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Sample records for histamine-2 receptor antagonists

  1. Histamine-2 Receptor Antagonists and Semen Quality.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Saleem A

    2016-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists are a class of drugs used to treat the acid-related gastrointestinal diseases such as ulcer and gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. Although such drugs, especially ranitidine and famotidine, are still widely used, their effects on semen quality, and hence on male infertility, is still unclear. This MiniReview systematically addresses and summarizes the effect of histamine-2 receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, nizatidine and famotidine) on semen quality, particularly, on sperm function. Cimetidine appears to have adverse effects on semen quality. While the effects of ranitidine and nizatidine on semen quality are still controversial, famotidine does not appear to change semen quality. Therefore, additional studies will be required to clarify whether histamine-2 receptor-independent effects of these drugs play a role in semen quality as well as further clinical studies including direct comparison of the histamine-2 receptor antagonists. PMID:26176290

  2. Histamine 2 Receptor Antagonists and Proton Pump Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Brinkworth, Megan D; Aouthmany, Mouhammad; Sheehan, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Within the last 50 years, the pharmacologic market for gastric disease has grown exponentially. Currently, medical management with histamine 2 receptor antagonist and proton pump inhibitors are the mainstay of therapy over surgical intervention. These are generally regarded as safe medications, but there are growing numbers of cases documenting adverse effects, especially those manifesting in the skin. Here we review the pharmacology, common clinical applications, and adverse reactions of both histamine 2 receptor antagonists and proton pump inhibitors with a particular focus on the potential for allergic reactions including allergic contact dermatitis. PMID:27172303

  3. Histamine2-receptor antagonists: Rapid development of tachyphylaxis with repeat dosing

    PubMed Central

    McRorie, Johnson W; Kirby, James A; Miner, Philip B

    2014-01-01

    Histamine2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are available over-the-counter (OTC) for the treatment and prevention of heartburn, but more than occasional, single-dose use can lead to rapid development of tachyphylaxis. The aim of this review is to assess the published evidence regarding the development of tachyphylaxis with repeat usage of H2RAs. PubMed and SCOPUS were searched across all years to identify clinical studies that examined the development of tachyphylaxis with repeated dosing of H2RAs. Although a single (first) dose of an H2RA can be effective for controlling gastric acid and preventing or relieving food-related heartburn, numerous studies confirm that tachyphylaxis, also known as tolerance, is consistently detected at the first time point assessed after the first dose, including the second day and/or second dose. Even if symptom relief is achieved with an H2RA, it may be due to desensitization of the esophagus to acid exposure, potentially providing symptom relief without significantly decreasing esophageal acid exposure. When recommending OTC drugs for treatment of frequent heartburn, clinicians should be aware of the potential for rapid development of tachyphylaxis in patients who use H2RAs for 2 or more consecutive days. Even if symptom relief is achieved, it may be due to desensitization of the esophagus to acid by the H2RA, potentially providing symptom relief without significantly decreasing esophageal acid exposure. Other strategies, such as an OTC proton pump inhibitor, may be needed to optimize management of frequent heartburn. PMID:24868486

  4. Comparison of antiproliferative effects of 1-histamine-2 receptor antagonists, cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine, in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hahm, K B; Park, I S; Kim, H C; Lee, K J; Kim, J H; Cho, S W; Lee, S I

    1996-01-01

    In the immune system, histamine is known to suppress cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and nitrogen induced lymphocyte thymidine uptake, down-regulate some cytokines, and activate suppressor T-lymphocytes, and in the gastrointestinal system, histamine was reported to have trophic effects on gastrointestinal epithelial cells. Enhanced rates of cell proliferation by histamine are implicated in the pathogenesis. This study was designed since there is a lack of comparative data about the cell proliferations of histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2-RA), cimetidine, ranitidine, and famotidine, in gastric cancer. KATO-III and AGS cell lines were used in this experiment. The concentrations of the histamine and cimetidine were 10(-5)-10(-8) M, respectively and those of ranitidine and famotidine were 10(-6)-10(-9)M, respectively. Cell proliferation after drug treatment was evaluated by direct cell counting, [3H]thymidine incorporation, and MTT assay. Activities of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), a rate limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis, were measured after each drug treatment. Protein kinase A, a cAMP-dependent protein kinase system, was assayed using [alpha-32P]ATP. Histamine showed statistically significant cell proliferating effects in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.001), the maximal effect in 10(-5) M concentration. ODC activities were increased in accordance with the increment of cell numbers after histamine treatment. Cimetidine reversed the histamine-stimulated cell proliferation significantly, the maximal effect in 10(-5) M concentration (P < 0.01). Although ranitidine showed the tendency to attenuate the cell proliferation dose-dependently, but without statistical significance, famotidine did not show such an effect at all. cAMP-dependent protein kinase activities were significantly increased following 10(-5) M histamine treatment, also reversed significantly by cimetidine co-administration (P < 0.01). Beneficial clinical outcomes could be anticipated from cimetidine

  5. Comparison of immunomodulative effects of histamine-2 receptor antagonists in gastric cancer patients: focus on the lymphoblastogenesis and cytotoxicity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Hahm, K B; Lee, S I; Chung, J P; Kim, W H; Kim, J H; Park, I S

    1994-12-01

    A proposed mechanism of the immunomodulative effects of histamine-2 receptor antagonist (H2-RA) has been considered to be the inhibition of suppressor T-lymphocyte activity, an increase in interleukin-2 production of helper T-lymphocytes, and an enhancement of natural killer cell activity. Since there is a lack of comparative data about the immunomodulative effects of various H2-RAs, cimetidine, ranitidine and famotidine on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), study of the comparison of the actions of H2-RA will be required. We compared the immunomodulative effect of each H2-RA on PBMC in patients with gastric cancer. DNA synthesis, cytotoxicity of PBMC against K562 cells and gastric cancer cell lines, and the levels of supernatant soluble interleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were measured after the addition of each H2-RA, respectively. Increased suppressor cell activities were attenuated and restored to the levels of normal controls by the addition of cimetidine to H2-RA. Statistically significant lymphoblastogenesis and cytotoxicity against K562 cells were observed only in cimetidine-treated PBMC (P < 0.05). Such effects were not observed in ranitidine- or famotidine-treated PBMC. Neither cimetidine- nor ranitidine-activated activated PBMC showed any significant cytotoxicity against gastric cancer cells. Significantly increased levels of sIL-2R were found in supernatants obtained from culture flasks treated with cimetidine or ranitidine and phytohemagglutinin (P < 0.01). A significant correlation was found between the cytotoxicity of cimetidine- or ranitidine-treated PBMC and supernatant sIL-2R (P < 0.05). In conclusion, the most strongly modulative substance among H2-RAs was cimetidine and the least modulative drug was famotidine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7705971

  6. Vasopressin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F

    2015-01-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is the principal hormone involved in regulating the tonicity of body fluids. Less appreciated is the role that AVP plays in a variety of other physiologic functions including glucose metabolism, cardiovascular homeostasis, bone metabolism, and cognitive behavior. AVP receptor antagonists are now available and currently approved to treat hyponatremia. There is a great deal of interest in exploring the potential benefits that these drugs may play in blocking AVP-mediated effects in other organ systems. The purpose of this report is to provide an update on the expanding role of AVP receptor antagonists and what disease states these drugs may eventually be used for. PMID:25604388

  7. Selective orexin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lebold, Terry P; Bonaventure, Pascal; Shireman, Brock T

    2013-09-01

    The orexin, or hypocretin, neuropeptides (orexin-A and orexin-B) are produced on neurons in the hypothalamus which project to key areas of the brain that control sleep-wake states, modulation of food intake, panic, anxiety, emotion, reward and addictive behaviors. These neuropeptides exert their effects on a pair of G-protein coupled receptors termed the orexin-1 (OX1) and orexin-2 (OX2) receptors. Emerging biology suggests the involvement of these receptors in psychiatric disorders as they are thought to play a key role in the regulation of multiple systems. This review is intended to highlight key selective OX1 or OX2 small-molecule antagonists. PMID:23891187

  8. Xanthines as Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2013-01-01

    The natural plant alkaloids caffeine and theophylline were the first adenosine receptor (AR) antagonists described in the literature. They exhibit micromolar affinities and are non-selective. A large number of derivatives and analogs have subsequently been synthesized and evaluated as AR antagonists. Very potent antagonists have thus been developed with selectivity for each of the four AR subtypes. PMID:20859796

  9. Endothelin receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Maguire, Janet J; Davenport, Anthony P

    2015-03-01

    All three members of the endothelin (ET) family of peptides, ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, are expressed in the human kidney, with ET-1 being the predominant isoform. ET-1 and ET-2 bind to two G-protein-coupled receptors, ETA and ETB, whereas at physiological concentrations ET-3 has little affinity for the ET(A) receptor. The human kidney is unusual among the peripheral organs in expressing a high density of ET(B). The renal vascular endothelium only expresses the ET(B) subtype and ET-1 acts in an autocrine or paracrine manner to release vasodilators. Endothelial ETB in kidney, as well as liver and lungs, also has a critical role in scavenging ET-1 from the plasma. The third major function is ET-1 activation of ET(B) in in the nephron to reduce salt and water re-absorption. In contrast, ET(A) predominate on smooth muscle, causing vasoconstriction and mediating many of the pathophysiological actions of ET-1. The role of the two receptors has been delineated using highly selective ET(A) (BQ123, TAK-044) and ET(B) (BQ788) peptide antagonists. Nonpeptide antagonists, bosentan, macitentan, and ambrisentan, that are either mixed ET(A)/ET(B) antagonists or display ET(A) selectivity, have been approved for clinical use but to date are limited to pulmonary hypertension. Ambrisentan is in clinical trials in patients with type 2 diabetic nephropathy. This review summarizes ET-receptor antagonism in the human kidney, and considers the relative merits of selective versus nonselective antagonism in renal disease. PMID:25966344

  10. Trends in Oral Antibiotic, Proton Pump Inhibitor, and Histamine 2 Receptor Blocker Prescription Patterns for Children Compared With Adults: Implications for Clostridium difficile Infection in the Community.

    PubMed

    Faden, Howard S; Ma, Chan-Xing

    2016-07-01

    The use of antibiotics, proton pump inhibitor (PPI), and histamine 2 receptor blocker (H2B) was compared between children and adults in the community from 2005 through 2011. Antibiotic prescription rates remained stable for children, but increased significantly for adults, P = .03. PPI prescription rates increased for children, P = .02 and for adults, P = .009. H2B prescription rates increased for children, P = .03, but not for adults. Antibiotic prescription rates were significantly higher in children than adults in all 7 years, P < .0001. In contrast, PPI prescription rates were significantly higher in adults than children in all 7 years, P < .0001. H2B prescription rates were significantly higher in adults than children 1 to 18 years old P < .0001; however, H2B prescription rates were highest in children <1 year old, P = .0001. The high use of oral antibiotics, PPI, and H2B among outpatients may be a contributing factor to the rise of Clostridium difficile infection in the community. PMID:26350427

  11. Tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cunyu; Westaway, Susan M; Speake, Jason D; Bishop, Michael J; Goetz, Aaron S; Carballo, Luz Helena; Hu, Mike; Epperly, Andrea H

    2011-01-15

    Opioid receptors play an important role in both behavioral and homeostatic functions. We herein report tetrahydroquinoline derivatives as opioid receptor antagonists. SAR studies led to the identification of the potent antagonist 2v, endowed with 1.58nM (K(i)) functional activity against the μ opioid receptor. DMPK data suggest that novel tetrahydroquinoline analogs may be advantageous in peripheral applications. PMID:21193310

  12. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Channick, Richard N; Sitbon, Olivier; Barst, Robyn J; Manes, Alessandra; Rubin, Lewis J

    2004-06-16

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic strategy in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Laboratory and clinical investigations have clearly shown that endothelin (ET)-1 is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and likely plays a significant pathogenetic role in the development and progression of pulmonary vasculopathy. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) have been shown to improve pulmonary hemodynamics, exercise capacity, functional status, and clinical outcome in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Bosentan, a dual-receptor antagonist, is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for class III and IV patients with PAH, based on two phase III trials. In addition to its efficacy as sole therapy, bosentan may have a role as part of a combination of drugs such as a prostanoid or sildenafil. The selective endothelin receptor-A antagonists sitaxsentan and ambrisentan are currently undergoing investigation. PMID:15194180

  13. Medicinal chemistry of competitive kainate receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Ann M; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-02-16

    Kainic acid (KA) receptors belong to the group of ionotropic glutamate receptors and are expressed throughout in the central nervous system (CNS). The KA receptors have been shown to be involved in neurophysiological functions such as mossy fiber long-term potentiation (LTP) and synaptic plasticity and are thus potential therapeutic targets in CNS diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression, neuropathic pain and epilepsy. Extensive effort has been made to develop subtype-selective KA receptor antagonists in order to elucidate the physiological function of each of the five subunits known (GluK1-5). However, to date only selective antagonists for the GluK1 subunit have been discovered, which underlines the strong need for continued research in this area. The present review describes the structure-activity relationship and pharmacological profile for 10 chemically distinct classes of KA receptor antagonists comprising, in all, 45 compounds. To the medicinal chemist this information will serve as reference guidance as well as an inspiration for future effort in this field. PMID:22778857

  14. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  15. Antiplatelet therapy: thrombin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Ueno, Masafumi; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets stimulate thrombus formation in response to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque or endothelial cell erosion, promoting atherothrombotic disease. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation. Aspirin, an irreversible inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis, in combination with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate platelet receptors, represent the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Although these agents have demonstrated significant clinical benefit, the increased risk of bleeding and the recurrence of thrombotic events represent substantial limitations. Thrombin is one of the most important platelet activators. The inhibition of protease-activated receptor 1 showed a good safety profile in preclinical studies. In fact, phase II studies with vorapaxar (SCH530348) and atopaxar (E5555) showed no increase of bleeding events in addition to the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy. Although the results of phase III trials for both drugs are awaited, this family is a promising new addition to the current clinical practice for patients with atherothrombotic disease, not only as an alternative, but also as additional therapy. PMID:21906120

  16. Vasopressin receptor antagonists: Characteristics and clinical role.

    PubMed

    Rondon-Berrios, Helbert; Berl, Tomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyponatremia, the most common electrolyte disorder in hospitalized patients is associated with increased risk of mortality even when mild and apparently asymptomatic. Likewise morbidity manifested as attention deficits, gait disturbances, falls, fractures, and osteoporosis is more prevalent in hyponatremic subjects. Hyponatremia also generates a significant financial burden. Therefore, it is important to explore approaches that effectively and safely treat hyponatremia. Currently available strategies are physiologically sound and affordable but lack evidence from clinical trials and are limited by variable efficacy, slow response, and/or poor compliance. The recent emergence of vasopressin receptor antagonists provides a class of drugs that target the primary pathophysiological mechanism, namely vasopressin mediated impairment of free water excretion. This review summarizes the historical development, pharmacology, clinical trials supporting efficacy and safety, shortcomings, as well as practical suggestions for the use of vasopressin receptor antagonists. PMID:27156765

  17. Azines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lazewska, Dorota; Kiec-Kononowicz, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Since 2000, when the histamine H4 receptor (H4R) was cloned, it has constituted an interesting target for drug development. Pharmacological studies suggest the potential utility of histamine H4R antagonists/inverse agonists in the treatment of inflammatory diseases, e.g. allergic rhinitis, asthma, atopic dermatitis, colitis, or pruritus. The first H4R ligands were non-selective compounds, but intensive chemical and pharmacological work has led to the discovery of highly potent and selective H4R antagonists (e.g. JNJ7777120, CZC-13788, PF-2988403, A-940894, A-987306). The first compound (UR-63325) has finally entered into clinical studies for the treatment of allergic respiratory diseases (completing the phase I ascending dose trial) and has been found to be safe and well tolerated. The number of scientific publications and patent applications in the H4 field is increasing annually. Among the diverse chemical structures of the H4R antagonists described a 2-aminopyrimidine scaffold is repeatedly found. This review looked at recent advances in the search for H4R antagonists as reflected in patent applications/patents and peer-reviewed publications over the last two years. The work concerns azines (mono-, di-, triazines) and their fused analogues. The chemistry and pharmacology has been described. PMID:22202103

  18. Rational discovery of novel nuclear hormone receptor antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schapira, Matthieu; Raaka, Bruce M.; Samuels, Herbert H.; Abagyan, Ruben

    2000-02-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) are potential targets for therapeutic approaches to many clinical conditions, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological diseases. The crystal structure of the ligand binding domain of agonist-bound NRs enables the design of compounds with agonist activity. However, with the exception of the human estrogen receptor-, the lack of antagonist-bound "inactive" receptor structures hinders the rational design of receptor antagonists. In this study, we present a strategy for designing such antagonists. We constructed a model of the inactive conformation of human retinoic acid receptor- by using information derived from antagonist-bound estrogen receptor-α and applied a computer-based virtual screening algorithm to identify retinoic acid receptor antagonists. Thus, the currently available crystal structures of NRs may be used for the rational design of antagonists, which could lead to the development of novel drugs for a variety of diseases.

  19. Pharmacodynamic properties of leukotriene receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Nicosia, S

    1999-06-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are among the most important mediators of asthma; cysteine-containing LTs (cysteinyl-LTs, i.e. LTC4, LTD4 and LTE4) are very potent bronchoconstrictors and participate in the inflammatory component of asthma by inducing mucus hypersecretion, plasma extravasation, mucosal oedema and eosinophil recruitment. Therefore, compounds able to inhibit either the formation or the action of LTs are potential antiasthma drugs and, at present, the cysteinyl-LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) appear to be the most promising. The receptors for cysteinyl-LTs, termed CysLT receptors, are heterogeneous; at least two different classes have so far been recognized, named CysLT1 (blocked by the so-called classical antagonists, such as FPL 55712, ICI 198,615, ICI 204,219, SK&F 104353, MK-476 and others) and CysLT2 (insensitive to the classical antagonists, but sensitive to BAY u9773). The authors' results indicate that even more receptor subclasses might exist in human airways, which discriminate between LTC4 and LTD4, both asthma mediators. Among the many LTRAs, zafirlukast (Accolate, ICI 204,219), montelukast (Singulair, MK-476) and pranlukast (Onon, ONO-1078) are available for clinical use. All the LTRAs are able to inhibit LTD4-induced bronchoconstriction in humans, albeit with different potencies. With respect to antigen challenge, all of them inhibit the early phase of response, whereas only the most recently developed and potent ones are effective in the late phase. LTRAs are effective in asthma triggered by exercise, cold or aspirin. Furthermore, although they are not bronchodilators per se, they increase basal forced expiratory volume in one second in patients with mild-to-moderate asthma, indicating that, in these individuals, constant cysteinyl-LT release contributes to maintaining increased bronchial tone. Finally, the effect of LTRAs is additive to that of beta-agonists and is potentiated by antihistamine compounds. In conclusion, the available results clearly

  20. Endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, J; Hoeper, M M

    2008-02-01

    The endothelin (ET) system, especially ET-1 and the ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Together with prostanoids and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors, ET receptor antagonists have become mainstays in the current treatment of PAH. Three substances are currently available for the treatment of PAH. One of these substances, bosentan, blocks both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors, whereas the two other compounds, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are more selective blockers of the ET(A) receptor. There is ongoing debate as to whether selective or nonselective ET receptor blockade is advantageous in the setting of PAH, although there is no clear evidence that receptor selectivity is relevant with regard to the clinical effects of these drugs. For the time being, other features, such as safety profiles and the potential for pharmacokinetic interactions with other drugs used in the treatment of PAH, may be more important than selectivity or nonselectivity when selecting treatments for individual patients. PMID:18238950

  1. Novel paramagnetic AT1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tan, Nichole P H; Taylor, Michelle K; Bottle, Steven E; Wright, Christine E; Ziogas, James; White, Jonathan M; Schiesser, Carl H; Jani, Nitya V

    2011-11-28

    Novel paramagnetic selective angiotensin AT(1) receptor antagonists (sartans) bearing nitroxides (3, 4) have been prepared and their pharmacology evaluated in vitro as well as in vivo. Compounds 3, 4 proved to be effective sartans with pK(B) estimates in the range 6.2-9.1. In addition, the sodium salt (11) of 4 (R = Bu) is able to protect against vascular injury in hypertensive rats as determined by its ability to attenuate the development of intimal thickening caused by balloon injury of the carotid artery. PMID:21963998

  2. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists and endothelial function

    PubMed Central

    Maron, Bradley A.; Leopold, Jane A.

    2010-01-01

    Hyperaldosteronism has been associated with endothelial dysfunction and impaired vascular reactivity in patients with hypertension or congestive heart failure. The mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone have been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality, in part, by ameliorating the adverse effects of aldosterone on vascular function. Although spironolactone and eplerenone are increasingly utilized in patients with cardiovascular disease, widespread clinical use is limited by the development of gynecomastia with spironolactone and hyperkalemia with both agents. This suggests that the development of newer agents with favorable side effect profiles is warranted. PMID:18729003

  3. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khanfar, Mohammad A.; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  4. Multiple Targeting Approaches on Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Khanfar, Mohammad A; Affini, Anna; Lutsenko, Kiril; Nikolic, Katarina; Butini, Stefania; Stark, Holger

    2016-01-01

    With the very recent market approval of pitolisant (Wakix®), the interest in clinical applications of novel multifunctional histamine H3 receptor antagonists has clearly increased. Since histamine H3 receptor antagonists in clinical development have been tested for a variety of different indications, the combination of pharmacological properties in one molecule for improved pharmacological effects and reduced unwanted side-effects is rationally based on the increasing knowledge on the complex neurotransmitter regulations. The polypharmacological approaches on histamine H3 receptor antagonists on different G-protein coupled receptors, transporters, enzymes as well as on NO-signaling mechanism are described, supported with some lead structures. PMID:27303254

  5. Indole-like Trk receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tammiku-Taul, Jaana; Park, Rahel; Jaanson, Kaur; Luberg, Kristi; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Kananovich, Dzmitry; Noole, Artur; Mandel, Merle; Kaasik, Allen; Lopp, Margus; Timmusk, Tõnis; Karelson, Mati

    2016-10-01

    The virtual screening for new scaffolds for TrkA receptor antagonists resulted in potential low molecular weight drug candidates for the treatment of neuropathic pain and cancer. In particular, the compound (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole and its derivatives were assessed for their inhibitory activity against Trk receptors. The IC50 values were computationally predicted in combination of molecular and fragment-based QSAR. Thereafter, based on the structure-activity relationships (SAR), a series of new compounds were designed and synthesized. Among the final selection of 13 compounds, (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-N-methyl-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide showed the best TrkA inhibitory activity using both biochemical and cellular assays and (Z)-3-((5-methoxy-1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)methylene)-2-oxindole-5-sulfonamide was the most potent inhibitor of TrkB and TrkC. PMID:27318978

  6. Endothelin receptor antagonists in the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Langleben, David

    2007-03-01

    The recognition that endothelin-1 contributes to the pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension has led to the development of clinically useful endothelin receptor antagonists that improve symptoms and functional capacity and alter the natural history of the disease in a beneficial way. The antagonists have varying degrees of selectivity for the two classes of endothelin receptor, termed ETA and ETB, and the varying degrees may translate into clinical differences. Endothelin receptor antagonists have become an integral part of therapy for pulmonary arterial hypertension, and the indications for their use are expanding. PMID:17338931

  7. Prostanoid receptor antagonists: development strategies and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, RL; Giembycz, MA; Woodward, DF

    2009-01-01

    Identification of the primary products of cyclo-oxygenase (COX)/prostaglandin synthase(s), which occurred between 1958 and 1976, was followed by a classification system for prostanoid receptors (DP, EP1, EP2 …) based mainly on the pharmacological actions of natural and synthetic agonists and a few antagonists. The design of potent selective antagonists was rapid for certain prostanoid receptors (EP1, TP), slow for others (FP, IP) and has yet to be achieved in certain cases (EP2). While some antagonists are structurally related to the natural agonist, most recent compounds are ‘non-prostanoid’ (often acyl-sulphonamides) and have emerged from high-throughput screening of compound libraries, made possible by the development of (functional) assays involving single recombinant prostanoid receptors. Selective antagonists have been crucial to defining the roles of PGD2 (acting on DP1 and DP2 receptors) and PGE2 (on EP1 and EP4 receptors) in various inflammatory conditions; there are clear opportunities for therapeutic intervention. The vast endeavour on TP (thromboxane) antagonists is considered in relation to their limited pharmaceutical success in the cardiovascular area. Correspondingly, the clinical utility of IP (prostacyclin) antagonists is assessed in relation to the cloud hanging over the long-term safety of selective COX-2 inhibitors. Aspirin apart, COX inhibitors broadly suppress all prostanoid pathways, while high selectivity has been a major goal in receptor antagonist development; more targeted therapy may require an intermediate position with defined antagonist selectivity profiles. This review is intended to provide overviews of each antagonist class (including prostamide antagonists), covering major development strategies and current and potential clinical usage. PMID:19624532

  8. Deficiency of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist responsive to anakinra.

    PubMed

    Schnellbacher, Charlotte; Ciocca, Giovanna; Menendez, Roxanna; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Duarte, Ana M; Rivas-Chacon, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    We describe a 3-month-old infant who presented to our institution with interleukin (IL)-1 receptor antagonist deficiency (DIRA), which consists of neutrophilic pustular dermatosis, periostitis, aseptic multifocal osteomyelitis, and persistently high acute-phase reactants. Skin findings promptly improved upon initiation of treatment with anakinra (recombinant human IL-1 receptor antagonist), and the bony lesions and systemic inflammation resolved with continued therapy. PMID:22471702

  9. Discovery of cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists by virtual screening.

    PubMed

    Lee, Gil Nam; Kim, Kwang Rok; Ahn, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Myung Ae; Kang, Nam Sook

    2010-09-01

    In this work, we tried to find a new scaffold for a CB1 receptor antagonist using virtual screening. We first analyzed structural features for the known cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonists and, then, we built pharmacophore models using the HipHop concept and carried out a docking study based on our homology CB1 receptor 3D structure. The most active compound, including thiazole-4-one moiety, showed an activity value of 125 nM IC(50), with a good PK profile. PMID:20667724

  10. Non-NMDA receptor antagonist-induced drinking in rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Z.; Johnson, A. K.

    1998-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the central control of mechanisms that maintain body fluid homeostasis. The present studies demonstrate that intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of the non-N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists 6, 7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) and 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3 dione (CNQX) induce drinking in rats. The dipsogenic effect of i.c.v. DNQX was antagonized by the non-NMDA receptor agonist alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA). The water intake induced by DNQX was also blocked by pretreatment with a NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801, but not by angiotensin type 1 (AT1) or acetylcholine muscarinic receptor antagonists (losartan and atropine). The results indicate that non-NMDA receptors may exert a tonic inhibitory effect within brain circuits that control dipsogenic activity and that functional integrity of NMDA receptors may be required for the non-NMDA receptor antagonists to induce water intake. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. Azogabazine; a photochromic antagonist of the GABAA receptor.

    PubMed

    Huckvale, Rosemary; Mortensen, Martin; Pryde, David; Smart, Trevor G; Baker, James R

    2016-07-12

    The design and synthesis of azogabazine is described, which represents a highly potent (IC50 = 23 nM) photoswitchable antagonist of the GABAA receptor. An azologization strategy is adopted, in which a benzyl phenyl ether in a high affinity gabazine analogue is replaced by an azobenzene, with resultant retention of antagonist potency. We show that cycling from blue to UV light, switching between trans and cis isomeric forms, leads to photochemically controlled antagonism of the GABA ion channel. PMID:27327397

  12. Fluorescent Human EP3 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Tomasch, Miriam; Schwed, J Stephan; Kuczka, Karina; Meyer Dos Santos, Sascha; Harder, Sebastian; Nüsing, Rolf M; Paulke, Alexander; Stark, Holger

    2012-09-13

    Exchange of the lipophilc part of ortho-substituted cinnamic acid lead structures with different small molecule fluorophoric moieties via a dimethylene spacer resulted in hEP3R ligands with affinities in the nanomolar concentration range. Synthesized compounds emit fluorescence in the blue, green, and red range of light and have been tested concerning their potential as a pharmacological tool. hEP3Rs were visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy on HT-29 cells, on murine kidney tissues, and on human brain tissues and functionally were characterized as antagonists on human platelets. Inhibition of PGE2 and collagen-induced platelet aggregation was measured after preincubation with novel hEP3R ligands. The pyryllium-labeled ligand 8 has been shown as one of the most promising structures, displaying a useful fluorescence and highly affine hEP3R antagonists. PMID:24900547

  13. Cholestasis of pregnancy, pruritus and 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Schumann, Roman; Hudcova, Jana

    2004-09-01

    Pruritus, an early symptom of intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy, may be severe. Conventional treatment includes ursodeoxycholic acid and cholestyramine. Ondansetron, a 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonist antiemetic, has been shown to reduce pruritus of different etiologies including cholestasis. We now report the successful preoperative use of ondansetron in a patient with pruritus from intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy. While the mechanism for our patient's response is poorly understood, 5-hydroxytryptamine 3 receptor antagonists should be further evaluated and possibly considered as a treatment option for intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy-related pruritus. PMID:15315599

  14. Discovery of Tertiary Sulfonamides as Potent Liver X Receptor Antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Zuercher, William J.; Buckholz†, Richard G.; Campobasso, Nino; Collins, Jon L.; Galardi, Cristin M.; Gampe, Robert T.; Hyatt, Stephen M.; Merrihew, Susan L.; Moore, John T.; Oplinger, Jeffrey A.; Reid, Paul R.; Spearing, Paul K.; Stanley, Thomas B.; Stewart, Eugene L.; Willson, Timothy M.

    2010-08-12

    Tertiary sulfonamides were identified in a HTS as dual liver X receptor (LXR, NR1H2, and NR1H3) ligands, and the binding affinity of the series was increased through iterative analogue synthesis. A ligand-bound cocrystal structure was determined which elucidated key interactions for high binding affinity. Further characterization of the tertiary sulfonamide series led to the identification of high affinity LXR antagonists. GSK2033 (17) is the first potent cell-active LXR antagonist described to date. 17 may be a useful chemical probe to explore the cell biology of this orphan nuclear receptor.

  15. Neuroprotection by NMDA receptor antagonists in a variety of neuropathologies.

    PubMed

    Palmer, G C

    2001-09-01

    Because of adverse reactions, early efforts to introduce high affinity competitive or use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists into patients suffering from stroke, head trauma or epilepsy met with failure. Later it was discovered that both low affinity use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists and compounds with selective affinity for the NR2B receptor subunit met the criteria for safe administration into patients. Furthermore, these low affinity antagonists exhibit significant mechanistic differences from their higher affinity counterparts. Success of the latter is attested to the ability of the following low affinity compounds to be marketed: 1) Cough suppressant-dextromethorphan (available for decades); 2) Parkinson's disease--amantadine, memantine and budipine; 3) Dementia--memantine; and 4) Epilepsy--felbamate. Moreover, Phase III clinical trials are ongoing with remacemide for epilepsy and Huntington's disease and head trauma for HU-211. A host of compounds are or were under evaluation for the possible treatment of stroke, head trauma, hyperalgesia and various neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the fact that other drugs with associated NMDA receptor mechanisms have reached clinical status, this review focuses only on those competitive and use-dependent NMDA receptor antagonists that reached clinical trails. The ensuing discussions link the in vivo pharmacological investigations that led to the success/mistakes/ failures for eventual testing of promising compounds in the clinic. PMID:11554551

  16. Novel alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridine muscarinic cholinergic receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shannon, H E; Bymaster, F P; Hendrix, J C; Quimby, S J; Mitch, C H

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the present studies was to compare a novel series of alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridines (A-OXTPs) as muscarinic receptor antagonists. The affinity of these compounds for muscarinic receptors was determined by inhibition of [3H]pirenzepine to M1 receptors in hippocampus, [3H]QNB to M2 receptors in brainstem, and [3H]oxotremorine-M to high affinity muscarinic agonist binding sites in cortex. All of the compounds had higher affinity for [3H]pirenzepine than for [3H]QNB or [3H]oxotremorine-M labeled receptors, consistent with an interpretation that they are relatively selective M1 receptor antagonists, although none were as selective as pirenzepine. In addition, dose-response curves were determined for antagonism of oxotremorine-induced salivation (mediated by M3 receptors) and tremor (mediated by non-M1 receptors) in mice. In general, the A-OXTPs were equipotent and equieffective in antagonizing both salivation and tremor, although there were modest differences for some compounds. Dose-response curves also were determined on behavior maintained under a spatial-alternation schedule of food presentation in rats as a measure of effects on working memory. The A-OXTPs produced dose-related decreases in percent correct responding at doses three- to ten-fold lower than those which decreased rates of responding. However, only one compound, MB-OXTP, produced effects on percent correct responding consistent with a selective effect on memory as opposed to non-memory variables. The present results provide evidence that these alkoxy-oxazolyl-tetrahydropyridines are a novel series of modestly M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonists, and that one member of the series, MB-OXTP, appears to be more selective in its effects on memory than previously studies muscarinic antagonists. PMID:7753969

  17. Endothelin receptor antagonists as disease modifiers in systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Nagalakshmi; Derk, Chris T

    2011-02-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease of unknown etiology that is characterized by inflammation, vascular dysfunction and fibrosis of the skin and visceral organs. SSc is clinically diverse both in terms of the burden of skin and organ involvement and the rate of progression of the disease. Recent studies indicate that the endothelin system, especially ET-1 and the ETA and ETB receptors may play a key role in the pathogenesis of SSc. A new class of drugs, endothelin receptor antagonists has been introduced for treatment of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Bosentan, a dual endothelin receptor antagonist as well as Sitaxsentan and Ambrisentan, selective blockers of the ETA receptor have proven effective in SSc-PAH. This effect may be mediated through both a vasodilatory and antifibrotic effect, thus making these agents attractive as potential disease modifying agents for SSc. PMID:21184655

  18. 2-Cycloalkyl phenoxyacetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Aldcroft, Clive; Baettig, Urs; Barker, Lucy; Beer, David; Bhalay, Gurdip; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Bidlake, Louise; Campbell, Emma; Cox, Brian; Everatt, Brian; Harrison, David; Leblanc, Catherine J; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Stringer, Rowan; Thompson, Katy S; Turner, Katharine L; Tweed, Morris F; Walker, Christoph; Watson, Simon J; Whitebread, Steven; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2007-08-01

    High throughput screening identified a phenoxyacetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a compound with functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:17531480

  19. The muscarinic antagonists scopolamine and atropine are competitive antagonists at 5-HT3 receptors.

    PubMed

    Lochner, Martin; Thompson, Andrew J

    2016-09-01

    Scopolamine is a high affinity muscarinic antagonist that is used for the prevention of post-operative nausea and vomiting. 5-HT3 receptor antagonists are used for the same purpose and are structurally related to scopolamine. To examine whether 5-HT3 receptors are affected by scopolamine we examined the effects of this drug on the electrophysiological and ligand binding properties of 5-HT3A receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells, respectively. 5-HT3 receptor-responses were reversibly inhibited by scopolamine with an IC50 of 2.09 μM. Competitive antagonism was shown by Schild plot (pA2 = 5.02) and by competition with the 5-HT3 receptor antagonists [(3)H]granisetron (Ki = 6.76 μM) and G-FL (Ki = 4.90 μM). The related molecule, atropine, similarly inhibited 5-HT evoked responses in oocytes with an IC50 of 1.74 μM, and competed with G-FL with a Ki of 7.94 μM. The reverse experiment revealed that granisetron also competitively bound to muscarinic receptors (Ki = 6.5 μM). In behavioural studies scopolamine is used to block muscarinic receptors and induce a cognitive deficit, and centrally administered concentrations can exceed the IC50 values found here. It is therefore possible that 5-HT3 receptors are also inhibited. Studies that utilise higher concentrations of scopolamine should be mindful of these potential off-target effects. PMID:27108935

  20. Use of the H3 receptor antagonist radioligand [3H]-A-349821 to reveal in vivo receptor occupancy of cognition enhancing H3 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Miller, TR; Milicic, I; Bauch, J; Du, J; Surber, B; Browman, KE; Marsh, K; Cowart, M; Brioni, JD; Esbenshade, TA

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The histamine H3 receptor antagonist radioligand [3H]-A-349821 was characterized as a radiotracer for assessing in vivo receptor occupancy by H3 receptor antagonists that affect behaviour. This model was established as an alternative to ex vivo binding methods, for relating antagonist H3 receptor occupancy to blood levels and efficacy in preclinical models. Experimental approach: In vivo cerebral cortical H3 receptor occupancy by [3H]-A-349821 was determined in rats from differences in [3H]-A-349821 levels in the isolated cortex and cerebellum, a brain region with low levels of H3 receptors. Comparisons were made to relate antagonist H3 receptor occupancy to blood levels and efficacy in a preclinical model of cognition, the five-trial inhibitory avoidance response in rat pups. Key results: In adult rats, [3H]-A-349821, 1.5 µg·kg−1, penetrated into the brain and cleared more rapidly from cerebellum than cortex; optimally, [3H]-A-349821 levels were twofold higher in the latter. With increasing [3H]-A-349821 doses, cortical H3 receptor occupancy was saturable with a binding capacity consistent with in vitro binding in cortex membranes. In studies using tracer [3H]-A-349821 doses, ABT-239 and other H3 receptor antagonists inhibited H3 receptor occupancy by [3H]-A-349821 in a dose-dependent manner. Blood levels of the antagonists corresponding to H3 receptor occupancy were consistent with blood levels associated with efficacy in the five-trial inhibitory avoidance response. Conclusions and implications: When employed as an occupancy radiotracer, [3H]-A-349821 provided valid measurements of in vivo H3 receptor occupancy, which may be helpful in guiding and interpreting clinical studies of H3 receptor antagonists. PMID:19413577

  1. Extra-helical binding site of a glucagon receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Ali; Doré, Andrew S; Lamb, Daniel; Krishnamurthy, Harini; Southall, Stacey M; Baig, Asma H; Bortolato, Andrea; Koglin, Markus; Robertson, Nathan J; Errey, James C; Andrews, Stephen P; Teobald, Iryna; Brown, Alastair J H; Cooke, Robert M; Weir, Malcolm; Marshall, Fiona H

    2016-05-12

    Glucagon is a 29-amino-acid peptide released from the α-cells of the islet of Langerhans, which has a key role in glucose homeostasis. Glucagon action is transduced by the class B G-protein-coupled glucagon receptor (GCGR), which is located on liver, kidney, intestinal smooth muscle, brain, adipose tissue, heart and pancreas cells, and this receptor has been considered an important drug target in the treatment of diabetes. Administration of recently identified small-molecule GCGR antagonists in patients with type 2 diabetes results in a substantial reduction of fasting and postprandial glucose concentrations. Although an X-ray structure of the transmembrane domain of the GCGR has previously been solved, the ligand (NNC0640) was not resolved. Here we report the 2.5 Å structure of human GCGR in complex with the antagonist MK-0893 (ref. 4), which is found to bind to an allosteric site outside the seven transmembrane (7TM) helical bundle in a position between TM6 and TM7 extending into the lipid bilayer. Mutagenesis of key residues identified in the X-ray structure confirms their role in the binding of MK-0893 to the receptor. The unexpected position of the binding site for MK-0893, which is structurally similar to other GCGR antagonists, suggests that glucagon activation of the receptor is prevented by restriction of the outward helical movement of TM6 required for G-protein coupling. Structural knowledge of class B receptors is limited, with only one other ligand-binding site defined--for the corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRF1R)--which was located deep within the 7TM bundle. We describe a completely novel allosteric binding site for class B receptors, providing an opportunity for structure-based drug design for this receptor class and furthering our understanding of the mechanisms of activation of these receptors. PMID:27111510

  2. Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Preti, Delia; Saponaro, Giulia; Szallasi, Arpad

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) channel is an irritant sensor highly expressed on nociceptive neurons. The clinical use of TRPA1 antagonists is based on the concept that TRPA1 is active during disease states like neuropathic pain. Indeed, in Phase 2a proof-of-concept studies the TRPA1 antagonist GRC17536 has shown efficacy in patients with painful diabetic neuropathy. Moreover, animal studies suggest that the therapeutic value of TRPA1 antagonists extends beyond pain to pruritus, asthma and cough with limited safety concerns. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the patent literature (since 2007) on small-molecule inhibitors of the TRPA1 channel. Despite the clear progress, many unanswered questions remain. Future advancement to Phase 3 studies will assess the real translational potential of this research field. PMID:25853468

  3. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-02-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates.

  4. μ Opioid receptor: novel antagonists and structural modeling

    PubMed Central

    Kaserer, Teresa; Lantero, Aquilino; Schmidhammer, Helmut; Spetea, Mariana; Schuster, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    The μ opioid receptor (MOR) is a prominent member of the G protein-coupled receptor family and the molecular target of morphine and other opioid drugs. Despite the long tradition of MOR-targeting drugs, still little is known about the ligand-receptor interactions and structure-function relationships underlying the distinct biological effects upon receptor activation or inhibition. With the resolved crystal structure of the β-funaltrexamine-MOR complex, we aimed at the discovery of novel agonists and antagonists using virtual screening tools, i.e. docking, pharmacophore- and shape-based modeling. We suggest important molecular interactions, which active molecules share and distinguish agonists and antagonists. These results allowed for the generation of theoretically validated in silico workflows that were employed for prospective virtual screening. Out of 18 virtual hits evaluated in in vitro pharmacological assays, three displayed antagonist activity and the most active compound significantly inhibited morphine-induced antinociception. The new identified chemotypes hold promise for further development into neurochemical tools for studying the MOR or as potential therapeutic lead candidates. PMID:26888328

  5. Receptor mechanisms and circuitry underlying NMDA antagonist neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Farber, N B; Kim, S H; Dikranian, K; Jiang, X P; Heinkel, C

    2002-01-01

    NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists are used in clinical anesthesia, and are being developed as therapeutic agents for preventing neurodegeneration in stroke, epilepsy, and brain trauma. However, the ability of these agents to produce neurotoxicity in adult rats and psychosis in adult humans compromises their clinical usefulness. In addition, an NMDA receptor hypofunction (NRHypo) state might play a role in neurodegenerative and psychotic disorders, like Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Thus, understanding the mechanism underlying NRHypo-induced neurotoxicity and psychosis could have significant clinically relevant benefits. NRHypo neurotoxicity can be prevented by several classes of agents (e.g. antimuscarinics, non-NMDA glutamate antagonists, and alpha(2) adrenergic agonists) suggesting that the mechanism of neurotoxicity is complex. In the present study a series of experiments was undertaken to more definitively define the receptors and complex neural circuitry underlying NRHypo neurotoxicity. Injection of either the muscarinic antagonist scopolamine or the non-NMDA antagonist NBQX directly into the cortex prevented NRHypo neurotoxicity. Clonidine, an alpha(2) adrenergic agonist, protected against the neurotoxicity when injected into the basal forebrain. The combined injection of muscarinic and non-NMDA Glu agonists reproduced the neurotoxic reaction. Based on these and other results, we conclude that the mechanism is indirect, and involves a complex network disturbance, whereby blockade of NMDA receptors on inhibitory neurons in multiple subcortical brain regions, disinhibits glutamatergic and cholinergic projections to the cerebral cortex. Simultaneous excitotoxic stimulation of muscarinic (m(3)) and glutamate (AMPA/kainate) receptors on cerebrocortical neurons appears to be the proximal mechanism by which the neurotoxic and psychotomimetic effects of NRHypo are mediated. PMID:11803444

  6. Aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines as 5-HT7 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeeyeon; Kim, Youngjae; Tae, Jinsung; Yeom, Miyoung; Moon, Bongjin; Huang, Xi-Ping; Roth, Bryan L; Lee, Kangho; Rhim, Hyewhon; Choo, Il Han; Chong, Youhoon; Keum, Gyochang; Nam, Ghilsoo; Choo, Hyunah

    2013-11-01

    The 5-HT7 receptor (5-HT7 R) is a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of depression and neuropathic pain. The 5-HT7 R antagonist SB-269970 exhibited antidepressant-like activity, whereas systemic administration of the 5-HT7 R agonist AS-19 significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity and thermal hyperalgesia. In our efforts to discover selective 5-HT7 R antagonists or agonists, aryl biphenyl-3-ylmethylpiperazines were designed, synthesized, and biologically evaluated against the 5-HT7 R. Among the synthesized compounds, 1-([2'-methoxy-(1,1'-biphenyl)-3-yl]methyl)-4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazine (28) was the best binder to the 5-HT7 R (pKi =7.83), and its antagonistic property was confirmed by functional assays. The selectivity profile of compound 28 was also recorded for the 5-HT7 R over other serotonin receptor subtypes, such as 5-HT1 R, 5-HT2 R, 5-HT3 R, and 5-HT6 R. In a molecular modeling study, the 2-methoxyphenyl moiety attached to the piperazine ring of compound 28 was proposed to be essential for the antagonistic function. PMID:24039134

  7. Rational design of high affinity tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Boyle, S; Guard, S; Higginbottom, M; Horwell, D C; Howson, W; McKnight, A T; Martin, K; Pritchard, M C; O'Toole, J; Raphy, J

    1994-05-01

    The rational design of a non-peptide tachykinin NK1 receptor antagonist, [(2-benzofuran)-CH2OCO]-(R)-alpha-MeTrp-(S)-NHCH(CH3)P h (28, PD 154075) is described. Compound 28 has a Ki = 9 and 0.35 nM for the NK1 receptor binding site in guinea-pig cerebral cortex membranes and human IM9, cells respectively (using [125I] Bolton-Hunter-SP as the radioligand). It is a potent antagonist in vitro where it antagonises the contractions mediated by SPOMe in the guinea-pig ileum (KB = 0.3 nM). Compound 28 is active in vivo in the guinea-pig plasma extravasation model, where it is able to block the SPOMe-induced protein plasma extravasation (monitored by Evans Blue) in the bladder with an ID50 of 0.02 mg kg-1 iv. PMID:7922147

  8. Discovery of aryloxy tetramethylcyclobutanes as novel androgen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuangxing; Linton, Angelica; Kephart, Susan; Ornelas, Martha; Pairish, Mason; Gonzalez, Javier; Greasley, Samantha; Nagata, Asako; Burke, Benjamin J; Edwards, Martin; Hosea, Natilie; Kang, Ping; Hu, Wenyue; Engebretsen, Jon; Briere, David; Shi, Manli; Gukasyan, Hovik; Richardson, Paul; Dack, Kevin; Underwood, Toby; Johnson, Patrick; Morell, Andrew; Felstead, Robert; Kuruma, Hidetoshi; Matsimoto, Hiroaki; Zoubeidi, Amina; Gleave, Martin; Los, Gerrit; Fanjul, Andrea N

    2011-11-10

    An aryloxy tetramethylcyclobutane was identified as a novel template for androgen receptor (AR) antagonists via cell-based high-throughput screening. Follow-up to the initial "hit" established 5 as a viable lead. Further optimization to achieve full AR antagonism led to the discovery of 26 and 30, both of which demonstrated excellent in vivo tumor growth inhibition upon oral administration in a castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) animal model. PMID:21936524

  9. The H2-receptor antagonist era in duodenal ulcer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, I. N.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the remarkable impact of H2-receptor antagonists on duodenal ulcer management. The development and the scientific rationale of these agents are presented, and efficacy and safety aspects in the short- and long-term treatment of duodenal ulcer disease discussed. Attention is focused on the possible role of "acid rebound" in ulcer relapse following the withdrawal of therapy and on the clinical relevance of prolonged suppression of acid secretion in patients on long-term therapy. PMID:1364125

  10. Estrogen Receptor Agonists and Antagonists in the Yeast Estrogen Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Si; Bovee, Toine F H

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based bioassays can be used to predict the eventual biological activity of a substance on a living organism. In vitro reporter gene bioassays are based on recombinant vertebrate cell lines or yeast strains and especially the latter are easy-to-handle, cheap, and fast. Moreover, yeast cells do not express estrogen, androgen, progesterone or glucocorticoid receptors, and are thus powerful tools in the development of specific reporter gene systems that are devoid of crosstalk from other hormone pathways. This chapter describes our experience with an in-house developed RIKILT yeast estrogen bioassay for testing estrogen receptor agonists and antagonists, focusing on the applicability of the latter. PMID:26585147

  11. Novel potent selective phenylglycine antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors.

    PubMed

    Bedingfield, J S; Jane, D E; Kemp, M C; Toms, N J; Roberts, P J

    1996-08-01

    The metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist properties of novel phenylglycine analogues were investigated in adult rat cortical slices (mGlu receptors negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase), neonatal rat cortical slices and in cultured rat cerebellar granule cells (mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis). (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-3-carboxymethyl-4-hydroxyphenylglycine (M3CM4HPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-hydroxy-3-phosphonomethylphenylglycine (M4H3PMPG) were demonstrated to have potent and selective effects against 10 microM L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4)- and 0.3 microM (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(2-carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-1)-mediated inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation in the adult rat cortex. In contrast, these compounds demonstrated either weak or no antagonism at mGlu receptors coupled to phosphoinositide hydrolysis in either neonatal rat cortex or in cultured cerebellar granule cells. These compounds thus appear to be useful discriminatory pharmacological tools for mGlu receptors and form the basis for the further development of novel antagonists. PMID:8864696

