1, 32 piglets (28 days of age) were weaned and fed diets containing 100 or 3000 mg zinc/kg (as ZnO) for 10 days (16 piglets per group). In Experiment 2, two groups of 28-day-old piglets (8 piglets per group) were fed the 100- or 3000-mg zinc/kg diet as in Experiment 1, except that they were pair-fed the same amounts of feed. Supplementation with a high level of ZnO reduced the incidence of diarrhea in weanling piglets. Dietary Zn supplementation reduced expression of the SCF gene at both mRNA and protein levels, the number of mast cells in the mucosa and submucosa of the small intestine and histamine release from mucosal mast cells. Collectively, our results indicate that dietary supplementation with ZnO inhibits SCF expression in the small intestine, leading to reductions in the number of mast cells and histamine release. These findings may have important implications for the prevention of weaning-associated diarrhea in piglets. PMID:17475461

  13. Release of platelet activating factor (PAF) and eicosanoids in UVC-irradiated corneal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Y; Birkle, D L

    1995-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation provokes acute inflammation of the eye, and can be used to model processes that occur in response to damage to the anterior segment. This study characterized ultraviolet-C (UVC, 254 nm) irradiation-induced PAF synthesis, and arachidonic acid (20:4) and eicosanoid release in rabbit corneal stromal cells maintained in vitro. PAF was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA) after exposing cultured corneal stromal cells to UVC irradiation (20 min, 2, 5, 10 mW/cm2). 14C-20:4-labeled stromal cells were also stimulated with UVC and radiolabeled phospholipids, neutral lipids and eicosanoids were measured. Synthesis of cell-associated and secreted PAF from corneal stromal cells was increased by UV irradiation. UV irradiation (254 nm, 5mW/cm2) enhanced 20:4 release from triacylglycerols, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, and increased levels of 20:4-diacylglycerol and unesterified 20:4. The released 20:4 entered both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways after UVC irradiation. The PAF antagonist, BN52021 (10 microM) reduced UVC irradiation-induced stimulation of prostaglandin production, but failed to inhibit UVC-induced 20:4 release and synthesis of lipoxygenase products. Furthermore, exogenous PAF (1 microM) stimulated prostaglandin production, but did not increase the synthesis of lipoxygenase products from radiolabeled 20:4. The effects of PAF on prostaglandin synthesis were inhibited by BN52021. These findings indicate that responses to injury in cultured corneal stromal cells include PAF synthesis, release of 20:4 from glycerolipids, accumulation of diacylglycerol and synthesis of eicosanoids. The data further suggest that during UVC irradiation in vitro, PAF is not a primary or initial mediator of 20:4 release and synthesis of lipoxygenase products, but may mediate UVC-induced prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:7648859

  14. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved. PMID:25760088

  15. Isolation of histamine-producing Lactobacillus buchneri from Swiss cheese implicated in a food poisoning outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, S S; Speckhard, M W; Somers, E B; Taylor, S L

    1985-01-01

    A histamine-producing strain of Lactobacillus buchneri was isolated from Swiss cheese that had been implicated in an outbreak of histamine poisoning. It produced up to 4,070 nmol of histamine per ml in MRS broth supplemented with 0.1% histidine. The identification of this isolate was based on its biochemical, bacteriological, and DNA characterizations. PMID:4083875

  16. Histamine-producing bacteria in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) and their abilities to produce histamine and other biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xia

    2014-08-01

    Using decarboxylation medium and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) were isolated and identified, and the histamine-producing abilities of the isolated HPB were determined. Nine mesophilic strains (H1-H9) isolated from the muscle of blue scad were identified as the genera of HPB, including Arthrobacter bergeri (H1), Pseudomonas sp. (H2, H5 and H6), Psychrobacter sp. (H3), Shewanella baltica (H4 and H7), and Aeromonas salmonicida (H8 and H9), respectively. Results showed that most of the HPB strains were weak on histamine formation (13.0-20.4 mg/l), except for the H8 strain with the ability of producing 115 mg of histamine/l in trypticase soy broth containing 1.0 % L-histidine. As the strongest HPB in blue scad, bacterial strain H8 also presented a strong ability to produce other biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and tryptamine. Therefore, the H8 strain identified as the genus of A. salmonicida was the dominant mesophilic HPB strain for producing histamine and other biogenic amines in blue scad at room temperature. PMID:24668182

