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Sample records for histamine symposium held

  1. FIRST BH COCHRANE SYMPOSIUM HELD

    PubMed Central

    Mahmic-Kaknjo, Mersiha; Novo, Ahmed; Krleza-Jeric, Karmela

    2016-01-01

    The first BH Cochrane Symposium was held on 12 October 2015 in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BH), organized by the Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Healthcare in Federation of BH (AKAZ) and Medical Faculty University of Sarajevo. A group of ten national and international experts presented the Cochrane organization and systematic reviews, as well as the IMPACT Observatory, development of guidelines in BH, and the role of AKAZ. Examples of the development and use of Cochrane reviews in evidence informed decision making in health as well as research integrity were presented and discussed. Major BH decision makers and interested professionals from all over BH participated in a symposium and its lively discussion, especially from the perspective of Cochrane and its activities in BH, and the collaboration with the Croatian Cochrane. It can be expected that this symposium will inspire further growth of participation and use of Cochrane in BH and increase the awareness of various aspects of evidence informed medicine and research integrity. PMID:27047274

  2. Land Subsidence International Symposium held in Venice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Third International Symposium on Land Subsidence was held March 18-25, 1984, in Venice, Italy. Sponsors were the Ground-Water Commission of the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS), the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), the Italian National Research Council (CNR), the Italian Regions of Veneto and Emilia-Romagna, the Italian Municipalities of Venice, Ravenna, and Modena, the Venice Province, and the European Research Office. Cosponsors included the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH), the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Foundation Engineering (ISSMFE), and the Association of Geoscientists for International Development (AGID).Organized within the framework of UNESCO's International Hydrological Program, the symposium brought together over 200 international interdisciplinary specialists in the problems of land subsidence due to fluid and mineral withdrawal. Because man's continuing heavy development of groundwater, gas, oil, and minerals is changing the natural regime and thus causing more and more subsiding areas in the world, there had been sufficient new land subsidence occurrence, problems, research, and remedial measures since the 1976 Second International Symposium held in Anaheim, California, to develop a most interesting program of nearly 100 papers from about 30 countries. The program consisted of papers covering case histories of fluid and mineral withdrawal, engineering theory and analysis, karst “sink-hole”-type subsidence, subsidence due to dewatering of organic deposits or due to application of water (hydrocompaction), instrumentation, legal, socioeconomic, and environmental effects of land subsidence, and remedial works.

  3. Beneficial Modifications of the Marine Environment. A Symposium Held March 11, 1968, Washington, D.C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC.

    This volume contains papers presented at a symposium on beneficial modifications of the marine environment held in March, 1968. Included are four papers and accompanying discussions. One paper discusses the reason that the presence or absence of ice on the sea can influence the formation of climate and looks into the following two questions: (1)…

  4. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (10TH) HELD AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON NOVEMBER 17-21, 1986. VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the Tenth Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), held in Atlanta, GA, November 17-21, 1986. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical information on FGD systems and processes applicable to utili...

  5. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (10TH) HELD AT ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON NOVEMBER 17-21, 1986. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the Tenth Symposium on Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD), held in Atlanta, GA, November 17-21, 1986. The symposium, jointly sponsored by EPA and EPRI, had as its objective the exchange of technical information on FGD systems and processes applicable to utili...

  6. Preserving Your Historical Records. Proceedings of the Symposium Held at Drake University (Des Moines, Iowa, October 21-22, 1978).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fishbein, Toby, Ed.; Perry, Alan F., Ed.

    This volume is the edited transcript of the tape-recorded symposium of archivists, manuscript curators, librarians, and historical agency administrators, which was held at Drake Univrsity in the fall of 1978. The papers presented are "The Law and Public Records: The Iowa Context" by Peter T. Harstad; "Being Selective: What to Collect and Preserve"…

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (EPA) FINE PARTICLE SCRUBBER SYMPOSIUM (2ND) HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MAY 2-3, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents the proceedings, including introductory remarks and 16 technical papers, of the Second Fine Particle Scrubber Symposium, held May 2-3, 1977, in New Orleans. Sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the symposium was held to stimulate and generate...

  8. SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS: TEXTILE INDUSTRY TECHNOLOGY HELD AT WILLIAMSBURG, VA. ON DECEMBER 5-8, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document most of the approximately 40 presentations at the symposium. The symposium provided an exchange of ideas between industry, government, and academic representatives in three related areas: emissions control, energy conservation, and material recovery. Ther...

  9. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (11TH) HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON APRIL 29-MAY 1, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eleventh Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Cincinnati, OH April 29 through May 1, 1985. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and rec...

  10. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NINTH ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MAY 2-4, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Ninth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky, on May 2, 3 and 4, 1983. The purposes of the symposium were (1) to provide a forum for state-of-the-art review and discussion of ongoing and rec...

  11. Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics, and Energy Science: Remarks from Steve Chu at the Scientific Symposium Held in his Honor

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steve

    2011-06-03

    Steve Chu, director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and recipient of the 1997 Nobel Prize, presents a talk at Frontiers in Laser Cooling, Single-Molecule Biophysics and Energy Science, a scientific symposium in his honor. The symposium was held August 30, 2008 in Berkeley.

  12. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (10TH) AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY HELD ON APRIL 3-5, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tenth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, remedial action, incineration and treatment of hazardous waste was held in Fort Mitchell, Kentucky April 3 through 5, 1984. The purpose of the Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings of ongoing and re...

  13. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 1977. VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, non-regenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-product ...

  14. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA, NOVEMBER 1977. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations made during the symposium, which dealt with the status of flue gas desulfurization technology in the United States and abroad. Subjects considered included: regenerable, non-regenerable, and advanced processes; process costs; and by-product ...

  15. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION HELD AT LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, MARCH 1979; VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The publication, in two volumes, contains the text of all papers presented at EPA's fifth flue gas desulfurization (FGD) symposium, March 5-8, 1979, at Las Vegas, Nevada. A partial listing of papers in Volume 2 includes the following: Basin Electric's involvement with dry flue ga...

  16. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (10TH) HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON APRIL 3-5, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Tenth Annual Research Symposium on Land Disposal, Remedial Action, Incineration and Treatment of Hazardous Waste was held April 3 through 5, 1984. This volume is a compilation of speakers' papers and poster presenters' abstracts for Session B, Hazardous Waste Incineration and...

  17. PROCEEDINGS: NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RECENT ADVANCES IN POLLUTANT MONITORING OF AMBIENT AIR AND STATIONARY SOURCES, HELD AT RADISON PLAZA RALEIGH HOTEL, ON MAY 8-10, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fourth annual national symposium sponsored by EPA's Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory was held May 8-10, 1984 in Raleigh, North Carolina. In seven sessions over three days, papers and discussions focused on state-of-the-art systems for monitoring source emissions, a...

  18. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1982. HELD AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA, ON NOVEMBER 16-18, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1982, the fourth in this series, held in Pittsburgh on November 16-18, 1982. It provided a forum for the exchange of information on technological problems related to multi...

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL GROUND WATER QUALITY SYMPOSIUM (3RD) HELD IN LAS VEGAS, NEVADA ON SEPTEMBER 15-17, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Third National Ground Water Quality Symposium was held in Las Vegas, September 15-17, 1976, in conjunction with the annual convention of the National Water Well Association. There were eight main sessions encompassing twenty-four technical papers. These were concerned with th...

  20. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1983. HELD IN CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ON OCTOBER 18-20, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceeding document presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1983, the fifth in this series, held in Chicago on October 18-20, 1983. It provided a forum for the exchange of information on technological problems related to multimedia ...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: 1987 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY SOURCE COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL. HELD IN NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA ON MARCH 23-26, 1987

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two-volume proceedings document the 1987 Joint (EPA and EPRI) Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 23-26, 1987 in New Orleans, LA. The 49 presentations covered: low NOx combustion developments (e.g., reburning and burner design modifications); coal-, oil...

  2. NEW TEACHING AIDS FOR THE AMERICAN CLASSROOM, A SYMPOSIUM HELD AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, NOVEMBER 13-14, 1959.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCHRAMM, WILBUR; AND OTHERS

    A SYMPOSIUM ON THE STATE OF RESEARCH IN INSTRUCTIONAL TELEVISION AND TEACHING MACHINES WAS HELD NOVEMBER 13-14, 1959, AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED STUDY IN THE BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, STANFORD, CALIFORNIA. IT INVOLVED A SMALL GROUP OF SCHOLARS, INFORMED AND EXPERIENCED IN RESEARCH ON THE NEW MEDIA, WHO DISCUSSED CURRENT DEVELOPMENTS AND FUTURE RESEARCH…

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM ON ENVIRONMENTAL ASPECTS OF FUEL CONVERSION TECHNOLOGY - VI: A SYMPOSIUM ON COAL-BASED SYNFUELS HELD IN DENVER, COLORADO ON OCTOBER 26-30, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    The document summarizes or contains an abstract of each presentation made at the EPA-sponsored symposium, October 26-30, 1981, in Denver, CO. The symposium provided a forum for the exchange of ideas and for discussion of environmentally related information on coal gasification an...

  4. WATERBORNE TRANSMISSION OF GIARDIASIS: PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON SEPTEMBER 18-20, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Health Effects Research Laboratory and the Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a National Symposium on Waterborne Transmission of Giardiasis in Cincinnati on September 18-20, 1978. The symposium brought together sc...

  5. INNOVATIVE MEANS OF DEALING WITH POTENTIAL SOURCES OF GROUND WATER CONTAMINATION: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL GROUND WATER QUALITY SYMPOSIUM (7TH) HELD AT LAS VEGAS, NEVADA ON SEPTEMBER 26-28, 1984

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Seventh National Ground Water Quality Symposium was held in Las Vegas, Nevada, on September 26-28, 1984. The symposium was dedicated to the memory of Mahdi S. Hantush (1921-1984), a pioneering scientist who specialized in the application of mathematics to solve transient grou...

  6. PROCEEDINGS OF THE INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON MARINE POLLUTION RESEARCH HELD IN GULF BREEZE, FLORIDA ON JANUARY 27-29, 1976

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposium papers discuss how man's activities have affected natural resources of a coastal environment. Participants, representing international aspects of coastal pollution, reviewed current status of research and procedures planned to minimize offshore coastal damage. Subje...

  7. PROCEEDINGS OF NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FOOD PROCESSING WASTES (8TH) HELD ON MARCH 30 - APRIL 1, 1977 IN SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Proceedings contains copies of 29 of the 31 papers presented at the Eighth National Symposium on Food Processing Wastes. Subjects included: processing modifications, product and by-product recovery, wastewater treatment, water recycle and water reuse for several segments of t...

  8. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (8TH) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, NOVEMBER 1983. VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the eighth in a series of symposiums (the second cosponsored by EPA and the Electric Power Research Institute) on flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It provided a forum for the exchange of technical developments and regulatory information on FGD systems and ...

  9. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON FLUE GAS DESULFURIZATION (8TH) HELD AT NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA, NOVEMBER 1983. VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the eighth in a series of symposiums (the second cosponsored by EPA and the Electric Power Research Institute) on flue gas desulfurization (FGD). It provided a forum for the exchange of technical developments and regulatory information on FGD systems and ...

  10. Report on the 13th symposium on invertebrate neurobiology held 26-30 August 2015 at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for ecological research of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Tihany, Hungary.

    PubMed

    Crisford, Anna; Holden-Dye, Lindy; Walker, Robert J

    2016-06-01

    This report summarizes the lectures and posters presented at the International Society for Invertebrate Neurobiology's 13th symposium held 26-30 August 2015, at the Balaton Limnological Institute, MTA Centre for Ecological Research, Tihany, Hungary. The symposium provided an opportunity for scientists working on a range of topics in invertebrate neurobiology to meet and present their research and discuss ways to advance the discipline. PMID:27149972

  11. Histamine, histamine intoxication and intolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovacova-Hanuskova, E; Buday, T; Gavliakova, S; Plevkova, J

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of histamine in the body leads to miscellaneous symptoms mediated by its bond to corresponding receptors (H1-H4). Increased concentration of histamine in blood can occur in healthy individuals after ingestion of foods with high contents of histamine, leading to histamine intoxication. In individuals with histamine intolerance (HIT) ingestion of food with normal contents of histamine causes histamine-mediated symptoms. HIT is a pathological process, in which the enzymatic activity of histamine-degrading enzymes is decreased or inhibited and they are insufficient to inactivate histamine from food and to prevent its passage to blood-stream. Diagnosis of HIT is difficult. Multi-faced, non-specific clinical symptoms provoked by certain kinds of foods, beverages and drugs are often attributed to different diseases, such as allergy and food intolerance, mastocytosis, psychosomatic diseases, anorexia nervosa or adverse drug reactions. Correct diagnosis of HIT followed by therapy based on histamine-free diet and supplementation of diamine oxidase can improve patient's quality of life. PMID:26242570

  12. Slow-release carbohydrates: growing evidence on metabolic responses and public health interest. Summary of the symposium held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS 2015)

    PubMed Central

    Vinoy, Sophie; Laville, Martine; Feskens, Edith J M

    2016-01-01

    To draw attention to the necessity of considering differences in the digestibility of carbohydrates, and more specifically of starch, a symposium was held at the 12th European Nutrition Conference (FENS), which took place in Berlin from October 20 to 23, 2015. The purpose of this session was to present the consolidated knowledge and recent advances regarding the relationship between slow-release carbohydrates, metabolic responses, and public health issues. Three main topics were presented: 1) the definition of, sources of, and recognised interest in the glycaemic response to slowly digestible starch (SDS); 2) clinical evidence regarding the physiological effects of slow-release carbohydrates from cereal foods; and 3) interest in reducing the postprandial glycaemic response to help prevent metabolic diseases. Foods with the highest SDS content induce the lowest glycaemic responses, as the starch is protected from gelatinisation during processing. In humans, high-SDS food consumption induces slower glucose release, lower postprandial insulinaemia, and stimulation of gut hormones. Moreover, postprandial hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for type two diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Therefore, given the plausible aetiologic mechanisms, we argue that postprandial glucose levels are relevant for health and disease and represent a meaningful target for intervention, for example, through dietary factors. This symposium was organised by Mondelez International R&D. PMID:27388153

  13. Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies Held in Cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobler, Benjamin (Editor); Hariharan, P. C. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This document contains copies of those technical papers received in time for publication prior to the Sixth Goddard Conference on Mass Storage Systems and Technologies which is being held in cooperation with the Fifteenth IEEE Symposium on Mass Storage Systems at the University of Maryland-University College Inn and Conference Center March 23-26, 1998. As one of an ongoing series, this Conference continues to provide a forum for discussion of issues relevant to the management of large volumes of data. The Conference encourages all interested organizations to discuss long term mass storage requirements and experiences in fielding solutions. Emphasis is on current and future practical solutions addressing issues in data management, storage systems and media, data acquisition, long term retention of data, and data distribution. This year's discussion topics include architecture, tape optimization, new technology, performance, standards, site reports, vendor solutions. Tutorials will be available on shared file systems, file system backups, data mining, and the dynamics of obsolescence.

  14. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1980 HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA ON NOVEMBER 18-20, 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents presentations at the second EPA-sponsored symposium on iron and steel pollution abatement technology, in Philadelphia, PA, November 18-20, 1980. (The first was in Chicago, IL, in October 1979.) The symposium provided participants an opportunity to exchange in...

  15. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY FOR 1981 HELD AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ON OCTOBER 6-8, 1981

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents presentations at the Symposium on Iron and Steel Pollution Abatement Technology for 1981, Chicago, IL, October 6-8. The Symposium provided a forum for the exchange of information on technology problems related to air, water, and solid waste pollution abatemen...

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF SYMPOSIUM ON PROCESS MEASUREMENTS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT (2ND), HELD AT THE SHERATON-ATLANTA HOTEL IN ATLANTA, GEORGIA ON FEBRUARY 25-27, 1980

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents 22 presentations comprising 12 poster sessions at the symposium. The symposium focused on the state-of-the-art of sampling and analysis techniques that are appropriate for process measurements in the context of an environmental assessment program. Methods are...

  17. HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL ENGINE EMISSIONS: PROCEEDINGS OF AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON DECEMBER 3-5, 1979. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Proceedings are organized into eight main sections corresponding to the format of the Symposium and addressing Toxicological Effects of Inhaled Diesel Emissions, Mutagenic and Carcinogenic Potency of Extracts of Diesel and Related Environmental Emissions, Mutagenicity of Inha...

  18. Personalized Cancer Medicine 2011: Toward Individualized Cancer Treatments. XV International Fritz Bender Symposium Held on February 21 to 23, 2011 at Matrix, Biopolis, Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Zaenker, Kurt S; Mihich, Enrico; Liu, Edison

    2011-01-01

    At the symposium, approaches to individualized cancer medicine were considered, from basic sciences (genetics, epigenetics, biological tumor signatures) to clinical investigations, including strategies about how best to undertake the clinical development of targeted agents. PMID:21804914

  19. PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM ON ECONOMIC APPROACHES TO SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT HELD AT PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA ON SEPTEMBER 19 AND 20, 1978

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Symposium sponsored by the Municipal Environmental Research Laboratory (Cincinnati, Ohio) provided an opportunity for economists interested in solid waste problems to exchange ideas and views on the potential role of pricing in municipal solid waste management. This report co...

  20. PROCEEDINGS: FIRST NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM/WORKSHOP ON ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR TECHNOLOGY HELD AT CHAMPION, PENNSYLVANIA ON FEBRUARY 4-6, 1980. VOLUME II

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a compilation of 68 papers presented at the First National Symposium/Workshop on Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC) Technology sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (Champaign, IL) ...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: FIRST NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM/WORKSHOP ON ROTATING BIOLOGICAL CONTACTOR TECHNOLOGY HELD AT CHAMPION, PENNSYLVANIA ON FEBRUARY 4-6, 1980. VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is a compilation of 68 papers presented at the First National Symposium/Workshop on Rotating Biological Contactor (RBC) Technology sponsored by the University of Pittsburgh in cooperation with the US Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (Champaign, IL) ...

  2. HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL ENGINE EMISSIONS: PROCEEDINGS OF AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CINCINNATI, OHIO ON DECEMBER 3-5, 1979. VOLUME I

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this Symposium was to bring together scientists and engineers from the public and private sectors to discuss their research findings on the health effects of diesel engine emissions and to conclude with a discussion of health risk assessment of diesel exhaust. The ...

  3. Handling of Nuclear Information; Proceedings of the Symposium... Organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency, and Held in Vienna, 16-20 February 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    An international nuclear information system (INIS) which applies computer techniques to the management of the world's nuclear literature is about to come into operation. This prompted the International Atomic Energy Agency to hold a symposium to provide a comprehensive review of the facilities and services available in the world for providing…

  4. NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RECENT ADVANCES IN POLLUTANT MONITORING OF AMBIENT AIR AND STATIONARY SOURCES, HELD AT RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA MAY 4-7, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The second national symposium to explore recent developments that may improve the state-of-the-art for monitoring techniques was presented by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory (EMSL), May 4 through May 7, 1982, at the Mission Va...

  5. PROCEEDINGS: SYMPOSIUM ON IRON AND STEEL POLLUTION ABATEMENT TECHNOLOGY (1ST), HELD AT CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ON OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 1, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposium was organized into air, water, and solids sessions. Air pollution topics included: emission standards, assessment of coke quench tower and by-product recovery plant emissions, sealing of coke-oven doors, volatilization of hydrocarbons in steel rolling operations, de...

  6. AMERICAN-SOVIET SYMPOSIUM ON CHEMICAL POLLUTION OF THE MARINE ENVIRONMENT (1ST) HELD AT ODESSA, USSR ON MAY 24-28, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    This symposium, organized under a U.S.-U.S.S.R. Environmental Agreement (Project 02.06-21), focuses on the impact of chemical pollution on the world's oceans. Soviet and American specialists discuss the fate of heavy metals in estuaries and the Gulf of Mexico; transport of natura...

  7. METHODOLOGIES AND PROTOCOLS IN CLINICAL RESEARCH: EVALUATING ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS IN MAN - PROCEEDINGS OF A SYMPOSIUM HELD AT CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA OCTOBER 26-28, 1977

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is a proceedings of a symposium convened at Chapel Hill, North Carolina, October 26-28, 1977. Five major topics pertaining to the use of humans as experimental subjects are addressed in this volume: philosophy of clinical research, environmental and physical safety con...

  8. SYMPOSIUM ON THE TRANSFER AND UTILIZATION OF PARTICULATE CONTROL TECHNOLOGY (2ND) HELD AT DENVER, COLORADO ON JULY 23-29, 1979. VOLUME III. PARTICULATE CONTROL DEVICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the approximately 120 presentations at the EPA/IERL-RTP-sponsored symposium, attended by nearly 800 representatives of a wide variety of companies (including 17 utilities). The keynote speech for the 4-day meeting was by EPA's Frank Princiotta. The meetin...

  9. U.S./U.S.S.R. SYMPOSIUM ON PARTICULATE CONTROL (3RD) HELD AT SUZDAL, U.S.S.R. ON SEPTEMBER 10-12, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the Third U.S./U.S.S.R. Symposium on Particulate Control, September 10-12, 1979, in Suzdal, U.S.S.R. Papers covered such topics as: predicting back-corona formation and fly ash resistivity, improved electrostatic precipitator (ESP) mathematical modeling, ...

  10. SECOND US/USSR SYMPOSIUM: BIOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON MARINE ORGANISMS HELD AT TERSKOL, USSR ON JUNE 4-9, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Symposium was conducted under a US/USSR Environmental Agreement, Project 02.06-21 titled 'Effect of Pollutants on Marine Organisms. Papers by American and Soviet specialists present advances in hydrobiological analysis of basic structural components of marine ecosystems and ...

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF THE US/USSR SYMPOSIUM ON COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENT (1ST), HELD AT TBILISI, GEORGIA, ON MARCH 25-29, 1974

    EPA Science Inventory

    These proceedings include the 24 papers presented at the first 1974 Symposium. The papers were originally presented in English and Russian at Tbilisi, Georgia, USSR. Their publication herein is part of the protocol agreement signed on March 29, 1974, for simultaneous and independ...

  12. SECOND JOINT U.S./USSR SYMPOSIUM ON THE COMPREHENSIVE ANALYSIS OF THE ENVIRONMENT, HELD AT HONOLULU, HAWAII OCTOBER 21-26, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    This proceeding includes papers presented at the Second U.S./USSR Symposium on Comprehensive Analysis of the Environment. All the papers, except for one, were given in English or Russian at Honolulu, Hawaii, USA between October 23 and October 25, 1975. The paper by Gerasimov, Izr...

  13. Papers Presented at the ACM SIGCSE Technical Symposium on Academic Education in Computer Science [held in Houston, Texas, November 16, 1970].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Robert M., Ed.

    1970-01-01

    The papers given at this symposium were selected for their description of how specific problems were tackled, and with what success, as opposed to proposals unsupported by experience. The goal was to permit the audience to profit from the trials (and errors) of others. The eighteen papers presented are: "Business and the University Computer…

  14. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (9TH) HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MAY 2-4, 1983

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purposes of the Symposium were (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of ongoing and recently completed research projects dealing with land disposal, incineration, and treatment of hazardous wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with haza...

  15. LAND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (8TH), HELD AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY, ON MARCH 8-10, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the symposium was (1) to provide a forum for a state-of-the-art review and discussion of on-going and recently completed research projects dealing with the managment of solid and industrial wastes; (2) to bring together people concerned with municipal solid waste m...

  16. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON FOOD PROCESSING WASTES (6TH), HELD AT MADISON, WISCONSIN ON APRIL 9-11, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sixth National Symposium on Food Processing Wastes was co-sponsored with the National Canners Association and the Wisconsin Canners and Freezers Association. The primary purpose of these symposia is the dissemination of the latest research, development and demonstration infor...

  17. Multicultural and Multilingual Education in Immigrant Countries. Proceedings of an International Symposium Held at the Wenner-Gren Center, Stockholm, August 2 and 3, 1982. Wenner-Gren Symposium Series, Volume 38.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Husen, Torsten, Ed.; Opper, Susan, Ed.

    Papers in this collection were presented at a 1982 symposium convened to address the question, "What is the best way to provide school education for immigrant children?" The papers (and their authors) include (1) "The Social and Ideological Context of Multicultural Education in Immigrant Countries" (Ronald Taft); (2) "Multilingualism and…

  18. 32nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, S. W. (Compiler); Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    The proceedings of the 32nd Aerospace Mechanism Symposium are reported. NASA John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) hosted the symposium that was held at the Hilton Oceanfront Hotel in Cocoa Beach, Florida on May 13-15, 1998. The symposium was cosponsored by Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space and the Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium Committee. During these days, 28 papers were presented. Topics included robotics, deployment mechanisms, bearing, actuators, scanners, boom and antenna release, and test equipment.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING ISSUES - RESULTS OF WORKSHOPS HELD IN JULY 1992 AS PART OF EPA'S EIGHTH ANNUAL WASTE TESTING AND QUALITY ASSURANCE SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes the ideas and information developed in a series of workshops held in July, 1992 to address four environmental monitoring issues. he issues addressed were: Adoption of performance based methods Predicting the environmental impact of oily materials Characteri...

  20. Pacific Nations Broadcasting I; Symposium Held at the Annual Broadcast Industry Conference (22nd, San Francisco, April 19-22, 1972).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Draper, Benjamin, Ed.

    This document contains the papers presented at the Twenty-Second Annual Broadcast Industry Conference held at California State University, San Francisco, in 1972. The aim of the conference was to develop a better means of communication among nations existing in a world that has grown smaller because of the development of the communications media.…

  1. Update from the''Radiochemistry at RIA'' Symposium held March 27, 2003 at the 225th American Chemical Society Meeting in New Orleans, LA

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M A; Mantica, P F

    2003-05-27

    The scientific case for a new high-luminosity Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) Facility capable of accelerating essentially the entire chart of the nuclides has been established over more than a decade.[1-5] Preliminary experiments at new facilities [6] are promising as the frontier of RIB research continues to expand at a fast rate. Radiochemical experiments that could benefit many areas of research, from the basic science of astrophysics and heavy element research, to the applied science of Stockpile Stewardship and medical isotope production, are now for the first time being seriously discussed for a RIB facility. This paper attempts to highlight some areas of research which may be significantly enhanced should a premier radiochemical facility be co-located at a RIB accelerator facility such as the Rare Isotope Accelerator (RIA). The purpose of the symposium was to gather together experts in a variety of fields to discuss the harvesting of radionuclides and its potential benefits to research in the heavy element research, medical isotope production, Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP), environmental research, medical astrophysics and educational fields. Preliminary ideas as to the engineering features required for such a facility at RIA, to generate, handle, store and use isotopes of interest potentially containing very high levels of radioactivity, were discussed.

  2. Vascular Effects of Histamine.

    PubMed

    Ebeigbe, Anthony B; Talabi, Olufunke O

    2014-01-01

    Four subtypes of receptors (H1, H2, H3 and H4) mediate the actions of histamine. In the vascular wall, the effects of histamine are mediated via H1 and H2 receptors and the actions are modulated by H3 receptor subtype located on presynaptic neurones. Alterations in vascular responses to histamine are associated with experimental as well as a human form of hypertension, suggesting a role for histanine in cardiovascular regulation. PMID:26196559

  3. 1999 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on May 18-20, 1999. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to orbit-attitude prediction, determination, and control; attitude sensor calibration; attitude determination error analysis; attitude dynamics; and orbit decay and maneuver strategy. Government, industry, and the academic community participated in the preparation and presentation of these papers.

  4. ACS Symposium Support

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth D. Jordan

    2010-02-20

    The funds from this DOE grant were used to help cover the travel costs of five students and postdoctoral fellows who attended a symposium on 'Hydration: From Clusters to Aqueous Solutions' held at the Fall 2007 American Chemical Society Meeting in Boston, MA, August 19-23. The Symposium was sponsored by the Physical Chemistry Division, ACS. The technical program for the meeting is available at http://phys-acs.org/fall2007.html.

  5. Histamine and the striatum.

    PubMed

    Bolam, J Paul; Ellender, Tommas J

    2016-07-01

    The neuromodulator histamine is released throughout the brain during periods of wakefulness. Combined with an abundant expression of histamine receptors, this suggests potential widespread histaminergic control of neural circuit activity. However, the effect of histamine on many of these circuits is unknown. In this review we will discuss recent evidence for histaminergic modulation of the basal ganglia circuitry, and specifically its main input nucleus; the striatum. Furthermore, we will discuss recent findings of histaminergic dysfunction in several basal ganglia disorders, including in Parkinson's disease and most prominently, in Tourette's syndrome, which has led to a resurgence of interest in this neuromodulator. Combined, these recent observations not only suggest a central role for histamine in modulating basal ganglia activity and behaviour, but also as a possible target in treating basal ganglia disorders. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26275849

  6. Symposium Promotes Technological Literacy through STEM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Havice, Bill; Marshall, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    This article describes a symposium which promotes technological literacy through science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). The three-day symposium titled, "The Anderson, Oconee, Pickens Symposium on Teaching and Learning STEM Standards for the 21st Century," was held August 4-6, 2008 at the Tri-County Technical College (TCTC)…

  7. 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Editor)

    2012-01-01

    The proceedings of the 41st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held in Pasadena Hilton, Pasadena, California on May 16-18, 2012. Lockheed Martin Space Systems cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include gimbals and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and Mars Science Laboratory mechanisms.

  8. 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Doty, Laura W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The proceedings of the 35th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Ames Research Center hosted the conference, which was held at the Four Points Sheraton, Sunnyvale, California, on May 9-11, 2001. The symposium was sponsored by the Mechanisms Education Association. Technology areas covered included bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; and other mechanisms for spacecraft and large space structures.

  9. 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler); Litty, Edward C. (Compiler); Sevilla, Donald R. (Compiler)

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the 33rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. JPL hosted the conference, which was held at the Pasadena Conference and Exhibition Center, Pasadena, California, on May 19-21, 1999. Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space cosponsored the symposium. Technology areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  10. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2003 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, HELD AT THE 2003 NEW ENGLAND FUEL INSTITUTE CONVENTION AND 30TH NORTH AMERICAN HEATING AND ENERGY EXPOSITION, HYNES CONVENTION CENTER, PRUDENTIAL CENTER, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS, JUNE 9 - 10, 2003.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2003-06-09

    This meeting is the sixteenth oilheat industry technology meeting held since 1984 and the third since the National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA) was formed. This year's symposium is a very important part of the effort in technology transfer, which is supported by the Oilheat Research Fuel Flexibility Program under the United States Department of Energy, Distributed Energy and Electricity Reliability Program (DEER). The foremost reason for the conference is to provide a platform for the exchange of information and perspectives among international researchers, engineers, manufacturers, service technicians, and marketers of oil-fired space-conditioning equipment. The conference provides a conduit by which information and ideas can be exchanged to examine present technologies, as well as helping to develop the future course for oil heating advancement. These conferences also serve as a stage for unifying government representatives, researchers, fuel oil marketers, and other members of the oil-heat industry in addressing technology advancements in this important energy use sector. The specific objectives of the conference are to: (1) Identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost effectively, reliably, and safely; (2) Foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  11. Histamine modulates microglia function

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Histamine is commonly acknowledged as an inflammatory mediator in peripheral tissues, leaving its role in brain immune responses scarcely studied. Therefore, our aim was to uncover the cellular and molecular mechanisms elicited by this molecule and its receptors in microglia-induced inflammation by evaluating cell migration and inflammatory mediator release. Methods Firstly, we detected the expression of all known histamine receptor subtypes (H1R, H2R, H3R and H4R), using a murine microglial cell line and primary microglia cell cultures from rat cortex, by real-time PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Then, we evaluated the role of histamine in microglial cell motility by performing scratch wound assays. Results were further confirmed using murine cortex explants. Finally, interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels were evaluated by ELISA measurements to determine the role of histamine on the release of these inflammatory mediators. Results After 12 h of treatment, 100 μM histamine and 10 μg/ml histamine-loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) microparticles significantly stimulated microglia motility via H4R activation. In addition, migration involves α5β1 integrins, and p38 and Akt signaling pathways. Migration of microglial cells was also enhanced in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 100 ng/ml), used as a positive control. Importantly, histamine inhibited LPS-stimulated migration via H4R activation. Histamine or H4R agonist also inhibited LPS-induced IL-1β release in both N9 microglia cell line and hippocampal organotypic slice cultures. Conclusions To our knowledge, we are the first to show a dual role of histamine in the modulation of microglial inflammatory responses. Altogether, our data suggest that histamine per se triggers microglia motility, whereas histamine impedes LPS-induced microglia migration and IL-1β release. This last datum assigns a new putative anti-inflammatory role for

  12. ASSA Symposium 2012 Abstracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-10-01

    of papers presented at the ASSA Symposium held in Cape Town 12-14 October 2012. Videos are available on You tube. See http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL8odLrzpzMkHS-cSEfPFIr3YLPAq4d5MU for a playlist.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON THE RECOVERY OF INDICATOR ORGANISMS EMPLOYING MEMBRANE FILTERS HELD AT THE MEETING OF THE AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TESTING AND MATERIALS, COMMITTEE D-19 ON WATER, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLORIDA ON JANUARY 20-21, 1975

    EPA Science Inventory

    The symposium brought together users, manufacturers, research scientists and representatives of government agencies to exchange technical information and review the performance of membrane filters for water and wastewater analyses. Problems with the recovery of bacterial indicato...

  14. 2001 Flight Mechanics Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lynch, John P. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    This conference publication includes papers and abstracts presented at the Flight Mechanics Symposium held on June 19-21, 2001. Sponsored by the Guidance, Navigation and Control Center of Goddard Space Flight Center, this symposium featured technical papers on a wide range of issues related to attitude/orbit determination, prediction and control; attitude simulation; attitude sensor calibration; theoretical foundation of attitude computation; dynamics model improvements; autonomous navigation; constellation design and formation flying; estimation theory and computational techniques; Earth environment mission analysis and design; and, spacecraft re-entry mission design and operations.

  15. Histamine receptors and cancer pharmacology

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Vanina A; Rivera, Elena S

    2010-01-01

    Considerable evidence has been collected indicating that histamine can modulate proliferation of different normal and malignant cells. High histamine biosynthesis and content together with histamine receptors have been reported in different human neoplasias including melanoma, colon and breast cancer, as well as in experimental tumours in which histamine has been postulated to behave as an important paracrine and autocrine regulator of proliferation. The discovery of the human histamine H4 receptor in different tissues has contributed to our understanding of histamine role in numerous physiological and pathological conditions revealing novel functions for histamine and opening new perspectives in histamine pharmacology research. In the present review we aimed to briefly summarize current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor involvement in cancer before focusing on some recent evidence supporting the novel role of histamine H4 receptor in cancer progression representing a promising molecular target and avenue for cancer drug development. LINKED ARTICLES BJP has previously published a Histamine themed issue (2009). To view this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2009.157.issue-1 PMID:20636392

  16. 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Obie H., Jr. (Compiler); Rogers, John F. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The proceedings of the 30th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. NASA Langley Research Center hosted the proceedings held at the Radisson Hotel in Hampton, Virginia on May 15-17, 1996, and Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Company, Inc. co-sponsored the symposium. Technological areas covered include bearings and tribology; pointing, solar array, and deployment mechanisms; orbiter/space station; and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  17. PROCEEDINGS OF THE SYMPOSIUM ON THE DEVELOPMENT AND USAGE OF PERSONAL MONITORS FOR EXPOSURE AND HEALTH EFFECT STUDIES HELD AT CHAPEL HILL, NORTH CAROLINA ON JANUARY 22-24, 1979

    EPA Science Inventory

    The work reported herein represents the content of a Symposium to present the state-of-the-art in personal monitor developments for measurement of pollution exposures and physiological responses to pollution exposures. This report contains edited transcripts of the discussion fol...

  18. SUPPORT FOR STUDENTS AND YOUNG SCIENTISTS TO PARTICIPATE IN THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY SYMPOSIUM ENTITLED LANHTANIDES AND ACTINIDES: A CHEMISTS'S PERSPECTIVE MARCH 21-25, 2010 HELD IN SAN FRANCISCO, CA

    SciTech Connect

    CATHY S. CUTLER

    2011-02-01

    DOE Award DE-SC0003653 of $6,000.00 was used to support early career scientist to attend the Lanthanide and Actinide Symposium at the ACS meeting in March in San Francisco 2010. The award was for $6,000.00 and was used to support 12 early career scientists at $500.00/each.

  19. The 1988 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium was held to provide a formal opportunity for GAS experimenters to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that have been flown on shuttle missions and on GAS payloads that will be flown in the future. Experiment design and payload integration issues are also examined.

  20. The 21st Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    During the symposium technical topics addressed included deployable structures, electromagnetic devices, tribology, actuators, latching devices, positioning mechanisms, robotic manipulators, and automated mechanisms synthesis. A summary of the 20th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium panel discussions is included as an appendix. However, panel discussions on robotics for space and large space structures which were held are not presented herein.

  1. Does Oenococcus oeni produce histamine?

    PubMed

    Garcia-Moruno, Emilia; Muñoz, Rosario

    2012-07-01

    The presence of histamine in wine and other fermented foods may pose a toxicological risk for consumers. Production of histamine by Oenococcus oeni, which is the main agent of malolactic fermentation in wine and thus very important for the wine industry, has been extensively analyzed with contradictory results. If histamine production by O. oeni strains is a widespread trait, enological practices will be affected and the use of non-producing commercial O. oeni starters should be strongly recommended to avoid histamine production during winemaking. However, a review of published data showed that most evidence strongly supports the view that O. oeni is not responsible for histamine production in wine. We therefore propose the adoption of common analytical methods and the introduction of publicly-available validated histamine-producing O. oeni reference strains as a common positive control in assays to resolve this important issue. PMID:22652194

  2. Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The third Progress In Electromagnetics Research Symposium (PIERS) was held 12-16 Jul. 1993, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California. More than 800 presentations were made, and those abstracts are included in this publication.

  3. Histamine pharmacology: four years on

    PubMed Central

    Chazot, Paul L

    2013-01-01

    The histamine field has moved on rapidly in the last four years, with expansion in roles and clinical development, particularly in the newest two of four histamine receptors. This themed volume is a testament to this expansion with 16 original and review articles spanning a wide spectrum of histamine-related topics, with therapeutic translational relevance to addiction, dementias, anxiety disorders, cancers, vestibular disorders, migraine and autoimmune disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23944741

  4. Histamine and histamine receptor regulation of gastrointestinal cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Lindsey; Hodges, Kyle; Meng, Fanyin; Alpini, Gianfranco; Francis, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a neurotransmitter released throughout the body that regulates multiple physiological responses. Primarily histamine is acknowledged for its role in inflammatory reactions to foreign pathogens that enter the body. Aside from inflammatory responses, histamine expression and synthesis has been detected in various cancer cell lines and multiple malignancies. Through experimentation histamine has demonstrated its ability to manage proliferation and angiogenesis in these cancerous cells, in either a positive or inhibitory manner. Regulation of angiogenesis and proliferation have been proven to be carried out by the stimulation or inhibition of numerous pathways and secondary response elements, such as VEGFA/C, IP3/Ca2+, G-proteins, cAMP, and many more. The activation of these different response pathways is linked to the binding of ligands to the histamine receptors H1-H4HR. These receptors exhibit various effects dependent on whether it binds an agonist, antagonist, or its specific ligand, histamine. In cancer cell lines and different tumor cells the binding of these different compounds has shown to be one of the main components in exerting proliferative or antiproliferative changes in the microenvironment. It is also known that the histamine receptors have varying degrees of expression in different forms of cancer, and this expression can impact the tumor in various ways. This clearly indicates the significance of histamine receptors in cancer formation, and one of the aims of this review is to cover this topic concisely and in depth. Histamine is produced from numerous cells such as basophils and mast cells and is synthesized from the enzyme histidine decarboxylase (HDC). In this review we will prominently discuss the function of mast cells and HDC in histamine expression in various gastrointestinal carcinomas. We also briefly discuss current studies to support these claims. In this review we hope to give the reader a clear and comprehensible overview of

  5. Proceedings of the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    This publication contains summaries of the papers presented at the Third Spaceborne Imaging Radar Symposium held at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, in Pasadena, California, on 18-21 Jan. 1993. The purpose of the symposium was to present an overview of recent developments in the different scientific and technological fields related to spaceborne imaging radars and to present future international plans. This symposium is the third in a series of 'Spaceborne Imaging Radar' symposia held at JPL. The first symposium was held in Jan. 1983 and the second in 1986.