  12. A prototypical Sigma-1 receptor antagonist protects against brain ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Schetz, John A.; Perez, Evelyn; Liu, Ran; Chen, Shiuhwei; Lee, Ivan; Simpkins, James W.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that the Sigma-1 ligand 4-phenyl-1-(4-phenylbutyl) piperidine (PPBP) protects the brain from ischemia. Less clear is whether protection is mediated by agonism or antagonism of the Sigma-1 receptor, and whether drugs already in use for other indications and that interact with the Sigma-1 receptor might also prevent oxidative damage due to conditions such as cerebral ischemic stroke. The antipsychotic drug haloperidol is an antagonist of Sigma-1 receptors and in this study it potently protects against oxidative stress-related cell death in vitro at low concentrations. The protective potency of haloperidol and a number of other butyrophenone compounds positively correlate with their affinity for a cloned Sigma-1 receptor, and the protection is mimicked by a Sigma-1 receptor-selective antagonist (BD1063), but not an agonist (PRE-084). In vivo, an acute low dose (0.05 mg/kg s.c.) of haloperidol reduces by half the ischemic lesion volume induced by a transient middle cerebral artery occlusion. These in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical results suggest that a low dose of acutely administered haloperidol might have a novel application as a protective agent against ischemic cerebral stroke and other types of brain injury with an ischemic component. PMID:17919467

  13. Targeting a family B GPCR/RAMP receptor complex: CGRP receptor antagonists and migraine

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eric L; Salvatore, Christopher A

    2012-01-01

    The clinical effectiveness of antagonizing the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor for relief of migraine pain has been clearly demonstrated, but the road to the development of these small molecule antagonists has been daunting. The key hurdle that needed to be overcome was the CGRP receptor itself. The vast majority of the current antagonists recognize similar epitopes on the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein 1 (RAMP1). RAMP1 is a relatively small, single, transmembrane-spanning protein and along with the G-protein-coupled receptor CLR comprise a functional CGRP receptor. The tri-helical extracellular domain of RAMP1 plays a key role in the high affinity binding of CGRP receptor antagonists and drives their species-selective pharmacology. Over the years, a significant amount of mutagenesis data has been generated to identify specific amino acids or regions within CLR and RAMP1 that are critical to antagonist binding and has directed attention to the CLR/RAMP1 extracellular domain (ECD) complex. Recently, the crystal structure of the CGRP receptor ECD has been elucidated and not only reinforces the early mutagenesis data, but provides critical insight into the molecular mechanism of CGRP receptor antagonism. This review will highlight the drug design hurdles that must be overcome to meet the desired potency, selectivity and pharmacokinetic profile while retaining drug-like properties. Although the development of these antagonists has proved challenging, blocking the CGRP receptor may one day represent a new way to manage migraine and offer hope to migraine sufferers. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Secretin Family (Class B) G Protein-Coupled Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.166.issue-1 PMID:21871019

  14. Inhibition of ionotropic neurotransmitter receptors by antagonists: strategy to estimate the association and the dissociation rate constant of antagonists with very strong affinity to the receptors.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, H; Inoue, Y; Hori, K

    1992-10-01

    Since binding of an agonist to an ionotropic neurotransmitter receptor causes not only channel opening, but also desensitization of the receptor, inhibition of the receptor by the antagonist sometimes becomes very complicated. The transient state kinetics of ligand association and dissociation, and desensitization of the receptor were considered on the basis of the minimal model proposed by Hess' group, and the following possibilities were proposed. 1) When an agonist is simultaneously applied to the receptor with an antagonist whose affinity to the receptor is extremely strong and different from that of the agonist, it is usually impossible to estimate the real inhibition constant exactly from the responses because desensitization of the receptor proceeds before the equilibrium of the ligand binding. Simultaneous addition of the antagonist with strong affinity to the receptor may apparently accelerate inactivation (desensitization) of the receptor. The association rate constant of the antagonist can be estimated by analyses of the rate of the inactivation in the presence and the absence of the antagonist. 2) A preincubated antagonist with a slow dissociation rate constant, i.e., a very effective inhibitor, may cause apparent noncompetitive inhibition of the receptor, since the receptor is desensitized by an agonist as soon as the antagonist dissociates from the receptor and the dissociation of the antagonist from the receptor becomes the rate-determining step. A nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) was expressed in Xenopus oocytes by injecting mRNA prepared from Electrophorus electricus electroplax and used for the experiments on inhibition by an antagonist.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1337082

  15. Functionalized Congeners of P2Y1 Receptor Antagonists:

    SciTech Connect

    de Castro, Sonia; Maruoka, Hiroshi; Hong, Kunlun; Kilbey, II, S Michael; Costanzi, Stefano; Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian; Harden, T. Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2010-01-01

    The P2Y{sub 1} receptor is a prothrombotic G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) activated by ADP. Preference for the North (N) ring conformation of the ribose moiety of adenine nucleotide 3',5'-bisphosphate antagonists of the P2Y{sub 1} receptor was established by using a ring-constrained methanocarba (a bicyclo[3.1.0]hexane) ring as a ribose substitute. A series of covalently linkable N{sup 6}-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2'-deoxyadenosine-3',5'-bisphosphates containing extended 2-alkynyl chains was designed, and binding affinity at the human (h) P2Y{sub 1} receptor determined. The chain of these functionalized congeners contained hydrophilic moieties, a reactive substituent, or biotin, linked via an amide. Variation of the chain length and position of an intermediate amide group revealed high affinity of carboxylic congener 8 (K{sub i} 23 nM) and extended amine congener 15 (K{sub i} 132 nM), both having a 2-(1-pentynoyl) group. A biotin conjugate 18 containing an extended {epsilon}-aminocaproyl spacer chain exhibited higher affinity than a shorter biotinylated analogue. Alternatively, click coupling of terminal alkynes of homologous 2-dialkynyl nucleotide derivatives to alkyl azido groups produced triazole derivatives that bound to the P2Y{sub 1} receptor following deprotection of the bisphosphate groups. The preservation of receptor affinity of the functionalized congeners was consistent with new P2Y{sub 1} receptor modeling and ligand docking. Attempted P2Y{sub 1} antagonist conjugation to PAMAM dendrimer carriers by amide formation or palladium-catalyzed reaction between an alkyne on the dendrimer and a 2-iodopurine-derivatized nucleotide was unsuccessful. A dialkynyl intermediate containing the chain length favored in receptor binding was conjugated to an azide-derivatized dendrimer, and the conjugate inhibited ADP-promoted human platelet aggregation. This is the first example of attaching a strategically functionalized P2Y receptor antagonist to a PAMAM dendrimer to

  16. Pharmacological characterization of antagonists of the C5a receptor

    PubMed Central

    Paczkowski, Natalii J; Finch, Angela M; Whitmore, Jacqueline B; Short, Anna J; Wong, Allan K; Monk, Peter N; Cain, Stuart A; Fairlie, David P; Taylor, Stephen M

    1999-01-01

    Potent and highly selective small molecule antagonists have recently been developed by us for C5a receptors (C5aR) on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In this study we compared a new cyclic antagonist, F-[OPdChaWR], with an acyclic derivative, MeFKPdChaWr, for their capacities to bind to C5aR on human PMN and human umbilical artery membranes. We also compared their inhibition of myeloperoxidase (MPO) secretion from human PMNs and their inhibition of human umbilical artery contraction induced by human recombinant C5a.In both PMNs and umbilical artery, the cyclic and acyclic C5a antagonists displayed insurmountable antagonism against C5a. There were differences in selectivities for the C5aR with F-[OPdChaWR] (pKb 8.64±0.21) being 30 times more potent than MeFKPdChaWr (pKb 7.16±0.11, P<0.05) in PMNs, but of similar potency (pKb 8.19±0.38 vs pKb 8.28±0.29, respectively) in umbilical artery. This trend was also reflected in their relative binding affinities, both antagonists having similar affinities (−logIC50 values) for C5aR in umbilical artery membranes (F-[OPdChaWR], 7.00±0.46; MeFKPdChaWr, 7.23±0.17), whereas in PMN membranes the C5aR affinity of the cycle F-[OPdChaWR] (7.05±0.06) was four times higher than that of acyclic MeFKPdChaWr (6.43±0.24, P<0.05).In summary, the results reveal that these antagonists are insurmountable in nature against C5a for C5aR on at least two human cell types, and the differences in relative receptor binding affinities and antagonistic potencies against C5a are consistent with differences in receptors within these cell types. The nature of these differences is yet to be elucidated. PMID:10602324

  17. Characterization of a novel non-steroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Qun-Yi; Zhang, Meng; Hallis, Tina M.; DeRosier, Therese A.; Yue, Jian-Min; Ye, Yang; Mais, Dale E.; Wang, Ming-Wei

    2010-01-15

    Selective antagonists of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) are desirable for the treatment of hypercortisolemia associated with Cushing's syndrome, psychic depression, obesity, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and glaucoma. NC3327, a non-steroidal small molecule with potent binding affinity to GR (K{sub i} = 13.2 nM), was identified in a high-throughput screening effort. As a full GR antagonist, NC3327 greatly inhibits the dexamethasone (Dex) induction of marker genes involved in hepatic gluconeogenesis, but has a minimal effect on matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP-9), a GR responsive pro-inflammatory gene. Interestingly, the compound recruits neither coactivators nor corepressors to the GR complex but competes with glucocorticoids for the interaction between GR and a coactivator peptide. Moreover, NC3327 does not trigger GR nuclear translocation, but significantly blocks Dex-induced GR transportation to the nucleus, and thus appears to be a 'competitive' GR antagonist. Therefore, the non-steroidal compound, NC3327, may represent a new class of GR antagonists as potential therapeutics for a variety of cortisol-related endocrine disorders.

  18. Adenosine receptor antagonists alter the stability of human epileptic GABAA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Roseti, Cristina; Martinello, Katiuscia; Fucile, Sergio; Piccari, Vanessa; Mascia, Addolorata; Di Gennaro, Giancarlo; Quarato, Pier Paolo; Manfredi, Mario; Esposito, Vincenzo; Cantore, Gianpaolo; Arcella, Antonella; Simonato, Michele; Fredholm, Bertil B.; Limatola, Cristina; Miledi, Ricardo; Eusebi, Fabrizio

    2008-01-01

    We examined how the endogenous anticonvulsant adenosine might influence γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA) receptor stability and which adenosine receptors (ARs) were involved. Upon repetitive activation (GABA 500 μM), GABAA receptors, microtransplanted into Xenopus oocytes from neurosurgically resected epileptic human nervous tissues, exhibited an obvious GABAA-current (IGABA) run-down, which was consistently and significantly reduced by treatment with the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist CGS15943 (100 nM) or with adenosine deaminase (ADA) (1 units/ml), that inactivates adenosine. It was also found that selective antagonists of A2B (MRS1706, 10 nM) or A3 (MRS1334, 30 nM) receptors reduced IGABA run-down, whereas treatment with the specific A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (10 nM) was ineffective. The selective A2A receptor antagonist SCH58261 (10 nM) reduced or potentiated IGABA run-down in ≈40% and ≈20% of tested oocytes, respectively. The ADA-resistant, AR agonist 2-chloroadenosine (2-CA) (10 μM) potentiated IGABA run-down but only in ≈20% of tested oocytes. CGS15943 administration again decreased IGABA run-down in patch-clamped neurons from either human or rat neocortex slices. IGABA run-down in pyramidal neurons was equivalent in A1 receptor-deficient and wt neurons but much larger in neurons from A2A receptor-deficient mice, indicating that, in mouse cortex, GABAA-receptor stability is tonically influenced by A2A but not by A1 receptors. IGABA run-down from wt mice was not affected by 2-CA, suggesting maximal ARs activity by endogenous adenosine. Our findings strongly suggest that cortical A2–A3 receptors alter the stability of GABAA receptors, which could offer therapeutic opportunities. PMID:18809912

  19. Crystal Structure of Antagonist Bound Human Lysophosphatidic Acid Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Chrencik, Jill E.; Roth, Christopher B.; Terakado, Masahiko; Kurata, Haruto; Omi, Rie; Kihara, Yasuyuki; Warshaviak, Dora; Nakade, Shinji; Asmar-Rovira, Guillermo; Mileni, Mauro; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Griffith, Mark T.; Rodgers, Caroline; Han, Gye Won; Velasquez, Jeffrey; Chun, Jerold; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Lipid biology continues to emerge as an area of significant therapeutic interest, particularly as the result of an enhanced understanding of the wealth of signaling molecules with diverse physiological properties. This growth in knowledge is epitomized by lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), which functions through interactions with six cognate G protein-coupled receptors. Herein we present three crystal structures of LPA1 in complex with antagonist tool compounds selected and designed through structural and stability analysis. Structural analysis combined with molecular dynamics identified a basis for ligand access to the LPA1 binding pocket from the extracellular space contrasting with the proposed access for the sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor. Characteristics of the LPA1 binding pocket raise the possibility of promiscuous ligand recognition of phosphorylated endocannabinoids. Cell-based assays confirmed this hypothesis, linking the distinct receptor systems through metabolically related ligands with potential functional and therapeutic implications for treatment of disease. PMID:26091040

  20. Vasopressin receptor antagonists, heart failure, and polycystic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Torres, Vicente E

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of nonpeptide orally bioavailable vasopressin antagonists devoid of agonistic activity (vaptans) has made possible the selective blockade of vasopressin receptor subtypes for therapeutic purposes. Vaptans acting on the vasopressin V2 receptors (aquaretics) have attracted attention as a possible therapy for heart failure and polycystic kidney disease. Despite a solid rationale and encouraging preclinical testing, aquaretics have not improved clinical outcomes in randomized clinical trials for heart failure. Additional clinical trials with select population targets, more flexible dosing schedules, and possibly a different drug type or combination (balanced V1a/V2 receptor antagonism) may be warranted. Aquaretics are promising for the treatment of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease and have been approved in Japan for this indication. More studies are needed to better define their long-term safety and efficacy and optimize their utilization. PMID:25493947

  1. Nicotinic Receptor Antagonists as Treatments for Nicotine Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Peter A.; Bardo, Michael T.; Dwoskin, Linda P.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the proven efficacy of current pharmacotherapies for tobacco dependence, relapse rates continue to be high, indicating that novel medications are needed. Currently, several smoking cessation agents are available, including varenicline (Chantix®), bupropion (Zyban®), and cytisine (Tabex®). Varenicline and cytisine are partial agonists at the α4β2* nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Bupropion is an antidepressant but is also an antagonist at α3β2* ganglionic nAChRs. The rewarding effects of nicotine are mediated, in part, by nicotine-evoked dopamine (DA) release leading to sensitization, which is associated with repeated nicotine administration and nicotine addiction. Receptor antagonists that selectivity target central nAChR subtypes mediating nicotine-evoked DA release should have efficacy as tobacco use cessation agents with the therapeutic advantage of a limited side-effect profile. While α-conotoxin MII (α-CtxMII)-insensitive nAChRs (e.g., α4β2*) contribute to nicotine-evoked DA release, these nAChRs are widely distributed in the brain, and inhibition of these receptors may lead to nonselective and untoward effects. In contrast, α-CtxMII-sensitive nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked DA release offer an advantage as targets for smoking cessation, due to their more restricted localization primarily to dopaminergic neurons. Small drug-like molecules that are selective antagonists at α-CtxMII-sensitive nAChR subtypes that contain α6 and β2 subunits have now been identified. Early research identified a variety of quaternary ammonium analogs that were potent and selective antagonists at nAChRs mediating nicotine-evoked DA release. More recent data have shown that novel, non-quaternary bis-1,2,5,6-tetrahydropyridine analogs potently inhibit (IC50<1 nM) nicotine-evoked DA release in vitro by acting as antagonists at α-CtxMII-sensitive nAChR subtypes; these compounds also decrease NIC self-administration in rats. PMID:24484986

  2. GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) are functional in vivo.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Maja; Strömberg, Jessica; Ragagnin, Gianna; Doverskog, Magnus; Bäckström, Torbjörn

    2016-06-01

    GABAA receptor modulating steroid antagonists (GAMSA) selectively inhibit neurosteroid-mediated enhancement of GABA-evoked currents at the GABAA receptor. 3α-hydroxy-neurosteroids, notably allopregnanolone and tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC), potentiate GABAA receptor-mediated currents. On the contrary, various 3β-hydroxy-steroids antagonize this positive neurosteroid-mediated modulation. Importantly, GAMSAs are specific antagonists of the positive neurosteroid-modulation of the receptor and do not inhibit GABA-evoked currents. Allopregnanolone and THDOC have both negative and positive actions. Allopregnanolone can impair encoding/consolidation and retrieval of memories. Chronic administration of a physiological allopregnanolone concentration reduces cognition in mice models of Alzheimer's disease. In humans an allopregnanolone challenge impairs episodic memory and in hepatic encephalopathy cognitive deficits are accompanied by increased brain ammonia and allopregnanolone. Hippocampal slices react in vitro to ammonia by allopregnanolone synthesis in CA1 neurons, which blocks long-term potentiation (LTP). Thus, allopregnanolone may impair learning and memory by interfering with hippocampal LTP. Contrary, pharmacological treatment with allopregnanolone can promote neurogenesis and positively influence learning and memory of trace eye-blink conditioning in mice. In rat the GAMSA UC1011 inhibits an allopregnanolone-induced learning impairment and the GAMSA GR3027 restores learning and motor coordination in rats with hepatic encephalopathy. In addition, the GAMSA isoallopregnanolone antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia in rats, and in humans it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced sedation and reductions in saccadic eye velocity. 17PA is also an effective GAMSA in vivo, as it antagonizes allopregnanolone-induced anesthesia and spinal analgesia in rats. In vitro the allopregnanolone/THDOC-increased GABA-mediated GABAA receptor activity is antagonized

  3. Toxicological Differences Between NMDA Receptor Antagonists and Cholinesterase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaodong; Lin, Xiaotian; Hu, Rui; Sun, Nan; Hao, Jingru; Gao, Can

    2016-08-01

    Cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs), represented by donepezil, rivastigmine, and galantamine, used to be the only approved class of drugs for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. After the approval of memantine by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been recognized by authorities and broadly used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Along with complementary mechanisms of action, NMDA antagonists and ChEIs differ not only in therapeutic effects but also in adverse reactions, which is an important consideration in clinical drug use. And the number of patients using NMDA antagonists and ChEIs concomitantly has increased, making the matter more complicated. Here we used the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System for statistical analysis , in order to compare the adverse events of memantine and ChEIs. In general, the clinical evidence confirmed the safety advantages of memantine over ChEIs, reiterating the precautions of clinical drug use and the future direction of antidementia drug development. PMID:26769920

  4. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist gene therapy for arthritis.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, B R

    1999-08-01

    Rheumtatoid arthritis (RA) is a crippling, autoimmune disease, and is characterized by inflammation and destruction of joint tissue. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) has been identified as a key pro-inflammatory cytokine responsible for inflammation. One of the mechanisms of regulation of activity of IL-1 is IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra)-mediated: IL-1RA competes with IL-1 for binding to the IL-1 receptor. Significant progress has been made in the potential application of IL-1ra gene therapyfor the treatment of arthritis. Various vectors have been tested for the delivery of the IL-1ra gene to the intra-articular region. Recent studies in humans have provided encouraging prospects for IL-1ra-mediated arthritis gene therapy. PMID:11713759

  5. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists in Preventing Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng; Zhang, Hao; Du, Bo-Xiang; Xu, Feng-Ying; Zou, Zui; Sui, Bo; Shi, Xue-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Newly developed neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) antagonists have been recently tried in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). This systematic review and meta-analysis was conducted to explore whether NK-1R antagonists were effective in preventing PONV. The PRISMA statement guidelines were followed. Randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that tested the preventive effects of NK-1R antagonists on PONV were identified by searching EMBASE, CINAHL, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library databases followed by screening. Data extraction was performed using a predefined form and trial quality was assessed using a modified Jadad scale. The primary outcome measure was the incidence of PONV. Meta-analysis was performed for studies using similar interventions. Network meta-analysis (NMA) was conducted to compare the anti-vomiting effects of placebo, ondansetron, and aprepitant at different doses. Fourteen RCTs were included. Meta-analysis found that 80 mg of aprepitant could reduce the incidences of nausea (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled risk ratio (RR) = 0.60, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.47 to 0.75), and vomiting (3 RCTs with 224 patients, pooled RR = 0.13, 95% CI = 0.04 to 0.37) compared with placebo. Neither 40 mg (3 RCTs with 1171 patients, RR = 0.47, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.60) nor 125 mg (2 RCTs with 1058 patients, RR = 0.32, 95% CI = 0.13 to 0.78) of aprepitant showed superiority over 4 mg of ondansetron in preventing postoperative vomiting. NMA did not find a dose-dependent effect of aprepitant on preventing postoperative vomiting. Limited data suggested that NK-1R antagonists, especially aprepitant were effective in preventing PONV compared with placebo. More large-sampled high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25984662

  6. Evodiamine as a novel antagonist of aryl hydrocarbon receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Hui; Tu, Yongjiu; Zhang, Chun; Fan, Xia; Wang, Xi; Wang, Zhanli; Liang, Huaping

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Evodiamine interacted with the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine inhibited the specific binding of [{sup 3}H]-TCDD to the AhR. {yields} Evodiamine acts as an antagonist of the AhR. -- Abstract: Evodiamine, the major bioactive alkaloid isolated from Wu-Chu-Yu, has been shown to interact with a wide variety of proteins and modify their expression and activities. In this study, we investigated the interaction between evodiamine and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR). Molecular modeling results revealed that evodiamine directly interacted with the AhR. Cytosolic receptor binding assay also provided the evidence that evodiamine could interact with the AhR with the K{sub i} value of 28.4 {+-} 4.9 nM. In addition, we observed that evodiamine suppressed the 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) induced nuclear translocation of the AhR and the expression of CYP1A1 dose-dependently. These results suggested that evodiamine was able to bind to the AhR as ligand and exhibit antagonistic effects.

  7. 3D pharmacophore models for thromboxane A(2) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Liu, Yixi; Wang, Songqing

    2009-10-01

    Thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) is an endogenous arachidonic acid derivative closely correlated to thrombosis and other cardiovascular diseases. The action of TXA(2) can be effectively inhibited with TXA(2) receptor antagonists (TXRAs). Previous studies have attempted to describe the interactions between the TXA(2) receptor and its ligands, but their conclusions are still controversial. In this study, ligand-based computational drug design is used as a new and effective way to investigate the structure-activity relationship of TXRAs. Three-dimensional pharmacophore models of TXRAs were built with HypoGenRefine and HipHop modules in CATALYST software. The optimal HypoGenRefine model was developed on the basis of 25 TXRAs. It consists of two hydrophobic groups, one aromatic ring, one hydrogen-bond acceptor and four excluded volumes. The optimal HipHop model contains two hydrophobic groups and two hydrogen-bond acceptors. These models describe the key structure-activity relationship of TXRAs, can predict their activities, and can thus be used to design novel antagonists. PMID:19263096

  8. Differential effect of glucocorticoid receptor antagonists on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Spiga, Francesca; Knight, David M; Droste, Susanne K; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Kershaw, Yvonne; MacSweeney, Cliona P; Thomson, Fiona J; Craighead, Mark; Peeters, Bernard WMM; Lightman, Stafford L

    2016-01-01

    The effects of RU486 and S-P, a more selective glucocorticoid receptor antagonist from Schering-Plough, were investigated on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding. In the in vitro study, AtT20 cells were treated with vehicle or with RU486, S-P or corticosterone (3–300 nM) or co-treated with vehicle or glucocorticoid receptor antagonists (3–300 nM) and 30 nM corticosterone. Both glucocorticoid receptor antagonists induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation but only RU486 induced DNA binding. RU486 potentiated the effect of corticosterone on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation and DNA binding, S-P inhibited corticosterone-induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation, but not glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding. In the in vivo study, adrenalectomized rats were treated with vehicle, RU486 (20 mg/kg) and S-P (50 mg/kg) alone or in combination with corticosterone (3 mg/kg). RU486 induced glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation in the pituitary, hippocampus and prefrontal cortex and glucocorticoid receptor-DNA binding in the hippocampus, whereas no effect of S-P on glucocorticoid receptor nuclear translocation or DNA binding was observed in any of the areas analysed. These findings reveal differential effects of RU486 and S-P on areas involved in regulation of hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis activity in vivo and they are important in light of the potential use of this class of compounds in the treatment of disorders associated with hyperactivity of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis. PMID:20093322

  9. N-Benzylpiperidine Derivatives as α7 Nicotinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Criado, Manuel; Mulet, José; Sala, Francisco; Sala, Salvador; Colmena, Inés; Gandía, Luis; Bautista-Aguilera, Oscar M; Samadi, Abdelouahid; Chioua, Mourad; Marco-Contelles, José

    2016-08-17

    A series of multitarget directed propargylamines, as well as other differently susbstituted piperidines have been screened as potential modulators of neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Most of them showed antagonist actions on α7 nAChRs. Especially, compounds 13, 26, and 38 displayed submicromolar IC50 values on homomeric α7 nAChRs, whereas they were less effective on heteromeric α3β4 and α4β2 nAChRs (up to 20-fold higher IC50 values in the case of 13). Antagonism was concentration dependent and noncompetitive, suggesting that these compounds behave as negative allosteric modulators of nAChRs. Upon the study of a series of less complex derivatives, the N-benzylpiperidine motif, common to these compounds, was found to be the main pharmacophoric group. Thus, 2-(1-benzylpiperidin-4-yl)-ethylamine (48) showed an inhibitory potency comparable to the one of the previous compounds and also a clear preference for α7 nAChRs. In a neuroblastoma cell line, representative compounds 13 and 48 also inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, cytosolic Ca(2+) signals mediated by nAChRs. Finally, compounds 38 and 13 inhibited 5-HT3A serotonin receptors whereas they had no effect on α1 glycine receptors. Given the multifactorial nature of many pathologies in which nAChRs are involved, these piperidine antagonists could have a therapeutic potential in cases where cholinergic activity has to be negatively modulated. PMID:27254782

  10. Orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutic agents for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Equihua, Ana C.; De La Herrán-Arita, Alberto K.; Drucker-Colin, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Insomnia is a common clinical condition characterized by difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep, or non-restorative sleep with impairment of daytime functioning. Currently, treatment for insomnia involves a combination of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTi) and pharmacological therapy. Among pharmacological interventions, the most evidence exists for benzodiazepine (BZD) receptor agonist drugs (GABAA receptor), although concerns persist regarding their safety and their limited efficacy. The use of these hypnotic medications must be carefully monitored for adverse effects. Orexin (hypocretin) neuropeptides have been shown to regulate transitions between wakefulness and sleep by promoting cholinergic/monoaminergic neural pathways. This has led to the development of a new class of pharmacological agents that antagonize the physiological effects of orexin. The development of these agents may lead to novel therapies for insomnia without the side effect profile of hypnotics (e.g., impaired cognition, disturbed arousal, and motor balance difficulties). However, antagonizing a system that regulates the sleep-wake cycle may create an entirely different side effect profile. In this review, we discuss the role of orexin and its receptors on the sleep-wake cycle and that of orexin antagonists in the treatment of insomnia. PMID:24416019

  11. NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine impairs feature integration in visual perception.

    PubMed

    Meuwese, Julia D I; van Loon, Anouk M; Scholte, H Steven; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Lamme, Victor A F

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans. PMID:24223927

  12. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine Impairs Feature Integration in Visual Perception

    PubMed Central

    Meuwese, Julia D. I.; van Loon, Anouk M.; Scholte, H. Steven; Lirk, Philipp B.; Vulink, Nienke C. C.; Hollmann, Markus W.; Lamme, Victor A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent interactions between neurons in the visual cortex are crucial for the integration of image elements into coherent objects, such as in figure-ground segregation of textured images. Blocking N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in monkeys can abolish neural signals related to figure-ground segregation and feature integration. However, it is unknown whether this also affects perceptual integration itself. Therefore, we tested whether ketamine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, reduces feature integration in humans. We administered a subanesthetic dose of ketamine to healthy subjects who performed a texture discrimination task in a placebo-controlled double blind within-subject design. We found that ketamine significantly impaired performance on the texture discrimination task compared to the placebo condition, while performance on a control fixation task was much less impaired. This effect is not merely due to task difficulty or a difference in sedation levels. We are the first to show a behavioral effect on feature integration by manipulating the NMDA receptor in humans. PMID:24223927

  13. Substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines as selective antagonists for the orexin 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Perrey, David A; German, Nadezhda A; Gilmour, Brian P; Li, Jun-Xu; Harris, Danni L; Thomas, Brian F; Zhang, Yanan

    2013-09-12

    Increasing evidence implicates the orexin 1 (OX1) receptor in reward processes, suggesting OX1 antagonism could be therapeutic in drug addiction. In a program to develop an OX1 selective antagonist, we designed and synthesized a series of substituted tetrahydroisoquinolines and determined their potency in OX1 and OX2 calcium mobilization assays. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies revealed limited steric tolerance and a preference for electron deficiency at the 7-position. Pyridylmethyl groups were shown to be optimal for activity at the acetamide position. Computational studies resulted in a pharmacophore model and confirmed the SAR results. Compound 72 significantly attenuated the development of place preference for cocaine in rats. PMID:23941044

  14. [Treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension: endothelin-receptor antagonists].

    PubMed

    Hoeper, M M

    2006-12-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is of significance in the pathophysiology and prognosis of pulmonary hypertension (PHT). Bosentan, an endothelin-receptor antagonist, currently plays a central role in the treatment of PHT, because it improves exercise capacity, hemodynamics, clinical symptoms and right ventricular function, achieving a survival duration of 2- 3 years. Bosentan causes an increase of transaminases in about 10% of patients, but this effect is reversible on dosage reduction or discontinuing the medication. However, transaminases should be measured every 4 weeks while patients are on bosentan. Almost all current guidelines list bosentan as of equal value to sildenafil or prostacyclin analogues in the first-line treatment of patients in NYHA functional class III and also, with narrower indications, of those in class IV. PMID:17139593

  15. Bone Mineral Density Changes Among Women Initiating Proton Pump Inhibitors or H2 Receptor Antagonists: A SWAN Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Daniel H; Diem, Susan J; Ruppert, Kristine; Juan Lian, Yin; Liu, Chih-Chin; Wohlfart, Alyssa; Greendale, Gail A; Finkelstein, Joel S

    2015-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been associated with diminished bone mineral density (BMD) and an increased risk of fracture; however, prior studies have not yielded consistent results, and many have suboptimal ascertainment of both PPI use and BMD. We used data from the Study of Women’s Health Across the Nation (SWAN), a multicenter, multi-ethnic, community-based longitudinal cohort study of women across the menopause transition to examine the association between annualized BMD changes and new use of PPIs. We compared changes in BMD in new PPI users with changes in BMD in new users of histamine 2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) and with changes in BMD in subjects who did not use either class of medications. Mixed linear regression models included recognized risk factors for osteoporosis, including demographics, menopausal transition stage, body mass index (BMI), lifestyle factors, as well as comorbidities and concomitant medications. To provide further evidence for the validity of our analytic approach, we also examined the effects of hormone-replacement therapy (HT), a class of medications that should reduce bone loss, on changes in BMD as an internal positive control group. We identified 207 new users of PPIs, 185 new users of H2RAs, and 1,676 non-users. Study subjects had a mean age of 50 years and were followed for a median of 9.9 years. Adjusted models found no difference in the annualized BMD change at the lumbar spine, femoral neck, or total hip in PPI users compared with H2RA users or non-users. These results were robust to sensitivity analyses. BMD increased as expected in HT users, supporting the validity of our study design. These longitudinal analyses plus similar prior studies argue against an association between PPI use and BMD loss. PMID:25156141

  16. Adenosine receptor antagonist and augmented vasodilation during hypoxic exercise.

    PubMed

    Casey, Darren P; Madery, Brandon D; Pike, Tasha L; Eisenach, John H; Dietz, Niki M; Joyner, Michael J; Wilkins, Brad W

    2009-10-01

    We tested the hypothesis that adenosine contributes to augmented skeletal muscle vasodilation during hypoxic exercise. In separate protocols, subjects performed incremental rhythmic forearm exercise (10% and 20% of maximum) during normoxia and normocapnic hypoxia (80% arterial O2 saturation). In protocol 1 (n = 8), subjects received an intra-arterial administration of saline (control) and aminophylline (adenosine receptor antagonist). In protocol 2 (n = 10), subjects received intra-arterial phentolamine (alpha-adrenoceptor antagonist) and combined phentolamine and aminophylline administration. Forearm vascular conductance (FVC; in ml x min(-1).100 mmHg(-1)) was calculated from forearm blood flow (in ml/min) and blood pressure (in mmHg). In protocol 1, the change in FVC (DeltaFVC; change from normoxic baseline) during hypoxic exercise with saline was 172 +/- 29 and 314 +/- 34 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20%, respectively). Aminophylline administration did not affect DeltaFVC during hypoxic exercise at 10% (190 +/- 29 ml x min(-1)x100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.4) or 20% (287 +/- 48 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.3). In protocol 2, DeltaFVC due to hypoxic exercise with phentolamine infusion was 313 +/- 30 and 453 +/- 41 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1) (10% and 20% respectively). DeltaFVC was similar at 10% (352 +/- 39 ml min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.8) and 20% (528 +/- 45 ml x min(-1) x 100 mmHg(-1), P = 0.2) hypoxic exercise with combined phentolamine and aminophylline. In contrast, DeltaFVC to exogenous adenosine was reduced by aminophylline administration in both protocols (P < 0.05 for both). These observations suggest that adenosine receptor activation is not obligatory for the augmented hyperemia during hypoxic exercise in humans. PMID:19661449

  17. Prostaglandins, H2-receptor antagonists and peptic ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Bright-Asare, P; Habte, T; Yirgou, B; Benjamin, J

    1988-01-01

    Peptic ulcer develops when offensive factors overwhelm defensive processes in the gastroduodenal mucosa. Offensive factors include NSAIDs, hydrochloric acid-peptic activity, bile reflux, and some products of the lipoxygenase pathway such as leukotriene B4; whereas defensive processes are largely mediated by prostaglandins through poorly understood mechanisms uniformly termed cytoprotection. Cytoprotection, a physiological process working through the products of arachidonic acid metabolism, may result from the net effect of the protective actions of prostaglandins versus the damaging actions of leukotrienes. Some prostaglandins also have antisecretory effects. Therefore the peptic ulcer healing effects of prostaglandin analogues, all of which have significant antisecretory activity, may be more due to their antisecretory effects than primarily to their effects on mucosal defences. Certain drug-induced gastroduodenal lesions, e.g. NSAID-induced ulcers, which are often unresponsive to H2-receptor antagonists, have been healed and their recurrence prevented by the use of PGE1 and PGE2 analogues. All the prostaglandin analogues investigated to date in humans have the potential for inducing abortion, an important side effect which may limit their worldwide use. The optimal prostaglandin analogue for ulcer healing should not induce abortion and should be potently cytoprotective. The predominant damaging agent in the development of peptic ulcer disease is gastric hydrochloric acid. Thus, the worldwide established efficacy and safety of H2-receptor antagonists such as cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine and most recently of roxatidine acetate suggest that these agents have become the standard by which other forms of anti-ulcer therapy should be judged. PMID:2905237

  18. Expression of histamine H4 receptor in human epidermal tissues and attenuation of experimental pruritus using H4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Yamaura, Katsunori; Oda, Manabu; Suwa, Eriko; Suzuki, Masahiko; Sato, Hiromi; Ueno, Koichi

    2009-10-01

    Many medicines exist which can cause pruritus (itching) as "serious adverse events." Many severe pruritic conditions respond poorly to histamine H1 receptor antagonists; there is no generally accepted antipruritic treatment. Recently described histamine H4 receptors are expressed in haematopoietic cells and have been linked to the pathology of allergy and asthma. We previously reported their expression in human dermal fibroblasts; in this study we have investigated H4 receptor expression in human epidermal tissue and found it to be greater in keratinocytes in the epidermal upper layer than in the lower layer. We have also investigated the effect of histamine H4 receptor antagonists on histamine H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus using a mouse model. Scratching behavior was induced by histamine (300 nmol) or substance P (100 nmol) injected intradermally into the rostral part of the back of each mouse. Fexofenadine, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, reduced scratching induced by histamine but not by substance P, whereas JNJ7777120, a histamine H4 receptor antagonist, significantly reduced both histamine- and substance P-induced scratching. These results suggest that H4 receptor antagonists may be useful for treatment of H1 receptor antagonist-resistant pruritus. PMID:19652466

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists but not NMDA antagonists affect conditioned taste aversion acquisition in the parabrachial nucleus of rats.

    PubMed

    Vales, Karel; Zach, Petr; Bielavska, Edita

    2006-02-01

    The effect of glutamate receptor antagonists on conditioned taste aversion (CTA) was studied in rats. The association of the short-term memory of a gustatory conditioned stimulus (CS) with visceral malaise (unconditioned stimulus, US) in the CTA paradigm takes place in the parabrachial nuclei (PBN) of the brainstem. The first direct evidence of participation of glutamatergic neurotransmission in the PBN during CTA demonstrated that the extracellular level of glutamate rises during saccharin drinking (Bielavska et al. in Brain Res 887:413-417, 2000). Our results show an effect of microdialysis administration of selective GluR antagonists into the PBN on the formation of CTA engram. We used four glutamate receptor (GluR) antagonists of different types (D-AP5, MK-801 as antagonists of ionotropic GluR and L-AP3, MSPG as antagonists of metabotropic GluR). The disruptive effect of MK-801 on CTA formation in the PBN is concentration-dependent, with the greatest inhibition under the higher concentrations eliciting significant disruption. The application of D-AP5 (0.1, 1, 5 mM) did not elicit a statistically significant blockade of CTA acquisition. This indicates that the association of the US-CS in the PBN is not dependent on NMDA receptors. On the contrary, application of L-AP3 (0.1, 1, 5 mM) blocked the CS-US association. PMID:16273405

  20. Adenosine receptor agonists attenuate and adenosine receptor antagonists exacerbate opiate withdrawal signs.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G B; Sears, M T

    1996-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated a role for adenosine in mediating opiate effects. Adenosine receptors and their functions have been shown to be regulated by chronic opiate treatment. This study examines the role of adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal behaviors. The effects of single doses of parenterally administered adenosine receptor subtype-selective agonists and antagonists on opiate withdrawal signs in morphine-dependent mice were measured. Mice received subcutaneous morphine pellet treatment for 72 h and then underwent naloxone-precipitated withdrawal after pretreatment with adenosinergic agents. Adenosine agonists attenuated different opiate withdrawal signs. The A1 agonist R-N6(phenylisopropyl)adenosine (0, 0.01, 0.02 mg/kg, IP) significantly reduced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea, while the A2a-selective agonist 2-p-(2-carboxethyl)phenylethylamino-5'-N-ethylcarboxamido adenosine or CGS 21680 (0, 0.01, 0.05 mg/kg, IP) significantly inhibited teeth chattering and forepaw treads. Adenosine receptor antagonists enhanced different opiate withdrawal signs. The adenosine A1 antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-cyclopentylxanthine (0, 1, 10 mg/kg, IP) significantly increased weight loss and the A2 antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (0, 1 and 10 mg/kg, IP) enhanced wet dog shakes and withdrawal diarrhea. Treatment effects of adenosinergic agents were not due to nonspecific motor effects, as demonstrated by activity monitoring studies. These results support a role for adenosine receptors in the expression of opiate withdrawal and suggest the potential utility of adenosine agonists in its treatment. PMID:8741956

  1. Dihydromorphine-peptide hybrids with delta receptor agonistic and mu receptor antagonistic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.B.; Medzihradsky, F.; Woods, J.H.

    1986-03-05

    The actions of two morphine derivatives with short peptide side chains were evaluated upon the contraction of the isolated mouse vas deferens and upon displacement of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat brain membranes. NIH-9833 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl) was a potent agonist upon the vas deferens. Its EC50 for inhibition of the twitch was 1.2 +/- 0.1 nM. Both naltrexone (10/sup -7/ M) a relatively nonselective opioid antagonist, and ICI-174864 (10/sup -/' M) a highly selective delta receptor antagonist, blocked the actions of NIH-9833 which indicates that this drug is a delta receptor agonist. In contrast, NIH-9835 (N-(6,14-endoetheno-7,8-dihydromorphine-7-alpha-carbonyl)-L-glycyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-leucine ethyl ester HCl), which differs from NIH-9835 by the presence of a single amino acid residue, was devoid of opioid agonistic activity but was a potent antagonist of the inhibitory actions on the vas deferens of morphine and sufentanil. NIH-9833 and NIH-9835 were potent displacers of /sup 3/H-etorphine from rat cerebral membranes with EC50's of 0.58 nM and 1.7 nM, respectively. The observation that addition of a single glycyl group changes a dihydromorphine-peptide analog from a potent delta receptor agonist to an equally potent mu receptor antagonist suggests that the two receptor sites might be structurally quite similar.

  2. Vasopressin receptor antagonists and their role in clinical medicine

    PubMed Central

    Narayen, Girish; Mandal, Surya Narayan

    2012-01-01

    Hyponatremia is the most common electrolyte abnormality in hospitalized patients. Its treatment is based not only on extracellular fluid volume status of patients but also on its pathogenetic mechanisms. Conventional treatment of hyponatremia like fluid restriction, which is useful in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremia, has very poor patient compliance over long term. Vasopressin receptor antagonists (Vaptans) are a new group of nonpeptide drugs which have been used in various clinical conditions with limited success. Whereas conivaptan is to be administered intravenously, the other vaptans like tolvaptan, lixivaptan, and satavaptan are effective as oral medication. They produce aquaresis by their action on vasopressin type 2 (V2R) receptors in the collecting duct and thus increase solute free water excretion. Vaptans are being used as an alternative to fluid restriction in euvolemic and hypervolemic hyponatremic patients. Efficacy of vaptans is now well accepted for management of correction of hyponatremia over a short period. However, its efficacy in improving the long-term morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic hyponatremia due to cirrhosis and heart failure is yet to be established. Vaptans have not become the mainstay treatment of hyponatremia yet. PMID:22470853

  3. CGRP Receptor Antagonists in the Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    Durham, Paul L.; Vause, Carrie V.

    2011-01-01

    Based on preclinical and clinical studies, the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is proposed to play a central role in the underlying pathology of migraine. CGRP and its receptor are widely expressed in both the peripheral and central nervous system by multiple cell types involved in the regulation of inflammatory and nociceptive responses. Peripheral release of CGRP from trigeminal nerve fibers within the dura and from the cell body of trigeminal ganglion neurons is likely to contribute to peripheral sensitization of trigeminal nociceptors. Similarly, the release of CGRP within the trigeminal nucleus caudalis can facilitate activation of nociceptive second order neurons and glial cells. Thus, CGRP is involved in the development and maintenance of persistent pain, central sensitization, and allodynia, events characteristic of migraine pathology. In contrast, CGRP release within the brain is likely to function in an anti-nociceptive capacity. This review will focus on the development and clinical data on CGRP receptor antagonists as well as discussing their potential roles in migraine therapy via modulation of multiple cell types within the peripheral and central nervous systems. PMID:20433208

  4. Angiotensin II receptor blockade in normotensive subjects: A direct comparison of three AT1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mazzolai, L; Maillard, M; Rossat, J; Nussberger, J; Brunner, H R; Burnier, M

    1999-03-01

    Use of angiotensin (Ang) II AT1 receptor antagonists for treatment of hypertension is rapidly increasing, yet direct comparisons of the relative efficacy of antagonists to block the renin-angiotensin system in humans are lacking. In this study, the Ang II receptor blockade induced by the recommended starting dose of 3 antagonists was evaluated in normotensive subjects in a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, 4-way crossover study. At 1-week intervals, 12 subjects received a single dose of losartan (50 mg), valsartan (80 mg), irbesartan (150 mg), or placebo. Blockade of the renin-angiotensin system was assessed before and 4, 24, and 30 hours after drug intake by 3 independent methods: inhibition of the blood pressure response to exogenous Ang II, in vitro Ang II receptor assay, and reactive changes in plasma Ang II levels. At 4 hours, losartan blocked 43% of the Ang II-induced systolic blood pressure increase; valsartan, 51%; and irbesartan, 88% (P<0.01 between drugs). The effect of each drug declined with time. At 24 hours, a residual effect was found with all 3 drugs, but at 30 hours, only irbesartan induced a marked, significant blockade versus placebo. Similar results were obtained when Ang II receptor blockade was assessed with an in vitro receptor assay and by the reactive rise in plasma Ang II levels. This study thus demonstrates that the first administration of the recommended starting dose of irbesartan induces a greater and longer lasting Ang II receptor blockade than that of valsartan and losartan in normotensive subjects. PMID:10082498

  5. Biomolecular recognition of antagonists by α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor: Antagonistic mechanism and structure-activity relationships studies.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei

    2015-08-30

    As the key constituent of ligand-gated ion channels in the central nervous system, nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and neurodegenerative diseases are strongly coupled in the human species. In recently years the developments of selective agonists by using nAChRs as the drug target have made a large progress, but the studies of selective antagonists are severely lacked. Currently these antagonists rest mainly on the extraction of partly natural products from some animals and plants; however, the production of these crude substances is quite restricted, and artificial synthesis of nAChR antagonists is still one of the completely new research fields. In the context of this manuscript, our primary objective was to comprehensively analyze the recognition patterns and the critical interaction descriptors between target α7 nAChR and a series of the novel compounds with potentially antagonistic activity by means of virtual screening, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation, and meanwhile these recognition reactions were also compared with the biointeraction of α7 nAChR with a commercially natural antagonist - methyllycaconitine. The results suggested clearly that there are relatively obvious differences of molecular structures between synthetic antagonists and methyllycaconitine, while the two systems have similar recognition modes on the whole. The interaction energy and the crucially noncovalent forces of the α7 nAChR-antagonists are ascertained according to the method of Molecular Mechanics/Generalized Born Surface Area. Several amino acid residues, such as B/Tyr-93, B/Lys-143, B/Trp-147, B/Tyr-188, B/Tyr-195, A/Trp-55 and A/Leu-118 played a major role in the α7 nAChR-antagonist recognition processes, in particular, residues B/Tyr-93, B/Trp-147 and B/Tyr-188 are the most important. These outcomes tally satisfactorily with the discussions of amino acid mutations. Based on the explorations of three-dimensional quantitative structure

  6. Antagonist of prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 induces metabolic alterations in liver of mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Limin; An, Yanpeng; Zhang, Lulu; Song, Yipeng; Wang, Yulan; Tang, Huiru

    2015-03-01

    Prostaglandin E2 receptor 4 (EP4) is one of the receptors for prostaglandin E2 and plays important roles in various biological functions. EP4 antagonists have been used as anti-inflammatory drugs. To investigate the effects of an EP4 antagonist (L-161982) on the endogenous metabolism in a holistic manner, we employed a mouse model, and obtained metabolic and transcriptomic profiles of multiple biological matrixes, including serum, liver, and urine of mice with and without EP4 antagonist (L-161982) exposure. We found that this EP4 antagonist caused significant changes in fatty acid metabolism, choline metabolism, and nucleotide metabolism. EP4 antagonist exposure also induced oxidative stress to mice. Our research is the first of its kind to report information on the alteration of metabolism associated with an EP4 antagonist. This information could further our understanding of current and new biological functions of EP4. PMID:25669961

  7. Stilbenes as κ-Selective, Non-nitrogenous Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The natural stilbene pawhuskin A has been shown to function as an opioid receptor antagonist, with preferential binding to the κ receptor. This finding encouraged assembly of a set of analogues to probe the importance of key structural features. Assays on these compounds determined that one (compound 29) shows potent opioid receptor binding activity and significantly improved selectivity for the κ receptor. These studies begin to illuminate the structural features of these non-nitrogenous opioid receptor antagonists that are required for activity. PMID:24456556

  8. Chromatographic resolution of angiotensin II receptor antagonists (sartans).

    PubMed

    Tahir, Muhammad Saqlain; Adnan, Ahmad; Syed, Quratulain

    2016-08-01

    First time a simple, sensitive and unified quantification method has been developed to analyze the complete class of angiotensin II receptor antagonists which are used in the treatment of hypertension either alone or in combination with some other drugs. The most important advantage of developed method was that the eight separate drugs can be determined on a single chromatographic system without modifications in detection wavelength and mobile phase. The drugs were separated on a Purospher Star 4.6mm×25cm, 5μm, C18 column maintained at 40°C with 1mLmin(-1) flow rate using ultra violet detection at 254nm. Good separation (Rs>2.0) was achieved in a short analysis allowing simultaneous determination of all eight sartans. The effect of variation in flow rate, detection wavelength and column oven temperature was also studied. The proposed method was statistically validated in terms of precision, accuracy, linearity, specificity and robustness. The newly developed method proved to be specific, robust and accurate for the quantification of eight sartans in commercial pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:27258943

  9. Leukotriene receptor antagonists for chronic urticaria: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of patients with chronic urticaria respond inadequately to first line treatment with antihistamines. Leukotreine receptor antagonists (LTRA) are also used for chronic urticaria, although firm recommendations on their use are lacking. We performed a systematic review of randomised trials to determine the role of LTRA in treatment of chronic urticaria. A search of PUBMED, EMBASE, SCOPUS, LILACS, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and the Web of Science for relevant randomized control trials or cross over studies yielded 10 eligible studies. The heterogeneity of trials were high, preventing valid meta-analysis of data. Most trials indicated that LTRA are not superior to placebo or antihistamine therapy, while combination therapy of LTRA and antihistamines appear to be more efficacious compared to antihistamine alone. The side effect profile and tolerability of this group of drugs is acceptable. The use of LTRA as monotherapy cannot be recommended. LTRA are effective add-on therapy to anti-histamines, and their use in patients responding poorly to antihistamines is justifiable. Further well designed randomized controlled trials with clear and standardized outcome measures are needed to determine the role of LTRA in chronic urticaria. PMID:24817895

  10. Side Effects of Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Semiha Bahceci; Nacaroglu, Hikmet Tekin; Unsal Karkiner, Canan Sule; Gunay, Ilker; Can, Demet

    2015-01-01

    Background: Leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) are drugs which have been widely used more than ten years. As the use of LTRAs increases, our knowledge with respect to their side effects increases as well. Objectives: The objective of our study was to evaluat the observed side effects of LTRAs used in patients with astma. Patients and Methods: 1024 patients treated only with LTRAs owing to asthma or early wheezing were included in the study for a five-year period. The observed side effects of LTRAs in these patients were retrospectively investigated. The side effects were divided into two parts as psychiatric and non-psychiatric. Results: Among the 1024 cases included in the study, 67.5% of the patients out of 41 with side effects were male, 32.5% were female and the average age was 6.5 years. The rate of patients with asthma was 63.41% and 36.58% of the patients had early wheezing. It was determined that sex, age and diagnosis (early wheezing or asthma) of the patients were ineffective in the emergence of side effects. The average period for the emergence of side effects was the first month. It was observed that hyperactivity was the most frequently observed psychiatric side effect and that abdominal pain was the non-psychiatric side effect. Conclusions: The side effects of LTRAs were common in children. Therefore, patients must be informed at the beginning of the treatment and they must be evaluated at certain intervals. PMID:26495098

  11. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists Decrease Cancer Risk in Asthma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chang, Wei-An; Hung, Jen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the potential of using cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) for chemoprevention, but this has not been investigated in any clinical setting. We therefore investigated the chemopreventive effect of LTRAs in a nationwide population-based study. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we enrolled adults with newly-diagnosed asthma between 2001 and 2011. Among these patients, each LTRA user was matched with five randomly-selected LTRA non-users by sex, age, asthma diagnostic year and modified Charlson Comorbidity Index score. We considered the development of cancer as the outcome. Totally, 4185 LTRA users and 20925 LTRA non-users were identified. LTRA users had a significantly lower cancer incidence rate than LTRA non-users did. Multivariable Cox regression analyses adjusting for baseline characteristics and comorbidities showed LTRA use was an independent protecting factor (hazard ratio = 0.31 [95% CI: 0.24–0.39]), and cancer risk decreased progressively with higher cumulative dose of LTRAs. In conclusion, this study revealed that the LTRA use decreased cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner in asthma patients. The chemopreventive effect of LTRAs deserves further study. PMID:27052782

  12. Applicability of DPI formulations for novel neurokinin receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kumon, M; Yabe, Y; Kasuya, Y; Suzuki, M; Kusai, A; Yonemochi, E; Terada, K

    2008-05-22

    A novel triple neurokinin receptor antagonist (TNRA) could have pharmaceutical efficacy for asthma and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. TNRA is potentially developed as inhalation medicine. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the applicability of dry powder inhaler (DPI) formulation for TNRA. DPI formulation containing lactose was used for this feasibility study. Mechanofusion process for surface modification was applied on lactose particles to prepare four different DPI formulations. The mixture of TNRA and lactose was administered to rats intratracheally using an insufflator. The deposition pattern and blood concentration profile of TNRA were evaluated. Although there was no significant difference in deposition on deep lungs between the four formulations, DPI formulations containing mechanofusion-processed lactose showed longer T(max) and t(1/2) and higher AUC(0-infinity) and MRT compared to that containing intact lactose. On the other hand, the contact angle measurement showed that the mechanofusion process decreased the polar part of the surface energy of the lactose. Therefore, the prolongation of the wetting of the formulated powder mixture seemed to delay the dissolution of TNRA deposited in respiratory tract. It was concluded that DPI formulation containing mechanofusion-processed lactose could be suitable for inhalation of TNRA. PMID:18294787

  13. Bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Moa Andresen; Isin, Emre M; Castagnoli, Neal; Milne, Claire E

    2011-10-01

    In the present work, the characterization of the biotransformation and bioactivation pathways of the cannabinoid receptor 1 antagonist rimonabant (Acomplia) is described. Rimonabant was approved in Europe in 2006 for the treatment of obesity but was withdrawn in 2008 because of a significant drug-related risk of serious psychiatric disorders. The aim of the present work is to characterize the biotransformation and potential bioactivation pathways of rimonabant in vitro in human and rat liver microsomes. The observation of a major iminium ion metabolite led us to perform reactive metabolite trapping, covalent binding to proteins, and time-dependent inhibition of cytochrome P450 3A4 studies. The major biotransformation pathways were oxidative dehydrogenation of the piperidinyl ring to an iminium ion, hydroxylation of the 3 position of the piperidinyl ring, and cleavage of the amide linkage. In coincubations with potassium cyanide, three cyanide adducts were detected. A high level of covalent binding of rimonabant in human liver microsomes was observed (920 pmol equivalents/mg protein). In coincubations with potassium cyanide and methoxylamine, the covalent binding was reduced by approximately 40 and 30%, respectively, whereas GSH had no significant effect on covalent binding levels. Rimonabant was also found to inhibit cytochrome P450 3A4 irreversibly in a time-dependent manner. In view of these findings, it is noteworthy that, to date, no toxicity findings related to the formation of reactive metabolites from rimonabant have been reported. PMID:21733882

  14. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor Antagonists Decrease Cancer Risk in Asthma Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Ju; Wu, Ping-Hsun; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Hsu, Ya-Ling; Chang, Wei-An; Hung, Jen-Yu; Yang, Chih-Jen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Kuo, Po-Lin; Huang, Ming-Shyan

    2016-01-01

    Previous in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated the potential of using cysteinyl leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRAs) for chemoprevention, but this has not been investigated in any clinical setting. We therefore investigated the chemopreventive effect of LTRAs in a nationwide population-based study. From the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database, we enrolled adults with newly-diagnosed asthma between 2001 and 2011. Among these patients, each LTRA user was matched with five randomly-selected LTRA non-users by sex, age, asthma diagnostic year and modified Charlson Comorbidity Index score. We considered the development of cancer as the outcome. Totally, 4185 LTRA users and 20925 LTRA non-users were identified. LTRA users had a significantly lower cancer incidence rate than LTRA non-users did. Multivariable Cox regression analyses adjusting for baseline characteristics and comorbidities showed LTRA use was an independent protecting factor (hazard ratio = 0.31 [95% CI: 0.24-0.39]), and cancer risk decreased progressively with higher cumulative dose of LTRAs. In conclusion, this study revealed that the LTRA use decreased cancer risk in a dose-dependent manner in asthma patients. The chemopreventive effect of LTRAs deserves further study. PMID:27052782

  15. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists for Treatment of Hypertension and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Sica, Domenic A.