  17. Functional characterization of histamine H4 receptor on human mast cells.

    PubMed

    Jemima, E Angel; Prema, A; Thangam, E Berla

    2014-11-01

    Among the four different types of histamine receptors (H1-H4), H4R is predominantly expressed in immune cells and involved in immunomodulatory response. Here, in this study we determined the expression of H4R in human mast cells (HMC-1, LAD-2 and primary cord blood derived CD34+ human mast cells) and characterized its functional properties. Interestingly, we found that human mast cells responded to both histamine (natural ligand) and 4-methylhistamine (selective H4R agonist) for sustained intracellular calcium mobilization, degranulation and cytokine production. However, only histamine induced the release of cAMP, but 4-methylhistamine down regulates cAMP indicating that H4R mediates its effect through Gαi/o protein and H1R via Gαq protein. Furthermore, both histamine and 4-methylhistamine induced the production of cysteinyl leukotrienes and LTB4. Using human inflammation antibody array membrane, we found that H4R induced the expression of various inflammatory proteins, involving pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines and these are TGF-β1, TNF-α, TNF-β, PDGF-BB, TIMP-2, M-CSF, IP-10, IL-16, IL-6, IL-3, IL-10, MIP-1α, IL-1α, ICAM-1, Eotaxin-2, RANTES, IL-8, MCP-1, and IL-6sR. We also quantified the level of various inflammatory cytokines produced by human mast cells through H4R. It was observed that, the production level of Th2 cytokines IL-4(401.34 pg/ml), IL-5 (64.21 pg/ml) and IL-13 (1044 pg/ml) and classical proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 (221.27 pg/ml) and IL-1β (34.24 pg/ml) and chemokines MCP-1(106 pg/ml) and IL-8 (818.32 pg/ml). Furthermore, activation of H4R caused the phosphorylation of ERK and PI3K in a time dependent manner. Taken together these data demonstrate that, the activation of H4R in human mast cells produced not only inflammatory mediators that are associated with allergic reactions but also other inflammatory conditions. PMID:24934979

  18. Histamine Poisoning from Ingestion of Fish or Scombroid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Vincenzo; Masciari, Peppino; Pezzi, Mario; Mola, Assunta; Tiburzi, Simona Paola; Zinzi, Maria Concetta; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Verre, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The scombroid poisoning is due to the ingestion of poorly preserved fish (especially tuna, sardines, and mackerel) out of the cold chain. Under the influence of the proliferation of gram negative bacteria that occurs for heating, the histidine content in the muscle of the fish is converted into histamine, by the action of the enzyme histidine decarboxylase. If the histamine is ingested in large quantities, it causes an anaphylactoid reaction with a variety of symptoms from moderate to severe to life-threating. We will describe two cases that came under our observation after consuming a meal of bluefin tuna. The diagnosis of scombroid syndrome was made on the basis of the anamnestic data and the clinical one. The rapid resolution of the signs and symptoms after treatment with histamines H1-H2 receptor blockers confirmed the suspected diagnosis. PMID:25544905

  19. Cellular analysis of the histamine H4 receptor in human myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Capelo, Ricardo; Lehmann, Christoph; Ahmad, Khalil; Snodgrass, Ryan; Diehl, Olaf; Ringleb, Julia; Flamand, Nicolas; Weigert, Andreas; Stark, Holger; Steinhilber, Dieter; Kahnt, Astrid S

    2016-03-01

    The human histamine H4 receptor (H4R) is a Gαi/o-coupled receptor which is mainly expressed on hematopoietic cells. Accordingly, the receptor is implicated in the pathology of various diseases such as autoimmune disorders, bronchial asthma and pruritus. Due to complicated receptor pharmacology, the lack of a reliable antibody and limited availability of primary cells expressing the receptor the physiology of this receptor is still poorly understood. Therefore, we aimed to assess absolute receptor mRNA expression and functionality (intracellular Ca(2+) release) in various human myeloid cell types such as granulocytes, monocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs). This was put into context with the expression of the H1R and H2R. In addition, the influence of various inflammatory stimuli on H4R expression was investigated in macrophages and monocyte-derived DCs. We found that classically activated macrophages treated with pro-inflammatory stimuli down-regulated histamine receptor mRNA expression as did LPS and zymosan A matured monocyte-derived DCs. In contrast, alternatively activated macrophages (IL-4 or IL-13) upregulated H2R and H4R expression compared to controls. Consistent with existing literature, we found eosinophils to be the major source of the H4R. Since availability of primary eosinophils is limited, we developed a cell model based on the differentiated eosinophilic cell line EOL-1, in which H4R pharmacology and physiology may be studied. PMID:26774453