  6. Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Fluid Management Symposium, held at the NASA Lewis Research Center, September 9 to 10, 1986, focused on future research in the microgravity fluid management field. The symposium allowed researchers and managers to review space applications that require fluid management technology, to present the current status of technology development, and to identify the technology developments required for future missions. The 19 papers covered three major categories: (1) fluid storage, acquisition, and transfer; (2) fluid management applications, i.e., space power and thermal management systems, and environmental control and life support systems; (3) project activities and insights including two descriptions of previous flight experiments and a summary of typical activities required during development of a shuttle flight experiment.

  7. A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachal, John R.

    2003-01-01

    Uses the framework of a symposium to present an imagined discussion by historical figures about whether and how knowledge might be acquired. Discussants include Democritus, Protagoras, Heraclitus, Socrates, Jesus, Gorgias, Nietzsche, Buddha, and Kierkegaard. (Contains 40 endnotes.) (SK)

  8. [The histamine-free diet].

    PubMed

    Wantke, F; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    1993-08-01

    Food intolerance is not IgE-mediated but caused by histamine. A diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diaminoxidase is suspected to be the reason. The therapeutic efficacy of a histamine-free diet was evaluated in 100 patients with food intolerance and allergic diseases, who were required to avoid fish, cheese, hardcured sausage, pickled cabbage, wine and beer for 4 weeks. Considerable improvement was observed in 57 patients, 15 of whom had total remission. The most striking treatment results were obtained in food or wine intolerance (80% P < 0.05; treatment of choice), bronchial asthma (80%), headache (64%) and urticaria (58%). After ingestion of food rich in histamine clearcut recurrence of atopic eczema was seen in 50% of the patients affected. Histamine plays a major part in food and wine intolerance. Histamine in food causes worsening of symptoms in atopics and patients suffering from headache. The results obtained indicate a deficiency of diaminoxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. Histamine levels in alcoholic beverages should be displayed on the labels. PMID:8376104

  9. Eighth particulate control symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-11-01

    The Eighth Symposium on the Transfer and Utilization of Particulate Control Technology was held in San Diego, California, March 20 through 23, 1990. The symposium proceedings contain 80 papers presented by representatives of utility companies, equipment and process suppliers, university representatives, research and development companies, EPA and other federal and state agency representatives, and EPRI staff members. Electrostatic precipitators and fabric filters were the major topics discussed during the symposium. Papers from this conference are organized by session in two volumes. This Volume (2) contains papers presented in the sessions on: low ratio baghouse O M experience, pulse-jet baghouse experience, particulate control for AFBCs, particulate control for dry SO2 control processes, baghouse design and performance, fundamental baghouse studies, high temperature filtration, and control of emissions from RDF incinerators. Both fabric filters and ESPs are discussed in the AFBC and dry SO2 control papers. The high temperature filtration papers deal with ceramic barrier and granular bed filters. The rest of the papers in Volume 2 are concerned with fabric filters on pulverized-coal-fired boilers. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  10. The histamine content of oriental foods.

    PubMed

    Chin, K W; Garriga, M M; Metcalfe, D D

    1989-05-01

    Several of the symptoms of scombroid poisoning (i.e. histamine toxicity) resemble those observed in people suffering from Chinese restaurant syndrome. Therefore, the histamine content of representative Chinese cuisine, which included 31 common dishes, 12 condiments and 12 basic ingredients from several sources, was measured using a sensitive and specific radioenzymatic assay. A further enzymatic procedure involving diamine oxidase was used to verify that the substance measured was histamine. A total of 184 assays were performed on 57 samples in the study. High levels of histamine were found in the cheeses, which were used as positive controls (863.6 micrograms histamine/g blue cheese and 107.4 micrograms histamine/g Parmesan cheese), and in some common condiments, including tamari (2392.2 micrograms histamine/g sample) and one brand of soy sauce (220.4 micrograms histamine/g sample). The histamine content of four condiments and three common dishes was over 10 micrograms histamine/g sample, while four condiments and 16 common dishes contained less than 1 microgram histamine/g sample. Calculations involving representative amounts of food that can be consumed at a typical oriental meal suggest that, in some cases, histamine intake may approach toxic levels. The results are discussed with regard to the possible role of histamine in reactions associated with restaurant meals. PMID:2744659

  11. International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lingle, Craig S.

    1990-01-01

    Cryospheric Sciences Program "International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow" (PI, C. Lingle) provided partial support for publication of Annals of Glaciology 36 by the International Glaciological Society. Annals of Glaciology is a peer-reviewed journal. Annals 36, which was published in 2003, contains 39 peer-reviewed and edited papers from the International Symposium on Fast Glacier Flow, which was held in Yakutat, Alaska, 10-14 June 2002.

  12. Symposium Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Richard G.

    2016-02-01

    The Stern-Gerlach experiment and the origin of electron spin are described in historical context. SPIN 2014 occurs on the fortieth anniversary of the first International High Energy Spin Physics Symposium at Argonne in 1974. A brief history of the international spin conference series is presented.

  13. Symposium: Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anson, Chris M.; Perelman, Les; Poe, Mya; Sommers, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article presents four symposium papers on assessment. It includes: (1) "Closed Systems and Standardized Writing Tests" (Chris M. Anson); (2) "Information Illiteracy and Mass Market Writing Assessments" (Les Perelman); (3) "Genre, Testing, and the Constructed Realities of Student Achievement" (Mya Poe); and (4) "The Call of Research: A…

  14. Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcus, Harris L.; Beeman, Joseph J.; Barlow, Joel W.; Bourell, David L.; Crawford, Richard H.

    1993-09-01

    This Proceedings of the Fourth Solid Freeform Fabrication Symposium, held at The University of Texas in Austin on August 9-11, 1993, reaffirms the dynamic nature of the research area. The interest shown by researchers over the wide range of disciplines and subdisciplines that make up solid freeform fabrication (SFF) highlight this technical symposium. The speakers addressed problems in computer software, in machine design, materials synthesis and processing, and SFF in integrated manufacturing. The exponential growth in the research, application, and development of SFF approaches was readily apparent from the attendees from industrial users, SFF machine manufacturers, universities, and government. This symposium is the first where real progress toward structurally sound samples and parts was demonstrated as SFF moves from 'feelie' to 'nonstructural' to 'structural' real parts over a range of materials. This advancement in the state-of-the-art of SFF will continue to drive the exponential growth of the area. The excitement amongst the symposium participants will continue to serve as the catalyst for the continued growth and the availability of solid freeform fabrication. The symposium organizers look forward to its being a continued source of technical exchange among the growing body of researchers involved in SFF.

  15. The 1975 Ride Quality Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A compilation is presented of papers reported at the 1975 Ride Quality Symposium held in Williamsburg, Virginia, August 11-12, 1975. The symposium, jointly sponsored by NASA and the United States Department of Transportation, was held to provide a forum for determining the current state of the art relative to the technology base of ride quality information applicable to current and proposed transportation systems. Emphasis focused on passenger reactions to ride environment and on implications of these reactions to the design and operation of air, land, and water transportation systems acceptable to the traveling public. Papers are grouped in the following five categories: needs and uses for ride quality technology, vehicle environments and dynamics, investigative approaches and testing procedures, experimental ride quality studies, and ride quality modeling and criteria.

  16. Developmental roles of brain histamine.

    PubMed

    Panula, Pertti; Sundvik, Maria; Karlstedt, Kaj

    2014-03-01

    Histamine appears early during brain development, has been shown to regulate fetal and adult brain-derived stem cells in a receptor type-dependent manner, and has widespread actions on systems involved in arousal and movement. Developmental studies in both rodents and zebrafish have elucidated the spatiotemporal patterning of the histaminergic system and, in zebrafish, have revealed the mechanisms whereby histamine regulates the number of hypocretin/orexin (hcrt) neurons, which in turn may regulate the number of histaminergic cells. Recent demonstrations of increased numbers of histaminergic neurons in patients with narcolepsy highlight the importance, for our understanding of both normal and pathological brain function, of understanding these interactions. Here, we review recent research into the developmental roles of histamine and suggest key areas for future research. PMID:24486025

  17. Phased arrays 1985 symposium: Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steyskal, H. P.

    1985-08-01

    The Phased Arrays '85 Symposium, sponsored by the Rome Air Development Center, the MITRE Corporation, and the University of Massachusetts, was held at the MITRE Corporation 15 to 18 October and reviewed the state-of-the-art of phased array antenna systems and of the technology for next generation systems. This report contains the full papers which were presented with clearance for unlimited distribution.

  18. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOX Control was held March 25-28,1991 in Washington, DC. The sixth meeting in a biennial series, the Symposium was cosponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Approxima...

  19. CPTAC Scientific Symposium Highlights - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    The first CPTAC Public Scientific Symposium was recently held on November 13, 2013 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, MD. The symposium brought together a record number of registrants, 450 scientists, who shared and discussed novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data.

  20. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium. Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium on “Factors controlling puberty in beef heifers” was held at the joint annual meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA, July 10 to 14, 2011. The objective of the symposium w...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1992 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS AND MITIGATION RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report documents the 1992 Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Mitigation Research Symposium held in Washington, DC, August 18-20, 1992. The symposium provided a forum for exchange of technical information on global change emissions and potential mitigation technologies. The primary ...

  2. Symposium on the Definition of Death: Summary Statement.

    PubMed

    Moschella, Melissa; Condic, Maureen L

    2016-06-01

    This statement summarizes the conclusions of the Symposium on the Definition of Death, held at The Catholic University of America in June 2014. After providing the background and context for contemporary debates about brain death and describing the aims of the symposium, the statement notes points of unanimous and broad agreement among the participants, and highlights areas for further study. PMID:27102243

  3. 76 FR 17137 - Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium AGENCY... announcing the following meeting: Pregnancy and Prescription Medication Use Symposium. The topic to be discussed is ``Prescription Drug Use in Pregnancy.'' Date and Time: The meeting will be held on May 17,...

  4. The 58th Shock and Vibration Symposium, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilkey, Walter D. (Compiler); Pilkey, Barbara F. (Compiler)

    1987-01-01

    The proceedings of the 58th Shock and Vibration Symposium, held in Huntsville, Alabama, October 13 to 15, 1987 are given. Mechanical shock, dynamic analysis, space shuttle main engine vibration, isolation and damping, and analytical methods are discussed.

  5. Histamine receptor signaling in energy homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2016-07-01

    Histamine modulates several aspects of energy homeostasis. By activating histamine receptors in the hypothalamus the bioamine influences thermoregulation, its circadian rhythm, energy expenditure and feeding. These actions are brought about by activation of different histamine receptors and/or the recruitment of distinct neural pathways. In this review we describe the signaling mechanisms activated by histamine in the hypothalamus, the evidence for its role in modulating energy homeostasis as well as recent advances in the understanding of the cellular and neural network mechanisms involved. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107117

  6. Histamine and antihistamines in anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Winbery, Stephen L; Lieberman, Philip L

    2002-01-01

    Anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions are potentially fatal. These disorders are sometimes iatrogenic, and increase with increased exposure to drugs, synthetic substances, and medical procedures. Non-IgE-mediated anaphylactoid reactions are common in medical settings and are clinically indistinguishable from anaphylaxis. These reactions may be unrecognized if a rigid classic definition of anaphylaxis is used. Histamine is a primary mediator of anaphylaxis and signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis can be reproduced by histamine infusion. Histamine triggers a cascade of inflammatory mediators and modulates its own release. H1-antihistamines are adjunctive treatment therapy for acute anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, in which many mediators of inflammation are involved. Compared with epinephrine, the first-response medication of choice, antihistamines have a slow onset of action, and they cannot block events that occur subsequent to histamine binding to its receptors. Antihistamines are an important component of regimens for the prevention of anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions in patients at risk, and may eventually have more widespread application in the perioperative setting. In some instances, such as with exercise-induced anaphylaxis and reactions to latex in sensitized individuals, prophylaxis regimens are not always effective. H2-antagonists are not detrimental in the therapy of anaphylaxis and many studies show a favorable outcome when combining H1- and H2-antagonist therapy for prophylaxis. They should be added to therapy at the discretion of the treating physician. Because of decreased antimuscarinic and central nervous system side effects, the newer antihistamines can be given in high doses, allowing more complete blockade of histamine receptors. These agents should lead to a reevaluation of the usefulness of antihistamines in both the treatment of acute anaphylaxis and in prophylactic regimens. The unavailability of parenterally administered

  7. 43rd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Sponsored and organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, responsibility for hosting the AMS is shared by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC). Now in its 43rd symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 43rd AMS was held in Santa Clara, California on May 4, 5 and 6, 2016. During these three days, 42 papers were presented. Topics included payload and positioning mechanisms, components such as hinges and motors, CubeSats, tribology, and mechanism testing. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components. The high quality of this symposium is a result of the work of many people, and their efforts are gratefully acknowledged. This extends to the voluntary members of the symposium organizing committee representing the eight NASA field centers, LMSSC, and the European Space Agency. Appreciation is also extended to the session chairs, the authors, and particularly the personnel at ARC responsible for the symposium arrangements and the publication of these proceedings. A sincere thank you also goes to the symposium executive committee who is responsible for the year-to-year management of the AMS, including paper processing and preparation of the program. The use of trade names of manufacturers in this publication does not constitute an official endorsement of such products or manufacturers, either expressed or implied, by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. An Introduction to the Third International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCowan, Colin

    2006-01-01

    This article presents the highlights of the Third International Symposium on Career Development and Public Policy, which was held at the Manly Pacific Hotel in Sydney, Australia from April 21-24, 2006. This symposium built on those held in Ottawa and Vancouver in 1999 and 2001 respectively and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and…

  9. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  10. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehdi, Imran (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The Twelfth International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology was held February 14-16, 2001 in San Diego, California, USA. This symposium was jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. The symposium featured sixty nine presentations covering a wide variety of technical topics relevant to Terahertz Technology. The presentations can be divided into five broad technology areas: Hot Electron Bolometers, superconductor insulator superconductor (SIS) technology, local oscillator (LO) technology, Antennas and Measurements, and Direct Detectors. The symposium provides scientists, engineers, and researchers working in the terahertz technology and science fields to engineers their work and exchange ideas with colleagues.

  11. Symposium on unsaturated flow and transport modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, E.M.; Gee, G.W.; Nelson, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    This document records the proceedings of a symposium on flow and transport processes in partially saturated groundwater systems, conducted at the Battelle Seattle Research Center on March 22-24, 1982. The symposium was sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the purpose of assessing the state-of-the-art of flow and transport modeling for use in licensing low-level nuclear waste repositories in partially saturated zones. The first day of the symposium centered around research in flow through partially saturated systems. Papers were presented with the opportunity for questions following each presentation. In addition, after all the talks, a formal panel discussion was held during which written questions were addressed to the panel of the days speakers. The second day of the Symposium was devoted to solute and contaminant transport in partially saturated media in an identical format. Individual papers are abstracted.

  12. Endothelial and smooth muscle histamine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, R.S.; Hollis, T.M.

    1986-03-01

    Histamine is produced within the vascular wall and mediates a variety of normal and pathologic vascular responses. The interaction of histamine with its vascular cell receptors has been shown to affect factors such as actin cable formation, cyclase activities, prostacyclin synthesis, cell motility, and proliferation. In addition, abundant evidence exists to implicate an arterial nascent histamine pool in the control of vessel wall permeability under conditions of stress and injury. However, endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors have been only incompletely characterized. The authors report here the time-dependent, saturable, and trypsin sensitive binding of /sup 3/H-histamine to the endothelial cell surface. The K/sub d/ for endothelial and smooth muscle cell histamine receptors are 0.70 and 2.80 ..mu..M respectively. Histamine binding to smooth muscle cells also exhibited saturation with concentrations of /sup 3/H-histamine up to 4 ..mu..M. While the smooth muscle cell H/sub 1/ receptor binding was negligible, the H/sub 2/ receptor appeared to represent a relatively low affinity, high capacity site for histamine binding. The uptake of /sup 3/H-histamine in both cell types displayed kinetics consistent with that of fluid-phase pinocytosis.

  13. Effects of multivalent histamine supported on gold nanoparticles: activation of histamine receptors by derivatized histamine at subnanomolar concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gasiorek, Friederike; Pouokam, Ervice; Diener, Martin; Schlecht, Sabine; Wickleder, Mathias S

    2015-10-21

    Colloidal gold nanoparticles with a functionalized ligand shell were synthesized and used as new histamine receptor agonists. Mercaptoundecanoic acid moieties were attached to the surface of the nanoparticles and derivatized with native histamine. The multivalent presentation of the immobilized ligands carried by the gold nanoparticles resulted in extremely low activation concentrations for histamine receptors on rat colonic epithelium. As a functional read-out system, chloride secretion resulting from stimulation of neuronal and epithelial histamine H1 and H2 receptors was measured in Ussing chamber experiments. These responses were strictly attributed to the histamine entities as histamine-free particles Au-MUDOLS or the monovalent ligand AcS-MUDA-HA proved to be ineffective. The vitality of the tissues used was not impaired by the nanoparticles. PMID:26289108

  14. Symposium on New Materials for Nonlinear Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marder, Seth R.

    1991-01-01

    The New Materials for Nonlinear Optics Symposium was held at the American Chemical Society National Meeting, in Boston on April 22 to 26, 1990. The meeting was a success. Throughout the week the average attendance was over 150 people/session. Several speakers had attendance over 300. The ACS organized a press conference about the meeting, held on Wednesday April 25, 1990 at 2 pm. At the time, the organizers devoted considerable time to educating the press about the importance of NLO research and the potential impact the NLO devices will have on the average person. The American Chemical Society is publishing an ACS Symposium Series monograph edited by the symposium organizers, to provide a permanent record of the proceeding of this meeting.

  15. Symposium: A Beginning in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Peter; Fry, Paul H.; Carnochan, W. B.; Culler, Jonathan; Lerer, Seth; Marshall, Donald G.; Johnson, Barbara; Steiner, Wendy; Haack, Susan; Nussbaum, Martha C.

    2002-01-01

    2001 marked Yale's 300th birthday. It seemed an opportunity for reflection on the evolution of the institution, and particularly on the vicissitudes of the humanities over those three centuries. This article presents essays which represent a selection from the symposium, "Beginning With the Humanities," held at the Whitney Humanities Center on…

  16. Women on Campus: 1970; A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. Center for Continuing Education for Women.

    The symposium: Women on Campus, 1970, held at Michigan University on October 14, 1970, centered on 3 major topics: "Toward a New Psychology of Women"; "The Case of the Woman Graduate Student"; and "The University and Women." The papers that were presented concerning the first topic included: "Internal Barriers to Achievement in Women--An…

  17. The 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The proceedings of the 29th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by NASA Johnson Space Center and held at the South Shore Harbour Conference Facility on May 17-19, 1995, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  18. The 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rohn, Douglas A. (Compiler)

    1994-01-01

    The proceedings of the 28th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was hosted by the NASA Lewis Research Center and held at the Cleveland Marriott Society Center on May 18, 19, and 20, 1994, are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, pointing mechanisms joints, bearings, release devices, booms, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for spacecraft.

  19. The 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The proceedings of the 26th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at the Goddard Space Flight Center on May 13, 14, and 15, 1992 are reported. Technological areas covered include actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  20. PROCEEDINGS OF "THE LEAD REMEDIATION EFFECTIVENESS SYMPOSIUM"

    EPA Science Inventory

    A Symposium on Lead Remediation Effectiveness, sponsored by the US Environmental Protection Agency, was held at Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, USA from 22-25 May, 2000. International participants from various levels of government, educational institutions, industry, and community represen...

  1. The 22nd Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the symposium, which was held at the NASA Langley Research Center, on May 4 to 6, 1988, are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for space station docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  2. Intergas `95: International unconventional gas symposium. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1995-07-01

    The International Unconventional Gas Symposium was held on May 14--20, 1995 in Tuscaloosa, Alabama where 52 reports were presented. These reports are grouped in this proceedings under: geology and resources; mine degasification and safety; international developments; reservoir characterization/coal science; and environmental/legal and regulatory. Each report has been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Aircraft Piston Engine Exhaust Emission Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A 2-day symposium on the reduction of exhaust emissions from aircraft piston engines was held on September 14 and 15, 1976, at the Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Papers were presented by both government organizations and the general aviation industry on the status of government contracts, emission measurement problems, data reduction procedures, flight testing, and emission reduction techniques.

  4. The 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mancini, Ron (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The proceedings of the 27th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium, which was held at ARC, Moffett Field, California, on 12-14 May 1993, are reported. Technological areas covered include the following: actuators, aerospace mechanism applications for ground support equipment, lubricants, latches, connectors, robotic mechanisms, and other mechanisms for large space structures.

  5. The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Second International Symposium on Plant Cryopreservation was held in Fort Collins, Colorado, USA, from August 11-14, 2013, under the auspices of the International Society for Horticultural Science. The town of Fort Collins is home to the USDA-ARS, National Center for Genetic Resources Preservati...

  6. The ninth international veterinary immunology symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This Introduction to the special issue of Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology summarizes the Proceedings of the 9th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (9th IVIS) held August, 2010, in Tokyo, Japan. Over 340 delegates from 30 countries discussed research progress analyzing the immune...

  7. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  8. Histamine in neurotransmission and brain diseases.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Panula, Pertti

    2010-01-01

    Apart from its central role in the mediation of allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion and inflammation in the periphery, histamine serves an important function as a neurotransitter in the central nervous system. The histaminergic neurons originate from the tuberomamillary nucleus of the posterior hypothalamus and send projections to most parts of the brain. The central histamine system is involved in many brain functions such as arousal, control of pituitary hormone secretion, suppression ofeating and cognitive functions. The effects of neuronal histamine are mediated via G-protein-coupled H1-H4 receptors. The prominent role of histamine as a wake-promoting substance has drawn interest to treat sleep-wake disorders, especially narcolepsy, via modulation of H3 receptor function. Post mortem studies have revealed alterations in histaminergic system in neurological and psychiatric diseases. Brain histamine levels are decreased in Alzheimer's disease patients whereas abnormally high histamine concentrations are found in the brains of Parkinson's disease and schizophrenic patients. Low histamine levels are associated with convulsions and seizures. The release of histamine is altered in response to different types of brain injury: e.g. increased release of histamine in an ischemic brain trauma might have a role in the recovery from neuronal damage. Neuronal histamine is also involved in the pain perception. Drugs that increase brain and spinal histamine concentrations have antinociceptive properties. Histaminergic drugs, most importantly histamine H3 receptors ligands, have shown efficacy in many animal models of the above-mentioned disorders. Ongoing clinical trials will reveal the efficacy and safety of these drugs in the treatment of human patients. PMID:21618891

  9. 38th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2006-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 38th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 38th AMs, hosted by the NASA Langley Research Center in Williamsburg, Virginia, was held May 17-19, 2006. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals, tribology, actuators, aircraft mechanisms, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  10. 37th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2004-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is reporting problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 37th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 37th AMS, hosted by the Johnson Space Center (JSC) in Galveston, Texas, was held May 19, 20 and 21, 2004. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, tribology, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station and Mars Rover mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  11. 39th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, E. A. (Compiler)

    2008-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production, and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. Organized by the Mechanisms Education Association, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for hosting the AMS. Now in its 39th symposium, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the United States and abroad. The 39th AMS was held in Huntsville, Alabama, May 7-9, 2008. During these 3 days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included gimbals and positioning mechanisms, tribology, actuators, deployment mechanisms, release mechanisms, and sensors. Hardware displays during the supplier exhibit gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  12. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  13. The Presence of Histamine and a Histamine Receptor in the Bivalve Mollusc, Crassostrea virginica

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Jarreau; LaFleur, Kisha; Mantone, Daniel; Boisette, Beatrix; Harris, Ave; Catapane, Edward J.; Carroll, Margaret A.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine, a biogenic amine, is a neurotransmitter in neurons and sensory receptors in invertebrates. Histamine has rarely been reported in bivalves. We used HPLC with pre-column derivatization using 2,3-naphthalenedicarboxaldehyde (NDA) as a fluorescent labeling agent to measure histamine in ganglia, and peripheral tissues of the oyster Crassostrea virginica. We also used Western Blot technique to look for the presence of a histamine receptor in the mantle rim. HPLC results found histamine present in ng amounts in both the cerebral and visceral ganglia, as well as the mantle rim and other peripheral tissues of C. virginica. The study confirms and quantifies histamine as an endogenous biogenic amine in C. virginica in the nervous system and innervated organs. Western Blot technique also identified a histamine H2-like receptor present in sensory tissue of the oyster's mantle rim. PMID:26120600

  14. Role of histamine in the regulation of intestinal immunity in fish.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Villegas, Jorge; Garcia-Garcia, Erick; Mulero, Victoriano

    2016-11-01

    In mammals, during the acute inflammatory response, the complex interrelationship and cross-talk among histamine and the immune system has been fairly well characterized. There is a substantial body of information on its structure, metabolism, receptors, signal transduction, physiologic and pathologic effects. However, for early vertebrates, there is little such knowledge. In the case of teleost fish, this lack of knowledge has been due to the widely held belief that histamine is not present in this phylogenetic group. However, it has been recently demonstrated, that granules of mast cells in perciforms contain biologically active histamine. More importantly, the inflammatory response was clearly demonstrated to be regulated by the direct action of histamine on professional phagocytes. Nevertheless, the molecular basis and exact role of this biogenic amine in perciforms is still a matter of speculation. Therefore, this review intends to summarize recent experimental evidence regarding fish mast cells and correlate the same with their mammalian counterparts to establish the possible role of histamine in the fish intestinal inflammatory response. PMID:26872545

  15. [Histamine in regulation of bone remodeling processes].

    PubMed

    Wiercigroch, Marek; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is under autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and central nervous system control. One of the potential endogenous factors affecting bone remodeling is histamine, an endogenous amine which acts as a mediator of allergic reactions and neuromediator, and induces production of gastric acid. Histamine H₁ receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions, H₂ receptor antagonists in peptic ulcer disease, and betahistine (an H₃ receptor antagonist and H₁ receptor agonist) is used in the treatment of Ménière's disease. Excess histamine release in mastocytosis and allergic diseases may lead to development of osteoporosis. Clinical and population-based studies on the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on the skeletal system have not delivered unequivocal results. Expression of mRNA of histamine receptors has been discovered in bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts). Histamine synthesis has been demonstrated in osteoclast precursors. Histamine increases bone resorption both by direct effects on osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, and indirectly, by increasing the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts. In in vivo studies, H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists exerted protective effects on the bone tissue, although not in all experimental models. In the present article, in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far, concerning the effects of histamine and drugs modifying its activity on the skeletal system, have been reviewed. PMID:24018454

  16. Persistent histamine excitation of glutamatergic preoptic neurons.

    PubMed

    Tabarean, Iustin V

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca(2+) elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  17. Persistent Histamine Excitation of Glutamatergic Preoptic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Tabarean, Iustin V.

    2012-01-01

    Thermoregulatory neurons of the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) represent a target at which histamine modulates body temperature. The mechanism by which histamine excites a population of MnPO neurons is not known. In this study it was found that histamine activated a cationic inward current and increased the intracellular Ca2+ concentration, actions that had a transient component as well as a sustained one that lasted for tens of minutes after removal of the agonist. The sustained component was blocked by TRPC channel blockers. Single-cell reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed expression of TRPC1, TRPC5 and TRPC7 subunits in neurons excited by histamine. These studies also established the presence of transcripts for the glutamatergic marker Vglut2 and for the H1 histamine receptor in neurons excited by histamine. Intracellular application of antibodies directed against cytoplasmic sites of the TRPC1 or TRPC5 channel subunits decreased the histamine-induced inward current. The persistent inward current and elevation in intracellular Ca2+ concentration could be reversed by activating the PKA pathway. This data reveal a novel mechanism by which histamine induces persistent excitation and sustained intracellular Ca2+ elevation in glutamatergic MnPO neurons. PMID:23082195

  18. Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P.

    2000-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fifth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Radisson Hotel Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California, on December 1-3, 1999. The symposium included 18 sessions in which a total of 53 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, controls, modeling, electromagnetic launch, magnetic suspension in wind tunnels, applications flywheel energy storage, rotating machinery, vibration isolation, and maglev. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  19. Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

  20. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  1. Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Fourth International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at The Nagaragawa Convention Center in Gifu, Japan, on October 30 - November 1, 1997. The symposium included 13 sessions in which a total of 35 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of maglev, controls, high critical temperature (T(sub c)) superconductivity, bearings, magnetic suspension and balance systems (MSBS), levitation, modeling, and applications. A list of attendees is included in the document.

  2. The role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, A C; Fantozzi, R

    2013-01-01

    The term ‘neurogenic inflammation’ has been adopted to describe the local release of inflammatory mediators, such as substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide, from neurons. Once released, these neuropeptides induce the release of histamine from adjacent mast cells. In turn, histamine evokes the release of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide; thus, a bidirectional link between histamine and neuropeptides in neurogenic inflammation is established. The aim of this review is to summarize the most recent findings on the role of histamine in neurogenic inflammation, with particular regard to nociceptive pain, as well as neurogenic inflammation in the skin, airways and bladder. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23734637

  3. SYMPOSIUM OVERVIEW: SYMPOSIUM ON APPLICATION OF PHARMACOKINETICS IN DEVELOPMENTAL TOXICOLOGY RISK ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A symposium entitled "Application of Pharmacokinetics in Developmental Toxicity Risk Assessments" was held at the 29th Annual Meeting of the Society of Toxicology (SOT) in Miami Beach, Florida. t was sponsored by the Reproductive and Developmental Specialty Section of SOT to addr...

  4. Feedback Systems. Symposium 28. [Concurrent Symposium Session at AHRD Annual Conference, 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This packet contains three papers from a symposium on feedback systems held at a conference on human resource development (HRD). The first paper, "The Role of Feedback in Management Development Training" (K. Peter Kuchinke), reports on a survey-based study that investigated the role of feedback in nine management development training settings in a…

  5. DOE Grant to organize "International Symposium on Opportunities in Underground Physics", Asilomar, CA, May 24-27, 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Babu, Kaladi S.

    2015-03-16

    The International Symposium in Opportunities in Underground Physics (ISOUP) was held in Asilomar, CA during May 24-27, 2013. The Symposium brought together scientists from the US and abroad for an open discussion on science opportunities provided by the possibility of a new generation of large underground detectors associated with long baseline neutrino beams. The Symposium was highly successful. The main focus of the Symposium was the science goals that could be achieved by placing such a detector deep underground.

  6. Histamine intolerance-like symptoms in healthy volunteers after oral provocation with liquid histamine.

    PubMed

    Wöhrl, Stefan; Hemmer, Wolfgang; Focke, Margarete; Rappersberger, Klemens; Jarisch, Reinhart

    2004-01-01

    Histamine in food at non-toxic doses has been proposed to be a major cause of food intolerance causing symptoms like diarrhea, hypotension, headache, pruritus and flush ("histamine intolerance"). Histamine-rich foods such as cheese, sausages, sauerkraut, tuna, tomatoes, and alcoholic beverages may contain histamine up to 500 mg/kg. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled cross-over study in 10 healthy females (age range 22-36 years, mean 29.1 +/- 5.4) who were hospitalized and challenged on two consecutive days with placebo (peppermint tea) or 75 mg of pure histamine (equaling 124 mg histamine dihydrochloride, dissolved in peppermint tea). Objective parameters (heart rate, blood pressure, skin temperature, peak flow) as well as a total clinical symptom score using a standardized protocol were recorded at baseline, 10, 20, 40, 80 minutes, and 24 hours. The subjects received a histamine-free diet also low in allergen 24 hours before hospitalization and over the whole observation period. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, 10, 20, 40, and 80 minutes, and histamine and the histamine-degrading enzyme diamine oxidase (DAO) were determined. After histamine challenge, 5 of 10 subjects showed no reaction. One individual experienced tachycardia, mild hypotension after 20 minutes, sneezing, itching of the nose, and rhinorrhea after 60 minutes. Four subjects experienced delayed symptoms like diarrhea (4x), flatulence (3x), headache (3x), pruritus (2x) and ocular symptoms (1x) starting 3 to 24 hours after provocation. No subject reacted to placebo. No changes were observed in histamine and DAO levels within the first 80 minutes in non-reactors as well as reactors. There was no difference in challenge with histamine versus challenge with placebo. We conclude that 75 mg of pure liquid oral histamine--a dose found in normal meals--can provoke immediate as well as delayed symptoms in 50% of healthy females without a history of food intolerance. PMID:15603203

  7. Symposium on accelerator mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    The area of accelerator mass spectrometry has expanded considerably over the past few years and established itself as an independent and interdisciplinary research field. Three years have passed since the first meeting was held at Rochester. A Symposium on Accelerator Mass Spectrometry was held at Argonne on May 11-13, 1981. In attendance were 96 scientists of whom 26 were from outside the United States. The present proceedings document the program and excitement of the field. Papers are arranged according to the original program. A few papers not presented at the meeting have been added to complete the information on the status of accelerator mass spectrometry. Individual papers were prepared separately for the data base.

  8. Recreation Symposium Proceedings. The Forest Recreation Symposium (State University of New York College of Forestry, Syracuse, 12-14 October 1971).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Syracuse. Coll. of Forestry.

    In this collection of 26 papers presented at the 1971 Forest Recreation Symposium held at Syracuse, N.Y., information is presented about the forest resource and forest recreation research. The symposium, designed to help meet the needs of the planner and the manager in both public and private areas o f the forest recreation resource, covered 5…

  9. CONFERENCE NOTE: Sixth Symposium on Temperature Scheduled for March 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-07-01

    The call for papers for the 6th Symposium on Temperature, Its Measurement and Control in Science and Industry has been issued. The Symposium is scheduled to take place in Washington, DC, USA during the week of March 14 18, 1982. Like its predecessors held in the years 1919, 1939, 1954, 1961, and 1971, the 6th Symposium will stress advances in the measurement of thermodynamic values of temperature, in temperature reference points, in temperature sensors and instruments for the control of temperature, and in the development and use of temperature scales. For the first time, an exhibit of thermometry will be a part of the Symposium. Manuscripts to be submitted for inclusion in the Symposium should be sent to the 6th Temperature Symposium Program Chairman, National Bureau of Standards, by September 15, 1981. Those papers accepted for the Symposium will be due in camera-ready form by February 15, 1982. Original papers on all of the topics listed above, as well as reviews of the past decade's progress in thermometry and temperature control, are solicited by the Symposium organizers. The Symposium arrangements and registration are in the care of the Instrument Society of America (represented on the Symposium General Committee by Mr C T Glazer, 67 Alexander Drive, PO Box 12277, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, 27709, USA). Questions regarding the instrument exhibits should also be addressed to the ISA. The technical program for the Symposium is the responsibility of a committee headed by Dr J F Schooley, Room B-128 Physics Building, National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC, 20234, USA. The Symposium proceedings will be published by the American Institute of Physics.

  10. [Histamine intolerance--possible dermatologic sequences].

    PubMed

    Lugović-Mihić, Liborija; Seserko, Ana; Duvancić, Tomislav; Situm, Mirna; Mihić, Josip

    2012-12-01

    Although histamine intolerance (HIT) is not very frequently encountered, it can have serious consequences. Food intolerance is a non allergic hypersensitivity to food that does not include the immune system even though the symptoms are similar to those of IgE-mediated allergic reactions. HIT apparently develops as a result of an impaired diamine oxidase (DAO) activity due to gastrointestinal disease or through DAO inhibition, as well as through a genetic predisposition which was proven in a number of patients. The intake of histamine-rich foods as well as alcohol or drugs which cause either the release of histamine or the blocking of DAO can lead to various disorders in many organs (gastrointestinal system, skin, lungs, cardiovascular system and brain), depending on the expression of histamine receptors. Dermatologic sequels can be rashes, itch, urticaria, angioedema, dermatitis, eczema and even acne, rosacea, psoriasis, and other. Recognizing the symptoms due to HIT is especially important in treating such patients. The significance of HIT in patients with atopic dermatitis in whom the benefit of a low histamine diet has been proven is becoming increasingly understood recently. Because of the possibility of symptoms affecting numerous organs, a detailed history of symptoms following the intake of histamine-rich foods or drugs that interfere with histamine metabolism is essential for making the diagnosis of HIT. Considering that such symptoms can be the result of multiple factors, the existence of HIT is usually underestimated, but considerable expectations are being made from future studies. PMID:23814966

  11. Transonic Symposium: Theory, Application, and Experiment, volume 1, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foughner, Jerome T., Jr. (Compiler)

    1989-01-01

    In order to assess the state of the art in transonic flow disciplines and to glimpse at future directions, NASA-Langley held a Transonic Symposium. Emphasis was placed on steady, three dimensional external, transonic flow and its simulation, both numerically and experimentally. The symposium included technical sessions on wind tunnel and flight experiments; computational fluid dynamic applications; inviscid methods and grid generation; viscous methods and boundary layer stability; and wind tunnel techniques and wall interference. This, being volume 1, is unclassified.

  12. CPTAC Scientific Symposium - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    On behalf of the National Cancer Institute and the Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research, you are invited to the First Annual CPTAC Scientific Symposium on Wednesday, November 13, 2013. The purpose of this symposium, which consists of plenary and poster sessions, is for investigators from CPTAC community and beyond to share and discuss novel biological discoveries, analytical methods, and translational approaches using CPTAC data. All scientists who use, or wish to use CPTAC data are welcome to participate at this free event. The symposium will be held at the Natcher Conference Facility on the main campus of the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland.

  13. PREFACE: Third International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasumori, Atsuo

    2009-09-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Third Symposium (ISAT-3) was held on 5-6 March 2009 at the Tokyo International Exchange Center, Tokyo, Japan jointed with the Third Polyscale Technology Workshop (PTW-3). The ISAT-3 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies, which was successively held after ISAT-1 at Tsukuba and ISAT-2 at Awaji in 2007. The symposium was attended by 136 participants. There were 12 invited and 4 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 101. From all the contributions, 32 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The 'Atomic Technology Project' and the 'Polyscale Technology Project' were started in 2006 as the joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing atomic and polyscale technologies. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of these projects is to contribute to the development of atomic and polyscale science and technologies. In this symposium, four research fields were focused on: Biomedical Applications, Fabrication for Advanced Materials and Devices, Magnetic Applications, and Quantum and Molecular Engineering for Advanced Technologies. Atsuo Yasumori Conference Chair Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science, 2641 Yamazaki, Noda, Chiba 278-8510, Japan.

  14. Laser-induced damage in optical materials: sixteenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Guenther, A H; Milam, D; Newnam, B E

    1987-03-01

    The Sixteenth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, CO, 15-17 Oct. 1984. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Approximately 180 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives from England, France, The Netherlands, Scotland, and West Germany. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Materials and Measurements, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6,microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin-film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. Harold E. Bennett of the U.S. Naval Weapons Center, Arthur H. Guenther of the U.S. Air Force Weapons Laboratory, David Milam of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the Symposium. PMID:20454228

  15. 22nd Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott Bloom

    2005-04-01

    The XXII Texas Symposium on Relativistic Astrophysics, jointly organized by the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and the Physics Department of Stanford University, was held on December 13-17, 2004. Following the tradition of past Texas Symposia the presentations emphasized recent developments in Cosmology, High Energy Astrophysics and the frontiers between these and Gravitation and Particle Physics. This Symposium was attended by more than 500 colleagues from a spectrum of disciplines mentioned above. There were 9 Plenary Sessions, 3 Parallel Sessions and 2 Poster Sessions held during the five-day program, with 76 oral and 240 poster presentations. These are now documented on CD and in the eConf proceedings archive. Funding of $15,000 received from the DOE under award DE-FG02-05ER41362 was used for expenses related to facility, local transportation and administrative expenses.

  16. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  17. Proceedings of the DMS medical ethics symposium.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, D J

    2011-12-01

    This article presents the proceedings of a symposium on medical ethics held at the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine in October 2010. The nature of current operations continually generates challenging ethical problems, many of which are unique to the military environment. This article is intended to generate a debate on these difficult issues and readers are encouraged to contribute to this debate by emailing the Editor. PMID:22319989

  18. Laser induced damage in optical materials: 8th ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1977-05-01

    The Eighth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was hosted by the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, from 13 to 15 July 1976. The Symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Energy Research and Development Administration, and the Office of Naval Research. About 160 scientists attended the Symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, and Brazil. The Symposium was divided into five half-day sessions concerning Bulk Material Properties and Thermal Behavior, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Film Properties, Thin Film Damage, and Scaling Laws and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the Symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to new materials for use at 10.6 microm in mirror substrates, windo s, and coatings. New techniques in film deposition and advances in diamond-turning of optics were described. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons of the Symposium. The Ninth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 4-6 October 1977 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20168679

  19. Proton nuclear magnetic resonance studies of mast cell histamine

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenstein, D.L.; Ludowyke, R.; Lagunoff, D.