    2015-01-01

    Spironolactone and eplerenone are both mineralocorticoid-receptor antagonists. These compounds block both the epithelial and nonepithelial actions of aldosterone, with the latter assuming increasing clinical relevance. Spironolactone and eplerenone both affect reductions in blood pressure either as mono- or add-on therapy; moreover, they each afford survival benefits in diverse circumstances of heart failure and the probability of renal protection in proteinuric chronic kidney disease. However, as use of mineralocorticoid-blocking agents has expanded, the hazards inherent in taking such drugs have become more apparent. Whereas the endocrine side effects of spironolactone are in most cases little more than a cosmetic annoyance, the potassium-sparing effects of both spironolactone and eplerenone can prove disastrous, even fatal, if sufficient degrees of hyperkalemia emerge. For most patients, however, the risk of developing hyperkalemia in and of itself should not discourage the sensible clinician from bringing these compounds into play. Hyperkalemia should always be considered a possibility in patients receiving either of these medications; therefore, anticipatory steps should be taken to minimize the likelihood of its occurrence if long-term therapy of these agents is being considered. PMID:27057293

  16. Prazosin, an alpha 1-adrenergic receptor antagonist, suppresses experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the Lewis rat.

    PubMed Central

    Brosnan, C F; Goldmuntz, E A; Cammer, W; Factor, S M; Bloom, B R; Norton, W T

    1985-01-01

    Prazosin, an antagonist of alpha 1-adrenergic receptors, has been found to suppress the clinical and histological expression of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the Lewis rat. Suppression was more significant in females than in males and was a dose-dependent phenomenon. Analysis of the effect of other adrenergic receptor antagonists supports the conclusion that the suppressive effect of prazosin is a consequence of blockade of the alpha 1-receptor since treatment with either the alpha 2-antagonist yohimbine or the beta-antagonist propranolol exacerbated the disease, whereas treatment with the long-acting mixed alpha 1/alpha 2-antagonist phenoxybenzamine had some suppressive activity. Treatment with prazosin was also able to suppress clinical and histological signs of EAE in animals sensitized by adoptive transfer with activated spleen or lymph node cells. Whether prazosin acts through altering vascular permeability or the immune response, or both, remains to be determined. Images PMID:2994053

  17. Discovery and pharmacological profile of new hydrophilic 5-HT(4) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Brudeli, Bjarne; Navaratnarajah, Mirusha; Andressen, Kjetil Wessel; Manfra, Ornella; Moltzau, Lise Román; Nilsen, Nils Olav; Levy, Finn Olav; Klaveness, Jo

    2014-09-15

    The synthesis and pharmacological data of some new and potent hydrophilic 5-HT4 receptor antagonists are described. Propanediol derivative 25 was identified as a potent antagonist with low affinity for the hERG potassium channel and promising pharmacokinetics. PMID:25149506

  18. Identification of potent CNS-penetrant thiazolidinones as novel CGRP receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pramod; Anderson, Corey; Binch, Hayley; Hadida, Sabine; Yoo, Sanghee; Bergeron, Danielle; Decker, Caroline; terHaar, Ernst; Moore, Jonathan; Garcia-Guzman, Miguel; Termin, Andreas

    2014-02-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in acute migraine pathogenesis. In an effort to identify novel CGRP receptor antagonists for the treatment of migraine, we have discovered thiazolidinone 49, a potent (Ki=30 pM, IC50=1 nM), orally bioavailable, CNS-penetrant CGRP antagonist with good pharmacokinetic properties. PMID:24405707

  19. Discovery of novel non-steroidal reverse indole mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Anthony K; Bunte, Ellen Vande; Mal, Rudrajit; Lan, Ping; Sun, Zhongxiang; Crespo, Alejandro; Wiltsie, Judyann; Clemas, Joseph; Gibson, Jack; Contino, Lisa; Lisnock, JeanMarie; Zhou, Gaochao; Garcia-Calvo, Margarita; Jochnowitz, Nina; Ma, Xiuying; Pan, Yi; Brown, Patricia; Zamlynny, Beata; Bateman, Thomas; Leung, Dennis; Xu, Ling; Tong, Xinchun; Liu, Kun; Crook, Martin; Sinclair, Peter

    2016-06-15

    Reported herein are a series of reverse indoles that represent novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. The key structure-activity relationships (SAR) are presented below. This reverse indole series is exemplified by a compound that demonstrated efficacy in an acute natriuresis rodent model comparable to marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone. PMID:27161805

  20. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor-2 Antagonists: Therapeutic Potential and Potential Risks

    PubMed Central

    Blankenbach, Kira V.; Schwalm, Stephanie; Pfeilschifter, Josef; Meyer zu Heringdorf, Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) signaling system with its specific G-protein-coupled S1P receptors, the enzymes of S1P metabolism and the S1P transporters, offers a multitude of promising targets for drug development. Until today, drug development in this area has nearly exclusively focused on (functional) antagonists at the S1P1 receptor, which cause a unique phenotype of immunomodulation. Accordingly, the first-in class S1P1 receptor modulator, fingolimod, has been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, and novel S1P1 receptor (functional) antagonists are being developed for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, inflammatory bowel disease, lupus erythematodes, or polymyositis. Besides the S1P1 receptor, also S1P2 and S1P3 are widely expressed and regulate many diverse functions throughout the body. The S1P2 receptor, in particular, often exerts cellular functions which are opposed to the functions of the S1P1 receptor. As a consequence, antagonists at the S1P2 receptor have the potential to be useful in a contrasting context and different areas of indication compared to S1P1 antagonists. The present review will focus on the therapeutic potential of S1P2 receptor antagonists and discuss their opportunities as well as their potential risks. Open questions and areas which require further investigations will be emphasized in particular. PMID:27445808

  1. Kynurenic acid amides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Galgóczy, Kornél; Gere, Anikó; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Greiner, István; Domány, György

    2007-01-15

    A novel series of kynurenic acid amides, ring-enlarged derivatives of indole-2-carboxamides, was prepared and identified as in vivo active NR2B subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The synthesis and SAR studies are discussed. PMID:17074483

  2. QT interval prolongation and torsade de pointes: Synergistic effect of flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Acosta-Materán, Carlos; Díaz-Oliva, Eloy; Fernández-Rodríguez, Diego; Hernández-Afonso, Julio

    2016-01-01

    A high percentage of patients having atrial fibrillation (AF) presents with paroxysmal AF. Flecainide, the prototypic class Ic anti-arrhythmic drug is the most effective drug to maintain sinus rhythm in this subgroup of patients, though the drug has potential pro-arrhythmic effects. Furthermore, the H1 receptor antagonists are the most commonly prescribed drugs for the symptomatic treatment of pruritus. Despite having low number of adverse effects, the H1 receptor antagonists have cardiotoxic effects. Flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists present arrhythmic complications including QT interval prolongation and torsade de pointes (TdP). The case presented here is a 65-year-old female who was diagnosed of atrial fibrillation and presented with rashes in lower extremities. The patient was treated using flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists (loratadine and hydroxyzine) that prolonged QT interval and induced TdP. The concomitant administration of flecainide and H1 receptor antagonists seems to have a synergistic effect in QT interval prolongation and subsequent TdP. The concurrent administration of H1 receptor antagonists to patients receiving class Ic anti-arrhythmic drugs should be avoided in order to reduce arrhythmic risk in this population. PMID:27440957

  3. Pharmacophore modeling of dual angiotensin II and endothelin A receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Xue, Wei-Zhe; Lü, Wei; Zhou, Zhi-Ming; Wang, Zhan-Li

    2009-09-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for AT1 and ET(A) receptors based on highly selective AT1 and ET(A) antagonists using the program Catalyst/HipHop. Both the best pharmacophore model for selective AT1 antagonists (Hypo-AT(1)-7) and ETA antagonists (Hypo-ET(A)-1) were obtained through a careful validation process. All five features contained in Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1 (hydrogen-bond acceptor (A), hydrophobic aliphatic (Z), negative ionizable (N), ring aromatic (R), and hydrophobic aromatic (Y)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity. Dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists (DARAs) can map to both Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, separately. Comparison of Hypo-AT(1)-7 and Hypo-ET(A)-1, not only AT1 and ET(A) antagonist pharmacophore models consist of essential features necessary for compounds to be highly active and selective toward their corresponding receptor, but also have something in common. The results in this study will act as a valuable tool for designing and researching structural relationship of novel dual AT1 and ET(A) receptor antagonists. PMID:20055175

  4. Development of 1,3-diphenyladamantane derivatives as nonsteroidal progesterone receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mori, Shuichi; Takeuchi, Yuki; Tanatani, Aya; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; Fujii, Shinya

    2015-02-15

    Nonsteroidal progesterone receptor (PR) full antagonists are needed as tools for elucidating the physiological functions of PR and as candidates for treatment of various diseases. We designed and synthesized 1,3-diphenyladamantane derivatives, and investigated their PR-antagonistic activity in comparison with our recently developed boron cluster-based PR antagonists. Among the synthesized adamantane derivatives, compound 9a exhibited the most potent PR-antagonistic activity (IC50: 25nM) and showed high binding affinity for the PR ligand-binding domain, comparable with that of the boron cluster-based PR antagonists. These results suggest that disubstituted adamantane, like the boron cluster m-carborane, is a promising hydrophobic pharmacophore for further structural development of nonsteroidal PR antagonists. PMID:25593098

  5. Both glutamate receptor antagonists and prefrontal cortex lesions prevent induction of cocaine sensitization and associated neuroadaptations.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Hu, X T; Berney, T G; Vartanian, A J; Stine, C D; Wolf, M E; White, F J

    1999-12-01

    Behavioral sensitization to psychomotor stimulants is accompanied by a number of alterations in the mesoaccumbens dopamine (DA) system, including DA autoreceptor subsensitivity in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and DA D1 receptor supersensitivity in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). We investigated the role of excitatory amino acid (EAA) transmission in the induction of cocaine sensitization and these accompanying DA receptor alterations. To do so, we used three glutamate receptor antagonists, the noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (0.1 mg/kg), the competitive NMDA receptor antagonist CGS 19755 (10.0 mg/kg), and the AMPA receptor antagonist NBQX (12.5 mg/kg). Rats received daily double injections of either one of these antagonists or saline with either cocaine (15.0 mg/kg) or saline for 5 days. Cocaine sensitization was defined as an increase in horizontal locomotor activity in response to cocaine challenge (7.5 mg/kg) on the third day of withdrawal. All three antagonists prevented the induction of cocaine sensitization. Extracellular single cell recordings revealed that these antagonists also prevented the induction of DA autoreceptor subsensitivity in the VTA and DA D1 receptor supersensitivity in the NAc. To determine whether the relevant glutamate receptors were under regulation by medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) EAA efferents, we next lesioned the mPFC bilaterally with ibotenic acid at least 7 days before repeated cocaine treatment began. These lesions also prevented the induction of cocaine sensitization and the associated neuroadaptations. Our findings indicate that glutamate transmission from mPFC to the mesoaccumbens DA system is critical for the induction of cocaine sensitization and its cellular correlates. PMID:10523754

  6. NOP receptor mediates anti-analgesia induced by agonist-antagonist opioids.

    PubMed

    Gear, R W; Bogen, O; Ferrari, L F; Green, P G; Levine, J D

    2014-01-17

    Clinical studies have shown that agonist-antagonist opioid analgesics that produce their analgesic effect via action on the kappa-opioid receptor, produce a delayed-onset anti-analgesia in men but not women, an effect blocked by co-administration of a low dose of naloxone. We now report the same time-dependent anti-analgesia and its underlying mechanism in an animal model. Using the Randall-Selitto paw-withdrawal assay in male rats, we found that nalbuphine, pentazocine, and butorphanol each produced analgesia during the first hour followed by anti-analgesia starting at ∼90min after administration in males but not females, closely mimicking its clinical effects. As observed in humans, co-administration of nalbuphine with naloxone in a dose ratio of 12.5:1 blocked anti-analgesia but not analgesia. Administration of the highly selective kappa-opioid receptor agonist U69593 produced analgesia without subsequent anti-analgesia, and confirmed by the failure of the selective kappa antagonist nor-binaltorphimine to block nalbuphine-induced anti-analgesia, indicating that anti-analgesia is not mediated by kappa-opioid receptors. We therefore tested the role of other receptors in nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Nociceptin/orphanin FQ (NOP) and sigma-1 and sigma-2 receptors were chosen on the basis of their known anti-analgesic effects and receptor binding studies. The selective NOP receptor antagonists, JTC801, and J-113397, but not the sigma receptor antagonist, BD 1047, antagonized nalbuphine anti-analgesia. Furthermore, the NOP receptor agonist NNC 63-0532 produced anti-analgesia with the same delay in onset observed with the three agonist-antagonists, but without producing preceding analgesia and this anti-analgesia was also blocked by naloxone. These results strongly support the suggestion that clinically used agonist-antagonists act at the NOP receptor to produce anti-analgesia. PMID:24188792

  7. Alcohol- and alcohol antagonist-sensitive human GABAA receptors: tracking δ subunit incorporation into functional receptors.

    PubMed

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W; Otis, Thomas S; Wallner, Martin

    2010-11-01

    GABA(A) receptors (GABA(A)Rs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn(2+) block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABA(A)Rs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs. PMID:20699325

  8. Alcohol- and Alcohol Antagonist-Sensitive Human GABAA Receptors: Tracking δ Subunit Incorporation into Functional Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Olsen, Richard W.; Otis, Thomas S.

    2010-01-01

    GABAA receptors (GABAARs) have long been a focus as targets for alcohol actions. Recent work suggests that tonic GABAergic inhibition mediated by extrasynaptic δ subunit-containing GABAARs is uniquely sensitive to ethanol and enhanced at concentrations relevant for human alcohol consumption. Ethanol enhancement of recombinant α4β3δ receptors is blocked by the behavioral alcohol antagonist 8-azido-5,6-dihydro-5-methyl-6-oxo-4H-imidazo[1,5-a][1,4]benzodiazepine-3-carboxylic acid ethyl ester (Ro15-4513), suggesting that EtOH/Ro15-4513-sensitive receptors mediate important behavioral alcohol actions. Here we confirm alcohol/alcohol antagonist sensitivity of α4β3δ receptors using human clones expressed in a human cell line and test the hypothesis that discrepant findings concerning the high alcohol sensitivity of these receptors are due to difficulties incorporating δ subunits into functional receptors. To track δ subunit incorporation, we used a functional tag, a single amino acid change (H68A) in a benzodiazepine binding residue in which a histidine in the δ subunit is replaced by an alanine residue found at the homologous position in γ subunits. We demonstrate that the δH68A substitution confers diazepam sensitivity to otherwise diazepam-insensitive α4β3δ receptors. The extent of enhancement of α4β3δH68A receptors by 1 μM diazepam, 30 mM EtOH, and 1 μM β-carboline-3-carboxy ethyl ester (but not 1 μM Zn2+ block) is correlated in individual recordings, suggesting that δ subunit incorporation into recombinant GABAARs varies from cell to cell and that this variation accounts for the variable pharmacological profile. These data are consistent with the notion that δ subunit-incorporation is often incomplete in recombinant systems yet is necessary for high ethanol sensitivity, one of the features of native δ subunit-containing GABAARs. PMID:20699325

  9. CGRP receptor antagonists and antibodies against CGRP and its receptor in migraine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Recently developed calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonistic molecules have shown promising results in clinical trials for acute treatment of migraine attacks. Drugs from the gepant class of CGRP receptor antagonists are effective and do not cause vasoconstriction, one of the major limitations in the use of triptans. However their use had to be discontinued because of risk of liver toxicity after continuous exposure. As an alternative approach to block CGRP transmission, fully humanized monoclonal antibodies towards CGRP and the CGRP receptor have been developed for treatment of chronic migraine (attacks >15 days/month). Initial results from phase I and II clinical trials have revealed promising results with minimal side effects and significant relief from chronic migraine as compared with placebo. The effectiveness of these various molecules raises the question of where is the target site(s) for antimigraine action. The gepants are small molecules that can partially pass the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and therefore, might have effects in the CNS. However, antibodies are large molecules and have limited possibility to pass the BBB, thus effectively excluding them from having a major site of action within the CNS. It is suggested that the antimigraine site should reside in areas not limited by the BBB such as intra- and extracranial vessels, dural mast cells and the trigeminal system. In order to clarify this topic and surrounding questions, it is important to understand the localization of CGRP and the CGRP receptor components in these possible sites of migraine-related regions and their relation to the BBB. PMID:25731075

  10. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Katz, Jonathan L; Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A; Rice, Kenner C; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H; McCurdy, Christopher R

    2016-07-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  11. Blockade of Cocaine or σ Receptor Agonist Self Administration by Subtype-Selective σ Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Hiranita, Takato; Kopajtic, Theresa A.; Rice, Kenner C.; Mesangeau, Christophe; Narayanan, Sanju; Abdelazeem, Ahmed H.; McCurdy, Christopher R.

    2016-01-01

    The identification of sigma receptor (σR) subtypes has been based on radioligand binding and, despite progress with σ1R cellular function, less is known about σR subtype functions in vivo. Recent findings that cocaine self administration experience will trigger σR agonist self administration was used in this study to assess the in vivo receptor subtype specificity of the agonists (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084 [2-(4-morpholinethyl) 1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate hydrochloride], and 1,3-di-o-tolylguanidine (DTG) and several novel putative σR antagonists. Radioligand binding studies determined in vitro σR selectivity of the novel compounds, which were subsequently studied for self administration and antagonism of cocaine, (+)-pentazocine, PRE-084, or DTG self administration. Across the dose ranges studied, none of the novel compounds were self administered, nor did they alter cocaine self administration. All compounds blocked DTG self administration, with a subset also blocking (+)-pentazocine and PRE-084 self administration. The most selective of the compounds in binding σ1Rs blocked cocaine self administration when combined with a dopamine transport inhibitor, either methylphenidate or nomifensine. These drug combinations did not decrease rates of responding maintained by food reinforcement. In contrast, the most selective of the compounds in binding σ2Rs had no effect on cocaine self administration in combination with either dopamine transport inhibitor. Thus, these results identify subtype-specific in vivo antagonists, and the utility of σR agonist substitution for cocaine self administration as an assay capable of distinguishing σR subtype selectivity in vivo. These results further suggest that effectiveness of dual σR antagonism and dopamine transport inhibition in blocking cocaine self administration is specific for σ1Rs and further support this dual targeting approach to development of cocaine antagonists. PMID:27189970

  12. Antagonist but not agonist labeling of serotonin-1A receptors is decreased in major depressive disorder

    PubMed Central

    Stockmeier, Craig A.; Howley, Eimear; Shi, Xiaochun; Sobanska, Anna; Clarke, Gerard; Friedman, Lee; Rajkowska, Grazyna

    2009-01-01

    Serotonin-1A receptors may play a role in the pathophysiology of depression and suicide. In postmortem brain tissue, agonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors is reportedly increased or unchanged in depression or suicide, while neuroimaging studies report a decrease in antagonist binding to these receptors in subjects with depression. In this study, both agonist and antagonist radioligand binding to serotonin-1A receptors were examined in postmortem orbitofrontal cortex from subjects with major depressive disorder (MDD). Brain tissue was collected at autopsy from 11 subjects with MDD and 11 age- and gender-matched normal control subjects. Two depressed subjects had a recent psychoactive substance use disorder. Six subjects with MDD had a prescription for an antidepressant drug in the last month of life, and, of these six, postmortem bloods from only two subjects tested positive for an antidepressant drug. There was no significant difference between cohorts for age, postmortem interval or tissue pH. The receptor agonist [3H]8-OH-DPAT or the antagonist [3H]MPPF were used to autoradiographically label serotonin-1A receptors in frozen sections from cytoarchitectonically-defined left rostral orbitofrontal cortex (area 47). There was no significant difference between depressed and control subjects in agonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors. However, antagonist binding was significantly decreased in outer layers of orbitofrontal cortex in MDD. This observation in postmortem tissue confirms reports using an antagonist radioligand in living subjects with depression. Decreased antagonist binding to serotonin-1A receptors in outer layers of orbitofrontal cortex suggests diminished receptor signaling and may be linked to corresponding neuronal changes detected previously in these depressed subjects. PMID:19215942

  13. In silico binding characteristics between human histamine H1 receptor and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojian; Yang, Qian; Li, Minyong; Yin, Dali; You, Qidong

    2010-09-01

    It is widely acknowledged that the H(1) receptor antagonists have important therapeutic significance in the treatment of various allergic disorders, but little was known about the binding mode between the receptor and antagonists since the crystal structure of G-protein coupling receptors (GPCRs) were hard to obtain. In this paper, a theoretical three-dimensional model of human histamine H(1) receptor (HHR1) was developed on the basis of recently reported high resolution structures of human A(2A) adenosine receptor, human beta(2)-adrenoceptor and turkey beta(1)-adrenoceptor. Furthermore, three representative H(1) receptor antagonists were chosen for docking studies. Subsequently, a qualitative pharmacophore model was developed by Hiphop algorithm based on the docking conformations of these three antagonists. In this paper, active environment, certain key residues, and the corresponding pharmacophore features of H(1) receptor were identified by such combinations of receptor-based and ligand-based approaches, which would give sufficient guidance for the rational design of novel antihistamine agents. PMID:20179978

  14. Improvement of Cold Tolerance by Selective A1 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, T. F.; Li, D. J.; Jacobson, K. A.; Wang, L. C. H.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we have shown that the improvement of cold tolerance by theophylline is due to antagonism at adenosine receptors rather than inhibition of phosphodiesterase. Since theophylline is a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist for both A1 and A2 receptors, the present study investigated the adenosine receptor subtype involved in theophylline’s action. Acute systemic injection of selective A1 receptor antagonists (1,3-dialkyl-8-aryl or 1,3-dialkyl-8-cyclopentyl xanthine derivatives) significantly increased both the total and maximal heat production as well as cold tolerance. In contrast, injection of a relatively selective A2 receptor antagonist, 3,7-dimethyl-1-propargylxanthine (compound No. 19), failed to significantly alter the thermogenic response of the rat under cold exposure. Further, the relative effectiveness of these compounds in increasing total thermogenesis was positively correlated with their potency in blocking the A1 adenosine receptor (r= .52, p<0.01), but not in A2 adenosine receptor (r= .20, p<0.2). It is likely that the thermally beneficial effects of adenosine A1 antagonists are due to their attenuation of the inhibitory effects of endogenously released adenosine on lipolysis and glucose utilization, resulting in increased substrate mobilization and utilization for enhanced thermogenesis. PMID:2263650

  15. Pretreatment H2 receptor antagonists that differ in P450 modulation activity: comparative effects on paclitaxel clearance rates and neutropenia.

    PubMed

    Slichenmyer, W J; Donehower, R C; Chen, T L; Bowling, M K; McGuire, W P; Rowinsky, E K

    1995-01-01

    Histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are principal components of the premedication regimen used to prevent major hypersensitivity reactions in patients receiving paclitaxel. Several different H2RAs, including cimetidine, ranitidine and famotidine, have been used in clinical trials of paclitaxel, as well as by clinicians in different geographic regions and hospitals primarily because of differences in the availability of the various H2RAs. However, H2RAs have highly variable cytochrome P450-modulating capabilities, and the P450 system appears to play a major role in paclitaxel metabolism and disposition. Therefore, the use of different H2RAs may result in different pharmacologic, toxicologic and antitumor profiles due to differential effects on paclitaxel metabolism. This study evaluated whether cimetidine and famotidine, which possess disparate P450-modulating capabilities, differentially affect paclitaxel clearance rates and the agent's principal toxicity, neutropenia. Women with advanced, platinum-refractory ovarian carcinoma received two courses of treatment with 135 mg/m2 paclitaxel over 24 h while participating in the National Cancer Institute's Treatment Referral Center Protocol. A crossover design was employed in which consecutive patients received either 300 mg cimetidine i.v. or 20 mg famotidine i.v. before their first course of paclitaxel and the alternate H2RA before their second course. In order to evaluate the differential effects of cimetidine and famotidine on pertinent pharmacologic and toxicologic parameters in the same individual, paclitaxel concentrations at steady-state (Css), paclitaxel clearance rates, and absolute neutrophil counts (ANCs) were obtained during both courses. Paclitaxel Css values were not significantly different in individual patients when either cimetidine or famotidine preceded paclitaxel (p = 0.16). Mean paclitaxel clearance rates were 271 and 243 ml/min per m2 following cimetidine and famotidine, respectively. These

  16. The pharmacological properties of a novel MCH1 receptor antagonist isolated from combinatorial libraries

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Chung, Shinjae; Dooley, Colette T.; Wang, Zhiwei; Li, Chunying; Saito, Yumiko; Clark, Stewart D; Houghten, Richard A.; Civelli, Olivier

    2009-01-01

    Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) is a neuropeptide that exhibits potent orexigenic activity. In rodents, it exerts its actions by interacting with one receptor, MCH1 receptor which is expressed in many parts of the central nervous system (CNS). To study the physiological implications of the MCH system, we need to be able to block it locally and acutely. This necessitates the use of MCH1 receptor antagonists. While MCH1 receptor antagonists have been previously reported, they are mainly not accessible to academic research. We apply here a strategy that leads to the isolation of a high affinity and selective MCH1 receptor antagonist amenable to in vivo analyses without further chemical modifications. This antagonist, TPI 1361-17, was identified through the screening of multiple non-peptide positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL) totaling more than eight hundred thousand compounds in conditions that allow for the identification of only high-affinity compounds. TPI 1361-17 exhibited an IC50 value of 6.1 nM for inhibition of 1 nM MCH-induced Ca2+ mobilization and completely displaced the binding of [125I] MCH to rat MCH1 receptor. TPI 1361-17 was found specific, having no affinity for a variety of other G-protein coupled receptors and channels. TPI 1361-17 was found active in vivo since it blocked MCH-induced food intake by 75 %. Our results indicate that TPI 1361-17 is a novel and selective MCH1 receptor antagonist and is an effective tool to study the physiological functions of the MCH system. These results also illustrate the successful application of combinatorial library screening to identify specific surrogate antagonists in an academic setting. PMID:19041642

  17. Identification of Receptor Ligands and Receptor Subtypes Using Antagonists in a Capillary Electrophoresis Single-Cell Biosensor Separation System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fishman, Harvey A.; Orwar, Owe; Scheller, Richard H.; Zare, Richard N.

    1995-08-01

    A capillary electrophoresis system with single-cell biosensors as a detector has been used to separate and identify ligands in complex biological samples. The power of this procedure was significantly increased by introducing antagonists that inhibited the cellular response from selected ligand-receptor interactions. The single-cell biosensor was based on the ligand-receptor binding and G-protein-mediated signal transduction pathways in PC12 and NG108-15 cell lines. Receptor activation was measured as increases in cytosolic free calcium ion concentration by using fluorescence microscopy with the intracellular calcium ion indicator fluo-3 acetoxymethyl ester. Specifically, a mixture of bradykinin (BK) and acetylcholine (ACh) was fractionated and the components were identified by inhibiting the cellular response with icatibant (HOE 140), a selective antagonist to the BK B_2 receptor subtype (B_2BK), and atropine, an antagonist to muscarinic ACh receptor subtypes. Structurally related forms of BK were also identified based on inhibiting B_2BK receptors. Applications of this technique include identification of endogenous BK in a lysate of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Hep G2) and screening for bioactivity of BK degradation products in human blood plasma. The data demonstrate that the use of antagonists with a single-cell biosensor separation system aids identification of separated components and receptor subtypes.

  18. Differentiation of agonist conformation and antagonist conformation in multiple opioid receptors.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, N; Yamawaki, Y; Kuroda, H; Nukina, I; Ofuji, T

    1981-12-11

    To differentiate the opiate (naloxone) receptor and the enkephalin receptor in rat brain, we solubilized the receptor molecules by detergent and determined the molecular weights by gel filtration. The receptor preparation was bound to [3H] naloxone or [3H] Met5-enkephalin, and was solubilized by Triton X-100. On gel chromatography with a Sepharose 6B column, the agonist and the antagonist conformation of opioid receptors eluted as molecules with the molecular weights of 240,000, and 120,000 and with Stokes' radii of 5.5 nm and 4.3 nm, respectively. Further, it was also disclosed that Na+ was bound to the antagonist conformation of opioid receptors but not to the agonist conformation. PMID:6275320

  19. 5-HT2B Receptor Antagonists Inhibit Fibrosis and Protect from RV Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Wiebke; Schymura, Yves; Novoyatleva, Tatyana; Luitel, Himal; Tretyn, Aleksandra; Pullamsetti, Soni Savai; Weissmann, Norbert; Seeger, Werner; Ghofrani, Hossein Ardeschir; Schermuly, Ralph Theo

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The serotonin (5-HT) pathway was shown to play a role in pulmonary hypertension (PH), but its functions in right ventricular failure (RVF) remain poorly understood. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of Terguride (5-HT2A and 2B receptor antagonist) or SB204741 (5-HT2B receptor antagonist) on right heart function and structure upon pulmonary artery banding (PAB) in mice. Methods. Seven days after PAB, mice were treated for 14 days with Terguride (0.2 mg/kg bid) or SB204741 (5 mg/kg day). Right heart function and remodeling were assessed by right heart catheterization, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and histomorphometric methods. Total secreted collagen content was determined in mouse cardiac fibroblasts isolated from RV tissues. Results. Chronic treatment with Terguride or SB204741 reduced right ventricular fibrosis and showed improved heart function in mice after PAB. Moreover, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists diminished TGF-beta1 induced collagen synthesis of RV cardiac fibroblasts in vitro. Conclusion. 5-HT2B receptor antagonists reduce collagen deposition, thereby inhibiting right ventricular fibrosis. Chronic treatment prevented the development and progression of pressure overload-induced RVF in mice. Thus, 5-HT2B receptor antagonists represent a valuable novel therapeutic approach for RVF. PMID:25667920

  20. New insights into the stereochemical requirements of the bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists binding.

    PubMed

    Lupala, Cecylia S; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J

    2016-07-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a nonapeptide involved in several pathophysiological conditions including among others, septic and haemorrhagic shock, anaphylaxis, arthritis, rhinitis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease. Accordingly, BK antagonists have long been sought after for therapeutic intervention. Action of BK is mediated through two different G-protein coupled receptors known as B1 and B2. Although there are several B1 antagonists reported in literature, their pharmacological profile is not yet optimal so that new molecules need to be discovered. In the present work we have constructed an atomistic model of the B1 receptor and docked diverse available non-peptide antagonists in order to get a deeper insight into the structure-activity relationships involving binding to this receptor. The model was constructed by homology modeling using the chemokine CXC4 and bovine rhodopsin receptors as template. The model was further refined using molecular dynamics for 600ns with the protein embedded in a POPC bilayer. From the refinement process we obtained an average structure that was used for docking studies using the Glide software. Antagonists selected for the docking studies include Compound 11, Compound 12, Chroman28, SSR240612, NPV-SAA164 and PS020990. The results of the docking study underline the role of specific receptor residues in ligand binding. The results of this study permitted to define a pharmacophore that describes the stereochemical requirements of antagonist binding, and can be used for the discovery of new compounds. PMID:27469392

  1. Abscisic Acid Analogues That Act as Universal or Selective Antagonists of Phytohormone Receptors.

    PubMed

    Rajagopalan, Nandhakishore; Nelson, Ken M; Douglas, Amy F; Jheengut, Vishal; Alarcon, Idralyn Q; McKenna, Sean A; Surpin, Marci; Loewen, Michele C; Abrams, Suzanne R

    2016-09-13

    The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays many important roles in controlling plant development and physiology, from flowering to senescence. ABA is now known to exert its effects through a family of soluble ABA receptors, which in Arabidopsis thaliana has 13 members divided into three clades. Homologues of these receptors are present in other plants, also in relatively large numbers. Investigation of the roles of each homologue in mediating the diverse physiological roles of ABA is hampered by this genetic redundancy. We report herein the in vitro screening of a targeted ABA-like analogue library and identification of novel antagonist hits, including the analogue PBI686 that had been developed previously as a probe for identifying ABA-binding proteins. Further in vitro characterization of PBI686 and development of second-generation leads yielded both receptor-selective and universal antagonist hits. In planta assays in different species have demonstrated that these antagonist leads can overcome various ABA-induced physiological changes. While the general antagonists open up a hitherto unexplored avenue for controlling plant growth through inhibition of ABA-regulated physiological processes, the receptor-selective antagonist can be developed into chemical probes to explore the physiological roles of individual receptors. PMID:27523384

  2. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma.

    PubMed

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability, exudation of macromolecules and edema. The cysteinyl leukotrienes also have potent chemoattractant properties for eosinophils, causing an influx of eosinophils into the airway mucosa, which further fuels the inflammatory process. In addition, the cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent secretagogues and reduce ciliary motility, which may hinder mucociliary clearance. Asthmatic patients demonstrate increased production of cysteinyl leukotrienes during naturally occurring asthma and acute asthma attacks as well as after allergen and exercise challenge. The leukotriene receptor antagonists montelukast, zafirlukast and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits that are additive with corticosteroid therapy. This supposition is supported by clinical observations that treatment with leukotriene receptor antagonists significantly improve asthma control when added to inhaled corticosteroid therapy. Moreover, the bronchodilator properties of the leukotriene receptor antagonists are additive with those of beta agonists. These data provide strong support for the use of leukotriene receptor antagonists for treating asthma. PMID

  3. Integrative role for serotonergic and glutamatergic receptor mechanisms in the action of NMDA antagonists: potential relationships to antipsychotic drug actions on NMDA antagonist responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Breese, George R; Knapp, Darin J; Moy, Sheryl S

    2002-06-01

    NMDA receptor antagonists worsen symptoms in schizophrenia and induce schizophrenic-like symptoms in normal individuals. In animals, NMDA antagonist-induced behavioral responses include increased activity, head weaving, deficits in paired pulse inhibition and social interaction, and increased forced swim immobility. Repeated exposure to NMDA antagonists in animals results in behavioral sensitization-a phenomenon accentuated in rats with dopaminergic neurons lesioned during development. In keeping with an involvement of serotonin and glutamate release in NMDA antagonist action, selected behaviors induced by NMDA antagonists are minimized by 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonists and mGLU2 receptor agonists. These observations provide promising new approaches for treating acute NMDA antagonist-induced psychosis. Further, acute atypical antipsychotic drugs also minimize NMDA antagonist actions to a greater degree than typical antipsychotics. However, because knowledge concerning acute versus chronic effectiveness of various antipsychotic drugs against NMDA antagonist neuropathology is limited, future studies to define more fully the basis of their differences in efficacy after chronic treatment could provide an understanding of their actions on neural mechanisms responsible for the core pathogenesis of schizophrenia. PMID:12204191

  4. Rigidified 2-aminopyrimidines as histamine H4 receptor antagonists: effects of substitution about the rigidifying ring.

    PubMed

    Koenig, John R; Liu, Huaqing; Drizin, Irene; Witte, David G; Carr, Tracy L; Manelli, Arlene M; Milicic, Ivan; Strakhova, Marina I; Miller, Thomas R; Esbenshade, Timothy A; Brioni, Jorge D; Cowart, Marlon

    2010-03-15

    Three novel series of histamine H(4) receptor (H(4)R) antagonists containing the 2-aminopyrimidine motif are reported. The best of these compounds display good in vitro potency in both functional and binding assays. In addition, representative compounds are able to completely block itch responses when dosed ip in a mouse model of H(4)-agonist induced scratching, thus demonstrating their activities as H(4)R antagonists. PMID:20171098

  5. Design and evaluation of xanthine based adenosine receptor antagonists: Potential hypoxia targeted immunotherapies

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhiannon; Lee, Joslynn; Chevalier, Vincent; Sadler, Sara; Selesniemi, Kaisa; Hatfield, Stephen; Sitkovsky, Michail; Ondrechen, Mary Jo; Jones, Graham B.

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling techniques were applied to the design, synthesis and optimization of a new series of xanthine based adenosine A2A receptor antagonists. The optimized lead compound was converted to a PEG derivative and a functional in vitro bioassay used to confirm efficacy. Additionally, the PEGylated version showed enhanced aqueous solubility and was inert to photoisomerization, a known limitation of existing antagonists of this class. PMID:24126093

  6. Neurokinin-1 Receptor Antagonists as Antitumor Drugs in Gastrointestinal Cancer: A New Approach

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Miguel; Coveñas, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is the term for a group of cancers affecting the digestive system. After binding to the neurokinin-1 (NK-1) receptor, the undecapeptide substance P (SP) regulates GI cancer cell proliferation and migration for invasion and metastasis, and controls endothelial cell proliferation for angiogenesis. SP also exerts an antiapoptotic effect. Both SP and the NK-1 receptor are located in GI tumor cells, the NK-1 receptor being overexpressed. By contrast, after binding to the NK-1 receptor, NK-1 receptor antagonists elicit the inhibition (epidermal growth factor receptor inhibition) of the proliferation of GI cancer cells in a concentration-dependent manner, induce the death of GI cancer cells by apoptosis, counteract the Warburg effect, inhibit cancer cell migration (counteracting invasion and metastasis), and inhibit angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor inhibition). NK-1 receptor antagonists are safe and well tolerated. Thus, the NK-1 receptor could be considered as a new target in GI cancer and NK-1 receptor antagonists (eg, aprepitant) could be a new promising approach for the treatment of GI cancer. PMID:27488320

  7. Selective P2X7 receptor antagonists for chronic inflammation and pain

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly-Roberts, Diana; Jarvis, Michael F.

    2008-01-01

    ATP, acting on P2X7 receptors, stimulates changes in intracellular calcium concentrations, maturation, and release of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and following prolonged agonist exposure, cell death. The functional effects of P2X7 receptor activation facilitate several proinflammatory processes associated with arthritis. Within the nervous system, these proinflammatory processes may also contribute to the development and maintenance of chronic pain. Emerging data from genetic knockout studies have indicated specific roles for P2X7 receptors in inflammatory and neuropathic pain states. The discovery of multiple distinct chemical series of potent and highly selective P2X7 receptor antagonists have enhanced our understanding of P2X7 receptor pharmacology and the diverse array of P2X7 receptor signaling mechanisms. These antagonists have provided mechanistic insight into the role(s) P2X7 receptors play under pathophysiological conditions. In this review, we integrate the recent discoveries of novel P2X7 receptor-selective antagonists with a brief update on P2X7 receptor pharmacology and its therapeutic potential. PMID:18568426

  8. Kinetic properties of "dual" orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors.

    PubMed

    Callander, Gabrielle E; Olorunda, Morenike; Monna, Dominique; Schuepbach, Edi; Langenegger, Daniel; Betschart, Claudia; Hintermann, Samuel; Behnke, Dirk; Cotesta, Simona; Fendt, Markus; Laue, Grit; Ofner, Silvio; Briard, Emmanuelle; Gee, Christine E; Jacobson, Laura H; Hoyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various "dual" orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [(3)H]-BBAC ((S)-N-([1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)thio)acetyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide). In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant, and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-yl)methyl)-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl)-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one) bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in binding and/or functional assays. Overall, the "dual" antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the "dual" antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo. PMID:24376396

  9. Kinetic properties of “dual” orexin receptor antagonists at OX1R and OX2R orexin receptors

    PubMed Central

    Callander, Gabrielle E.; Olorunda, Morenike; Monna, Dominique; Schuepbach, Edi; Langenegger, Daniel; Betschart, Claudia; Hintermann, Samuel; Behnke, Dirk; Cotesta, Simona; Fendt, Markus; Laue, Grit; Ofner, Silvio; Briard, Emmanuelle; Gee, Christine E.; Jacobson, Laura H.; Hoyer, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Orexin receptor antagonists represent attractive targets for the development of drugs for the treatment of insomnia. Both efficacy and safety are crucial in clinical settings and thorough investigations of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics can predict contributing factors such as duration of action and undesirable effects. To this end, we studied the interactions between various “dual” orexin receptor antagonists and the orexin receptors, OX1R and OX2R, over time using saturation and competition radioligand binding with [3H]-BBAC ((S)-N-([1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)-1-(2-((1-methyl-1H-benzo[d]imidazol-2-yl)thio)acetyl)pyrrolidine-2-carboxamide). In addition, the kinetics of these compounds were investigated in cells expressing human, mouse and rat OX1R and OX2R using FLIPR® assays for calcium accumulation. We demonstrate that almorexant reaches equilibrium very slowly at OX2R, whereas SB-649868, suvorexant, and filorexant may take hours to reach steady state at both orexin receptors. By contrast, compounds such as BBAC or the selective OX2R antagonist IPSU ((2-((1H-Indol-3-yl)methyl)-9-(4-methoxypyrimidin-2-yl)-2,9-diazaspiro[5.5]undecan-1-one) bind rapidly and reach equilibrium very quickly in binding and/or functional assays. Overall, the “dual” antagonists tested here tend to be rather unselective under non-equilibrium conditions and reach equilibrium very slowly. Once equilibrium is reached, each ligand demonstrates a selectivity profile that is however, distinct from the non-equilibrium condition. The slow kinetics of the “dual” antagonists tested suggest that in vitro receptor occupancy may be longer lasting than would be predicted. This raises questions as to whether pharmacokinetic studies measuring plasma or brain levels of these antagonists are accurate reflections of receptor occupancy in vivo. PMID:24376396

  10. Orexin 1 receptor antagonists in compulsive behavior and anxiety: possible therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Merlo Pich, Emilio; Melotto, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Fifteen years after the discovery of hypocretin/orexin a large body of evidence has been collected supporting its critical role in the modulation of several regulatory physiological functions. While reduced levels of hypocretin/orexin were initially associated with narcolepsy, increased levels have been linked in recent years to pathological states of hypervigilance and, in particular, to insomnia. The filing to FDA of the dual-activity orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) suvorexant for the indication of insomnia further corroborates the robustness of such evidences. However, as excessive vigilance is also typical of anxiety and panic episodes, as well as of abstinence and craving in substance misuse disorders. In this review we briefly discuss the evidence supporting the development of hypocretin/orexin receptor 1 (OX1) antagonists for these indications. Experiments using the OX1 antagonist SB-334867 and mutant mice have involved the OX1 receptor in mediating the compulsive reinstatement of drug seeking for ethanol, nicotine, cocaine, cannabinoids and morphine. More recently, data have been generated with the novel selective OX1 antagonists GSK1059865 and ACT-335827 on behavioral and cardiovascular response to stressors and panic-inducing agents in animals. Concluding, while waiting for pharmacologic data to become available in humans, risks and benefits for the development of an OX1 receptor antagonist for Binge Eating and Anxiety Disorders are discussed. PMID:24592206

  11. Characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Croy, Carrie H; Chan, Wai Y; Castetter, Andrea M; Watt, Marla L; Quets, Anne T; Felder, Christian C

    2016-07-01

    Identification of synthetic ligands selective for muscarinic receptor subtypes has been challenging due to the high sequence identity and structural homology among the five muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Here, we report the pharmacological characterization of PCS1055, a novel muscarinic M4 receptor antagonist. PCS1055 inhibited radioligand [(3)H]-NMS binding to the M4 receptor with a Ki=6.5nM. Though the potency of PCS1055 is lower than that of pan-muscarinic antagonist atropine, it has better subtype selectivity over previously reported M4-selective reagents such as the muscarinic-peptide toxins (Karlsson et al., 1994; Santiago and Potter, 2001a) at the M1 subtype, and benzoxazine ligand PD102807 at the M3-subtype (Bohme et al., 2002). A detailed head-to-head comparison study using [(3)H]-NMS competitive binding assays characterizes the selectivity profiles of PCS1055 to that of other potent muscarinic-antagonist compounds PD102807, tropicamide, AF-DX-384, pirenzapine, and atropine. In addition to binding studies, the subtype specificity of PCS1055 is also demonstrated by functional receptor activation as readout by GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding. These GTP-γ-[(35)S] binding studies showed that PCS1055 exhibited 255-, 69.1-, 342- and >1000-fold greater inhibition of Oxo-M activity at the M4 versus the M1-, M2(-), M3-or M5 receptor subtypes, respectively. Schild analyses indicates that PCS1055 acts as a competitive antagonist to muscarinic M4 receptor, and confirms the affinity of the ligand to be low nanomolar, Kb=5.72nM. Therefore, PCS1055 represents a new M4-preferring antagonist that may be useful in elucidating the roles of M4 receptor signaling. PMID:27085897

  12. Attenuation of D-1 antagonist-induced D-1 receptor upregulation by conccomitant D-2 receptor blockade

    SciTech Connect

    Parashos, S.A.; Barone, P.; Tucci, I.; Chase, T.N.