  20. Histamine fish poisoning in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Knope, Katrina; Sloan-Gardner, Timothy S; Stafford, Russell J

    2014-12-01

    We report on human illness due to histamine fish poisoning outbreaks in Australia from 2001 to 2013. Histamine fish poisoning results from the ingestion of histamine contained within the flesh of certain fish species that naturally contain histidine, which has been converted to histamine by spoilage bacteria following poor handling or temperature control after harvesting. While symptoms vary, allergic symptoms such as facial flushing, headaches and rashes are frequently reported. Using the OzFoodNet outbreak register, published case reports and surveillance reports, we found data on 57 outbreaks of histamine fish poisoning, which affected 187 people, of whom 14% were hospitalised. There were no deaths reported. Outbreaks were generally small in size, with a median of 2 cases per outbreak (range 1 to 22 people), with 88% of outbreaks comprising less than 5 people. Tuna (in the family Scombridae) was the most frequently reported food vehicle, while 18 outbreaks involved non-scombridae fish. Median incubation periods among the outbreaks were short; being less than 1 hour for 22 outbreaks. The most frequently reported symptoms were diarrhoea and rash. Symptoms of facial/body flushing were reported for at least one case in 19 outbreaks and tingling, burning or swelling of the skin, especially around the lips for at least 1 case in 13 outbreaks. In 3 outbreaks, one or more cases were reported to have had respiratory distress or difficulty breathing. While the condition is often mild, improved recognition and appropriate treatment is important, as it will reduce the possibility of any severe health effects resulting from this condition. Key features of histamine fish poisoning outbreaks are the high attack rate, rapid onset, the typical symptoms and their short duration. PMID:25631589

  1. Crystal structure of release factor RF3 trapped in the GTP state on a rotated conformation of the ribosome

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jie; Lancaster, Laura; Trakhanov, Sergei; Noller, Harry F.

    2012-03-26

    The class II release factor RF3 is a GTPase related to elongation factor EF-G, which catalyzes release of class I release factors RF1 and RF2 from the ribosome after termination of protein synthesis. The 3.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of the RF3 {center_dot} GDPNP {center_dot} ribosome complex provides a high-resolution description of interactions and structural rearrangements that occur when binding of this translational GTPase induces large-scale rotational movements in the ribosome. RF3 induces a 7{sup o} rotation of the body and 14{sup o} rotation of the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit, and itself undergoes inter- and intradomain conformational rearrangements. We suggest that ordering of critical elements of switch loop I and the P loop, which help to form the GTPase catalytic site, are caused by interactions between the G domain of RF3 and the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA. The rotational movements in the ribosome induced by RF3, and its distinctly different binding orientation to the sarcin-ricin loop of 23S rRNA, raise interesting implications for the mechanism of action of EF-G in translocation.

  2. [Isoforms of the human histamine H3 receptor: Generation, expression in the central nervous system and functional implications].

    PubMed

    García-Gálvez, Ana Maricela; Arias-Montaño, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Histamine plays a significant role as a neuromodulator in the human central nervous system. Histamine-releasing neurons are exclusively located in the tuberomammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus, project to all major areas of the brain, and participate in functions such as the regulation of sleep/wakefulness, locomotor activity, feeding and drinking, analgesia, learning, and memory. The functional effects of histamine are exerted through the activation of four G protein-coupled receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4), and in the central nervous system the first three receptors are widely expressed. The H3 receptor (H3R) is found exclusively in neuronal cells, where it functions as auto- and hetero-receptor. One remarkable characteristic of the H3R is the existence of isoforms, generated by alternative splicing of the messenger RNA. For the human H3R, 20 isoforms have been reported; although a significant number lack those regions required for agonist binding or receptor signaling, at least five isoforms appear functional upon heterologous expression. In this work we review the evidence for the generation of human H3R isoforms, their expression, and the available information regarding the functionality of such receptors. PMID:26927649

  3. Comparison of the effects of eleven histamine H1-receptor antagonists on monoamine turnover in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Shishido, S; Yamori, M; Saeki, K