    1987-11-03

    The state of histamine in mast cells was studied by /sup 1/H NMR spectroscopy. Spectra were measured for histamine in situ in intact mast cells, for histamine in suspensions of mast cell granule matrices that had been stripped of their membranes, and for histamine in solutions of heparin. The /sup 1/H NMR spectrum of intact mast cells is relatively simple, consisting predominantly of resonances for intracellular histamine superimposed on a weaker background of resonances from heparin and proteins of the cells. All of the intracellular histamine contributes of the NMR signals, indicating it must be relatively mobile and not rigidly associated with the negatively charged granule matrix. Spectra for intracellular histamine and for histamine in granule matrices are similar, indicating the latter to be a reasonable model for the in situ situation. The dynamics of binding of histamine by granule matrices and by heparin are considerably different; exchange of histamine between the bulk water and the granule matrices is slow on the /sup 1/H NMR time scale, whereas exchange between the free and bound forms in heparin solution is fast. The chemical shifts of resonances for histamine in mast cells are pH dependent, decreasing as the intragranule pH increases without splitting or broadening. The results are interpreted to indicate that histamine in mast cells is relatively labile, with rapid exchange between histamine and pools of free histamine in water compartments confined in the granule matrix.

  20. The new biology of histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing-Feng; Thurmond, Robin L

    2008-03-01

    The physiologic functions of histamine have been recognized for more than 100 years, yet new roles are still being uncovered. Most importantly, a newly discovered receptor of the amine has helped refine our understanding of histamine. This new receptor, the histamine H4 receptor (H4R), has a higher affinity for histamine compared with the histamine H1 receptor and appears to be more selectively expressed, found mainly on hematopoietic cells. H4R is involved in chemotaxis and inflammatory mediator release by eosinophils, mast cells, monocytes, dendritic cells, and T cells. Studies in animal models using selective antagonists or H4R-deficient mice have shown a role for the receptor in inflammation in vivo. In particular, H4R antagonists have shown promise in experimental models of asthma and pruritus, two conditions where currently marketed antihistamines targeting the histamine H1 receptor are not optimally effective in humans. Thus, a new class of H4R-specific antihistamines may be distinctively effective in treating allergic diseases associated with chronic pruritus and asthma. PMID:18377770

  1. INCINERATION AND TREATMENT OF HAZARDOUS WASTE. PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM (8TH) AT FT. MITCHELL, KENTUCKY ON MARCH 8-10, 1982

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Eighth Annual Research Symposium on land disposal, incineration and treatment of hazardous wastes was held in Ft. Mitchell, Kentucky, on March 8, 9, and 10, 1982. These Proceedings are a compilation of papers presented by the symposium speakers. The symposium proceedings are ...

  2. Advances in the understanding of dairy and cheese flavors: Symposium Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A symposium titled “Advances in the Understanding of Dairy and Cheese Flavors” was held in September 2013 at the American Chemical Society’s 246th National Meeting in Indianapolis, IN. The symposium, which was sponsored by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, was to discuss the state of...

  3. Natural Areas--Needs and Opportunities, 1970 Symposium Proceedings, Northwest Scientific Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dittrich, William J., Ed.; Trappe, James M., Ed.

    Proceedings of a symposium held at the Northwest Scientific Association Forty-Third Annual Meeting, Salem, Oregon, March, 1970, are presented. The symposium indicated that mutual understanding by educators, scientists, land managers, and politicians must be developed on the definition of naturalness, present and future use and management of…

  4. Global perspectives on poisonous plants: The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 9th International Symposium on Poisonous Plants (ISOPP9) was held from 15th-21st July, 2013, at the Inner Mongolia Agricultural University in Hohhot, Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China. The Symposium consisted of three days of oral and poster presentations, followed by a tour of the Xilin...

  5. The 13th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltrus, John P.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the James L. Waters Annual Symposium is to recognize pioneers in the development of instrumentation by preserving the early history of the cooperation and important contributions of inventors, scientists, engineers, entrepreneurs, and marketing organizations. The symposium was held in Pittsburgh, United States in March 2002 to…

  6. Final Report of the Bilingual Symposium: Building a Research Agenda. Volume 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Applied Linguistics, Arlington, VA.

    This is the second of a series of three volumes containing papers from a bilingual symposium held in 1975. Presentations and discussion at the symposium dealt primarily with suggestions for research which linguists should undertake to assist bilingual programs. This volume contains the following papers: "A Survey of Research in Syntax," by Arnold…

  7. Brick and Click Libraries: An Academic Library Symposium (12th, Maryville, Missouri, October 26, 2012)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Johnson, Carolyn, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty scholarly papers and fifteen abstracts comprise the content of the twelfth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship.…

  8. Proceedings of the second international symposium on molecular markers in horticulture Acta Horticulturae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Molecular Markers in Horticulture was held at the CH2M Hill Alumni Center at Oregon State University (OSU), Corvallis (Oregon, US), from July 29 to August 1st, 2009. This symposium was convened by a scientist at the National Clonal Germplasm Repository (NCGR) of...

  9. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1992 EPA/AWMA INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM MEASUREMENT OF TOXIC AND RELATED AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1992 USEPA/AWMA International Symposium Measurement of Toxic and Related Air Pollutants was held in Durham, NC on May 4-9, 1992. his yearly symposium is sponsored by the Atmospheric Research and Exposure Assessment Laboratory and the Air & Waste Management Association. he tec...

  10. Brick & Click Libraries: An Academic Library Symposium (13th, Maryville, Missouri, November 1, 2013)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Johnson, Carolyn, Ed.; Park, Sarag G., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-six scholarly papers and ten abstracts comprise the content of the thirteenth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. The…

  11. Status Report on the "Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts" Symposium and Workshop

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The “Wildfires and Invasive Plants in American Deserts” symposium and workshop, was held in Reno, Nevada on December 9-11, 2008. The purpose of this symposium was to synthesize the current understanding of the interactions of wildfire and invasive plants in the four U.S. deserts and the Colorado Pla...

  12. CONTROL TECHNOLOGY: SUMMARY OF THE 1991 EPRI/EPA/DOE S02 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1991 SO2 Control Symposium was held December 3–6, 1991, in Washington, D.C. The symposium, jointly sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), focused attention...

  13. Making the Geography Curriculum: Reflections on the IGU-CGE London Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Clare

    2013-01-01

    "Curriculum making", highlighted in the Geographical Association's Manifesto in 2009, was the focus of a research symposium held in London in April 2011. Using an auto-ethnographic approach, I reflect on and explore my experience of participating in that symposium. The analysis explores the "cultures of influence" and the "forms of…

  14. Triennial Reproduction Symposium: challenges and opportunities facing livestock reproduction in the 21st century.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2009 Triennial Reproduction Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Society of Animal Science, American Dairy Science Association, and Canadian Society of Animal Science in Montreal, Canada, in July 2009. The intent of the symposium was to identify major ch...

  15. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-02-01

    Scientists Meet in Antofagasta to Discuss Front-Line Astrophysics To mark the beginning of the VLT era, the European Southern Observatory is organizing a VLT Opening Symposium which will take place in Antofagasta (Chile) on 1-4 March 1999, just before the start of regular observations with the ESO Very Large Telescope on April 1, 1999. The Symposium occupies four full days and is held on the campus of the Universidad Catolica del Norte. It consists of plenary sessions on "Science in the VLT Era and Beyond" and three parallel Workshops on "Clusters of Galaxies at High Redshift" , "Star-way to the Universe" and "From Extrasolar Planets to Brown Dwarfs" . There will be many presentations of recent work at the major astronomical facilities in the world. The meeting provides a very useful forum to discuss the latest developments and, in this sense, contributes to the planning of future research with the VLT and other large telescopes. The symposium will be opened with a talk by the ESO Director General, Prof. Riccardo Giacconi , on "Paranal - an observatory for the 21st century". It will be followed by reports about the first scientific results from the main astronomical instruments on VLT UT1, FORS1 and ISAAC. The Symposium participants will see the VLT in operation during special visits to the Paranal Observatory. Press conferences are being arranged each afternoon to inform about the highlights of the conference. After the Symposium, there will be an Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March Contributions from ESO ESO scientists will make several presentations at the Symposium. They include general reviews of various research fields as well as important new data and results from the VLT that show the great potential of this new astronomical facility. Some of the recent work is described in this Press Release, together with images and spectra of a large variety of objects. Note that all of these data will soon become publicly available via the VLT Archive

  16. Eighteenth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-31

    This volume provides the proceedings for the Eighteenth Symposium on Biotechnology for Fuels and Chemicals held May 5-9, 1996 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The proceedings contains abstracts for oral and poster presentations.

  17. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT: PROCEEDINGS OF 3RD BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM, NANJING, PRC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists from four countries presented papers at the Third Biennial International Symposium on Fish Physiology, Toxicology and Water Quality Management, which was held on the campus of Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China. his proceedings in...

  18. Growth of cultured human glioma tumour cells can be regulated with histamine and histamine antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Van der Ven, L. T.; Prinsen, I. M.; Jansen, G. H.; Roholl, P. J.; Defferrari, R.; Slater, R.; Den Otter, W.

    1993-01-01

    The 50% survival time for low grade astrocytomas is 50 months and for high grade astrocytomas it is 13 months, underlining the need for new therapies. Several reports show that in vivo histamine antagonists cause retardation of tumour growth in some animal models and prolonged survival in cancer patients. Therefore we have tested the growth modulating effects of histamine and histamine antagonists on human glioma cultures. Twelve freshly excised human gliomas were cultured and tested for their in vitro sensitivity to histamine and histamine antagonists. Four continuous glioma cell lines were used to confirm the glioma-specificity of the effects observed in the primary cell lines. In low serum concentration (0 or 1%) the growth of 5/9 primary glioma-derived cultures could be stimulated with 0.2 mM histamine, and in 4/5 cases with 0.2 microM histamine. One mM of the histamine H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine could inhibit the growth of 4/5 primary glioma cultures when tested in 1% human AB serum, and of 6/13 cases when tested in 1% FCS. Lower concentrations (down to 1 microM) were less effective. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist pyrilamine gave variable results. The specificity of the effects is indicated by the absence of a generalised toxic effect, by the observation that the antagonist-induced inhibition could be reversed with histamine, and by the correlation of the obtained cimetidine-induced growth inhibition with the maximal growth rate of the primary cell lines in 10% FCS. The observed cimetidine-induced inhibition of the in vitro proliferation of gliomas suggests that cimetidine is a relevant candidate for the in vivo growth inhibition of these tumours. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8353038

  19. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Pt. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S. (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  20. First International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, John S (Editor); Tcheng, Ping (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    The first International Symposium on Strain Gauge Balances was sponsored and held at NASA Langley Research Center during October 22-25, 1996. The symposium provided an open international forum for presentation, discussion, and exchange of technical information among wind tunnel test technique specialists and strain gauge balance designers. The Symposium also served to initiate organized professional activities among the participating and relevant international technical communities. Over 130 delegates from 15 countries were in attendance. The program opened with a panel discussion, followed by technical paper sessions, and guided tours of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) wind tunnel, a local commercial balance fabrication facility, and the LaRC balance calibration laboratory. The opening panel discussion addressed "Future Trends in Balance Development and Applications." Forty-six technical papers were presented in 11 technical sessions covering the following areas: calibration, automatic calibration, data reduction, facility reports, design, accuracy and uncertainty analysis, strain gauges, instrumentation, balance design, thermal effects, finite element analysis, applications, and special balances. At the conclusion of the Symposium, a steering committee representing most of the nations and several U.S. organizations attending the Symposium was established to initiate planning for a second international balance symposium, to be held in 1999 in the UK.

  1. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    In the summer of 2012, a great discovery emerged at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN in Geneva. A plethora of new precision data had already by then been collected by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at LHC, providing further extensive support for the validity of the Standard Model of particle physics. But what now appeared was the first evidence for what was not only the last unverified prediction of the Standard Model, but also perhaps the most decisive one: the prediction made already in 1964 of a unique scalar boson required by the theory of François Englert and Peter Higgs on how fundamental particles acquire mass. At that moment in 2012, it seemed particularly appropriate to start planning a gathering of world experts in particle physics to take stock of the situation and try to answer the challenging question: what next? By May 2013, when the LHC Nobel Symposium was held at the Krusenberg Mansion outside Uppsala in Sweden, the first signs of a great discovery had already turned into fully convincing experimental evidence for the existence of a scalar boson of mass about 125 GeV, having properties compatible with the 50-year-old prediction. And in October 2013, the evidence was deemed so convincing that the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics to Englert and Higgs for their pioneering work. At the same time the search at the LHC for other particles, beyond those predicted by the Standard Model, with heavier masses up to—and in some cases beyond—1 TeV, had provided no positive result. The triumph of the Standard Model seems resounding, in particular because the mass of the discovered scalar boson is such that, when identified with the Higgs boson, the Standard Model is able to provide predictions at energies as high as the Planck mass, although at the price of accepting that the vacuum would be metastable. However, even if there were some feelings of triumph, the ambience at the LHC Nobel Symposium was more one of

  2. International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    This proceeding is a compilation of peer reviewed papers presented at the 13th International Symposium on Advanced Materials (ISAM 2013) held from September 23-27, 2013, at Islamabad, Pakistan. In my capacity as ISAM-2013 Secretary, I feel honoured that the symposium has ended on a positive note. The ever increasing changes and intricacies that characterize modern industry necessitate a growing demand for technical information on advanced materials. ISAM and other similar forums serve to fulfill this need. The five day deliberations of ISAM 2013, consisted of 19 technical sessions and 2 poster sessions. In all, 277 papers were presented, inclusive of 80 contributory, invited and oral presentations. The symposium also hosted panel discussions led by renowned scientists and eminent researchers from foreign as well as local institutes. The ultimate aim of this proceeding is to record in writing the new findings in the field of advanced materials. I hope that the technical data available in this publication proves valuable to young scientists and researchers working in this area of science. At the same time, I wish to acknowledge Institute of Physics (IOP) Publishing UK, for accepting the research papers from ISAM-2013 for publication in the IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering. The proceeding will be available on the IOP website as an online open access document. I am profoundly thankful to the Symposium Chairman for his steadfast support and valuable guidance without which ISAM 2013 could not have been the mega event that it turned out to be. My gratitude to all our distinguished participants, session chairs/co-chairs, and reviewers for their active role in the symposium. I appreciate the entire organizing committee for the zest and ardor with which each committee fulfilled its obligations to ISAM. Last yet not the least, my thankfulness goes to all our sponsors for wilfully financing the event. Dr. Sara Qaisar Symposium Secretary Further

  3. Histamine (Scombroid) Fish Poisoning: a Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Charles; Teuber, Suzanne; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-02-01

    Histamine fish poisoning, also known as scombroid poisoning, is the most common cause of ichythyotoxicosis worldwide and results from the ingestion of histamine-contaminated fish in the Scombroidae and Scomberesocidae families, including mackerel, bonito, albacore, and skipjack. This disease was first described in 1799 in Britain and re-emerged in the medical literature in the 1950s when outbreaks were reported in Japan. The symptoms associated with histamine fish poisoning are similar to that of an allergic reaction. In fact, such histamine-induced reactions are often misdiagnosed as IgE-mediated fish allergy. Indeed, histamine fish poisoning is still an underrecognized disease. In this review, we discuss the epidemiology, pathophysiology, evaluation, and treatment of scombroid disease. Because more than 80% of fish consumed in the USA is now imported from other countries, the disease is intimately linked with the global fish trade (National Marine Fisheries Service, 2012). Preventing future scombroid outbreaks will require that fishermen, public health officials, restaurant workers, and medical professionals work together to devise international safety standards and increase awareness of the disease. The implications of scombroid poisoning go far beyond that of fish and have broader implications for the important issues of food safety. PMID:25876709

  4. Histamine and Skin Barrier: Are Histamine Antagonists Useful for the Prevention or Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis?

    PubMed Central

    De Benedetto, Anna; Yoshida, Takeshi; Fridy, Sade; Park, Joo-Eun S.; Kuo, I.-Hsin; Beck, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD), the most common chronic inflammatory skin disease, is characterized by an overactive immune response to a host of environmental allergens and dry, itchy skin. Over the past decade important discoveries have demonstrated that AD develops in part from genetic and/or acquired defects in the skin barrier. Histamine is an aminergic neurotransmitter involved in physiologic and pathologic processes such as pruritus, inflammation, and vascular leak. Enhanced histamine release has been observed in the skin of patients with AD and antihistamines are often prescribed for their sedating and anti-itch properties. Recent evidence suggests that histamine also inhibits the terminal differentiation of keratinocytes and impairs the skin barrier, raising the question whether histamine might play a role in AD barrier impairment. This, coupled with the notion that histamine’s effects mediated through the recently identified histamine receptor H4R, may be important in allergic inflammation, has renewed interest in this mediator in allergic diseases. In this paper we summarize the current knowledge on histamine and histamine receptor antagonists in AD and skin barrier function. PMID:26239353

  5. 34th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boesiger, Edward A. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    The Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium (AMS) provides a unique forum for those active in the design, production and use of aerospace mechanisms. A major focus is the reporting of problems and solutions associated with the development and flight certification of new mechanisms. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) share the responsibility for organizing the AMS. Now in its 34th year, the AMS continues to be well attended, attracting participants from both the U.S. and abroad. The 34th AMS, hosted by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland, was held May 10, 11 and 12, 2000. During these three days, 34 papers were presented. Topics included deployment mechanisms, bearings, actuators, pointing and optical mechanisms, Space Station mechanisms, release mechanisms, and test equipment. Hardware displays during the vendor fair gave attendees an opportunity to meet with developers of current and future mechanism components.

  6. The 1992 4th NASA SERC Symposium on VLSI Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Sterling R.

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the fourth annual NASA Symposium on VLSI Design, co-sponsored by the IEEE, are presented. Each year this symposium is organized by the NASA Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) at the University of Idaho and is held in conjunction with a quarterly meeting of the NASA Data System Technology Working Group (DSTWG). One task of the DSTWG is to develop new electronic technologies that will meet next generation electronic data system needs. The symposium provides insights into developments in VLSI and digital systems which can be used to increase data systems performance. The NASA SERC is proud to offer, at its fourth symposium on VLSI design, presentations by an outstanding set of individuals from national laboratories, the electronics industry, and universities. These speakers share insights into next generation advances that will serve as a basis for future VLSI design.

  7. Symposium on electroslag component casting: proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Judkins, R.R.; Hobday, J.M.

    1984-03-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, Office of Surface Coal Gasification, has established a Materials Program to develop and apply appropriate materials to coal gasification plant components. The overall goals of the Surface Gasification Materials Program (SGMP) are to improve operational reliability and system durability and to reduce fabrication and operating costs of coal gasification plant components. The SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project is directed to the development of electroslag casting (ESC) technology for use in coal conversion components such as valve bodies, pump housings, and pipe fittings. The aim is to develop a sufficient data base to permit ESC to become an ASME Code-accepted process. It is also intended to transfer the ESC process technology to private industry. This symposium was planned to discuss not only the SGMP Electroslag Component Casting Project but the activities and experiences of other organizations as well. The symposium addressed descriptions of electroslag processes; a worldwide perspective on the status of ESC technology; and details of production, mechanical properties, economics, and use of ESC for coal gasification components. Ten papers were presented, and a panel discussion was held to provide participants an opportunity to express their opinions and to offer recommendations on the content of the DOE program. This document constitutes the proceedings of that symposium. The papers included here are minimally edited transcripts of the presentations made at the symposium. All papers have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  8. International Symposium on Karst Water Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, William

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, in addition to the following government organizations of Turkey: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, State Hydraulic, Works (DSI), General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA), Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration (EIE) and Geological Engineering Department of the Engineering Faculty and Karst Hydrogeology Research Group (KRG) at the Hacettepe University Earth Sciences Application and Research Center. Cooperating organizations included the Turkish National Committee of the International Hydrological Program, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Water Resources Association (IWRA). The symposium was divided into two parts: a paper presentation session held at the new Turkish National Library in Ankara during July 7-12, 1985, and a field trip from Ankara through Konya and Antalya to Izmir during July 13-18. The symposium chairman was Gultekin Gunay of the Hydrogeological Engineering Department of Ankara's Hacettepe University, and the cochairman was A. Ivan Johnson, a water resources consultant from Denver, Colo., and editor of WaterWatch. Scientists from 27 countries were represented among the 200 or so participants in attendance.

  9. Laser induced damage in optical materials: twelfth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1981-09-01

    The twelfth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30 Sept.-l Oct., 1980. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-l, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, the Office of Naval Research, and the Air Force Office of Scientific research. Over 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Japan, and West Germany. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning materials and measurements, mirrors and surfaces, thin films, and finally fundamental mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high power systems. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos National Laboratory were cochairmen of the symposium. The thirteenth annual symposium is scheduled for 17-18 Nov. 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20333088

  10. Symposium: Ionic and Respiratory Interaction in Aquatic Animals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Physiologist, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Presented are eight abstracts of a symposium held in conjunction with the American Physiological Society (APS) and the American Society of Zoologists (ASZ). Fish gill structure and function, renal function, acid-base balance and ionic sensitivity are topics discussed. (EB)

  11. Summary of Sloan symposium: healthy buildings 2015-Europe.

    PubMed

    Levin, Hal; Täubel, Martin; Hernandez, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Sloan Symposium, "Microbiology of the Indoor Environment," was held to facilitate dialog on biological research between scientists and practitioners in the field which was complementary to the adjoining activities of the ISIAQ Healthy Buildings Europe conference, Eindhoven, Netherlands, on 20-21 May 2015. Multi-media archives of these special adjunct proceedings are presented. PMID:26627048

  12. STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL: A SUMMARY OF THE 1991 SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes the 1991 Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx (nitrous oxides) Control, held March 25-28, 1991, in Washington, DC. pproximately 500 attended, representing 53 domestic and 13 foreign utility companies, federal and state government agencies, research and deve...

  13. Growth and development symposium: Fetal programming in animal agriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fetal programming is the ability to improve animal production and well-being by altering the maternal environment and holds enormous challenges and great opportunities for researchers and the animal industry. A symposium was held to provide an overview of current knowledge of fetal programming in re...

  14. Social Research and Broadcasting. Proceedings of a Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Southern California, Los Angeles. Annenberg School of Communications.

    A special symposium held at the University of Southern California examined an agenda for action, "Social Research on Broadcasting--Proposals for Further Development," which was commissioned by the British Broadcasting Company and written by Professor Elihu Katz of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Participants included communications and…

  15. Highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Veterinary immunologists have expanded understanding of the immune systems for our companion animals and developed new vaccines and therapeutics. This manuscript summarizes the highlights of the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto,...

  16. Triennial Growth Symposium: Dietary regulation of growth development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2010 Triennial Growth Symposium was held immediately before the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association, Poultry Science Association, Asociación Mexicana de Producción Animal, Canadian Society of Animal Science, Western Section American Society of Animal Science, and Ameri...

  17. International symposium on erosion and landscape evolution abstracts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book contains all of the extended abstracts from the ASABE specialty conference, the International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE), held September 18-21, 2011 at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Three extended abstracts from the meeting keynote speakers as ...

  18. The 2011 North American strawberry symposium: an introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2011 Symposium was held in conjunction with the 32nd North American Strawberry Growers Association (NASGA) Annual Conference on 8-11 Feb. 2011, at the Doubletree Hotel in Tampa, FL. The scientific program was conducted over two days and featured five sessions of oral and poster presentations sp...

  19. NUC Symposium on Environmental Preservation, 20-21 May 1970.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Undersea Center, San Diego, CA.

    This publication consists of papers presented at an in-house symposium held at the Naval Undersea Research and Development (R and D) Center, San Diego, in May 1970. The topics discussed in these presentations are as follows: principles of evolution and the ecological crisis; alternatives to overpopulation; examples of San Diego noise climate;…

  20. Biotechnology Symposium - In Memoriam, the Late Dr. Allan Zipf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A one-day biotechnology symposium was held at Alabama A&M University (AAMU), Normal, AL on June 4, 2004 in memory of the late Dr. Allan Zipf (Sept 1953-Jan 2004). Dr. Zipf was a Research Associate Professor at the Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, AAMU, who collaborated extensively with ARS/MS...

  1. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1991 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 4: SYMPOSIUM POSTER PAPERS: SESSIONS VI THROUGH X

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991 International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5, 1991. n all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome address, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14 panel session paper...

  2. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1991 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 2: SYMPOSIUM ORAL PAPERS: SESSIONS VI THROUGH X

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991 International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5, 1991. n all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome address, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14 panel session paper...

  3. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1991 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 1: SYMPOSIUM ORAL PAPERS: SESSIONS I THROUGH V

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991 International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5, 1991. n all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome address, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14 panel session paper...

  4. Space Symposium/76

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    A symposium dealing with career opportunities in the aerospace program for minorities was conducted and evaluated. The symposium was attended by students from eleven predominantly minority colleges and universities in and around Washington, D. C. and the eastern region, and from high schools in five jurisdictions of the Washington metropolitan area. Speakers included representatives of Howard University, NASA, and private industry. On display during the symposium was a NASA exhibit of moon rocks, space shuttles, a lunar module, command module, pacemaker, LANDSAT, and other items of interest.

  5. Klebsiella pneumoniae Produces No Histamine: Raoultella planticola and Raoultella ornithinolytica Strains Are Histamine Producers

    PubMed Central

    Kanki, Masashi; Yoda, Tomoko; Tsukamoto, Teizo; Shibata, Tadayoshi

    2002-01-01

    Histamine fish poisoning is caused by histamine-producing bacteria (HPB). Klebsiella pneumoniae and Klebsiella oxytoca are the best-known HPB in fish. However, 22 strains of HPB from fish first identified as K. pneumoniae or K. oxytoca by commercialized systems were later correctly identified as Raoultella planticola (formerly Klebsiella planticola) by additional tests. Similarly, five strains of Raoultella ornithinolytica (formerly Klebsiella ornithinolytica) were isolated from fish as new HPB. R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica strains were equal in their histamine-producing capabilities and were determined to possess the hdc genes, encoding histidine decarboxylase. On the other hand, a collection of 61 strains of K. pneumoniae and 18 strains of K. oxytoca produced no histamine. PMID:12089029

  6. Future high energy colliders symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z. |

    1996-12-31

    A `Future High Energy Colliders` Symposium was held October 21-25, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was one of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor, the National Science Foundation, as part of a 5 month program on `New Ideas for Particle Accelerators`. The long term program and symposia were organized and coordinated by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of Brookhaven National Laboratory/ITP. The purpose of the symposium was to discuss the future direction of high energy physics by bringing together leaders from the theoretical, experimental and accelerator physics communities. Their talks provided personal perspectives on the physics objectives and the technology demands of future high energy colliders. Collectively, they formed a vision for where the field should be heading and how it might best reach its objectives.

  7. Homogeneous time resolved fluorescence assay to measure histamine release.

    PubMed

    Claret, Emmanuel J; Ouled-Diaf, Josy; Seguin, Patrick

    2003-12-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine synthesized by the enzymatic decarboxylation of histidine. Implication of histamine in allergy is well described but histamine is also found in some specific neurones, functions as a neurotransmitter and regulates sleep/wake cycles, hormonal secretion, cardiovascular control and thermo-regulation. We have developed a TR-FRET histamine assay, based on the competition between sample histamine and allophycocyanine (XL665) labelled histamine for binding to a Europium cryptate (EuK) labelled antibody. As histamine is a small monoamine molecule, high affinity antibodies have been raised against carrier protein conjugated histamine. Therefore, sample histamine needs to be derivatized in the same way as the conjugated histamine, so that the antibody will have a similar affinity for both molecules. This acylation step is performed directly in wells and does not need to be done in separate vials, making handling easier for large numbers of samples. The incubation takes place at room temperature for 3 hours. The assay covers a measurement range of 1.56 to 400 nM and shows an analytical sensitivity of 1.3nM. We have shown that miniaturization of sample and reagents volumes down to 20 micro l does not alter these performances. This histamine release assay provides a particularly well adapted procedure for HTS and secondary screening compared to current heterogeneous methods. PMID:14683484

  8. Population pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of histamine response measured by histamine iontophoresis laser Doppler.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Jones, Bridgette L; Roberts, Jessica K; Sherwin, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    The epicutaneous histamine (EH) test is the current gold standard method for the clinical evaluation of allergic conditions. However, the EH method is limited in providing an objective and qualitative assessment of histamine pharmacodynamic response. The histamine iontophoresis with laser Doppler (HILD) monitoring method, an alternative method, allows a fixed dose of histamine to be delivered and provides an objective, continuous, and dynamic measurement of histamine epicutaneous response in children and adults. However, due to the high sampling frequency (up to 40 Hz), the output files are usually too cumbersome to be directly used for further analysis. In this study, we developed an averaging algorithm that efficiently reduces the HILD data in size. The reduced data was further analyzed and a population linked effect pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) model was developed to describe the local histamine response. The model consisted of a one-compartment PK model and a direct-response fractional maximum effect (Emax) model. The parameter estimates were obtained as follows: absorption rate constant (ka), 0.094/min; absorption lag time (Tlag), 2.72 min; partitioning clearance from local depot to systemic circulation (CLpar), 0.0006 L/min; baseline effect (E0), 13.1 flux unit; Emax, 13.4; concentration at half maximum effect (EC50) 31.1 mg/L. Covariate analysis indicated that age and race had significant influence on Tlag and EC50, respectively. PMID:27307292

  9. Histamine metabolism in cluster headache and migraine. Catabolism of 14C histamine.

    PubMed

    Sjaastad, O; Sjaastad, O V

    1977-09-12

    Various parameters of histamine metabolism were studied in patients with migraine, cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania. These included urinary excretion of radioactivity and of 14C histamine and its metabolites, exhaled 14CO2 and fecal radioactivity after oral as well as subcutaneous administration of radioactive histamine. No marked deviation from the normal was found except in one patient with the cluster headache variant, chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, in whom an aberration in 14C histamine degradation seemed to be present. Only minute quantities of the 14C histamine metabolite C14 imidazoleacetic acid riboside seemed to be formed during a period with severe paroxysms. During a symptom-free period no deviation from normal was observed. The most likely explanation for this finding seems to be a defect in the conversion of imidazoleacetic acid to its riboside. This defect may possibly explain the increased urinary excretion of histamine in this particular patient. The relationship of this metabolic aberration to the production of headache still remains dubious for various reasons. PMID:72800

  10. Impaired basophil histamine release from allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Stahl Skov, P; Norn, S; Weeke, B; Nolte, H

    1987-04-01

    A few patients (6-7%) with a verified type I allergic reaction do not respond with histamine release after challenge of their basophils with specific antigen (non-responding basophils from allergic patients). Sera from these non-responding patients were used for passive sensitization of responding cells from healthy controls. When these sensitized cells were challenged with specific antigen, histamine release was observed indicating that the non-responding allergic patients have circulating antigen-specific IgE capable of binding to Fc-receptors on the basophils. These findings suggest the possibility that non-responding basophils have impaired cell functions. We therefore examined the influence of enhanced IgE receptor stimulation on histamine release in non-responding basophils. This was made by stimulating protein kinase C activity by a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate). When the non-responding cells were incubated with the phorbol ester and challenged with either anti-IgE or specific antigen, the cells released histamine. These findings support the hypothesis that the unresponsiveness of basophils in some allergic patients is associated with impaired IgE receptor complex activation or subcellular functioning and not with a lack of cell-bound IgE. PMID:2440283

  11. Ninteenth Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The proceedings of the 19th Aerospace Mechanisms Symposium are reported. Technological areas covered include space lubrication, bearings, aerodynamic devices, spacecraft/Shuttle latches, deployment, positioning, and pointing. Devices for spacecraft docking and manipulator and teleoperator mechanisms are also described.

  12. PREFACE: The International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirai, Yasuharu

    2008-03-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The Second Symposium (ISAT-2) was held on 1-2 October 2007 at the Awaji Yumebutai Conference Center, Awaji City, Japan presided by the `Atomic Technology Project'. The ISAT-2 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion of the latest progress in atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 106 delegates. There were 9 invited and 5 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 73. From all the contributions, 24 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The `Atomic Technology Project' was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and were developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and devices. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Yasuharu Shirai Conference Chair Center for Atomic Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph

  13. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  14. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (9th, Maryville, Missouri, November 6, 2009)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2009-01-01

    Twenty-one scholarly papers and fourteen abstracts comprise the content of the ninth annual "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  15. Meat science and muscle biology symposium: In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Meat Science and Muscle Biology Symposium titled “In utero factors that influence postnatal muscle growth, carcass composition, and meat quality” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting in Phoenix, AZ, July 15 to 19, 2012. The goal of this symposium was to highlight research on the impact of fetal...

  16. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (10th, Maryville, Missouri, November 5, 2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    Twenty-one scholarly papers and fifteen abstracts comprise the content of the tenth annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  17. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (11th, Maryville, Missouri, November 4, 2011)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    Twenty-three scholarly papers and twelve abstracts comprise the content of the eleventh annual Brick and Click Libraries Symposium, held at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The peer-reviewed proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of…

  18. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Libraries Symposium (7th, Maryville, Missouri, November 2, 2007)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-three scholarly papers and eleven abstracts reflect the content of the seventh "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. Many of…

  19. Improving Linkages--the Challenge for the Southeast. Early Childhood Regional Symposium Proceedings (Atlanta, Georgia, November 21-22, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina Univ., Greensboro. School of Education.

    This report outlines the proceedings of a symposium held to discuss ways of strengthening linkages and transitions between pre-kindergarten programs and early elementary school. The 63 symposium participants included Head Start representatives, elementary school teachers and principals, state and federal department of education employees,…

  20. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Libraries Symposium (8th, Maryville, Missouri, November 7, 2008)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    Eighteen scholarly papers and eighteen abstracts comprise the content of the 8th "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. The proceedings, authored by academic librarians and presented at the symposium, portray the contemporary and future face of librarianship. Many of the…

  1. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (Northwest Missouri State University, Maryville, Missouri, October 14, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ury, Connie Jo., Ed.; Baudino, Frank, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    These proceedings document the fifth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium", held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri. Thirty five peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries have references and…

  2. REMEDIAL ACTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTEENTH ANNUAL HAZARDOUS WASTE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Sixteenth Annual Research Symposium on Remedial Action, Treatment and Disposal of Hazardous Waste was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 3-5, 1990. he purpose of this Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed projects f...

  3. REMEDIAL ACTION, TREATMENT AND DISPOSAL OF HAZARDOUS WASTE: PROCEEDINGS OF THE SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL HAZARDOUS WASTE RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Seventeenth Annual RREL Research Symposium on Remedial Action, Treatment and Disposal of Hazardous Waste was held in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 9-11, 1991. he purpose of this Symposium was to present the latest significant research findings from ongoing and recently completed pr...

  4. Report from the Second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health: Critical Needs, Challenges and Potential Solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  5. Brick and Click Libraries: Proceedings of an Academic Library Symposium (6th, Maryville, Missouri, November 3, 2006)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baudino, Frank, Ed.; Ury, Connie Jo, Ed.; Park, Sarah G., Ed.

    2006-01-01

    These proceedings document the sixth year of the "Brick and Click Libraries Symposium," held annually at Northwest Missouri State University in Maryville, Missouri, on November 3, 2006. Thirty-four peer-reviewed papers and abstracts, written by academic librarians, and presented at the symposium are included in this volume. Many of the entries…

  6. PROCEEDINGS: 1989 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, MARCH 6-9, 1989 VOLUME 2

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the 1989 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 6-9. 1989. in San Francisco, CA. The symposium, sponsored by the U.S. EPA and EPRI, was the fifth in a series devoted solely to the discussion of control of NOx emi...

  7. PROCEEDINGS: 1989 JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON STATIONARY COMBUSTION NOX CONTROL, SAN FRANCISCO, CA, MARCH 6-9, 1989 VOLUME 1

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document presentations at the 1989 Joint Symposium on Stationary Combustion NOx Control, held March 6-9, 1989, in San Francisco, CA. The symposium, sponsored by the U. S. EPA and EPRl, was the fifth in a series devoted solely to the discussion of control of NOx em...

  8. GLOBAL CHANGE RESEARCH NEWS #12: U.S.-- CANADA SYMPOSIUM ON NORTH AMERICAN CLIMATE CHANGE AND WEATHER EXTREMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This edition reports on a U.S.-Canada Symposium onNorth American Climate Change and Weather Extremes that was held in Atlanta in October. This symposium was conducted by EPA's Global Change Research Program in partnership with Environment Canada and the U.S. National Weather Se...

  9. The Junior Science & Humanities Symposium: Management and Operations, 2003-2004. Theme--Atmosphere--The Other Ocean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenker, Richard M.

    This document reviews the Pacific Region Junior Science and Humanities Symposium (PJSHS) program for 2003-2004 which is a 10-month, precollege student research program held in Japan. The theme is AtmosphereThe Other Ocean. The program includes a one-week symposium of student delegates who have completed research projects in the sciences or have…

  10. Report from the second international symposium on animal genomics for animal health: critical needs, challenges and potential solutions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The second International Symposium on Animal Genomics for Animal Health held in Paris, France 31 May-2 June, 2010, assembled more than 140 participants representing research organizations from 40 countries. The symposium included a roundtable discussion on critical needs, challenges and opportunitie...

  11. Fifth Billings symposium on disturbed land rehabilitation. Volume I: Hardrock waste, analytical and revegetation

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    This publication contains Volume I of the proceedings of the Symposium on Disturbed Land Rehabilitation held in Billings, Montana, March 25-30, 1990. Sessions were held on the following topics: Tailings rehabilitation; Cyanide; Other hardrock rehabilitation; Revegetation; Selenium; and, Geostatistical, GIS and Data Base Management. Those papers of specific interest are indexed separately in this data base.

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1990 EPA/AWMA INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM: MEASUREMENT OF TOXIC AND RELATED AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The 1990 EPA/AWMA Symposium was held May 1-4, 1990 in Raleigh, N.C. he technical program consisted of 178 presentations held in 2O separate sessions. he sessions focused on recent advances in the measurement and monitoring of toxic and related pollutants. ew sessions to the sympo...

  13. Abstracts of papers presented at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on quantitative Biology: DNA and chromosomes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This volume contains the abstracts of oral and poster presentations made at the LVIII Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on Quantitative Biology entitles DNA & Chromosomes. The meeting was held June 2--June 9, 1993 at Cold Spring Harbor, New York.

  14. Report on the IUTAM Symposium on Mobile Particulate Systems: Kinematics, Rheology, and Complex Phenomena, Bangalore, India, 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nott, P. R.; Davis, R. H.; Reeks, M.; Saintillan, D.; Sundaresan, S.

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the presentations and discussions conducted during the symposium, which was held under the aegis of the International Union of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics during 23-27 January 2012 in Bangalore, India.

  15. Laser induced damage in optical materials: eleventh ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Bennett, H E; Glass, A J; Guenther, A H; Newnam, B

    1980-07-15

    The eleventh Symposium on Optical Materials for High-Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 30-31 October 1979. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 150 scientists attended the symposium, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and Denmark. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning transparent optical materials and the measurement of their properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film characteristics, thin film damage, considerations for high-power systems, and finally theory and breakdown. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented at the symposium was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for high-power apparatus. The wavelength range of prime interest was from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was discussed in detail. Harold E. Bennett of the Naval Weapons Center, Alexander J. Glass of the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory, and Brian E. Newnam of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory were cochairpersons. The twelfth annual symposium is scheduled for 30 September-1 October 1980 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20234423

  16. 8th International symposium on transport phenomena in combustion

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The 8th International Symposium on Transport Phenomena in Combustion will be held in San Francisco, California, U.S.A., July 16-20, 1995, under the auspices of the Pacific Center of Thermal-Fluids Engineering. The purpose of the Symposium is to provide a forum for researchers and practitioners from around the world to present new developments and discuss the state of the art and future directions and priorities in the areas of transport phenomena in combustion. The Symposium is the eighth in a series; previous venues were Honolulu 1985, Tokyo 1987, Taipei 1988, Sydney 1991, Beijing 1992, Seoul 1993 and Acapulco 1994, with emphasis on various aspects of transport phenomena. The current Symposium theme is combustion. The Symposium has assembled a balanced program with topics ranging from fundamental research to contemporary applications of combustion theory. Invited keynote lecturers will provide extensive reviews of topics of great interest in combustion. Colloquia will stress recent advances and innovations in fire spread and suppression, and in low NO{sub x} burners, furnaces, boilers, internal combustion engines, and other practical combustion systems. Finally, numerous papers will contribute to the fundamental understanding of complex processes in combustion. This document contains abstracts of papers to be presented at the Symposium.