    1987-11-16

    The effect of chronic selective D-1 and/or D-2 dopamine receptor blockade on regional D-1 receptor binding was studied in rat brain following chronic treatment with the specific D-1 antagonist SCH 23390 and/or the predominantly D-2 antagonist haloperidol. D-1 receptor density and affinity were evaluated by quantitative autoradiography using /sup 125/I-SCH 23982. Chronic SCH 23390 treatment increased D-1 receptor density by 30 to 40% in the striatum, accumbens and tuberculum olfactorium; receptor affinity remained unchanged. Haloperidol had no effect on D-1 receptor Bmax or Kd values, although, when administered with SCH 23390, reduced the D-1 receptor upregulation induced by the D-1 antagonist in striatum and tuberculum olfactorium, but not in nucleus accumbens, These results may be attributable to D-1/D-2 dopamine receptor interactions occurring in the striatum and tuberculum olfactorium and may have implications for the prevention and treatment of drug-induced extrapyramidal disorders. 34 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  13. Functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at the 5-HT3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Hermann, B; Wetzel, C H; Pestel, E; Zieglgänsberger, W; Holsboer, F; Rupprecht, R

    1996-08-23

    The atypical neuroleptic clozapine is thought to exert its psychopharmacological actions through a variety of neurotransmitter receptors. It binds preferentially to D4 and 5-HT2 receptors; however, little is known on it's interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor. Using a cell line stably expressing the 5-HT3 receptor, whole-cell voltage-clamp analysis revealed functional antagonistic properties of clozapine at low nanomolar concentrations in view of a binding affinity in the upper nanomolar range. Because the concentration of clozapine required for an interaction with the 5-HT3 receptor can be achieved with therapeutical doses, functional antagonistic properties at this ligand-gated ion channel may contribute to its unique psychopharmacological profile. PMID:8780717

  14. Identification of short-acting κ-opioid receptor antagonists with anxiolytic-like activity.

    PubMed

    Peters, Matthew F; Zacco, Anna; Gordon, John; Maciag, Carla M; Litwin, Linda C; Thompson, Carolann; Schroeder, Patricia; Sygowski, Linda A; Piser, Timothy M; Brugel, Todd A

    2011-07-01

    The κ-opioid receptor plays a central role in mediating the response to stressful life events. Inhibiting κ-opioid receptor signaling is proposed as a mechanism for treating stress-related conditions such as depression and anxiety. Preclinical testing consistently confirms that disruption of κ-opioid signaling is efficacious in animal models of mood disorders. However, concerns about the feasibility of developing antagonists into drugs stem from an unusual pharmacodynamic property of prototypic κ-opioid receptor-selective antagonists; they inhibit receptor signaling for weeks to months after a single dose. Several fundamental questions include - is it possible to identify short-acting antagonists; is long-lasting inhibition necessary for efficacy; and is it safe to develop long-acting antagonists in the clinic. Here, we test representative compounds (AZ-ECPC, AZ-MTAB, and LY-DMPF) from three new chemical series of κ-opioid receptor ligands for long-lasting inhibition. Each compound dose-dependently reversed κ-opioid agonist-induced diuresis. However, unlike the prototypic antagonist, nBNI, which fully inhibited evoked diuresis for at least four weeks, the new compounds showed no inhibition after one week. The two compounds with greater potency and selectivity were tested in prenatally-stressed rats on the elevated plus maze, an exploration-based model of anxiety. Spontaneous exploration of open arms in the elevated plus maze was suppressed by prenatal stress and restored with both compounds. These findings indicate that persistent inhibition is not an inherent property of κ-opioid-selective antagonists and that post-stress dosing with transient inhibitors can be effective in a mood disorder model. This further supports κ-opioid receptor as a promising target for developing novel psychiatric medications. PMID:21539838

  15. Aldosterone and aldosterone receptor antagonists in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Nappi, Jean M; Sieg, Adam

    2011-01-01

    Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid hormone synthesized by the adrenal glands that has several regulatory functions to help the body maintain normal volume status and electrolyte balance. Studies have shown significantly higher levels of aldosterone secretion in patients with congestive heart failure compared with normal patients. Elevated levels of aldosterone have been shown to elevate blood pressure, cause left ventricular hypertrophy, and promote cardiac fibrosis. An appreciation of the true role of aldosterone in patients with chronic heart failure did not become apparent until the publication of the Randomized Aldactone Evaluation Study. Until recently, the use of aldosterone receptor antagonists has been limited to patients with severe heart failure and patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. The Eplerenone in Mild Patients Hospitalization and Survival Study in Heart Failure (EMPHASIS-HF) study added additional evidence to support the expanded use of aldosterone receptor antagonists in heart failure patients. The results of the EMPHASIS-HF trial showed that patients with mild-to-moderate (New York Heart Association Class II) heart failure had reductions in mortality and hospitalizations from the addition of eplerenone to optimal medical therapy. Evidence remains elusive about the exact mechanism by which aldosterone receptor antagonists improve heart failure morbidity and mortality. The benefits of aldosterone receptor antagonist use in heart failure must be weighed against the potential risk of complications, ie, hyperkalemia and, in the case of spironolactone, possible endocrine abnormalities, in particular gynecomastia. With appropriate monitoring, these risks can be minimized. We now have evidence that patients with mild-to-severe symptoms associated with systolic heart failure will benefit from the addition of an aldosterone receptor antagonist to the standard therapies of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and beta

  16. Pharmacological characterization of YM598, a selective endothelin-A receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Sudoh, Katsumi; Yuyama, Hironori; Noguchi, Yukiko; Fujimori, Akira; Ukai, Masashi; Ohtake, Akiyoshi; Sato, Shuichi; Sasamata, Masao; Miyata, Keiji

    2004-11-01

    The binding affinities of YM598, a novel endothelin-A (ETA) receptor antagonist, for native human ETA receptors expressed in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells and endothelin-B (ETB) subtypes in the human melanoma cell line SKMel- 28 were compared with those of atrasentan and bosentan. The in vivo ETA receptor antagonist activities of YM598 and atrasentan were also evaluated in pithed rats. The inhibitory dissociation constant values of YM598, atrasentan and bosentan were 0.772, 0.0551 and 4.75 nM, respectively, for native human ETA receptors, and 143, 4.80 and 40.9 nM, respectively, for native human ETB subtypes. The calculated selectivity ratios of YM598, atrasentan and bosentan for ETA versus ETB receptors were 222, 136 and 13.0, respectively. In pithed rats, YM598 and atrasentan inhibited the big endothelin-1 (1 nmol/kg)-induced pressor response in a dose-dependent manner, after both intravenous and oral administration. The inhibitory effect of YM598 was less potent than that of atrasentan when these agents were intravenously administered, but those of both agents were comparable when orally administered. These results suggest that YM598 has a high selectivity for native human ETA receptors against ETB receptors, and that YM598 is superior to atrasentan as an ETA receptor antagonist, with regard to pharmacological bioavailability in rats. PMID:15838329

  17. Ineffectiveness of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists for treatment-resistant depression: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hee Ryung; Woo, Young Sup; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2016-09-01

    Emerging preclinical and clinical evidences suggest a potential role of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in the pathophysiology of depression. Several clinical trials have investigated the efficacy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists in treatment-resistant depression. We carried out this meta-analysis to investigate whether nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists significantly improve symptoms in patients with major depressive disorder who have an inadequate response to standard antidepressant therapy. A comprehensive literature search identified six randomized-controlled trials. These six trials, which included 2067 participants, were pooled for this meta-analysis using a random-effects model. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists failed to show superior efficacy compared with placebo in terms of the mean change in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score [mean difference=-0.12 (95% confidence interval (CI)=-0.96 to 0.71]; response rate [risk ratio=0.92 (95% CI=0.83-1.02)]; and remission rate [risk ratio=1.01 (95% CI=0.83-1.23)]. This meta-analysis failed to confirm preliminary positive evidence for the efficacy of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists in treatment-resistant depression. Further studies investigating the efficacy of various alternative treatment strategies for treatment-resistant depression will help clinicians to better understand and choose better treatment options for these populations. PMID:26982579

  18. A mechanistic basis for converting a receptor tyrosine kinase agonist to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Tolbert, W. David; Daugherty, Jennifer; Gao, ChongFeng; Xie, Qian; Miranti, Cindy; Gherardi, Ermanno; Vande Woude, George; Xu, H. Eric

    2010-03-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) activates the Met receptor tyrosine kinase by binding and promoting receptor dimerization. Here we describe a mechanistic basis for designing Met antagonists based on NK1, a natural variant of HGF containing the N-terminal and the first kringle domain. Through detailed biochemical and structural analyses, we demonstrate that both mouse and human NK1 induce Met dimerization via a conserved NK1 dimer interface. Mutations designed to alter the NK1 dimer interface abolish its ability to promote Met dimerization but retain full Met-binding activity. Importantly, these NK1 mutants act as Met antagonists by inhibiting HGF-mediated cell scattering, proliferation, branching, and invasion. The ability to separate the Met-binding activity of NK1 from its Met dimerization activity thus provides a rational basis for designing Met antagonists. This strategy of antagonist design may be applicable for other growth factor receptors by selectively abolishing the receptor activation ability but not the receptor binding of the growth factors.

  19. Binding of antagonists of H1 and H2 histamine receptors to peripheral blood lymphocytes of atopic and healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Zak-Nejmark, T; Małolepszy, J; Osos, M; Nadobna, G; Jutel, M

    1991-01-01

    The binding of the antagonists of histamine H1 and H2 receptors by peripheral blood lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects was investigated. We found that lymphocytes from atopic subjects showed statistically significant decrease in the binding of H2 receptor antagonist - ranitidine. In addition, lymphocytes from atopic and control subjects had similar capacity of binding of H1 receptor antagonist - promethazine. The ratio of the amount of H1 and H2 antagonists, bound to lymphocytes from atopic and healthy subjects, was calculated. The difference between the values in the group of atopic (2.55) and control subjects (1.55) was statistically significant. PMID:1841552

  20. Allosteric interactions of three muscarine antagonists at bovine tracheal smooth muscle and cardiac M2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Elzinga, C R; Meurs, H; Zaagsma, J

    1989-03-01

    The kinetics of [3H]dexetimide dissociation from muscarine receptors in bovine cardiac left ventricular and tracheal smooth muscle membranes were studied in the absence and presence of three muscarine antagonists. It was found that [3H]dexetimide dissociation from cardiac muscarine receptors was monophasic and very fast (half life less than 1 min) and was slowed by the cardioselective muscarine antagonists, gallamine, methoctramine and AF-DX 116, concentration dependently. [3H]Dexetimide dissociation from tracheal muscarine receptors was biphasic, with a fast phase (half-life less than 1 min) followed after 4-5 min by a slow phase (half-life = 38.5 min). The fast component, but not the slow component, was slowed by the muscarine antagonists with concentration dependencies very similar to those found in the heart. We conclude from these data that the major population of tracheal smooth muscle muscarine receptors resembles the cardiac M2 type not only with respect to equilibrium binding affinities but also with respect to the secondary, allosteric binding site on the muscarine receptor. The results also imply that the cardiac receptor subtype is much more sensitive to allosteric modulation than the glandular/smooth muscle receptor subtype. PMID:2714370

  1. Rational Design of Potent Antagonists to the Human Growth Hormone Receptor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuh, Germaine; Cunningham, Brian C.; Fukunaga, Rikiro; Nagata, Shigekazu; Goeddel, David V.; Wells, James A.

    1992-06-01

    A hybrid receptor was constructed that contained the extracellular binding domain of the human growth hormone (hGH) receptor linked to the transmembrane and intracellular domains of the murine granulocyte colony-stimulating factor receptor. Addition of hGH to a myeloid leukemia cell line (FDC-P1) that expressed the hybrid receptor caused proliferation of these cells. The mechanism for signal transduction of the hybrid receptor required dimerization because monoclonal antibodies to the hGH receptor were agonists whereas their monovalent fragments were not. Receptor dimerization occurs sequentially-a receptor binds to site 1 on hGH, and then a second receptor molecule binds to site 2 on hGH. On the basis of this sequential mechanism, which may occur in many other cytokine receptors, inactive hGH analogs were designed that were potent antagonists to hGH-induced cell proliferation. Such antagonists could be useful for treating clinical conditions of hGH excess, such as acromegaly.

  2. Opposite effects of GABAA and NMDA receptor antagonists on ethanol-induced behavioral sleep in rats.

    PubMed

    Beleslin, D B; Djokanović, N; Jovanović Mićić, D; Samardzić, R

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the GABAA receptor antagonists, pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline, and picrotoxin, the glycine antagonist, strychnine, and the NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, on ethanol-induced behavioral sleep and body temperature were investigated. Pentylenetetrazol, bicuculline, and picrotoxin given prior and following ethanol reduced the behavioral sleep and potentiated the hypothermia caused by ethanol. However, convulsions appeared when bicuculline, but not pentylenetetrazol and picrotoxin, were given following ethanol. After the reversal of unconsciousness in rats without convulsions the animals remained awake throughout the experiments without motor incoordination, hyperexcitability, and sedation, but they were in hypothermia within 12 h. The glycine antagonist, strychnine, given prior or after ethanol had virtually no effect on ethanol-induced behavioral sleep and hypothermia. Ethanol given prior or following strychnine failed to antagonize strychnine-induced convulsions. The NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine, given following ethanol potentiated the behavioral sleep and had virtually no effect on hypothermia induced by ethanol. It is suggested that the ethanol-induced behavioral sleep may be attributed to its ability to enhance the GABAergic mechanisms and to inhibit NMDA-mediated excitatory responses. However, the ethanol-induced hypothermia may be ascribed solely to the facilitation of GABAergic transmission. Further, it is postulated that a bidirectional inhibitory system subserves the regulation of behavioral sleep and convulsions. However, one-way inhibitory system underlies the ethanol-induced hypothermia. PMID:9085718

  3. Modeling the interactions between alpha(1)-adrenergic receptors and their antagonists.

    PubMed

    Du, Lupei; Li, Minyong

    2010-09-01

    As crucial members of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) superfamily, alpha (1)-adrenergic receptors (alpha(1)-ARs) are recognized to intervene the actions of endogenous catecholamines such as norepinephrine and epinephrine. So far three distinct alpha(1)-AR subtypes, alpha(1A), alpha(1B) and alpha(1D), have been characterized by functional analysis, radio-ligand binding and molecular biology studies. The alpha(1)-ARs are of therapeutic interest because of their distinct and critical roles in many physiological processes, containing hypertension, benign prostatic hyperplasia, smooth muscle contraction, myocardial inotropy and chronotropy, and hepatic glucose metabolism. Accordingly, designing subtype-selective antagonists for each of the three alpha(1)-AR subtypes has been an enthusiastic region of medicinal research. Even though a large number of studies on GPCRs have been conducted, understanding of how known antagonists bind to alpha(1)-ARs still remains sketchy and has been a serious impediment to search for potent and subtype-selective alpha(1)-AR antagonists because of the lack of detailed experimental structural knowledge. This review deliberates the simulation of alpha(1)-ARs and their interactions with antagonists by using ligand-based (pharmacophore identification and QSAR modeling) and structure-based (comparative modeling and molecular docking) approaches. Combined with experimental data, these computational attempts could improve our understanding of the structural basis of antagonist binding and the molecular basis of receptor activation, thus offering a more reasonable approach in the design of drugs targeting alpha(1)-ARs. PMID:20412040

  4. Inhibition of Morphine Tolerance and Dependence by the NMDA Receptor Antagonist MK-801

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trujillo, Keith A.; Akil, Huda

    1991-01-01

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of the glutamate receptor is an important mediator of several forms of neural and behavioral plasticity. The present studies examined whether NMDA receptors might be involved in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence, two examples of behavioral plasticity. The noncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 attenuated the development of tolerance to the analgesic effect of morphine without affecting acute morphine analgesia. In addition, MK-801 attenuated the development of morphine dependence as assessed by naloxone-precipitated withdrawal. These results suggest that NMDA receptors may be important in the development of opiate tolerance and dependence.

  5. (-) Arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β.

    PubMed

    Ogungbe, Ifedayo Victor; Crouch, Rebecca A; Demeritte, Teresa

    2014-11-24

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (-) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  6. (−) Arctigenin and (+) Pinoresinol Are Antagonists of the Human Thyroid Hormone Receptor β

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lignans are important biologically active dietary polyphenolic compounds. Consumption of foods that are rich in lignans is associated with positive health effects. Using modeling tools to probe the ligand-binding pockets of molecular receptors, we found that lignans have high docking affinity for the human thyroid hormone receptor β. Follow-up experimental results show that lignans (−) arctigenin and (+) pinoresinol are antagonists of the human thyroid hormone receptor β. The modeled complexes show key plausible interactions between the two ligands and important amino acid residues of the receptor. PMID:25383984

  7. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1)) assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b) values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2)) compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2):17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively). Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1) assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2) rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive ERA with

  8. Identification of Trisubstituted-pyrazol Carboxamide Analogs as Novel and Potent Antagonists of Farnesoid X Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Donna D.; Lin, Wenwei; Forman, Barry M.; Chen, Taosheng

    2014-01-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, NRIH4) plays a major role in the control of cholesterol metabolism. This suggests that antagonizing the transcriptional activity of FXR is a potential means to treat cholestasis and related metabolic disorders. Here we describe the synthesis, biological evaluation, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) studies of trisubstituted-pyrazol carboxamides as novel and potent FXR antagonists. One of these novel FXR antagonists, 4j has an IC50 of 7.5 nM in an FXR binding assay and 468.5 nM in a cell-based FXR antagonistic assay. Compound 4j has no detectable FXR agonistic activity or cytotoxicity. Notably, 4j is the most potent FXR antagonist identified to date; it has a promising in vitro profile and could serve as an excellent chemical tool to elucidate the biological function of FXR. PMID:24775917

  9. [Discovery and pharmacological properties of selective neurokinin-receptor antagonists, FK224 and FK888].

    PubMed

    Fujii, T

    1995-09-01

    In order to create a new drug for the treatment of respiratory diseases, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, having a novel therapeutic mechanism, we have been trying to develop new compounds with neurokinin (NK)-receptor antagonistic effects. We used [3H]-substance P binding to guinea pig lung membrane for the first screening system and successfully discovered FK224 from a fermentation product and FK888 from chemical design studies using an octapeptide antagonist (D-Pro4,D-Trp7,9,10) SP4-11 as the parent compound. FK224 and FK888 showed different selectivities against the NK-receptor subtypes (NK1, NK2, NK3); FK888 was a highly potent NK1-selective antagonist, and FK224 was a NK1 + NK2 dual receptor antagonist. Neither compound had any activity on the NK3 receptor. In the in vivo experiments, FK224 and FK888 significantly inhibited the constriction and plasma extravasation in the airway induced by agonist injection. These compounds also showed inhibitory effects on the airway response induced by capsaicin and antidromic stimulation of vagus nerves. Furthermore, FK224 and FK888 were effective on the mucus secretion in the airway and the cough reflex induced by citric acid challenge. There were some differences in the effects of FK224 and FK888 in the in vivo experiments, and it was suggested that the NK1 receptor and NK2 receptor were mainly involved in neurogenic inflammation and airway constriction, respectively. FK224 and FK888 are now undergoing clinical studies to test the effectiveness of a NK antagonist in human respiratory diseases. PMID:8529964

  10. Histamine H3 receptor antagonist decreases cue-induced alcohol reinstatement in mice.

    PubMed

    Nuutinen, Saara; Mäki, Tiia; Rozov, Stanislav; Bäckström, Pia; Hyytiä, Petri; Piepponen, Petteri; Panula, Pertti

    2016-07-01

    We have earlier found that the histamine H3 receptor (H3R) antagonism diminishes motivational aspects of alcohol reinforcement in mice. Here we studied the role of H3Rs in cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in C57BL/6J mice using two different H3R antagonists. Systemic administration of H3R antagonists attenuated cue-induced alcohol seeking suggesting that H3R antagonists may reduce alcohol craving. To understand how alcohol affects dopamine and histamine release, a microdialysis study was performed on C57BL/6J mice and the levels of histamine, dopamine and dopamine metabolites were measured in the nucleus accumbens. Alcohol administration was combined with an H3R antagonist pretreatment to reveal whether modulation of H3R affects the effects of alcohol on neurotransmitter release. Alcohol significantly increased the release of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens but did not affect histamine release. Pretreatment with H3R antagonist ciproxifan did not modify the effect of alcohol on dopamine release. However, histamine release was markedly increased with ciproxifan. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that H3R antagonism attenuates cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking in mice. Alcohol alone does not affect histamine release in the nucleus accumbens but H3R antagonist instead increases histamine release significantly suggesting that the mechanism by which H3R antagonist inhibits alcohol seeking found in the present study and the decreased alcohol reinforcement, reward and consumption found earlier might include alterations in the histaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. These findings imply that selective antagonists of H3Rs could be a therapeutic strategy to prevent relapse and possibly diminish craving to alcohol use. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Histamine Receptors'. PMID:26107118

  11. Bradykinin as a pain mediator: receptors are localized to sensory neurons, and antagonists have analgesic actions

    SciTech Connect

    Steranka, L.R.; Manning, D.C.; DeHaas, C.J.; Ferkany, J.W.; Borosky, S.A.; Connor, J.R.; Vavrek, R.J.; Stewart, J.M.; Snyder, S.H.

    1988-05-01

    Autoradiographic studies localize (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptor binding sites to the substantia gelatinosa, dorsal root, and a subset of small cells in both the dorsal root and trigeminal ganglia of the guinea pig. (/sup 3/H)Bradykinin labeling is also observed over myocardinal/coronary visceral afferent fibers. The localization of (/sup 3/H)bradykinin receptors to nociceptive pathways supports a role for bradykinin in pain mediation. Several bradkykinin antagonists block bradykinin-induced acute vascular pain in the rat. The bradykinin antagonists also relieve bradykinin- and urate-induced hyperalgesia in the rat paw. These results indicate that bradykinin is a physiologic mediator of pain and that bradykinin antagonists have analgesic activity in both acute and chronic pain models.

  12. Orexin Receptor Antagonists: New Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Insomnia.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Anthony J; Cox, Christopher D; Coleman, Paul J

    2016-01-28

    Since its discovery in 1998, the orexin system, composed of two G-protein coupled receptors, orexins 1 and 2, and two neuropeptide agonists, orexins A and B, has captured the attention of the scientific community as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity, anxiety, and sleep/wake disorders. Genetic evidence in rodents, dogs, and humans was revealed between 1999 and 2000, demonstrating a causal link between dysfunction or deletion of the orexin system and narcolepsy, a disorder characterized by hypersomnolence during normal wakefulness. These findings encouraged efforts to discover agonists to treat narcolepsy and, alternatively, antagonists to treat insomnia. This perspective will focus on the discovery and development of structurally diverse orexin antagonists suitable for preclinical pharmacology studies and human clinical trials. The work described herein culminated in the 2014 FDA approval of suvorexant as a first-in-class dual orexin receptor antagonist for the treatment of insomnia. PMID:26317591

  13. Structure-based design of eugenol analogs as potential estrogen receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Anita, Yulia; Radifar, Muhammad; Kardono, Leonardus Bs; Hanafi, Muhammad; Istyastono, Enade P

    2012-01-01

    Eugenol is an essential oil mainly found in the buds and leaves of clove (Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merrill and Perry), which has been reported to have activity on inhibition of cell proliferation and apoptosis induction in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. This biological activity is correlated to its activity as an estrogen receptor antagonist. In this article, we present the construction and validation of structure-based virtual screening (SBVS) protocols to identify the potent estrogen receptor α (ER) antagonists. The selected protocol, which gave acceptable enrichment factors as a virtual screening protocol, subsequently used to virtually screen eugenol, its analogs and their dimers. Based on the virtual screening results, dimer eugenol of 4-[4-hydroxy-3-(prop-2-en-1- yl)phenyl]-2-(prop-2-en-1-yl)phenol is recommended to be developed further in order to discover novel and potent ER antagonists. PMID:23144548

  14. Isoquinoline derivatives as potent CRTH2 receptor antagonists: synthesis and SAR.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa-Shimono, Rie; Sekiguchi, Yoshinori; Koami, Takeshi; Kawamura, Madoka; Wakasugi, Daisuke; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Wakahara, Shunichi; Matsumoto, Kayo; Takayama, Tetsuo

    2012-05-01

    Synthesis and structure-activity relationship of a novel series of isoquinoline CRTH2 receptor antagonists are described. One of the most potent compounds, TASP0376377 (6m), showed not only potent binding affinity (IC(50)=19 nM) but also excellent functional antagonist activity (IC(50)=13 nM). TASP0376377 was tested for its ability of a chemotaxis assay to show the effectiveness (IC(50)=23 nM), which was in good agreement with the CRTH2 antagonist potency. Furthermore, TASP0376377 showed sufficient selectivity for binding to CRTH2 over the DP1 prostanoid receptor (IC(50)>1 μM) and COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes (IC(50)>10 μM). PMID:22469703

  15. Benzofuran-substituted urea derivatives as novel P2Y(1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; Aiyar, Nambi; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Erhardt, Joseph A; Kallal, Lorena A; Morrow, Dwight M; Senadhi, Shobha; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Marino, Joseph P

    2010-07-15

    Benzofuran-substituted urea analogs have been identified as novel P2Y(1) receptor antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies around the urea and the benzofuran moieties resulted in compounds having improved potency. Several analogs were shown to inhibit ADP-mediated platelet activation. PMID:20542694

  16. New benzoyl urea derivatives as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Borza, I; Greiner, I; Kolok, S; Galgóczy, K; Ignácz-Szendrei, Gy; Horváth, Cs; Farkas, S; Gáti, T; Háda, V; Domány, Gy

    2006-09-01

    A novel series of benzoyl urea derivatives was prepared and identified as NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The influence of the substitution of the piperidine ring on the biological activity of the compounds was studied. Compound 9 was active in the formalin test in mice. PMID:17020160

  17. A Time-course Study with the Androgen Receptor Antagonist Flutamide in Fish

    EPA Science Inventory

    Flutamide, a drug registered to treat some types of prostate cancer in humans, has been used for many years as a model androgen receptor (AR) antagonist in studies aimed at characterizing disruption of the vertebrate hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Various studies hav...

  18. CHOLECYSTOKININ RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST HALTS PROGRESSION OF PANCREATIC CANCER PRECURSOR LESIONS AND FIBROSIS IN MICE

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jill P.; Cooper, Timothy K.; McGovern, Christopher O.; Gilius, Evan L.; Zhong, Qing; Liao, Jiangang; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Matters, Gail L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Exogenous administration of cholecystokinin (CCK) induces hypertrophy and hyperplasia of the pancreas with an increase in DNA content. We hypothesized that endogenous CCK is involved with the malignant progression of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) lesions and the fibrosis associated with pancreatic cancer. Methods The presence of CCK receptors in early PanIN lesions was examined by immunohistochemistry in mouse and human pancreas. Pdx1-Cre/LSL-KrasG12D transgenic mice were randomized to receive either untreated drinking water or water supplemented with a CCK-receptor antagonist (proglumide, 0.1mg/ml). Pancreas from mice were removed and examined histologically for number and grade of PanINs after 1, 2 or 4 months of antagonist therapy. Results Both CCK-A and CCK-B receptors were identified in early stage PanINs from mouse and human pancreas. The grade of PanIN lesions was reversed and progression to advanced lesions arrested in mice treated with proglumide compared to controls (p=0.004). Furthermore, pancreatic fibrosis was significantly reduced in antagonist-treated animals compared to vehicle (pitalic>0.001). Conclusions These findings demonstrate that endogenous CCK is in part responsible for the development and progression of pancreatic cancer. Use of CCK-receptor antagonists may have a role in cancer prophylaxis in high risk subjects, and may reduce fibrosis in the microenvironment. PMID:25058882

  19. 7-Azaindole-3-acetic acid derivatives: potent and selective CRTh2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Adcock, Claire; Bala, Kamlesh; Barker, Lucy; Brown, Zarin; Dubois, Gerald; Budd, David; Cox, Brian; Fairhurst, Robin A; Furegati, Markus; Leblanc, Catherine; Manini, Jodie; Profit, Rachael; Reilly, John; Stringer, Rowan; Schmidt, Alfred; Turner, Katharine L; Watson, Simon J; Willis, Jennifer; Williams, Gareth; Wilson, Caroline

    2009-08-15

    High throughput screening identified a 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid scaffold as a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist chemotype, which could be optimised to furnish a highly selective compound with good functional potency for inhibition of human eosinophil shape change in whole blood and oral bioavailability in the rat. PMID:19592244

  20. Synthetic approaches to site selective deuterium incorporation in a novel CRTh2 receptor antagonist clinical candidate.

    PubMed

    Sandham, David A; Page, Christopher J

    2014-03-01

    Selection of acidic or basic reaction conditions, combined with appropriate temperatures, allowed for site selective direct incorporation of deuterium at multiple positions in the 7-azaindole-3-acetic acid CRTh2 receptor antagonist clinical candidate NVP-QAV680. PMID:24452929

  1. Possible differences in modes of agonist and antagonist binding at human 5-HT6 receptors.

    PubMed

    Pullagurla, Manik R; Westkaemper, Richard B; Glennon, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A graphics model of the human 5-HT6 receptor was constructed and automated docking studies were performed. The model suggests that 5-HT6 antagonist arylsulfonyltryptamines might bind differently than that of the agonist serotonin. Furthermore, the model explains many of the empirical results from our previous structure-affinity studies. PMID:15357994

  2. Attenuation of antagonist-induced impairment of dopamine receptors by L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide

    SciTech Connect

    Saleh, M.I.M.

    1988-01-01

    The present study was undertaken in order to determine whether chronic,long-term postnatal challenge of rat pups per se, with specific dopamine D1 and D2 receptor antagonists, would modify the ontogeny of the respective receptor types. Since the neuropeptide L-prolyl-L-leucyl-glycinamide (PLG) attenuates the effect of haloperidol on dopamine D2 receptors in adult rats it was of interest to determine whether PLG would modulate antagonists-induced alterations in the ontogeny of striatal dopamine D1 and D2 receptors. Half of the rats were treated daily for 32 days from birth with SCH-23390, a selective dopamine D1 antagonist; or spiroperidol, a selective dopamine D2 antagonists; or both SCH-23390 and spiroperidol; or saline. The other half of the litters were treated with PLG, in combination with the other treatments. Animals were decapitated at 5, 8, and 12 weeks from birth for neurochemical analysis of the striatum. Chronic SCH-23390 treatment produced a 70-80% decrease in the binding of ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 to striatal homogenates. The alteration at 5 weeks was associated with a 78% decrease in the Bmax for ({sup 3}H) SCH-23390 binding, and no change in the K{sub D}. Similarly, at 5, 8, and 12 weeks, chronic spiroperidol treatment reduced the binding of ({sup 3}H) spiroperidol to striatal homogenates by 70-80%.

  3. I. Effects of a Dopamine Receptor Antagonist on Fathead Minnow, Pimephales promelas ,Reproduction

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study used a 21 d fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) reproduction assay to test the hypothesis that exposure to the dopamine 2 receptor (D2R) antagonist, haloperidol, would impair fish reproduction. Additionally, a 96 h experiment with fathead minnows and zebrafish (Danio ...

  4. Inhibition of Acetylcholinesterase Modulates NMDA Receptor Antagonist Mediated Alterations in the Developing Brain

    PubMed Central

    Bendix, Ivo; Serdar, Meray; Herz, Josephine; von Haefen, Clarissa; Nasser, Fatme; Rohrer, Benjamin; Endesfelder, Stefanie; Felderhoff-Mueser, Ursula; Spies, Claudia D.; Sifringer, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists has been demonstrated to induce neurodegeneration in newborn rats. However, in clinical practice the use of NMDA receptor antagonists as anesthetics and sedatives cannot always be avoided. The present study investigated the effect of the indirect cholinergic agonist physostigmine on neurotrophin expression and the extracellular matrix during NMDA receptor antagonist induced injury to the immature rat brain. The aim was to investigate matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 activity, as well as expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) after co-administration of the non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK801 (dizocilpine) and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitor physostigmine. The AChE inhibitor physostigmine ameliorated the MK801-induced reduction of BDNF mRNA and protein levels, reduced MK801-triggered MMP-2 activity and prevented decreased TIMP-2 mRNA expression. Our results indicate that AChE inhibition may prevent newborn rats from MK801-mediated brain damage by enhancing neurotrophin-associated signaling pathways and by modulating the extracellular matrix. PMID:24595240

  5. A cross-laboratory preclinical study on the effectiveness of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stroke.

    PubMed

    Maysami, Samaneh; Wong, Raymond; Pradillo, Jesus M; Denes, Adam; Dhungana, Hiramani; Malm, Tarja; Koistinaho, Jari; Orset, Cyrille; Rahman, Mahbubur; Rubio, Marina; Schwaninger, Markus; Vivien, Denis; Bath, Philip M; Rothwell, Nancy J; Allan, Stuart M

    2016-03-01

    Stroke represents a global challenge and is a leading cause of permanent disability worldwide. Despite much effort, translation of research findings to clinical benefit has not yet been successful. Failure of neuroprotection trials is considered, in part, due to the low quality of preclinical studies, low level of reproducibility across different laboratories and that stroke co-morbidities have not been fully considered in experimental models. More rigorous testing of new drug candidates in different experimental models of stroke and initiation of preclinical cross-laboratory studies have been suggested as ways to improve translation. However, to our knowledge, no drugs currently in clinical stroke trials have been investigated in preclinical cross-laboratory studies. The cytokine interleukin 1 is a key mediator of neuronal injury, and the naturally occurring interleukin 1 receptor antagonist has been reported as beneficial in experimental studies of stroke. In the present paper, we report on a preclinical cross-laboratory stroke trial designed to investigate the efficacy of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in different research laboratories across Europe. Our results strongly support the therapeutic potential of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist in experimental stroke and provide further evidence that interleukin 1 receptor antagonist should be evaluated in more extensive clinical stroke trials. PMID:26661169

  6. Structure of the human M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor bound to an antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Haga, Kazuko; Kruse, Andrew C.; Asada, Hidetsugu; Yurugi-Kobayashi, Takami; Shiroishi, Mitsunori; Zhang, Cheng; Weis, William I.; Okada, Tetsuji; Kobilka, Brian K.; Haga, Tatsuya; Kobayashi, Takuya

    2012-03-15

    The parasympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system regulates the activity of multiple organ systems. Muscarinic receptors are G-protein-coupled receptors that mediate the response to acetylcholine released from parasympathetic nerves. Their role in the unconscious regulation of organ and central nervous system function makes them potential therapeutic targets for a broad spectrum of diseases. The M2 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (M2 receptor) is essential for the physiological control of cardiovascular function through activation of G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels, and is of particular interest because of its extensive pharmacological characterization with both orthosteric and allosteric ligands. Here we report the structure of the antagonist-bound human M2 receptor, the first human acetylcholine receptor to be characterized structurally, to our knowledge. The antagonist 3-quinuclidinyl-benzilate binds in the middle of a long aqueous channel extending approximately two-thirds through the membrane. The orthosteric binding pocket is formed by amino acids that are identical in all five muscarinic receptor subtypes, and shares structural homology with other functionally unrelated acetylcholine binding proteins from different species. A layer of tyrosine residues forms an aromatic cap restricting dissociation of the bound ligand. A binding site for allosteric ligands has been mapped to residues at the entrance to the binding pocket near this aromatic cap. The structure of the M2 receptor provides insights into the challenges of developing subtype-selective ligands for muscarinic receptors and their propensity for allosteric regulation.

  7. In silico modelling of prostacyclin and other lipid mediators to nuclear receptors reveal novel thyroid hormone receptor antagonist properties.

    PubMed

    Perez Diaz, Noelia; Zloh, Mire; Patel, Pryank; Mackenzie, Louise S

    2016-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) is a key mediator involved in cardiovascular homeostasis, acting predominantly on two receptor types; cell surface IP receptor and cytosolic peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) β/δ. Having a very short half-life, direct methods to determine its long term effects on cells is difficult, and little is known of its interactions with nuclear receptors. Here we used computational chemistry methods to investigate the potential for PGI2, beraprost (IP receptor agonist), and GW0742 (PPARβ/δ agonist), to bind to nuclear receptors, confirmed with pharmacological methods. In silico screening predicted that PGI2, beraprost, and GW0742 have the potential to bind to different nuclear receptors, in particular thyroid hormone β receptor (TRβ) and thyroid hormone α receptor (TRα). Docking analysis predicts a binding profile to residues thought to have allosteric control on the TR ligand binding site. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that beraprost and GW0742 display TRβ and TRα antagonistic properties; beraprost IC50 6.3×10(-5)mol/L and GW0742 IC50 4.9×10(-6)mol/L. Changes to triiodothyronine (T3) induced vasodilation of rat mesenteric arteries measured on the wire myograph were measured in the presence of the TR antagonist MLS000389544 (10(-5)mol/L), beraprost (10(-5)mol/L) and GW0742 (10(-5)mol/L); all significantly inhibited T3 induced vasodilation compared to controls. We have shown that both beraprost and GW0742 exhibit TRβ and TRα antagonist behaviour, and suggests that PGI2 has the ability to affect the long term function of cells through binding to and inactivating thyroid hormone receptors. PMID:26686607

  8. ( sup 3 H)SCH39166, a D1 dopamine receptor antagonist: Binding characteristics and localization

    SciTech Connect

    Wamsley, J.K.; Hunt, M.E.; McQuade, R.D.; Alburges, M.E. )

    1991-02-01

    Schering-Plough Research has developed a new, more specific analogue of SCH23390. This compound, SCH39166, has been shown to be a potent, specific, D1 receptor antagonist with several features which are advantageous over its predecessor. In this report, the binding characteristics of (3H)SCH39166 are described by in vitro analysis in rat brain tissues. The binding was shown to be of high affinity (Kd in the low nM range), saturable, and specific (readily displaceable with SCH23390, but not with the D2 receptor antagonists sulpiride or haloperidol). The binding of SCH39166 is more selective for binding to D1 receptors than SCH23390 with regard to overlap of the latter compound onto 5HT2 and 5HT1C receptors. Autoradiographic localization of D1 receptor sites labeled with (3H)SCH39166 showed a very specific distribution in areas known to contain high quantities of D1 receptors. These regions included the deepest layer of the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, olfactory tubercle, entopeduncular nucleus, and substantia nigra-pars reticulata, as well as less dense binding in a few other areas. At the concentration of ligand used (1 nM), there was a noticeable paucity of labeling in lamina IV of the cerebral cortex and in the choroid plexus, regions of high 5HT2 and 5HT1C receptor binding, respectively. Thus, SCH39166 represents a new D1 receptor antagonist which shows a greater specificity for the D1 receptor than its predecessor SCH23390. As previously shown, another distinct advantage of this compound is its stability in primates which should allow the determination of the effects and utility of D1 receptor antagonism in vivo.

  9. Mesenteric vascular reactivity to histamine receptor agonists and antagonists. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Walus, K.M.; Fondacaro, J.D.; Jacobson, E.D.

    1981-05-01

    Response patterns of intestinal blood flow, oxygen extraction and consumption, blood flow distribution, and motility were assessed during intraarterial infusions of histamine, histamine after H1 or H2 blockade, dimaprit or dimaprit after H2 blockade. Histamine produced an initial peak response of blood flow with a slow decrease thereafter. Oxygen extraction was evenly depressed throughout the infusion, and oxygen consumption increased at the beginning. All initial responses were blocked by tripelennamine. Ranitidine, a new H2 antagonist, accelerated the decay of all responses. Dimaprit produced effects identical to those of histamine after tripelennamine. Distribution of blood flow was unchanged at the beginning of histamine infusion, but subsequently showed a shift to muscularis which was blocked by tripelennamine. Histamine usually stimulated intestinal contractions and this effect was abolished by tripelennamine. Thus, H1 stimulation, besides producing an initial vasodilation, increases oxygen uptake and redistributes flow to the muscularis.

  10. Oxycodone with an opioid receptor antagonist: A review.

    PubMed

    Davis, Mellar P; Goforth, Harold W

    2016-01-01

    The rationale for putting opioid antagonists with an agonist is to improve pain control, to reduce side effects, and/or to reduce abuse. The combination of prolonged release (PR) oxycodone and naloxone reduces constipation as demonstrated in multiple studies and has been designated a tamper-resistant opioid by the Food and Drug Administration. Bioequivalence of the combination product compared with PR oxycodone has not been established. Several of the pivotal studies provided suboptimal laxative support in the control arm of the randomized trials. Two noninferiority trials have demonstrated equivalent analgesia between PR oxycodone and the combination product at doses of less than 120 mg of oxycodone per day. There appears to be an analgesic ceiling above 80-120 mg of oxycodone per day. Safety monitoring during randomized trials was not been well described in published manuscripts. Benefits appear to be better for those with chronic noncancer pain compared with individuals with cancer when constipation was the primary outcome. PMID:26908305

  11. Histamine H₄ Receptor Antagonists: A New Approach for Tinnitus Treatment?

    PubMed

    Hagenow, Jens; Stark, Holger

    2015-01-01

    Tinnitus, a disorder with disruptive sound perception in the head without an external source, affects around 15 % of the worldwide adult population. Since there is no approved drug for the treatment for this symptom, novel strategies need to be developed to provide relief for the patient. A patent from the small French start-up company Sensorion suggests the use of histamine H4 receptor (H4R) inhibitors as potential treatment. Since histamine and its receptor subtypes are strongly involved in neuronal and inflammatory processes in vestibular areas, targeting the H4R could be a novel way to gain a treatment for tinnitus. Although mRNA and protein levels of H4R have been demonstrated on isolated spiral ganglion neurons from mice, the methods of receptor detection as well as the species relevance of the data are under discussion and require considerable further verification, especially on a disease with a high medical need like tinnitus. PMID:25909438

  12. TNF-α receptor antagonist attenuates isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, NENGLI; LIANG, YAFENG; YANG, PEI; WANG, WEIJIAN; ZHANG, XUEZHENG; WANG, JUNLU

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD), a common clinical in aged patients, is characterized by deficits in cognitive functions in patients following anesthesia and surgery. It has been demonstrated that isoflurane may lead to cognitive impairment in aged rats; however, effective clinical interventions for preventing this disorder are limited. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α has been suggested to be involved in neuroinflammation as well as the development of POCD. Accordingly, the present study aimed to investigate whether TNF-α signaling is involved in the isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats, and whether TNF-α receptor antagonist are able to attenuate isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment in aged rats. A population of 20-month-old rats were administered TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 or an equal volume of saline by intraperitoneal injection 12 h prior to exposure to isoflurane to model cognitive impairment following anesthesia in old patients. Then the rats were exposed to 1.3% isoflurane for 4 h. In the control group, rats showed impaired cognitive functions evaluated by Morris water maze assay after isoflurane exposure. Furthermore, isoflurane exposure induced marked upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines, including interleukin (IL)-1β, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 in the hippocampus tissue. In the experimental group, intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 significantly attenuated isoflurane-induced cognitive impairment and upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Further investigation revealed that intracisternal administration of TNF-α receptor antagonist R-7050 notably suppressed isoflurane-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling. Collectively, the present results suggest that TNF-α receptor antagonist may serve as a potential agent for the prevention of anesthesia-induced cognitive decline in aged patients. PMID:27347079

  13. APORPHINOID ANTAGONISTS OF 5-HT2A RECEPTORS: FURTHER EVALUATION OF RING A SUBSTITUENTS AND THE SIZE OF RING C

    PubMed Central

    Ponnala, Shashikanth; Kapadia, Nirav; Navarro, Hernán A.; Harding, Wayne W.

    2014-01-01

    A series of ring A modified analogs of nantenine as well as structural variants in ring C were synthesized and evaluated for antagonist activity at 5-HT2A and α1A receptors. Halogenation improves 5-HT2A antagonist potency in molecules containing a C1 methoxyl/C2 methoxyl or C1 methoxyl/C2 hydroxyl moiety. Bromination or iodination (but not chlorination) with the latter moiety also significantly increased α1A antagonist potency. Homologation or contraction of ring C adversely affected antagonist activity at both receptors, implying that a six-membered ring C motif is beneficial for high antagonist potency at both receptors. Molecular docking studies suggest that the improved antagonist activity (by virtue of improved affinity) of C3 halogenated aporphines in this study, is attributable to favorable interactions with the C3 halogen and F339 and/or F340. PMID:24766771

  14. Bazedoxifene-scaffold-based mimetics of solomonsterols A and B as novel pregnane X receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Hodnik, Žiga; Peterlin Mašič, Lucija; Tomašić, Tihomir; Smodiš, Domen; D'Amore, Claudio; Fiorucci, Stefano; Kikelj, Danijel

    2014-06-12

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR), a member of the NR1I nuclear receptor family, acts as a xenobiotic sensor and a paramount transcriptional regulator of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters. The overexpression of PXR in various cancer cells indicates the importance of PXR as a drug target for countering multidrug resistance in anticancer treatments. We describe the discovery of novel bazedoxifene-scaffold-based PXR antagonists inspired by the marine sulfated steroids solomonsterol A and B as natural leads. A luciferase reporter assay on a PXR-transfected HepG2 cell line identified compounds 19-24 as promising PXR antagonists. Further structure-activity relationship studies of the most active PXR antagonist from the series (compound 20, IC50 = 11 μM) revealed the importance of hydroxyl groups as hydrogen-bond donors for PXR antagonistic activity. PXR antagonists 20 and 24 (IC50 = 14 μM), in addition to the downregulation of PXR expression, exhibited inhibition of PXR-induced CYP3A4 expression, which illustrates their potential to suppress PXR-regulated phase-I drug metabolism. PMID:24828006

  15. Inhibition of Ebola and Marburg Virus Entry by G Protein-Coupled Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Han; Lear-Rooney, Calli M.; Johansen, Lisa; Varhegyi, Elizabeth; Chen, Zheng W.; Olinger, Gene G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Filoviruses, consisting of Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV), are among the most lethal infectious threats to mankind. Infections by these viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fevers in humans and nonhuman primates with high mortality rates. Since there is currently no vaccine or antiviral therapy approved for humans, there is an urgent need to develop prophylactic and therapeutic options for use during filoviral outbreaks and bioterrorist attacks. One of the ideal targets against filoviral infection and diseases is at the entry step, which is mediated by the filoviral glycoprotein (GP). In this report, we screened a chemical library of small molecules and identified numerous inhibitors, which are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs, including histamine receptors, 5-HT (serotonin) receptors, muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, and adrenergic receptor. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of both infectious EBOV and MARV, indicating a broad antiviral activity of the GPCR antagonists. The time-of-addition experiment and microscopic studies suggest that GPCR antagonists block filoviral entry at a step following the initial attachment but prior to viral/cell membrane fusion. These results strongly suggest that GPCRs play a critical role in filoviral entry and GPCR antagonists can be developed as an effective anti-EBOV/MARV therapy. IMPORTANCE Infection of Ebola virus and Marburg virus can cause severe illness in humans with a high mortality rate, and currently there is no FDA-approved vaccine or therapeutic treatment available. The 2013-2015 epidemic in West Africa underscores a lack of our understanding in the infection and pathogenesis of these viruses and the urgency of drug discovery and development. In this study, we have identified numerous inhibitors that are known G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) antagonists targeting different GPCRs. These inhibitors can effectively block replication of

  16. Effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists beyond platelet inhibition - comparison of ticagrelor with thienopyridines.