    1994-02-01

    To compare in vivo effects of eleven compounds of different classes of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (alcoholamines: diphenhydramine, carbinoxamine, and clemastine; ethylenediamines: mepyramine, tripelennamine, and clemizole; alkylamines: triprolidine and chlorpheniramine; piperazines: meclizine and homochlorcyclizine; phenothiazines: promethazine) on neuronal uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), the effects on the turnover of these monoamines were examined in the mouse brain, based on the alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine-induced depletion of DA and NA or probenecid-induced accumulation of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The DA turnover was reduced remarkably by diphenhydramine, tripelennamine, and promethazine, and also significantly by chlorpheniramine, mepyramine, clemizole, and homochlorcyclizine, at doses used in the ordinary animal experiments. The 5-HT turnover was reduced markedly by mepyramine, tripelennamine, and chlorpheniramine. In contrast, the NA turnover was increased by promethazine and homochlorcyclizine, possibly due to their antagonistic effects on alpha-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that (1) the degree of inhibition of the uptake of DA and 5-HT by histamine H1-receptor antagonists is considerably different, (2) most H1-antagonists have little influence on NA uptake and some compounds enhance NA release, and that (3) carbinoxamine, clemastine, triprolidine, and meclizine have comparatively weak influences on monoamine metabolism. These effects on brain monoamine systems may be related to some central actions of histamine H1-receptor antagonists, such as an addiction to these compounds combined with opioids. PMID:7513381

  4. Localized drug delivery using crosslinked gelatin gels containing liposomes: factors influencing liposome stability and drug release.

    PubMed

    DiTizio, V; Karlgard, C; Lilge, L; Khoury, A E; Mittelman, M W; DiCosmo, F

    2000-07-01

    We describe a drug-delivery vehicle that combines the sustained release properties of liposomes with the structural advantages of crosslinked gelatin gels that can be implanted directly or coated onto medical devices. Liposome inclusion in gelatin gels does not compromise thermal stability nor does it interfere with the resiliency of gels to tensile force. However, electron spin resonance analysis of sequestered DPPC liposomes revealed a slight depression (ca. 1.0 degrees C) of the gel-to-fluid phase transition relative to liposomes in suspension. The level of liposome release from gels was determined by liposome concentration, liposome size, and the presence of poly(ethylene oxide) chains in the gel matrix or in the liposome membrane. Both neutral and charged liposomes displayed relatively high affinities for poly(ethylene glycol)gelatin gels, with only 10-15% release of initially sequestered liposomes while liposomes in which poly(ethylene glycol) was included within the membrane were not as well retained (approximately 65% release). The in vitro efflux of ciprofloxacin from liposomal gels immersed in serum was nearly complete after 24 h compared to 38% release of liposomal chlorhexidine after 6 days. The serum-induced destabilization of liposomal ciprofloxacin depended on the accessibility of serum components to gels as partly immersed gels retained approximately 50% of their load of drug after 24 h. In vivo experiments using a catheterized rabbit model of urinary tract infection revealed the absence of viable Escherichia coli on coated catheter surfaces in seven out of nine cases while all untreated catheter surfaces examined (n = 7) were contaminated. PMID:10813750

  5. Granzyme B Cleaves Decorin, Biglycan and Soluble Betaglycan, Releasing Active Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Boivin, Wendy A.; Shackleford, Marlo; Vanden Hoek, Amanda; Zhao, Hongyan; Hackett, Tillie L.; Knight, Darryl A.; Granville, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Granzyme B (GrB) is a pro-apoptotic serine protease that contributes to immune-mediated target cell apoptosis. However, during inflammation, GrB accumulates in the extracellular space, retains its activity, and is capable of cleaving extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Recent studies have implicated a pathogenic extracellular role for GrB in cardiovascular disease, yet the pathophysiological consequences of extracellular GrB activity remain largely unknown. The objective of this study was to identify proteoglycan (PG) substrates of GrB and examine the ability of GrB to release PG-sequestered TGF-β1 into the extracellular milieu. Methods/Results Three extracellular GrB PG substrates were identified; decorin, biglycan and betaglycan. As all of these PGs sequester active TGF-β1, cytokine release assays were conducted to establish if GrB-mediated PG cleavage induced TGF-β1 release. Our data confirmed that GrB liberated TGF-β1 from all three substrates as well as from endogenous ECM and this process was inhibited by the GrB inhibitor 3,4-dichloroisocoumarin. The released TGF-β1 retained its activity as indicated by the induction of SMAD-3 phosphorylation in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells. Conclusion In addition to contributing to ECM degradation and the loss of tissue structural integrity in vivo, increased extracellular GrB activity is also capable of inducing the release of active TGF-β1 from PGs. PMID:22479366