  17. XXIVth International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Lattice 2006, the XXIV International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory, was held from July 23-28, 2006 at the Starr Pass Hotel near Tucson, Arizona, USA, hosted by the University of Arizona Physics Department. The scientific program contained 25 plenary session talks and 193 parallel session contributions (talks and posters). Topics in lattice QCD included: hadron spectroscopy; hadronic interactions and structure; algorithms, machines, and networks; chiral symmetry; QCD confinement and topology; quark masses, gauge couplings, and renormalization; electroweak decays and mixing; high temperature and density; and theoretical developments. Topics beyond QCD included large Nc, Higgs, SUSY, gravity, and strings.

  18. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2014-01-10

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  19. The C3E Women in Clean Energy Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Saylors-Laster, Kim; Kirsch, Emily; Brown, Sandra; Jordan, Rhonda; Mukherjee, Anuradha; Martin, Cheryl; Madden, Alice; Araujo, Kathy

    2013-09-30

    The Clean Energy Education & Empowerment initiative (C3E), provides a forum for thought leaders across the clean energy sector to devise innovative solutions to the nation's most pressing energy challenges. This year, the symposium was held at MIT's Media Lab in Cambridge, MA, on September 19-20, 2013. What sets the annual conference apart is its focus on building a strong community of professionals dedicated to advancing more women leaders in clean energy fields. By working to leverage the skills, talents and perspectives of women, the symposium helps to better position the U.S. to lead the global clean energy revolution.

  20. Eighth Symposium on Biologic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Dearth, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    The Eighth Symposium on Biologic Scaffolds for Regenerative Medicine was held from 24 to 26 April 2014 at the Silverado Resort in Napa, CA, USA. The symposium was well attended by a diverse audience of academic scientists, industry members and physicians from around the world. The conference showcased the strong foundation of both basic and translational research utilizing biologic scaffolds in regenerative medicine applications across nearly all tissue systems and facilitated vibrant discussions among participants. This article provides an overview of the conference by providing a brief synopsis of selected presentations, each focused on a unique research and/or clinical investigation currently underway. PMID:25372075

  1. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modeling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  2. Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review recent developments in sensors, controls, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the Third International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Holiday Inn Capital Plaza in Tallahassee, Florida on 13-15 Dec. 1995. The symposium included 19 sessions in which a total of 55 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, superconductivity, vibration isolation, maglev, controls, space applications, general applications, bearing/actuator design, modeling, precision applications, electromagnetic launch and hypersonic maglev, applications of superconductivity, and sensors.

  3. Skin Regeneration Symposium Cambridge, 12-13 April 2016.

    PubMed

    Hill, Rosalind

    2016-07-01

    The Annual Skin Regeneration Symposium, held in Cambridge, UK, 12-13 April 2016, explored the latest advancements in skin repair, regeneration and restoration, and the impact this has on patients. With over 140 delegates from the disciplines of burn and trauma care, chronic wounds and esthetic medicine, the symposium sparked lively debate and the sharing of results from interesting case studies, clinical trials and basic research to support the use of a Regenerative Epithelial Suspension produced using the ReCell(®) technology. Furthermore, it enabled delegates and speakers alike to share ideas and discuss how to improve the quality of care for patients. PMID:27357476

  4. Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, the 2nd International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology was held at the Westin Hotel in Seattle, WA, on 11-13 Aug. 1993. The symposium included 18 technical sessions in which 44 papers were presented. The technical sessions covered the areas of bearings, bearing modelling, controls, vibration isolation, micromachines, superconductivity, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), rotating machinery and energy storage, and applications. A list of attendees appears at the end of the document.

  5. World Population Day special symposium.

    PubMed

    1998-08-01

    This article describes Japan's celebration of World Population Day, and provides excerpts from speeches at the symposium held on July 8, 1998. The symposium, in Tokyo, was attended by about 300 people. The Chairman of JOICFP gave the opening address. The executive director of UNFPA congratulated Japan for its efforts in the field of population awareness and noted Japan's self-sufficiency despite its importation of 40% of its food and most of its raw materials. A keynote address was delivered by the president of CPE and the former UN Secretary General, who stressed income inequities in the 66% of developing countries within the 185 UN member states. The UN has been promoting sustainable development, but is facing the issue of limited arable land and population growth. The Tutsi and Hutus are fighting due to population based issues. The emphasis should be on women's reproductive rights and protection of women's human rights. 1998 is the 50th year of human rights; progress has been made. The UNFPA Goodwill Ambassador spoke about the disparity between the rich and poor in the Philippines. A small donation reaps incredible progress. Manila has high levels of adolescent childbearing. Men appear to be unaware of the disadvantages of childbearing too early. Rural areas are dominated by strict Roman Catholic beliefs. Manila has commercial sex workers who provide services to Japanese men. The 1998 Kato Award was given to women who raised awareness about coercion in the sex trade and female genital mutilation. The economic situation in Japan creates even greater need to promote family planning and reproductive health. PMID:12321788

  6. In vitro study of histamine and histamine receptor ligands influence on the adhesion of purified human eosinophils to endothelium.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Wójcik, Tomasz; Chlopicki, Stefan; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2016-04-15

    It is a well-known fact that histamine is involved in eosinophil-dependent inflammatory responses including cellular chemotaxis and migration. Nevertheless, the relative role of histamine receptors in the mechanisms of eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells is not known. Therefore the aim of presented study was to examine the effect of selective histamine receptors ligands on eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. For that purpose the highly purified human eosinophils have been isolated from the peripheral blood. The viability and functional integrity of isolated eosinophils have been validated in several tests. Histamine as well as 4-methylhistamine (selective H4 agonist) in concentration-dependent manner significantly increased number of eosinophils that adhere to endothelium. Among the selective histamine receptors antagonist or H1 inverse agonist only JNJ7777120 (histamine H4 antagonist) and thioperamide (dual histamine H3/H4 antagonist) had direct effect on eosinophils adhesion to endothelial cells. Antagonists of H1 (diphenhydramine, mepyramine) H2 (ranitidine and famotidine) and H3 (pitolisant) histamine receptors were ineffective. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that histamine receptor H4 plays a dominant role in histamine-induced eosinophils adhesion to endothelium. PMID:26939881

  7. Increased histamine sensitivity in mice after administration of endotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, R K; Munoz, J J

    1977-01-01

    CFW mice given submicrogram doses of endotoxins intravenously became highly susceptible to the lethal effects of 0.5 mg of histamine given intraperitoneally 1 to 2 h later. The histamine-sensitizing effects of the endotoxins were transitory and disappeared within 6 to 8 h. L-Epinephrine administered intravenously immediately after histamine challenge protected mice from death, but aterenol and isoproterenol were ineffective. The histamine-sensitizing effect in endotoxins was precipitated by anti-endotoxin sera with a concomitant eightfold loss in activity. However, dissociation of the immune complex in 0.25 M acetic acid fully restored histamine-sensitizing activity. The transitory nature of the hypersensitivity produced by endotoxin and the high heat resistance of the active material prove that it is different from the histamine-sensitizing effects of pertussigen. PMID:188767

  8. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  9. Histamine pharmacology and new CNS drug targets.

    PubMed

    Tiligada, Ekaterini; Kyriakidis, Konstantinos; Chazot, Paul L; Passani, M Beatrice

    2011-12-01

    During the last decade, the identification of a number of novel drug targets led to the development of promising new compounds which are currently under evaluation for their therapeutic prospective in CNS related disorders. Besides the established pleiotropic regulatory functions in the periphery, the interest in the potential homeostatic role of histamine in the brain was revived following the identification of H(3) and H(4) receptors some years ago. Complementing classical CNS pharmacology, the development of selective histamine receptor agonists, antagonists, and inverse agonists provides the lead for the potential exploitation of the histaminergic system in the treatment of brain pathologies. Although no CNS disease entity has been associated directly to brain histamine dysfunction until now, the H(3) receptor is recognized as a drug target for neuropathic pain, sleep-wake disorders, including narcolepsy, and cognitive impairment associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, Alzheimer's, or Parkinson's disease, while the first H(3) receptor ligands have already entered phase I-III clinical trials. Interestingly, the localization of the immunomodulatory H(4) receptor in the nervous system exposes attractive perspectives for the therapeutic exploitation of this new drug target in neuroimmunopharmacology. This review focuses on a concise presentation of the current "translational research" approach that exploits the latest advances in histamine pharmacology for the development of beneficial drug targets for the treatment of neuronal disorders, such as neuropathic pain, cognitive, and sleep-wake pathologies. Furthermore, the role of the brain histaminergic system(s) in neuroprotection and neuroimmunology/inflammation remains a challenging research area that is currently under consideration. PMID:22070192

  10. Histamine release inhibition activity of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, K; Tsuchiya, S; Sugimoto, Y; Sugimura, Y; Yamada, Y

    1992-12-01

    Eleven examples of bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloids (head-to-head; 10, head-to-tail; 1) and one half molecule type (N-methylcoclaurine), were tested by in vitro histamine release inhibition assay. The order of the potency of the inhibitory effect was ranked thus: homoaromoline, aromoline, isotetrandrine, cepharanthine, fangchinoline, obaberine, and tetrandrine. The following substances, cepharanoline, berbamine, oxyacanthine, and cycleanine (head-to-tail structure) had no inhibitory effect. N-Methylcoclaurine showed an inhibitory effect comparable to that of fangchinoline. PMID:1484888

  11. PREFACE: XXXVII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijker, R.; Lerma, S.; Lizcano, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Symposium on Nuclear Physics is an international meeting organized every year since 1978 by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society. The 37th edition was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc in the state of Morelos, Mexico, from 6-9 January, 2014. The symposium is intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in different areas of nuclear physics (nuclear astrophysics, nuclear structure, neutrino physics, hadron physics and nuclear reactions among others). Both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists gathered in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. The symposium was organized in plenary sessions with invited talks and a poster session. In this edition the program consisted of 26 invited talks and 19 posters, whose subjects reflected the active areas and interests of the mexican nuclear physics community. The organization encouraged the participation of young scientist as speakers in the plenary sessions. Seven of the 26 invited talks were given by postdoctoral and doctoral students working in different institutions from Mexico, USA and Europe. The proceedings collect a total of 16 manuscripts from the invited speakers.

  12. International research symposium on Goltz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fete, Timothy J; Fete, Mary

    2016-03-01

    The International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was held at Texas Children's Hospital on July 22 and 23, 2013. This unique research, educational, and family-oriented symposium was sponsored by the National Foundation for Ectodermal Dysplasias, Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children's Hospital. Goltz syndrome, or Focal Dermal Hypoplasia (FDH), is a highly variable X-linked dominant disorder with abnormalities in tissues derived from the ectoderm and mesoderm. Classic clinical features include patchy hypoplastic skin, split hand/foot deformities, and ocular manifestations. FDH is caused by PORCN gene mutations. PORCN is involved in the secretion and signaling of Wnt proteins, which play a role in embryonic tissue development. The purpose of the International Research Symposium on Goltz Syndrome was to review the progress that has been made in recent years in research related to this rare disorder and to explore potential future research directions and treatments. This issue of American Journal of Medical Genetics contains the research findings from the evaluations from multiple subspecialties. There is a recommendation for a new diagnostic guideline to aid clinicians in identifying individuals with Focal Dermal Hypoplasia. A tissue repository has been instituted at Texas Children's Hospital, to aid future researchers in this area. PMID:26834080

  13. Pulmonary serotonin and histamine in experimental asbestosis

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, I.M.; Day, R.; Lemaire, S.

    1986-03-01

    Adult male Wistar rats were treated once with tracheal instillation of 5 mg Crysotile B asbestos fibers in 0.5 ml saline under ketamine/xylaxine anesthesia. Control rats (n = 37) received 0.5 ml saline. Test and control rats were killed at 7 and 14 d., and 1, 3 and 6 mo. post instillation. Serotonin (5-HT) was quantitated in lung tissue homogenate from all rats using HPLC and electrochemical detection. Among rats killed at 1, 3 and 6 mo., lung tissue histamine-o-phthaldialdehyde complex was quantitated using reverse phase HPLC coupled to a fluorometric detector. Furthermore, 5-HT was quantitated in the cytoplasm of grouped (NEB) and individual (NEC) neuroendocrine cells and in mast cells using formaldehyde-vapor-induced fluorescence and microspectrofluorometry, and mast cell numbers were determined. Test rats had higher pulmonary 5-HT and histamine levels than controls at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Test rats also had higher cellular 5-HT compared to controls in NEB's at 1 mo., but not in NECs, and tended to have higher 5-HT-levels in mast cells at 6 mo. Mast cell numbers were higher among tests at 1 and 3 mo. The authors results suggest that NEBs may contribute to the early asbestos induced rise in 5-HT, and that the major source of 5-HT and histamine is from the increased numbers of mast cells.

  14. Histamine operates Cl -gated channels in crayfish neurosecretory cells.

    PubMed

    Cebada, Jorge; García, Ubaldo

    2007-11-01

    We describe a histamine-activated Cl(-) conductance in the X-organ neurons from crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus, which has comparable properties to the homomultimeric histamine-gated ion channels described in Drosophila. Topical application of histamine inhibited spontaneous neuronal firing in the X-organ sinus gland tract, concomitant with an increase in the membrane conductance. In X-organ neurons in culture and under voltage-clamp conditions, histamine evoked outward currents at -40 mV that reversed at the Cl(-) equilibrium potential. Histamine sensitivity in these neurons had a half-maximal response (EC(50))=3.3+/-1 micromol l(-1), with a Hill number of 2.6+/-0.4. The histamine-evoked current was blocked by tiotidine, cimetidine, ranitidine and 256+/-11 and 483+/-11 micromol l(-1), respectively) and d-tubocurarine (IC(50)=21+/-2 micromol l(-1)), but was insensitive to picrotoxin, bicuculline and strychnine. Neither GABA nor glutamate was capable of desensitizing the histamine response, indicating that histamine activates a particular Cl(-) conductance. The presence of immunoreactive neurons to histamine in the medulla terminalis with axonal projections to the neuropile suggests a possible histaminergic modulation of the X-organ sinus gland system. PMID:17981864

  15. Characterisation of textile dust extracts: I. Histamine release in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, J S; Duncan, P G

    1984-01-01

    Cotton, flax, hemp, and cotton bracts extracts did not release histamine from mouse, rat, guinea pig, horse, cow, and monkey lung. Neither rat peritoneal mast cells nor mouse mastocytoma cells released histamine when incubated with textile dust extracts. Compound 48/80 caused a considerable release of histamine from all these tissues and the extracts released histamine from pig and human lung tissues. Whereas dusts that cause bronchospasm in man released histamine--for instance, cotton--those that are inactive, such as pericarps, did not. Histamine release was not quantitatively related to the concentration of extract used. Cotton bracts extract released histamine from pig lung tissue whereas in the same preparations methyl piperonylate was inactive. The active releasing agent was highly water soluble but could not be steam distilled from, nor extracted by, ether from bracts extract. These physicochemical properties are not characteristic of methyl piperonylate. There was no correlation between the induction of histidine decarboxylase and the histamine releasing capacity of the extracts. We conclude that pig lung is a useful qualitative assay tissue for the further characterisation of the histamine releasing agent(s) in textile dust extracts. PMID:6197990

  16. Decrease in blood histamine in drug-treated parkinsonian patients.

    PubMed

    Coelho, M H; Silva, I J; Azevedo, M S; Manso, C F

    1991-04-01

    Blood histamine and serum histaminase activity were determined in a group of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) and in a group of healthy controls. Untreated PD patients present significantly higher blood histamine than normal controls. Therapy with L-dopa + cardidopa results in a significant decrease in blood histamine. This decrease becomes more accentuated when anticholinergics are added to this therapy. No significant changes were detected in plasma histaminase. The authors suggest, as a hypothesis, that the CNS contributes to blood histamine concentration and that its rise is the result of increased neuronal destruction. PMID:1910360

  17. PREFACE: Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergström, Lars; Botner, Olga; Carlson, Per; Hulth, Per Olof; Ohlsson, Tommy

    2005-01-01

    Nobel Symposium 129 on Neutrino Physics was held at Haga Slott in Enköping, Sweden during August 19 24, 2004. Invited to the symposium were around 40 globally leading researchers in the field of neutrino physics, both experimental and theoretical. In addition to these participants, some 30 local researchers and graduate students participated in the symposium. The dominant theme of the lectures was neutrino oscillations, which after several years were recently verified by results from the Super-Kamiokande detector in Kamioka, Japan and the SNO detector in Sudbury, Canada. Discussion focused especially on effects of neutrino oscillations derived from the presence of matter and the fact that three different neutrinos exist. Since neutrino oscillations imply that neutrinos have mass, this is the first experimental observation that fundamentally deviates from the standard model of particle physics. This is a challenge to both theoretical and experimental physics. The various oscillation parameters will be determined with increased precision in new, specially designed experiments. Theoretical physics is working intensively to insert the knowledge that neutrinos have mass into the theoretical models that describe particle physics. It will probably turn out that the discovery of neutrino oscillations signifies a breakthrough in the description of the very smallest constituents of matter. The lectures provided a very good description of the intensive situation in the field right now. The topics discussed also included mass models for neutrinos, neutrinos in extra dimensions as well as the `seesaw mechanism', which provides a good description of why neutrino masses are so small. Also discussed, besides neutrino oscillations, was the new field of neutrino astronomy. Among the questions that neutrino astronomy hopes to answer are what the dark matter in the Universe consists of and where cosmic radiation at extremely high energies comes from. For this purpose, large neutrino

  18. The VLT Opening Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergeron, J.

    1999-06-01

    The beginning of the VLT era was marked by two major events: the VLT Official Inauguration Ceremony at Paranal on 5 March 1999, preceded by the VLT Opening Symposium on 1-4 March. ESO is indebted to Professor J.A. Music Tomicic, Rector of the Universidad Católica del Norte, for hosting this symposium. Another major event occurred on the night of 4 March: First light was achieved ahead of schedule at Kueyen, the second 8.2-m VLT unit telescope.

  19. Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyer, Don

    2002-01-01

    This is to report on the use of the funds provided by NASA to support the 'Third International Symposium on Environmental Hydraulics with a Special Theme on Urban Fluid Dynamics'. The Symposium was held on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona, USA, from 5-8 December 2001. It proved to be a forum for the discussion of a wide range of applied and basic research being conducted in the general areas of water and air resources, with the latter focusing on air quality in urban areas associated with complex terrain. This aspect of the Symposium was highlighted by twelve invited papers given by distinguished international scientists and roughly three hundred contributed manuscripts. Owing primarily to the current international situation, roughly 20% of the authors canceled their plans to attend the Symposium; while this was unfortunate, the Symposium went ahead with the enthusiastic participation of more than 250 scientists from forty nations.

  20. The 13th Tihany Symposium on Radiation Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojnárovits, László; Takács, Erzsébet

    2016-07-01

    The Symposium was held in Balatonalmádi, a beautiful city by the Lake Balaton, Hungary, between August 29 and September 3, 2015. This time - to meet the expectations of many colleagues and friends - a place close to the village Tihany was selected, where the first Tihany Symposium was organized in 1962. The participants beside the excellent lectures could also enjoy the panorama of the Lake from the rooms and from the terrace of Hotel Ramada. The number of participants was close to 170 from about 33 countries. The highest number of participants arrived from Poland (14), followed by France (11), Turkey (9) and China (9). The Symposium had 6-6 colleagues from Brazil, Israel, and Romania. Beside China, Asia was represented by a few scientists from the Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, Philippines and from Saudi Arabia.

  1. Fourth International Symposium on Long-Range Sound Propagation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willshire, William L., Jr. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Long range sound propagation is an aspect of many acoustical problems ranging from en route aircraft noise to the acoustic detection of aircraft. Over the past decade, the University of Mississippi and the Open University of England, together with a third institution, have held a symposium approx. every 2 years so that experts in the field of long range propagation could exchange information on current research, identify areas needing additional work, and coordinate activities as much as possible. The Fourth International Symposium on Long Range Sound Propagation was jointly sponsored by the University of Mississippi, the Open University of England, and NASA. Papers were given in the following areas: ground effects on propagation; infrasound propagation; and meteorological effects on sound propagation. A compilation of the presentations made at the symposium is presented along with a list of attendees, and the agenda.

  2. Proceedings of the 2012 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    ELMORE, SUSAN A.; BERRIDGE, BRIAN R.; BOYLE, MICHAEL C.; CORA, MICHELLE C.; HOENERHOFF, MARK J.; KOOISTRA, LINDA; LAAST, VICTORIA A.; MORRISON, JAMES P.; RAO, DEEPA; RINKE, MATTHIAS; YOSHIZAWA, KATSUHIKO

    2014-01-01

    The 2012 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held in Boston in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology’s 31st annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting or discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include eosinophilic crystalline pneumonia in a transgenic mouse model; differentiating adrenal cortical cystic degeneration from adenoma; atypical eosinophilic foci of altered hepatocytes; differentiating cardiac schwannoma from cardiomyopathy; diagnosis of cardiac papillary muscle lesions; intrahepatocytic erythrocytes and venous subendothelial hepatocytes; lesions in Rathke’s cleft and pars distalis; pernicious anemia and megaloblastic disorders; embryonic neuroepithelial dysplasia, holoprosencephaly and exencephaly; and INHAND nomenclature for select cardiovascular lesions. PMID:23262640

  3. PREFACE: 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-08-01

    The 24th European Cosmic Ray Symposium (ECRS) took place in Kiel, Germany, at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel from September 1 - 5, 2014, The first symposium was held in 1968 in Lodz, Poland (high energy, extensive air showers and astrophysical aspects) and in Bern (solar and heliospheric phenomena) and the two "strands" joined together in 1976 with the meeting in Leeds. The 24th ECRS covered a wide range of scientific issues divided into the following topics: HECR-I Primary cosmic rays I (experiments) HECR-II Primary cosmic rays II (theory) MN Cosmic ray muons and neutrinos GR GeV and TeV gamma astronomy SH Energetic particles in the heliosphere (solar and anomalous CRs and GCR modulation) GEO Cosmic rays and geophysics (energetic particles in the atmosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth) INS Future Instrumentation DM Dark Matter The organizers are very grateful to the Deutsche Forschungs Gemeinschaft for supporting the symposium.

  4. CHRONICLE: Third International Symposium on Modern Optics, Budapest, September 1988

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhenskiĭ, M. F.; Nikitin, P. I.; Semenov, A. S.

    1989-07-01

    The Third International Symposium on Modern Optics (Optics-88), held in Budapest on 13-16 September 1988, was organized by the Hungarian Optical, Acoustic, and Cinematographic Society with the support of the International Commission on Optics and various scientific and industrial organizations in Hungary. The International Symposium Committee was composed of leading specialists from 11 countries in Asia, America, and Europe with A. M. Prokhorov (USSR) and N. Kroo (Hungary) as Co-chairmen. The purpose of this regular symposium is to summarize the scientific and technical progress underlying the developments in optics itself, discuss the branches of science where progress depends on optical methods in devices, and draw the attention of specialists to the most promising trends which should yield results in the immediate future.

  5. The Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This volume contains the papers presented at the Fifth Symposium on Numerical and Physical Aspects of Aerodynamic Flows, held at the California State University, Long Beach, from 13 to 15 January 1992. The symposium, like its immediate predecessors, considers the calculation of flows of relevance to aircraft, ships, and missiles with emphasis on the solution of two-dimensional unsteady and three-dimensional equations.

  6. Proceedings of the 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Eun-Kyung; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Hyung Jae

    2004-09-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Blue Laser and Light Emitting Diodes (ISBLLED-2004) was held in Gyeongju, Korea, 15-19 March 2004. The purpose of the symposium was to provide a forum for scientists and engineers to discuss recent progress and future trends in the rapidly advancing wide band gap semiconductor science and technologies and their applications in blue laser and light emitting diodes.

  7. PREFACE: XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof

    2011-10-01

    In the present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the 'XXXIV Symposium on Nuclear Physics', which was held from 4-7 January 2011 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings consist of 19 contributions that were presented as invited talks at the meeting. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. From the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium has been organized every year without interruption, which makes the present Symposium the 34th in a row. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks and 17 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear physics, ranging from the traditional fields of nuclear structure (Draayer, Pittel, Van Isacker, Fraser, Lerma, Cejnar, Hirsch, Stránský and Rath) and nuclear reactions (Aguilera, Gómez-Camacho, Scheid, Navrátil and Yennello) to radioactive beams (Padilla-Rodal and Galindo-Uribarri), nuclear astrophysics (Aprahamian, Civitarese and Escher), hadronic physics (Bijker, Valcarce and Hess), fundamental symmetries (Liu, Barrón-Palos and Baessler) and LHC physics (Menchaca-Rocha and Paic). The high quality of the talks, the prestige of the speakers and the broad spectrum of subjects covered in the meeting, shows that nuclear physics is a very active area at the frontier of scientific research which establishes bridges between many different disciplines. Libertad Barr

  8. Involvement of histamine H4 and H1 receptors in scratching induced by histamine receptor agonists in Balb C mice.

    PubMed

    Bell, J K; McQueen, D S; Rees, J L

    2004-05-01

    The role of histamine H(1), H(2), H(3) and H(4) receptors in acute itch induced by histamine was investigated in female BalbC mice. Scratching was induced by intradermal injections of pruritogen into the back of the neck and "itch" assessed by quantifying the scratching evoked. Histamine (0.03-80 micromol), histamine-trifluoromethyl-toluidine (HTMT, H(1) agonist, 0.002-2 micromol), clobenpropit (H(4) agonist, H(3) antagonist, 0.002-0.6 micromol) and to a lesser extent imetit (H(3)/H(4) agonist, 0.03-3 micromol) all induced dose-dependent scratching. Dimaprit (H(2) agonist, 0.04-40 micromol) did not cause scratching. Mepyramine (H(1) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced scratching evoked by histamine and HTMT, but not that caused by H(3) or H(4) agonists. Thioperamide (H(3)/H(4) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced scratching induced by histamine, H(3) and H(4) agonists, but not that caused by HTMT. The non-sedating H(1) antagonist, terfenadine, also significantly reduced the scratching induced by the H(1) agonist, HTMT. Cimetidine (H(2) antagonist, 20 mg kg(-1), i.p.) did not affect histamine-induced scratching. These results indicate that activation of histamine H(4) receptors causes itch in mice, in addition to the previously recognised role for H(1) receptors in evoking itch. Histamine H(4) receptor antagonists therefore merit investigation as antipruritic agents. PMID:15066908

  9. PREFACE: 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Shu; Sekino, Tohru; Tanaka, Shun-ichiro; Sato, Tsugio; Lu, Li; Xue, Dongfeng

    2012-01-01

    The 4th International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM2011) was held in Sendai, Japan, on 2-6 August 2011. This Special Issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) consists of partial manuscripts which were presented at ISFM2011. Advanced materials have experienced a dramatic increase in demand for research, development and applications. The aim of the International Symposium on Functional Materials (ISFM) was to provide an overview of the present status with historical background and to foresee future trends in the field of functional materials. The 4th symposium, ISFM 2011, covered a wide variety of topics within state-of-the-art advanced materials science and technology, and focused especially on four major categories including: Environmental Materials, Electronic Materials, Energy Materials and Biomedical Materials. As you know, a massive earthquake and the Tsunami that followed occurred near the Tohoku region on 11 March 2011. After the earthquake, although there were many difficulties in continuing to organize the symposium, we received warm encouragement from many researchers and societies, especially from the members of the International Advisory Committee and Organizing Committee, so that ISFM2011 could be held on schedule. We are honored that ISFM2011 was the first formal international academic conference held in the Tohoku area of Japan after the 11 March earthquake. About 140 participants from 14 countries took part in the ISFM2011 symposium, which included five plenary talks by world-leading scientists, 32 invited talks, and many oral and poster presentations. We are delighted to see that many researchers are interested in the synthesis and the properties as well as the applications of functional materials. Many fruitful and exciting research achievements were presented in the symposium. We believe that this symposium provided a good chance for scientists to communicate and exchange opinions with each other. We would also like to

  10. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20212622

  11. Development of a homogeneous binding assay for histamine receptors.

    PubMed

    Crane, Kathy; Shih, Daw-Tsun

    2004-12-01

    Histamine is critically involved in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes through its actions at different receptors. Thus, histamine receptors have been actively pursued as therapeutic targets in the pharmaceutical industry for the treatment of a variety of diseases. There are currently four histamine receptors that have been cloned, all of which are G protein-coupled receptors. Studies from both academia and pharmaceutical companies have identified compounds that modulate the function of specific histamine receptors. These efforts led to the successful introduction of histamine H(1) and H(2) receptor antagonists for the treatment of allergy and excess gastric acid secretion, respectively. Histamine H(3) receptor ligands are currently under investigation for the treatment of obesity and neurological disorders. The recently identified histamine H(4) receptor is preferentially expressed in the immune tissues, suggesting a potential role in normal immune functions and possibly in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases. Even with the long history of histamine research and the important applications of histamine receptor ligands, assays to measure the affinity of compounds binding to histamine receptors are still routinely analyzed using a filtration assay, a very low-throughput assay involving washing and filtration steps. This article describes a simple, robust, and homogeneous binding assay based on the scintillation proximity assay (SPA) technology that provides results equivalent to those obtained using the more complex filtration assay. The SPA format is easily adapted to high-throughput screening because it is amenable to automation. In summary, this technique allows high-throughput screening of compounds against multiple histamine receptors and, thus, facilitates drug discovery efforts. PMID:15519569

  12. 32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB 2016).

    PubMed

    Ramautar, Rawi

    2016-09-01

    32nd International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis, Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, 3-7 April 2016 The 32nd edition of the International Symposium on Microscale Separations and Bioanalysis (MSB) was held in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Canada, from 3 to 7 April 2016. This article outlines the aim and the main distinctive features of the MSB symposium. A selection of the scientific research presented at MSB 2016 is highlighted with a special focus on microscale separation developments in the fields of sample preparation, (glyco)proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:27416852

  13. Overview of the International Symposium on Eurasian Ruffe (Gymnocephalus cernuus) Biology, Impacts, and Control

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gunderson, Jeffrey L.; Klepinger, Michael R.; Bronte, Charles R.; Marsden, J. Ellen

    1998-01-01

    The International Symposium on the Biology and Management of Ruffe was organized to address the potential threat ruffe pose to North American fisheries. Scientists in diverse disciplines from Eurasia and North America were brought together in an attempt to examine all aspects of the North American invasion of ruffe, and to highlight the effects of similar introductions in Europe and Asia. The symposium, sponsored by the Minnesota and Michigan Sea Grant College programs, featured 48 oral and poster presentations and was held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during 21-23 March 1997. Papers from the symposium are published in a special section of this issue of the Journal of Great Lakes Research.

  14. Research Symposium I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The proceedings of this symposium consist of abstracts of talks presented by interns at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The interns assisted researchers at GRC in projects which primarily address the following topics: aircraft engines and propulsion, spacecraft propulsion, fuel cells, thin film photovoltaic cells, aerospace materials, computational fluid dynamics, aircraft icing, management, and computerized simulation.

  15. Tools in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on tools in human resource development (HRD). "Game Theory Methodology in HRD" (Thomas J. Chermack, Richard A. Swanson) explores the utility of game theory in helping the HRD profession address the complexity of integrating multiple theories for disciplinary understanding and fulfilling its…

  16. Recruitment and Training. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on recruitment and training. "College Choice: The State of Marketing and Effective Student Recruitment Strategies" (Fredrick Muyia Nafukho, Michael F. Burnett) reports on a study of the recruitment strategies used by Louisiana State University's admissions office and College of Agriculture that…

  17. European Cosmic Ray Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    13me Symposium qui se déroule du 27 au 31 juillet pour la première fois au Cern. Brian Pattison ouvre la cérémonie et donne la parole à Dr.Ugland (qui représente le DG C.Rubbia excusé) et d'autres intervenants

  18. Standards and Certification. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on standards and certification in human resource development (HRD). "Implementing Management Standards in the UK" (Jonathan Winterton, Ruth Winterton) reports on a study that explored the implementation of management standards in 16 organizations and identified 36 key themes and strategic issues…

  19. Globalism and HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on globalization and human resource development (HRD). "Challenges and Strategies of Developing Human Resources in the Surge of Globalization: A Case of the People's Republic of China" (De Zhang, Baiyin Yang, Yichi Zhang) analyzes the challenges and strategies of HRD in China and discusses the…

  20. Online Learning. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on online learning that was conducted as part of a conference on human resource development (HRD). "An Instructional Strategy Framework for Online Learning Environments" (Scott D. Johnson, Steven R. Aragon) discusses the pitfalls of modeling online courses after traditional instruction instead…

  1. Fifth Cooley's anemia symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Bank, A.; Anderson, W.F.; Zaino, E.C.

    1985-01-01

    This book discusses the topics presented at the symposium on the subject of 'Thalassemia'. Sickle cell anemia is also briefly discussed. The aspects discussed are chromosomal defects of anemias particularly globin synthesis, and the role of messenger RNA and other chromosomes.

  2. Issues of Gender. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on issues of gender in human resource development (HRD). "The Impact of Awareness and Action on the Implementation of a Women's Network" (Laura L. Bierema) reports on research to examine how gender consciousness emerges through the formation of in-company networks to promote corporate women's status. It…

  3. Technical Entrepreneurship: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Arnold C., Ed.; Komives, John L., Ed.

    Contained in this document are papers presented at the Symposium on Technical Entrepreneurship at Purdue University by researchers who were then or had previously been engaged in research in the area. Because formal research in this area was in its infancy, there was a particular need to afford investigators in the field opportunities to compare…

  4. Issues of HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on issues of human resource development (HRD). "The Complex Roots of Human Resource Development" (Monica Lee) discusses the roots of HRD within the framework of the following views of management: (1) classic (the view that managers must be able to create appropriate rules and procedures for…

  5. Competencies in HRD. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on competencies in human resource development (HRD). "The Development of a Competency Model and Assessment Instrument for Public Sector Leadership and Management Development" (Sharon S. Naquin, Elwood F. Holton III) reports on a streamlined methodology and process used to develop a competency model for…

  6. Quality of Life Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces. New Mexico Environmental Inst.

    Comments, speeches, and questions delivered at the Quality of Life Symposium are compiled in these proceedings. As an exploratory session, the conference objectives were to (1) become better informed about New Mexico--its resource base, the economy, social and cultural base, and the environment; and (2) to evaluate and discuss the role of New…

  7. Values: A Symposium Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, T. A., Ed.

    This publication brings together a set of four papers prepared for a symposium on values at the 1972 annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association. The first paper, by Fred N. Kerlinger, establishes a rationale for values research. The discussion focuses on the definition of values, relationship between values and attitudes,…

  8. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid information,…

  9. Histamine and histamine receptors in Tourette syndrome and other neuropsychiatric conditions.

    PubMed

    Rapanelli, Maximiliano; Pittenger, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    The potential contributions of dysregulation of the brain's histaminergic modulatory system to neuropsychiatric disease, and the potential of histamine-targeting medications as therapeutic agents, are gradually coming into focus. The H3R receptor, which is expressed primarily in the central nervous system, is a promising pharmacotherapeutic target. Recent evidence for a contribution of histamine dysregulation to Tourette syndrome and tic disorders is particularly strong; although specific mutations in histamine-associated genes are rare, they have led to informative studies in animal models that may pave the way for therapeutic advances. A controlled study of an H3R antagonist in Tourette syndrome is ongoing. Preclinical studies of H3R antagonists in schizophrenia, attention deficit disorder, and narcolepsy have all shown promise. Recently reported controlled studies have been disappointing in schizophrenia and attention deficit disorder, but the H3R antagonist pitolisant shows promise in the treatment of narcolepsy and excessive daytime sleepiness and is currently under regulatory review for these conditions. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26282120

  10. Laser induced damage in optical materials: ninth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1978-08-01

    The Ninth Annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 4-6 October 1977. The symposium was under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy (formerly ERDA), and the Office of Naval Research. About 185 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Australia, Union of South Africa, and the Soviet Union. The Symposium was divided into sessions concerning Laser Windows and Materials, Mirrors and Surfaces, Thin Films, Laser Glass and Glass Lasers, and Fundamental Mechanisms. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the uv region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength were also discussed. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The Tenth Annual Symposium is scheduled for 12-14 September 1978 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20203792

  11. Reaching the hip-hop generation: Final (symposium proceedings) report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The goal of this final (closing) report is to capture the flavor of the symposium held March 1 and 2, 1993 in New York City convened by Motivational Educational Entertainment, Inc. (MEE), a black-owned communications research, consulting, and video production company based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The mission of MEE is to understand, reach, and positively affect inner-city youth. Traditional communication approaches from mainstream sources to at-risk youth often don`t account for the unique way youth communicate among themselves and how they relate to the media. This understanding, however, is crucial. To understand youth communication, the people who create and send both entertaining and educational messages to urban youth must be brought into the dialogue. The meeting in New York was intended to provide an important opportunity for senders to meet and evaluate the appropriateness and effectiveness of their messages. In addition, the MEE symposium provided a forum for the continuing public debate about what needs to be done to reach today`s urban teens. Included in this document is a description of symposium goals/objectives, symposium activities, the reaction to and analysis of the symposium, recommendations for future MEE courses of action, and an appendix containing copies of press articles.

  12. PREFACE: XXXVIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.

    2015-09-01

    The 38th edition of the Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 6-9, 2015. As in previous years, the Symposium brought together leading scientists from all around the world, working on: nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. The scientific program consisted of 27 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee that covered, in a balanced way, the experimental and theoretical work that currently is undergoing in the research fields of the Symposium. Ten posters complemented the program, providing students with an opportunity to bring their work to the attention of visiting scientists. This year, the conference activities also included a special talk presented by Archaeologist Omar Espinosa Severino about the ancient ruins found in Chalcatzingo, a village located approximately a 40 minute drive from the conference venue. The talk was followed by a visit to the archaeological site, guided by the group led by Archaeologist Mario Cordova Tello. The present volume contains 14 research articles based on invited talks presented at the Symposium. I would like to thank all the authors for their enthusiastic contribution. Special thanks to the anonymous referees for the time devoted to the review process, their input helped to maintain a high standard of the Conference Proceedings. Finally I would also like to thank the Symposiums' International Advisory Committee and the Sponsoring Organizations that made this event possible.

  13. 2nd PEGS Annual Symposium on Antibodies for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Mitchell; Royston, Ivor; Beck, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The 2nd Annual Antibodies for Cancer Therapy symposium, organized again by Cambridge Healthtech Institute as part of the Protein Engineering Summit, was held in Boston, USA from April 30th to May 1st, 2012. Since the approval of the first cancer antibody therapeutic, rituximab, fifteen years ago, eleven have been approved for cancer therapy, although one, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, was withdrawn from the market.  The first day of the symposium started with a historical review of early work for lymphomas and leukemias and the evolution from murine to human antibodies. The symposium discussed the current status and future perspectives of therapeutic antibodies in the biology of immunoglobulin, emerging research on biosimilars and biobetters, and engineering bispecific antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates. The tumor penetration session was focused on the understanding of antibody therapy using ex vivo tumor spheroids and the development of novel agents targeting epithelial junctions in solid tumors. The second day of the symposium discussed the development of new generation recombinant immunotoxins with low immunogenicity, construction of chimeric antigen receptors, and the proof-of-concept of ‘photoimmunotherapy’. The preclinical and clinical session presented antibodies targeting Notch signaling and chemokine receptors.  Finally, the symposium discussed emerging technologies and platforms for therapeutic antibody discovery. PMID:22864478

  14. PREFACE: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Maria L.; Dolganova, Irina N.; Gevorgyan, Narine; Guzman, Angela; Papoyan, Aram; Sarkisyan, Hayk; Yurchenko, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    The ICTP smr2633: 2nd International Symposium "Optics and its Applications" (OPTICS-2014) http://indico.ictp.it/event/a13253/ was held in Yerevan and Ashtarak, Armenia, on 1-5 September 2014. The Symposium was organized by the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) with the collaboration of the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter, the Armenian TC of ICO, the Russian-Armenian University (RAU), the Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia (IPR of NAS), the Greek-Armenian industrial company LT-Pyrkal, and the Yerevan State University (YSU). The Symposium was co-organized by the BMSTU SPIE & OSA student chapters. The International Symposium OPTICS-2014 was dedicated to the 50th anniversary of the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics. This symposium "Optics and its Applications" was the First Official ICTP Scientific Event in Armenia. The presentations at OPTICS-2014 were centered on these topics: optical properties of nanostructures; quantum optics & information; singular optics and its applications; laser spectroscopy; strong field optics; nonlinear & ultrafast optics; photonics & fiber optics; optics of liquid crystals; and mathematical methods in optics.