    PubMed

    Nylander, Sven; Schulz, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    The effect and clinical benefit of P2Y12 receptor antagonists may not be limited to platelet inhibition and the prevention of arterial thrombus formation. Potential additional effects include reduction of the pro-inflammatory role of activated platelets and effects related to P2Y12 receptor inhibition on other cells apart from platelets. P2Y12 receptor antagonists, thienopyridines and ticagrelor, differ in their mode of action being prodrugs instead of direct acting and irreversibly instead of reversibly binding to P2Y12 . These key differences may provide different potential when it comes to additional effects. In addition to P2Y12 receptor blockade, ticagrelor is unique in having the only well-documented additional target of inhibition, the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1. The current review will address the effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists beyond platelets and the protection against arterial thrombosis. The discussion will include the potential for thienopyridines and ticagrelor to mediate anti-inflammatory effects, to conserve vascular function, to affect atherosclerosis, to provide cardioprotection and to induce dyspnea. PMID:26758983

  17. Enantiopure Indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines: Synthesis and Evaluation as NMDA Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Nuno A L; Sureda, Francesc X; Pérez, Maria; Amat, Mercedes; Santos, Maria M M

    2016-01-01

    Enantiopure tryptophanol is easily obtained from the reduction of its parent natural amino acid trypthophan (available from the chiral pool), and can be used as chiral auxiliary/inductor to control the stereochemical course of a diastereoselective reaction. Furthermore, enantiopure tryptophanol is useful for the syntheses of natural products or biological active molecules containing the aminoalcohol functionality. In this communication, we report the development of a small library of indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines and evaluation of their activity as N-Methyl d-Aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists. The indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidine scaffold was obtained using the following key steps: (i) a stereoselective cyclocondensation of (S)- or (R)-tryptophanol with appropriate racemic δ-oxoesters; (ii) a stereocontrolled cyclization on the indole nucleus. The synthesized enantiopure indolo[2,3-a]quinolizidines were evaluated as NMDA receptor antagonists and one compound was identified to be 2.9-fold more potent as NMDA receptor blocker than amantadine (used in the clinic for Parkinson's disease). This compound represents a hit compound for the development of novel NMDA receptor antagonists with potential applications in neurodegenerative disorders associated with overactivation of NMDA receptors. PMID:27509489

  18. Identification of a GPER/GPR30 antagonist with improved estrogen receptor counterselectivity.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Megan K; Field, Angela S; Burai, Ritwik; Ramesh, Chinnasamy; Petrie, Whitney K; Bologa, Cristian G; Oprea, Tudor I; Yamaguchi, Yuri; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi; Sklar, Larry A; Hathaway, Helen J; Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Prossnitz, Eric R

    2011-11-01

    GPER/GPR30 is a seven-transmembrane G protein-coupled estrogen receptor that regulates many aspects of mammalian biology and physiology. We have previously described both a GPER-selective agonist G-1 and antagonist G15 based on a tetrahydro-3H-cyclopenta[c]quinoline scaffold. The antagonist lacks an ethanone moiety that likely forms important hydrogen bonds involved in receptor activation. Computational docking studies suggested that the lack of the ethanone substituent in G15 could minimize key steric conflicts, present in G-1, that limit binding within the ERα ligand binding pocket. In this report, we identify low-affinity cross-reactivity of the GPER antagonist G15 to the classical estrogen receptor ERα. To generate an antagonist with enhanced selectivity, we therefore synthesized an isosteric G-1 derivative, G36, containing an isopropyl moiety in place of the ethanone moiety. We demonstrate that G36 shows decreased binding and activation of ERα, while maintaining its antagonist profile towards GPER. G36 selectively inhibits estrogen-mediated activation of PI3K by GPER but not ERα. It also inhibits estrogen- and G-1-mediated calcium mobilization as well as ERK1/2 activation, with no effect on EGF-mediated ERK1/2 activation. Similar to G15, G36 inhibits estrogen- and G-1-stimulated proliferation of uterine epithelial cells in vivo. The identification of G36 as a GPER antagonist with improved ER counterselectivity represents a significant step towards the development of new highly selective therapeutics for cancer and other diseases. PMID:21782022

  19. Small-molecule endothelin receptor antagonists: a review of patenting activity across therapeutic areas.

    PubMed

    Mucke, Hermann A M

    2009-06-01

    In the field of nonpeptide NCEs with endothelin receptor antagonist activity, a burst in corporate IP filings occurred in the 1990s once the human endothelin system had been characterized, but patent activity has declined in the past decade. Universities have not been active in this area of research to a degree that would have led to many patent applications. While three endothelin receptor antagonists (bosentan, sitaxentan and ambrisentan) are already available for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension, the use of such compounds for the larger therapy areas of heart failure, cancer and nephropathy is still being evaluated in late-stage clinical trials. Marketed and advanced-stage endothelin receptor blockers have remarkably little chemical diversity; thus, the substantially larger chemical space defined by patenting remains to be explored. PMID:19517317

  20. Drug Insight: endothelin-receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Marc; Simonneau, Gérald

    2005-12-01

    Rapid advances in the understanding of endothelin as a naturally occurring peptide with developmental and regulatory roles in normal physiology, along with a number of deleterious effects under pathologic conditions (including vasoconstriction, fibrosis, vascular hypertrophy, and inflammation) have led to the development of endothelin-receptor antagonists (ERAs). Bosentan, an antagonist with dual specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtypes A and B, has been shown to be efficacious and well tolerated in placebo-controlled clinical trials and is now approved in many countries, including the US, Canada, and Europe, for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), including PAH associated with rheumatic diseases. ERAs with specificity for the endothelin-receptor subtype A, including sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, are currently undergoing investigation. This article reviews PAH associated with systemic rheumatic diseases and describes the role of ERAs in this setting. PMID:16932638

  1. Homology modeling and antagonist binding site study of the human histamine H2 receptor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Qi, Tao; Wei, Jing

    2012-11-01

    On the basis of the high resolution crystal structures of bovine rhodopsin, human beta2-adrenergic receptor and human A(2a) adenosine receptor, three-dimensional structure of the human histamine H2 receptor (HHR2) was developed by homology modeling. Results of the evaluations suggest that a high quality homology model for HHR2 has been obtained. Three antagonists, cimetidine, ranitidine and nizatidine, were applied to binding site study with this model through molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulations and the molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area calculations. One aspartic acid, Asp98 in transmembrane domain 7 (TM3), has been identified as major contributors to ligand binding by H-bond interactions. Asn159 in TM4 and Asp186 in TM5 are of great importance in stabilizing HHR2- antagonist complexes. Two hydrophobic sites especially two residues, Val99 in TM3 and Phe254 in TM6, were identified to be essential for their strong hydrophobic interactions with antagonists. The findings reported here are in agreement with available experimental mutagenesis data. This study should be very helpful for a better understanding of the action mode of the antagonist and for guiding further drug design and mutagenesis studies. PMID:22779803

  2. Identification of a New Morpholine Scaffold as a P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Young Ha; Lee, Joo-Youn; Park, Hee Dong; Kim, Tae Hun; Park, Min Chul; Choi, Gildon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor is critical for platelet activation and is an attractive drug target for the prevention of atherothrombotic events. Despite the proven antithrombotic efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors, these thienopyridine scaffolds are prodrugs that lack important features of the ideal antithrombotic agent. For this reason, ticagrelor-a new chemical class of P2Y12 receptor antagonist-was developed, but it can cause shortness of breath and various types of bleeding. Moreover, ticagrelor is a cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate/inhibitor and, therefore, caution should be exercised when it is used concomitantly with strong CYP3A4 inducers/inhibitors. There is a need for novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist scaffolds that are reversible and have high efficacy without associated side effects. Here, we describe a novel antagonist containing a morpholine moiety that was identified by screening libraries of commercially available compounds. The molecule, Compound E, acted on P2Y12, but not P2Y1 and P2Y13, and exhibited pharmacological characteristics that were distinct from those of ticagrelor, acting instead on P2Y12 via an allosteric mechanism. These results provide a basis for the development/optimization of a new class of P2Y12 antagonists. PMID:27563870

  3. A new class of pseudopeptide antagonists of the kinin B1 receptor containing alkyl spacers.

    PubMed

    Galoppini, C; Meini, S; Tancredi, M; Di Fenza, A; Triolo, A; Quartara, L; Maggi, C A; Formaggio, F; Toniolo, C; Mazzucco, S; Papini, A; Rovero, P

    1999-02-11

    Four previously reported kinin receptor peptide antagonists, including the B1 receptor-selective peptides desArg10-HOE 140 (H-D-Arg-Arg-Pro-Hyp-Gly-Thi-Ser-D-Tic-Oic-OH) and B-9858 (H-Lys-Lys-Arg-Pro-Hyp-Gly-Igl-Ser-D-Igl-Oic-OH), have been modified by replacement of the central tetrapeptide Pro-Hyp-Gly-Xaa with linear alkyl spacers of variable length. The analogue of desArg10-HOE 140 containing the 11-aminoundecanoic acid as spacer, MEN 11575 [H-D-Arg-Arg-NH-(CH2)10-CO-Ser-D-Tic-Oic-OH], was found to be slightly more potent than the unmodified peptide (pA2 = 7.1) as a kinin B1 receptor antagonist in the rat ileum longitudinal smooth muscle assay. Moreover, MEN 11575 is devoid of residual agonist activity at the kinin B1 receptor (rat ileum) and antagonist activity at the kinin B2 receptor (guinea pig ileum longitudinal smooth muscle). Both these activities are displayed by the parent peptide desArg10-HOE 140. Therefore, despite its greatly simplified chemical structure, MEN 11575 shows an improved pharmacological profile in terms of both potency and selectivity, and it represents a good template for the development of new peptidomimetic kinin B1 receptor antagonists. We also report an attempt to investigate the conformational role of the flexible, linear spacer of MEN 11575 and to design more constrained analogues, possibly locked in the bioactive conformation, using semirigid spacers based on Calpha-tetrasubstituted alpha-amino acids of the family of 1-aminocycloalkane-1-carboxylic acids (Acnc). PMID:9986712

  4. Antagonists of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) are potent growth inhibitors of prostate carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, L A; Krinks, C H Van; Durham, J; Tomkins, S E; Burnett, R D; Jones, E L; Chandraratna, R A S; Brown, G

    2001-01-01

    Novel synthetic antagonists of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) have been developed. To avoid interference by serum retinoids when testing these compounds, we established serum-free grown sub-lines (>3 years) of the prostate carcinoma lines LNCaP, PC3 and DU145. A high affinity pan-RAR antagonist (AGN194310, Kd for binding to RARs = 2–5 nM) inhibited colony formation (by 50%) by all three lines at 16–34 nM, and led to a transient accumulation of flask-cultured cells in G1 followed by apoptosis. AGN194310 is 12–22 fold more potent than all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) against cell lines and also more potent in inhibiting the growth of primary prostate carcinoma cells. PC3 and DU145 cells do not express RARβ, and an antagonist with predominant activity at RARβ and RARγ (AGN194431) inhibited colony formation at concentrations (∼100 nM) commensurate with a Kd value of 70 nM at RARγ. An RARα antagonist (AGN194301) was less potent (IC50 ∼200 nM), but was more active than specific agonists of RARα and of βγ. A component(s) of serum and of LNCaP-conditioned medium diminishes the activity of antagonists: this factor is not the most likely candidates IGF-1 and EGF. In vitro studies of RAR antagonists together with data from RAR-null mice lead to the hypothesis that RARγ-regulated gene transcription is necessary for the survival and maintenance of prostate epithelium. The increased potencies of RAR antagonists, as compared with agonists, suggest that antagonists may be useful in the treatment of prostate carcinoma. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11487280

  5. Serotonin 2C receptor antagonists induce fast-onset antidepressant effects.

    PubMed

    Opal, M D; Klenotich, S C; Morais, M; Bessa, J; Winkle, J; Doukas, D; Kay, L J; Sousa, N; Dulawa, S M

    2014-10-01

    Current antidepressants must be administered for several weeks to produce therapeutic effects. We show that selective serotonin 2C (5-HT2C) antagonists exert antidepressant actions with a faster-onset (5 days) than that of current antidepressants (14 days) in mice. Subchronic (5 days) treatment with 5-HT2C antagonists induced antidepressant behavioral effects in the chronic forced swim test (cFST), chronic mild stress (CMS) paradigm and olfactory bulbectomy paradigm. This treatment regimen also induced classical markers of antidepressant action: activation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and induction of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC). None of these effects were induced by subchronic treatment with citalopram, a prototypical selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Local infusion of 5-HT2C antagonists into the ventral tegmental area was sufficient to induce BDNF in the mPFC, and dopamine D1 receptor antagonist treatment blocked the antidepressant behavioral effects of 5-HT2C antagonists. 5-HT2C antagonists also activated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) in the mPFC, effects recently linked to rapid antidepressant action. Furthermore, 5-HT2C antagonists reversed CMS-induced atrophy of mPFC pyramidal neurons. Subchronic SSRI treatment, which does not induce antidepressant behavioral effects, also activated mTOR and eEF2 and reversed CMS-induced neuronal atrophy, indicating that these effects are not sufficient for antidepressant onset. Our findings reveal that 5-HT2C antagonists are putative fast-onset antidepressants, which act through enhancement of mesocortical dopaminergic signaling. PMID:24166413

  6. Major Depressive Disorder and Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wei; Sun, Huijiao; Chen, Hao; Yang, Xicheng; Xiao, Li; Liu, Renyu; Shao, Liming; Qiu, Zhuibai

    2016-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a common psychiatric disease worldwide. The clinical use of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs)/serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRIs) for this condition have been widely accepted, but they were challenged by unacceptable side-effects, potential drug-drug interactions (DDIs) or slow onset/lack of efficacy. The endogenous opioid system is involved in stress and emotion regulatory processes and its role in MDD has been implicated. Although several KOR antagonists including JDTic and PF-04455242 were discontinued in early clinical trials, ALKS 5461 and CERC-501(LY-2456302) survived and entered into Phase-III and Phase-II trials, respectively. Considering the efficacy and safety of early off-label use of buprenorphine in the management of the treatment-resistant depression (TRD), it will be not surprising to predict the potential success of ALKS 5461 (a combination of buprenorphine and ALKS-33) in the near future. Moreover, CERC-501 will be expected to be available as monotherapy or adjuvant therapy with other first-line antidepressants in the treatment of TRD, if ongoing clinical trials continue to provide positive benefit-risk profiles. Emerging new researches might bring more drug candidates targeting the endogenous opioid system to clinical trials to address current challenges in MDD treatment in clinical practice. PMID:27213169

  7. Species differences in the effects of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist zyklophin.

    PubMed

    Sirohi, Sunil; Aldrich, Jane V; Walker, Brendan M

    2016-03-01

    We have shown that dysregulation of the dynorphin/kappa-opioid receptor (DYN/KOR) system contributes to escalated alcohol self-administration in alcohol dependence and that KOR antagonists with extended durations of action selectively reduce escalated alcohol consumption in alcohol-dependent animals. As KOR antagonism has gained widespread attention as a potential therapeutic target to treat alcoholism and multiple neuropsychiatric disorders, we tested the effect of zyklophin (a short-acting KOR antagonist) on escalated alcohol self-administration in rats made alcohol-dependent using intermittent alcohol vapor exposure. Following dependence induction, zyklophin was infused centrally prior to alcohol self-administration sessions and locomotor activity tests during acute withdrawal. Zyklophin did not impact alcohol self-administration or locomotor activity in either exposure condition. To investigate the neurobiological basis of this atypical effect for a KOR antagonist, we utilized a κ-, μ-, and δ-opioid receptor agonist-stimulated GTPyS coupling assay to examine the opioid receptor specificity of zyklophin in the rat brain and mouse brain. In rats, zyklophin did not affect U50488-, DAMGO-, or DADLE-stimulated GTPyS coupling, whereas the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine (norBNI) attenuated U50488-induced stimulation in the rat brain tissue at concentrations that did not impact μ- and δ-receptor function. To reconcile the discrepancy between the present rat data and published mouse data, comparable GTPyS assays were conducted using mouse brain tissue; zyklophin effects were consistent with KOR antagonism in mice. Moreover, at higher concentrations, zyklophin exhibited agonist properties in rat and mouse brains. These results identify species differences in zyklophin efficacy that, given the rising interest in the development of short-duration KOR antagonists, should provide valuable information for therapeutic development efforts. PMID:26992699

  8. CysLT1 leukotriene receptor antagonists inhibit the effects of nucleotides acting at P2Y receptors

    PubMed Central

    Mamedova, Liaman; Capra, Valérie; Accomazzo, Maria Rosa; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Ferrario, Silvia; Fumagalli, Marta; Abbracchio, Maria P.; Rovati, G. Enrico; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Montelukast and pranlukast are orally active leukotriene receptor antagonists selective for the CysLT1 receptor. Conversely, the hP2Y1,2,4,6,11,12,13,14 receptors represent a large family of GPCRs responding to either adenine or uracil nucleotides, or to sugar-nucleotides. Montelukast and pranlukast were found to inhibit nucleotide-induced calcium mobilization in a human monocyte-macrophage like cell line, DMSO-differentiated U937 (dU937). Montelukast and pranlukast inhibited the effects of UTP with IC50 values of 7.7 and 4.3 μM, respectively, and inhibited the effects of UDP with IC50 values of 4.5 and 1.6 μM, respectively, in an insurmountable manner. Furthermore, ligand binding studies using [3H]LTD4 excluded the possibility of orthosteric nucleotide binding to the CysLT1 receptor. dU937 cells were shown to express P2Y2, P2Y4, P2Y6, P2Y11, P2Y13 and P2Y14 receptors. Therefore, these antagonists were studied functionally in a heterologous expression system for the human P2Y receptors. In 1321N1 astrocytoma cells stably expressing human P2Y1,2,4,6 receptors, CysLT1 antagonists inhibited both the P2Y agonist-induced activation of phospholipase C and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. IC50 values at P2Y1 and P2Y6 receptors were <1 μM. In control astrocytoma cells expressing an endogenous M3 muscarinic receptor, 10 μM montelukast had no effect on the carbachol-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+. These data demonstrated that CysLT1 receptor antagonists interact functionally with signaling pathways of P2Y receptors, and this should foster the study of possible implications for the clinical use of these compounds in asthma or in other inflammatory conditions. PMID:16280122

  9. Prophylactic effects of the histamine H1 receptor antagonist epinastine and the dual thromboxane A2 receptor and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells antagonist ramatroban on allergic rhinitis model in mice.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yuh; Inoue, Toshio; Yamamoto, Atsuki; Sugimoto, Yukio

    2011-01-01

    The prophylactic use of anti-allergic drugs has been proposed to be effective in the treatment of seasonal allergic rhinitis in humans. However, there is little information regarding the prophylactic effect of thromboxane A(2) (TXA(2)) receptor antagonist on allergic rhinitis. Recent studies revealed that a TXA(2) receptor antagonist ramatroban could block the prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) receptor and chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecule expressed on Th2 cells (CRTH2). In the present study, we investigated the prophylactic effects of the histamine H(1) receptor antagonist epinastine and the TXA(2) receptor antagonist ramatroban and seratrodast on mouse models of allergic rhinitis. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized by an intraperitoneal injection of ovalbumin and alum on days 0, 5, 14 and 21. Seven days later, mice were sensitized by intranasal application of ovalbumin thrice a week. Drugs were administered once a day from day 22. The severity of allergic rhinitis was assessed by determining the extent of 2 nasal allergic symptoms (sneezing and nasal rubbing). Histamine sensitivity and eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa were also determined. Epinastine and ramatroban significantly reduced nasal symptoms and the number of eosinophils in the nasal mucosa. Seratrodast showed no effect on nasal symptoms and eosinophil infiltration into the nasal mucosa. In addition, histamine sensitivity was reduced by epinastine and ramatroban. These results indicate that epinastine and ramatroban induce the prophylactic effect on allergic rhinitis. PMID:21467637

  10. Discovery and development of orexin receptor antagonists as therapeutics for insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Winrow, CJ; Renger, JJ

    2014-01-01

    Insomnia persistently affects the quality and quantity of sleep. Currently approved treatments for insomnia primarily target γ-aminobutyric acid-A (GABA-A) receptor signalling and include benzodiazepines and GABA-A receptor modulators. These drugs are used to address this sleep disorder, but have the potential for side effects such as tolerance and dependence, making them less attractive as maintenance therapy. Forward and reverse genetic approaches in animals have implicated orexin signalling (also referred to as hypocretin signalling) in the control of vigilance and sleep/wake states. Screening for orexin receptor antagonists using in vitro and in vivo methods in animals has identified compounds that block one or other of the orexin receptors (single or dual orexin receptor antagonists [SORAs and DORAs], respectively) in animals and humans. SORAs have primarily been used as probes to further elucidate the roles of the individual orexin receptors, while a number of DORAs have progressed to clinical development as pharmaceutical candidates for insomnia. The DORA almorexant demonstrated significant improvements in a number of clinically relevant sleep parameters in animal models and in patients with insomnia but its development was halted. SB-649868 and suvorexant have demonstrated efficacy and tolerability in Phase II and III trials respectively. Furthermore, suvorexant is currently under review by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of insomnia. Based on the publication of recent non-clinical and clinical data, orexin receptor antagonists potentially represent a targeted, effective and well-tolerated new class of medications for insomnia. Linked ArticlesThis article is part of a themed section on Orexin Receptors. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-2 PMID:23731216

  11. Preladenant, a selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, is active in primate models of movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Robert A; Bedard, Paul J; Varty, Geoffrey B; Kazdoba, Tatiana M; Di Paolo, Therese; Grzelak, Michael E; Pond, Annamarie J; Hadjtahar, Abdallah; Belanger, Nancy; Gregoire, Laurent; Dare, Aurelie; Neustadt, Bernard R; Stamford, Andrew W; Hunter, John C

    2010-10-01

    Parkinson's Disease (PD) and Extrapyramidal Syndrome (EPS) are movement disorders that result from degeneration of the dopaminergic input to the striatum and chronic inhibition of striatal dopamine D(2) receptors by antipsychotics, respectively. Adenosine A(2A) receptors are selectively localized in the basal ganglia, primarily in the striatopallidal ("indirect") pathway, where they appear to operate in concert with D(2) receptors and have been suggested to drive striatopallidal output balance. In cases of dopaminergic hypofunction, A(2A) receptor activation contributes to the overdrive of the indirect pathway. A(2A) receptor antagonists, therefore, have the potential to restore this inhibitor imbalance. Consequently, A(2A) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in diseases of dopaminergic hypofunction such as PD and EPS. Targeting the A(2A) receptor may also be a way to avoid the issues associated with direct dopamine agonists. Recently, preladenant was identified as a potent and highly selective A(2A) receptor antagonist, and has produced a significant improvement in motor function in rodent models of PD. Here we investigate the effects of preladenant in two primate movement disorder models. In MPTP-treated cynomolgus monkeys, preladenant (1 or 3 mg/kg; PO) improved motor ability and did not evoke any dopaminergic-mediated dyskinetic or motor complications. In Cebus apella monkeys with a history of chronic haloperidol treatment, preladenant (0.3-3.0 mg/kg; PO) delayed the onset of EPS symptoms evoked by an acute haloperidol challenge. Collectively, these data support the use of preladenant for the treatment of PD and antipsychotic-induced movement disorders. PMID:20655910

  12. Roles of Amino Acids and Subunits in Determining the Inhibition of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors by Competitive Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Dilger, James P.; Vidal, Ana Maria; Liu, Man; Mettewie, Claire; Suzuki, Takahiro; Pham, Anh; Demazumder, Deeptankar

    2008-01-01

    Background Binding sites for agonists and competitive antagonists (nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents) are located at the α–δ and α–ε subunit interfaces of adult nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Most information about the amino acids that participate in antagonist binding comes from binding studies with (+)-tubocurarine and metocurine. These bind selectively to the α–ε interface but are differentially sensitive to mutations. To test the generality of this observation, the authors measured current inhibition by five competitive antagonists on wild-type and mutant acetylcholine receptors. Methods HEK293 cells were transfected with wild-type or mutant (αY198F, εD59A, εD59N, εD173A, εD173N, δD180K) mouse muscle acetylcholine receptor complementary DNA. Outside-out patches were excised and perfused with acetylcho-line in the absence and presence of antagonist. Concentration–response curves were constructed to determine antagonist IC50. An antagonist-removal protocol was used to determine dissociation and association rates. Results Effects of mutations were antagonist specific. αY198F decreased the IC50 of (+)-tubocurarine 10-fold, increased the IC50 of vecuronium 5-fold, and had smaller effects on other antagonists. (+)-Tubocurarine was the most sensitive antagonist to εD173 mutations. εD59 mutations had large effects on metocurine and cisatracurium. δD180K decreased inhibition by pancuronium, vecuronium, and cisatracurium. Inhibition by these antagonists was increased for receptors containing two δ subunits but no ε subunit. Differences in IC50 arose from differences in both dissociation and association rates. Conclusion Competitive antagonists exhibited different patterns of sensitivity to mutations. Except for pancuronium, the antagonists were sensitive to mutations at the α–ε interface. Pancuronium, vecuronium, and cisatracurium were selective for the α–δ interface. This suggests the possibility of synergistic

  13. 5-HT2 Receptor Regulation of Mitochondrial Genes: Unexpected Pharmacological Effects of Agonists and Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Jennifer L; Wills, Lauren P; McOmish, Caitlin E; Demireva, Elena Y; Gingrich, Jay A; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-04-01

    In acute organ injuries, mitochondria are often dysfunctional, and recent research has revealed that recovery of mitochondrial and renal functions is accelerated by induction of mitochondrial biogenesis (MB). We previously reported that the nonselective 5-HT2 receptor agonist DOI [1-(4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine] induced MB in renal proximal tubular cells (RPTCs). The goal of this study was to determine the role of 5-HT2 receptors in the regulation of mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in the kidney. The 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP-809,101 [2-[(3-chlorophenyl)methoxy]-6-(1-piperazinyl)pyrazine] and antagonist SB-242,084 [6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-5-methyl-N-[6-[(2-methyl-3-pyridinyl)oxy]-3-pyridinyl]-1H-indole-1-carboxyamide dihydrochloride] were used to examine the induction of renal mitochondrial genes and oxidative metabolism in RPTCs and in mouse kidneys in the presence and absence of the 5-HT2C receptor. Unexpectedly, both CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased RPTC respiration and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) mRNA expression in RPTCs at 1-10 nM. In addition, CP-809,101 and SB-242,084 increased mRNA expression of PGC-1α and the mitochondrial proteins NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 and NADH dehydrogenase (ubiquinone) β subcomplex 8 in mice. These compounds increased mitochondrial genes in RPTCs in which the 5-HT2C receptor was downregulated with small interfering RNA and in the renal cortex of mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. By contrast, the ability of these compounds to increase PGC-1α mRNA and respiration was blocked in RPTCs treated with 5-HT2A receptor small interfering RNA or the 5-HT2A receptor antagonist eplivanserin. In addition, the 5-HT2A receptor agonist NBOH-2C-CN [4-[2-[[(2-hydroxyphenyl)methyl]amino]ethyl]-2,5-dimethoxybenzonitrile] increased RPTC respiration at 1-100 nM. These results suggest that agonism of the 5-HT2A receptor induces MB and that the classic 5-HT2C receptor agonist CP

  14. Effects of Urotensin II Receptor Antagonist, GSK1440115, in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Alison; Kumar, Sanjay; Behm, David J.; Mahar, Kelly M.; Noble, Robert B.; Throup, John P.; Russ, Steven F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Urotensin II (U-II) is highly expressed in the human lung and has been implicated in regulating respiratory physiology in preclinical studies. Our objective was to test antagonism of the urotensin (UT) receptor by GSK1440115, a novel, competitive, and selective inhibitor of the UT receptor, as a therapeutic strategy for the treatment of asthma. Methods: Safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) of single doses of GSK1440115 (1–750 mg) were assessed in a Phase I, placebo controlled study in 70 healthy subjects. In a Phase Ib study, 12 asthmatic patients were randomized into a two-period, single-blind crossover study and treated with single doses of 750 mg GSK1440115 or placebo and given a methacholine challenge. Results: Administration of GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated in healthy subjects and asthmatic patients. In both studies, there was a high degree of variability in the observed PK following oral dosing with GSK1440115 at all doses. There was a marked food effect in healthy subjects at the 50 mg dose. In the presence of food at the 750 mg dose, the time to maximal concentration was between 2 and 6 h and the terminal half-life was short at approximately 2 h. All asthmatic patients maintained greater than the predicted concentration levels necessary to achieve predicted 96% receptor occupancy for ≥3 h (between 4 and 7 h post-dose). There were no apparent trends or relationships between the systemic plasma exposure of GSK1440115 and pharmacodynamic endpoints, PC20 after methacholine challenge and FEV1, in asthmatics. Conclusion: While GSK1440115 was safe and well-tolerated, it did not induce bronchodilation in asthmatics, or protect against methacholine-induced bronchospasm, suggesting that acute UT antagonism is not likely to provide benefit as an acute bronchodilator in this patient population. PMID:23641215

  15. P2X1 Receptor Antagonists Inhibit HIV-1 Fusion by Blocking Virus-Coreceptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Giroud, Charline; Marin, Mariana; Hammonds, Jason; Spearman, Paul

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 Env glycoprotein-mediated fusion is initiated upon sequential binding of Env to CD4 and the coreceptor CXCR4 or CCR5. Whereas these interactions are thought to be necessary and sufficient to promote HIV-1 fusion, other host factors can modulate this process. Previous studies reported potent inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by selective P2X1 receptor antagonists, including NF279, and suggested that these receptors play a role in HIV-1 entry. Here we investigated the mechanism of antiviral activity of NF279 and found that this compound does not inhibit HIV-1 fusion by preventing the activation of P2X1 channels but effectively blocks the binding of the virus to CXCR4 or CCR5. The notion of an off-target effect of NF279 on HIV-1 fusion is supported by the lack of detectable expression of P2X1 receptors in cells used in fusion experiments and by the fact that the addition of ATP or the enzymatic depletion of ATP in culture medium does not modulate viral fusion. Importantly, NF279 fails to inhibit HIV-1 fusion with cell lines and primary macrophages when added at an intermediate stage downstream of Env-CD4-coreceptor engagement. Conversely, in the presence of NF279, HIV-1 fusion is arrested downstream of CD4 binding but prior to coreceptor engagement. NF279 also antagonizes the signaling function of CCR5, CXCR4, and another chemokine receptor, as evidenced by the suppression of calcium responses elicited by specific ligands and by recombinant gp120. Collectively, our results demonstrate that NF279 is a dual HIV-1 coreceptor inhibitor that interferes with the functional engagement of CCR5 and CXCR4 by Env. IMPORTANCE Inhibition of P2X receptor activity suppresses HIV-1 fusion and replication, suggesting that P2X signaling is involved in HIV-1 entry. However, mechanistic experiments conducted in this study imply that P2X1 receptor is not expressed in target cells or involved in viral fusion. Instead, we found that inhibition of HIV-1 fusion by a specific P2X1

  16. Identification of spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine motifs as potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lotesta, Stephen D; Marcus, Andrew P; Zheng, Yajun; Leftheris, Katerina; Noto, Paul B; Meng, Shi; Kandpal, Geeta; Chen, Guozhou; Zhou, Jing; McKeever, Brian; Bukhtiyarov, Yuri; Zhao, Yi; Lala, Deepak S; Singh, Suresh B; McGeehan, Gerard M

    2016-03-15

    Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists continue to be a prevalent area of research in the pharmaceutical industry. Herein we report the discovery of various spirooxindole and dibenzoxazepine constructs as potent MR antagonists. SAR analysis of our spirooxindole hit led to highly potent compounds containing polar solubilizing groups, which interact with the helix-11 region of the MR ligand binding domain (LBD). Various dibenzoxazepine moieties were also prepared in an effort to replace a known dibenzoxepane system which interacts with the hydrophobic region of the MR LBD. In addition, an X-ray crystal structure was obtained from a highly potent compound which was shown to exhibit both partial agonist and antagonist modes of action against MR. PMID:26897089

  17. Development of novel NK3 receptor antagonists with reduced environmental impact.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Koki; Okazaki, Shiho; Ohno, Hiroaki; Matsuda, Fuko; Ohkura, Satoshi; Maeda, Kei-Ichiro; Fujii, Nobutaka; Oishi, Shinya

    2016-08-15

    The neurokinin B (NKB)-neurokinin-3 receptor (NK3R) signaling positively regulates the release of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) from the hypothalamus. The NK3R-selective antagonists may suppress the reproductive functions of mammals. For development of novel NK3R antagonists with reduced environmental toxicity, a structure-activity relationship study of an NK3R antagonist, talnetant, was carried out. Among several talnetant derivatives with labile functional groups in the natural environment, 3-mercaptoquinoline 2f exhibited a comparable biological activity to that of the parent talnetant. Additionally, compound 2f was converted into the disulfide 3f or isothiazolone 8 by air-oxidation, both of which showed no binding affinity to NK3R. PMID:27298001

  18. Effect of Y-25130, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonist, on gastric emptying in mice.

    PubMed

    Haga, K; Asano, K; Inaba, K; Morimoto, Y; Setoguchi, M

    1994-01-01

    The effect of Y-25130 on gastric emptying of nutrient test meals (solid chow) was examined in mice. In a dose range of 0.01-1 mg/kg, p.o., Y-25130 significantly accelerated gastric emptying of solid meals in a dose-dependent manner, at an ED30 of 0.021 mg/kg. Other 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists and prokinetic agents having 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonistic properties accelerated the emptying of solid meals in the following rank order of potency: Y-25130 = granisetron > or = tropisetron > ondansetron > cisapride > metoclopramide. The acceleration of the gastric emptying showed a good correlation with the antagonistic potencies of these compounds on 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptors, determined by the inhibition test of the von Bezold-Jarisch reflex in anesthetized rats (r2 = 0.99). Domperidone (1 and 10 mg/kg, p.o.) and trimebutine (10 and 100 mg/kg, p.o.) failed to increase the rate of emptying from the stomach. Cisplatin (30 mg/kg, i.p.), a chemotherapeutic agent, significantly delayed the gastric emptying of solid meals, and Y-25130 (0.1-1 mg/kg, p.o.) prevented such a delay in emptying in a dose-dependent manner. These results suggest that Y-25130 accelerates the gastric emptying in mice by antagonism of the 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor. PMID:7625886

  19. The necessity and effectiveness of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist in the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Atsuhisa

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and diabetic nephropathy is the most common primary disease necessitating dialysis treatment in the world including Japan. Major guidelines for treatment of hypertension in Japan, the United States and Europe recommend the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-receptor blockers, which suppress the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), as the antihypertensive drugs of first choice in patients with coexisting diabetes. However, even with the administration of RAS inhibitors, failure to achieve adequate anti-albuminuric, renoprotective effects and a reduction in cardiovascular events has also been reported. Inadequate blockade of aldosterone may be one of the reasons why long-term administration of RAS inhibitors may not be sufficiently effective in patients with diabetic nephropathy. This review focuses on treatment in diabetic nephropathy and discusses the significance of aldosterone blockade. In pre-nephropathy without overt nephropathy, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist can be used to enhance the blood pressure-lowering effects of RAS inhibitors, improve insulin resistance and prevent clinical progression of nephropathy. In CKD categories A2 and A3, the addition of a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist to an RAS inhibitor can help to maintain 'long-term' antiproteinuric and anti-albuminuric effects. However, in category G3a and higher, sufficient attention must be paid to hyperkalemia. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are not currently recommended as standard treatment in diabetic nephropathy. However, many studies have shown promise of better renoprotective effects if mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists are appropriately used. PMID:25762415

  20. Differential effects of GABAA receptor antagonists in the control of respiratory neuronal discharge patterns.

    PubMed

    Dogas, Z; Krolo, M; Stuth, E A; Tonkovic-Capin, M; Hopp, F A; McCrimmon, D R; Zuperku, E J

    1998-11-01

    To ascertain the role of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in shaping and controlling the phasic discharge patterns of medullary respiratory premotor neurons, localized pressure applications of the competitive GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline (BIC) and the noncompetitive GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (PIC) were studied. Multibarrel micropipettes were used in halothane anesthetized, paralyzed, ventilated, vagotomized dogs to record single unit activity from inspiratory and expiratory neurons in the caudal ventral respiratory group and to picoeject GABAA receptor antagonists. The moving time average of phrenic nerve activity was used to determine respiratory phase durations and to synchronize cycle-triggered histograms of discharge patterns. Picoejection of BIC and PIC had qualitatively different effects on the discharge patterns of respiratory neurons. BIC caused an increase in the discharge rate during the neuron's active phase without inducing activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The resulting discharge patterns were amplified replicas (x2-3) of the underlying preejection phasic patterns. In contrast, picoejection of PIC did not increase the peak discharge rate during the neuron's active phase but induced a tonic level of activity during the neuron's normally silent phase. The maximum effective BIC dose (15 +/- 1.8 pmol/min) was considerably smaller than that for PIC (280 +/- 53 pmol/min). These findings suggest that GABAA receptors with differential pharmacology mediate distinct functions within the same neuron, 1) gain modulation that is BIC sensitive but PIC insensitive and 2) silent-phase inhibition blocked by PIC. These studies also suggest that the choice of an antagonist is an important consideration in the determination of GABA receptor function within the respiratory motor control system. PMID:9819249

  1. Activity of new NOP receptor ligands in a rat peripheral mononeuropathy model: Potentiation of Morphine anti-allodynic activity by NOP receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Khroyan, Taline V.; Polgar, Willma E.; Orduna, Juan; Jiang, Faming; Olsen, Cris; Toll, Lawrence; Zaveri, Nurulain T.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of new NOP receptor agonists and antagonists in the rat chronic constriction injury model was investigated. Intraperitoneally administered NOP receptor agonist SR14150 and antagonists SR16430 and SR14148, had no effect on mechanical allodynia when given alone. The nonselective NOP/mu-opioid receptor agonist SR16435, however, produced an anti-allodynic response, similar to morphine and reversible by naloxone. Notably, co-administration of the NOP receptor antagonists potentiated the anti-allodynic activity of both morphine and SR16435. Increased levels of the NOP receptor are implicated in the reduced efficacy of morphine in neuropathic pain. Our results suggest the utility of NOP receptor antagonists for potentiating opioid efficacy in chronic pain. PMID:19285491

  2. Phase shifts to light are altered by antagonists to neuropeptide receptors.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ryan K; Sterniczuk, Roxanne; Enkhbold, Yaruuna; Jeffers, Ryan T; Basu, Priyoneel; Duong, Bryan; Chow, Sue-Len; Smith, Victoria M; Antle, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    The mammalian circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is a heterogeneous structure. Two key populations of cells that receive retinal input and are believed to participate in circadian responses to light are cells that contain vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) and gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP). VIP acts primarily through the VPAC2 receptor, while GRP works primarily through the BB2 receptor. Both VIP and GRP phase shift the circadian clock in a manner similar to light when applied to the SCN, both in vivo and in vitro, indicating that they are sufficient to elicit photic-like phase shifts. However, it is not known if they are necessary signals for light to elicit phase shifts. Here we test the hypothesis that GRP and VIP are necessary signaling components for the photic phase shifting of the hamster circadian clock by examining two antagonists for each of these neuropeptides. The BB2 antagonist PD176252 had no effect on light-induced delays on its own, while the BB2 antagonist RC-3095 had the unexpected effect of significantly potentiating both phase delays and advances. Neither of the VIP antagonists ([d-p-Cl-Phe6, Leu17]-VIP, or PG99-465) altered phase shifting responses to light on their own. When the BB2 antagonist PD176252 and the VPAC2 antagonist PG99-465 were delivered together to the SCN, phase delays were significantly attenuated. These results indicate that photic phase shifting requires participation of either VIP or GRP; phase shifts to light are only impaired when signalling in both pathways are inhibited. Additionally, the unexpected potentiation of light-induced phase shifts by RC-3095 should be investigated further for potential chronobiotic applications. PMID:27090819

  3. Different agonist- and antagonist-induced conformational changes in retinoic acid receptors analyzed by protease mapping.

    PubMed Central

    Keidel, S; LeMotte, P; Apfel, C

    1994-01-01

    The pleiotropic effects of retinoic acid on cell differentiation and proliferation are mediated by two subfamilies of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs). Recently the synthetic retinoid Ro 41-5253 was identified as a selective RAR alpha antagonist. As demonstrated by gel retardation assays, Ro 41-5253 and two related new RAR alpha antagonists do not influence RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimerization and DNA binding. In a limited trypsin digestion assay, complexation of RAR alpha with retinoic acid or several other agonistic retinoids altered the degradation of the receptor such that a 30-kDa proteolytic fragment became resistant to proteolysis. This suggests a ligand-induced conformational change, which may be necessary for the interaction of the DNA-bound RAR alpha/RXR alpha heterodimer with other transcription factors. Our results demonstrate that antagonists compete with agonists for binding to RAR alpha and may induce a different structural alteration, suggested by the tryptic resistance of a shorter 25-kDa protein fragment in the digestion assay. This RAR alpha conformation seems to allow RAR alpha/RXR alpha binding to DNA but not the subsequent transactivation of target genes. Protease mapping with C-terminally truncated receptors revealed that the proposed conformational changes mainly occur in the DE regions of RAR alpha. Complexation of RAR beta, RAR gamma, and RXR alpha, as well as the vitamin D3 receptor, with their natural ligands resulted in a similar resistance of fragments to proteolytic digestion. This could mean that ligand-induced conformational changes are a general feature in the hormonal activation of vitamin D3 and retinoid receptors. Images PMID:8264595

  4. The orally active urotensin receptor antagonist, KR36676, attenuates cellular and cardiac hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Oh, K S; Lee, J H; Yi, K Y; Lim, C J; Lee, S; Park, C H; Seo, H W; Lee, B H

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Blockade of the actions of urotensin-II (U-II) mediated by the urotensin (UT) receptor should improve cardiac function and prevent cardiac remodelling in cardiovascular disease. Here, we have evaluated the pharmacological properties of the recently identified UT receptor antagonist, 2-(6,7-dichloro-3-oxo-2H-benzo[b][1,4]oxazin-4(3H)-yl)-N-methyl-N-(2-(pyrrolidin-1-yl)-1-(4-(thiophen-3-yl)phenyl) ethyl)acetamide (KR36676). Experimental Approach Pharmacological properties of KR36676 were studied in a range of in vitro assays (receptor binding, calcium mobilization, stress fibre formation, cellular hypertrophy) and in vivo animal models such as cardiac hypertrophy induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) or myocardial infarction (MI). Key Results KR36676 displayed high binding affinity for the UT receptor (Ki: 0.7 nM), similar to that of U-II (0.4 nM), and was a potent antagonist at that receptor (IC50: 4.0 nM). U-II-induced stress fibre formation and cellular hypertrophy were significantly inhibited with low concentrations of KR36676 (≥0.01 μM). Oral administration of KR36676 (30 mg·kg−1) in a TAC model in mice attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial fibrosis. Moreover, KR36676 restored cardiac function and myocyte size in rats with MI-induced cardiac hypertrophy. Conclusions and Implications A highly potent UT receptor antagonist exerted anti-hypertrophic effects not only in infarcted rat hearts but also in pressure-overloaded mouse hearts. KR36676 could be a valuable pharmacological tool in elucidating the complicated physiological role of U-II and UT receptors in cardiac hypertrophy. PMID:25597918

  5. Positron tomography of a radiobrominated analog of SCH 23390: A selective dopamine D1 receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    De Jesus, O.T.; Woolverton, W.L.; Van Moffaert, G.J.C.; Goldberg, L.I.; Dinerstein, R.J.; Yasillo, N.J.; Ortega, C.; Cooper, M.D.; Friedman, A.M.

    1985-05-01

    Alterations in the central dopaminergic system have been hypothesized to underlie several neuropsychiatric disorders. Dopamine (DA) receptors in the CNS have been classified into two classes based on whether linkage to the enzyme adenylate cyclase exists, the D1 receptors, or not, D2 receptors. To date, studies on cerebral DA system by positron tomography (PET) have utilized the butyrophenones which are predominantly D2 antagonists. We have prepared Br-75 or Br-76 labelled 8-bromo analog of SCH 23390, (BrSCH), a highly selective antagonist for DA D1 receptors and have measured its distribution in the intact monkey brain by PET and by postmortem section of the mouse brain. An anesthesized 8.5 kg male rhesus monkey was given, i.v., ca. 2 mCi BrSCH on two occasions and scanned with The University of Chicago PETT VI system. Results revealed that the drug localized specifically in the basal ganglia. In a similar experiment in the same monkey given Br-76-bromospiroperidol (BrSP), a predominantly D2 antagonist, high uptake in the basal ganglia was also observed but the time course for specific localization of BrSCH was much faster than that of BrSP. These results provide evidence the D1 receptors, like D2 receptors, are localized in the caudate nucleus (CN) although BrSCH, compared to BrSP, appear to localize more in the posterior aspect of the CN. In conclusion, BrSCH should be a useful imaging agent to study dopamine D1 receptors in the CNS.

  6. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer

    PubMed Central

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D.; Schiffmann, Serge N.; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  7. Allosteric interactions between agonists and antagonists within the adenosine A2A receptor-dopamine D2 receptor heterotetramer.