  6. Stereoselective synthesis of desloratadine derivatives as antagonist of histamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gai-Zhi; Xu, Hai-Wei; Chen, Guang-Wei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ya-Na; Liu, Hong-Min; Yu, De-Quan

    2010-02-15

    A series of desloratadine derivatives were stereoselectively synthesized and evaluated for H(1) antihistamine activity. For the evaluation of H(1) antihistamine activity, the in vitro histamine-induced contraction of the guinea-pig ileum assay (HC) was used. The synthesized desloratadine derivatives 7, 8 and 9 are structurally related to rupatadine and were generated by replacement of the 5-methyl-3-pyridine group of rupatadine with gamma-alkylidene butenolide. Their H(1) antihistamine activities have shown a high dependence on the exact nature of the substituent in the lactone ring. Optimum structures 7, 8a and 8g display potent activity inhibiting histamine-induced effects. PMID:20110173

  7. Histamine H2 receptor - Involvement in gastric ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Brown, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The involvement of the H1 and H2 receptors for histamine in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers was investigated in rats. Metiamide, an H2 receptor antagonist, reliably reduced ulceration produced by stress alone or by a combination of stress and aspirin. In contrast, pyrilamine, which blocks only the H1 receptor, was without effect under these same conditions. The results support the hypothesis that histamine mediates both stress and stress plus aspirin induced ulceration by a mechanism involving the H2 receptor.

  8. Histamine 2 Receptor Antagonists and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Megan D; Aouthmany, Mouhammad; Sheehan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 50 years, the pharmacologic market for gastric disease has grown exponentially. Currently, medical management with histamine 2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy over surgical intervention. These are generally regarded as safe medications, but there are growing numbers of cases documenting adverse effects, especially those manifesting in the skin. Here we review the pharmacology, common clinical applications, and adverse reactions of both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors with a particular focus on the potential for allergic reactions including allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:27172303

  9. Investigation of some factors affecting on release of radon-222 from phosphogypsum waste associated with phosphate ore processing.

    PubMed

    Hilal, M A; El Afifi, E M; Nayl, A A

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study is oriented to investigate the influence of some physicochemical factors such as radium distribution, grain size, moisture content and chemical constituents on releases of radon-222 from the accumulated phosphogypsum (PG) waste. The emanation fraction, activity concentration in the pore and the surface exhalation rate of radon-222 in the bulk PG waste are 34.5 ± 0.3%, 238.6 ± 7.8 kBq m(-3) and 213 ± 6.9 mBq m(-2) s(-1), respectively. These values were varied and enhanced slightly in the fine grain sizes (F1 < 0.125 mm) by a factor of 1.05 folds compared to the bulk residue. It was also found that release of radon from residue PG waste was controlled positively by radium (Ra-226), calcium (CaSO4) and strontium (SrO). About 67% of radon release attributed to the grain size below 0.5 mm, while 33% due to the large grain size above 0.5 mm. The emanation fraction of Rn-222 is increased with moisture content and the maximum emanation is ∼43% of moisture of 3-8%. It reduced slowly with the continuous increase in moisture till 20%. Due to PG waste in situ can be enhancing the background to the surround workers and/or public. Therefore, the environmental negative impacts due to release of Rn-222 can be minimized by legislation to restrict its civil uses, or increasing its moisture to ∼10%, or by the particle size separation of the fine fraction containing the high levels of Ra-226 followed by a suitable chemical treatment or disposal; whereas the low release amount can be diluted and used in cement industry, roads or dam construction. PMID:25863719

  10. A factor analysis of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms using data pooled from two venlafaxine extended-release clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Dan J; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Baldwin, David S; Szumski, Annette; Pedersen, Ronald; Davidson, Jonathan R T