  15. Symposium on 'Adaptations of cells and tissues to mechanical stimuli' or 'Roux revisited' held during the Joint Meeting of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland, the Anatomical Society of Southern Africa and the Nederlandse Anatomen Vereniging, April 15-18 1998, Rolduc, The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Hillen, B

    1999-04-01

    In 1895, well over 100 years ago, Willem Roux published his collected works on the developmental mechanics of organisms in 2 volumes. Volume 1 is largely dedicated to functional adaptation and is a condensation of his investigations into causes of the size and shape of organs and tissues, postulating the influence of functional demand, mediated by mechanical stimuli, on the shaping of organs and tissues. In this classic work he contributed to the understanding of the control of the structural development and organisation of blood vessels, muscles and bone. This work has been a source of inspiration for many investigators over the years. Well known examples are Wolff's law and Pauwel's theory on trajectories. Over the past 2 decades these hypotheses and concepts have been reappraised using 2 main approaches. Firstly, in muscles and tendons a qualitative approach with classical Newtonian mechanics combined with the anatomical configuration of these structures has been used to study the direction and the nature of the mechanical stresses in the tissues, be they compressive, tensile or shear. In bone and blood vessels these stresses are less accessible and often require computer modelling to calculate the mechanics at a cellular level. Secondly, molecular biology has demonstrated, both in tissue culture and in animal experiments, that mechanical stimuli can bring about cascades of messages in and between cells, but the experimental control of mechanical stresses in biological experiments is far from simple and limits the conclusions that can be derived. In order to approach a complete picture, the gap between these 2 approaches must be bridged. In this respect modern imaging techniques are helpful because they offer the possibility of studying the shape and change of shape over time in living organisms in greater detail.The Symposium was organised in such a way that for different tissues recent advances using different approaches could be presented, helping to identify

  16. Histamine content, diamine oxidase activity and histamine methyltransferase activity in human tissues: fact or fictions?

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, R; Sattler, J; Lorenz, W; Stahlknecht, C D; Barth, H; Crombach, M; Weber, D

    1984-04-01

    To understand the role of histamine in the aetiology and pathogenesis of human diseases reliable data are urgently needed for the histamine content and for the activities of histamine-forming and -inactivating enzymes in human tissues. In order to make a substantial progress toward this aim a tissue-sampling programme during surgical interventions was carefully conceived and conducted. From March 1982 until January 1983 106 tissue specimens were taken from 56 patients who underwent surgery. Only healthy tissues, not injured or oedematous, and without adherent structures were taken by only one surgeon who was interested in this research and experienced in tissue preparation procedures in biochemistry. The times of 'warm' ischaemia during the operative procedures were visually estimated, the times between resection of the organs or specimens and deep-freezing of the tissues were precisely recorded. Compared to previous work in the literature and especially to our own work using the same assays for determination higher histamine contents were found in this study in most of the tissues, in particular in the gastrointestinal tract. Also the diamine oxidase activities were considerably higher in many organs, e.g. 3-4 times higher in the gastrointestinal tract when compared with those in publications of our group who used always the same analytical test. However, the histamine methyltransferase activities in this study were not at variance to those determined in previous investigations. Many of them were reported in this communication for the first time. Since the methods for histamine determination and those for measuring enzymic activities were not different in this study and in previous communications of our group we are convinced that the optimized tissue-sampling and -preparation techniques were responsible for the higher values in this communication. But the problem of the 'warm' ischaemia period could not be solved by sample-taking procedures of this type during

  17. Highlights from the Student Council Symposium 2011 at the International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology and European Conference on Computational Biology

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The Student Council (SC) of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) organized their annual symposium in conjunction with the Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB) conference. This meeting report summarizes the scientific content of the Student Council Symposium 2011 as well as other activities organized by the Student Council in the context of ISMB. The symposium was held in Vienna, Austria on July 15th 2011.

  18. [Histamine intolerance - are the criteria of an adverse reaction met?].

    PubMed

    Reese, Imke

    2016-06-01

    Searching the internet for an explaination of recurring symptoms, many people come across the so-called histamine intolerance disorder. Also many practitioners like to diagnose this disorder without making sure that reproducibility, a prerequisite for an adverse reaction, is present. Consequently, presumably affected persons are often advised to follow a low-histamine diet. Depending on the source of information, these diets often avoid a huge variety of foods containing more or less histamine, which has a considerable impact on patient quality of life. While most persons benefit from such a diet in the beginning - this might be due to the change in dietary habits or the expectation of symptom improvement by dieting - in the long run the expected loss of symptoms will not happen. Underlying a diminished capacity for histamine degradation, the lack of partial or complete symptom improvement might be due to the fact that endogenous histamine release is responsible for reactions. The role of ingested histamine is discussed controversially. However, it is more than obvious that the histamine content of a certain food alone is not enough to predict its tolerance.If histamine intolerance is suspected, an individual diagnostic and therapeutic procedure is mandatory in order to minimize avoidance and to preserve a high quality of life. Ideally this is done in a close cooperation between allergologists and nutritionists/dieticians. PMID:27177895

  19. Histamine-induced itch and its relationship with pain.

    PubMed

    Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Uhtaek

    2008-01-01

    Itch is one of the major complications of skin diseases. Although there are various substances that induce itch or pruritus, it is evident that histamine is the best known endogenous agent that evokes itch. Even though histamine-induced itch has been studied for some time, the underlying mechanism of itch is just beginning to emerge. Although various downstream signaling pathways of histamine receptors have been revealed, more studies are required to determine the cause of histamine-induced itch. It appears that itch and pain involve different neuronal pathways. Pain generally inhibits itch, which indicates an inter-communication between the two. Complex interactions between itch and pain may be expected based on reports on disease states and opioids. In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanism and the pharmacological aspects of histamine-induced itch. Especially, the underlying mechanism of TRPV1 (an anti-pruritus target) has been determined to some extent. PMID:18667087

  20. [Pseudo-allergies are due to histamine intolerance].

    PubMed

    Götz, M

    1996-01-01

    Numerous undesirable reactions to alcoholic beverages, foods, drugs and other substances are characterized by allergy-like signs and symptoms and yet show unambiguously negative allergy test results. Such persons should be assessed for evidence of histamine intolerance caused by histamine overload and/or diamine oxidase deficiency. Diamine oxidase is the main histamine degrading enzyme with a predominantly gut activity. This would explain why nutritional allergies are often primarily suspected. The clinical evidence for histamine intolerance is based on chronic headache, diarrhoea, vomiting, flush, urticaria, asthma-like symptoms, rhinitis and others. Histamine restricted food, supported if necessary by H1 antihistamine blockade are simple but highly efficacious measures as shown by us in large patient groups. Intolerance to red wine probably is the most outstanding clinical characteristic and a directed question must be included into any allergy history in order to avoid missing a very major diagnostic spectrum with good therapeutic maneuverability. PMID:9012205

  1. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology. Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Groom, N.J.; Britcher, C.P.

    1992-05-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  2. International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology, Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groom, Nelson J. (Editor); Britcher, Colin P. (Editor)

    1992-01-01

    In order to examine the state of technology of all areas of magnetic suspension and to review related recent developments in sensors and controls approaches, superconducting magnet technology, and design/implementation practices, a symposium was held. The proceedings are presented. The sessions covered the areas of bearings, sensors and controls, microgravity and vibration isolation, superconductivity, manufacturing applications, wind tunnel magnetic suspension systems, magnetically levitated trains (MAGLEV), space applications, and large gap magnetic suspension systems.

  3. February NICBR Symposium Highlights Careers in Science | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Poster Staff The first National Interagency Confederation for Biological Research (NICBR) Exploring Careers in a Scientific Environment Symposium was held on Feb. 18 at the Advanced Technology Research Facility. The event drew more than 70 Frederick County public school teachers, who learned about the wide range of biomedical research being conducted by scientists in the NICBR agencies, as well as the variety of opportunities for students interested in pursuing careers in science and/or technology.

  4. NASA Earth Resources Survey Symposium. Volume 3: Summary reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    This document contains the proceedings and summaries of the earth resources survey symposium, sponsored by the NASA Headquarters Office of Applications and held in Houston, Texas, June 9 to 12, 1975. Topics include the use of remote sensing techniques in agriculture, in geology, for environmental monitoring, for land use planning, and for management of water resources and coastal zones. Details are provided about services available to various users. Significant applications, conclusions, and future needs are also discussed.

  5. Mechanisms of histamine stimulated secretion in rabbit ileal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Linaker, B D; McKay, J S; Higgs, N B; Turnberg, L A

    1981-11-01

    Histamine is present in high concentrations in the intestine and we investigated the possibility that it might have a role here in intestinal transport. When added to the basal side of rabbit ileal mucosa in vitro histamine (10(-4)M) induced a short-lived increase in electrical potential difference and short circuit current. It inhibited net chloride absorption but did not influence sodium transport. Alkali secretion, measured by a pH stat technique, was inhibited, suggesting that bicarbonate secretion was reduced. Both the electrical and ion flux responses to histamine were blocked by the H1 receptor blocker diphenhydramine, but not by the H2 receptor blocker cimetidine. The presence of specific H1 histamine receptors was further supported by shifts in the dose-response curve to histamine by four different concentrations of diphenhydramine. Calculation of a pA2 value from these "Schild' plots provided a figure of 7.85, which is similar to that for H1 receptors in other tissues. Aminoguanidine, a histaminase blocker, had no electrical effects alone but shifted the histamine dose response curve to the left. These studies indicate that histamine inhibits chloride absorption and alkali secretion, possibly by influencing a chloride/bicarbonate exchange process, through specific mucosal H1 receptors. Enhancement of histamine effects by a histaminase inhibitor suggests that histaminases are present in the intestinal mucosa and supports the possibility of a role for endogenous histamine in influencing ion transport. The observations indicate a mechanism by which absorption might be impaired in diseases in which histamine is liberated locally in the intestine. PMID:7308851

  6. PROCEEDINGS: JOINT SYMPOSIUM ON DRY SO2 AND SIMULTANEOUS SO2/NOX CONTROL TECHNOLOGIES (1ST): VOLUME 2. POWER PLANT INTEGRATION, ECONOMICS, AND FULL-SCALE EXPERIENCE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document the First Joint Symposium on Dry SO2 and Simultaneous SO2/NOx Control Technologies, held November 13-16, 1984, in San Diego, CA. The symposium, sponsored jointly by EPRI and EPA, was the first meeting of its kind devoted solely to the discussion of emissi...

  7. Symposium on General Linear Model Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research (Athens, Georgia, June 29-July 1, 1967). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bashaw, W. L., Ed.; Findley, Warren G., Ed.

    This volume contains the five major addresses and subsequent discussion from the Symposium on the General Linear Models Approach to the Analysis of Experimental Data in Educational Research, which was held in 1967 in Athens, Georgia. The symposium was designed to produce systematic information, including new methodology, for dissemination to the…

  8. Archeology and Education: The Classroom and Beyond. Papers from the Symposium (2nd, Tucson, Arizona, 1990). Archeological Assistance Study Number 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, KC, Ed.; McManamon, Francis P., Ed.

    The papers collected in this document are derived from a symposium held during the 1990 annual meeting of the Society for Historical Archeology. The symposium, part of an increasing effort to make archeology more accessible to the general public, was dedicated solely to archaeology and education, and the papers described programs designed to…

  9. The Health/Education Connection: Initiating Dialogue on Integrated Services to Children at Risk and Their Families. Symposium (Alexandria, Virginia, March 5-6, 1990).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1990

    This document reports on a symposium that was held to begin to shape a national policy on delivery of services to children at risk and their families, and to develop guidelines for future collaborative efforts between representatives from the health and education professional communities. The symposium explored innovative ways to integrate and…

  10. 77 FR 17086 - U.S. Customs and Border Protection 2012 West Coast Trade Symposium: “Transforming Trade for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-23

    ... Federal Register (77 FR 16048) on March 19, 2012, about the West Coast trade symposium which will be held... Symposium: ``Transforming Trade for a Stronger Economy'' AGENCY: U.S. Customs and Border Protection... ``Transforming Trade for a Stronger Economy''; and to inform the public that the fees have changed for...

  11. Report of the International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF 2015).

    PubMed

    Xiao, Jianbo

    2016-08-01

    The International Symposium on Phytochemicals in Medicine and Food (ISPMF2015) was held June 26-29, 2015, in Shanghai, China. This is the first time that a PSE meeting has been held in Asia and a PSE-PSA joint symposium provided an opportunity for communication between scientists from European and Asian countries. More than 270 scientists from 48 countries attended this meeting. ISPMF2015 assembled an exciting and diverse programme with 16 sessions, consisting of 12 plenary lectures, 20 invited talks, 55 short oral presentations, and in excess of 130 posters, dedicated to creating a podium for exchanging the latest research results on phytochemicals for food and human health. PMID:26988528

  12. Eleventh symposium on energy engineering sciences: Proceedings. Solid mechanics and processing: Analysis, measurement and characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    The Eleventh Symposium on Energy Engineering Sciences was held on May 3--5, 1993, at the Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois. These proceedings include the program, list of participants, and the papers that were presented during the eight technical sessions held at this meeting. This symposium was organized into eight technical sessions: Surfaces and interfaces; thermophysical properties and processes; inelastic behavior; nondestructive characterization; multiphase flow and thermal processes; optical and other measurement systems; stochastic processes; and large systems and control. Individual projects were processed separately for the databases.

  13. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  14. Work-in-progress presented at the Army symposium on solid mechanics, 1980, designing for extremes: Environment, loading, and structural behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1980-09-01

    Work-in-Progress was presented at the Army Symposium on solid Mechanics, 1980. Designing for Extremes: Environment, Loading, and Structural Behavior, held at Bass River (Cape Cod), Massachusetts, 29 September through 2 October 1980 were presented.

  15. Second International Lygus Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Goodell, P. B.; Ellsworth, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    The Second International Lygus Symposium brought together 52 entomologists from six nations and 11 states representing universities, public agencies, and private entities to discuss the latest research on Lygus species and their relatives. Symposium topics included Lygus biology, behavior and ecology, IPM, insecticides and resistance, and biological control. Papers and posters dealt with Lygus as a pest of several crops, including cotton, strawberries, seed alfalfa, canola, dry beans, cucumbers, cereals, peaches, and new crops guayule and lesquerella. Intercrop movement of Lygus2008200820082008 species was another important topic of many presentations. In the capstone session, participants identified needs and priorities for ongoing Lygus research and education (available at http://ag.arizona.edu/apmc/Arid_SWPMC_RAMP.html). The conference was sponsored in part by FMC Corporation, the University of Arizona Arizona Pest Management Center, the University of California Statewide IPM Program, and a grant to Ellsworth et al. (CRIS# 0207436) from the USDA-CSREES, Risk Avoidance and Mitigation Program (RAMP).

  16. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described. PMID:22202103

  17. Histamine-free diet: treatment of choice for histamine-induced food intolerance and supporting treatment for chronic headaches.

    PubMed

    Wantke, F; Götz, M; Jarisch, R

    1993-12-01

    Histamine-induced food intolerance is not IgE-mediated. Skin-prick testing and specific IgE to food allergens are typically negative. Food rich in histamine or red wine may cause allergy-like symptoms such as sneezing, flush, skin itching, diarrhoea and even shortness of breath. The suspected reason is a diminished histamine degradation based on a deficiency of diamine oxidase. As diamine oxidase cannot be supplemented, a histamine-free diet was implemented to reduce histamine intake. Forty-five patients with a history of suffering from intolerance to food or wine (n = 17) and chronic headache (n = 28) were put on the diet over months to years. Fish, cheese, hard cured sausages, pickled cabbage and alcoholic beverages had to be avoided. Complaint intensity and drug-use per week prior to and 4 weeks after a histamine-free diet were compared. After 4 weeks on the diet 33/45 patients improved considerably (P < 0.01), eight of them had total remission. In 12/45 patients, however, no changes in symptoms were observed. Symptoms of food or wine intolerance significantly decreased (P < 0.02; treatment of choice), headaches decreased in frequency (P < 0.001), duration and intensity. After eating histamine-rich food symptoms were reproducible and could be eliminated by anti-histamines in most patients. These data indicate the role of histamine in food and wine intolerance and that histamine-rich food causes a worsening of symptoms in patients suffering from chronic headaches. Results obtained support the hypothesis of a deficiency of diamine oxidase in patients with intolerance to food or wine. PMID:10779289

  18. 1979 DOE statistical symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Gardiner, D.A.; Truett T.

    1980-09-01

    The 1979 DOE Statistical Symposium was the fifth in the series of annual symposia designed to bring together statisticians and other interested parties who are actively engaged in helping to solve the nation's energy problems. The program included presentations of technical papers centered around exploration and disposal of nuclear fuel, general energy-related topics, and health-related issues, and workshops on model evaluation, risk analysis, analysis of large data sets, and resource estimation.

  19. Space 2000 Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  20. The Lindsay Centennial Symposium. Eric Melvyn Lindsay and Astronomy in Ireland. Report and Selected Contributions from a Conference held in Armagh on 26 January 2007 to Celebrate the 100th Anniversary of the Birth of E.M. Lindsay, Seventh Director of Armagh Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mark E.

    2007-11-01

    The Lindsay Centennial Symposium celebrates the wider importance of astronomy in Ireland and its unique role in advancing our understanding of the world in which we all live. Astronomy is an international endeavour that transcends political boundaries and helps to draw people together. Virtually every country in the world - and Ireland is no exception - looks to astronomy as part of its national heritage and as an activity, in common with other nations, that goes back almost to the dawn of civilization. In Ireland, astronomy can be traced back more than five thousand years to the time of the construction of megalithic monuments, such as the famous passage-tomb at Newgrange. More recently, Ireland was home to the largest optical telescope in the world, the so-called ‘Leviathan of Parsonstown’. Lindsay played a major role in advancing Irish astronomy. He recognized, very early on, that astronomy is not merely a national activity, but an international one as well, and one that on the island of Ireland must include close collaboration between the two jurisdictions: Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland. Astronomy attracts people, young and old, into science and to a more scientific way of thinking; it addresses issues of major significance for culture and for our understanding of mankind's place in the Universe; and provides young people with challenges in science and mathematics that are of the utmost technical difficulty and which bring important practical benefits to society. The occasion of the 100th anniversary of Lindsay's birth is a time of great optimism for political and economic developments on the island of Ireland, and especially for the growth of astronomy on both sides of the Border and as part of Ireland's involvement in wider European science.

  1. PROCEEDINGS: THE 1991 INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON RADON AND RADON REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY - VOLUME 3: SYMPOSIUM PANEL/POSTER PAPERS: SESSIONS I THROUGH V

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings, in four volumes, document the 1991 International Symposium on Radon and Radon Reduction Technology, held in Philadelphia, PA, April 2-5, 1991. n all, 65 oral papers (including the welcome address, the lead address, and the keynote address), 14 panel session paper...

  2. Interactions of the histamine and hypocretin systems in CNS disorders.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ling; Dauvilliers, Yves; Siegel, Jerome M

    2015-07-01

    Histamine and hypocretin neurons are localized to the hypothalamus, a brain area critical to autonomic function and sleep. Narcolepsy type 1, also known as narcolepsy with cataplexy, is a neurological disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, impaired night-time sleep, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and short latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep after sleep onset. In narcolepsy, 90% of hypocretin neurons are lost; in addition, two groups reported in 2014 that the number of histamine neurons is increased by 64% or more in human patients with narcolepsy, suggesting involvement of histamine in the aetiology of this disorder. Here, we review the role of the histamine and hypocretin systems in sleep-wake modulation. Furthermore, we summarize the neuropathological changes to these two systems in narcolepsy and discuss the possibility that narcolepsy-associated histamine abnormalities could mediate or result from the same processes that cause the hypocretin cell loss. We also review the changes in the hypocretin and histamine systems, and the associated sleep disruptions, in Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease and Tourette syndrome. Finally, we discuss novel therapeutic approaches for manipulation of the histamine system. PMID:26100750

  3. Infralimbic cortex activation and motivated arousal induce histamine release

    PubMed Central

    Forray, María Inés; Torrealba, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Appetitive behaviours occur in a state of behavioural and physiological activation that allows the optimal performance of these goal-directed behaviours. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histamine neurons under the command of the infralimbic cortex are important to provide behavioural activation. Extracellular histamine and serotonin were measured by microdialysis of the medial prefrontal cortex in behaving rats in parallel with a picrotoxin microinjection into the infralimbic cortex. The injection aroused the rats behaviourally, increased histamine release and decreased serotonin levels. Inhibition of the infralimbic cortex with muscimol produced the opposite effects on neurotransmitter release. The behavioural activation induced by motivating hungry rats with caged food was paralleled by an immediate histamine release, whereas awakening induced by tapping their microdialysis bowl increased serotonin, but not histamine levels. In conclusion, picrotoxin injection into the infralimbic cortex produces behavioural activation together with histamine release; in a similar manner, induction of an appetitive state produced histamine release, likely related to increased behavioural activation characteristic of an appetitive behaviour. PMID:25746330

  4. Histamine action in paraquat-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Lindenschmidt, R C; Selig, W M; Patterson, C E; Verburg, K M; Henry, D P; Forney, R B; Rhoades, R A

    1986-02-01

    We investigated direct histamine release and its effects in edema formation following paraquat (PQ) injury in a blood-free, perfused rat lung preparation. Under control conditions, perfusate histamine levels from the lung averaged 9.5 +/- 1.4 ng/ml. Lungs perfused with paraquat (1 mM) showed marked increases in pulmonary arterial pressure (133%), airway pressure (74%), alveolarcapillary protein flux (200%), and lung weight (38%). Prior to any detectable lung weight or pressure changes, PQ caused a 300% increase in perfusate histamine. Diphenhydramine (1.0 X 10(-5) M), a specific H1-histamine receptor antagonist, blocked the increased protein flux that followed PQ administration and significantly delayed edema. Furthermore, diphenhydramine attenuated the rise in PGF2 alpha. Conversely, histamine release was partially attenuated by the cyclooxygenase inhibitor, ibuprofen, at 2.4 X 10(-5) M, the same level that we had previously shown to block an early rise in PGF2 alpha and the onset of edema after PQ. These data show that the increased alveolar-capillary protein flux that occurred with PQ injury was attenuated by an H1-receptor antagonist and suggest that histamine is a primary mediator in paraquat-induced injury and that histamine subsequently stimulates prostaglandin release. PMID:3456218

  5. International Symposium on Interfacial Joining and Surface Technology (IJST2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2014-08-01

    Interfacial joining (bonding) is a widely accepted welding process and one of the environmentally benign technologies used in industrial production. As the bonding temperature is lower than the melting point of the parent materials, melting of the latter is kept to a minimum. The process can be based on diffusion bonding, pressure welding, friction welding, ultrasonic bonding, or brazing-soldering, all of which offer many advantages over fusion welding. In addition, surface technologies such as surface modification, spraying, coating, plating, and thin-film formation are necessary for advanced manufacturing, fabrication, and electronics packaging. Together, interfacial joining and surface technology (IJST) will continue to be used in various industrial fields because IJST is a very significant form of environmentally conscious materials processing. The international symposium of IJST 2013 was held at Icho Kaikan, Osaka University, Japan from 27-29 November, 2013. A total of 138 participants came from around the world to attend 56 oral presentations and 36 posters presented at the symposium, and to discuss the latest research and developments on interfacial joining and surface technologies. This symposium was also held to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Technical Commission on Interfacial Joining of the Japan Welding Society. On behalf of the chair of the symposium, it is my great pleasure to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE). Among the presentations, 43 papers are published here, and I believe all of the papers have provided the welding community with much useful information. I would like to thank the authors for their enthusiastic and excellent contributions. Finally, I would like to thank all members of the committees, secretariats, participants, and everyone who contributed to this symposium through their support and invaluable effort for the success of IJST 2013. Yasuo Takahashi Chair of IJST 2013

  6. Histamine-induced vasodilatation in the human forearm vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Sandilands, Euan A; Crowe, Jane; Cuthbert, Hayley; Jenkins, Paul J; Johnston, Neil R; Eddleston, Michael; Bateman, D Nicholas; Webb, David J

    2013-01-01

    Aim To investigate the mechanism of action of intra-arterial histamine in the human forearm vasculature. Methods Three studies were conducted to assess changes in forearm blood flow (FBF) using venous occlusion plethysmography in response to intra-brachial histamine. First, the dose–response was investigated by assessing FBF throughout a dose-escalating histamine infusion. Next, histamine was infused at a constant dose to assess acute tolerance. Finally, a four way, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study was conducted to assess FBF response to histamine in the presence of H1- and H2-receptor antagonists. Flare and itch were assessed in all studies. Results Histamine caused a dose-dependent increase in FBF, greatest with the highest dose (30 nmol min−1) infused [mean (SEM) infused arm vs. control: 26.8 (5.3) vs. 2.6 ml min−1 100 ml−1; P < 0.0001]. Dose-dependent flare and itch were demonstrated. Acute tolerance was not observed, with an increased FBF persisting throughout the infusion period. H2-receptor antagonism significantly reduced FBF (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo at 30 nmol min−1 histamine: −11.9 ml min−1 100 ml−1 (−4.0, −19.8), P < 0.0001) and flare (mean (95% CI) difference from placebo: −403.7 cm2 (−231.4, 576.0), P < 0.0001). No reduction in FBF or flare was observed in response to the H1-receptor antagonist. Itch was unaffected by the treatments. Histamine did not stimulate vascular release of tissue plasminogen activator or von Willebrand factor. Conclusion Histamine causes dose-dependent vasodilatation, flare and itch in the human forearm. H2-receptors are important in this process. Our results support further exploration of combined H1- and H2-receptor antagonist therapy in acute allergic syndromes. PMID:23488545

  7. Immunological release of histamine from bovine leucocytes. Unusual adrenergic modulation.

    PubMed Central

    Holroyde, M C; Eyre, P

    1976-01-01

    Sensitized bovine granulocytes release histamine when exposed to specific antigen. In comparison with in vitro systems in several other species, the modulation of this release by adrenergic agents is unique. Beta-Adrenoceptor stimulation potentiates (rather than inhibits), whereas alpha-adrenoceptor stimulation inhibits (rather than potentiates) histamine release. Adrenaline, which is generally considered to be a physiological antagonist of the anaphylactic reaction, potentiated histamine release in this study. Dopamine, which is present in high concentration in bovine mast cells, was without effect. The results are discussed in terms of the possible role of granulocytes in bovine hypersensitivity. PMID:60282

  8. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  9. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  10. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung‐Jae V.; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-01-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age‐associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, including C. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  11. Meeting Report: International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History II.

    PubMed

    Artan, Murat; Hwang, Ara B; Lee, Seung V; Nam, Hong Gil

    2015-06-01

    The second International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History was held at the campus of Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology (DGIST), Daegu, South Korea, from May 14 to 16, 2014. Many leading scientists in the field of aging research from all over the world contributed to the symposium by attending and presenting their recent work and thoughts. The aim of the symposium was to stimulate international collaborations and interactions among scientists who work on the biology of aging. In the symposium, the most recent and exciting work on aging research was presented, covering a wide range of topics, including the genetics of aging, age-associated diseases, and cellular senescence. The work was conducted in various organisms, includingC. elegans, mice, plants, and humans. Topics covered in the symposium stimulated discussion of novel directions for future research on aging. The meeting ended with a commitment for the third International Symposium on the Genetics of Aging and Life History, which will be held in 2016. PMID:26115541

  12. PREFACE: 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials (NSPM 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Aidy; Salit, Sapuan

    2010-07-01

    NSPM 2009 is the formal proceedings of the 9th National Symposium on Polymeric Materials held in Residence Hotel Uniten Bangi on 14-16 December 2009. It is also organised with The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia PRIM. The symposium proceedings consists of 94 papers covering a large number of issues on experimental and analytical studies of polymeric materials. The objectives of the symposium are to review the state-of-the art, present and latest findings and exchange ideas among engineers, researchers and practitioners involved in this field. We strongly hope the outcomes of this symposium will stimulate and enhanced the progress of experimental and analytical studies on polymeric materials as well as contribute to the fundamental understanding in related fields. After careful refereeing of all manuscripts, 15 papers were selected for publications in this issue. Another 20 papers were selected for publication in Pertanika Journal of Science and Technology (PJST). The content of the material and its rapid dissemination was considered to be more important than its form. We are grateful to all the authors for their papers and presentations in this symposium. They are also the ones who help make this symposium possible through their hard work in the preparation of the manuscripts. We would also like to offer our sincere thanks to all the invited speakers who came to share their knowledge with us. We would also like to acknowledge the untiring efforts of the reviewers, research assistants and students in meeting deadlines and for their patience and perseverance. We are indeed honoured to associate this event with Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing, and Faculty of Engineering, Universiti Putra Malaysia. Finally, we appreciate the sponsor support provided by Faculty of Engineering, The Plastics and Rubber Institute Malaysia (PRIM) and PETRONAS Malaysia. Thank you all. Editors: Aidy Ali and S M Sapuan

  13. Annual symposium on Frontiers in Science

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, N.; Fulton, K.R.

    1998-12-31

    This final report summarizes activities conducted for the National Academy of Sciences' Annual Symposium on Frontiers of Science with support from the US Department of Energy for the period July 1, 1993 through May 31, 1998. During the report period, five Frontiers of Science symposia were held at the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Center of the National Academies of Sciences and Engineering. For each Symposium, an organizing committee appointed by the NAS President selected and planned the eight sessions for the Symposium and identified general participants for invitation by the NAS President. These Symposia accomplished their goal of bringing together outstanding younger (age 45 or less) scientists to hear presentations in disciplines outside their own and to discuss exciting advances and opportunities in their fields in a format that encourages, and allows adequate time for, informal one-on-one discussions among participants. Of the 458 younger scientists who participated, over a quarter (124) were women. Participant lists for all symposia (1993--1997) are attached. The scientific participants were leaders in basic research from academic, industrial, and federal laboratories in such disciplines as astronomy, astrophysics, atmospheric science, biochemistry, cell biology, chemistry, computer science, earth sciences, engineering, genetics, material sciences, mathematics, microbiology, neuroscience, physics, and physiology. For each symposia, the 24 speakers and discussants on the program were urged to focus their presentations on current cutting-edge research in their field for a scientifically sophisticated but non-specialist audience, and to provide a sense of the experimental data--what is actually measured and seen in the various fields. They were also asked to address questions such as: What are the major research problems and unique tools in their field? What are the current limitations on advances as well as the frontiers? Speakers were asked to provide a 2500- to

  14. Histamine induces NF-κB controlled cytokine secretion by orbital fibroblasts via histamine receptor type-1.

    PubMed

    Virakul, Sita; Phetsuksiri, Tanachaporn; van Holten-Neelen, Conny; Schrijver, Benjamin; van Steensel, Leendert; Dalm, Virgil A S H; Paridaens, Dion; van den Bosch, Willem A; van Hagen, P Martin; Dik, Willem A

    2016-06-01

    Mast cells and their products are likely to be involved in regulating orbital fibroblast activity in Graves' Ophthalmopathy (GO). Histamine is abundantly present in granules of mast cells and is released upon mast cell activation. However, the effect of histamine on orbital fibroblasts has not been examined so far. Orbital tissues from GO patients and controls were analyzed for the presence of mast cells using toluidine blue staining and immunohistochemical detection of CD117 (stem cell factor receptor). Orbital fibroblasts were cultured from GO patients and healthy controls, stimulated with histamine and cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, CCL2, CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10 and CXCL11) were measured in culture supernatants. Also hyaluronan levels were measured in culture supernatants and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) and hyaluronidase (HYAL) gene expression levels were determined. In addition, histamine receptor subtype gene expression levels were examined as well as the effect of the histamine receptor-1 (HRH1) antagonist loratadine and NF-κB inhibitor SC-514 on histamine-induced cytokine production. Mast cell numbers were increased in GO orbital tissues. Histamine stimulated the production of IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 by orbital fibroblasts, while it had no effect on the production of CCL5, CCL7, CXCL10, CXCL11 and hyaluronan. Orbital fibroblasts expressed HRH1 and loratadine and SC-514 both blocked histamine-induced IL-6, IL-8 and CCL2 production by orbital fibroblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that histamine can induce the production of NF-κB controlled-cytokines by orbital fibroblasts, which supports a role for mast cells in GO. PMID:27170049

  15. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  16. Summaries of the Regional Conferences Held in Preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UNEVOC Info, 1999

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, five regional conferences were held in preparation for the Second International Congress on Technical and Vocational Education (TVE). The Asia-Pacific regional conference focused on challenges of the 21st century, demands of the world of work, and changing patterns in the delivery of training programs. The European symposium covered five…

  17. FAA/NASA En Route Noise Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Clemans A. (Compiler)

    1990-01-01

    Aircraft community noise annoyance is traditionally a concern only in localities near airports. The proposed introduction of large commercial airplanes with advanced turboprop propulsion systems with supersonic propellers has given rise to concerns of noise annoyance in areas previously considered not to be impacted by aircraft noise. A symposium was held to assess the current knowledge of factors important to the impact of en route noise and to aid in the formulation of FAA and NASA programs in the area. Papers were invited on human response to aircraft noise in areas with low ambient noise levels, aircraft noise heard indoors and outdoors, aircraft noise in recreational areas, detection of propeller and jet aircraft noise, and methodological issues relevant to the design of future studies.

  18. PREFACE: 13th IMEKO TC17-TC7 Joint Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sanowar

    2010-04-01

    'Without Measurement No Science, Without Science No Measurement' The 13th IMEKO (International Measurement Confederation) TC1-TC7 Joint Symposium was held at City University London, UK from 1-3 September 2010. For the first time this Symposium also included the involvement of IMEKO Technical Committee 13 (TC13) - Measurements in Biology and Medicine. This brings an added dimension to the Symposium in London since the area of measurement science and technology in biology and medicine is an important and a fast growing one. The Symposium was organized by the City University London (www.city.ac.uk) in collaboration with the Institute of Physics (IOP), UK (www.iop.org). The work of this Symposium is reported in this volume. The scope of the Symposium included the main topics covered by the above Technical Committees - education and training in measurement and instrumentation (TC1), measurement science (TC7) and measurements in biology and medicine. These themes underpinned the strap line of the Symposium, 'Without Measurement No Science, Without Science No Measurement' with the highest number of contributions from the measurement science area. The thematic areas were led by invited presentations from each of the areas by eminent speakers. The Symposium provided a useful forum for experts working in these areas for sharing and exchanging their work and ideas. The Symposium attracted participants from many countries of the world including the United States, Japan, Russia and Ukraine. In total over sixty papers are included in the volume and they are presented under the above three key thematic areas. Each paper was independently peer-reviewed by two reviewers from a distinguished international panel. The organizers of the Symposium, City University London have pioneered the establishment of measurement and instrumentation as an academic discipline in the UK through the work of Professor Ludwik Finkelstein who was for many years Chairman of TC1 and a founding member of TC

  19. Kick-off symposium series to help New Ph.D.s is a success

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernys, Michael; Roughan, Moninya

    The U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Office of Naval Research (ONR) recently sponsored the first of what is expected to be many symposia to be held every couple of years to help new scientists begin their research careers. The inaugural dissertation symposium, Physical Oceanography Dissertation Symposium I (PODS I), provided a forum for new Ph.D.s and doctoral candidates soon to receive their degrees in physical oceanography or a related field, to discuss science and forge future professional relationships. The next symposium is expected to be in October 2003, in Hawaii, in concert with the Dissertation Symposium for Chemical Oceanographers (DISCO); information to be posted at http://spars.aibs.org/pods/. Applications from prospective participants were sought internationally, with the sponsoring agencies and coordinators advertising by e-mail, through personal communication with established researchers, and by informing degree-granting institutions in the related fields.

  20. Symposium Review: Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites at MS&T 2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Nikhil; Paramsothy, Muralidharan

    2014-06-01

    This article reflects on the presentations made during the Metal and Polymer Matrix Composites symposium at Materials Science and Technology 2013 (MS&T'13) held in Montreal (Quebec, Canada) from October 27 to 31. The symposium had three sessions on metal matrix composites and one session on polymer matrix composites containing a total of 23 presentations. While the abstracts and full-text papers are available through databases, the discussion that took place during the symposium is often not captured in writing and gets immediately lost. We have tried to recap some of the discussion in this article and hope that it will supplement the information present in the proceedings. The strong themes in the symposium were porous composites, aluminum matrix composites, and nanocomposites. The development of processing methods was also of interest to the speakers and attendees.

  1. RICIS Symposium 1988

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Integrated Environments for Large, Complex Systems is the theme for the RICIS symposium of 1988. Distinguished professionals from industry, government, and academia have been invited to participate and present their views and experiences regarding research, education, and future directions related to this topic. Within RICIS, more than half of the research being conducted is in the area of Computer Systems and Software Engineering. The focus of this research is on the software development life-cycle for large, complex, distributed systems. Within the education and training component of RICIS, the primary emphasis has been to provide education and training for software professionals.

  2. IAU Symposium 317 Summary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gratton, Raffaele G.

    2016-08-01

    The assembly of the halo yields fundamental information on the formation and evolution of galaxies: this was quite exhaustively discussed at this very important symposium. I present a brief personal summary of the meeting, outlining those points that I found more exciting and suggestive. I also remarked a few areas that were possibly not enough expanded. I found this research field extremely interesting and I think there are great expectations for new developments in the next few years, thanks to the new large spectroscopic surveys and the ESA GAIA satellite.