    PubMed

    Bonaventura, Jordi; Navarro, Gemma; Casadó-Anguera, Verònica; Azdad, Karima; Rea, William; Moreno, Estefanía; Brugarolas, Marc; Mallol, Josefa; Canela, Enric I; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Volkow, Nora D; Schiffmann, Serge N; Ferré, Sergi; Casadó, Vicent

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR)-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) heteromers are key modulators of striatal neuronal function. It has been suggested that the psychostimulant effects of caffeine depend on its ability to block an allosteric modulation within the A2AR-D2R heteromer, by which adenosine decreases the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of dopamine at the D2R. We describe novel unsuspected allosteric mechanisms within the heteromer by which not only A2AR agonists, but also A2AR antagonists, decrease the affinity and intrinsic efficacy of D2R agonists and the affinity of D2R antagonists. Strikingly, these allosteric modulations disappear on agonist and antagonist coadministration. This can be explained by a model that considers A2AR-D2R heteromers as heterotetramers, constituted by A2AR and D2R homodimers, as demonstrated by experiments with bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and bimolecular fluorescence and bioluminescence complementation. As predicted by the model, high concentrations of A2AR antagonists behaved as A2AR agonists and decreased D2R function in the brain. PMID:26100888

  8. Endothelin receptor antagonists for pulmonary arterial hypertension: rationale and place in therapy.

    PubMed

    Price, Laura C; Howard, Luke S G E

    2008-01-01

    The last decade has seen significant advances in the understanding and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Three main pathways, involving endothelin, nitric oxide, and prostacyclin, have been identified in its pathogenesis and these have all led to the development of therapies in current use. While the nitric oxide and prostacyclin pathways require augmentation, the endothelin system is overactive in PAH, with increased endothelin synthesis and receptor expression and, therefore, requires blockade. There are two known endothelin receptors. The type A receptor, expressed in pulmonary artery media, mediates vasoconstriction and remodeling, whereas the function of the type B receptor is more complex. Like the type A receptor, the type B receptor mediates vasoconstriction and remodeling effects when expressed on smooth muscle cells and (myo)fibroblasts, yet functions to clear endothelin from the circulation and induce release of endogenous nitric oxide and prostacyclin, when activated in the pulmonary artery endothelium. Consequently, it is not clear from in vitro data whether the optimal strategy is to block only the type A receptor or both receptors. Phase III clinical studies show clear short-term physiologic benefit with both dual and selective endothelin blockade in PAH. Longer-term experience with bosentan, a dual receptor antagonist, has shown improved outcomes compared with historic control data and comparable survival to intravenous prostacyclin therapy. The newer selective blockers, sitaxsentan and ambrisentan, appear to have similar short-term efficacy, but long-term data are as yet either lacking or unpublished. They may be less hepatotoxic than bosentan, although long-term follow-up of patients receiving bosentan has shown this is not a significant problem. On the basis of available evidence, the endothelin receptor antagonists have become first-line therapy for patients with PAH, except in the most severely affected who still require

  9. Cucurbitacins are insect steroid hormone antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor.

    PubMed

    Dinan, L; Whiting, P; Girault, J P; Lafont, R; Dhadialla, T S; Cress, D E; Mugat, B; Antoniewski, C; Lepesant, J A

    1997-11-01

    Two triterpenoids, cucurbitacins B and D, have been isolated from seeds of Iberis umbellata (Cruciferae) and shown to be responsible for the antagonistic activity of a methanolic extract of this species in preventing the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-induced morphological changes in the Drosophila melanogaster BII permanent cell line. With a 20E concentration of 50 nM, cucurbitacins B and D give 50% responses at 1.5 and 10 microM respectively. Both cucurbitacins are able to displace specifically bound radiolabelled 25-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone (ponasterone A) from a cell-free preparation of the BII cells containing ecdysteroid receptors. The Kd values for cucurbitacins B and D (5 and 50 microM respectively) are similar to the concentrations required to antagonize 20E activity with whole cells. Cucurbitacin B (cucB) prevents stimulation by 20E of an ecdysteroid-responsive reporter gene in a transfection assay. CucB also prevents the formation of the Drosophila ecdysteroid receptor/Ultraspiracle/20E complex with the hsp27 ecdysteroid response element as demonstrated by gel-shift assay. This is therefore the first definitive evidence for the existence of antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor. Preliminary structure/activity studies indicate the importance of the Delta23-22-oxo functional grouping in the side chain for antagonistic activity. Hexanorcucurbitacin D, which lacks carbon atoms C-22 to C-27, is found to be a weak agonist rather than an antagonist. Moreover, the side chain analogue 5-methylhex-3-en-2-one possesses weak antagonistic activity. PMID:9581538

  10. Cucurbitacins are insect steroid hormone antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Dinan, L; Whiting, P; Girault, J P; Lafont, R; Dhadialla, T S; Cress, D E; Mugat, B; Antoniewski, C; Lepesant, J A

    1997-01-01

    Two triterpenoids, cucurbitacins B and D, have been isolated from seeds of Iberis umbellata (Cruciferae) and shown to be responsible for the antagonistic activity of a methanolic extract of this species in preventing the 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E)-induced morphological changes in the Drosophila melanogaster BII permanent cell line. With a 20E concentration of 50 nM, cucurbitacins B and D give 50% responses at 1.5 and 10 microM respectively. Both cucurbitacins are able to displace specifically bound radiolabelled 25-deoxy-20-hydroxyecdysone (ponasterone A) from a cell-free preparation of the BII cells containing ecdysteroid receptors. The Kd values for cucurbitacins B and D (5 and 50 microM respectively) are similar to the concentrations required to antagonize 20E activity with whole cells. Cucurbitacin B (cucB) prevents stimulation by 20E of an ecdysteroid-responsive reporter gene in a transfection assay. CucB also prevents the formation of the Drosophila ecdysteroid receptor/Ultraspiracle/20E complex with the hsp27 ecdysteroid response element as demonstrated by gel-shift assay. This is therefore the first definitive evidence for the existence of antagonists acting at the ecdysteroid receptor. Preliminary structure/activity studies indicate the importance of the Delta23-22-oxo functional grouping in the side chain for antagonistic activity. Hexanorcucurbitacin D, which lacks carbon atoms C-22 to C-27, is found to be a weak agonist rather than an antagonist. Moreover, the side chain analogue 5-methylhex-3-en-2-one possesses weak antagonistic activity. PMID:9581538

  11. C-C chemokine receptor type 4 antagonist Compound 22 ameliorates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Moriguchi, Kota; Miyamoto, Katsuichi; Tanaka, Noriko; Ueno, Rino; Nakayama, Takashi; Yoshie, Osamu; Kusunoki, Susumu

    2016-02-15

    Chemokines and chemokine receptors play important roles in the immune response. We previously reported the pathogenic role of C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4) in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Here, we examined whether CCR4 antagonism modulates the disease course of EAE. Wild-type and CCR4-knockout mice were induced EAE and were administered Compound 22, an antagonist of CCR4. Compound 22 significantly ameliorated the severity of EAE in wild-type mice, but not in the CCR4-knockout mice. Compound 22 inhibited Th1 and Th17 polarization of antigen-induced T-cell responses. Therefore, CCR4 antagonists might be potential therapeutic agents for multiple sclerosis. PMID:26857495

  12. Immunoactive effects of cannabinoids: considerations for the therapeutic use of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Greineisen, William E; Turner, Helen

    2010-05-01

    The active constituents of Cannabis sativa have been used for centuries as recreational drugs and medicinal agents. Today, marijuana is the most prevalent drug of abuse in the United States and, conversely, therapeutic use of marijuana constituents are gaining mainstream clinical and political acceptance. Given the documented contributions of endocannabinoid signaling to a range of physiological systems, including cognitive function, and the control of eating behaviors, it is unsurprising that cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are showing significant clinical potential. In addition to the neuroactive effects of cannabinoids, an emerging body of data suggests that both endogenous and exogenous cannabinoids are potently immunoactive. The central premise of this review article is that the immunological effects of cannabinoids should be considered in the context of each prescribing decision. We present evidence that the immunological effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists and antagonists are highly relevant to the spectrum of disorders for which cannabinoid therapeutics are currently offered. PMID:20219697

  13. Androgen receptor antagonists compromise T cell response against prostate cancer leading to early tumor relapse.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yang; Xu, Meng; Liang, Yong; Yang, Kaiting; Guo, Yajun; Yang, Xuanming; Fu, Yang-Xin

    2016-04-01

    Surgical and medical androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is a cornerstone for prostate cancer treatment, but relapse usually occurs. We herein show that orchiectomy synergizes with immunotherapy, whereas the more widely used treatment of medical ADT involving androgen receptor (AR) antagonists suppresses immunotherapy. Furthermore, we observed that the use of medical ADT could unexpectedly impair the adaptive immune responses through interference with initial T cell priming rather than in the reactivation or expansion phases. Mechanistically, we have revealed that inadvertent immunosuppression might be potentially mediated by a receptor shared with γ-aminobutyric acid. Our data demonstrate that the timing and dosing of antiandrogens are critical to maximizing the antitumor effects of combination therapy. This study highlights an underappreciated mechanism of AR antagonist-mediated immunosuppression and provides a new strategy to enhance immune response and prevent the relapse of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:27053771

  14. Biaryls as potent, tunable dual neurokinin 1 receptor antagonists and serotonin transporter inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Degnan, Andrew P; Tora, George O; Han, Ying; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Bertekap, Robert; Krause, Rudolph; Davis, Carl D; Hu, Joanna; Morgan, Daniel; Taylor, Sarah J; Krause, Kelly; Li, Yu-Wen; Mattson, Gail; Cunningham, Melissa A; Taber, Matthew T; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Gillman, Kevin W; Macor, John E

    2015-08-01

    Depression is a serious illness that affects millions of patients. Current treatments are associated with a number of undesirable side effects. Neurokinin 1 receptor (NK1R) antagonists have recently been shown to potentiate the antidepressant effects of serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in a number of animal models. Herein we describe the optimization of a biaryl chemotype to provide a series of potent dual NK1R antagonists/serotonin transporter (SERT) inhibitors. Through the choice of appropriate substituents, the SERT/NK1R ratio could be tuned to afford a range of target selectivity profiles. This effort culminated in the identification of an analog that demonstrated oral bioavailability, favorable brain uptake, and efficacy in the gerbil foot tap model. Ex vivo occupancy studies with compound 58 demonstrated the ability to maintain NK1 receptor saturation (>88% occupancy) while titrating the desired level of SERT occupancy (11-84%) via dose selection. PMID:26048800

  15. Cardiac effects of muscarinic receptor antagonists used for voiding dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karl-Erik; Campeau, Lysanne; Olshansky, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Antimuscarinic agents are the main drugs used to treat patients with the overactive bladder (OAB) syndrome, defined as urgency, with or without urgency incontinence, usually with increased daytime frequency and nocturia. Since the treatment is not curative and since OAB is a chronic disease, treatment may be life-long. Antimuscarinics are generally considered to be ‘safe’ drugs, but among the more serious concerns related to their use is the risk of cardiac adverse effects, particularly increases in heart rate (HR) and QT prolongation and induction of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (torsade de pointes). An elevated resting HR has been linked to overall increased morbidity and mortality, particularly in patients with cardiovascular diseases. QT prolongation and its consequences are not related to blockade of muscarinic receptors, but rather linked to inhibition of the hERG potassium channel in the heart. However, experience with terodiline, an antimuscarinic drug causing torsade de pointes in patients, has placed the whole drug class under scrutiny. The potential of the different antimuscarinic agents to increase HR and/or prolong the QT time has not been extensively explored for all agents in clinical use. Differences between drugs cannot be excluded, but risk assessments based on available evidence are not possible. PMID:21595741

  16. Characterization of protoberberine analogs employed as novel human P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ga Eun; Lee, Won-Gil; Lee, Song-Yi; Lee, Cho-Rong; Park, Chul-Seung; Chang, Sunghoe; Park, Sung-Gyoo; Song, Mi-Ryoung; Kim, Yong-Chul

    2011-04-15

    The P2X{sub 7} receptor (P2X{sub 7}R), a member of the ATP-gated ion channel family, is regarded as a promising target for therapy of immune-related diseases including rheumatoid arthritis and chronic pain. A group of novel protoberberine analogs (compounds 3-5), discovered by screening of chemical libraries, was here investigated with respect to their function as P2X{sub 7}R antagonists. Compounds 3-5 non-competitively inhibited BzATP-induced ethidium ion influx into hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells, with IC{sub 50} values of 100-300 nM. This antagonistic action on the channel further confirmed that both BzATP-induced inward currents and Ca{sup 2+} influx were strongly inhibited by compounds 3-5 in patch-clamp and Ca{sup 2+} influx assays. The antagonists also effectively suppressed downstream signaling of P2X{sub 7} receptors including IL-1{beta} release and phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 proteins in hP2X{sub 7}-expressing HEK293 cells or in differentiated human monocytes (THP-1 cells). Moreover, IL-2 secretion from CD3/CD28-stimulated Jurkat T cell was also dramatically inhibited by the antagonist. These results imply that novel protoberberine analogs may modulate P2X{sub 7} receptor-mediated immune responses by allosteric inhibition of the receptor. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted

  17. Benzimidazole-2-carboxamides as novel NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Borza, István; Kolok, Sándor; Gere, Anikó; Nagy, József; Fodor, László; Galgóczy, Kornél; Fetter, József; Bertha, Ferenc; Agai, Béla; Horváth, Csilla; Farkas, Sándor; Domány, György

    2006-09-01

    A novel series of benzimidazole-2-carboxamide derivatives was prepared and identified as NR2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists. The influence of some structural elements, like H-bond donor groups placed on the benzimidazole skeleton and the substitution pattern of the piperidine ring, on the biological activity was studied. Compound 6a showed excellent analgetic activity in the mouse formalin test following po administration. PMID:16782335

  18. An Autoinflammatory Disease with Deficiency of the Interleukin-1–Receptor Antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Aksentijevich, Ivona; Masters, Seth L.; Ferguson, Polly J.; Dancey, Paul; Frenkel, Joost; van Royen-Kerkhoff, Annet; Laxer, Ron; Tedgård, Ulf; Cowen, Edward W.; Pham, Tuyet-Hang; Booty, Matthew; Estes, Jacob D.; Sandler, Netanya G.; Plass, Nicole; Stone, Deborah L.; Turner, Maria L.; Hill, Suvimol; Butman, John A.; Schneider, Rayfel; Babyn, Paul; El-Shanti, Hatem I.; Pope, Elena; Barron, Karyl; Bing, Xinyu; Laurence, Arian; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Chapelle, Dawn; Clarke, Gillian I.; Ohson, Kamal; Nicholson, Marc; Gadina, Massimo; Yang, Barbara; Korman, Benjamin D.; Gregersen, Peter K.; van Hagen, P. Martin; Hak, A. Elisabeth; Huizing, Marjan; Rahman, Proton; Douek, Daniel C.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Kastner, Daniel L.; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela

    2010-01-01

    Background Autoinflammatory diseases manifest inflammation without evidence of infection, high-titer autoantibodies, or autoreactive T cells. We report a disorder caused by mutations of IL1RN, which encodes the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, with prominent involvement of skin and bone. Methods We studied nine children from six families who had neonatal onset of sterile multifocal osteomyelitis, periostitis, and pustulosis. Response to empirical treatment with the recombinant interleukin-1–receptor antagonist anakinra in the first patient prompted us to test for the presence of mutations and changes in proteins and their function in interleukin-1–pathway genes including IL1RN. Results We identified homozygous mutations of IL1RN in nine affected children, from one family from Newfoundland, Canada, three families from the Netherlands, and one consanguineous family from Lebanon. A nonconsanguineous patient from Puerto Rico was homozygous for a genomic deletion that includes IL1RN and five other interleukin-1–family members. At least three of the mutations are founder mutations; heterozygous carriers were asymptomatic, with no cytokine abnormalities in vitro. The IL1RN mutations resulted in a truncated protein that is not secreted, thereby rendering cells hyperresponsive to interleukin-1β stimulation. Patients treated with anakinra responded rapidly. Conclusions We propose the term deficiency of the interleukin-1–receptor antagonist, or DIRA, to denote this autosomal recessive autoinflammatory disease caused by mutations affecting IL1RN. The absence of interleukin-1–receptor antagonist allows unopposed action of interleukin-1, resulting in life-threatening systemic inflammation with skin and bone involvement. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059748.) PMID:19494218

  19. A review of granisetron, 5-hydroxytryptamine3 receptor antagonists, and other antiemetics.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Eric S

    2010-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting are 2 of the most upsetting adverse reactions of chemotherapy. Current guidelines propose 5-hydroxytryptamine3 (5-HT3) receptor antagonists as a pharmacologic intervention for acute and delayed nausea and vomiting [chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV)] associated with moderately and highly emetogenic chemotherapy. Meanwhile, both postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) and postdischarge nausea and vomiting are challenging situations after surgeries and procedures. Prophylactic and therapeutic combinations of antiemetics are recommended in patients at high risk of suffering from PONV and postdischarge nausea and vomiting. Granisetron (Kytril) is a selective 5-HT3 receptor antagonist that does not induce or inhibit the hepatic cytochrome P-450 system in vitro. There are also 4 other antagonists of 5-HT3 receptor (dolasetron, ondansetron, palonosetron, and tropisetron) being metabolized via the CYP2D6 and are subject to potential genetic polymorphism. The launch of a new class of antiemetics, the substance P/neurokinin1 receptor antagonists, was attributed to the scientific update on the central generator responsible for emesis and role of substance P. There has been mounting interest in exploring integrative medicine, either acupuncture or acustimulation of P6 (Nei-Kuwan), to complement the western medicine for prevention and management of nausea and vomiting. The potential application of cannabinoids, either alone or in combination with other agents of different mechanism, could contribute further to improve outcome in CINV. Implementation of future treatment guidelines for more effective management of CINV and PONV could certainly improve the efficacy and outcome of cancer and postoperative care. PMID:20844345

  20. Effects of Olopatadine Hydrochloride, a Histamine H1 Receptor Antagonist, on Histamine-Induced Skin Responses

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Takashi; Ishii, Norito; Hamada, Takahiro; Dainichi, Teruki; Karashima, Tadashi; Nakama, Takekuni; Yasumoto, Shinichiro

    2010-01-01

    Effects of olopatadine hydrochloride, a histamine H1 receptor antagonist, on histamine-induced skin responses were evaluated in 10 healthy subjects in comparison with placebo, fexofenadine hydrochloride, and bepotastine besilate. Olopatadine significantly suppressed histamine-induced wheal, flare, and itch, starting 30 minutes after oral administration. Olopatadine was more effective than fexofenadine and bepotastine. None of the drugs studied impaired performance of word processing tasks. These results suggest that olopatadine can suppress skin symptoms caused by histamine soon after administration. PMID:20886023

  1. Structural insights into Resveratrol’s antagonist and partial agonist actions on estrogen receptor alpha

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a naturally occurring stilbene, has been categorized as a phytoestrogen due to its ability to compete with natural estrogens for binding to estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and modulate the biological responses exerted by the receptor. Biological effects of resveratrol (RES) on estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) remain highly controversial, since both estrogenic and anti-estrogenic properties were observed. Results Here, we provide insight into the structural basis of the agonist/antagonist effects of RES on ERα ligand binding domain (LBD). Using atomistic simulation, we found that RES bound ERα monomer in antagonist conformation, where Helix 12 moves away from the ligand pocket and orients into the co-activator binding groove of LBD, is more stable than RES bound ERα in agonist conformation, where Helix 12 lays over the ligand binding pocket. Upon dimerization, the agonistic conformation of RES-ERα dimer becomes more stable compared to the corresponding monomer but still remains less stable compared to the corresponding dimer in antagonist conformation. Interestingly, while the binding pocket and the binding contacts of RES to ERα are similar to those of pure agonist diethylstilbestrol (DES), the binding energy is much less and the hydrogen bonding contacts also differ providing clues for the partial agonistic character of RES on ERα. Conclusions Our Molecular Dynamics simulation of RES-ERα structures with agonist and antagonist orientations of Helix 12 suggests RES action is more similar to Selective Estrogen Receptor Modulator (SERM) opening up the importance of cellular environment and active roles of co-regulator proteins in a given system. Our study reveals that potential co-activators must compete with the Helix 12 and displace it away from the activator binding groove to enhance the agonistic activity. PMID:24160181

  2. Pathophysiology of a severe case of Puumala hantavirus infection successfully treated with bradykinin receptor antagonist icatibant.

    PubMed

    Vaheri, Antti; Strandin, Tomas; Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Vapalahti, Olli; Jarva, Hanna; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Antonen, Jaakko; Leppänen, Ilona; Mäkelä, Satu; Meri, Seppo; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-11-01

    We recently described a patient with very severe Puumala hantavirus infection manifested by capillary leakage syndrome and shock. He was successfully treated with the bradykinin receptor antagonist, icatibant (Antonen et al., 2013). Here we report analysis of the pathophysiology which indicated pronounced complement activation, prolonged leukocytosis, extensive fibrinolysis, circulating histones, and defects in liver function. The patient had an uncommon HLA-phenotype, which may have contributed to the severe course of the disease. PMID:25194993

  3. Discovery and characterization of a potent and selective EP4 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Schiffler, Matthew A; Chandrasekhar, Srinivasan; Fisher, Matthew J; Harvey, Anita; Kuklish, Steven L; Wang, Xu-Shan; Warshawsky, Alan M; York, Jeremy S; Yu, Xiao-Peng

    2015-08-15

    EP4 is a prostaglandin E2 receptor that is a target for potential anti-nociceptive therapy. Described herein is a class of amphoteric EP4 antagonists which reverses PGE2-induced suppression of TNFα production in human whole blood. From this class, a potent and highly bioavailable compound (6) has been selected for potential clinical studies. EP4 binding and functional data, selectivity, and pharmacokinetic properties of this compound are included. PMID:26091726

  4. PTH and PTH Antagonist Induce Different Conformational Changes in the PTHR1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Beena E.; Sharma, Sandhya; Mierke, Dale F.; Rosenblatt, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Interaction of ligands with their specific receptors is accompanied by conformational shifts culminating in receptor activation and expression of hormonal activity. Using an engineered disulfide bond formation strategy, we characterized the relative conformational changes taking place within the PTH type 1 receptor (PTHR1) at the interface of transmembrane (TM)5 and TM6 on binding the PTH agonist, PTH(1-34), compared with the antagonist PTH(7-34). Cysteines were singly incorporated into a portion of the extracellular-facing region of TM5 (365–370), while simultaneously a second cysteine was introduced at position 420, 423, or 425 at the extracellular end of TM6, leading to a total of 18 double cysteine-containing PTHR1 mutants. All mutants, except P366C/V423C and P366C/M425C, were expressed in the cell membrane preparations. In the presence of agonist, H420C and M425C in TM6 formed disulfide bonds with all and with most, respectively, of the substituted cysteines incorporated in TM5. In contrast to the conformational shift induced (or stabilized) by agonist in activating the receptor, antagonist binding produced no detectable change from the basal (inactive) conformation of PTHR1. Our studies provide physicochemical evidence that the extracellular-facing ligand binding regions of receptor, TM5 and TM6, are dynamic and move relative to each other on ligand binding. The distinct differences in receptor conformation induced (or stabilized) by agonist PTH(1-34) compared with antagonist PTH(7-34) begin to provide insight into the early events in and mechanism of PTHR1 activation. PMID:19063682

  5. G-receptor antagonists increased the activating effect of mastoparan on low Km GTPase of mouse PAG.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Peña, Y; Sánchez-Blázquez, P; Garzón, J

    1995-02-01

    Mastoparan activated in a concentration-dependent manner the low Km GTPase activity in P2 fractions from mouse periaquedultal grey matter (PAG). This peptide at 1-10 mM produced increases of 30-70% over the basal value of 90-120 pmol Pi/mg/min. A series of substances displaying antagonist activity at cellular receptors and not modifying the GTPase function, when used at nanomolar and micromolar concentrations enhanced the effect of mastoparan upon this enzyme. These included antagonists of receptors coupling G proteins: naloxone (non selective opioid antagonist), CTOP (m opioid receptors), ICI 174,864 (d opioid receptors), nor-BNI (k opioid receptors), sulpiride (D2 dopaminergic antagonist), idazoxan (a2 adrenergic antagonist). Bicuculline, antagonist of a receptor not linked to G proteins, GABAA, did not alter the effect of mastoparan on the GTPase. The m opioid agonist, DAMGO, prevented naloxone from increasing the function of the mastoparan-activated enzyme. Thus, mastoparan appears to act on Gi/Go proteins at a site not directly related to the receptor binding domain. PMID:7794687

  6. Extended N-Arylsulfonylindoles as 5-HT₆ Receptor Antagonists: Design, Synthesis & Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Vera, Gonzalo; Lagos, Carlos F; Almendras, Sebastián; Hebel, Dan; Flores, Francisco; Valle-Corvalán, Gissella; Pessoa-Mahana, C David; Mella-Raipán, Jaime; Montecinos, Rodrigo; Recabarren-Gajardo, Gonzalo

    2016-01-01

    Based on a known pharmacophore model for 5-HT₆ receptor antagonists, a series of novel extended derivatives of the N-arylsulfonyindole scaffold were designed and identified as a new class of 5-HT₆ receptor modulators. Eight of the compounds exhibited moderate to high binding affinities and displayed antagonist profile in 5-HT₆ receptor functional assays. Compounds 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-tosyl-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4b), 1-(1-(4-iodophenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)-2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)ethanol (4g) and 2-(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)-1-(1-(naphthalen-1-ylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)ethanol (4j) showed the best binding affinity (4b pKi = 7.87; 4g pKi = 7.73; 4j pKi = 7.83). Additionally, compound 4j was identified as a highly potent antagonist (IC50 = 32 nM) in calcium mobilisation functional assay. PMID:27537868

  7. Novel benzo[1,4]diazepin-2-one derivatives as endothelin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bolli, Martin H; Marfurt, Judith; Grisostomi, Corinna; Boss, Christoph; Binkert, Christoph; Hess, Patrick; Treiber, Alexander; Thorin, Eric; Morrison, Keith; Buchmann, Stephan; Bur, Daniel; Ramuz, Henri; Clozel, Martine; Fischli, Walter; Weller, Thomas

    2004-05-20

    Since its discovery in 1988 by Yanagisawa et al., endothelin (ET), a potent vasoconstrictor, has been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and renal diseases. Many research groups have embarked on the discovery and development of ET receptor antagonists for the treatment of such diseases. While several compounds, e.g., ambrisentan 2, are in late clinical trials for various indications, one compound (bosentan, Tracleer) is being marketed to treat pulmonary arterial hypertension. Inspired by the structure of ambrisentan 2, we designed a novel class of ET receptor antagonists based on a 1,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-benzo[e][1,4]diazepin-2-one scaffold. Here, we report on the preparation as well as the in vitro and in vivo structure-activity relationships of these derivatives. Potent dual ET(A)/ET(B) receptor antagonists with affinities in the low nanomolar range have been identified. In addition, several compounds efficiently reduced arterial blood pressure after oral administration to Dahl salt sensitive rats. In this animal model, the efficacy of the benzo[e][1,4]diazepin-2-one derivative rac-39au was superior to that of racemic ambrisentan, rac-2. PMID:15139756

  8. Clinical pharmacokinetics and drug-drug interactions of endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Venitz, Jürgen; Zack, Julia; Gillies, Hunter; Allard, Martine; Regnault, Jean; Dufton, Christopher

    2012-12-01

    The authors review the basic pharmacology and potential for adverse drug-drug interactions (DDIs) of bosentan and ambrisentan, the 2 endothelin receptor antagonists currently approved for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) treatment. Bosentan, an endothelin (ET) receptor-type ET(A) and ET(B) antagonist, is metabolized to active metabolites by and an inducer of cytochrome P450 (CYP)2C9 and CYP3A. Ambrisentan, a selective ET(A) receptor antagonist, is metabolized primarily by uridine 5'diphosphate glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 1A9S, 2B7S, and 1A3S and, to a lesser extent, by CYP3A and CYP2C19. Drug interactions observed with bosentan DDI studies have demonstrated a potential for significant clinical implications during PAH management: bosentan is contraindicated with cyclosporine A and glyburide, and additional monitoring/dose adjustments are required when coadministered with hormonal contraceptives, simvastatin, lopinavir/ritonavir, and rifampicin. As bosentan carries a boxed warning regarding risks of liver injury and showed dose-dependant increases in serum aminotransferase abnormalities, drug interactions that increase bosentan exposure are of particular clinical concern. Ambrisentan DDI studies performed to date have shown only one clinically relevant DDI, an interaction with cyclosporine A that requires ambrisentan dose reduction. As the treatment of PAH moves toward multimodal combination therapy, scrutiny should be placed on ensuring that drug combinations achieve maximal clinical benefit while minimizing side effects. PMID:22205719

  9. Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Deficiency Presenting as Infantile Pustulosis Mimicking Infantile Pustular Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Minkis, Kira; Aksentijevich, Ivona; Goldbach-Mansky, Raphaela; Magro, Cynthia; Scott, Rachelle; Davis, Jessica G.; Sardana, Niti; Herzog, Ronit

    2012-01-01

    Background Deficiency of interleukin 1 receptor antagonist (DIRA) is a recently described autoinflammatory syndrome of skin and bone caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist. Few studies have been published about this debilitating condition. Early identification is critical for targeted lifesaving intervention. Observations A male infant, born to nonconsanguineous Puerto Rican parents, was referred for management of a pustular eruption diagnosed as pustular psoriasis. At 2 months of age, the infant developed a pustular eruption. After extensive evaluation, he was confirmed to be homozygous for a 175-kb genomic deletion on chromosome 2 that includes the IL1RN gene, commonly found in Puerto Ricans. Therapy with anakinra was initiated, with rapid clearance of skin lesions and resolution of systemic inflammation. Conclusions Recent identification of DIRA as a disease entity, compounded by the limited number of reported cases, makes early identification difficult. It is critical to consider this entity in the differential diagnosis of infantile pustulosis. Targeted therapy with the recombinant human interleukin 1 receptor antagonist anakinra can be lifesaving if initiated early. A high carrier frequency of the 175-kb DIRA-associated genomic deletion in the Puerto Rican population strongly supports testing infants presenting with unexplained pustulosis in patients from this geographic region. PMID:22431714

  10. A non-peptide NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580, inhibits neurogenic inflammation postsynaptically.

    PubMed

    Moussaoui, S M; Montier, F; Carruette, A; Blanchard, J C; Laduron, P M; Garret, C

    1993-05-01

    1. The non-peptide neurokinin NK1-receptor antagonist, RP 67580 (3aR, 7aR), a perhydroisoindolone derivative, powerfully reduced plasma extravasation in rat hind paw skin induced by local application of xylene (ID50 = 0.03 mg kg-1, i.v.) or capsaicin (ID50 = 0.06 mg kg-1, i.v.), or by i.v. injection of exogenous substance P (SP) or septide ([pGlu6,Pro9]SP(6-11)) (ID50 = 0.04-0.05 mg kg-1, i.v.). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) also abolished capsaicin-induced nasal fluid hypersecretion (by 82 +/- 5%). These effects were found to be stereospecific, the enantiomer, RP 68651 (3aS, 7aS), being inactive at 1 mg kg-1, i.v. 2. In rats neonatally treated with capsaicin (50 mg kg-1, s.c.), plasma extravasation induced by SP was significantly increased (by 43 +/- 7%). RP 67580 (1 mg kg-1, i.v.) completely inhibited the SP-induced plasma extravasation in capsaicin neonatally treated-animals, as it did in control animals. This result suggests that RP 67580 acts at the postsynaptic level for the inhibition of plasma extravasation. 3. Opioid receptor agonists, mu-(morphine) and kappa-(PD-117302) at 10 mg kg-1, s.c., in contrast to NK1-receptor antagonists, did not inhibit plasma extravasation induced by exogenous SP. They were, however, partially effective against plasma extravasation induced by electrical nerve stimulation (74 +/- 4% and 48 +/- 9% inhibition at 10 mg kg-1, s.c. of morphine and PD-117302, respectively, compared to 90 +/- 3% inhibition obtained with RP 67580, 3 mg kg-1, s.c.). These results indicate the presynaptic action of opioid receptor agonists, in contrast to the postsynaptic action of NK1-receptor antagonists for the inhibition of plasma extravasation.4. Ligature of the saphenous nerve distal to the point of electrical stimulation, local application of lignocaine to the saphenous nerve, neonatal capsaicin pretreatment, and colchicine at very low doses(120 microg kg-1 day-1 given for 3 days) were found to prevent plasma extravasation elicited by electrical nerve

  11. New P2X3 receptor antagonists. Part 1: Discovery and optimization of tricyclic compounds.

    PubMed

    Szántó, Gábor; Makó, Attila; Bata, Imre; Farkas, Bence; Kolok, Sándor; Vastag, Mónika; Cselenyák, Attila

    2016-08-15

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors are trimeric ligand-gated ion channels whose antagonism is an appealing yet challenging and not fully validated drug development idea. With the aim of identification of an orally active, potent human P2X3 receptor antagonist compound that can penetrate the central nervous system, the compound collection of Gedeon Richter was screened. A hit series of tricyclic compounds was subjected to a rapid, two-step optimization process focusing on increasing potency, improving metabolic stability and CNS penetrability. Attempts resulted in compound 65, a potential tool compound for testing P2X3 inhibitory effects in vivo. PMID:27423478

  12. Influence of Receptor Antagonists, Local Anesthetics, and Denervation on Microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Homann, Heinz H.; Hirsch, Tobias; Steinau, H.U.; Muehlberger, Thomas; Moll, Wibke; Lehnhardt, Marcus; Goertz, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Impaired microcirculation is one of the most important factors in delayed wound healing. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of chemical and surgical interruption of sympathetic nerve fibers and α- and β-receptors blockers on muscular microcirculation. Methods: The experiment was performed on a standardized cremaster muscle model of male Wistar rats (n=51). Microcirculation was recorded via transillumination microscopy on each of the 4 test groups and in a control group before and after their respective treatments with one of the following: topical application of bupivacaine, metoprolol, phentolamine, or surgical denervation. The arteriolar diameter and functional capillary density (FCD) as parameter for tissue perfusion were assessed. Results: The α-blocker phentolamine was the only agent that caused a significant dilation of the arteriolar diameter (76.6 ± 6.9 vs 100.0 ± 12.0 µm). However, like bupivacaine, metoprolol, and the surgical sympathectomy, it did not improve FCD as a parameter for tissue perfusion. The strongest vasoconstriction (35.9 ± 4.3 vs 28.6 ± 4.0) and impairment of the FCD (10.0 ± 0.7 vs 4.1 ± 0.9) was induced by the β-blocker metoprolol. Conclusions: This study shows that phentolamine could be an agent for dilating arteriolar diameter, but it did not improve FCD. Whereas the other agents, including sympathectomy, did not alter arteriolar diameter, the β-blocker worsened both investigated parameters. Our results raise the question whether β-blockers negatively influence microcirculation. Therefore, further studies are needed to investigate the potential adverse effects of β-blockers on wound healing. PMID:21283734

  13. Possible Mechanisms for Functional Antagonistic Effect of Ferula assafoetida on Muscarinic Receptors in Tracheal Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kiyanmehr, Majid; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Khazdair, Mohammad Reza; Hashemzehi, Milad

    2016-01-01

    Background The contribution of histamine (H1) receptors inhibitory and/or β-adrenoceptors stimulatory mechanisms in the relaxant property of Ferula assa-foetida. (F. asafoetida) was examined in the present study. Methods We evaluated the effect of three concentrations of F. asafoetida extract (2.5, 5, and 10 mg/mL), a muscarinic receptors antagonist, and saline on methacholine concentration-response curve in tracheal smooth muscles incubated with β-adrenergic and histamine (H1) (group 1), and only β-adrenergic (group 2) receptors antagonists. Results EC50 values in the presence of atropine, extract (5 and 10 mg/mL) and maximum responses to methacholine due to the 10 mg/mL extract in both groups and 5 mg/mL extract in group 1 were higher than saline (P < 0.0001, P = 0.0477, and P = 0.0008 in group 1 and P < 0.0001, P = 0.0438, and P = 0.0107 in group 2 for atropine, 5 and 10 mg/mL extract, respectively). Values of concentration ratio minus one (CR-1), in the presence of extracts were lower than atropine in both groups (P = 0.0339 for high extract concentration in group 1 and P < 0.0001 for other extract concentrations in both groups). Conclusion Histamine (H1) receptor blockade affects muscarinic receptors inhibitory property of F. asafoetida in tracheal smooth muscle PMID:27540324

  14. Discovery of piperidine ethers as selective orexin receptor antagonists (SORAs) inspired by filorexant.

    PubMed

    Raheem, Izzat T; Breslin, Michael J; Bruno, Joseph; Cabalu, Tamara D; Cooke, Andrew; Cox, Christopher D; Cui, Donghui; Garson, Susan; Gotter, Anthony L; Fox, Steven V; Harrell, C Meacham; Kuduk, Scott D; Lemaire, Wei; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Renger, John J; Stump, Craig; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Williams, Peter D; Winrow, Christopher J; Coleman, Paul J

    2015-02-01

    Highly selective orexin receptor antagonists (SORAs) of the orexin 2 receptor (OX2R) have become attractive targets both as potential therapeutics for insomnia as well as biological tools to help further elucidate the underlying pharmacology of the orexin signaling pathway. Herein, we describe the discovery of a novel piperidine ether 2-SORA class identified by systematic lead optimization beginning with filorexant, a dual orexin receptor antagonist (DORA) that recently completed Phase 2 clinical trials. Changes to the ether linkage and pendant heterocycle of filorexant were found to impart significant selectivity for OX2R, culminating in lead compound PE-6. PE-6 displays sub-nanomolar binding affinity and functional potency on OX2R while maintaining >1600-fold binding selectivity and >200-fold functional selectivity versus the orexin 1 receptor (OX1R). PE-6 bears a clean off-target profile, a good overall preclinical pharmacokinetic (PK) profile, and reduces wakefulness with increased NREM and REM sleep when evaluated in vivo in a rat sleep study. Importantly, subtle structural changes to the piperidine ether class impart dramatic changes in receptor selectivity. To this end, our laboratories have identified multiple piperidine ether 2-SORAs, 1-SORAs, and DORAs, providing access to a number of important biological tool compounds from a single structural class. PMID:25577040

  15. Early Use of the NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine in Refractory and Superrefractory Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Zeiler, F. A.

    2015-01-01

    Refractory status epilepticus (RSE) and superrefractory status epilepticus (SRSE) pose a difficult clinical challenge. Multiple cerebral receptor and transporter changes occur with prolonged status epilepticus leading to pharmacoresistance patterns unfavorable for conventional antiepileptics. In particular, n-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor upregulation leads to glutamate mediated excitotoxicity. Targeting these NMDA receptors may provide a novel approach to otherwise refractory seizures. Ketamine has been utilized in RSE. Recent systematic review indicates 56.5% and 63.5% cessation in seizures in adults and pediatrics, respectively. No complications were described. We should consider earlier implementation of ketamine or other NMDA receptor antagonists, for RSE. Prospective study of early implementation of ketamine should shed light on the role of such medications in RSE. PMID:25649724

  16. Chemical function based pharmacophore generation of endothelin-A selective receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Funk, Oliver F; Kettmann, Viktor; Drimal, Jan; Langer, Thierry

    2004-05-20

    Both quantitative and qualitative chemical function based pharmacophore models of endothelin-A (ET(A)) selective receptor antagonists were generated by using the two algorithms HypoGen and HipHop, respectively, which are implemented in the Catalyst molecular modeling software. The input for HypoGen is a training set of 18 ET(A) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging between 0.19 nM and 67 microM. The best output hypothesis consists of five features: two hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI) function. The highest scoring Hip Hop model consists of six features: three hydrophobic (HY), one ring aromatic (RA), one hydrogen bond acceptor (HBA), and one negative ionizable (NI). It is the result of an input of three highly active, selective, and structurally diverse ET(A) antagonists. The predictive power of the quantitative model could be approved by using a test set of 30 compounds, whose activity values spread over 6 orders of magnitude. The two pharmacophores were tested according to their ability to extract known endothelin antagonists from the 3D molecular structure database of Derwent's World Drug Index. Thereby the main part of selective ET(A) antagonistic entries was detected by the two hypotheses. Furthermore, the pharmacophores were used to screen the Maybridge database. Six compounds were chosen from the output hit lists for in vitro testing of their ability to displace endothelin-1 from its receptor. Two of these are new potential lead compounds because they are structurally novel and exhibit satisfactory activity in the binding assay. PMID:15139753

  17. Antitumor activity of neurokinin-1 receptor antagonists in MG-63 human osteosarcoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Miguel; Berger, Michael; Rosso, Marisa; Gonzalez-Ortega, Ana; Carranza, Andrés; Coveñas, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is a highly malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents. Aprepitant is a selective high‑affinity antagonist of the human neurokinin‑1 (NK‑1) receptor (NK1R) with robust antitumor activity. No data exist on the presence of NK1R in osteosarcoma and whether this tumor responds to NK1R antagonists. Here, we analyzed the expression of NK1R in the human osteosarcoma cell line MG-63 with western blot analysis and PCR and found significant expression both at the protein and mRNA levels. We further studied the growth inhibitory capacity of aprepitant and other NK1R antagonists on MG-63 in vitro using an MTS cytotoxicity assay and DAPI staining. All antagonists induced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis. Synergism was observed for the combination of L-733,060 with common cytostatic drugs in MG-63, but not in non-malignant HEK293 cells. Pretreatment of HEK293 with L-733,060 prior to exposure to cytostatic drugs partially protected HEK293 cells from inhibition by these drugs. Furthermore, nanomolar concentrations of substance P (SP), the natural ligand of the NK1R, increased the growth rate of MG‑63 cells and micromolar concentrations of aprepitant inhibited SP-induced growth in a dose‑dependent manner. In vivo, a xenograft for MG-63 was created in nude mice and treated with peritumoral s.c. injections of fosaprepitant, which resulted in a significant reduction of tumor volume. Collectively, we demonstrated for the first time that the NK1R is expressed in human osteosarcoma cell line MG‑63 and that this receptor can be targeted with NK1R antagonists both in vitro as well as in vivo. PMID:24190675

  18. A selective TSH receptor antagonist inhibits stimulation of thyroid function in female mice.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Susanne; Nir, Eshel A; Eliseeva, Elena; Huang, Wenwei; Marugan, Juan; Xiao, Jingbo; Dulcey, Andrés E; Gershengorn, Marvin C

    2014-01-01

    Because the TSH receptor (TSHR) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of thyroid disease, a TSHR antagonist could be a novel treatment. We attempted to develop a small molecule, drug-like antagonist of TSHR signaling that is selective and active in vivo. We synthesized NCGC00242364 (ANTAG3) by chemical modification of a previously reported TSHR antagonist. We tested its potency, efficacy, and selectivity in a model cell system in vitro by measuring its activity to inhibit stimulation of cAMP production stimulated by TSH, LH, or FSH. We tested the in vivo activity of ANTAG3 by measuring its effects to lower serum free T4 and thyroid gene expression in female BALB/c mice continuously treated with ANTAG3 for 3 days and given low doses of TRH continuously or stimulated by a single administration of a monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody M22. ANTAG3 was selective for TSHR inhibition; half-maximal inhibitory doses were 2.1 μM for TSHR and greater than 30 μM for LH and FSH receptors. In mice treated with TRH, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 44% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 75% and 83%, respectively. In mice given M22, ANTAG3 lowered serum free T4 by 38% and lowered mRNAs for sodium-iodide cotransporter and thyroperoxidase by 73% and 40%, respectively. In conclusion, we developed a selective TSHR antagonist that is effective in vivo in mice. This is the first report of a small-molecule TSHR antagonist active in vivo and may lead to a drug to treat Graves' disease. PMID:24169564

  19. Discovery of novel dihydrobenzofuran cyclopropane carboxylic acid based calcium sensing receptor antagonists for the treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Gui-Bai; Zhou, Changyou; Huo, Xianghong; Wang, Hank; Yang, Xuelin; Huang, Shaoqiang; Wang, Haisheng; Wilkinson, Hilary; Luo, Lusong; Tang, Wei; Sutton, David; Li, Hong; Zaller, Dennis; Meinke, Peter T

    2016-08-15

    In a search for novel small molecule calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) antagonists as oral bone anabolic agents, we discovered dihydrobenzofuran cyclopropane carboxylic acid derivatives, such as 12f (IC50=27.6nM), are highly potent calcium-sensing receptor antagonists. Studies in rats established that compound 12f stimulates parathyroid hormone (PTH) release in a fast-acting, pulsatile manner. PMID:27397499

  20. 5-HT6 Receptor Antagonists: Potential Efficacy for the Treatment of Cognitive Impairment in Schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Natasja M W J; Kruse, Chris G

    2015-01-01

    5-hydroxytryptamine6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonists have shown efficacy in animal models for cognitive impairment in multiple cognitive domains relevant for schizophrenia. Improvements were found with 5-HT6R antagonists in preclinical tests for episodic memory, social cognition, executive function, working memory and several other tests for both learning and memory. In contrast, there is little evidence for efficacy on attention. It will be interesting to further investigate 5-HT6R antagonists in neurodevelopmental animal models which are based on prenatal exposure to specific environmental insults, and are characterized by a high level of face, construct and predictive validity for cognitive impairments associated with schizophrenia. It is also important to do more add-on preclinical studies of 5-HT6 antagonists with antipsychotics. Possible mechanisms of action to improve cognition have been described. 5-HT6R antagonists decrease GABA release and GABAergic interneuron excitability, which subsequently disinhibits glutamate and/or acetylcholine release and results in enhancement of synaptic plasticity. Furthermore, cognition could be improved by 5-HT6R antagonists, because these compounds increase the number of NCAM PSA-immunoreactive neurons in the dendate gyrus, inhibit mTOR and Fyn-tyrosine kinase and interact with DARPP-32. Interestingly, there is increasing preclinical evidence that could support additional benefits of 5-HT6R ligandson comorbid conditions in schizophrenia such as drug abuse, depression, anxiety, obesity andantipsychotic-induced EPS. Finally, we briefly give an overview of the 5-HT6R compounds that are currently in clinical development for the treatment of cognitive impairment in both schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26044973

  1. Control of gastric acid secretion. Histamine H2-receptor antagonists and H+K(+)-ATPase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shamburek, R D; Schubert, M L

    1992-09-01

    Gastric acid secretion is regulated by an intricate interplay of neural (acetylcholine), hormonal (gastrin), and paracrine (histamine, somatostatin) mechanisms. Receptors for each of these agents and the signal transduction pathways to which these receptors are coupled have been identified on the parietal cell. The stimulatory effect of acetylcholine and gastrin is mediated by an increase in cytosolic calcium, whereas that of histamine is mediated by activation of adenylate cyclase and generation of cAMP. Strong potentiation between histamine and either gastrin or acetylcholine reflects postreceptor interaction between the distinct pathways as well as the ability of acetylcholine and gastrin to release histamine from mucosal ECL cells. The inhibitory effects of somatostatin on acid secretion are mediated by receptors coupled by guanine nucleotide-binding proteins to inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity. All the pathways converge on and modulate the activity of the luminal enzyme, H+K(+)-ATPase, the proton pump of the parietal cell. Precise information on the mechanisms involved in gastric acid secretion has led to the development of potent drugs capable of inhibiting acid secretion. These include competitive antagonists that interact with stimulatory receptors (e.g., histamine H2-receptor antagonists) as well as noncompetitive inhibitors of H+K(+)-ATPase (e.g., omeprazole). The histamine H2-receptor antagonists (cimetidine, ranitidine, famotidine, and nizatidine) continue as first-line therapy for peptic ulcer disease and are effective in preventing relapse. Although they are generally well tolerated, histamine H2-receptor antagonists may cause untoward CNS, cardiac, and endocrine effects as well as interference with the absorption, metabolism, and elimination of various drugs. Omeprazole is a weak base that reaches the parietal cell through the bloodstream, diffuses through the cytoplasm, and becomes activated and trapped as a sulfenamide in the acidic

  2. Actions of picrodendrin antagonists on dieldrin-sensitive and -resistant Drosophila GABA receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Hosie, A. M.; Ozoe, Y.; Koike, K.; Ohmoto, T.; Nikaido, T.; Sattelle, D. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of terpenoid compounds, recently isolated from Picrodendron baccatum, share a picrotoxane skeleton with picrotoxinin, an antagonist of ionotropic GABA receptors. Referred to as picrodendrins, they inhibit the binding of [35S]-tert-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) to rat GABAA receptors. Hitherto, their effects on GABA receptors have not been investigated electrophysiologically. Under two-electrode voltage-clamp, the actions of picrodendrins and related terpenoids have been assayed on homooligomeric GABA receptors formed by the expression of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit (RDLac) in Xenopus oocytes. 2. All the terpenoids tested, dose-dependently antagonized currents induced by 30 microM (EC50) GABA. 3. Tutin and its analogues (dihydrotutin and isohyenanchin) differ in the structure of their axial C4 substituents. Of these compounds, tutin, which bears an isopropenyl group at this carbon atom, was the most potent antagonist of RDLac homo-oligomers, whereas isohyenanchin, which bears a hydroxyisopropyl group, was the least potent antagonist tested. 4. Picrodendrins differ mainly in the structure of their C9 substituents. The IC50s of picrodendrins ranged from 17 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-Q) to 1006 +/- 1.3 nM (picrodendrin-O). As such, the most potent picrodendrins (Q, A and B) were approximately equipotent with picrotoxinin as antagonists of RDLac homo-oligomers. 5. Certain picrodendrin compounds effected a use-dependent blockade of RDLac homo-oligomers. Such a biphasic block was not observed with tutin analogues. 6. Picrotoxin-resistant RDLacA3025 homo-oligomers, which have a single amino acid substitution (A302S) in the 2nd transmembrane region, were markedly less sensitive to picrodendrin-O than the wild-type, dieldrin-sensitive, homo-oligomers. 7. The relative potency of tutin analogues demonstrates that the structure-activity relationship of the C4 substituent of picrotoxane-based compounds is conserved in vertebrates and insects. However, the

  3. Novel class of medications, orexin receptor antagonists, in the treatment of insomnia - critical appraisal of suvorexant.