    2013-01-01

    Background Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition) (DSM-IV) three-factor posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic criteria was conducted to determine fit for this patient population. An exploratory factor analysis (EFA) of alternate symptom structures was planned to identify symptoms that cluster in this population. The response of symptom factors to treatment with venlafaxine extended release (ER) was explored. Methods Baseline 17-item Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS-SX17) data were pooled from patients enrolled in two double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials. The CFA was conducted using maximum likelihood and weighted, least-squares factor extraction methods. The EFA was performed using a polychoric correlation covariance matrix and Pearson correlation matrix. Results Data from a pooled population of 685 patients (venlafaxine ER: n = 339; placebo: n = 346) were analyzed. CFA rejected the DSM-IV three-factor structure. The EFA identified a different three-factor structure as the best fit: factor 1 included reexperiencing symptoms, factor 2 included symptoms of altered mood and cognition, whereas factor 3 comprised avoidance and arousal symptoms. All DSM-IV symptom factors and all factors in the identified three-factor model responded positively to venlafaxine ER treatment. Conclusions Data are consistent with literature failing to confirm the three-factor structure of DSM-IV PTSD, and they support the DSM-5 inclusion of a symptom cluster addressing altered mood and cognition in PTSD. The efficacy of venlafaxine ER in reducing a range of symptom clusters in PTSD is consistent with its multiple mechanisms of action. PMID:24363976

  11. Basic fibroblast growth factor binds to subendothelial extracellular matrix and is released by heparitinase and heparin-like molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkin, P.; Doctrow, S.; Klagsbrun, M.; Svahn, C.M.; Folkman, J.; Vlodavsky, I. )

    1989-02-21

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) exhibits specific binding to the extracellular matrix (ECM) produced by cultured endothelial cells. Binding was saturable as a function both of time and of concentration of {sup 125}I-bFGF. Scatchard analysis of FGF binding revealed the presence of about 1.5 x 10{sup 12} binding sites/mm{sup 2} ECM with an apparent k{sub D} of 610 nM. FGF binds to heparan sulfate (HS) in ECM as evidenced by (i) inhibition of binding in the presence of heparin or HS at 0.1-1 {mu}g/mL, but not by chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, or hyaluronic acid at 10 {mu}g/mL, (ii) lack of binding to ECM pretreated with heparitinase, but not with chondroitinase ABC, and (iii) rapid release of up to 90% of ECM-bound FGF by exposure to heparin, HS, or heparitinase, but not to chondroitin sulfate, keratan sulfate, hyaluronic acid, or chondroitinase ABC. Oligosaccharides derived from depolymerized heparin, and as small as the tetrasaccharide, released the ECM-bound FGF, but there was little or no release of FGF by modified nonanticoagulant heparins such as totally desulfated heparin, N-desulfated heparin, and N-acetylated heparin. FGF released from ECM was biologically active, as indicated by its stimulation of cell proliferation and DNA synthesis in vascular endothelial cells and 3T3 fibroblasts. Similar results were obtained in studies on release of endogenous FGF-like mitogenic activity from Descement's membranes of bovine corneas. It is suggested that ECM storage and release of bFGF provide a novel mechanism for regulation of capillary blood vessel growth. Whereas ECM-bound FGF may be prevented from acting on endothelial cells, its displacement by heparin-like molecules and/or HS-degrading enzymes may elicit a neovascular response.

  12. Corticotropin-Releasing Factor Mediates Pain-Induced Anxiety through the ERK1/2 Signaling Cascade in Locus Coeruleus Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Gisela Patrícia; Micó, Juan Antonio; Neto, Fani Lourença

    2015-01-01

    Background: The corticotropin-releasing factor is a stress-related neuropeptide that modulates locus coeruleus activity. As locus coeruleus has been involved in pain and stress-related patologies, we tested whether the pain-induced anxiety is a result of the corticotropin-releasing factor released in the locus coeruleus. Methods: Complete Freund’s adjuvant-induced monoarthritis was used as inflammatory chronic pain model. α-Helical corticotropin-releasing factor receptor antagonist was microinjected into the contralateral locus coeruleus of 4-week-old monoarthritic animals. The nociceptive and anxiety-like behaviors, as well as phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 and corticotropin-releasing factor receptors expression, were quantified in the paraventricular nucleus and locus coeruleus. Results: Monoarthritic rats manifested anxiety and increased phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 levels in the locus coeruleus and paraventricular nucleus, although the expression of corticotropin-releasing factor receptors was unaltered. α-Helical corticotropin-releasing factor antagonist administration reversed both the anxiogenic-like behavior and the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 levels in the locus coeruleus. Conclusions: Pain-induced anxiety is mediated by corticotropin-releasing factor neurotransmission in the locus coeruleus through extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 signaling cascade. PMID:25716783

  13. TGF-β2 treatment enhances cytoprotective factors released from embryonic stem cells and inhibits apoptosis in infarcted myocardium.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K; Singla, Reetu D; Lamm, Stephanie; Glass, Carley