  3. Functional Profiling of 2-Aminopyrimidine Histamine H4 Receptor Modulators.

    PubMed

    Tichenor, Mark S; Thurmond, Robin L; Venable, Jennifer D; Savall, Brad M

    2015-09-24

    Histamine is an important endogenous signaling molecule that is involved in a number of physiological processes including allergic reactions, gastric acid secretion, neurotransmitter release, and inflammation. The biological effects of histamine are mediated by four histamine receptors with distinct functions and distribution profiles (H1-H4). The most recently discovered histamine receptor (H4) has emerged as a promising drug target for treating inflammatory diseases. A detailed understanding of the role of the H4 receptor in human disease remains elusive, in part because low sequence similarity between the human and rodent H4 receptors complicates the translation of preclinical pharmacology to humans. This review provides an overview of H4 drug discovery programs that have studied cross-species structure-activity relationships, with a focus on the functional profiling of the 2-aminopyrimidine chemotype that has advanced to the clinic for allergy, atopic dermatitis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25993395

  4. Histamine: an undercover agent in multiple rare diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Melgarejo, Esther; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2012-01-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine performing pleiotropic effects in humans, involving tasks within the immune and neuroendocrine systems, neurotransmission, gastric secretion, cell life and death, and development. It is the product of the histidine decarboxylase activity, and its effects are mainly mediated through four different G-protein coupled receptors. Thus, histamine-related effects are the results of highly interconnected and tissue-specific signalling networks. Consequently, alterations in histamine-related factors could be an important part in the cause of multiple rare/orphan diseases. Bearing this hypothesis in mind, more than 25 rare diseases related to histamine physiopathology have been identified using a computationally assisted text mining approach. These newly integrated data will provide insight to elucidate the molecular causes of these rare diseases. The data can also help in devising new intervention strategies for personalized medicine for multiple rare diseases. PMID:22435405

  5. Histamine: an undercover agent in multiple rare diseases?

    PubMed

    Pino-Ángeles, Almudena; Reyes-Palomares, Armando; Melgarejo, Esther; Sánchez-Jiménez, Francisca

    2012-09-01

    Histamine is a biogenic amine performing pleiotropic effects in humans, involving tasks within the immune and neuroendocrine systems, neurotransmission, gastric secretion, cell life and death, and development. It is the product of the histidine decarboxylase activity, and its effects are mainly mediated through four different G-protein coupled receptors. Thus, histamine-related effects are the results of highly interconnected and tissue-specific signalling networks. Consequently, alterations in histamine-related factors could be an important part in the cause of multiple rare/orphan diseases. Bearing this hypothesis in mind, more than 25 rare diseases related to histamine physiopathology have been identified using a computationally assisted text mining approach. These newly integrated data will provide insight to elucidate the molecular causes of these rare diseases. The data can also help in devising new intervention strategies for personalized medicine for multiple rare diseases. PMID:22435405

  6. Capillary zone electrophoretic determination of histamine in fish.

    PubMed

    Mopper, B; Sciacchitano, C J

    1994-01-01

    Histamine, the principal causative agent in scombroid food poisoning, was analyzed in seafood by a new, rapid, and sensitive method using capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) with UV detection at 210 nm. Incurred histamine in methanolic fish extracts migrated within 4 min in a fused silica capillary filled with 0.02 M citrate buffer, pH 2.5, under an applied potential of 375 V/cm. The analytical response was linear from 0.5 to 100 ppm histamine (correlation coefficient, r = 0.999). The coefficients of variation for migration time and peak area response were < 1 and < 3%, respectively. Recovery of histamine in fortified fish composites was satisfactory. CZE was considered for alternative application in seafood speciation. PMID:8069116

  7. Quality assurance of histamine analysis in fresh and canned fish.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Warlley P; Silva, Tarliane M; Guidi, Letícia R; Tette, Patrícia A S; Byrro, Ricardo M D; Santiago-Silva, Paula; Fernandes, Christian; Gloria, Maria Beatriz A

    2016-11-15

    Histamine determination is relevant for fish safety, quality and trade. Recently a study by the European Union (EU) compared the Codex and the EU mandated methods for the analysis of histamine and observed that they underestimated and overestimated the results, respectively. To solve this problem, a simple and efficient procedure for the extraction and quantification of histamine by ion-pair HPLC method with post-column derivatization and fluorimetric detection is proposed. It was optimized and validated for the analysis of histamine in fish. The method attended the performance criteria established by Commission Decision 2002/657/CE. The method was also submitted to proficiency testing; uncertainty was calculated; and the stability of solutions and standards was investigated. There was no matrix effect. The LOD, LOQ, CCα and CCβ were fit for the purpose. The method was successfully used in the analyses of freshwater fish and fresh and canned tuna. PMID:27283612

  8. Modulation of neutrophil oxidative burst via histamine receptors

    PubMed Central

    Číž, M; Lojek, A

    2013-01-01

    Histamine has the ability to influence the activity of immune cells including neutrophils and plays a pivotal role in inflammatory processes, which are a complex network of cellular and humoral events. One of the main functions manifested by activated neutrophils is oxidative burst, which is linked to the production of reactive oxygen species; therefore, the effects of histamine receptor agonists and antagonists on the oxidative burst of neutrophils is reviewed. A role for the well-characterized histamine H1 and H2 receptors in this process is discussed and compared to that of the recently discovered H4 receptor. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed issue on Histamine Pharmacology Update. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2013.170.issue-1 PMID:23336732

  9. Studies on the possible role of brain histamine in behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Gerald, M. C.; Maickel, R. P.

    1972-01-01

    1. The possible role of brain histamine in behavioural performance was studied in rats using thirst-induced water consumption, continuous (Sidman) avoidance, and reinforcement withdrawal test systems. 2. Parenteral administration of a variety of antihistamines to rats decreased thirst-induced water consumption; this effect could be antagonized by administration of histamine directly into the brain by a ventricular cannula. 3. When intraventricular doses of histamine were administered to rats at weekly intervals, an adaptation was seen in the effects of the amine on continuous avoidance behaviour. With succeeding doses, the initial period of depression of avoidance responding was shortened and the subsequent rebound stimulation disappeared. 4. The results support the hypothesis that histamine in the brain is involved in several behavioural phenomena. PMID:4402743

  10. PREFACE: High Performance Computing Symposium 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talon, Suzanne; Mousseau, Normand; Peslherbe, Gilles; Bertrand, François; Gauthier, Pierre; Kadem, Lyes; Moitessier, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy; Wittig, Rod

    2012-02-01

    HPCS (High Performance Computing Symposium) is a multidisciplinary conference that focuses on research involving High Performance Computing and its application. Attended by Canadian and international experts and renowned researchers in the sciences, all areas of engineering, the applied sciences, medicine and life sciences, mathematics, the humanities and social sciences, it is Canada's pre-eminent forum for HPC. The 25th edition was held in Montréal, at the Université du Québec à Montréal, from 15-17 June and focused on HPC in Medical Science. The conference was preceded by tutorials held at Concordia University, where 56 participants learned about HPC best practices, GPU computing, parallel computing, debugging and a number of high-level languages. 274 participants from six countries attended the main conference, which involved 11 invited and 37 contributed oral presentations, 33 posters, and an exhibit hall with 16 booths from our sponsors. The work that follows is a collection of papers presented at the conference covering HPC topics ranging from computer science to bioinformatics. They are divided here into four sections: HPC in Engineering, Physics and Materials Science, HPC in Medical Science, HPC Enabling to Explore our World and New Algorithms for HPC. We would once more like to thank the participants and invited speakers, the members of the Scientific Committee, the referees who spent time reviewing the papers and our invaluable sponsors. To hear the invited talks and learn about 25 years of HPC development in Canada visit the Symposium website: http://2011.hpcs.ca/lang/en/conference/keynote-speakers/ Enjoy the excellent papers that follow, and we look forward to seeing you in Vancouver for HPCS 2012! Gilles Peslherbe Chair of the Scientific Committee Normand Mousseau Co-Chair of HPCS 2011 Suzanne Talon Chair of the Organizing Committee UQAM Sponsors The PDF also contains photographs from the conference banquet.

  11. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  12. Hand-held medical robots.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2014-08-01

    Medical robots have evolved from autonomous systems to tele-operated platforms and mechanically-grounded, cooperatively-controlled robots. Whilst these approaches have seen both commercial and clinical success, uptake of these robots remains moderate because of their high cost, large physical footprint and long setup times. More recently, researchers have moved toward developing hand-held robots that are completely ungrounded and manipulated by surgeons in free space, in a similar manner to how conventional instruments are handled. These devices provide specific functions that assist the surgeon in accomplishing tasks that are otherwise challenging with manual manipulation. Hand-held robots have the advantages of being compact and easily integrated into the normal surgical workflow since there is typically little or no setup time. Hand-held devices can also have a significantly reduced cost to healthcare providers as they do not necessitate the complex, multi degree-of-freedom linkages that grounded robots require. However, the development of such devices is faced with many technical challenges, including miniaturization, cost and sterility, control stability, inertial and gravity compensation and robust instrument tracking. This review presents the emerging technical trends in hand-held medical robots and future development opportunities for promoting their wider clinical uptake. PMID:24927713

  13. Involvement of histamine receptors in SAPK/JNK phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Radhika D; Khan, Manzoor M

    2012-06-01

    Histamine is a mediator of inflammation in allergic disease and asthma. Stress activated protein kinases/c-jun N-terminal kinases (SAPK/JNK) are involved in asthma. This study examined the role of histamine receptors on the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK in splenocytes. C57BL/6 mice splenocytes were treated with histamine (10⁻⁴ M to 10⁻¹¹ M), and its selective receptor agonists, phorbol 12 myristate 13-acetate (PMA) was used as a positive control, and phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK was determined. Histamine (10⁻⁴ M-10⁻⁸ M) inhibited phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK. H1R agonist betahistine (10⁻⁵ M) decreased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation and H2R agonist amthamine (10⁻⁵ M) did not show any significant effect. However, H3R agonist methimepip (10⁻⁶ M) and H4R agonist 4-methyl histamine (10⁻⁶ M), increased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation. We used TNFα knockout mice to determine if histamine regulated SAPK/JNK phosphorylation via TNFα. While the effects of histamine and H1 agonists were similar to that of wild type mice in inhibiting the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK, the effects of H3 and H4 agonists differed in TNFα knockout mice splenocytes. Activation of H3 receptors decreased SAPK/JNK phosphorylation in TNFα knockout mice, as opposed to an increase in wild type mice, whereas H4 agonist did not show any significant effect on the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK. This data showed that histamine acting through H4 receptors caused the phosphorylation of SAPK/JNK via TNFα. The role of H4 receptors in pro-inflammatory response is intriguing. PMID:22487127

  14. Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures: A Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Raymond F.

    1961-01-01

    This book contains the program and all available abstracts of the 90' invited and contributed papers to be presented at the TUPAC Symposium on Chemical and Thermodynamic Properties at High Temperatures. The Symposium will be held in conjunction with the XVIIIth IUPAC Congress, Montreal, August 6 - 12, 1961. It has been organized, by the Subcommissions on Condensed States and on Gaseous States of the Commission on High Temperatures and Refractories and by the Subcommission on Experimental Thermodynamics of the Commission on Chemical Thermodynamics, acting in conjunction with the Organizing Committee of the IUPAC Congress. All inquiries concerning participation In the Symposium should be directed to: Secretary, XVIIIth International Congress of Pure and Applied Chemistry, National Research Council, Ottawa, 'Canada. Owing to the limited time and facilities available for the preparation and printing of the book, it has not been possible to refer the proofs of the abstracts to the authors for checking. Furthermore, it has not been possible to subject the manuscripts to a very thorough editorial examination. Some obvious errors in the manuscripts have been corrected; other errors undoubtedly have been introduced. Figures have been redrawn only when such a step was essential for reproduction purposes. Sincere apologies are offered to authors and readers for any errors which remain; however, in the circumstances neither the IUPAC Commissions who organized the Symposium, nor the U. S. Government Agencies who assisted in the preparation of this book can accept responsibility for the errors.

  15. Proceedings of the 2010 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Adams, E. Terence; Auerbach, Scott; Blackshear, Pamela E.; Bradley, Alys; Gruebbel, Margarita M.; Little, Peter B.; Malarkey, David; Maronpot, Robert; McKay, Jennifer S.; Miller, Rodney A.; Moore, Rebecca R.; Morrison, James P.; Nyska, Abraham; Ramot, Yuval; Rao, Deepa; Suttie, Andrew; Wells, Monique Y.; Willson, Gabrielle A.; Elmore, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held in Chicago, Illinois, in advance of the scientific symposium sponsored jointly by the Society of Toxicologic Pathology (STP) and the International Federation of Societies of Toxicologic Pathologists (IFSTP). The goal of the annual NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for voting or discussion. Some topics covered during the symposium included a comparison of rat and mouse hepatocholangiocarcinoma, a comparison of cholangiofibrosis and cholangiocarcinoma in rats, a mixed pancreatic neoplasm with acinar and islet cell components, an unusual preputial gland tumor, renal hyaline glomerulopathy in rats and mice, eosinophilic substance in the nasal septum of mice, INHAND nomenclature for proliferative and nonproliferative lesions of the CNS/PNS, retinal gliosis in a rat, fibroadnexal hamartoma in rats, intramural plaque in a mouse, a treatment-related chloracne-like lesion in mice, and an overview of mouse ovarian tumors. PMID:21177527

  16. Evolution of histamine oxidase activity for biotechnological applications.

    PubMed

    Rosini, Elena; Tonin, Fabio; Vasylieva, Natalia; Marinesco, Stephane; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2014-01-01

    Histamine is present to various degrees in many foods, and concentrations in fish samples are considered a good indicator of freshness and hygienic food quality. Seeking for innovative methods to quantify histamine in foods, we used a synthetic gene designed on the sequence of histamine oxidase from Arthrobacter crystallopoietes (HOD) as the starting point in this study to develop a biosensor. HOD was expressed in Escherichia coli cells with a yield of ∼7 mg protein/L of fermentation broth. Recombinant wild-type HOD oxidized histamine and tyramine whereas it was inactive toward putrescine and cadaverine (two amines present in fish samples). The putative residues involved in substrate binding were identified by an in silico docking procedure based on a model of the structure of HOD: site-saturation mutagenesis was performed on 8 positions. The most significant changes in kinetic properties were observed for the P143M HOD: this variant showed higher histamine affinity and lower substrate inhibition by tyramine than wild-type enzyme. Biosensor prototypes were produced using both the wild-type and the P143M variant HOD. These biosensors showed a good sensitivity and selectivity with respect to biogenic amines present in food specimens. Accordingly, the HOD-based biosensor was successfully used to assess histamine in fish samples, yielding values in good agreement with those obtained by HPLC analyses but in a few seconds and at a significantly lower cost per analysis. PMID:23995223

  17. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, P. J.; Evans, Elizabeth; Valić, F.; Žuškin, Eugenija

    1973-01-01

    Nicholls, P. J., Evans, E., Valić, F., and Žuškin, E. (1973).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,30, 142-145. Histamine-releasing activity and bronchoconstricting effects of sisal. Extracts of dry and oiled sisal released histamine from pig and human but not from rat lung tissue. A suspension in Tyrode solution of the oil used for softening the sisal fibres had a pH of 8·1 and also released histamine from pig and human lung. The releasing activity was abolished when the pH of this suspension was adjusted to pH 7·4. As all the sisal extracts were adjusted to pH 7·4 for incubation with lung tissue, the histamine-releasing activity of sisal in vitro is unrelated to the presence of the oil. Significant (P < 0·01) mean reductions over the work shift of ventilatory capacity (PEF and FEV1·0) were recorded in all the workers exposed to airborne sisal dust. These reductions were greater in combers than in drawers and spinners. Sisal collected from combing machines possessed more histamine-releasing activity than material from drawing and spinning machines. These results indicate that histamine release by sisal may be the cause of acute ventilatory capacity changes in sisal exposure. PMID:4122162

  18. Histamine inhibits differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Yamagata, Kaoru; Nakayamada, Shingo; Sawamukai, Norifumi; Yamaoka, Kunihiro; Sakata, Kei; Nakano, Kazuhisa; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2015-07-31

    Histamine and TGF-β, major mediators secreted by mast cells, are involved in skin inflammation and play critical roles in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis. However, the roles of signaling mechanisms in the development of skin fibrosis remain largely unclear. Here we show that histamine suppressed the expression of α smooth muscle actin (αSMA), a marker of myofibroblasts, induced by TGF-β1 in skin fibroblasts. Histamine H1-receptor (H1R), but not H2-receptor (H2R) or H4-receptor (H4R), was expressed on skin fibroblasts at both mRNA and protein levels. Interestingly, an H1R antagonist, but not H2R or H4R antagonists, antagonized the histamine-mediated suppression of αSMA expression by TGF-β1. Correspondingly, phosphorylated Smad2 was detected after treatment with TGF-β1, whereas the addition of histamine inhibited this phosphorylation. Taken together, histamine-H1R decreased TGF-β1-mediated Smad2 phosphorylation and inhibited differentiation of skin fibroblasts into myofibroblasts. PMID:26036574

  19. 11th European VLBI Network Symposium & Users Meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Bordeaux (LAB) at the University of Bordeaux (France), on behalf of the European VLBI Consortium, hosted the 11th European VLBI Network (EVN) Symposium and EVN Users Meeting on October 9-12, 2012. The Symposium was held at the "Chambre de Commerce et d'Industrie de Bordeaux", located in the "Palais de la Bourse", in the center of Bordeaux. The conference highlighted the latest scientific results and technical developments from VLBI, space VLBI and e-VLBI. All fields of astrophysics were concerned - stellar, galactic and extragalactic - as well as astrometry and planetary science. Presentations addressing synergy between (e-)VLBI and other new or planned radio facilities (ALMA, LOFAR, e-MERLIN,...) or instruments at other wavelengths (Fermi, CTA, Gaia,...) were also an integral part of the program. The scientific program was organized in 11 sessions including 71 oral presentations, with an additional 43 posters available for viewing during the entire length of the conference. An EVN Users Meeting was also held during one of the evening to foster interaction between the EVN users and the EVN organization. The symposium was attended by a total of 122 delegates originating from 47 institutes world-wide, sharing new VLBI science and innovations while also building links with other communities. The research leading to these results has received funding from the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme for research, technological development and demonstration under grant agreement no 283393 (RadioNet3).

  20. Proceedings of the 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization

    SciTech Connect

    Maxfield, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The 2nd symposium on valves for coal conversion and utilization was held October 15 to 17, 1980. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, in cooperation with the Valve Manufacturers Association. Seventeen papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA. (LTN)

  1. Proceedings of the 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 7th International Symposium on the Molecular Breeding of Forage and Turf, MBFT2012, was held in Salt Lake City, UT, USA, from 4-7 June 2012. One-hundred and fifteen researchers from around the world presented oral and poster formats relating to ten general topics: Genetic mechanisms and applic...

  2. Determination of Air Quality. Proceedings of the ACS Symposium on Determination of Air Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mamantov, Gleb, Ed.; Shults, W. D., Ed.

    Composed of data submitted by a variety of experts in the field, this book provides an introduction to air pollution control. It contains the proceedings of the American Chemical Society Symposium on Determination of Air Quality held in Los Angeles, California, April 1-2, 1971. Contributions from chemists, physicians, engineers, administrators,…

  3. GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT SYMPOSIUM: Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Growth and Development Symposium titled “Understanding and mitigating the impacts of inflammation on animal growth and development” was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the American Dairy Science Association and the American Society of Animal Science in New Orleans, LA, July 10 to 14, 2011. T...

  4. Addendum: Tenth International Symposium on Alcohol Fuels, The road to commercialization

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The Tenth International Symposium on ALCOHOL FUELS ``THE ROAD TO COMMERCIALIZATION`` was held at the Broadmoor Hotel, Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA November 7--10, 1993. Twenty-seven papers on the production of alcohol fuels, specifications, their use in automobiles, buses and trucks, emission control, and government policies were presented. Individual papers have been processed separately for entry into the data base.

  5. Mounting Pressures on Planet Earth. A Four-Part Bicentennial Symposium Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderton, David A., Ed.

    Detailed are the proceedings of the 1976 Bicentennial Symposium Series held under the general title of Mounting Pressures on Planet Earth. This event, co-sponsored by the Maryland State Department of Education and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, brought together researchers and educators to discuss solutions to the Earth's problems. The…

  6. Proceedings of the 1980 symposium on instrumentation and control for fossil energy processes

    SciTech Connect

    Doering, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The 1980 symposium on Instrumentation and Control for Fossil Energy Processes was held June 9-11, 1980, New Cavalier, Virginia Beach, Virginia. It was sponsored by the Argonne National Laboratory and the US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy. Forty-five papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; nine papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  7. Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resiliency after the Sandy Hook Tragedy. Crisis Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zenere, Frank J.

    2013-01-01

    On February 27 and 28, 2013, The Symposium of Hope: Recovery and Resilience after the Sandy Hook Tragedy, was held in Danbury, Connecticut. The event was hosted by the United Way of Western Connecticut and Western Connecticut State University. Frank J. Zenere, school psychologist and crisis team member in the Division of Student Services of the…

  8. SPECIAL ISSUE VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY IMMUNOPATHOLOGY: PROCEEDINGS 8TH INTERNATIONAL VETERINARY IMMUNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the Special Issue of Vet. Immunol. Immunopathol. that summarizes the 8th International Veterinary Immunology Symposium (8 th IVIS) held August 15th-19th, 2007, in Ouro Preto, Brazil. The 8 th IVIS highlighted the importance of veterinary immunology for animal health, vaccinology, reproducti...

  9. Proceedings of the Stake Symposium on Educational Evaluation (Champaign, Illinois, May 8-9, 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Rita, Ed.

    A symposium on educational evaluation was held to celebrate the career of Robert E. Stake. Contributions, which relate to many aspects of educational evaluation, include: (1) "The Issue of Advocacy in Evaluation" (Ernest House and Kenneth Howe); (2) "The Meaning of Bias" (Michael Scriven); (3) Commentary on Ernie House and Michael Scriven's…

  10. The Symposium on the Evaluation of Foreign Language Proficiency: Challenges to the Profession.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdman, Albert

    This paper presents a report of a 1987 symposium on the Evaluation of Foreign Language Proficiency held in Bloomington, Indiana. Although much has been accomplished in language testing, much remains to be done before the language teaching profession has at its disposal a common means of measuring proficiency in the functional use of language in…

  11. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - A 25th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 25th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 81st Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in March 2015. The principal objective, for the previous 24 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spec...

  12. Highlights from the 1st ISCB Latin American Student Council Symposium 2014

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes the scientific content and activities of the first edition of the Latin American Symposium organized by the Student Council of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB), held in conjunction with the Third Latin American conference from the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB-LA 2014) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, on October 27, 2014. PMID:25955751

  13. PROCEEDINGS: 1990 SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM - VOLUME 1: SESSIONS 1, 2, 3A, AND 3B

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document 110 papers presented at the Symposium held in New Orleans, LA, May 8-11, 1990. opics included SO2 control economics, furnace sorbent injection, byproduct utilization, spray dryer technology, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and combined SOx/NOx control ...

  14. PROCEEDINGS: 1990 SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM - VOLUME 4: SESSIONS 7A, 7B, AND POSTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document 110 papers presented at the Symposium held in New Orleans, LA, May 8-11, 1990. opics included SO2 control economics, furnace sorbent injection, byproduct utilization, spray dryer technology, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and combined SOx/NOx control ...

  15. PROCEEDINGS: 1990 SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM - VOLUME 3: SESSIONS 6A, 6B, 6C

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document 110 papers presented at the Symposium held in New Orleans, LA, May 8-11, 1990. opics included SO2 control economics, furnace sorbent injection, byproduct utilization, spray dryer technology, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and combined SOx/NOx control ...

  16. Sheep symposium: Biology and management of low-input lambing in easy-care systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low-input lambing management was the focus of the 2007 Sheep Symposium at the joint annual meetings of the American Society of Animal Science, the American Dairy Science Association, the Asociacio´n Mexicana de Produccio´n Animal, and the Poultry Science Association held in San Antonio, Texas, on Ju...

  17. Symposium on Early Childhood Education (Urbana-Champaign, Illinois, November 9-10, 1997). Abstracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Univ., Champaign. Coll. of Education.

    This book compiles abstracts of presentations from a symposium held in honor of Dr. Bernard Spodek, a leading scholar in early childhood education, on the occasion of his retirement. Topics addressed are as follows: (1) culture in early childhood curriculum; (2) developmental and cultural appropriateness; (3) kindergarten in Japan; (4) pressure…

  18. CD-ROM Proceedings International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This CD-ROM contains the abstracts and full papers for the proceedings from the ASABE specialty conference, the International Symposium on Erosion and Landscape Evolution (ISELE), held September 18-21, 2011 at the Hilton Anchorage Hotel in Anchorage, Alaska. Three extended abstracts from the meeting...

  19. The Third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The third Air Force/NASA Symposium on Recent Advances in Multidisciplinary Analysis and Optimization was held on 24-26 Sept. 1990. Sessions were on the following topics: dynamics and controls; multilevel optimization; sensitivity analysis; aerodynamic design software systems; optimization theory; analysis and design; shape optimization; vehicle components; structural optimization; aeroelasticity; artificial intelligence; multidisciplinary optimization; and composites.

  20. SUMMARY OF DISCUSSION SESSIONS: SYMPOSIUM ON LEAD-BLOOD PRESSURE RELATIONSHIPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The International Symposium on Lead-Blood Pressure Relationships was held in Chapel Hill, NC, April 27-29, 1987. The program was structured so as to first present an overview of theories and findings in the general area of human hypertension and then to have speakers review the e...

  1. Proceedings of the sixth international symposium on methodologies for intelligent systems (Poster Session)

    SciTech Connect

    Harber, K.S.

    1991-09-01

    This volume contains papers which have been selected for the poster Session at the Sixth International Symposium for Intelligent Systems held October 1991, The following major areas were covered: expert systems; intelligent databases; knowledge representation; learning and adaptive systems; and logic for artificial intelligence. Nineteen full papers are included. (GHH)

  2. Mosquito vector biology and control in Latin America - a 24th symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 24th Annual Latin American Symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 80th Annual Meeting in Seattle, WA in February 2014. The principal objective, as for the previous 23 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control spe...

  3. Brief Report: State of the Science Symposium on Aging and Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Tamar; Janicki, Matthew P.; Marks, Beth; Hammel, Joy; Factor, Alan

    2008-01-01

    The overall goal of the "2007 State of the Science Symposium on Aging with Developmental Disabilities: Charting Lifespan Trajectories and Supportive Environments for Healthy Community Living" (held in Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.A.) was to increase the understanding and definition of how to improve the health, psychosocial well-being, and community…

  4. Mosquito Vector Control and Biology in Latin America - A 17th Symposium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 17th Annual Latin America American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 73rd Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL, in April 2007. The principal objective, as for the previous 16 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector cont...

  5. Discussing the Issues: A Report on the 2013 Ivies + Access Services Symposium

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    As access services emerges as a discrete discipline within the field of librarianship, opportunities for access services librarians to meet and discuss the issues facing today's libraries continue to grow. One annual meeting that has attracted less attention over the years is the Ivies + Access Services Symposium. Held at various member…

  6. MOSQUITO VECTOR CONTROL AND BIOLOGY IN LATIN AMERICA - A 19TH SYMPOSIUM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 19th Annual Latin American symposium presented by the American Mosquito Control Association (AMCA) was held as part of the 75th Annual Meeting in New Orleans, LA, in April 2009. The principal objective, as for the previous 18 symposia, was to promote participation in the AMCA by vector control s...

  7. Symposium commemorating the 25th anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium

    SciTech Connect

    Seaborg, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    The Symposium honoring the 25th Anniversary of the discovery of mendelevium was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory on March 28, 1980. The following three papers were presented: Chemical Properties of Mendelevium; Nuclear Properties of Mendelevium; and Radioactive Decay of Md Isotopes. Besides these papers there were introductory remarks, reminiscences, and concluding remarks.

  8. The 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium at Pittcon: Raman Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy was the main topic of the 14th Annual James L. Waters Symposium, which was held in March 2003 at Pittcon. The development of the enabling technologies that have made Raman spectroscopy a routine analysis tool in many laboratories worldwide is discussed.

  9. Birth of a Neurogastronomy Nation: The Inaugural Symposium of the International Society of Neurogastronomy.

    PubMed

    Herz, Rachel S

    2016-02-01

    A review of the neuroscientific, clinical medicine, culinary, and food technology and agriculture presentations and demonstrations that were featured at the inaugural symposium of the International Society of Neurogastronomy, held at the University of Kentucky on November 7, 2015. PMID:26657144

  10. The South African Young Spectroscopist Symposium: current model and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cawood, Janette E.

    2003-10-01

    The Young Spectroscopist Symposium is held annually for young scientists to present spectroscopic research projects. All ethnic groups are represented. Ratings are on merit alone without ethnic/gender considerations. The event is widely supported, with 80-85% attendance by previously disadvantaged population groups. Future developments are to extend support to young spectroscopists.

  11. Production, management, and environment symposium: Environmental footprint of livestock production - Greenhouse gas emissions and climate change

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This manuscript is the introduction to the 2015 Production, Management, and Environment symposium titled “Environmental Footprint of Livestock Production – Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Climate Change” that was held at the Joint Annual Meeting of the ASAS and ADSA at the Rosen Shingle Creek Resort in...

  12. Improving the quality of papers submitted to dental journals: Transcription of session for editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing held at IADR meeting in Cape Town on Wednesday, 25 June 2014.

    PubMed

    Eaton, Kenneth A; Giannobile, William V; Sourgen, Deborah L; Balaji, S M; Honkala, Eino; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-08-01

    This satellite symposium was the fourth in a series for editors, publishers, reviewers and all those with an interest in scientific publishing. It was held on Wednesday 25th June 2014 at the IADR International meeting in Cape Town, South Africa. The symposium attracted more than 180 attendees. This symposium placed an emphasis on how the quality of papers submitted to dental journals could be improved. The panel included representation from editors, researchers and publishers from North America, India and the Gulf States. The symposium identified a number of challenges for editors and publishers, including the poor quality of many papers submitted to dental and other scientific journals, plagiarism, attempted duplicate publication and sometimes fraudulent results. Where possible speakers are identified by name. A subsequent symposium was held during the IADR meeting in Boston on March 11th 2015. Involvement open to editors, associate editors, publishers and others with an interest in scientific publishing. PMID:25748020

  13. Albizia lebbeck suppresses histamine signaling by the inhibition of histamine H1 receptor and histidine decarboxylase gene transcriptions.

    PubMed

    Nurul, Islam Mohammed; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Shahriar, Masum; Venkatesh, Pichairajan; Maeyama, Kazutaka; Mukherjee, Pulok K; Hattori, Masashi; Choudhuri, Mohamed Sahabuddin Kabir; Takeda, Noriaki; Fukui, Hiroyuki

    2011-11-01

    Histamine plays major roles in allergic diseases and its action is mediated mainly by histamine H(1) receptor (H1R). We have demonstrated that histamine signaling-related H1R and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) genes are allergic diseases sensitive genes and their expression level affects severity of the allergic symptoms. Therefore, compounds that suppress histamine signaling should be promising candidates as anti-allergic drugs. Here, we investigated the effect of the extract from the bark of Albizia lebbeck (AL), one of the ingredients of Ayruvedic medicines, on H1R and HDC gene expression using toluene-2,4-diisocyanate (TDI) sensitized allergy model rats and HeLa cells expressing endogenous H1R. Administration of the AL extract significantly decreased the numbers of sneezing and nasal rubbing. Pretreatment with the AL extract suppressed TDI-induced H1R and HDC mRNA elevations as well as [(3)H]mepyramine binding, HDC activity, and histamine content in the nasal mucosa. AL extract also suppressed TDI-induced up-regulation of IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13 mRNA. In HeLa cells, AL extract suppressed phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate- or histamine-induced up-regulation of H1R mRNA. Our data suggest that AL alleviated nasal symptoms by inhibiting histamine signaling in TDI-sensitized rats through suppression of H1R and HDC gene transcriptions. Suppression of Th2-cytokine signaling by AL also suggests that it could affect the histamine-cytokine network. PMID:21782040

  14. Automated histamine analysis for in vitro allergy testing. I. A method utilizing allergen-induced histamine release from whole blood.

    PubMed

    Siraganian, R P; Brodsky, M J

    1976-06-01

    A sensitive, automated, histamine assay system has been developed and applied for in vitro allergy testing. Nine common pollen and environmental allergens were used at three log dilutions for in vivo studies utilizing small volumes of blood (15-20 ml). The clinical evaluation was correlated with the results of the histamine release. two different procedures were utilized. The first is the commonly used histamine release from washed leukocytes. There was excellent correlation between the clinical evaluation and the results of histamine release from washed leukocytes in 17 different individuals. The second and simpler method utilized whole heparinized blood which might better reflect the immunologic reaction which occurs in vivo. Aliquots of blood and allergen were incubated for 1 hr at 37 degrees C and each supernatant was then analyzed for histamine release. There was excellent correlation between the two tests in 29 patients tested by both the whole blood and washed leukocyte methods. There was also good correlation between the clinical evaluation of the patients amd the intro tests. The precision, accuracy, and sensitivity of the automated histamine assay make feasible its routine application in the clinical study of allergic patients. PMID:58879

  15. The first Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Anjos Candeiro, Carlos Roberto; da Silva Marinho, Thiago

    2015-08-01

    The 1st Brazilian Dinosaur Symposium gathered paleontologists, geologists, and paleoartists in the city of Ituiutaba, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, from April 21st to 24th, 2013. The Dinosaur Symposium in the Pontal Campus of the Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, Minas Gerais State, Brazil provided an opportunity to share many new results of dinosaur research being conducted around the world. The symposium coincided with a new dawn of scientific advances in dinosaur paleontology further expanding its importance, interest and credibility worldwide.

  16. Women's technical and professional symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Budil, K; Mack, L

    1999-10-01

    This is the fourth LLNL-sponsored Women's Technical and Professional Symposium. This year's theme: ''Excellence through the Millennium,'' focuses on the cutting edge work being done at LLNL and the many contributions of women to our science and technology mission. We hope this Symposium gives each person attending a better idea of the broad scope of the Laboratory's mission and their place within the organization. It is easy to lose sight of the fact that we all work in support of science and technology despite the diversity of our experience. This Symposium provides an opportunity to reflect on our past and to begin to plan our future.

  17. Symposium focuses on Arctic science and policy needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-07-01

    The most important step the United States needs to take for the future of the Arctic is ratification of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (LOS), U.S. Senator Mark Begich (D-AK) told attendees at the 4th Symposium on the Impacts of an Ice-Diminishing Arctic on Naval and Maritime Operations, held 20-22 June in Washington, D. C. With the Arctic region undergoing rapid transformation due to climate change, scientists at the symposium provided details about diminishing ice and other concerns, while U.S. Naval and Coast Guard officers discussed research and operational needs and policy makers called for more resources to deal with Arctic issues and for LOS ratification.

  18. Inhibition of histidine decarboxylase ablates the autocrine tumorigenic effects of histamine in human cholangiocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Heather; DeMorrow, Sharon; Venter, Julie; Onori, Paolo; White, Mellanie; Gaudio, Eugenio; Francis, Taylor; Greene, John F; Tran, Steve; Meininger, Cynthia J; Alpini, Gianfranco

    2011-01-01

    Background In several tumours the endogenous activity of histidine decarboxylase (HDC), the enzyme stimulating histamine synthesis, sustains the autocrine trophic effect of histamine on cancer progression. Cholangiocarcinoma is a biliary cancer with limited treatment options. Histamine interacts with four G-protein coupled receptors, H1–H4 histamine receptors (HRs). Objective To determine the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition of histamine synthesis (by modulation of HDC) on cholangiocarcinoma growth. Methods In vitro studies were performed using multiple human cholangiocarcinoma lines. The expression levels of the histamine synthetic machinery and HRs were evaluated along with the effects of histamine stimulation and inhibition on cholangiocarcinoma proliferation. A xenograft tumour model was used to measure tumour volume after treatment with histamine or inhibition of histamine synthesis by manipulation of HDC. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression was measured in cholangiocarcinoma cells concomitant with the evaluation of the expression of CD31 in endothelial cells in the tumour microenvironment. Results Cholangiocarcinoma cells display (1) enhanced HDC and decreased monoamine oxidase B expression resulting in increased histamine secretion; and (2) increased expression of H1–H4 HRs. Inhibition of HDC and antagonising H1HR decreased histamine secretion in Mz-ChA-1 cells. Long-term treatment with histamine increased proliferation and VEGF expression in cholangiocarcinoma that was blocked by HDC inhibitor and the H1HR antagonist. In nude mice, histamine increased tumour growth (up to 25%) and VEGF expression whereas inhibition of histamine synthesis (by reduction of HDC) ablated the autocrine stimulation of histamine on tumour growth (~80%) and VEGF expression. No changes in angiogenesis (evaluated by changes in CD31 immunoreactivity) were detected in the in vivo treatment groups. Conclusion The novel concept that an autocrine loop

  19. Histamine H3 receptor in primary mouse microglia inhibits chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion.

    PubMed

    Iida, Tomomitsu; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Matsuzawa, Takuro; Naganuma, Fumito; Nakamura, Tadaho; Miura, Yamato; Mohsen, Attayeb S; Harada, Ryuichi; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2015-07-01

    Histamine is a physiological amine which initiates a multitude of physiological responses by binding to four known G-protein coupled histamine receptor subtypes as follows: histamine H1 receptor (H1 R), H2 R, H3 R, and H4 R. Brain histamine elicits neuronal excitation and regulates a variety of physiological processes such as learning and memory, sleep-awake cycle and appetite regulation. Microglia, the resident macrophages in the brain, express histamine receptors; however, the effects of histamine on critical microglial functions such as chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and cytokine secretion have not been examined in primary cells. We demonstrated that mouse primary microglia express H2 R, H3 R, histidine decarboxylase, a histamine synthase, and histamine N-methyltransferase, a histamine metabolizing enzyme. Both forskolin-induced cAMP accumulation and ATP-induced intracellular Ca(2+) transients were reduced by the H3 R agonist imetit but not the H2 R agonist amthamine. H3 R activation on two ubiquitous second messenger signalling pathways suggests that H3 R can regulate various microglial functions. In fact, histamine and imetit dose-dependently inhibited microglial chemotaxis, phagocytosis, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production. Furthermore, we confirmed that microglia produced histamine in the presence of LPS, suggesting that H3 R activation regulate microglial function by autocrine and/or paracrine signalling. In conclusion, we demonstrate the involvement of histamine in primary microglial functions, providing the novel insight into physiological roles of brain histamine. PMID:25754956

  20. Blood histamine release: A new allergy blood test

    SciTech Connect

    Faraj, B.A.; Gottlieb, G.R.; Camp, V.M.; Lollies, P.

    1985-05-01

    Allergen-mediated histamine release from human leukocytes represents an important model for in vitro studies of allergic reactions. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the measurement of histamine released in allergic patients (pts) by radioenzymatic assay following mixing of their blood with common allergens represents a reliable index for diagnosis of atopic allergy. Three categories of allergies were used: (1) housedust and mite; (2) cat and dog dander; (3) trees and grasses and ragweed mixture. The presence of allergy was established by intradermal skin testing in the study group of 82 pts. Significant atopy was defined as greater than or equal to 3+ (overall range 0-4 +, negative to maximum) on skin testing. The test was carried out in tubes with 0.5 ml heparinized blood, 0.5 ml tris albumin buffer, and one of the allergens (60-100 PNU/ml). In 20 controls without allergy, there always was less than or equal to 4% histamine release (normal response). A significant allergen-mediated histamine release, ranging from 12 to 30% of the total blood histamine content, was observed in 96% of the pts with skin test sensitivity of greater than or equal to 3+. There was good agreement between skin testing and histamine release in terms of the allergen causing the response. Thus, measurement of histamine release in blood in response to allergen challenge represents a clinically useful in vitro test for the diagnosis of atopic allergy. Because data can be obtained from a single sample and are highly quantitative, this new method should have application to the longitudinal study of allergic pts and to the assessment of interventions.

  1. Research symposium proceedings. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    THE research symposium was organized to present the cutting edge research for PET by individuals from leading institutions throughout the world. The Institute for Clinical PET (ICP) has focused its annual meeting on the clinical applications of PET.