    PubMed

    Norman, Jessica L; Anderson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    Insomnia, a highly prevalent disorder, can be detrimental to patients' overall health and worsen existing comorbidities. Patients may have acute episodes of insomnia related to a traumatic event, but more commonly insomnia occurs chronically. While proper sleep hygiene and behavioral therapy play important roles in the nonpharmacologic management of short-term and chronic insomnia, medications may also be required. Historically, insomnia has been treated with agents such as benzodiazepines, nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonists, and melatonin agonists. Dual orexin receptor antagonists represent a new class of medications for the treatment of insomnia, which block the binding of wakefulness-promoting neuropeptides orexin A and orexin B to their respective receptor sites. Suvorexant (Belsomra) is the first dual orexin receptor antagonist to be approved in the US and Japan and has demonstrated efficacy in decreasing time to sleep onset and increasing total sleep time. Its unique mechanism of action, data to support efficacy and safety over 12 months of use, and relative lack of withdrawal effects when discontinued may represent an alternative for patients with chronic insomnia who cannot tolerate or do not receive benefit from more traditional sleep agents. Suvorexant is effective and well tolerated, but precautions exist for certain patient populations, including females, obese patients, and those with respiratory disease. Suvorexant has only been studied vs placebo, and hence it is unknown how it directly compares with other medications approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for insomnia. Suvorexant is not likely to replace benzodiazepines or nonbenzodiazepine receptor antagonists as a first-line sleep agent but does represent a novel option for the treatment of patients with chronic insomnia. PMID:27471419

  4. Synthesis of 4-(aminoalkyl) substituted 1,3-dioxanes as potent NMDA and σ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Utech, Tina; Köhler, Jens; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2011-06-01

    Elongation of the distance between the oxygen heterocycle and the basic amino moiety or ring expansion of the oxygen heterocycle of the NMDA receptor antagonists dexoxadrol and etoxadrol led to compounds with promising NMDA receptor affinity. Herein the combination of both structural features, i.e. elongation of the O-heterocycle--amine distance with a 1,3-dioxane ring is envisaged. The synthesis of aminoethyl-1,3-dioxanes 13, 22, 23 and 29 was performed by transacetalization of various acetals with pentane-1,3,5-triol, activation of the remaining free OH moiety with tosyl chloride and subsequent nucleophilic substitution. The corresponding 3-aminopropyl derivatives 33-35 were prepared by substitution of the tosylates with KCN and LiAlH4 reduction. The highest NMDA receptor affinity was found for 1,3-dioxanes with a phenyl and an ethyl residue at the acetalic position (23) followed by diphenyl (22) and monophenyl derivatives (13). Generally the NMDA affinity of primary amines is higher than the NMDA affinity of secondary and tertiary amines. Altogether the primary amine 23a (Ki=24 nM) represents the most promising NMDA receptor antagonist of this series exceeding the NMDA affinity of the mono-homologues (2-aminoethyl)-1,3-dioxolanes (3,4) and (aminomethyl)-1,3-dioxanes (5,6). Whereas the primary amine 23a turned out to be selective against σ1 and σ2 receptors the benzylamine 13d was identified as potent (Ki=19 nM) and selective σ1 antagonist, which showed extraordinarily high antiallodynic activity in the capsaicin assay. PMID:21444132

  5. Subtype selective NMDA receptor antagonists induce recovery of synapses lost following exposure to HIV-1 Tat

    PubMed Central

    Shin, AH; Kim, HJ; Thayer, SA

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Neurocognitive disorders afflict approximately 20% of HIV-infected patients. HIV-1-infected cells in the brain shed viral proteins such as transactivator of transcription (Tat). Tat elicits cell death and synapse loss via processes initiated by NMDA receptor activation but mediated by separate downstream signalling pathways. Subunit selective NMDA receptor antagonists may differentially modulate survival relative to synaptic changes. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Tat-evoked cell death was quantified by measuring propidium iodide uptake into rat hippocampal neurons in culture. The effects of Tat on synaptic changes were measured using an imaging-based assay that quantified clusters of the scaffolding protein postsynaptic density 95 fused to green fluorescent protein. KEY RESULTS Dizocilpine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist, inhibited Tat-induced synapse loss, subsequent synapse recovery and Tat-induced cell death with comparable potencies. Memantine (10 µM) and ifenprodil (10 µM), which preferentially inhibit GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, protected from Tat-induced cell death with no effect on synapse loss. Surprisingly, memantine and ifenprodil induced synapse recovery in the presence of Tat. In contrast, the GluN2A-prefering antagonist TCN201 prevented synapse loss and recovery with no effect on cell death. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Synapse loss is a protective mechanism that enables the cell to cope with excess excitatory input. Thus, memantine and ifenprodil are promising neuroprotective drugs because they spare synaptic changes and promote survival. These GluN2B-preferring drugs induced recovery from Tat-evoked synapse loss, suggesting that synaptic pharmacology changed during the neurotoxic process. NMDA receptor subtypes differentially participate in the adaptation and death induced by excitotoxic insult. PMID:22142193

  6. Label-Free Kinetics: Exploiting Functional Hemi-Equilibrium to Derive Rate Constants for Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Riddy, Darren M; Valant, Celine; Rueda, Patricia; Charman, William N; Sexton, Patrick M; Summers, Roger J; Christopoulos, Arthur; Langmead, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Drug receptor kinetics is as a key component in drug discovery, development, and efficacy; however, determining kinetic parameters has historically required direct radiolabeling or competition with a labeled tracer. Here we present a simple approach to determining the kinetics of competitive antagonists of G protein-coupled receptors by exploiting the phenomenon of hemi-equilibrium, the state of partial re-equilibration of agonist, antagonist, and receptor in some functional assays. Using functional [Ca(2+)]i-flux and extracellular kinases 1 and 2 phosphorylation assays that have short incubation times and therefore are prone to hemi-equilibrium "behaviors," we investigated a wide range of structurally and physicochemically distinct muscarinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists. Using a combined operational and hemi-equilibrium model of antagonism to both simulate and analyze data, we derived estimates of association and dissociation rates for the test set of antagonists, identifying both rapidly dissociating (4-DAMP, himbacine) and slowly dissociating (tiotropium, glycopyrrolate) ligands. The results demonstrate the importance of assay incubation time and the degree of receptor reserve in applying the analytical model. There was an excellent correlation between estimates of antagonist pK(B), k(on), and k(off) from functional assays and those determined by competition kinetics using whole-cell [(3)H]N-methylscopolamine binding, validating this approach as a rapid and simple method to functionally profile receptor kinetics of competitive antagonists in the absence of a labeled tracer. PMID:26243731

  7. Functionalized Congeners of 1,4-Dihydropyridines as Antagonist Molecular Probes for A3 Adenosine Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Chang, Louis; Ji, Xiao-duo; Melman, Neli; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    4-Phenylethynyl-6-phenyl-1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives are selective antagonists at human A3 adenosine receptors, with Ki values in a radioligand binding assay vs [125I]AB-MECA [N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarbamoyl-adenosine] in the submicromolar range. In this study, functionalized congeners of 1,4-dihydropyridines were designed as chemically reactive adenosine A3 antagonists, for the purpose of synthesizing molecular probes for this receptor subtype. Selectivity of the new analogues for cloned human A3 adenosine receptors was determined in radioligand binding in comparison to binding at rat brain A1 and A2A receptors. Benzyl ester groups at the 3- and/or 5-positions and phenyl groups at the 2- and/or 6-positions were introduced as potential sites for chain attachment. Structure–activity analysis at A3 adenosine receptors indicated that 3,5-dibenzyl esters, but not 2,6-diphenyl groups, are tolerated in binding. Ring substitution of the 5-benzyl ester with a 4-fluorosulfonyl group provided enhanced A3 receptor affinity resulting in a Ki value of 2.42 nM; however, a long-chain derivative containing terminal amine functionalization at the 4-position of the 5-benzyl ester showed only moderate affinity. This sulfonyl fluoride derivative appeared to bind irreversibly to the human A3 receptor (1 h incubation at 100 nM resulting in the loss of 56% of the specific radioligand binding sites), while the binding of other potent dihydropyridines and other antagonists was generally reversible. At the 3-position of the dihydropyridine ring, an amine-functionalized chain attached at the 4-position of a benzyl ester provided higher A3 receptor affinity than the corresponding 5-position isomer. This amine congener was also used as an intermediate in the synthesis of a biotin conjugate, which bound to A3 receptors with a Ki value of 0.60 μM. PMID:10411465

  8. Effects of the neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist BIBP3226 on vascular NPY-receptors with different ligand requirements.

    PubMed

    Grundemar, L; Ekelund, M

    1996-11-01

    The aim was to examine effects of a newly developed neuropeptide Y (NPY)-receptor antagonist, BIBP3226 and to characterize NPY-receptors in the isolated guinea pig caval vein and human subcutaneous artery, respectively. BIBP3226 < or = 1 microM did not affect the basal tension. Pretreatment with increasing concentrations of BIBP3226 (10 nM-1 microM) resulted in a progressive rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to the Y1-receptor selective agonist [Pro34]NPY in the guinea pig caval vein. Regression analysis of the Schild plot gave a pA2-value of 7.58 (7.20-8.33, 95% confidence interval), slope of regression line 0.96 (0.52-1.39, 95% confidence interval) and a correlation coefficient of 0.78. NPY and the C-terminal NPY 2-36 evoked equipotent concentration-dependent contractions, both of which were sensitive to BIBP3226. Although less potent than NPY 2-36, also the contraction induced by NPY 5-36 was antagonized by BIBP3226. In the human subcutaneous artery [Pro34]NPY but not NPY 2-36 (< or = 0.3 microM) evoked a concentration-dependent contraction. Pretreatment with BIBP3226 (0.1 microM) resulted in a rightward shift of the concentration-response curve to [Pro34]NPY (from 7.38 +/- 0.10 to 6.95 +/- 0.16 (P < 0.05, n = 6). The present study has shown that the Y1-receptor-selective antagonist BIBP3226 potently antagonizes vascular NPY-receptors with different ligand requirements in the guinea pig caval vein and human subcutaneous artery, respectively. It appears that the guinea pig Y1-receptor is much less stringent in its demand on the N-terminal part of NPY than that of human Y1-receptors. PMID:8936561

  9. Heterogeneous receptor binding of classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists. I. Bovine tissue distribution.

    PubMed

    Roffel, A F; Ensing, K; in 't Hout, W G; de Zeeuw, R A; Zaagsma, J

    1991-01-01

    In competition experiments with the tertiary radioligand [3H]dexetimide, classical quaternary muscarinic antagonists like ipratropium bromide and N-methylscopolamine bromide distinguished two muscarinic binding sites in bovine brain (total brain minus cerebellum) membranes, in contrast to their tertiary analogues, atropine and scopolamine, which recognized only one binding site. This binding behavior was found to be almost identical in bovine striatal membranes, both in terms of binding affinities and proportions of high (Q1) and low (Q2) affinity binding sites. Both in total brain and in striatal membranes, the Q1/Q2 binding heterogeneity was independent of pirenzepine binding heterogeneity (M1/M2). In peripheral tissues, the binding properties of quaternary muscarinic antagonists varied. Whereas tertiary as well as quaternary compounds showed only high affinity binding towards muscarinic receptors in bovine atrial and left ventricular membranes, heterogeneous binding behavior was observed with quaternary but not with tertiary antagonists in bovine tracheal smooth muscle membranes. The tissue distribution found in the present study suggests that bovine tracheal smooth muscle contraction studies might shed light on the functional significance of the anomalous binding behavior of quaternary muscarinic antagonists. PMID:1824191

  10. Therapeutic potential of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 agonists and antagonists as analgesics: Recent advances and setbacks.

    PubMed

    Wong, Gilbert Y; Gavva, Narender R

    2009-04-01

    The vanilloid receptor TRPV1 is a homotetrameric, non-selective cation channel abundantly expressed in the nociceptors (c-fibers). TRPV1 is considered as a highly validated pain target because, i) its agonists such as capsaicin cause desensitization of TRPV1 channels that relieves pain behaviors in preclinical species, and ii) its antagonists relieve pain behaviors in rodent models of inflammation, osteoarthritis, and cancer. Hence, both agonists and antagonists of TRPV1 are being evaluated as potential analgesics in clinical trials. Clinical trial results of TRPV1 agonists such as resiniferatoxin in interstitial cystitis, NGX 4010 in post-herpetic neuralgia, and 4975 (Adlea) in osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma have been reported. Similarly, clinical trial results of TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and AMG 517 have also been published recently. Overall, some molecules (e.g., capsaicin) demonstrated potential analgesia in certain conditions (postsurgical pain, postherpetic neuralgia, pain in diabetic neuropathy, osteoarthritis, bunionectomy, and Morton's neuroma), whereas others fell out of the clinic due to on-target liabilities or failed to demonstrate efficacy. This review summarizes recent advances and setbacks of TRPV1 agonists and antagonists in the clinic and predicts future directions. PMID:19150372

  11. Non-peptide angiotensin II receptor antagonists: chemical feature based pharmacophore identification.

    PubMed

    Krovat, Eva M; Langer, Thierry

    2003-02-27

    Chemical feature based pharmacophore models were elaborated for angiotensin II receptor subtype 1 (AT(1)) antagonists using both a quantitative and a qualitative approach (Catalyst HypoGen and HipHop algorithms, respectively). The training sets for quantitative model generation consisted of 25 selective AT(1) antagonists exhibiting IC(50) values ranging from 1.3 nM to 150 microM. Additionally, a qualitative pharmacophore hypothesis was derived from multiconformational structure models of the two highly active AT(1) antagonists 4u (IC(50) = 0.2 nM) and 3k (IC(50) = 0.7 nM). In the case of the quantitative model, the best pharmacophore hypothesis consisted of a five-features model (Hypo1: seven points, one hydrophobic aromatic, one hydrophobic aliphatic, a hydrogen bond acceptor, a negative ionizable function, and an aromatic plane function). The best qualitative model consisted of seven features (Hypo2: 11 points, two aromatic rings, two hydrogen bond acceptors, a negative ionizable function, and two hydrophobic functions). The obtained pharmacophore models were validated on a wide set of test molecules. They were shown to be able to identify a range of highly potent AT(1) antagonists, among those a number of recently launched drugs and some candidates presently undergoing clinical tests and/or development phases. The results of our study provide confidence for the utility of the selected chemical feature based pharmacophore models to retrieve structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activity by virtual screening. PMID:12593652

  12. 3D-pharmacophere models for CC chemokine receptor 1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yixi; Andre, Philippe; Wei, Jing; Zhao, Kang

    2009-07-01

    The CC Chemokine Receptor 1 (CCR1) is closely related to various chronic inflammatory diseases like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, and plays a crucial role in transplant rejection. Inhibiting its activity with CCR1 antagonists has been proved to be effective in preventing some diseases. A number of in vivo experiments have been carried out to shed light on the underlying mechanism of the interactions between the CCR1 and its ligands. However, their conclusions are still controversial. In this study, ligand-based computational drug design is applied as a new and effective way to study the structure-activity relationship of CCR1 antagonists. Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for CCR1 antagonists, using both HypoGen and HipHop algorithms in Catalyst software. Two optimal pharmacophore models were defined through careful qualification processes. Both of them have four features: one hydrogen-bond acceptor, one positive ionable and two hydrophobic groups. Additional information was obtained through comparison between the two models. Our results can be valuable tools for the discovery and development of specific, highly potent CCR1 antagonists. For Supplement material, please see the online version of the article. PMID:19689388

  13. Adenosine receptor antagonists inhibit the development of morphine sensitization in the C57BL/6 mouse.

    PubMed

    Weisberg, S P; Kaplan, G B

    1999-04-01

    We examined the effects of adenosine antagonists on the development of morphine sensitization in C57BL/6 mice. Adenosine antagonists or vehicle were repeatedly co-administered intraperitoneally with morphine (10 mg/kg, s.c.) to mice once every other day for 9 days. Two days later, a 10 mg/kg morphine-only challenge was administered to each group. Consistent with sensitization, mice receiving morphine alone developed enhanced ambulatory activity responses to subsequent morphine administrations and, upon morphine-only challenge, had a significantly greater response to morphine than vehicle pretreated animals. The nonselective adenosine antagonist, caffeine, at 10 and 20 mg/kg but not at 5 mg/kg, attenuated the development of sensitization during co-administration with morphine and also following morphine-only challenge. The adenosine A1 selective antagonist 1,3-dipropyl-8-(2-amino-4-chlorophenyl)-xanthine (PACPX), at 0.001 and 0.002 mg/kg but not at 0.2 mg/kg, similarly attenuated the development of morphine sensitization. We propose a mechanism which involves an adenosine receptor role in the mesolimbic dopamine system. PMID:10320021

  14. Guanidino acids act as rho1 GABA(C) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chebib, Mary; Gavande, Navnath; Wong, Kit Yee; Park, Anna; Premoli, Isabella; Mewett, Kenneth N; Allan, Robin D; Duke, Rujee K; Johnston, Graham A R; Hanrahan, Jane R

    2009-10-01

    GABA(C) receptors play a role in myopia, memory-related disorders and circadian rhythms signifying a need to develop potent and selective agents for this class of receptors. Guanidino analogs related to glycine, beta-alanine and taurine were evaluated at human rho(1)GABA(C) receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes using 2-electrode voltage clamp methods. Of the 12 analogs tested, 8 analogs were active as antagonists and the remaining were inactive. (S)-2-guanidinopropionic acid (IC(50) = 2.2 microM) and guanidinoacetic acid (IC(50) = 5.4 microM; K (B) = 7.75 microM [pK (B) = 5.11 +/- 0.06]) were the most potent being competitive antagonists at this receptor. In contrast, the beta-alanine and GABA guanidino analogs showed reduced activity, indicating the distance between the carboxyl carbon and terminal nitrogen of the guanidino group is critical for activity. Substituting the C2-position of guanidinoacetic acid with various alkyl groups reduced activity indicating that steric effects may impact on activity. The results of this study contribute to the structure-activity-relationship profile required in developing novel therapeutic agents. PMID:19387831

  15. Synthesis and evaluation of novel angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists as anti-hypertension drugs.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaolu; Zhu, Weibo; Zhang, Ruijing; Wen, Caihong; Wang, Li; Yan, Yijia; Tang, Hesheng; Chen, Zhilong

    2016-05-01

    Three new angiotensin II receptor 1 antagonists, 1, 2 and 3 were designed, synthesized and evaluated. The AT1 receptor-binding assays in vitro showed that all the synthesized compounds had nanomolar affinity for the AT1 receptor. From which compound 3 was found to be the most potent ligands with an IC50 value of 2.67±0.23 nM. Biological evaluation in vivo revealed that all the compounds could cause significant decrease on MBP in a dose dependent manner in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and compound 3 especially showed an efficient and long-lasting effect in reducing blood pressure, whose maximal response lowered 41 mmHg of MBP at 10mg/kg and 62 mmHg at 15 mg/kg after oral administration, the significant anti-hypertensive effect lasted beyond 12 h, which is better than the reference compound losartan. The pharmacokinetic experiments showed that compound 3 could be absorbed efficiently and metabolized smoothly both in blood and in tissues in Wistar rats. The acute toxicity assay suggested that it has low toxicity with the LD50 value of 2974.35 mg/kg. These results demonstrate that compound 3 is a potent angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonist which could be considered as a novel anti-hypertension candidate and deserved for further investigation. PMID:27004954

  16. Discovery and characterization of novel small-molecule CXCR4 receptor agonists and antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rama K.; Shum, Andrew K.; Platanias, Leonidas C.; Miller, Richard J.; Schiltz, Gary E.

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its cognate receptor CXCR4 are involved in a large number of physiological processes including HIV-1 infectivity, inflammation, tumorigenesis, stem cell migration, and autoimmune diseases. While previous efforts have identified a number of CXCR4 antagonists, there have been no small molecule agonists reported. Herein, we describe the identification of a novel series of CXCR4 modulators, including the first small molecules to display agonist behavior against this receptor, using a combination of structure- and ligand-based virtual screening. These agonists produce robust calcium mobilization in human melanoma cell lines which can be blocked by the CXCR4-selective antagonist AMD3100. We also demonstrate the ability of these new agonists to induce receptor internalization, ERK activation, and chemotaxis, all hallmarks of CXCR4 activation. Our results describe a new series of biologically relevant small molecules that will enable further study of the CXCR4 receptor and may contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:27456816

  17. Discovery of a 7-arylaminobenzimidazole series as novel CRF1 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Michiyo; Kori, Masakuni; Kono, Mitsunori; Yano, Takahiko; Sako, Yuu; Tanaka, Maiko; Kanzaki, Naoyuki; Gyorkos, Albert C; Corrette, Christopher P; Aso, Kazuyoshi

    2016-10-01

    A promising lead compound 1 of a benzimidazole series has been identified as a corticotropin-releasing factor 1 (CRF1) receptor antagonist. In this study, we focused on replacement of a 7-alkylamino group of 1, predicted to occupy a large lipophilic pocket of a CRF1 receptor, with an aryl group. During the course of this examination, we established new synthetic approaches to 2,7-diarylaminobenzimidazoles. The novel synthesis of 7-arylaminobenzimidazoles culminated in the identification of compounds exhibiting inhibitory activities comparable to the alkyl analog 1. A representative compound, p-methoxyanilino analog 16g, showed potent CRF binding inhibitory activity against a human CRF1 receptor and human CRF1 receptor antagonistic activity (IC50=27nM, 56nM, respectively). This compound exhibited ex vivo (125)I-Tyr(0) ((125)I-CRF) binding inhibitory activity in mouse frontal cortex, olfactory bulb, and pituitary gland at 20mg/kg after oral administration. In this report, we discuss the structure-activity-relationship of these 7-arylamino-1H-benzimidazoles and their synthetic method. PMID:27567079

  18. Discovery and characterization of novel small-molecule CXCR4 receptor agonists and antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Rama K; Shum, Andrew K; Platanias, Leonidas C; Miller, Richard J; Schiltz, Gary E

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 (SDF-1) and its cognate receptor CXCR4 are involved in a large number of physiological processes including HIV-1 infectivity, inflammation, tumorigenesis, stem cell migration, and autoimmune diseases. While previous efforts have identified a number of CXCR4 antagonists, there have been no small molecule agonists reported. Herein, we describe the identification of a novel series of CXCR4 modulators, including the first small molecules to display agonist behavior against this receptor, using a combination of structure- and ligand-based virtual screening. These agonists produce robust calcium mobilization in human melanoma cell lines which can be blocked by the CXCR4-selective antagonist AMD3100. We also demonstrate the ability of these new agonists to induce receptor internalization, ERK activation, and chemotaxis, all hallmarks of CXCR4 activation. Our results describe a new series of biologically relevant small molecules that will enable further study of the CXCR4 receptor and may contribute to the development of new therapeutics. PMID:27456816

  19. Estrogen receptor (ER) agonists and androgen receptor (AR) antagonists in effluents from Norwegian North Sea oil production platforms.

    PubMed

    Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Harman, Christopher; Smith, Andy; Thomas, Kevin V

    2007-03-01

    The in vitro estrogen receptor (ER) agonist and androgen receptor (AR) antagonist potencies of offshore produced water effluents collected from the Norwegian Sector were determined using recombinant yeast estrogen and androgen screens. Solid phase extraction (SPE) concentrates of the effluents showed E2 agonist activities similar to those previously reported for the United Kingdom (UK) Continental Shelf (<0.1-4 ng E2 L(-1)). No activity was detected in the filtered oil droplets suggesting that produced water ER activity is primarily associated with the dissolved phase. Targeted analysis for methyl- to nonyl-substituted alkylphenol isomers show the occurrence of known ER agonists in the analysed samples. For the first time, AR antagonists were detected in both the dissolved and oil associated phase at concentrations of between 20 and 8000 microg of flutamide equivalents L(-1). The identity of the AR antagonists is unknown, however this represents a significant input into the marine environment of unknown compounds that exert a known biological effect. It is recommended that further analysis using techniques such as bioassay-directed analysis is performed to identify the compounds/groups of compounds that are responsible in order to improve the assessment of the risk posed by produced water discharges to the marine environment. PMID:17258235

  20. Scorpion venom-induced neutrophilia is inhibited by a PAF receptor antagonist in the rat.

    PubMed

    Borges, C M; Silveira, M R; Aparecida, M; Beker, C L; Freire-Maia, L; Teixeira, M M

    2000-04-01

    A dramatic blood neutrophilia is an important feature of the severe envenoming caused by the Brazilian scorpion Tityus serrulatus and may contribute to the development of lung injury in children. We examined the effects of an intravenous injection of T. serrulatus scorpion venom (TsV) on the total number of leukocytes and neutrophils in the blood of anesthetized rats. Injection of TsV (250 microg/kg) induces a significant leukocytosis 2 and 3 h after its injection, explained by an increase in the number of neutrophils. The release of catecholamines and action on adrenoceptors is responsible for most of the systemic manifestations of TsV. However, pretreatment with the beta-adrenoceptor antagonists metoprolol and propranolol or the alpha1-adrenoceptor antagonist prazosin (0.25 mg/kg) did not prevent TsV-induced neutrophilia. Blood neutrophilia induced by TsV occurred simultaneously with a significant reduction of mature neutrophils in bone marrow. Pretreatment with the platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonists UK-74505 or WEB-2086 prevented TsV-induced increase in blood neutrophils and reduction in the number of neutrophils in the bone marrow. It is concluded that scorpion venom induces blood neutrophilia in rats, explained by a PAF receptor-dependent mobilization of neutrophils from the bone marrow. PMID:10770284

  1. The bradykinin B1 receptor antagonist R-954 inhibits Ehrlich tumor growth in rodents.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Patricia Dias; Gomes, Niele de Matos; Sirois, Pierre

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a new bradykinin B(1) receptor antagonist, R-954, on the development of Ehrlich ascitic tumor (EAT) induced by the intraperitoneal inoculation of EAT cells in mice and the formation of a solid tumor by the subcutaneous injection of the cells in rat paw. The development of the tumor was associated with an increase in mouse total cell counts in bone marrow (10.8-fold), ascitic fluid (14.6-fold), and blood (12.6-fold). R-954 (2mg/kg, s.c.) significantly reduced the ascitic fluid volume (63.7%) and the mouse weight gain (30.5%) after 10 consecutive days of treatment. The B(1) antagonist as well as the anti-neoplasic drug vincristine also significantly inhibited the increase in total cell count in bone marrow, ascitic fluid, and blood. R-954 reduced significantly the total protein extravasation (57.3%), the production of nitric oxide (56%), PGE(2) production (82%), and TNFα release (85.7%) in mice peritoneal cavity whereas vincristine reduced the release of these inflammatory mediators by 84-94%. The increase in paw edema after intraplantar injection of EAT cells was reduced by approximately 52% by either R-954 or vincristine treatment. In conclusion, this study presents for the first time the antitumoral activity of a new bradykinin B(1) receptor antagonist on ascitic and solid tumors induced by Ehrlich cell inoculation in mice and rats. PMID:21835216

  2. Natural variants of cytotoxic epitopes are T-cell receptor antagonists for antiviral cytotoxic T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Sette, Alessandro; Chisari, Francis V.; Penna, Amalia; Levrero, Massimo; Carli, Marco De; Fiaccadori, Franco; Ferrari, Carlo

    1994-06-01

    IT has been suggested that mutations within immunodominant cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes may be exploited by viruses to evade protective immune responses critical for clearance1-4. Viral escape could originate from passive mechanisms, such as mutations within crucial CTL epitopes, either affecting major histocompatibility complex binding or T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognition. Additionally, it has recently been shown that substitutions of TCR contact sites can yield analogue peptides that can still interact with the T-cell receptor but be unable to deliver a full stimulatory signal, thus inducing anergy5 or acting as an antagonist for the TCR6-8. We report here that hepatitis B virus isolates derived from two chronically infected patients display variant epitopes that act as natural TCR antagonists with the capacity to inhibit the CTL response to the wild-type epitope. During natural infection, TCR antagonist mutations of CTL epitopes could contribute to the development of viral persistence, especially if the antiviral CTL response is monospecific or the epitope is strongly immunodominant.

  3. Distribution of cells responsive to 5-HT6 receptor antagonist-induced hypophagia

    PubMed Central

    Garfield, Alastair S.; Burke, Luke K.; Shaw, Jill; Evans, Mark L.; Heisler, Lora K.

    2014-01-01

    The central 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT; serotonin) system is well established as an important regulator of appetite and continues to remain a focus of obesity research. While much emphasis has focussed on the 5-HT2C receptor (5-HT2CR) in 5-HT's anorectic effect, pharmacological manipulation of the 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) also reduces appetite and body weight and may be amenable to obesity treatment. However, the neurological circuits that underlie 5-HT6R-induced hypophagia remain to be identified. Using c-fos immunoreactivity (FOS-IR) as a marker of neuronal activation, here we mapped the neuroanatomical targets activated by an anorectic dose of the 5-HT6R antagonist SB-399885 throughout the brain. Furthermore, we quantified SB-399855 activated cells within brain appetitive nuclei, the hypothalamus, dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) and nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Our results reveal that 5-HT6R antagonist-induced hypophagia is associated with significantly increased neuronal activation in two nuclei with an established role in the central control of appetite, the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVH) and the NTS. In contrast, no changes in FOS-IR were observed between treatment groups within other hypothalamic nuclei or DRN. The data presented here provide a first insight into the neural circuitry underlying 5-HT6R antagonist-induced appetite suppression and highlight the PVH and NTS in the coordination of 5-HT6R hypophagia. PMID:24566060

  4. Synthesis and pharmacological evaluation of indolinone derivatives as novel ghrelin receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Puleo, Letizia; Marini, Pietro; Avallone, Roberta; Zanchet, Marco; Bandiera, Silvio; Baroni, Marco; Croci, Tiziano

    2012-09-15

    The ghrelin receptor is a G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) widely expressed in the brain, stomach and the intestine. It was firstly identified during studies aimed to find synthetic modulators of growth hormone (GH) secretion. GHSR and its endogenous ligand ghrelin were found to be involved in hunger response. Through food intake regulation, they could affect body weight and adiposity. Thus GHSR antagonists rapidly became an attractive target to treat obesity and feeding disorders. In this study we describe the biological properties of new indolinone derivatives identified as a new, chiral class of ghrelin antagonists. Their synthesis as well as the structure-activity relationship will be discussed herein. The in vitro identified compound 14f was a potent GHSR1a antagonist (IC(50) = 7 nM). When tested in vivo, on gastric emptying model, 14f showed an inhibitory intrinsic effect when given alone and it dose dependently inhibited ghrelin stimulation. Compound 14f also reduced food intake stimulated both by fasting condition (high level of endogenous ghrelin) and by icv ghrelin. Moreover this compound improved glucose tolerance in ipGTT test. PMID:22901671

  5. Functional potencies of dopamine agonists and antagonists at human dopamine D₂ and D₃ receptors.

    PubMed

    Tadori, Yoshihiro; Forbes, Robert A; McQuade, Robert D; Kikuchi, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    We measured the functional agonist potencies of dopamine agonists including antiparkinson drugs, and functional antagonist potencies of antipsychotics at human dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptors. In vitro pharmacological assessment included inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cAMP accumulation and the reversal of dopamine-induced inhibition in clonal Chinese hamster ovary cells expressing low and high densities of human dopamine D(2L) and D(2S) receptors (hD(2L)-Low, hD(2L)-High, hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High, respectively) and human dopamine D(3) Ser-9 and D(3) Gly-9 receptors (hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9, respectively). Cabergoline, bromocriptine, pergolide, (±)-7-hydroxy-N,N-di-n-propyl-2-aminotetralin (7-OH-DPAT), talipexole, pramipexole, R-(+)-trans-3,4,4a,10b-tetrahydro-4-propyl-2H,5H-[1]benzopyrano[4,3-b]-1,4-oxazin-9-olhydrochloride (PD128907) and ropinirole behaved as dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor full agonists and showed higher potencies in hD(2L)-High and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low. In hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9 compared to hD(2L)-Low and hD(2S)-Low, dopamine, ropinirole, PD128907, and pramipexole potencies were clearly higher; talipexole and 7-OH-DPAT showed slightly higher potencies; pergolide showed slightly lower potency; and, cabergoline and bromocriptine potencies were lower. Aripiprazole acted as an antagonist in hD(2L)-Low; a low intrinsic activity partial agonist in hD(2S)-Low; a moderate partial agonist in hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9; a robust partial agonist in hD(2L)-High; and a full agonist in hD(2S)-High. Amisulpride, sulpiride and perphenazine behaved as preferential antagonists; and chlorpromazine and asenapine behaved as modest preferential antagonists; whereas fluphenazine, haloperidol, and blonanserin behaved as non-preferential antagonists in hD(2S)-Low and hD(2S)-High compared to hD(3)-Ser-9 and hD(3)-Gly-9. These findings may help to elucidate the basis of therapeutic benefit observed with these drugs, with

  6. Past, present and future of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists in the therapy of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Armentero, Marie Therese; Pinna, Annalisa; Ferré, Sergi; Lanciego, José Luis; Müller, Christa E.; Franco, Rafael

    2011-01-01

    Several selective antagonists for adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR) are currently under evaluation in clinical trials (phases I to III) to treat Parkinson’s disease, and they will probably soon reach the market. The usefulness of these antagonists has been deduced from studies demonstrating functional interactions between dopamine D2 and adenosine A2A receptors in the basal ganglia. At present it is believed that A2AR antagonists can be used in combination with the dopamine precursor L-DOPA to minimize the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s patients. However, a considerable body of data indicates that in addition to ameliorating motor symptoms, adenosine A2AR antagonists may also prevent neurodegeneration. Despite these promising indications, one further issue must be considered in order to develop fully optimized anti-parkinsonian drug therapy, namely the existence of receptor (hetero)dimers/oligomers of G protein-coupled receptors, a topic currently the focus of intense debate within the scientific community. Dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) expressed in the striatum are known to form heteromers with A2A adenosine receptors. Thus, the development of heteromer-specific A2A receptor antagonists represents a promising strategy for the identification of more selective and safer drugs. PMID:21810444

  7. Antagonist of the amylin receptor blocks beta-amyloid toxicity in rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Jhamandas, Jack H; MacTavish, David

    2004-06-16

    Salvage of cholinergic neurons in the brain through a blockade of the neurotoxic effects of amyloidbeta protein (Abeta) is one of the major, but still elusive, therapeutic goals of current research in Alzheimer's disease (AD). To date, no receptor has been unequivocally identified for Abeta. Human amylin, which acts via a receptor composed of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor and a receptor-associated membrane protein, possesses amyloidogenic properties and has a profile of neurotoxicity that is strikingly similar to Abeta. In this study, using primary cultures of rat cholinergic basal forebrain neurons, we show that acetyl-[Asn30, Tyr32] sCT(8-37) (AC187), an amylin receptor antagonist, blocks Abeta-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment of cultures with AC187 before exposure to Abeta results in significantly improved neuronal survival as judged by MTT and live-dead cell assays. Quantitative measures of Abeta-evoked apoptotic cell death, using Hoechst and phosphotidylserine staining, confirm neuroprotective effects of AC187. We also demonstrate that AC187 attenuates the activation of initiator and effector caspases that mediate Abeta-induced apoptotic cell death. These data are the first to show that expression of Abeta toxicity may occur through the amylin receptor and suggest a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of AD. PMID:15201330

  8. Coexpressed D1- and D2-Like Dopamine Receptors Antagonistically Modulate Acetylcholine Release in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Andrew T.; Maher, Kathryn N.; Wani, Khursheed A.; Betts, Katherine E.; Chase, Daniel L.

    2011-01-01

    Dopamine acts through two classes of G protein-coupled receptor (D1-like and D2-like) to modulate neuron activity in the brain. While subtypes of D1- and D2-like receptors are coexpressed in many neurons of the mammalian brain, it is unclear how signaling by these coexpressed receptors interacts to modulate the activity of the neuron in which they are expressed. D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors are also coexpressed in the cholinergic ventral-cord motor neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans. To begin to understand how coexpressed dopamine receptors interact to modulate neuron activity, we performed a genetic screen in C. elegans and isolated mutants defective in dopamine response. These mutants were also defective in behaviors mediated by endogenous dopamine signaling, including basal slowing and swimming-induced paralysis. We used transgene rescue experiments to show that defects in these dopamine-specific behaviors were caused by abnormal signaling in the cholinergic motor neurons. To investigate the interaction between the D1- and D2-like receptors specifically in these cholinergic motor neurons, we measured the sensitivity of dopamine-signaling mutants and transgenic animals to the acetylcholinesterase inhibitor aldicarb. We found that D2 signaling inhibited acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons while D1 signaling stimulated release from these same cells. Thus, coexpressed D1- and D2-like dopamine receptors act antagonistically in vivo to modulate acetylcholine release from the cholinergic motor neurons of C. elegans. PMID:21515580

  9. The behavioural properties of CI-988, a selective cholecystokininB receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, L.; Field, M. J.; Hughes, J.; Menzies, R.; Oles, R. J.; Vass, C. A.; Woodruff, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    1. The behavioural effects of a selective cholecystokininB (CCKB) receptor antagonist CI-988 were investigated in rodents. 2. In three rodent tests of anxiety (rat elevated X-maze, rat social interaction test and mouse light/dark box) CI-988 over the dose range 0.001-10.0 mg kg-1, (i.p.) produced an anxiolytic-like action. The magnitude of this effect was similar to that of chlordiazepoxide (CDP). In contrast, the selective CCKA receptor antagonist, devazepide, was inactive. CI-988 also showed anxiolytic-like action in the rat conflict test but the magnitude of this effect was about 2.5 fold less than that of CDP. 3. Central but not peripheral administration of the selective CCKB receptor agonist, pentagastrin, like FG 7142, produced an anxiogenic-like action. 4. The pentagastrin-induced anxiety was dose-dependently antagonized by CI-988, whereas devazepide was inactive. However, ten times higher doses of CI-988 were required to block a similar action of FG 7142. 5. In contrast to CDP, CI-988 up to 3000 fold higher doses than those inducing anxiolysis was inactive in tests measuring sedation and ataxia. It also failed to antagonize pentylenetetrazol-induced tonic seizures. Furthermore, CI-988 did not interact with alcohol or barbiturates. Thus, CI-988 appears to be an anxioselective compound. 6. The anxiolytic-like action of CDP in the rat elevated X-maze was dose-dependently antagonized by flumazenil. In contrast, the benzodiazepine receptor antagonist failed to block a similar effect of CI-988. 7. Thus, CI-988 shows anxiolytic-like activity in several animal models of anxiety.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1686205

  10. Effects of aglepristone, a progesterone receptor antagonist, in a dog with a vaginal fibroma.

    PubMed

    Rollón, E; Millán, Y; de las Mulas, J Martín

    2008-01-01

    A 12-year-old, entire, nulliparous crossbreed female dog was presented with a history of vulval bleeding, bulging of the perineum and faecal tenesmus. A firm, non-painful perineal mass, measuring 9.11x5.4 cm, with erythema was detected. Abdominal radiography showed compression and elevation of the rectal ampulla. A dose of 10 mg/kg aglepristone was administered subcutaneously on days 1, 2, 8, 15, 28 and 35. An incision biopsy was taken on day 15 and immunohistochemical analysis showed that the majority of neoplastic cells expressed progesterone receptors. Both the cutaneous erythema and the faecal tenesmus had resolved by day 28. A 50 per cent reduction in size was observed by day 60 (surgical excision). This study shows that benign tumours of the vagina of the dog that contain progesterone receptors can be reduced in size in a palliative or neoadjuvant setting using the progesterone receptor antagonist aglepristone. PMID:17784929

  11. Predicting the relative binding affinity of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists by density functional methods.

    PubMed

    Roos, Katarina; Hogner, Anders; Ogg, Derek; Packer, Martin J; Hansson, Eva; Granberg, Kenneth L; Evertsson, Emma; Nordqvist, Anneli

    2015-12-01

    In drug discovery, prediction of binding affinity ahead of synthesis to aid compound prioritization is still hampered by the low throughput of the more accurate methods and the lack of general pertinence of one method that fits all systems. Here we show the applicability of a method based on density functional theory using core fragments and a protein model with only the first shell residues surrounding the core, to predict relative binding affinity of a matched series of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists. Antagonists of MR are used for treatment of chronic heart failure and hypertension. Marketed MR antagonists, spironolactone and eplerenone, are also believed to be highly efficacious in treatment of chronic kidney disease in diabetes patients, but is contra-indicated due to the increased risk for hyperkalemia. These findings and a significant unmet medical need among patients with chronic kidney disease continues to stimulate efforts in the discovery of new MR antagonist with maintained efficacy but low or no risk for hyperkalemia. Applied on a matched series of MR antagonists the quantum mechanical based method gave an R(2) = 0.76 for the experimental lipophilic ligand efficiency versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional in gas phase and an R(2) = 0.64 for experimental binding affinity versus relative predicted binding affinity calculated with the M06-2X functional including an implicit solvation model. The quantum mechanical approach using core fragments was compared to free energy perturbation calculations using the full sized compound structures. PMID:26572910

  12. The kappa opioid receptor antagonist JDTic attenuates alcohol seeking and withdrawal anxiety.

    PubMed

    Schank, Jesse R; Goldstein, Andrea L; Rowe, Kelly E; King, Courtney E; Marusich, Julie A; Wiley, Jenny L; Carroll, F Ivy; Thorsell, Annika; Heilig, Markus

    2012-05-01

    The role of kappa-opioid receptors (KOR) in the regulation of alcohol-related behaviors is not completely understood. For example, alcohol consumption has been reported to increase following treatment with KOR antagonists in rats, but was decreased in mice with genetic deletion of KOR. Recent studies have further suggested that KOR antagonists may selectively decrease alcohol self-administration in rats following a history of dependence. We assessed the effects of the KOR antagonist JDTic on alcohol self-administration, reinstatement of alcohol seeking induced by alcohol-associated cues or stress, and acute alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety ('hangover anxiety'). JDTic dose-dependently reversed hangover anxiety when given 48 hours prior to testing, a time interval corresponding to the previously demonstrated anxiolytic efficacy of this drug. In contrast, JDTic decreased alcohol self-administration and cue-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking when administered 2 hours prior to testing, but not at longer pre-treatment times. For comparison, we determined that the prototypical KOR antagonist nor-binaltorphimine can suppress self-administration of alcohol at 2 hours pre-treatment time, mimicking our observations with JDTic. The effects of JDTic were behaviorally specific, as it had no effect on stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking, self-administration of sucrose, or locomotor activity. Further, we demonstrate that at a 2 hours pre-treatment time JDTic antagonized the antinociceptive effects of the KOR agonist U50,488H but had no effect on morphine-induced behaviors. Our results provide additional evidence for the involvement of KOR in regulation of alcohol-related behaviors and provide support for KOR antagonists, including JDTic, to be evaluated as medications for alcoholism. PMID:22515275

  13. The effects of sigma (σ1) receptor-selective ligands on muscarinic receptor antagonist-induced cognitive deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Maninder; Rangel-Barajas, Claudia; Sumien, Nathalie; Su, Chang; Singh, Meharvan; Chen, Zhenglan; Huang, Ren-Qi; Meunier, Johann; Maurice, Tangui; Mach, Robert H; Luedtke, Robert R

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Cognitive deficits in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, traumatic brain injury and stroke often involve alterations in cholinergic signalling. Currently available therapeutic drugs provide only symptomatic relief. Therefore, novel therapeutic strategies are needed to retard and/or arrest the progressive loss of memory. Experimental Approach Scopolamine-induced memory impairment provides a rapid and reversible phenotypic screening paradigm for cognition enhancement drug discovery. Male C57BL/6J mice given scopolamine (1 mg·kg−1) were used to evaluate the ability of LS-1–137, a novel sigma (σ1) receptor-selective agonist, to improve the cognitive deficits associated with muscarinic antagonist administration. Key Results LS-1–137 is a high-affinity (Ki = 3.2 nM) σ1 receptor agonist that is 80-fold selective for σ1, compared with σ2 receptors. LS-1–137 binds with low affinity at D2-like (D2, D3 and D4) dopamine and muscarinic receptors. LS-1–137 was found to partially reverse the learning deficits associated with scopolamine administration using a water maze test and an active avoidance task. LS-1–137 treatment was also found to trigger the release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from rat astrocytes. Conclusions and Implications The σ1 receptor-selective compound LS-1–137 may represent a novel candidate cognitive enhancer for the treatment of muscarinic receptor-dependent cognitive deficits. PMID:25573298

  14. P2X7 receptor antagonist activity of the anti-allergic agent oxatomide.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuki; Ito, Masaaki; Matsuoka, Isao

    2015-11-15

    Activation of the P2X7 receptor by extracellular ATP is associated with various immune responses including allergic inflammation. Anti-allergic agents, such as H1-antihistamines, are known to inhibit the effects of different chemical mediators such as acetylcholine and platelet-activating factor. Therefore, we hypothesized that some anti-allergic agents might affect P2X7 receptor function. Using N18TG2 and J774 cells, which express functional P2X7 receptors, the effects of several anti-allergic agents on P2X7 receptor function were investigated by monitoring the ATP-induced increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i). Among the various agents tested, oxatomide significantly inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated [Ca(2+)]i elevation in a concentration-dependent manner without affecting the P2Y2 receptor-mediated response in both N18TG2 and J774 cells. Consistently, oxatomide inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated membrane current and downstream responses such as mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, inflammation-related gene induction, and cell death. In addition, oxatomide inhibited P2X7 receptor-mediated degranulation in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells. Whole cell patch clamp analyses in HEK293 cells expressing human, mouse, and rat P2X7 receptors revealed that the inhibitory effect of oxatomide on ATP-induced current was most prominent for the human P2X7 receptor and almost non-existent for the rat P2X7 receptor. The potent inhibitory effects of oxatomide on human P2X7 receptor-mediated function were confirmed in RPMI8226 human B cell-like myeloma cells, which endogenously express the P2X7 receptor. Our results demonstrated that the antihistamine oxatomide also acts as a P2X7 receptor antagonist. Future studies should thus evaluate whether P2X7 receptor antagonism contributes to the anti-allergic effects of oxatomide. PMID:26463039

  15. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists.

    PubMed

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W Mei; Stoermer, Martin J; Sweet, Matthew J; Reid, Robert C; Suen, Jacky Y; Fairlie, David P

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1-3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents. PMID:27094554

  16. Antagonistic effects of extracts from Artemisia rupetris L. and Leontopodium leontopodioides to CC chemokine receptor 2b (CCR2b).

    PubMed

    Yu, Qin-Wei; Hu, Jie; Wang, Hao; Chen, Xin; Zhao, Fang; Gao, Peng; Yang, Qiu-Bin; Sun, Dan-Dan; Zhang, Lu-Yong; Yan, Ming

    2016-05-01

    The present study was designed to establish a suitable assay to explore CCR2b receptor antagonists from the natural products of Artemisia rupetris and Leontopodium leontopodioides. An aequorin assay was developed as a cell-based assay suitable for 384-well microplate and used for screening CCR2b receptor antagonists from natural products. Through establishing suitable conditions, the assay was shown to be suitable for screening of CCR2b receptor antagonists. Seven compounds were identified in preliminary screening. Five of them showed evident dose-response relationship in secondary screening. The structure-activity relationship study suggested that 7-position hydroxyl group of flavonoids was necessary, a polar group should be introduced on the 3-position, and the substituents on 2-position benzene ring of flavonoids have little influence on the potentency of the inhibition activity on CCR2b receptor. The ortho-position dihydroxyl structure in quinic acid compounds may be important. In conclusion, Compounds HR-1, 5, 7, and AR-20, 35 showed activity as antagonist of CCR2b receptor, which shed lights on the development of novel drugs as CCR2b receptor antagonists for preventing inflammation related diseases. PMID:27478099

  17. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents. PMID:27094554

  18. Receptor residence time trumps drug-likeness and oral bioavailability in determining efficacy of complement C5a antagonists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seow, Vernon; Lim, Junxian; Cotterell, Adam J.; Yau, Mei-Kwan; Xu, Weijun; Lohman, Rink-Jan; Kok, W. Mei; Stoermer, Martin J.; Sweet, Matthew J.; Reid, Robert C.; Suen, Jacky Y.; Fairlie, David P.

    2016-04-01

    Drug discovery and translation are normally based on optimizing efficacy by increasing receptor affinity, functional potency, drug-likeness (rule-of-five compliance) and oral bioavailability. Here we demonstrate that residence time of a compound on its receptor has an overriding influence on efficacy, exemplified for antagonists of inflammatory protein complement C5a that activates immune cells and promotes disease. Three equipotent antagonists (3D53, W54011, JJ47) of inflammatory responses to C5a (3nM) were compared for drug-likeness, receptor affinity and antagonist potency in human macrophages, and anti-inflammatory efficacy in rats. Only the least drug-like antagonist (3D53) maintained potency in cells against higher C5a concentrations and had a much longer duration of action (t1/2 ~ 20 h) than W54011 or JJ47 (t1/2 ~ 1–3 h) in inhibiting macrophage responses. The unusually long residence time of 3D53 on its receptor was mechanistically probed by molecular dynamics simulations, which revealed long-lasting interactions that trap the antagonist within the receptor. Despite negligible oral bioavailability, 3D53 was much more orally efficacious than W54011 or JJ47 in preventing repeated agonist insults to induce rat paw oedema over 24 h. Thus, residence time on a receptor can trump drug-likeness in determining efficacy, even oral efficacy, of pharmacological agents.