    2011-04-01

    We investigated whether factors released from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells primed with and without transforming growth factor (TGF)-β2 inhibit iodoacetic acid (IAA)- and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in the cell culture system as well as after transplantation in the infarcted heart. We generated conditioned media (CMs) from ES cells primed with and without TGF-β2 and determined their effects on IAA- and H(2)O(2)-induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells. We also transplanted both ES-CMs in the infarcted heart to determine the effects on apoptosis and cardiac function after myocardial infarction (MI) at day (D)1 and D14. Terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, apoptotic ELISA, and cell viability data demonstrated significantly (P < 0.05) reduced apoptosis with ES-CM compared with controls in both cell culture models. Moreover, TGF-β2-primed ES-CM (T-ES-CM) demonstrated enhanced beneficial effects, with further reduced (P < 0.05) apoptosis compared with ES-CM, suggesting the a presence of additional cytoprotective released factors after TGF-β2 treatment. Next, our in vivo apoptosis data suggested significant decrease in apoptosis with both ES-CMs compared with MI alone at D1 and D14. Notably, T-ES-CM demonstrated significant (P < 0.05) inhibition of apoptosis and fibrosis with improved cardiac function compared with ES-CM at D14, whereas no such effects were observed at D1. Next, we confirmed that apoptosis is mediated through a prosurvival Akt pathway. Moreover, we determined that after TGF-β2 treatment there was a two- to fivefold increase in cytoprotective released factors (interleukin-10, stem cell factor, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1, and VEGF) with T-ES-CM compared with ES-CM. In conclusion, we suggest that factors released from ES cells with and without TGF-β2 treatment contain antiapoptotic factors that inhibit apoptosis in vitro and in vivo. We also suggest that T-ES-CM demonstrates additional

  14. Studies of the role of endothelium-dependent nitric oxide release in the sustained vasodilator effects of corticotrophin releasing factor and sauvagine.

    PubMed

    Barker, D M; Corder, R

    1999-01-01

    1. The mechanisms of the sustained vasodilator actions of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) and sauvagine (SVG) were studied using rings of endothelium de-nuded rat thoracic aorta (RTA) and the isolated perfused rat superior mesenteric arterial vasculature (SMA). 2. SVG was approximately 50 fold more potent than CRF on RTA (EC40: 0.9 +/- 0.2 and 44 +/- 9 nM respectively, P < 0.05), and approximately 10 fold more active in the perfused SMA (ED40: 0.05 +/- 0.02 and 0.6 +/- 0.1 nmol respectively, P < 0.05). Single bolus injections of CRF (100 pmol) or SVG (15 pmol) in the perfused SMA caused reductions in perfusion pressure of 23 +/- 1 and 24 +/- 2% that lasted more than 20 min. 3. Removal of the endothelium in the perfused SMA with deoxycholic acid attenuated the vasodilatation and revealed two phases to the response; a short lasting direct action, and a sustained phase which was fully inhibited. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase with L-NAME (100 microM) L-NMMA (100 microM) or 2-ethyl-2-thiopseudourea (ETPU, 100 microM) had similar effects on the vasodilator responses to CRF as removal of the endothelium, suggesting a pivotal role for nitric oxide. However the selective guanylate cyclase inhibitor 1H-[l,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-alpha]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 microM) did not affect the response to CRF. 5. High potassium (60 mM) completely inhibited the vasodilator response to CRF in the perfused SMA, indicating a role for K channels in this response. 6. Compared to other vasodilator agents acting via the release of NO, the actions of CRF and SVG are strikingly long-lasting, suggesting a novel mechanism of prolonged activation of nitric oxide synthase. PMID:10051151

  15. Huntingtin-associated Protein-1 Interacts with Pro-brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor and Mediates Its Transport and Release*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Linda Lin-yan; Fan, Yongjun; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Zhou, Xin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a pivotal role in brain development and synaptic plasticity. It is synthesized as a precursor (pro-BDNF), sorted into the secretory pathway, transported along dendrites and axons, and released in an activity-dependent manner. Mutant Huntingtin with expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) and the V66M polymorphism of BDNF reduce the dendritic distribution and axonal transport of BDNF. However, the mechanism underlying this defective transport remains unclear. Here, we report that Huntingtin-associated protein-1 (HAP1) interacts with the prodomain of BDNF and that the interaction was reduced in the presence of polyQ-expanded Huntingtin and BDNF V66M. Consistently, there was reduced coimmunoprecipitation of pro-BDNF with HAP1 in the brain homogenate of Huntington disease. Pro-BDNF distribution in the neuronal processes and its accumulation in the proximal and distal segments of crushed sciatic nerve and the activity-dependent release of pro-BDNF were abolished in HAP1−/− mice. These results suggest that HAP1 may participate in axonal transport and activity-dependent release of pro-BDNF by interacting with the BDNF prodomain. Accordingly, the decreased interaction between HAP1 and pro-BDNF in Huntington disease may reduce the release and transport of BDNF. PMID:19996106