  2. Endogenous Histamine and Cortisol Levels in Subjects with Different Histamine N-Methyltransferase C314T Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Yuen Yi; Jusko, William J.; Zhou, Hong-Hao; Chen, Guo-Lin; Guo, Dong; Zhou, Gan; Spratlin, Vicky E.; Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Histamine N-methyltransferase (HNMT) catalyzes the methylation of histamine and plays an important role in histamine biotransformation in bronchial epithelium. Enzymatic activity of HNMT has been shown to be regulated by genetic factors, including polymorphisms in the HNMT gene. In this pilot study we determined endogenous levels of histamine and Cortisol in plasma and whole blood samples from subjects with different genotypes for the HNMT C314T polymorphism, and investigated whether these parameters differed between individuals with the HNMT CC genotype and those with the CT genotype. Methods Blood samples were collected from 48 unrelated volunteers (36 males, 12 females), aged 21-40 years, who participated in the study. PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis was used to determine HNMTC314T genotypes. Erythrocyte HNMT activity was determined as well as plasma and whole blood levels of histamine and Cortisol. Two-group comparisons of the various parameters were analyzed by Blocked Wilcoxon test and Wilcoxon Rank Sum test as appropriate. Results Thirty-seven subjects (24 Caucasians, three African Americans, one Middle Eastern, five Indians, three Chinese, and one Filipino) were found to have the homozygous CC genotype. Ten subjects (eight Caucasians, one Middle Eastern, and one Chinese) were heterozygous and one individual (Pakistani) was homozygous for the variant 314T allele. The frequency of HNMT CT heterozygotes in the small Caucasian cohort was 0.125. Median enzyme activity was significantly lower in subjects with the heterozygous CT genotype than in those with the homozygous CC genotype (485 vs 631 U/mL of red blood cells; p = 0.023). A broad range of histamine levels in plasma and whole blood was observed for all subjects. Whereas the median plasma histamine level was found to be higher in heterozygotes for the wild-type 314C allele than homozygotes (3.32 vs 2.30 nmol/L; p = 0.021), there was no difference between the two groups in

  3. Histidines, histamines and imidazoles as glycosidase inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Field, R A; Haines, A H; Chrystal, E J; Luszniak, M C

    1991-01-01

    This present study reports the ability of a range of derivatives of L-histidine, histamine and imidazole to act as inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase, yeast alpha-glucosidase and Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase. The addition of a hydrophobic group to the basic imidazole nucleus greatly enhances binding to both the alpha- and beta-glucosidases. L-Histidine (beta-naphthylamide (Ki 17 microM) is a potent competitive inhibitor of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase as is omega-N-acetylhistamine (K1 35 microM), which inhibits the sweet-almond beta-glucosidase at least 700 times more strongly than either yeast alpha-glucosidase or Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase, and suggests potential for the development of selective reversible beta-glucosidase inhibitors. A range of hydrophobic omega-N-acylhistamines were synthesized and shown to be among the most potent inhibitors of sweet-almond beta-glucosidase reported to date. PMID:2012615

  4. Histamine and Immune Biomarkers in CNS Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Torrellas, Clara; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; López-Muñoz, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimmune dysregulation is a common phenomenon in different forms of central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Cross-links between central and peripheral immune mechanisms appear to be disrupted as reflected by a series of immune markers (CD3, CD4, CD7, HLA-DR, CD25, CD28, and CD56) which show variability in brain disorders such as anxiety, depression, psychosis, stroke, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, epilepsy, vascular dementia, mental retardation, cerebrovascular encephalopathy, multiple sclerosis, brain tumors, cranial nerve neuropathies, mental retardation, and posttraumatic brain injury. Histamine (HA) is a pleiotropic monoamine involved in several neurophysiological functions, neuroimmune regulation, and CNS pathogenesis. Changes in brain HA show an age- and sex-related pattern, and alterations in brain HA levels are present in different CNS regions of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Brain HA in neuronal and nonneuronal compartments plays a dual role (neurotrophic versus neurotoxic) in a tissue-specific manner. Pathogenic mechanisms associated with neuroimmune dysregulation in AD involve HA, interleukin-1β, and TNF-α, whose aberrant expression contributes to neuroinflammation as an aggravating factor for neurodegeneration and premature neuronal death. PMID:27190492

  5. PREFACE: Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosandi, Y.; Urbassek, H. M.; Yamanaka, H.

    2016-01-01

    This issue of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science contains selected papers presented at the Padjadjaran Earth Dialogues: International Symposium on Geophysical Issues, PEDISGI. The meeting was held from June 8 to 10, 2015, at the Bale-Sawala of Universitas Padjadjaran in Jatinangor, Indonesia. The PEDISGI is a symposium to accommodate communication between researchers, in particular geophysicists and related scientists, and to enable sharing of knowledge and research findings concerning local and global geophysical issues. The symposium was attended by 126 participants and 64 contributors from Indonesian universities and the neighbouring countries in four categories, viz. Theoretical and Computational Geophysics, Environmental Geophysics, Geophysical Explorations, and Geophysical Instrumentations and Methods. The symposium was accompanied by a dialog, discussing a chosen topic regarding environmental and geological problems of relevance for the Indonesian archipelago and the surrounding regions. For this first event the topic was ''The formation of Bandung-Basin between myths and facts: Exemplary cultural, geological and geophysical study on the evolution of the earth surface'', presented by invited speakers and local experts. This activity was aimed at extending our knowledge on this particular subject, which may have global impact. This topic was augmented by theoretical background lectures on the earth's surface formation, presented by the invited speakers of the symposium. The meeting would not have been successful without the assistance of the local organizing committee. We want to specially thank Irwan A. Dharmawan for managing the programme, Anggie Susilawati and Mia U. Hasanah for the conference administration, and Dini Fitriani for financial management. We also thank the National Geographic Indonesia for its support via the Business to Business Collaboration Program. The conference photograph can be viewed in the PDF.

  6. The histamine H4 receptor: from orphan to the clinic

    PubMed Central

    Thurmond, Robin L.

    2015-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a class A G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this new receptor and determine if it represented a viable drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on the function of histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists of the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation

  7. The histamine H4 receptor: from orphan to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Robin L

    2015-01-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was first noted as a sequence in genomic databases that had features of a class A G-protein coupled receptor. This putative receptor was found to bind histamine consistent with its homology to other histamine receptors and thus became the fourth member of the histamine receptor family. Due to the previous success of drugs that target the H1 and H2 receptors, an effort was made to understand the function of this new receptor and determine if it represented a viable drug target. Taking advantage of the vast literature on the function of histamine, a search for histamine activity that did not appear to be mediated by the other three histamine receptors was undertaken. From this asthma and pruritus emerged as areas of particular interest. Histamine has long been suspected to play a role in the pathogenesis of asthma, but antihistamines that target the H1 and H2 receptors have not been shown to be effective for this condition. The use of selective ligands in animal models of asthma has now potentially filled this gap by showing a role for the H4R in mediating lung function and inflammation. A similar story exists for chronic pruritus associated with conditions such as atopic dermatitis. Antihistamines that target the H1 receptor are effective in reducing acute pruritus, but are ineffective in pruritus experienced by patients with atopic dermatitis. As for asthma, animal models have now suggested a role for the H4R in mediating pruritic responses, with antagonists of the H4R reducing pruritus in a number of different conditions. The anti-pruritic effect of H4R antagonists has recently been shown in human clinical studies, validating the preclinical findings in the animal models. A selective H4R antagonist inhibited histamine-induced pruritus in health volunteers and reduced pruritus in patients with atopic dermatitis. The history to date of the H4R provides an excellent example of the deorphanization of a novel receptor and the translation

  8. Transect workshop held in Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barazangi, Muawia

    A workshop on the progress of the Global Geoscience Transects (GGT) project in the Middle East and Africa (see maps) was held January 15-17 in Cairo, Egypt. (Transect plans in the region have been described in Eos, 69, p. 124). It was jointly organized and funded by the Egyptian National Committee of Geodesy and Geophysics and the International Lithosphere Program coordinating Committee CC-7 of GGT. A. Ashour of Cairo University, Egypt, chaired the workshop; the general secretary was S. Riad of Assiut University, Egypt, who was responsible for most of the organization, scheduling and implementation of the workshop.

  9. The therapeutic potential of histamine receptor ligands in inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Detlef; Seifert, Roland

    2014-09-01

    In the intestine of patients suffering from inflammatory bowel disease concentrations of histamine are increased compared to healthy controls. Genetic ablation of histamine production in mice ameliorates the course of experimentally induced colitis. These observations and first pharmacological studies indicate a function of histamine in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. However, a closer examination reveals that available data are highly heterogeneous, limiting the rational design of strategies addressing specific histamine receptor subtypes as possible target for pharmacological interaction. However, very recently first clinical data indicate that antagonism at the histamine receptor subtype H4 provides a beneficial effect in at least the skin. Here, we discuss the available data on histamine effects and histamine receptor subtype functions in inflammatory bowel disease with a special emphasis on the histamine H4-receptor. PMID:24929116

  10. The role of histamine in burn, tourniquet and endotoxin shock in mice.

    PubMed

    Markley, K; Horakova, Z; Smallman, E T; Beaven, M A

    1975-01-01

    The release of histamine and mortality was studied in mice after various types of experimental shock. In burn shock, serum histamine rose significantly after injury, but there was no correlation between increased serum histamine and high mortality as a consequence of several therapy regimens. For example, after treatment with histamine or Compound 48/80 before burning, there was a rise of serum histamine, yet shock mortality fell significantly. Although separate administration of antagonists of H1 - or H2 - histamine receptors had no effect on mortality, pretreatment with both diphenhydramine and burimamide significantly increased shock mortality. In tourniquet shock, serum histamine rose significantly, and treatment with both antagonists before trauma produced a significant elevation of shock mortality. In endotoxin shock, prior treatment with one or both drugs did not change mortality. These results suggest that endogenous histamine is not a lethal factor in burn and tourniquet trauma, but rather it appears to have a compensatory, beneficial effect. PMID:241652

  11. Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis with a Low-histamine Diet.

    PubMed

    Chung, Bo Young; Cho, Soo Ick; Ahn, In Su; Lee, Hee Bong; Kim, Hye One; Park, Chun Wook; Lee, Cheol Heon

    2011-09-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) has numerous trigger factors. The question of whether foods can aggravate AD remains open to debate. Although a number of published papers have detailed the relationship between food allergies and AD, little research has examined the question of how food intolerance affects AD. For the purposes of this study, a six-year-old Korean boy with AD was admitted to the hospital for evaluation of the possibility of food, particularly pork, as a triggering factor in his skin disease. He had a history of worsening of symptoms when eating pork. Total serum IgE concentration was 157 IU/ml. House dust was class 2.2 (1.5 IU/ml) in MAST. All other MAST items were negative. In an oral food challenge test, he showed a positive result after eating 200 g of pork, but did not show a positive result after eating 60 g of pork. After discharge, we attempted to keep him on a balanced diet that included various types of food and prohibited him from eating food that contains a high level of histamine. After keeping the patient on a balanced and low-histamine dietary regimen, his AD symptoms showed improvement and have not worsened for more than seven months. A low-histamine, balanced diet could be helpful for AD patients having symptoms that resemble histamine intolerance in which their AD symptoms worsened after intake of histamine-rich foods, but in which food allergy tests are negative. PMID:22028584

  12. Neuronal histamine and cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zlomuzica, Armin; Dere, Dorothea; Binder, Sonja; De Souza Silva, Maria Angelica; Huston, Joseph P; Dere, Ekrem

    2016-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by extracellular amyloid plaque deposits, mainly composed of amyloid-beta peptide and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles consisting of aggregated hyperphosphorylated tau protein. Amyloid-beta represents a neurotoxic proteolytic cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein. The progressive cognitive decline that is associated with Alzheimer's disease has been mainly attributed to a deficit in cholinergic neurotransmission due to the continuous degeneration of cholinergic neurons e.g. in the basal forebrain. There is evidence suggesting that other neurotransmitter systems including neuronal histamine also contribute to the development and maintenance of Alzheimer's disease-related cognitive deficits. Pathological changes in the neuronal histaminergic system of such patients are highly predictive of ensuing cognitive deficits. Furthermore, histamine-related drugs, including histamine 3 receptor antagonists, have been demonstrated to alleviate cognitive symptoms in Alzheimer's disease. This review summarizes findings from animal and clinical research on the relationship between the neuronal histaminergic system and cognitive deterioration in Alzheimer's disease. The significance of the neuronal histaminergic system as a promising target for the development of more effective drugs for the treatment of cognitive symptoms is discussed. Furthermore, the option to use histamine-related agents as neurogenesis-stimulating therapy that counteracts progressive brain atrophy in Alzheimer's disease is considered. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26025658

  13. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria

    PubMed Central

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  14. Caffeine promotes glutamate and histamine release in the posterior hypothalamus

    PubMed Central

    Kodama, Tohru; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2014-01-01

    Histamine neurons are active during waking and largely inactive during sleep, with minimal activity during rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep. Caffeine, the most widely used stimulant, causes a significant increase of sleep onset latency in rats and humans. We hypothesized that caffeine increases glutamate release in the posterior hypothalamus (PH) and produces increased activity of wake-active histamine neurons. Using in vivo microdialysis, we collected samples from the PH after caffeine administration in freely behaving rats. HPLC analysis and biosensor measurements showed a significant increase in glutamate levels beginning 30 min after caffeine administration. Glutamate levels remained elevated for at least 140 min. GABA levels did not significantly change over the same time period. Histamine level significantly increased beginning 30 min after caffeine administration and remained elevated for at least 140 min. Immunostaining showed a significantly elevated number of c-Fos-labeled histamine neurons in caffeine-treated rats compared with saline-treated animals. We conclude that increased glutamate levels in the PH activate histamine neurons and contribute to caffeine-induced waking and alertness. PMID:25031227

  15. Updosing of Nonsedating Anti-histamines in Recalcitrant Chronic Urticaria.

    PubMed

    Godse, Kiran; Bhattar, Prachi; Patil, Sharmila; Nadkarni, Nitin; Gautam, Manjyot

    2016-01-01

    Chronic urticaria (CU) is a persistent, debiliating condition that causes severe impairment on the quality of life (QoL) of patient by interrupting work productivity. Current guidelines recommend second-generation (nonsedating) anti-histamines for the treatment for all forms of urticaria. In patients who do not respond adequately to conventional doses of anti-histamines, it is recommended to increase the dose to up to four times to obtain control. But there are only few controlled studies that have assessed the efficacy and safety of nonsedating anti-histamines. Though sedating histamines are frequently used as an add-on therapy in severe cases, they have a negative impact on QoL by compromising sleep and performance. The use of other suggested therapeutic options (omalizumab, cyclosporine A, montelukast and dapsone) is also limited by paucity of data on their efficacy and adverse effect profile. Second-generation anti-histamines which are relatively safer require more proven data to support their judicious use to improve disease in patients with CU. PMID:27293247

  16. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  17. PREFACE: International Symposium on Molecular Conductors: Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions (ISMC 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Toshihiro; Suzumura, Yoshikazu

    2008-02-01

    The International Symposium on Molecular Conductors 2008 (ISMC2008) was held as the second international symposium of the project entitled `Novel Functions of Molecular Conductors under Extreme Conditions', which was supported by the Grant-in-aid for Scientific Research on Priority Areas from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology in Japan. The project lasted from September 2003 to March 2008, and was completed by this symposium held at Okazaki Conference Center, Institute for Molecular Science, Okazaki, Japan (23-25 July 2008), which about 100 scientists attended. During the symposium, five project teams gave summary talks and exciting talks were given on the topics developed recently not only by the members of the project but also by other scientists including invited speakers from abroad, who are doing active research on molecular conductors. It is expected that papers presented in the symposium will give valuable hints for the next step in the research of this field. Therefore the organizers of this symposium decided to publish this proceedings in order to demonstrate these activities, not only for the local community of the project, but also for the broad society of international scientists who are interested in molecular conductors. The editors, who are also the organizers of this symposium, believe that this proceedings provides a significant and relevant contribution to the field of molecular conductors since it is the first time we have published such a proceedings as an electronic journal. We note that all papers published in this volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series have been peer reviewed by expert referees. Editors made every effort to satisfy the criterion of a proceedings journal published by IOP Publishing. Toshihiro Takahashi and Yoshikazu Suzumura Editors: Toshihiro Takahashi (Gakushuin University) (Chairman) Kazushi Kanoda (University of Tokyo) Seiichi Kagoshima (University of Tokyo) Takehiko Mori (Tokyo

  18. Human eosinophils - potential pharmacological model applied in human histamine H4 receptor research.

    PubMed

    Grosicki, Marek; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Histamine and histamine receptors are well known for their immunomodulatory role in inflammation. In this review we describe the role of histamine and histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils. In the first part of article we provide short summary of histamine and histamine receptors role in physiology and histamine related therapeutics used in clinics. We briefly describe the human histamine receptor H4 and its ligands, as well as human eosinophils. In the second part of the review we provide detailed description of known histamine effects on eosinophils including: intracellular calcium concentration flux, actin polymerization, cellular shape change, upregulation of adhesion proteins and cellular chemotaxis. We provide proofs that these effects are mainly connected with the activation of histamine H4 receptor. When examining experimental data we discuss the controversial results and limitations of the studies performed on isolated eosinophils. In conclusion we believe that studies on histamine H4 receptor on human eosinophils can provide interesting new biomarkers that can be used in clinical studies of histamine receptors, that in future might result in the development of new strategies in the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions like asthma or allergy, in which eosinophils are involved. PMID:25760088

  19. Isolation of histamine-producing Lactobacillus buchneri from Swiss cheese implicated in a food poisoning outbreak.

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, S S; Speckhard, M W; Somers, E B; Taylor, S L

    1985-01-01

    A histamine-producing strain of Lactobacillus buchneri was isolated from Swiss cheese that had been implicated in an outbreak of histamine poisoning. It produced up to 4,070 nmol of histamine per ml in MRS broth supplemented with 0.1% histidine. The identification of this isolate was based on its biochemical, bacteriological, and DNA characterizations. PMID:4083875

  20. Histamine-producing bacteria in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) and their abilities to produce histamine and other biogenic amines.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue; Huang, Zhiyong; Chen, Xia

    2014-08-01

    Using decarboxylation medium and 16S rDNA sequence analysis, histamine-producing bacteria (HPB) in blue scad (Decapterus maruadsi) were isolated and identified, and the histamine-producing abilities of the isolated HPB were determined. Nine mesophilic strains (H1-H9) isolated from the muscle of blue scad were identified as the genera of HPB, including Arthrobacter bergeri (H1), Pseudomonas sp. (H2, H5 and H6), Psychrobacter sp. (H3), Shewanella baltica (H4 and H7), and Aeromonas salmonicida (H8 and H9), respectively. Results showed that most of the HPB strains were weak on histamine formation (13.0-20.4 mg/l), except for the H8 strain with the ability of producing 115 mg of histamine/l in trypticase soy broth containing 1.0 % L-histidine. As the strongest HPB in blue scad, bacterial strain H8 also presented a strong ability to produce other biogenic amines, such as putrescine, cadaverine, spermidine, spermine, tyramine and tryptamine. Therefore, the H8 strain identified as the genus of A. salmonicida was the dominant mesophilic HPB strain for producing histamine and other biogenic amines in blue scad at room temperature. PMID:24668182

  1. 11th Annual LVMH Recherche Symposium: skin rejuvenation.

    PubMed

    Bonté, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    The 11(th) Annual LVMH Recherche Scientific Symposium was held in London on October 27(th), into the warmth of the distinguished British Library, with nearly 150 industry and research attendees. The meeting organized by LVMH Recherche was centered on the theme of skin rejuvenation. The current state of play for rejuvenation research was summarized, and then advances in the science of skin aging and rejuvenation therapies were discussed in detail. Personalized genomics and current and prospective translational therapies were presented, followed by a clever linking of multiple global theories towards a cohesive plan for future goals in rejuvenation research. PMID:22615002

  2. Evaluating Visual Analytics at the 2007 VAST Symposium Contest

    SciTech Connect

    Plaisant, Catherine; Grinstein, Georges; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.; O'Connell, Theresa; Laskowski, Sharon; Chien, Lynn; Tat, Annie; Wright, William; Gorg, Carsten; Lui, Zhicheng; Parekh, Neel; Singhal, Kanupriya; Stasko, John T.

    2008-03-01

    The second Visual Analytics Science and Technology (VAST) contest was held in conjunction with the 2007 IEEE VAST Symposium. A synthetic data set was created containing a known scenario with embedded threats, therefore providing ground truth. Participants used visual analytic tools to explore the heterogeneous data collection and find the evidence of illegal and possible terrorist activities in the data. We describe the contest and the evaluation methodology, then provide details on the results and the two winning entries. Lessons learned are reported from different points of view: contest committee, participants, judges, stake holders and other researchers.

  3. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    MCDONALD,R.J.

    2002-08-20

    This is the PROCEEDINGS OF THE 2002 NATIONAL OILHEAT RESEARCH ALLIANCE TECHNOLOGY SYMPOSIUM, which was Held at Oilheat Visions Conference, Rhode Island Convention Center, Providence, Rhode Island, August 20-21, 2002. The specific objectives of this conference are to: (1) identify and evaluate the current state-of-the-art and recommend new initiatives for higher efficiency, a cleaner environment, and to satisfy consumer needs cost-effectively, reliably, and safely; and (2) foster cooperative interactions among federal and industrial representatives for the common goal of sustained economic growth and energy security via energy conservation.

  4. Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Space Transportation Propulsion Technology Symposium was held to provide a forum for communication within the propulsion within the propulsion technology developer and user communities. Emphasis was placed on propulsion requirements and initiatives to support current, next generation, and future space transportation systems, with the primary objectives of discerning whether proposed designs truly meet future transportation needs and identifying possible technology gaps, overlaps, and other programmatic deficiencies. Key space transportation propulsion issues were addressed through four panels with government, industry, and academia membership. The panels focused on systems engineering and integration; development, manufacturing and certification; operational efficiency; and program development and cultural issues.

  5. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh; Daud, Taher; Strauss, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2001 that was held on November 7-8, 2001 in San Diego, CA. The proceedings contains a a wide range of papers that cover current and new memory technologies including Flash memories, Magnetic Random Access Memories (MRAM and GMRAM), Ferro-electric RAM (FeRAM), and Chalcogenide RAM (CRAM). The papers presented in the proceedings address the use of these technologies for space applications as well as radiation effects and packaging issues.

  6. Waste management in space: a NASA symposium. Special issue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wydeven, T. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    This special issue contains papers from the NASA Symposium on Waste Processing for Advanced Life Support, which was held at NASA Ames Research Center on September 11-13, 1990. Specialists in waste management from academia, government, and industry convened to exchange ideas and advise NASA in developing effective methods for waste management in a Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS). Innovative and well-established methods were presented to assist in developing and managing wastes in closed systems for future long-duration space missions, especially missions to Mars.

  7. Proceedings of the Americas Nuclear Energy Symposium (ANES 2004)

    SciTech Connect

    2004-10-03

    These are the proceedings of the Americas Nuclear Energy Symposium (ANES 2004) held October 3 through 6, 2004 in Miami Beach, Florida. Over 200 participants from the public, private, and academic research sectors, represented by 15 different countries, attended this conference. ANES 2004 consisted of 26 sessions highlighting advances in environmental sciences and alternative energies, the nuclear fuel cycle, information and knowledge transfer, power generation, research reactor operation and utilization, nuclear safety, and plant financing. ANES 2004 featured more than 100 papers and presentations on these topics as well as 15 international exhibitors.

  8. Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000: Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aranki, Nazeeh (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    This publication contains the proceedings for the Non-Volatile Memory Technology Symposium 2000 that was held on November 15-16, 2000 in Arlington, Virginia. The proceedings contains a wide range of papers that cover the presentations of myriad advances in the nonvolatile memory technology during the recent past including memory cell design, simulations, radiation environment, and emerging memory technologies. The papers presented in the proceedings address the design challenges and applications and deals with newer, emerging memory technologies as well as related issues of radiation environment and die packaging.

  9. Histamine Poisoning from Ingestion of Fish or Scombroid Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tortorella, Vincenzo; Masciari, Peppino; Pezzi, Mario; Mola, Assunta; Tiburzi, Simona Paola; Zinzi, Maria Concetta; Scozzafava, Annamaria; Verre, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The scombroid poisoning is due to the ingestion of poorly preserved fish (especially tuna, sardines, and mackerel) out of the cold chain. Under the influence of the proliferation of gram negative bacteria that occurs for heating, the histidine content in the muscle of the fish is converted into histamine, by the action of the enzyme histidine decarboxylase. If the histamine is ingested in large quantities, it causes an anaphylactoid reaction with a variety of symptoms from moderate to severe to life-threating. We will describe two cases that came under our observation after consuming a meal of bluefin tuna. The diagnosis of scombroid syndrome was made on the basis of the anamnestic data and the clinical one. The rapid resolution of the signs and symptoms after treatment with histamines H1-H2 receptor blockers confirmed the suspected diagnosis. PMID:25544905

  10. Advances in the understanding of dairy and cheese flavors: symposium introduction.

    PubMed

    Tunick, Michael H; Gummalla, Sanjay

    2014-06-25

    A symposium titled "Advances in the Understanding of Dairy and Cheese Flavors" was held in September 2013 at the American Chemical Society's 246th National Meeting in Indianapolis, IN, USA. The symposium, which was sponsored by the Division of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, was to discuss the state of the art in the detection and quantitation of flavor in dairy products. The authors of two of the presentations have been selected to expand on their talks by submitting full papers about their research. PMID:24911867

  11. Twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals: Program and abstracts

    SciTech Connect

    Scheitlin, F.M.

    1990-01-01

    This report is the program and abstracts of the twelfth symposium on biotechnology for fuels and chemicals, held on May 7--11, 1990, at Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The symposium, sponsored by the Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Solar Energy Research Institute, Badger Engineers, Inc., Gas Research Institute, and American Chemical Society, consists of five sessions: Session 1, thermal, chemical, and biological processing; Session 2 and 3, applied biological research; Session 4, bioengineering research; and Session 5, biotechnology, bioengineering, and the solution of environmental problems. It also consists of a poster session of the same five subject categories.

  12. Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium V: New Frontiers in Aortic Disease and Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Mohamad; Fok, Matthew; Shaw, Matthew; Field, Mark; Kuduvalli, Manoj; Desmond, Michael; Harrington, Deborah; Rashid, Abbas; Oo, Aung

    2014-01-01

    Aortic aneurysm disease is a complex condition that requires a multidisciplinary approach in management. The innovation and collaboration among vascular surgery, cardiothoracic surgery, interventional radiology, and other related specialties is essential for progress in the management of aortic aneurysms. The Fifth Liverpool Aortic Surgery Symposium that was held in May 2013 aimed at bringing national and international experts from across the United Kingdom and the globe to deliver their thoughts, applications, and advances in aortic and vascular surgery. In this report, we present a selected short synopsis of the key topics presented at this symposium. PMID:26798724

  13. Histamine fish poisoning in Australia, 2001 to 2013.

    PubMed

    Knope, Katrina; Sloan-Gardner, Timothy S; Stafford, Russell J

    2014-12-01

    We report on human illness due to histamine fish poisoning outbreaks in Australia from 2001 to 2013. Histamine fish poisoning results from the ingestion of histamine contained within the flesh of certain fish species that naturally contain histidine, which has been converted to histamine by spoilage bacteria following poor handling or temperature control after harvesting. While symptoms vary, allergic symptoms such as facial flushing, headaches and rashes are frequently reported. Using the OzFoodNet outbreak register, published case reports and surveillance reports, we found data on 57 outbreaks of histamine fish poisoning, which affected 187 people, of whom 14% were hospitalised. There were no deaths reported. Outbreaks were generally small in size, with a median of 2 cases per outbreak (range 1 to 22 people), with 88% of outbreaks comprising less than 5 people. Tuna (in the family Scombridae) was the most frequently reported food vehicle, while 18 outbreaks involved non-scombridae fish. Median incubation periods among the outbreaks were short; being less than 1 hour for 22 outbreaks. The most frequently reported symptoms were diarrhoea and rash. Symptoms of facial/body flushing were reported for at least one case in 19 outbreaks and tingling, burning or swelling of the skin, especially around the lips for at least 1 case in 13 outbreaks. In 3 outbreaks, one or more cases were reported to have had respiratory distress or difficulty breathing. While the condition is often mild, improved recognition and appropriate treatment is important, as it will reduce the possibility of any severe health effects resulting from this condition. Key features of histamine fish poisoning outbreaks are the high attack rate, rapid onset, the typical symptoms and their short duration. PMID:25631589

  14. Niobium - Proceedings of the international symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, H.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium on niobium. Topics considered at the symposium included niobium mining, ore processing, uses, fabrication, microstructure, mechanical properties, physical properties, corrosion, physical radiation effects, and marketing.

  15. The 1986 Get Away Special Experimenter's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Lawrence R. (Editor); Mosier, Frances L. (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The 1986 Get Away Special (GAS) Experimenter's Symposium will provide a formal opportunity for GAS Experimenter's to share the results of their projects. The focus of this symposium is on payloads that will be flown in the future.

  16. Stereoselective synthesis of desloratadine derivatives as antagonist of histamine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gai-Zhi; Xu, Hai-Wei; Chen, Guang-Wei; Wang, Peng; Wang, Ya-Na; Liu, Hong-Min; Yu, De-Quan

    2010-02-15

    A series of desloratadine derivatives were stereoselectively synthesized and evaluated for H(1) antihistamine activity. For the evaluation of H(1) antihistamine activity, the in vitro histamine-induced contraction of the guinea-pig ileum assay (HC) was used. The synthesized desloratadine derivatives 7, 8 and 9 are structurally related to rupatadine and were generated by replacement of the 5-methyl-3-pyridine group of rupatadine with gamma-alkylidene butenolide. Their H(1) antihistamine activities have shown a high dependence on the exact nature of the substituent in the lactone ring. Optimum structures 7, 8a and 8g display potent activity inhibiting histamine-induced effects. PMID:20110173

  17. Histamine H2 receptor - Involvement in gastric ulceration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, P. A.; Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Brown, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The involvement of the H1 and H2 receptors for histamine in the pathogenesis of gastric ulcers was investigated in rats. Metiamide, an H2 receptor antagonist, reliably reduced ulceration produced by stress alone or by a combination of stress and aspirin. In contrast, pyrilamine, which blocks only the H1 receptor, was without effect under these same conditions. The results support the hypothesis that histamine mediates both stress and stress plus aspirin induced ulceration by a mechanism involving the H2 receptor.

  18. Histamine 2 Receptor Antagonists and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Megan D; Aouthmany, Mouhammad; Sheehan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 50 years, the pharmacologic market for gastric disease has grown exponentially. Currently, medical management with histamine 2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy over surgical intervention. These are generally regarded as safe medications, but there are growing numbers of cases documenting adverse effects, especially those manifesting in the skin. Here we review the pharmacology, common clinical applications, and adverse reactions of both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors with a particular focus on the potential for allergic reactions including allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:27172303

  19. The fate of released histamine: reception, response and termination.

    PubMed Central

    Rangachari, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Histamine released from ECL cells elicits responses from a variety of cellular targets in the vicinity. Three sets of receptors are involved (H1, H2 and H3). Receptor occupation is promptly transduced into cellular responses. The responses, in turn, are terminated by diverse mechanisms: enzymatic inactivation, cellular uptake and desensitization at the receptor level. Under specific pathological conditions, histamine effects could be exaggerated by the presence of derivatives that may be of marginal relevance under physiological conditions. Images Figure 2 PMID:10461350

  20. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    ScienceCinema

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2013-06-05

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world?s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne?s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during ?The Dawn of the Nuclear Age?, a Director?s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne?s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980?s and ?90?s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi?s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi?s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi?s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950?s and ?60?s and contributing to many of the research ?firsts? that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne?s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne?s nuclear energy legacy to life for everyone in the auditorium. These engaging presentations prompted a

  1. CP-1 70th Anniversary Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Len Koch; Harold Agnew

    2012-07-11

    Dr. Harold Agnew, retired director of Los Alamos National Laboratory and one of 49 people present on December 2, 1942 when the world’s first man-made controlled nuclear chain reaction was achieved with the CP-1 reactor, and Dr. Len Koch, one of Argonne’s earliest staff members and a designer of EBR-I, the first liquid metal-cooled fast reactor, spoke about their early work during “The Dawn of the Nuclear Age”, a Director’s Special Symposium held as one of the events to commemorate the 70th anniversary year of CP-1 achieving criticality. The symposium was moderated by Dr. Charles Till, a retired Argonne associate laboratory director who led Argonne’s nuclear engineering programs throughout the 1980’s and ‘90’s. Dr. Agnew painted a vivid picture of the challenges and rewards of working in Enrico Fermi’s group under strict security conditions and the complete faith all in the group had in Fermi’s analyses. He stated that no one ever doubted that CP-1 would achieve criticality, and when the moment came, those present acknowledged the accomplishment with little more than a subdued toast of chianti from a bottle provided by reactor physicist Eugene Wigner. This experimental work on nuclear reactors was continued in the Chicago area and led first by Fermi and then Walter Zinn, another member of Fermi’s CP-1 group, resulting in the formal establishment of Argonne National Laboratory on July 1, 1946. Dr. Koch described how much he enjoyed working at Argonne through the 1950’s and ‘60’s and contributing to many of the research “firsts” that Argonne achieved in the nuclear energy field and led to the foundation of the commercial nuclear power generation industry. His reminiscences about all that was achieved with EBR-I and how that work then led into Argonne’s design, building, and operation of EBR-II as a full demonstration of a fast reactor power plant brought Argonne’s nuclear energy legacy to life for everyone in the auditorium. These

  2. The Schoolwide Symposium: A Model for Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cottingham, Walt

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the first schoolwide symposium at Hendersonville High School (North Carolina) in which, for one week, students and faculty were immersed in the culture and history of the Vietnam War era. Explains that because this first symposium was so successful in gaining student enthusiasm, the school organized three more symposiums. (CMK)

  3. Proceedings of the 2011 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Boorman, Gary; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Kolenda-Roberts, Holly; Latimer, Ken; Miller, Andrew D.; Muravnick, Kathleen B.; Nyska, Abraham; Ochoa, Ricardo; Pardo, Ingrid D.; Ramot, Yuval; Rao, Deepa B.; Schuh, JoAnn; Suttie, Andrew; Travlos, Greg S.; Ward, Jerrold M.; Wolf, Jeffrey C.; Elmore, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri,” was held in Denver, Colorado in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology’s 30th Annual Meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting or discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium include: proliferative lesions from various fish species including ameloblastoma, gas gland hyperplasia, nodular regenerative hepatocellular hyperplasia, and malignant granulosa cell tumor; spontaneous cystic hyperplasia in the stomach of CD1 mice and histiocytic aggregates in the duodenal villous tips of treated mice; an olfactory neuroblastoma in a cynomolgus monkey; various rodent skin lesions, including follicular parakeratotic hyperkeratosis, adnexal degeneration, and epithelial intracytoplasmic accumulations; oligodendroglioma and microgliomas in rats; a diagnostically challenging microcytic, hypochromic, responsive anemia in rats; a review of microcytes and microcytosis; nasal lesions associated with green tea extract and Ginkgo biloba in rats; corneal dystrophy in Dutch belted rabbits; valvulopathy in rats; and lymphoproliferative disease in a cynomolgus monkey. PMID:22089839

  4. Proceedings of the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    Many organizations face high consequence safety situations where unwanted stimuli due to accidents, catastrophes, or inadvertent human actions can cause disasters. In order to improve interaction among such organizations and to build on each others` experience, preventive approaches, and assessment techniques, the High Consequence Operations Safety Symposium was held July 12--14, 1994 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The symposium was conceived by Dick Schwoebel, Director of the SNL Surety Assessment Center. Stan Spray, Manager of the SNL System Studies Department, planned strategy and made many of the decisions necessary to bring the concept to fruition on a short time scale. Angela Campos and about 60 people worked on the nearly limitless implementation and administrative details. The initial symposium (future symposia are planned) was structured around 21 plenary presentations in five methodology-oriented sessions, along with a welcome address, a keynote address, and a banquet address. Poster papers addressing the individual session themes were available before and after the plenary sessions and during breaks.

  5. International Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures (Energy, Environment, and Health)

    SciTech Connect

    Jena, Puru

    2011-11-10

    The international Symposium on Clusters and Nanostructures was held in Richmond, Virginia during November 7-10, 2011. The symposium focused on the roles clusters and nanostructures play in solving outstanding problems in clean and sustainable energy, environment, and health; three of the most important issues facing science and society. Many of the materials issues in renewable energies, environmental impacts of energy technologies as well as beneficial and toxicity issues of nanoparticles in health are intertwined. Realizing that both fundamental and applied materials issues require a multidisciplinary approach the symposium provided a forum by bringing researchers from physics, chemistry, materials science, and engineering fields to share their ideas and results, identify outstanding problems, and develop new collaborations. Clean and sustainable energy sessions addressed challenges in production, storage, conversion, and efficiency of renewable energies such as solar, wind, bio, thermo-electric, and hydrogen. Environmental issues dealt with air- and water-pollution and conservation, environmental remediation and hydrocarbon processing. Topics in health included therapeutic and diagnostic methods as well as health hazards attributed to nanoparticles. Cross-cutting topics such as reactions, catalysis, electronic, optical, and magnetic properties were also covered.

  6. Proceedings of the 2015 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Farman, Cindy A; Hailey, James R; Kovi, Ramesh C; Malarkey, David E; Morrison, James P; Neel, Jennifer; Pesavento, Patricia A; Porter, Brian F; Szabo, Kathleen A; Teixeira, Leandro B C; Quist, Erin M

    2016-06-01

    The 2015 Annual National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Minneapolis, Minnesota, at the American College of Veterinary Pathologists/American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology/Society of Toxicologic Pathology combined meeting. The goal of this symposium is to present and discuss diagnostic pathology challenges or nomenclature issues. Because of the combined meeting, both laboratory and domestic animal cases were presented. This article presents summaries of the speakers' talks, including challenging diagnostic cases or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included hepatocellular lesions, a proposed harmonized diagnostic approach to rat cardiomyopathy, crop milk in a bird, avian feeding accoutrement, heat exchanger in a tuna, metastasis of a tobacco carcinogen-induced pulmonary carcinoma, neurocytoma in a rat, pituicytoma in a rat, rodent mammary gland whole mounts, dog and rat alveolar macrophage ultrastructure, dog and rat pulmonary phospholipidosis, alveolar macrophage aggregation in a dog, degenerating yeast in a cat liver aspirate, myeloid leukemia in lymph node aspirates from a dog, Trypanosoma cruzi in a dog, solanum toxicity in a cow, bovine astrovirus, malignant microglial tumor, and nomenclature challenges from the Special Senses International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria Organ Working Group. PMID:27075180

  7. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.; Boyle, Michael C.; Boyle, Molly H.; Cora, Michelle C.; Crabbs, Torrie A.; Cummings, Connie A.; Gruebbel, Margarita M.; Johnson, Crystal L.; Malarkey, David E.; McInnes, Elizabeth F.; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C.; Ward, Jerrold M.

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri” was held in Portland, Oregon in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen induced hepatoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat. PMID:24334674

  8. Proceedings of the 2014 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Cora, Michelle C; Gruebbel, Margarita M; Hayes, Schantel A; Hoane, Jessica S; Koizumi, Haruko; Peters, Rachel; Rosol, Thomas J; Singh, Bhanu P; Szabo, Kathleen A

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri" was held in Washington, D.C., in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 33rd annual meeting. The goal of this annual NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a pulmonary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a male B6C3F1 mouse; plexiform vasculopathy in Wistar Han (Crl:WI[Han]) rats; staging of the estrous cycle in rats and mice; peri-islet fibrosis, hemorrhage, lobular atrophy and inflammation in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats; retinal dysplasia in Crl:WI[Han] rats and B6C3F1 mice; multicentric lymphoma with intravascular microemboli and tumor lysis syndrome, and 2 cases of myopathy and vascular anomaly in Tg.rasH2 mice; benign thymomas in Crl:WI[Han] rats; angiomatous lesions in the mesenteric lymph nodes of Crl:WI[Han] rats; an unusual foveal lesion in a cynomolgous monkey; and finally a series of nomenclatures challenges from the endocrine International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) Organ Working Group (OWG). PMID:25385331

  9. Proceedings of the 2013 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Susan A; Boyle, Michael C; Boyle, Molly H; Cora, Michelle C; Crabbs, Torrie A; Cummings, Connie A; Gruebbel, Margarita M; Johnson, Crystal L; Malarkey, David E; McInnes, Elizabeth F; Nolte, Thomas; Shackelford, Cynthia C; Ward, Jerrold M

    2014-01-01

    The 2013 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled "Pathology Potpourri," was held in Portland, Oregon, in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology's 32nd annual meeting. The goal of the NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers' presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a caudal tail vertebra duplication in mice; nephroblastematosis in rats; ectopic C cell tumor in a hamster; granular cell aggregates/tumor in the uterus of a hamster; Pneumocystis carinii in the lung of a rat; iatrogenic chronic inflammation in the lungs of control rats; hepatoblastoma arising within an adenoma in a mouse; humoral hypercalcemia of benignancy in a transgenic mouse; acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in rats; electron microscopy images of iatrogenic intraerythrocytic inclusions in transgenic mice; questionable hepatocellular degeneration/cell death/artifact in rats; atypical endometrial hyperplasia in rats; malignant mixed Müllerian tumors/carcinosarcomas in rats; differential diagnoses of proliferative lesions of the intestine of rodents; and finally obstructive nephropathy caused by melamine poisoning in a rat. PMID:24334674

  10. Proceedings of the 2014 National Toxicology Program Satellite Symposium

    PubMed Central

    Elmore, Susan A.; Cora, Michelle C.; Gruebbel, Margarita M.; Hayes, Schantel A.; Hoane, Jessica S.; Koizumi, Haruko; Peters, Rachel; Rosol, Thomas J.; Singh, Bhanu P.; Szabo, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 annual National Toxicology Program (NTP) Satellite Symposium, entitled “Pathology Potpourri” was held in Washington DC, in advance of the Society of Toxicologic Pathology’s 33rd annual meeting. The goal of this annual NTP Symposium is to present current diagnostic pathology or nomenclature issues to the toxicologic pathology community. This article presents summaries of the speakers’ presentations, including diagnostic or nomenclature issues that were presented, along with select images that were used for audience voting and discussion. Some lesions and topics covered during the symposium included a pulmonary mucinous adenocarcinoma in a male B6C3F1 mouse; plexiform vasculopathy in Wistar Han rats; staging of the estrous cycle in rats and mice; peri-islet fibrosis, hemorrhage, lobular atrophy and inflammation in male Sprague Dawley rats; retinal dysplasia in Wistar Han rats and B6C3F1 mice; multicentric lymphoma with intravascular microemboli and tumor lysis syndrome, and two cases of myopathy and vascular anomaly in Tg.rasH2 mice; benign thymomas in Wistar Han rats; angiomatous lesions in the mesenteric lymph nodes of Wistar Han rats; an unusual foveal lesion in a cynomolgous monkey; and finally a series of nomenclatures challenges from the endocrine International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic Criteria (INHAND) organ working group (OWG). PMID:25385331

  11. Report of the TFOS/ARVO Symposium on global treatments for dry eye disease: an unmet need.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, David A; Hammitt, Katherine M; Schaumberg, Debra A; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Begley, Carolyn G; Gjorstrup, Per; Garrigue, Jean-Sébastien; Nakamura, Masatsugu; Quentric, Yann; Barabino, Stefano; Dalton, Michelle; Novack, Gary D

    2012-04-01

    In September 2010, a Symposium in Florence, Italy, was held to address the unmet need for global treatments for dry eye disease (DED). It was sponsored by The Tear Film & Ocular Surface Society (TFOS; www.TearFilm.org) and co-sponsored by the Association for Research in Vision & Ophthalmology (www.arvo.org). The Symposium objectives were two-fold: first, to discuss accepted and emerging clinical endpoints of DED with regulatory experts from around the world; and second, to consider how to improve clinical trials of treatments for DED. The Symposium focused on the personal and collective burden of DED, as well as the developmental and regulatory challenges associated with generating new DED therapeutics. This article provides a synopsis of many of the presentations, discussions and recommendations of this Symposium. PMID:22482471

  12. Lithium carbonate therapy for cluster headache. Changes in number of platelets, and serotonin and histamine levels.

    PubMed

    Medina, J L; Fareed, J; Diamond, S

    1980-09-01

    Three groups of patients were studied: Group A consisted of 12 patients with cluster headache that was treated with lithium carbonate. Group B consisted of six patients with cluster headache that was managed with other drugs. Group C consisted of five patients with muscle contraction headache who received lithium. Serum lithium levels, platelet count, platelet serotonin levels, and platelet-rich plasma histamine levels were determined before and during therapy. The frequency of the headache and levels of serotonin and histamine tended to follow a parallel course in groups A and B: as the headache frequency dropped, serotonin and histamine levels fell. The stable period was characterized by little change in serotonin and histamine levels. Recurrences of headaches were accompanied by a return of serotonin and histamine to pretreatment levels. The course of cluster headache is related to changes in serotonin and histamine levels. Lithium, by modifying the headache course, changes serotonin and histamine levels. PMID:7417056

  13. Histamine in foods: its possible role in non-allergic adverse reactions to ingestants.

    PubMed

    Malone, M H; Metcalfe, D D

    1986-01-01

    Histamine is well recognized as a product of both mast cells and basophils. Its release from these sources in IgE-mediated reactions unquestionably contributes to the allergic response. It is often stated that ingestion of foods rich in histamine can result in absorption of sufficient histamine to provoke signs and symptoms reminiscent of an allergic reaction. A review of literature relevant to this issue suggests that certain foods do indeed contain histamine as measured by current methodology. Further, histamine ingestion in excess of 36 to 250 mg may or may not result in a clinical response which includes abdominal complaints, feelings of warmth, flushing and headache. Taken together, this evidence supports the hypothesis that ingestion of large amounts of histamine-containing foods or foods which contain the histamine precursor, histidine, under some circumstances can result in adverse reactions. PMID:3302658

  14. Histamine regulation of pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer: a review of recent findings

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Taylor; Graf, Allyson; Hodges, Kyle; Kennedy, Lindsey; Hargrove, Laura; Price, Mattie; Kearney, Kate

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is a dynamic organ that performs a multitude of functions within the body. Diseases that target the pancreas, like pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer, are devastating and often fatal to the suffering patient. Histamine and histamine receptors (H1-H4HRs) have been found to play a critical role in biliary diseases. Accordingly, the biliary tract and the pancreas share similarities with regards to morphological, phenotypical and functional features and disease progression, studies related the role of H1-H4HRs in pancreatic diseases are important. In this review, we have highlighted the role that histamine, histidine decarboxylase (HDC), histamine receptors and mast cells (the main source of histamine in the body) play during both pancreatitis and pancreatic cancer. The objective of the review is to demonstrate that histamine and histamine signaling may be a potential therapeutic avenue towards treatment strategies for pancreatic diseases. PMID:24570946

  15. Effects of Histamine on Light Responses of Amacrine Cells in Tiger Salamander Retina

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yongchun; Satoh, Hiromasa; Vila, Alejandro; Wu, Samuel M.; Marshak, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Using immunofluorescence, we showed that histamine receptor 1 is expressed by horizontal cell axons and a subset of amacrine cells in the tiger salamander retina. The effects of histamine on light responses of amacrine cells were studied in slice preparations. Histamine modulated the light responses of many salamander amacrine cells, depending upon the morphological type. The most pronounced effects of histamine were decreases in the light responses of broadly stratified amacrine cells, particularly those having medium-sized dendritic field diameters. To determine whether the effects of histamine were direct, Co++ was substituted for Ca++ in the extracellular medium to block synaptic transmission. Histamine still affected broadly stratified amacrine cells, but not narrowly stratified amacrine cells under these conditions. Taken together, these findings suggest that inhibitory interactions between strata of the IPL and within the classical receptive fields of the ganglion cells would be particularly sensitive to histamine released from retinopetal axons. PMID:20878231

  16. LHC Symposium 2003: Summary Talk

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Appel

    2003-08-12

    This summary talk reviews the LHC 2003 Symposium, focusing on expectations as we prepare to leap over the current energy frontier into new territory. We may learn from what happened in the two most recent examples of leaping into new energy territory. Quite different scenarios appeared in those two cases. In addition, they review the status of the machine and experiments as reported at the Symposium. Finally, I suggest an attitude which may be most appropriate as they look forward to the opportunities anticipated for the first data from the LHC.

  17. Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium

    SciTech Connect

    None Available

    1999-06-24

    The Mining and Reclamation Technology Symposium was commissioned by the Mountaintop Removal Mining/Valley Fill Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) Interagency Steering Committee as an educational forum for the members of the regulatory community who will participate in the development of the EIS. The Steering Committee sought a balanced audience to ensure the input to the regulatory community reflected the range of perspectives on this complicated and emotional issue. The focus of this symposium is on mining and reclamation technology alternatives, which is one of eleven topics scheduled for review to support development of the EIS. Others include hydrologic, environmental, ecological, and socio-economic issues.

  18. Frank N. Bash Symposium 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The University of Texas at Austin Department of Astronomy and McDonald Observatory will be hosting the sixth biennial Frank N. Bash Symposium on the topic of New Horizons in Astronomy, October 18-20, 2015, on The University of Texas at Austin campus. This meeting will bring together young researchers at the cutting edge of astronomy and astrophysics, to promote the exchange of research ideas and visions for the future of astronomy. The symposium will focus on invited review talks, and will include discussions and contributed poster papers from postdocs and students.

  19. Frontiers of Nuclear Structure Physics - Proceedings of the International Symposium held in Honor of Akito Arima

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, M.; Otsuka, T.; Mizusaki, T.; Yazaki, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Table of Contents for the full book PDF is as follows: * Preface * Aspects of the structure of light nuclei * A frontier of shell model calculation: large-scale calculation with G-matrix interaction in middle pf-shell * Realistic large-basis shell-model calculation in the low-mass tin isotopes * Isospin symmetry breaking in light nuclei * The role of pairing in nuclear collective motion * Universal correlations of collective observables: empirical phenomenology and model interpretations * Interacting Boson Model for O(6) nuclei * Multiple Q-phonon modes in even barium nuclei * Two-phonon γ-vibrational states in deformed nuclei * Scattering of GeV electrons by nuclei * Nuclear structure experiments at CEBAF * Correlations and relativistic features in nuclear structure * Collective string-like model of baryons * Hadron-nucleon scattering lengths in QCD sum rules * Atomic yrast brands of metastable amiprotonic helium atomcules * Loosely coupling few-body systems * Nuclear spin responses in astroparticle physics * Towards extremes of nuclear states with radioactive beams * Strangeness Nuclear Physics: experimental tests of quark-based pictures * Deep hole states and hypernuclei * Simple two-body effective-interaction matrix elements and realistic microscopic nuclear-structure calculations * Signature and parity splitting in rotational bands: double minimal potential model * Search for mixed-symmetry states in O(6) nuclei * From the shell model to the interacting boson model * Optimal pair description of nuclear motions in a degenerate orbit * Some current topics in nuclear structure at drip lines * Halo structure of light neutron-rich nuclei * Nucleosynthesis in explosive hydrogen burning process * Nuclear astrophysics with secondary (radioactive) beams * Magnetic moments: A microscopic look into the nuclear structure of medium weight and heavy nuclei * Laser trapping of radioactive atoms * Chiral perturbation in dense matter and meson condensation controversy * Enhanced heavy elements in big-bang nucleosynthesis: test of baryon dominated universe * High energy heavy ion experiment at BNL * Program * List of Participants

  20. Third annual symposium on Frontiers of Engineering: Reports on leading edge engineering from the 1997 NAE symposium

    SciTech Connect

    Hunziker, Janet

    1998-06-01

    This book is the third publication highlighting the presentations of the National Academy of Engineering's (NAE) symposium series, Frontiers of Engineering. The Third Annual NAE Symposium on Frontiers of Engineering was held September 18-20, 1997, at the Beckman Center in Irvine, California. The 101 emerging engineering leaders from industry, academia, and federal laboratories who attended the meeting heard presentations and discussed pioneering research and technical work in a variety of engineering fields. Symposium speakers were asked to prepare extended abstracts of their presentations, and those papers are contained herein. Fifteen papers are organized under the following five headings: biomechanics, sensors and control for manufacturing processes, safety and security issues, decision-making tools for design and manufacturing, and intelligent transportation systems. Talks focused on such topics as implant design and technology, design and application of optical fiber sensors, quadrupole resonance explosive detection systems, multicriteria evaluation of manufacturing performance, and automated highway systems. The after-dinner speech, which focused on today's rapid pace of change, is also included.

  1. Conformational study of neutral histamine monomer and their vibrational spectra.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, V; Yadav, T

    2016-08-01

    Molecular modeling and potential energy scanning of histamine molecule, which is an important neurotransmitter, with respect to the dihedral angle of methylamine side chain have done which prefer three different conformers of histamine monomer. We have calculated molecular structures and vibrational spectra with IR and Raman intensities of these conformers using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the exchange functional B3LYP incorporated with the basis set 6-31++G(d,p) and Hartree-Fock (HF) with the same basis set. We have also employed normal coordinate analysis (NCA) to scale the theoretical frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions (PEDs) for the conspicuous assignments. Normal modes assignments of some of the vibrational frequencies of all the three conformers are in good agreement with the earlier reported experimental frequencies of histamine whereas others have modified. The standard deviations between the theoretical and experimental frequencies fall in the region 13-20cm(-1) for the three conformers. NBO analyses of histamine conformers were also performed. The net charge transfers from ethylamine side chain to the imidazole ring. The intensive interactions between bonding and anti-bonding orbitals are found in imidazole ring. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is nearly 5.50eV. PMID:27155558

  2. Conformational study of neutral histamine monomer and their vibrational spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, V.; Yadav, T.

    2016-08-01

    Molecular modeling and potential energy scanning of histamine molecule, which is an important neurotransmitter, with respect to the dihedral angle of methylamine side chain have done which prefer three different conformers of histamine monomer. We have calculated molecular structures and vibrational spectra with IR and Raman intensities of these conformers using Density Functional Theory (DFT) with the exchange functional B3LYP incorporated with the basis set 6-31 ++G(d,p) and Hartree-Fock (HF) with the same basis set. We have also employed normal coordinate analysis (NCA) to scale the theoretical frequencies and to calculate potential energy distributions (PEDs) for the conspicuous assignments. Normal modes assignments of some of the vibrational frequencies of all the three conformers are in good agreement with the earlier reported experimental frequencies of histamine whereas others have modified. The standard deviations between the theoretical and experimental frequencies fall in the region 13-20 cm- 1 for the three conformers. NBO analyses of histamine conformers were also performed. The net charge transfers from ethylamine side chain to the imidazole ring. The intensive interactions between bonding and anti-bonding orbitals are found in imidazole ring. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap is nearly 5.50 eV.

  3. Effects of aerosolized histamine and carbachol in the conscious horse.

    PubMed Central

    Mirbahar, K B; McDonell, W N; Bignell, W; Eyre, P

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests were performed in seven conscious, standing horses. Changes in pulmonary mechanics and ventilation volumes were measured after inhalation challenge with saline (baseline), histamine (1% w/v solution for 5 min) and carbachol (0.5% w/v solution for 3 min). Comparisons between baseline and posthistamine values revealed a significant (P less than 0.05) increase in nonelastic work of breathing (Wb), maximum change in transpulmonary pressure (max delta Ppl), and pulmonary resistance (RL), while dynamic compliance (Cdyn) decreased (P less than 0.05). Tripelennamine completely abolished these histamine induced changes suggesting the involvement of H1 receptors. A nonsignificant increase occurred in functional residual capacity. However, the amount of nitrogen retained in the lung at the end of a nitrogen washout test was significantly (P less than 0.05) greater after histamine when compared to baseline values. The effect of carbachol was qualitatively similar to that of histamine, Wb and max delta Ppl increased while Cdyn decreased (P less than 0.05). The increase in lower RL reached statistical significance (P less than 0.05) only at the beginning of expiration (/ 25% VT). The present investigation demonstrates that the physiological measurements of lung function could be carried out in conscious, unsedated horses and that the pulmonary function test methods could be used as a tool for study of drug induced changes in pulmonary mechanics. PMID:4016587

  4. Histamine Modulates Sweating and Affects Clinical Manifestations of Atopic Dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Aya; Tani, Saki; Murota, Hiroyuki; Katayama, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    Many factors such as food or environmental allergens, bacteria, fungi, and mental stress aggravate the condition of atopic dermatitis (AD) eczema. Sweating can also exacerbate AD, and patients are aware of that. In the past, it has been reported that contamination of skin surface antigens by sweat induces acute allergic reactions and that sweating functions of AD patients via axonal reflexes are decreased. Histamine demonstrably inhibits acetylcholine-induced sweating in both mice and humans via histamine H1 receptor-mediated signaling. In sweat glands, acetylcholine inactivates glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), a kinase involved in endocytosis and secretion, whereas simultaneous stimulation with histamine activates GSK3β and inhibits sweat secretion. Thus, histamine might be involved in the mechanism of abnormal skin dryness in patients with AD via decreasing sweat secretion. On another front, some patients secrete sweat normally. Patients with regular sweating are prone to develop skin disorders such as papules or erythema by residual sweat left on the skin surface. Patients with decreased sweating are prone to develop disorders characterized by xerosis, lichenoid changes, prurigo by elevated skin temperature, skin dryness, and compromised skin conditions. Careful inspection of skin manifestations provides a good indication of a patient's ability to sweat. PMID:27584962

  5. Histamine H4 receptors in the gastrointestinal tract

    PubMed Central

    Deiteren, A; De Man, J G; Pelckmans, P A; De Winter, B Y

    2015-01-01

    Histamine is a well-established mediator involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological mechanisms and exerts its effect through activation of four histamine receptors (H1–H4). The histamine H4 receptor is the newest member of this histamine receptor family, and is expressed throughout the gastrointestinal tract as well as in the liver, pancreas and bile ducts. Functional studies using a combination of selective and non-selective H4 receptor ligands have rapidly increased our knowledge of H4 receptor involvement in gastrointestinal processes both under physiological conditions and in models of disease. Strong evidence points towards a role for H4 receptors in the modulation of immune-mediated responses in gut inflammation such as in colitis, ischaemia/reperfusion injury, radiation-induced enteropathy and allergic gut reactions. In addition, data have emerged implicating H4 receptors in gastrointestinal cancerogenesis, sensory signalling, and visceral pain as well as in gastric ulceration. These studies highlight the potential of H4 receptor targeted therapy in the treatment of various gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome and cancer. PMID:25363289

  6. Histamine and neuroinflammation: insights from murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Passani, Maria B.; Ballerini, Clara

    2012-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory, neurodegenerative disease of the CNS whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown, and available therapies are rarely successful in reversing neurological deficits or stopping disease progression. Ongoing studies on MS and the widely used murine model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) are focused on the many components of this complex and heterogeneous neurodegenerative disease in the hope of providing a mechanism-based characterization of MS that will afford successful strategies to limit and repair the neuronal damage. Recently, histamine has been postulated to have a key regulatory role in EAE and MS pathogenesis. Histamine is a mediator of inflammation and immune responses, exerting its many actions through four G protein-coupled receptors (H1,2,3,4R) that signal through distinct intracellular pathways and have different therapeutic potentials as they vary in expression, isoform distribution, signaling properties, and function. Immune cells involved in MS/EAE, including dendritic cells (DCs) and T lymphocytes, express H1R, H2R and H4R, and histamine may have varying and counteracting effects on a particular cell type, depending on the receptor subtypes being activated. Here, we review evidence of the complex and controversial role of histamine in the pathogenesis of MS and EAE and evaluate the therapeutic potential of histaminergic ligands in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:22563309

  7. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11-12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  8. Highlights of the ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, 11–12 March 2016, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Villalba, Marcelo Blanco; Bramajo, Marina; Bruno, Mario

    2016-01-01

    The ecancer/SAC First International Prostate Cancer Symposium, held in Buenos Aires, included national, regional, and international experts in the field of prostate cancer. More than 200 professionals from a variety of areas (clinical urologists, pathologists, oncologists, biologists, imaging specialists, radiation therapists, and generalist doctors, among others) attended, and they proposed multidisciplinary management of prostate pathology from the start in concordance with the ideas set forth by the organising committee. A radiotherapy workshop was also held during the symposium, in which new techniques and their possible uses were specifically discussed. In addition to the local doctors, Dr Lilian Faroni (COI Group, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), Dr Leonardo Carmona (Chilean Head and Neck Institute, Chile), and Dr Anthony Addesa (Jupiter Medical Centre, Florida, USA) also participated in this symposium. PMID:27350786

  9. The Third International Symposium on Space Terahertz Technology: Symposium proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Papers from the symposium are presented that are relevant to the generation, detection, and use of the terahertz spectral region for space astronomy and remote sensing of the Earth's upper atmosphere. The program included thirteen sessions covering a wide variety of topics including solid-state oscillators, power-combining techniques, mixers, harmonic multipliers, antennas and antenna arrays, submillimeter receivers, and measurement techniques.

  10. Acute Pancreatitis-Progress and Challenges: A Report on an International Symposium.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Elham; Pandol, Stephen J; Shimosegawa, Tooru; Sutton, Robert; Wu, Bechien U; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Gorelick, Fred; Hirota, Morihisa; Windsor, John; Lo, Simon K; Freeman, Martin L; Lerch, Markus M; Tsuji, Yoshihisa; Melmed, Gil Y; Wassef, Wahid; Mayerle, Julia

    2015-11-01

    An international symposium entitled "Acute pancreatitis: progress and challenges" was held on November 5, 2014 at the Hapuna Beach Hotel, Big Island, Hawaii, as part of the 45th Anniversary Meeting of the American Pancreatic Association and the Japanese Pancreas Society. The course was organized and directed by Drs. Stephen Pandol, Tooru Shimosegawa, Robert Sutton, Bechien Wu, and Santhi Swaroop Vege. The symposium objectives were to: (1) highlight current issues in management of acute pancreatitis, (2) discuss promising treatments, (3) consider development of quality indicators and improved measures of disease activity, and (4) present a framework for international collaboration for development of new therapies. This article represents a compilation and adaptation of brief summaries prepared by speakers at the symposium with the purpose of broadly disseminating information and initiatives. PMID:26465949

  11. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  12. Proceedings of the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, Catherine A. (Compiler)

    1997-01-01

    This publication contains the fifty-two technical papers presented at the FAA-NASA Symposium on the Continued Airworthiness of Aircraft Structures. The symposium, hosted by the FAA Center of Excellence for Computational Modeling of Aircraft Structures at Georgia Institute of Technology, was held to disseminate information on recent developments in advanced technologies to extend the life of high-time aircraft and design longer-life aircraft. Affiliations of the participants included 33% from government agencies and laboratories, 19% from academia, and 48% from industry; in all 240 people were in attendance. Technical papers were selected for presentation at the symposium, after a review of extended abstracts received by the Organizing Committee from a general call for papers.

  13. The Barcelona International Symposium (21-23 April 2005). Synthesis reports.

    PubMed

    Basu, Kisalaya; Danon-Hersch, Nadia; Frisack, Johan; Kingma, Mireille; Martinez-Carretero, Josep Maria; Oberg, Klas; Pong, Raymond W

    2005-01-01

    The Symposium was held in Barcelona, Spain, with the Institut d'Estudis de la Salut acting as host. It gathered 51 participants working in 34 institutions based in 18 countries. The main objective of the Symposium was to create an opportunity for assessing the past trends and forecasting the future developments of health workforce within the various national health systems. The Symposium was composed of 5 sessions devoted to presentations of the papers freely contributed by the participants and 5 discussion sessions devoted to the following themes : (i) Supply of and demand for health workforce, (ii) Future trends and forecasting methods ; (iii) Strategies for managing and planning health workforce ; (iv) Health workforce in underserved areas; (v) International migration of health workers. Each discussion session was conducted by a discussion leader whose the synthesis report is displayed here below. PMID:16285408

  14. Nanomedicine drug development: a scientific symposium entitled "Charting a roadmap to commercialization".

    PubMed

    Finch, Gregory; Havel, Henry; Analoui, Mostafa; Barton, Randall W; Diwan, Anil R; Hennessy, Meliessa; Reddy, Vijayapal; Sadrieh, Nakissa; Tamarkin, Lawrence; Wolfgang, Marc; Yerxa, Benjamin; Zolnik, Banu; Liu, Man

    2014-07-01

    The use of nanotechnology in medicine holds great promise for revolutionizing a variety of therapies. The past decade witnessed dramatic advancements in scientific research in nanomedicines, although significant challenges still exist in nanomedicine design, characterization, development, and manufacturing. In March 2013, a two-day symposium "Nanomedicines: Charting a Roadmap to Commercialization," sponsored and organized by the Nanomedicines Alliance, was held to facilitate better understanding of the current science and investigative approaches and to identify and discuss challenges and knowledge gaps in nanomedicine development programs. The symposium provided a forum for constructive dialogue among key stakeholders in five distinct areas: nanomedicine design, preclinical pharmacology, toxicology, CMC (chemistry, manufacturing, and control), and clinical development. In this meeting synopsis, we highlight key points from plenary presentations and focus on discussions and recommendations from breakout sessions of the symposium. PMID:24821054

  15. PREFACE: The Third 21COE Symposium: Astrophysics as Interdisciplinary Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Kei-ichi; Yamada, Shoichi; Daishido, Tsuneaki

    2006-03-01

    In the last decade, we have seen a remarkable progress in observations by air-borne and satellite-loaded detectors as well as large ground-based telescopes. Cosmological parameters have been precisely determined. For example, the age of the Universe is about 14 Gyrs and the curvature of our 3-space is almost zero. We have also recognized that most of the matter content of the Universe is unknown, the mystery of Dark Energy and Dark Matter. When we look at compact objects in the Universe, recent observations of supernovae and gamma ray bursts (up to cosmological distances) have revealed a variety of high energy astrophysical phenomena much beyond our expectations. Also found are quite exotic astrophysical objects such as magnetars and probably quark stars. Now we have a lot of new observational data. The present theoretical understanding, on the other hand, is far behind such observational advances. We may need new ideas to solve such problems. In the late 20th century, astrophysicists have learned much from particle physics and nuclear physics, resulting in the deeper understanding of how the big bang universe expands and stars evolve. Then we would like to extend this practice in different directions. This volume contains lectures and contributed papers presented at ``The Third 21COE Symposium: Astrophysics as Interdisciplinary Science'', which was held at Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, on September 1 3, 2005. The aim of the symposium is to obtain new insights into the important themes mentioned above by bringing together the latest ideas from various fields. In the symposium, we have discussed not only such mysterious and important astrophysical or cosmological objects but also some subjects closely related with other fields such as nonlinear dynamics, statistical physics and condensed matter physics. Hence the main topics in the symposium have included formations of large-scale structures, galaxies, stellar clusters as well as the nature of condensed matter in

  16. INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NEW FRONTIERS FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE MANAGEMENT. PROCEEDINGS OF A CONFERENCE HELD AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA ON SEPTEMBER 15-18, 1985

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proceedings of the International Conference on New Frontiers for Hazardous Waste Management held in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, September 15-18, 1985. Papers presented by Symposium speakers were in the areas of: (1) Geologic hazards and the siting of hazardous waste facilities; (2)...

  17. Science education in partnership: the 2002 Australian American Fulbright Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devore, E.; Oliver, C.; Wilmoth, K.; Vozzo, L.

    The Australian American Fulbright 2002 Symposium: Science Education in Partnership was held in parallel--in partnership-- with the scientific meeting of the IAU 213 Bioastronomy 2002 Symposium: Life Among the Stars. In practice, the two meetings modeled partnership between educators and scientists, both professional events interacting while maintaining individual goals. Leading scientists attending the IAU meeting participated in the Fulbright with presentations based upon their work and their experiences. Educators and scientists interacted on how their work impacts science education and strategies for building direct connections between scientists and classrooms. Educators attending the Fulbright Symposium attended a number of scientific presentations in IAU meeting as well. A major issue in science education is teaching science in a way that is relevant to the student. Partnerships between scientists and teachers can provide real-life scientific research experience in the laboratory and the field for teachers and students. These partnerships enhance the quality of both teaching and learning, and engage students directly in projects and curricula that lead to a better understanding of the nature and practice of science. Scientists are often engaged in the development of new curricula as a part of the education and public outreach programs affiliated with research programs. Participants explored the similarities and differences between the approach to this endeavor in Australia and the US. Partnerships between all the professionals involved--scientists, teachers, and writers--creates an opportunity for innovative, cutting-edge research to reach the classroom. The excitement of seeking new knowledge, exploring the unknown, can motivate students to pursue science studies in high school and beyond at the university. Oral papers, posters and workshops presented the results of partnerships between scientists and educators in Australian and the US as well as

  18. PREFACE: International Symposium on Geohazards and Geomechanics (ISGG2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utili, S.

    2015-09-01

    These Conference Proceedings contain the full papers in electronic format of the International Symposium on 'Geohazards and Geomechanics', held at University of Warwick, UK, on September 10-11, 2015. The Symposium brings together the complementary expertise of world leading groups carrying out research on the engineering assessment, prevention and mitigation of geohazards. A total of 58 papers, including 8 keynote lectures cover phenomena such as landslide initiation and propagation, debris flow, rockfalls, soil liquefaction, ground improvement, hazard zonation, risk mapping, floods and gas and leachates. The techniques reported in the papers to investigate geohazards involve numerical modeling (finite element method, discrete element method, material point method, meshless methods and particle methods), experimentation (laboratory experiments, centrifuge tests and field monitoring) and analytical simplified techniques. All the contributions in this volume have been peered reviewed according to rigorous international standards. However the authors take full responsibility for the content of their papers. Agreements are in place for the edition of a special issue dedicated to the Symposium in three international journals: Engineering Geology, Computational Particle Mechanics and International Journal of Geohazards and Environment. Authors of selected papers will be invited to submit an extended version of their work to these Journals that will independently assess the papers. The Symposium is supported by the Technical Committee 'Geo-mechanics from Micro to Macro' (TC105) of the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering (ISSMGE), 'Slope Stability in Engineering Practice' (TC208), 'Forensic Geotechnical Engineering' (TC302), the British Geotechnical Association and the EU FP7 IRSES project 'Geohazards and Geomechanics'. Also the organizers would like to thank all authors and their supporting institutions for their contributions. For any

  19. International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons. (Bordeaux, France, September 8-14, 1981). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 43.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    Lagoons and their characteristic coastal bay-mouth bars represent 15 percent of the world coastal zone. They are among the most productive ecosystems in the biosphere, this productivity resulting from the interplay of ocean and continent. An International Symposium on Coastal Lagoons (ISCOL) was held to: assess the state of knowledge in the…

  20. EURO/PAHO Symposium on Appropriate Technology Following Birth (Trieste, October 7-11, 1986). Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    In October, 1986, The World Health Organization's regional offices for Europe and the Americas held a joint symposium attended by over 40 participants from North and South America and Europe, including obstetricians, pediatricians, health administrators, sociologists, psychologists, economists, epidemiologists, medical journalists, and service…

  1. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, TOXICOLOGY, AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT: PROCEEDINGS OF AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM, SACRAMENTO, CALIFORNIA, USA, SEPTEMBER 18-20, 1993

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists from five countries presented papers at the Second International Symposium on Fish Physiology, Toxicology, and Water Quality Management, which was held in Sacramento, California, on September 18-20, 1990. his proceedings includes 21 papers presented in sessions on the ...

  2. A Crisis of Lost Opportunity--Conclusions from a Symposium on Challenges for Animal Population Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hird, David; King, Lonnie; Salman, Mo; Werge, Rob

    2002-01-01

    Describes a symposium on "Population Health Education" held at the University of California Davis on May 9-11, 2002. Its objectives were to assess the market needs and opportunities presented by the users of population medicine veterinarians, determine the degree to which veterinary colleges are producing professionals who meet these needs,…

  3. Art Education and Art History: Collected Papers. Pennsylvania's Symposium II (Carlisle, Pennsylvania, November 7-9, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeAngelis, Joseph B., Ed.

    A symposium, held at King's Gap Environmental Education Center, focused on art education and art history and provided an opportunity for scholars and leaders in art education to discuss and react to current problems and future directions. All 21 participants prepared and presented papers in the general area of art history. Danielle Rice, Director…

  4. Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium: The current status of heat shock in early embryonic survival and reproductive efficiency

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Physiology and Endocrinology Symposium entitled “The Current Status of Heat Shock in Early Embryonic Survival and Reproductive Efficiency” was held at the Joint ADSA-CSAS-AMPA-WSAS-ASAS Meeting in Phoenix, Arizona, July 15 to 19, 2012. In recent years, data has accumulated suggesting a role for...

  5. The Second Annual Symposium of the NASA Specialized Center of Research and Training (NSCORT) in Gravitational Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spooner, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The second annual meeting of the NSCORT in Gravitational Biology was held at Kansas State University on September 29-October 1, 1992. Symposium presentations at the meeting included ones on basic gravitational cellular and developmental biology, spaceflight hardware for biological studies, studies on Space Shuttle, and special talks on Space Station Freedom and on life support systems.

  6. FISH PHYSIOLOGY, FISH TOXICOLOGY, AND FESHERIES MANAGEMENT. PROCEEDINGS OF AN INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM, GUANGZHOU, PRC SPETEMBER 14-16, 1988

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists from eight countries presented papers at the first International Symposium on Fish Physiology, Fish Toxicology and which was held on the campus of Zhongshan Univesity, Guanghzhou, PRC. This proceedings includes 30 papers presented in sessions on the reproduction and gr...

  7. Letter from Seoul: Correspondence from the International Arts Education Symposium and the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aprill, Arnold; Schroeder-Yu, Gigi

    2006-01-01

    Arts educator Gigi Schroeder-Yu and Arnold Aprill arrived in Seoul, Korea to participate in the International Arts Education Symposium and in the Asia-Pacific Regional Conference that are part of the wind up for the pitch of the UNESCO World Conference on Arts Education to be held in Lisbon in March 2006. In this article, they reflect on their…

  8. PROCEEDINGS: 1990 SO2 CONTROL SYMPOSIUM - VOLUME 2: SESSIONS 4A, 4B, 4C, AND 5

    EPA Science Inventory

    The proceedings document 110 papers presented at the Symposium held in New Orleans, LA, May 8-11, 1990. opics included SO2 control economics, furnace sorbent injection, byproduct utilization, spray dryer technology, wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and combined SOx/NOx control ...

  9. PATRAM '92: 10th international symposium on the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials [Papers presented by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This document provides the papers presented by Sandia Laboratories at PATRAM '92, the tenth International symposium on the Packaging and Transportation of Radioactive Materials held September 13--18, 1992 in Yokohama City, Japan. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. (FL)

  10. Research & Information on Employment & Training. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hershey Convention Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania, October 14-15, 1976).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franchak, Stephen J., Ed.

    A compilation of 21 presentations given at a symposium held to improve communications between individuals and agencies (education, government and private industry) which produce or use occupational research and information for program planning and decisionmaking contains the following titles: Some Thoughts on Economic Illiteracy; We Can Survive:…

  11. The New Engineering Research Centers: Purposes, Goals, and Expectations. Symposium (District of Columbia, April 29-30, 1985).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Engineering and Technical Systems.

    The sympoisum was held to describe the roots and future plans of the Engineering Research Center's (ERC's) concept and program. The first section of this symposium compilation describes the national goals that the ERCs represent. The second section presents the point of view of the National Science Foundation on the ERCs--the concept behind them,…

  12. Symposium: The Changing Mission of the United States Employment Service: Increasing Productivity and Improving the Operation of the Labor Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petro, Peter G., Ed.

    Conference addresses and summaries of group discussion are included in these proceedings of a symposium held to commemorate the 40th anniversary of the U.S. Employment Service and to explore its future role. The first item is a research report, "The Potential Impact of the Employment Service on the Economy," by Charles Holt, followed by responses…

  13. PREFACE: 10th International LISA Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciani, Giacomo; Conklin, John W.; Mueller, Guido

    2015-05-01

    The LISA Symposia have become a mainstay of the gravitational wave community. Held every two years, they are the prime opportunity for our community to discuss the exciting science, technology, mission designs, and progress of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna. The 8th LISA symposium, held at Stanford University in the summer of 2010 was the largest symposium so far and was dominated by progress and hopes that the LISA mission will soon excel following the expected launch of the LISA pathfinder (LPF), no later than 2012, and the expected prioritization by the Decadal survey which was released 6 weeks later. The following years were challenging. Although the Decadal survey ranked LISA very high, NASA's budget issues, mostly due to the cost increase of the James Webb Space Telescope, and continued delays in LPF put too much stress on the LISA project and it officially ended in 2011. The LISA International Science Team (LIST), the core group of LISA scientists and technologists, was dissolved and the community in the U.S. was struggling to maintain cohesion. In the wake of these events, ESA started a new selection process for their next three large missions, L1, L2, and L3, and the European LISA team developed the New Gravitational wave Observatory (NGO), an evolved LISA concept, as an ESA only L1 candidate. A few weeks before the 9th LISA Symposium, held in Paris in May 2012, ESA announced its decision to select JUICE, a planetary mission to Jupiter and its moons, as its next large science mission (L1). Despite having the highest ranked science case, NGO was not selected due to further delays in LPF and the general feeling outside the GW community that the technology is perhaps too challenging to be pulled off in time for the L1 launch in 2022. Many U.S. members of the LISA community cancelled their travel plans and the mood at that symposium ranged from resignation to defiance. Hope for a somewhat timely launch of a LISA-like mission rested upon L2, the next

  14. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    SciTech Connect

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  15. TED KYCIA MEMORIAL SYMPOSIUM.

    SciTech Connect

    LITTENBERG, L.; RUBINSTEIN, R.; SAMIOS, N.; LI, K.; GIACOMELLI, G.; MOCKETT, P.; CARROLL, A.; JOHNSON, R.; BRYMAN, D.; TIPPENS, B.

    2000-05-19

    On the afternoon of May 19 2000, a Memorial Seminar was held in the BNL physics Large Seminar Room to honor the memory of Ted Kyeia, a prominent particle physicist who had been a member of the BNL staff for 40 years. Although it was understandably a somewhat sad occasion because Ted was no longer with us, nevertheless there was much for his colleagues and friends to celebrate in recalling the outstanding contributions that he had made in those four decades. The Seminar speakers were all people who had worked with Ted during that period; each discussed one aspect of his career, but also included anecdotes and personal reminiscences. This booklet contains the Seminar program, listing the speakers, and also copies of transparencies of the talks (and one paper which was a later expansion of a talk); sadly, not all of the personal remarks appeared on the transparencies.

  16. PREFACE: XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Bijker, Roelof; Fossion, Ruben; Lizcano, David

    2010-04-01

    The attached PDF gives a full listing of contributors and organisation members. In the present volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series we publish the proceedings of the "XXXIII Symposium on Nuclear Physics", that was held from January 5-8, 2010 at the Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico. The proceedings contain the plenary talks that were presented during the conference. The abstracts of all contributions, plenary talks and posters, were published in the Conference Handbook. The Symposium on Nuclear Physics has a long and distinguished history. From the beginning it was intended to be a relatively small meeting designed to bring together some of the leading nuclear scientists in the field. Its most distinctive feature is to provide a forum for specialists in different areas of nuclear physics, both theorists and experimentalists, students, postdocs and senior scientists, in a relaxed and informal environment providing them with a unique opportunity to exchange ideas. After the first meeting in Oaxtepec in 1978, the Symposium was organized every year without interruption which makes the present one the 33rd in a row. This year's meeting was dedicated to the memory of Marcos Moshinsky, who passed away on April 1, 2009. Dr. Moshinsky was the most distinguished pioneer and promoter of nuclear physics in Mexico and Latin America and holds the record of 31 (out of 32) participations at the Symposium. In the inaugural session, Alejandro Frank (ICN-UNAM), Peter Hess (ICN-UNAM) and Jorge Flores (IF-UNAM) spoke in his honor and recalled the virtues that characterized him as a teacher, scientist, founder of schools and academic institutions, colleague and friend. His generosity, excellence and honesty were emphasized as the personal qualities that characterized both his personal and academic life. moshinksky_photo "Marcos Moshinsky (1921-2009)" The scientific program consisted of 26 invited talks and 20 posters on a wide variety of hot topics in contemporary nuclear

  17. International Symposium on Optics and its Applications (OPTICS-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacherjee, Aranya B.; Calvo, Maria L.; Kazaryan, Eduard M.; Papoyan, Aram V.; Sarkisyan, Hayk A.

    2012-03-01

    OPTICS Logo PREFACE The papers selected for this volume were reported at the International Symposium 'Optics and its applications' (OPTICS-2011, Yerevan & Ashtarak, Armenia, September 5-9, 2011), http://www.ipr.sci.am/optics2011/. The Symposium was organized by the SPIE Armenian Student Chapter and major Armenian R&D organizations, universities and industrial companies working in the field of basic and applied optics: Institute for Physical Research of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia, Yerevan State University, Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University, and LT-PYRKAL Closed Joint Stock Company. OPTICS-2011 was primarily intended to support and promote the involvement of students and young scientists in various fields of modern optics, giving them the possibility to attend invited talks by prominent scientists and to present and discuss their own results. Furthermore, the Symposium allowed foreign participants from 14 countries to become acquainted with the achievements of optical science and technology in Armenia, which became a full member of the International Commission for Optics (ICO) in 2011. To follow this concept, the Symposium sessions were held in various host institutions. The creative and friendly ambience established at OPTICS-2011 promoted further international collaboration in the field and motivated many students to take up research in optics and photonics as a career. This volume of Journal of Physics: Conference Series covers thematic sections of the Symposium (both oral and poster), which represent the main fields of interest in optics for Armenian scientists: quantum optics & information, laser spectroscopy, optical properties of nanostructures, photonics & fiber optics, and optics of liquid crystals. Such wide coverage is consistent with the general scope of the Symposium, allowing all the students involved in optics to present, discuss and publish their recent results, and for those who are making their first steps in science to choose

  18. Learning on the Job. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains two papers from a symposium on learning on the job. "Professional Crisis Workers: Impact of Repeated Exposure to Human Pain and Destructiveness" (Lynn Atkinson-Tovar) examines the following topics: (1) the secondary and vicarious traumatic stress disorder that affects many professional crisis workers who are repeatedly…

  19. Symposium on Dental Health Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Lawrence W., Ed.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This document presents papers, critiques, and comments from a symposium which assessed the current status of preventive dental behavior. The field was divided into the following three major areas: (a) mass media programs, (b) school health programs, and (c) effect of the private practitioner. Each author was asked to review the literature, provide…

  20. Learning and Job Satisfaction. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This symposium is comprised of three papers on learning and job satisfaction. "The Relationship Between Workplace Learning and Job Satisfaction in United States Small to Mid-Sized Businesses" (Robert W. Rowden) reports findings that revealed sufficient evidence to conclude that learning is pervasive in the small to mid-sized businesses studied;…