  16. The nucleotide exchange factors Grp170 and Sil1 induce cholera toxin release from BiP to enable retrotranslocation.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jeffrey M; Inoue, Takamasa; Chen, Grace; Tsai, Billy

    2015-06-15

    Cholera toxin (CT) intoxicates cells by trafficking from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where the catalytic CTA1 subunit hijacks components of the ER-associated degradation (ERAD) machinery to retrotranslocate to the cytosol and induce toxicity. In the ER, CT targets to the ERAD machinery composed of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Hrd1-Sel1L complex, in part via the activity of the Sel1L-binding partner ERdj5. This J protein stimulates BiP's ATPase activity, allowing BiP to capture the toxin. Presumably, toxin release from BiP must occur before retrotranslocation. Here, using loss-and gain-of-function approaches coupled with binding studies, we demonstrate that the ER-resident nucleotide exchange factors (NEFs) Grp170 and Sil1 induce CT release from BiP in order to promote toxin retrotranslocation. In addition, we find that after NEF-dependent release from BiP, the toxin is transferred to protein disulfide isomerase; this ER redox chaperone is known to unfold CTA1, which allows the toxin to cross the Hrd1-Sel1L complex. Our data thus identify two NEFs that trigger toxin release from BiP to enable successful retrotranslocation and clarify the fate of the toxin after it disengages from BiP. PMID:25877869

  17. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Enhances Release of Native Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor from Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Buldyrev, Ilya; Tanner, Nathan M.; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Dodd, Emily G.; Nguyen, Loi T.; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2008-01-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity in nociceptive pathways has been implicated in pathomechanisms of chronic pain syndromes. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which is expressed by trigeminal nociceptors, has recently been identified as a key player in the mechanism of migraine headaches. Here we show that CGRP is co-expressed with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a large subset of adult rat trigeminal ganglion neurons in vivo. Using ELISA in situ, we show that CGRP (1–1000 nM) potently enhances BDNF release from cultured trigeminal neurons. The effect of CGRP is dose–dependent and abolished by pretreatment with CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP(8–37). Intriguingly, CGRP-mediated BDNF release, unlike BDNF release evoked by physiological patterns of electrical stimulation, is independent of extracellular calcium. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin blocks the CGRP-mediated BDNF release. Using transmission electron microscopy, our study also shows that BDNF-immunoreactivity is present in dense core vesicles of unmyelinated axons and axon terminals in the subnucleus caudalis of the spinal trigeminal nucleus, the primary central target of trigeminal nociceptors. Together, these results reveal a previously unknown role for CGRP in regulating BDNF availability, and point to BDNF as a candidate mediator of trigeminal nociceptive plasticity. PMID:17064360

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide enhances release of native brain-derived neurotrophic factor from trigeminal ganglion neurons.

    PubMed

    Buldyrev, Ilya; Tanner, Nathan M; Hsieh, Hui-ya; Dodd, Emily G; Nguyen, Loi T; Balkowiec, Agnieszka

    2006-12-01

    Activity-dependent plasticity in nociceptive pathways has been implicated in pathomechanisms of chronic pain syndromes. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), which is expressed by trigeminal nociceptors, has recently been identified as a key player in the mechanism of migraine headaches. Here we show that CGRP is coexpressed with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a large subset of adult rat trigeminal ganglion neurons in vivo. Using ELISA in situ, we show that CGRP (1-1000 nM) potently enhances BDNF release from cultured trigeminal neurons. The effect of CGRP is dose-dependent and abolished by pretreatment with CGRP receptor antagonist, CGRP(8-37). Intriguingly, CGRP-mediated BDNF release, unlike BDNF release evoked by physiological patterns of electrical stimulation, is independent of extracellular calcium. Depletion of intracellular calcium stores with thapsigargin blocks the CGRP-mediated BDNF release. Using transmission electron microscopy, our study also shows that BDNF-immunoreactivity is present in dense core vesicles of unmyelinated axons