  19. Identification of androgen receptor antagonists: In vitro investigation and classification methodology for flavonoid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yang; Doering, Jon A; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-09-01

    A tremendous gap exists between the number of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) possibly in the environment and the limitation of traditional regulatory testing. In this study, the anti-androgenic potencies of 21 flavonoids were analyzed in vitro, and another 32 flavonoids from the literature were selected as additional chemicals. Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to obtain four different separation approaches based on the different behaviors of ligands and receptors during the process of interaction. Specifically, ligand-receptor complex which highlighted the discriminating features of ligand escape or retention via "mousetrap" mechanism, hydrogen bonds formed during simulation times, ligand stability and the stability of the helix-12 of the receptor were investigated. Together, a methodology was generated that 87.5% of flavonoids could be discriminated as active versus inactive antagonists, and over 90% inactive antagonists could be filtered out before QSAR study. This methodology could be used as a "proof of concept" to identify inactive anti-androgenic flavonoids, as well could be beneficial for rapid risk assessment and regulation of multiple new chemicals for androgenicity. PMID:27258897

  20. Optimizing endothelin receptor antagonist use in the management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Steiner, M Kathryn; Preston, Ioana R

    2008-01-01

    Endothelin receptor antagonism has emerged as an important therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Bench to bedside scientific research has shown that endothelin-1 (ET-1) is overexpressed in several forms of pulmonary vascular disease and may play an important pathogenetic role in the development and progression of PAH. Oral endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) improved exercise capacity, functional status, pulmonary hemodynamics, and delayed the time to clinical worsening in several randomized placebo-controlled trials. Two ERAs are currently approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: bosentan, a dual ERA for patients with class III and IV PAH, and ambrisentan, a selective ERA for patients with class II and III PAH. Sitaxsentan, another selective ERA, has been approved in Europe, Canada, and Australia. The objective of this review is to evaluate the available evidence describing the pharmacology, efficacy, safety, and tolerability, and patient-focused perspectives regarding the different types of endothelin receptor antagonists. Ongoing and forthcoming randomized trials are also highlighted including the approach of combining this class of drugs with other drugs that target different cellular pathways believed to be etiologically important in PAH. PMID:19183742

  1. Skeletal effects of a gastrin receptor antagonist in H+/K+ATPase beta subunit KO mice.

    PubMed

    Aasarød, Kristin M; Ramezanzadehkoldeh, Masoud; Shabestari, Maziar; Mosti, Mats P; Stunes, Astrid K; Reseland, Janne E; Beisvag, Vidar; Eriksen, Erik Fink; Sandvik, Arne K; Erben, Reinhold G; Schüler, Christiane; Boyce, Malcolm; Skallerud, Bjørn H; Syversen, Unni; Fossmark, Reidar

    2016-08-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest an increased fracture risk in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) for long term. The underlying mechanism, however, has been disputed. By binding to the gastric proton pump, PPIs inhibit gastric acid secretion. We have previously shown that proton pump (H(+)/K(+)ATPase beta subunit) KO mice exhibit reduced bone mineral density (BMD) and inferior bone strength compared with WT mice. Patients using PPIs as well as these KO mice exhibit gastric hypoacidity, and subsequently increased serum concentrations of the hormone gastrin. In this study, we wanted to examine whether inhibition of the gastrin/CCK2 receptor influences bone quality in these mice. KO and WT mice were given either the gastrin/CCK2 receptor antagonist netazepide dissolved in polyethylene glycol (PEG) or only PEG for 1year. We found significantly lower bone mineral content and BMD, as well as inferior bone microarchitecture in KO mice compared with WT. Biomechanical properties by three-point bending test also proved inferior in KO mice. KO mice receiving netazepide exhibited significantly higher cortical thickness, cortical area fraction, trabecular thickness and trabecular BMD by micro-CT compared with the control group. Three-point bending test also showed higher Young's modulus of elasticity in the netazepide KO group compared with control mice. In conclusion, we observed that the gastrin receptor antagonist netazepide slightly improved bone quality in this mouse model, suggesting that hypergastrinemia may contribute to deteriorated bone quality during acid inhibition. PMID:27325243

  2. Effect of inhaled H1 and H2 receptor antagonist in normal and asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, N C; Kerr, J W

    1980-01-01

    The effects on airflow resistance of an inhaled H1 receptor antagonist, clemastine, and an H2 receptor antagonist, cimetidine, have been investigated in normal and asthmatic subjects. No significant changes in specific conductance (sGaw) were seen in six normal subjects. In eight asthmatic subjects a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) occurred at 60 min (< 0.02), and 120 (< 0.05) after the inhalation of clemastine, whereas inhaled cimetidine had no effect on airflow resistance. Clemastine and cimetidine were tested on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal and eight asthmatic subjects. Clemastine significantly reduced the fall in sGaw in normal subjects and the fall in FEV1 in asthmatic subjects, whereas cimetidine had no protective effect. Clemastine and ipratropium bromide were tested on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction in eight normal subjects. Ipratropium bromide, but not clemastine, significantly reduced the fall in sGaw after methacholine. These results suggest that in normal and asthmatic subjects histamine-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated predominantly via H1 rather than H2 receptors in the airways. PMID:6449094

  3. SKF-83566, a D1-dopamine receptor antagonist, inhibits the dopamine transporter.

    PubMed

    Stouffer, Melissa A; Ali, Solav; Reith, Maarten E A; Patel, Jyoti C; Sarti, Federica; Carr, Kenneth D; Rice, Margaret E

    2011-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) is an important transmitter in both motor and limbic pathways. We sought to investigate the role of D(1)-receptor activation in axonal DA release regulation in dorsal striatum using a D(1)-receptor antagonist, SKF-83566. Evoked DA release was monitored in rat striatal slices using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. SKF-83566 caused a concentration-dependent increase in peak single-pulse evoked extracellular DA concentration, with a maximum increase of ∼ 65% in 5 μM SKF-83566. This was accompanied by a concentration-dependent increase in extracellular DA concentration clearance time. Both effects were occluded by nomifensine (1 μM), a dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor, suggesting that SKF-83566 acted via the DAT. We tested this by examining [(3)H]DA uptake into LLc-PK cells expressing rat DAT, and confirmed that SKF-83566 is a competitive DAT inhibitor with an IC(50) of 5.7 μM. Binding studies with [(3)H]CFT, a cocaine analog, showed even more potent action of SKF-83566 at the DAT cocaine binding site (IC(50) = 0.51 μM). Thus, data obtained using SKF-83566 as a D(1) DA-receptor antagonist may be confounded by concurrent DAT inhibition. More positively, however, SKF-83566 might be a candidate to attenuate cocaine effects in vivo because of the greater potency of this drug at the cocaine versus DA binding site of the DAT. PMID:21689106

  4. Action of adenosine receptor antagonists on the cardiovascular response to defence area stimulation in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    St Lambert, J H; Dawid-Milner, M S; Silva-Carvalho, L; Spyer, K M

    1994-01-01

    1. The action of adenosine in the mediation of the cardiovascular changes associated with the defence reaction has been investigated in the rat using two A1 receptor antagonists. 2. Cumulative doses of 1,3 dipropyl-cyclopentylxanthine (DPCPX) (0.3-3 mg kg-1) and ethanol (0.03-0.25 ml) and bolus doses of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) and 8-sulphophenyltheophylline (8-SPT) (20 mg kg-1) were given into alpha-chloralose, paralysed and artificially ventilated rats. Recordings were made of arterial blood pressure and heart rate. 3. Ethanol, the vehicle for DPCPX, failed to modify the magnitude of the defence response; however, cumulative doses of DPCPX produced a dose-dependent decrease in the HDA (hypothalamic defence area)-evoked increase in arterial blood pressure, accompanied by a similar fall in the magnitude of the evoked heart rate response. 4. The evoked rise in arterial blood pressure was reduced significantly by intravenous injection of DPCPX (3 mg kg-1) but not 8-SPT (20 mg kg-1), a purely peripherally acting adenosine antagonist. 5. These results suggest that adenosine acting at A1 receptors located in the central nervous system, is involved in the HDA-evoked pressor response. Whilst the site of action of the A1 receptors is not known, possible locations are discussed. PMID:7812606

  5. Benzimidazolone bioisosteres of potent GluN2B selective NMDA receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lütnant, Ines; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard

    2016-06-30

    Overactivation of the NMDA receptor is associated with excitotoxic events leading to neurodegenerative processes as observed during the development of Alzheimer's disease, ParFnson's disease, Chorea Huntington and epilepsy. Negative allosteric modulators addressing selectively the ifenprodil binding site of GluN2B subunit containing NMDA receptors are of major interest due to their neuroprotective potential accompanied by few side effects. Herein benzimidazolone bioisosteres of potent GluN2B antagonists 1-5 were designed and synthesized. A seven step sequence provided the central intermediate 19 in 28% yield. Elimination of water, methylation, epoxidation, epoxide rearrangement and finally reductive amination afforded the [7]annulenobenzimidazolone 30 with a 3-phenylpropylamino substituent in 6-position. Although 30 fits nicely into the pharmacophore of potent GluN2B antagonists, the gluN2B binding affinity of 30 was only moderate (Ki = 697 nM). Additionally, 30 shows low selectivity over the σ2 receptor (Ki = 549 nM). The moderate GluN2B affinity was explained by the rigid tricyclic structure of the [7]annulenobenzimidazolone 30. PMID:27061977

  6. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human Pregnane X-Receptor in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; Tracy, Julia; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Eaton, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand – rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 µmoles SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. PMID:23153560

  7. Pharmacological characterization of a novel centrally permeable P2X7 receptor antagonist: JNJ-47965567

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Anindya; Wang, Qi; Ao, Hong; Shoblock, James R; Lord, Brian; Aluisio, Leah; Fraser, Ian; Nepomuceno, Diane; Neff, Robert A; Welty, Natalie; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Bonaventure, Pascal; Wickenden, Alan D; Letavic, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE An increasing body of evidence suggests that the purinergic receptor P2X, ligand-gated ion channel, 7 (P2X7) in the CNS may play a key role in neuropsychiatry, neurodegeneration and chronic pain. In this study, we characterized JNJ-47965567, a centrally permeable, high-affinity, selective P2X7 antagonist. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We have used a combination of in vitro assays (calcium flux, radioligand binding, electrophysiology, IL-1β release) in both recombinant and native systems. Target engagement of JNJ-47965567 was demonstrated by ex vivo receptor binding autoradiography and in vivo blockade of Bz-ATP induced IL-1β release in the rat brain. Finally, the efficacy of JNJ-47965567 was tested in standard models of depression, mania and neuropathic pain. KEY RESULTS JNJ-47965567 is potent high affinity (pKi 7.9 ± 0.07), selective human P2X7 antagonist, with no significant observed speciation. In native systems, the potency of the compound to attenuate IL-1β release was 6.7 ± 0.07 (human blood), 7.5 ± 0.07 (human monocytes) and 7.1 ± 0.1 (rat microglia). JNJ-47965567 exhibited target engagement in rat brain, with a brain EC50 of 78 ± 19 ng·mL−1 (P2X7 receptor autoradiography) and functional block of Bz-ATP induced IL-1β release. JNJ-47965567 (30 mg·kg−1) attenuated amphetamine-induced hyperactivity and exhibited modest, yet significant efficacy in the rat model of neuropathic pain. No efficacy was observed in forced swim test. Conclusion and Implications JNJ-47965567 is centrally permeable, high affinity P2X7 antagonist that can be used to probe the role of central P2X7 in rodent models of CNS pathophysiology. PMID:23889535

  8. Neuroprotection afforded by antagonists of endothelin-1 receptors in experimental stroke.

    PubMed

    Moldes, Octavio; Sobrino, Tomás; Blanco, Miguel; Agulla, Jesús; Barral, David; Ramos-Cabrer, Pedro; Castillo, José

    2012-12-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is involved on the development of cerebral edema in acute ischemic stroke. As edema is a therapeutic target in cerebral ischemia, our aim was to study the effect of antagonists for ET-1 receptors (Clazosentan® and BQ-788, specific antagonists for receptors A and B, respectively) on the development of edema, infarct volume and sensorial-motor deficits in rats subjected to ischemia by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAO). We used Wistar rats (280-320 g) submitted to ischemia by intraluminal transient (90 min) MCAO. After ischemia, rats were randomized into 4 groups (n = 6) treated with; 1) control group (saline), 2) Clazosentan® group (10 mg/kg iv), 3) BQ-788 group (3 mg/kg iv), and 4) combined treatment (Clazosentan® 10 mg/kg plus BQ-788 3 mg/kg iv). We observed that rats treated with Clazosentan® showed a reduction of edema, measured by MRI, at 72 h (hours) and at day 7 (both p < 0.0001), and a decrease in the serum levels of ET-1 at 72 h (p < 0.0001) and at day 7 (p = 0.009). The combined treatment also induced a reduction of edema at 24 h (p = 0.004), 72 h (p < 0.0001) and at day 7 (p < 0.0001), a reduction on infarct volume, measured by MRI, at 24 and 72 h, and at day 7 (all p < 0.01), and a better sensorimotor recovery at 24 and 72 h, and at day 7 (all p < 0.01). Moreover, Clazosentan® induced a decrease in AQP4 expression, while BQ-788 induced an increase in AQP9 expression. These results suggest that antagonists for ET-1 receptors may be a good therapeutic target for cerebral ischemia. PMID:22975409

  9. Clinical and preclinical characterization of the histamine H(4) receptor antagonist JNJ-39758979.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Robin L; Chen, Bin; Dunford, Paul J; Greenspan, Andrew J; Karlsson, Lars; La, David; Ward, Peter; Xu, Xie L

    2014-05-01

    The histamine H4 receptor (H(4)R) has been shown to have preclinical involvement in both inflammatory and pruritic responses. JNJ-39758979 [(R)-4-(3-amino-pyrrolidin-1-yl)-6-isopropyl-pyrimidin-2-ylamine] is a potent and selective H(4)R antagonist with a Ki at the human receptor of 12.5 ± 2.6 nM and greater than 80-fold selectivity over other histamine receptors. The compound also exhibited excellent selectivity versus other targets. JNJ-39758979 showed dose-dependent activity in models of asthma and dermatitis consistent with other H(4)R antagonists. Preclinical toxicity studies of up to 6 months in rats and 9 months in monkeys indicated an excellent safety profile, supporting the clinical testing of the compound. An oral formulation of JNJ-39758979 was studied in a phase 1 human volunteer study to assess safety, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics. The compound was well tolerated, with the exception of dose-dependent nausea, and no safety issues were noted in the phase 1 study. JNJ-39758979 exhibited good pharmacokinetics upon oral dosing with a plasma half-life of 124-157 hours after a single oral dose. In addition, dose-dependent inhibition of histamine-induced eosinophil shape change was detected, suggesting that the H4R was inhibited in vivo. In conclusion, JNJ-39758979 is a potent and selective H(4)R antagonist that exhibited good preclinical and phase 1 safety in healthy volunteers with evidence of a pharmacodynamics effect in humans. PMID:24549371

  10. Discovery of MK-3697: a selective orexin 2 receptor antagonist (2-SORA) for the treatment of insomnia.

    PubMed

    Roecker, Anthony J; Reger, Thomas S; Mattern, M Christa; Mercer, Swati P; Bergman, Jeffrey M; Schreier, John D; Cube, Rowena V; Cox, Christopher D; Li, Dansu; Lemaire, Wei; Bruno, Joseph G; Harrell, C Meacham; Garson, Susan L; Gotter, Anthony L; Fox, Steven V; Stevens, Joanne; Tannenbaum, Pamela L; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Cabalu, Tamara D; Cui, Donghui; Stellabott, Joyce; Hartman, George D; Young, Steven D; Winrow, Christopher J; Renger, John J; Coleman, Paul J

    2014-10-15

    Orexin receptor antagonists have demonstrated clinical utility for the treatment of insomnia. The majority of clinical efforts to date have focused on the development of dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs), small molecules that antagonize both the orexin 1 and orexin 2 receptors. Our group has recently disclosed medicinal chemistry efforts to identify highly potent, orally bioavailable selective orexin 2 receptor antagonists (2-SORAs) that possess acceptable profiles for clinical development. Herein we report additional SAR studies within the 'triaryl' amide 2-SORA series focused on improvements in compound stability in acidic media and time-dependent inhibition of CYP3A4. These studies resulted in the discovery of 2,5-disubstituted isonicotinamide 2-SORAs such as compound 24 that demonstrated improved stability and TDI profiles as well as excellent sleep efficacy across species. PMID:25248679

  11. Calcium antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride affects striatal D2 dopamine receptors in the young adult and aged rat brain.

    PubMed

    Asanuma, M; Ogawa, N; Haba, K; Hirata, H; Mori, A

    1991-01-01

    The calcium (Ca) antagonist flunarizine hydrochloride (FNZ) has been reported to induce parkinsonism, especially in the elderly. The effects of FNZ on dopamine receptors in rat striatal membranes, especially in aged rats, were studied using radiolabeled receptor assay. Similar displacing potencies in [(3)H]spiperone bindings were exhibited for FNZ and the Ca antagonists verapamil and nicardipine. FNZ was found to directly and competitively effect D2 receptors (D2-Rs) as an antagonist, without effecting D1 receptors. Furthermore, the washing of preoccupied membranes revealed that FNZ has a long-acting potent effect on D2-Rs. The comparative study of FNZ and sulpiride in young-adult and aged rats showed that the effect of FNZ on D2-Rs was more marked in aged rats. These results might be related to FNZ-induced parkinsonism and its high incidence in the elderly. PMID:15374420

  12. NMDA receptor antagonists attenuate the proconvulsant effect of juvenile social isolation in male mice.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shayan; Haj-Mirzaian, Arya; Amini-Khoei, Hossein; Momeny, Majid; Shirzadian, Armin; Balaei, Maryam Rahimi; Zarrinrad, Ghazaleh; Ghazi-Khansari, Mahmoud; Azizi, Romina; Dehpour, Ahmad Reza; Mehr, Shahram Ejtemaei

    2016-03-01

    Experiencing psychosocial stress in early life, such as social isolation stress (SIS), is known to have negative enduring effects on the development of the brain and behavior. In addition to anxiety and depressive-like behaviors, we previously showed that juvenile SIS increases susceptibility to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures in mice through enhancing the nitrergic system activity in the hippocampus. In this study, we investigated the possible involvement of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS. Applying 4 weeks of SIS to juvenile male mice at postnatal day 21-23, we observed an increased susceptibility to PTZ as well as anxiety and depressive-like behaviors in adult mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of NMDA receptor antagonists, MK-801 (0.05mg/kg) and ketamine (0.5mg/kg), reversed the proconvulsant effects of SIS in Isolated (and not social) housed animals. Co-administration of non-effective doses of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors, 7NI (25mg/kg) and L-NAME (10mg/kg), with NMDA receptor antagonists, MK-801 (0.01mg/kg) and ketamine (0.1mg/kg) attenuated the proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS only in isolated housed mice. Also, using real time RT-PCR, we showed that hippocampal upregulation of NR2B subunit of NMDA receptor may play a critical role in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS by dysregulation of NMDA/NO pathway. In conclusion, results of present study revealed that experiencing SIS during adolescence predisposes the co-occurrence of seizure disorders with psychiatric comorbidities and also, alteration of NMDA receptor structure and function in hippocampus plays a role in proconvulsant effects of juvenile SIS through enhancing the NMDA/NO pathway. PMID:26836272

  13. Characterization of a Sphingosine 1-Phosphate Receptor Antagonist ProdrugS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Perry C.; Zhu, Ran; Huang, Tao; Tomsig, Jose L.; Mathews, Thomas P.; David, Marion; Peyruchaud, Olivier; Macdonald, Timothy L.

    2011-01-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is a phospholipid that binds to a set of G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1–S1P5) to initiate an array of signaling cascades that affect cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. On a larger physiological scale, the effects of S1P on immune cell trafficking, vascular barrier integrity, angiogenesis, and heart rate have also been observed. An impetus for the characterization of S1P-initiated signaling effects came with the discovery that FTY720 [fingolimod; 2-amino-2-(2-[4-octylphenyl]ethyl)-1,3-propanediol] modulates the immune system by acting as an agonist at S1P1. In the course of structure-activity relationship studies to better understand the functional chemical space around FTY720, we discovered conformationally constrained FTY720 analogs that behave as S1P receptor type-selective antagonists. Here, we present a pharmacological profile of a lead S1P1/3 antagonist prodrug, 1-(hydroxymethyl)-3-(3-octylphenyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090). VPC03090 is phosphorylated by sphingosine kinase 2 to form the competitive antagonist species 3-(3-octylphenyl)-1-(phosphonooxymethyl)cyclobutane (VPC03090-P) as observed in guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding assays, with effects on downstream S1P receptor signaling confirmed by Western blot and calcium mobilization assays. Oral dosing of VPC03090 results in an approximate 1:1 phosphorylated/alcohol species ratio with a half-life of 30 h in mice. Because aberrant S1P signaling has been implicated in carcinogenesis, we applied VPC03090 in an immunocompetent mouse mammary cancer model to assess its antineoplastic potential. Treatment with VPC03090 significantly inhibited the growth of 4T1 primary tumors in mice. This result calls to attention the value of S1P receptor antagonists as not only research tools but also potential therapeutic agents. PMID:21632869

  14. Effects of endothelin receptor antagonist on cyclosporine-induced vasoconstriction in isolated rat renal arterioles.

    PubMed Central

    Lanese, D M; Conger, J D

    1993-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that the potent constrictor peptide, endothelin (ET) has a mediating role in cyclosporine A (CsA)-related renal vasoconstriction. However, the nature of the CsA-ET interaction and effect on the renal vasculature is uncertain. The purpose of the present study was twofold: (a) to determine if CsA exposure caused direct local release of ET from the endothelium of the renal microvasculature and (b) to determine if locally generated ET has paracrine effects on the underlying vascular smooth muscle to induce vasoconstriction. Experiments were performed in isolated rat renal arterioles. First it was determined that both afferent arteriole (AA) and efferent arteriole (EA) exhibited concentration-dependent decreases in lumen diameter to increasing molar concentrations of CsA. The AA was more sensitive to the vasoconstrictive effects of CsA than the EA. Next, the blocking effect of a recently synthesized putative ETA receptor antagonist was verified in both the AA and EA, where it was found that the cyclic peptide cyclo D-Asp-L-Pro-D-Val-L-Leu-D-Trp totally inhibited the vasoconstriction observed with ET addition. Finally, the role of locally stimulated ET in CsA-induced vasoconstriction was tested by determining the effect of the ETA receptor antagonist on CsA-induced AA and EA constriction. In the AA the vasoconstrictor effect of 10(-11) M CsA was completely blocked by the ETA receptor antagonist. However, in contrast to AA, 10(-11) M CsA in EA in the presence of the ETA receptor antagonist decreased EA lumen diameter by a mean of 41% from baseline (4.80 +/- 0.75 microns vs 7.80 +/- 0.84 microns, P < 0.05). This change in lumen diameter was similar to that induced by CsA alone. These data suggest that CsA directly constricts renal microvessels. This effect is mediated by ET in the AA but not the EA. PMID:8486781

  15. Pharmacology of modality-specific transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 antagonists that do not alter body temperature.

    PubMed

    Reilly, Regina M; McDonald, Heath A; Puttfarcken, Pamela S; Joshi, Shailen K; Lewis, LaGeisha; Pai, Madhavi; Franklin, Pamela H; Segreti, Jason A; Neelands, Torben R; Han, Ping; Chen, Jun; Mantyh, Patrick W; Ghilardi, Joseph R; Turner, Teresa M; Voight, Eric A; Daanen, Jerome F; Schmidt, Robert G; Gomtsyan, Arthur; Kort, Michael E; Faltynek, Connie R; Kym, Philip R

    2012-08-01

    The transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) channel is involved in the development and maintenance of pain and participates in the regulation of temperature. The channel is activated by diverse agents, including capsaicin, noxious heat (≥ 43°C), acidic pH (< 6), and endogenous lipids including N-arachidonoyl dopamine (NADA). Antagonists that block all modes of TRPV1 activation elicit hyperthermia. To identify efficacious TRPV1 antagonists that do not affect temperature antagonists representing multiple TRPV1 pharmacophores were evaluated at recombinant rat and human TRPV1 channels with Ca(2+) flux assays, and two classes of antagonists were identified based on their differential ability to inhibit acid activation. Although both classes of antagonists completely blocked capsaicin- and NADA-induced activation of TRPV1, select compounds only partially inhibited activation of the channel by protons. Electrophysiology and calcitonin gene-related peptide release studies confirmed the differential pharmacology of these antagonists at native TRPV1 channels in the rat. Comparison of the in vitro pharmacological properties of these TRPV1 antagonists with their in vivo effects on core body temperature confirms and expands earlier observations that acid-sparing TRPV1 antagonists do not significantly increase core body temperature. Although both classes of compounds elicit equivalent analgesia in a rat model of knee joint pain, the acid-sparing antagonist tested is not effective in a mouse model of bone cancer pain. PMID:22570364

  16. Comparison of the β-Adrenergic Receptor Antagonists Landiolol and Esmolol: Receptor Selectivity, Partial Agonism, and Pharmacochaperoning Actions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahi-Shirazi, Shahrooz; Sucic, Sonja; Yang, Qiong; Freissmuth, Michael; Nanoff, Christian

    2016-10-01

    Blockage of β1-adrenergic receptors is one of the most effective treatments in cardiovascular medicine. Esmolol was introduced some three decades ago as a short-acting β1-selective antagonist. Landiolol is a more recent addition. Here we compared the two compounds for their selectivity for β1-adrenergic receptors over β2-adrenergic receptors, partial agonistic activity, signaling bias, and pharmacochaperoning action by using human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cell lines, which heterologously express each human receptor subtype. The affinity of landiolol for β1-adrenergic receptors and β2-adrenergic receptors was higher and lower than that of esmolol, respectively, resulting in an improved selectivity (216-fold versus 30-fold). The principal metabolite of landiolol (M1) was also β1-selective, but its affinity was very low. Both landiolol and esmolol caused a very modest rise in cAMP levels but a robust increase in the phosphorylation of extracellular signal regulated kinases 1 and 2, indicating that the two drugs exerted partial agonist activity with a signaling bias. If cells were incubated for ≥24 hours in the presence of ≥1 μM esmolol, the levels of β1-adrenergic-but not of β2-adrenergic-receptors increased. This effect was contingent on export of the β1-receptor from endoplasmic reticulum and was not seen in the presence of landiolol. On the basis of these observations, we conclude that landiolol offers the advantage of: 1) improved selectivity and 2) the absence of pharmacochaperoning activity, which sensitizes cells to rebound effects upon drug discontinuation. PMID:27451411

  17. Theoretical evaluation of antiemetic effects of 5-HT3 receptor antagonists for prevention of vomiting induced by cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hironori; Yokoyama, Haruko; Takayanagi, Risa; Yoshimoto, Koichi; Nakajima, Akihiro; Okuyama, Kiyoshi; Iwase, Osamu; Yamada, Yasuhiko

    2015-03-01

    5-HT(3) receptor antagonists are widely used as antiemetic agents in clinical setting, of which palonosetron, with a long elimination half life (t(1/2)), has recently become available. It is important to evaluate the concentration of serotonin when investigating the antiemetic effects of 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists, as those effects are not based solely on the t(1/2) value. We theoretically evaluated the antiemetic effects of three 5-HT(3) receptor antagonists (granisetron, azasetron, palonosetron) on cisplatin-induced nausea and vomiting by estimating the time course of the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. We estimated the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin in the small intestine, based on the time course of plasma concentration of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist and the time course of concentration of serotonin near the 5-HT(3) receptor in the small intestine after administration of cisplatin. The antiemetic effect of each 5-HT(3) receptor antagonist was evaluated based on the normal level of 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin. Our results suggest that an adequate antiemetic effect will be provided when a dose of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin is given to patients along with any single administration of granisetron, azasetron, or palonosetron at a usual dose. On the other hand, the 5-HT(3) receptor occupancy of serotonin was found to be significantly lower than normal for several days after administration of palonosetron, as compared to granisetron and azasetron, indicating that constipation may be induced. Our results show that granisetron, azasetron, and palonosetron each have an adequate antiemetic effect after administration of 75 mg/m(2) of cisplatin. PMID:24470169

  18. Amino acid conjugates of lithocholic acid as antagonists of the EphA2 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Incerti, Matteo; Tognolini, Massimiliano; Russo, Simonetta; Pala, Daniele; Giorgio, Carmine; Hassan-Mohamed, Iftiin; Noberini, Roberta; Pasquale, Elena B.; Vicini, Paola; Piersanti, Silvia; Rivara, Silvia; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Mor, Marco; Lodola, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    The Eph receptor–ephrin system is an emerging target for the development of novel antiangiogenetic agents. We recently identified lithocholic acid (LCA) as a small molecule able to block EphA2-dependent signals in cancer cells, suggesting that its (5β)-cholan-24-oic acid scaffold can be used as a template to design a new generation of improved EphA2 antagonists. Here, we report the design and synthesis of an extended set of LCA derivatives obtained by conjugation of its carboxyl group with different α-amino acids. Structure-activity relationships indicate that the presence of a lipophilic amino acid side chain is fundamental to achieve good potencies. The L-Trp derivative (20, PCM126) was the most potent antagonist of the series disrupting EphA2-ephrinA1 interaction and blocking EphA2 phosphorylation in prostate cancer cells at low μM concentrations, thus being significantly more potent than LCA. Compound 20 is among the most potent small molecule antagonists of the EphA2 receptor. PMID:23489211

  19. Quantitative toxicoproteomic analysis of zebrafish embryos exposed to a retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Yu, Jianlan; Shi, Huahong; Xia, Liang; Xin, Qi; Zhang, Qiang; Zhao, Heng; Luo, Ji; Jin, Wenhai; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-09-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) antagonists, including some environmental endocrine disruptors, have a teratogenic effect on vertebrate embryos. To investigate the toxicological mechanism on the protein expression level, a quantitative proteomic study was conducted to analyze the proteome alterations of zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos exposed to gradient concentrations of a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Using isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) labeling coupled nano high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (nano HPLC-MS/MS), in total 6592 proteins were identified, among which 195 proteins were found to be differentially expressed by more than a two-fold change in exposed groups compared with the control. Gene ontology analysis showed that these differential proteins were mostly involved in anatomical structure development, biosynthetic process, ion binding and oxidoreductase activity. Moreover, the biological pathways of translation, lipoprotein metabolism, cell survival and gluconeogenesis were intensively inhibited after exposure. Some significantly downregulated proteins such as apolipoprotein A-I and vitellogenin and upregulated proteins such as calcium activated nucleotidase 1b, glutathione S-transferase and glucose 6-dehydrogenases showed a strong dose-dependent response. The results provided new insight into the molecular details of RXR antagonist-induced teratogenicity and added novel information of pathways and potential biomarkers for evaluation of RXR interfering activity. PMID:25581642

  20. A representative retinoid X receptor antagonist UVI3003 induced teratogenesis in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Liang; Xu, Ting; Li, Daoji; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-03-01

    Retinoid X receptor (RXR) interfering activity has been detected in different water resources. To study RXR disruptor-induced toxicological effects on vertebrates, embryos of zebrafish (Danio rerio) were exposed to a representative RXR antagonist UVI3003. Results showed that the teratogenic index (LC50 /EC50 ) of UVI3003 was as high as 5.4. UVI3003 induced multiple malformations of embryos, including deformed fins, reduced brains, small jaws, bent tails and edema in hearts, the degree of which became more severe with increasing exposure concentration. Although no significant difference was observed in the hatching rates between the exposure group and control, the whole body length was significantly reduced by 6.5% and 8.9% when exposed to 200 and 300 µg l(-1) of UVI3003, respectively. The heart rate also significantly decreased by 8.8-50.2% during exposure. Further experiments revealed that the pharyngula stage was the most sensitive development phase in terms of embryo response to UVI3003. The results demonstrated severe teratogenicity of RXR antagonist in zebrafish embryos and provided important data for ecotoxicological evaluation of RXR antagonists. PMID:25186191

  1. Structure-Activity Relationships of the Peptide Kappa Opioid Receptor Antagonist Zyklophin.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Anand A; Murray, Thomas F; Aldrich, Jane V

    2015-11-25

    The dynorphin (Dyn) A analogue zyklophin ([N-benzyl-Tyr(1)-cyclo(d-Asp(5),Dap(8))]dynorphin A(1-11)NH2) is a kappa opioid receptor (KOR)-selective antagonist in vitro, is active in vivo, and antagonizes KOR in the CNS after systemic administration. Hence, we synthesized zyklophin analogues to explore the structure-activity relationships of this peptide. The synthesis of selected analogues required modification to introduce the N-terminal amino acid due to poor solubility and/or to avoid epimerization of this residue. Among the N-terminal modifications, the N-phenethyl and N-cyclopropylmethyl substitutions resulted in analogues with the highest KOR affinities. Pharmacological results for the alanine-substituted analogues indicated that Phe(4) and Arg(6), but interestingly not the Tyr(1) phenol, are important for zyklophin's KOR affinity and that Arg(7) was important for KOR antagonist activity. In the GTPγS assay, while all of the cyclic analogues exhibited negligible KOR efficacy, the N-cyclopropylmethyl-Tyr(1) and N-benzyl-Phe(1) analogues were 28- and 11-fold more potent KOR antagonists, respectively, than zyklophin. PMID:26491810

  2. Synthesis of inositol phosphate-based competitive antagonists of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors.

    PubMed

    Konieczny, Vera; Stefanakis, John G; Sitsanidis, Efstratios D; Ioannidou, Natalia-Anastasia T; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos V; Fylaktakidou, Konstantina C; Taylor, Colin W; Koumbis, Alexandros E

    2016-02-16

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) are intracellular Ca(2+) channels that are widely expressed in animal cells, where they mediate the release of Ca(2+) from intracellular stores evoked by extracellular stimuli. A diverse array of synthetic agonists of IP3Rs has defined structure-activity relationships, but existing antagonists have severe limitations. We combined analyses of Ca(2+) release with equilibrium competition binding to IP3R to show that (1,3,4,6)IP4 is a full agonist of IP3R1 with lower affinity than (1,4,5)IP3. Systematic manipulation of this meso-compound via a versatile synthetic scheme provided a family of dimeric analogs of 2-O-butyryl-(1,3,4,6)IP4 and (1,3,4,5,6)IP5 that compete with (1,4,5)IP3 for binding to IP3R without evoking Ca(2+) release. These novel analogs are the first inositol phosphate-based competitive antagonists of IP3Rs with affinities comparable to that of the only commonly used competitive antagonist, heparin, the utility of which is limited by off-target effects. PMID:26818818

  3. Discovery and SAR of 6-alkyl-2,4-diaminopyrimidines as histamine H₄ receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Savall, Brad M; Chavez, Frank; Tays, Kevin; Dunford, Paul J; Cowden, Jeffery M; Hack, Michael D; Wolin, Ronald L; Thurmond, Robin L; Edwards, James P

    2014-03-27

    This report discloses the discovery and SAR of a series of 6-alkyl-2-aminopyrimidine derived histamine H4 antagonists that led to the development of JNJ 39758979, which has been studied in phase II clinical trials in asthma and atopic dermatitis. Building on our SAR studies of saturated derivatives from the indole carboxamide series, typified by JNJ 7777120, and incorporating knowledge from the tricyclic pyrimidines led us to the 6-alkyl-2,4-diaminopyrimidine series. A focused medicinal chemistry effort delivered several 6-alkyl-2,4-diaminopyrimidines that behaved as antagonists at both the human and rodent H4 receptor. Further optimization led to a panel of antagonists that were profiled in animal models of inflammatory disease. On the basis of the preclinical profile and efficacy in several animal models, JNJ 39758979 was selected as a clinical candidate; however, further development was halted during phase II because of the observation of drug-induced agranulocytosis (DIAG) in two subjects. PMID:24495018

  4. GluN2B subunit-containing NMDA receptor antagonists prevent Abeta-mediated synaptic plasticity disruption in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hu, Neng-Wei; Klyubin, Igor; Anwyl, Roger; Anwy, Roger; Rowan, Michael J

    2009-12-01

    Currently, treatment with the relatively low-affinity NMDA receptor antagonist memantine provides limited benefit in Alzheimer's disease (AD). One probable dose-limiting factor in the use of memantine is the inhibition of NMDA receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity mechanisms believed to underlie certain forms of memory. Moreover, amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) oligomers that are implicated in causing the cognitive deficits of AD potently inhibit this form of plasticity. Here we examined if subtype-preferring NMDA receptor antagonists could preferentially protect against the inhibition of NMDA receptor-dependent plasticity of excitatory synaptic transmission by Abeta in the hippocampus in vivo. Using doses that did not affect control plasticity, antagonists selective for NMDA receptors containing GluN2B but not other GluN2 subunits prevented Abeta(1-42) -mediated inhibition of plasticity. Evidence that the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha mediates this deleterious action of Ass was provided by the ability of TNFalpha antagonists to prevent Abeta(1-42) inhibition of plasticity and the abrogation of a similar disruptive effect of TNFalpha using a GluN2B-selective antagonist. Moreover, at nearby synapses that were resistant to the inhibitory effect of TNFalpha, Abeta(1-42) did not significantly affect plasticity. These findings suggest that preferentially targeting GluN2B subunit-containing NMDARs may provide an effective means of preventing cognitive deficits in early Alzheimer's disease. PMID:19918059

  5. In Hamsters the D1 Receptor Antagonist SCH 23390 Depresses Ventilation during Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.

    2008-01-01

    During exposure of animals to hypoxia, brain and blood dopamine levels increase stimulating dopaminergic receptors which influence the integrated ventilatory response to low oxygen. The purpose of the present study is to test the hypothesis, that in conscious hamsters, systemic antagonism of D1 receptors would depress their breathing in air and in response to hypoxic and hypercapnic challenges. Nine male hamsters were treated with saline or 0.25 mg/kg SCH-23390 (SCH), a D1 receptor antagonist that crosses the blood-brain barrier. Ventilation was determined using the barometric method and oxygen consumption and CO2 production were evaluated utilizing the flow-through method. During exposure to air, SCH decreased frequency of breathing. During exposure to hypoxia (10% oxygen in nitrogen), relative to saline, SCH-treated hamsters decreased minute ventilation by decreasing tidal volume and oxygen consumption but not CO2 production. During exposure to hypercapnia (5% CO2 in 95% O2) frequency of breathing was decreased with SCH, but there was no significant effect on minute ventilation. Relative to saline treatment body temperature was lower in SCH treated hamsters by 0.6 degrees Celsius. These results demonstrate that in hamsters D1 receptors can modulate control of ventilation in air and during hypoxia and hypercapnic exposures. Whether D1 receptors located centrally or on carotid bodies modulate these effects is not clear from this study. PMID:18036574

  6. Analysis of hydrophobic interactions of antagonists with the beta2-adrenergic receptor.

    PubMed

    Novoseletsky, V N; Pyrkov, T V; Efremov, R G

    2010-01-01

    The adrenergic receptors mediate a wide variety of physiological responses, including vasodilatation and vasoconstriction, heart rate modulation, and others. Beta-adrenergic antagonists ('beta-blockers') thus constitute a widely used class of drugs in cardiovascular medicine as well as in management of anxiety, migraine, and glaucoma. The importance of the hydrophobic effect has been evidenced for a wide range of beta-blocker properties. To better understand the role of the hydrophobic effect in recognition of beta-blockers by their receptor, we carried out a molecular docking study combined with an original approach to estimate receptor-ligand hydrophobic interactions. The proposed method is based on automatic detection of molecular fragments in ligands and the analysis of their interactions with receptors separately. A series of beta-blockers, based on phenylethanolamines and phenoxypropanolamines, were docked to the beta2-adrenoceptor binding site in the crystal structure. Hydrophobic complementarity between the ligand and the receptor was calculated using the PLATINUM web-server (http://model.nmr.ru/platinum). Based on the analysis of the hydrophobic match for molecular fragments of beta-blockers, we have developed a new scoring function which efficiently predicts dissociation constant (pKd) with strong correlations (r(2) approximately 0.8) with experimental data. PMID:20373213

  7. Preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetics of AZD3783, a selective 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Minli; Zhou, Diansong; Wang, Yi; Maier, Donna L; Widzowski, Daniel V; Sobotka-Briner, Cynthia D; Brockel, Becky J; Potts, William M; Shenvi, Ashok B; Bernstein, Peter R; Pierson, M Edward

    2011-11-01

    The preclinical pharmacology and pharmacokinetic properties of (2R)-6-methoxy-8-(4-methylpiperazin-1-yl)-N-(4-morpholin-4-ylphenyl)chromane-2-carboxamide (AZD3783), a potent 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B (5-HT(1B)) receptor antagonist, were characterized as part of translational pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic hypothesis testing in human clinical trials. The affinity of AZD3783 to the 5-HT(1B) receptor was measured in vitro by using membrane preparations containing recombinant human or guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptors and in native guinea pig brain tissue. In vivo antagonist potency of AZD3783 for the 5HT(1B) receptor was investigated by measuring the blockade of 5-HT(1B) agonist-induced guinea pig hypothermia. The anxiolytic-like potency was assessed using the suppression of separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. The affinity of AZD3783 for human and guinea pig 5-HT(1B) receptor (K(i), 12.5 and 11.1 nM, respectively) was similar to unbound plasma EC(50) values for guinea pig receptor occupancy (11 nM) and reduction of agonist-induced hypothermia (18 nM) in guinea pig. Active doses of AZD3783 in the hypothermia assay were similar to doses that reduced separation-induced vocalization in guinea pig pups. AZD3783 demonstrated favorable pharmacokinetic properties. The predicted pharmacokinetic parameters (total plasma clearance, 6.5 ml/min/kg; steady-state volume of distribution, 6.4 l/kg) were within 2-fold of the values observed in healthy male volunteers after a single 20-mg oral dose. This investigation presents a direct link between AZD3783 in vitro affinity and in vivo receptor occupancy to preclinical disease model efficacy. Together with predicted human pharmacokinetic properties, we have provided a model for the quantitative translational pharmacology of AZD3783 that increases confidence in the optimal human receptor occupancy required for antidepressant and anxiolytic effects in patients. PMID:21825000

  8. A Three-Site Mechanism for Agonist/Antagonist Selective Binding to Vasopressin Receptors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Noureldin; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco L; Haensele, Elke; Banting, Lee; Whitley, David C; Sopkova-de Oliveira Santos, Jana; Bureau, Ronan; Clark, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations with metadynamics enhanced sampling reveal three distinct binding sites for arginine vasopressin (AVP) within its V2 -receptor (V2 R). Two of these, the vestibule and intermediate sites, block (antagonize) the receptor, and the third is the orthosteric activation (agonist) site. The contacts found for the orthosteric site satisfy all the requirements deduced from mutagenesis experiments. Metadynamics simulations for V2 R and its V1a R-analog give an excellent correlation with experimental binding free energies by assuming that the most stable binding site in the simulations corresponds to the experimental binding free energy in each case. The resulting three-site mechanism separates agonists from antagonists and explains subtype selectivity. PMID:27184628

  9. Suvorexant: efficacy and safety profile of a dual orexin receptor antagonist in treating insomnia.

    PubMed

    Owen, R T

    2016-01-01

    Suvorexant is a hypnotic representing the first-in-class of a new group of agents known as dual orexin receptor antagonists. They target cerebral orexin receptors which, when activated, contribute to arousal and wakefulness. Suvorexant was shown to decrease sleep onset times and increase sleep duration, whether assessed objectively by polysomnography or subjectively by sleep diaries in primary insomnia patients. Overall tolerability was good, with somnolence being the commonest adverse event (≤ 7% in 3-month studies). No strong signals for rebound or withdrawal were seen after 1-12 months of treatment and few adverse events suggestive of residual psychomotor or cognitive events have been recorded. Further studies are required in patients with insomnia comorbid with depression and head-to-head studies with established hypnotics such as zolpidem and eszopiclone. Studies augmenting the small number of patients evaluating the initial recommended dose (10 mg) would also be prudent. PMID:26937493

  10. Recent progress in the development of agonists and antagonists for melatonin receptors.

    PubMed

    Zlotos, D P

    2012-01-01

    The various physiological actions of the neurohormone melatonin are mediated mainly by two G-protein-coupled MT(1) and MT(2) receptors. The melatoninergic drugs on the market, ramelteon and agomelatine, as well as the most advanced drug candidates under clinical evaluation, tasimelteon and PD-6735, are high-affinity nonselective MT(1) and MT(2) agonists. However, exploring the exact physiological role of the MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors requires subtype selective MT(1) and MT(2) ligands. This review covers novel melatoninergic agonists and antagonists published since 2010, focusing on high-affinity and subtype selective agents. Additionally, compounds not mentioned in the previous review articles and ligands selective for the MT(3) binding site are included. PMID:22680635

  11. Novel 5-HT6 receptor antagonists/D2 receptor partial agonists targeting behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kołaczkowski, Marcin; Marcinkowska, Monika; Bucki, Adam; Śniecikowska, Joanna; Pawłowski, Maciej; Kazek, Grzegorz; Siwek, Agata; Jastrzębska-Więsek, Magdalena; Partyka, Anna; Wasik, Anna; Wesołowska, Anna; Mierzejewski, Paweł; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw

    2015-03-01

    We describe a novel class of designed multiple ligands (DMLs) combining serotonin 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) antagonism with dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) partial agonism. Prototype hybrid molecules were designed using docking to receptor homology models. Diverse pharmacophore moieties yielded 3 series of hybrids with varying in vitro properties at 5-HT6R and D2R, and at M1 receptor and hERG channel antitargets. 4-(piperazin-1-yl)-1H-indole derivatives showed highest antagonist potency at 5-HT6R, with 7-butoxy-3,4-dihydroquinolin-2(1H)-one and 2-propoxybenzamide derivatives having promising D2R partial agonism. 2-(3-(4-(1-(phenylsulfonyl)-1H-indol-4-yl)piperazin-1-yl)propoxy)benzamide (47) exhibited nanomolar affinity at both 5-HT6R and D2R and was evaluated in rat models. It displayed potent antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like activity in the Porsolt and Vogel tests, respectively, more pronounced than that of a reference selective 5-HT6R antagonist or D2R partial agonist. In addition, 47 also showed antidepressant-like activity (Porsolt's test) and anxiolytic-like activity (open field test) in aged (>18-month old) rats. In operant conditioning tests, 47 enhanced responding for sweet reward in the saccharin self-administration test, consistent with anti-anhedonic properties. Further, 47 facilitated extinction of non-reinforced responding for sweet reward, suggesting potential procognitive activity. Taken together, these studies suggest that DMLs combining 5-HT6R antagonism and D2R partial agonism may successfully target affective disorders in patients from different age groups without a risk of cognitive deficits. PMID:25557493

  12. Development of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity in vitro and improved therapeutic efficacy in collagen-induced arthritis.

    PubMed

    Dahlén, Eva; Barchan, Karin; Herrlander, Daniel; Höjman, Patrik; Karlsson, Marie; Ljung, Lill; Andersson, Mats; Bäckman, Eva; Hager, Ann-Christin Malmborg; Walse, Björn; Joosten, Leo; van den Berg, Wim

    2008-04-01

    Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of the pro-inflammatory interleukin-1-mediated activation of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R). Although wild-type IL-1Ra is used for treatment of inflammatory diseases, its effect is moderate and/or short-lived. The objective of this study was to generate IL-1Ra mutants with enhanced antagonistic activity for potential therapeutic use. Using a directed evolution approach in which libraries of IL-1Ra gene mutants were generated and screened in functional assays, mutants with desired properties were identified. Initially, diversity was introduced into the IL-1Ra using random mutagenesis. Mutations resulting in enhanced antagonistic activity were identified by screening in a reporter cell assay. To further enhance the antagonistic activity, selected mutations were recombined using the DNA recombination technology Fragment-INduced Diversity (FIND). Following three rounds of FIND recombination, several mutants with up to nine times enhanced antagonistic activity (mean IC50 +/- SEM value: 0.78 +/- 0.050 vs. 6.8 +/- 1.1 ng/ml for mutant and wild-type, respectively) were identified. Sequence analysis identified the mutations D47N, E52R and E90Y as being most important for this effect, however, the mutations P38Y, H54R, Q129L and M136N further enhanced the antagonistic function. Analysis of identified mutations in protein models based on the crystal structure of the IL-1Ra/IL-1R complex suggested that mutations found to enhance the antagonistic activity had a stabilizing effect on the IL-1Ra mutants or increased the affinity for the IL-1R. Finally, the therapeutic effect of one mutant was compared to that of wild-type IL-1Ra in collagen-induced arthritis in mice. Indeed, the enhanced antagonistic effect of the mutants observed in vitro was also seen in vivo. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that directed evolution of IL-1Ra is an effective means of generating highly potent therapeutic

  13. Ambrisentan, an endothelin receptor type A-selective endothelin receptor antagonist, for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kingman, Martha; Ruggiero, Rosechelle; Torres, Fernando

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disease of the pulmonary vasculature characterized by vasoconstriction and vascular proliferation, which leads to right heart failure and death. Prostacyclin, NO and endothelin are felt to be key mediators in the development of PAH. We present the available published and presented data about ambrisentan, an ET(A)-selective endothelin receptor antagonist (ERA) and newest ERA agent to be approved by the FDA for the treatment of PAH in patients with WHO functional class II and III symptoms. Randomized, placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated a significant improvement in exercise capacity and decrease in time to clinical worsening, along with evidence to support an improvement in WHO functional class and quality of life for patients receiving ambrisentan. Long-term data have shown a 1-year survival of 95%; of the survivors, 94% remained on ambrisentan monotherapy. Endothelin receptor antagonists as a drug class have previously been associated with peripheral edema, aminotransferases abnormalities and a teratogenic risk to a developing fetus. Peripheral edema was observed in patients receiving ambrisentan; however, a greater percentage was experienced in patients aged > 65 years. In contrast, significant aminotransferase abnormalities were not observed with ambrisentan treatment in the placebo-controlled trials, and in all clinical trials combined the 1-year risk seems to be low (< 3%). Despite these data, the FDA requires monthly liver function tests monitoring. As with other ERAs, monthly pregnancy testing is required in all women of child bearing potential. PMID:19601701

  14. Discovery of 3-aryloxy-lactam analogs as potent androgen receptor full antagonists for treating castration resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Guo, Chuangxing; Kephart, Susan; Ornelas, Martha; Gonzalez, Javier; Linton, Angelica; Pairish, Mason; Nagata, Asako; Greasley, Samantha; Elleraas, Jeff; Hosea, Natilie; Engebretsen, Jon; Fanjul, Andrea N

    2012-01-15

    High throughput cell-based screening led to the identification of 3-aryloxy lactams as potent androgen receptor (AR) antagonists. Refinement of these leads to improve the ADME profile and remove residual agonism led to the discovery of 12, a potent full antagonist with greater oral bioavailability. Improvements in the ADME profile were realized by designing more ligand-efficient molecules with reduced molecular weights and lower lipophilicities. PMID:22197140

  15. Antinociceptive effects of MSVIII-19, a functional antagonist of the GluK1 kainate receptor.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Chang-Shen; Lash-Van Wyhe, Leanne; Sasaki, Makoto; Sakai, Ryuichi; Swanson, Geoffrey T; Gereau, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    The ionotropic glutamate receptor subunit, GluK1 (GluR5), is expressed in many regions of the nervous system related to sensory transmission. Recently, a selective ligand for the GluK1 receptor, MSVIII-19 (8,9-dideoxy-neodysiherbaine), was synthesized as a derivative of dysiherbaine, a toxin isolated from the marine sponge Lendenfeldia chondrodes. MSVIII-19 potently desensitizes GluK1 receptors without channel activation, rendering it useful as a functional antagonist. Given the high selectivity for GluK1 and the proposed role for this glutamate receptor in nociception, we sought to test the analgesic potential of MSVIII-19 in a series of models of inflammatory, neuropathic, and visceral pain in mice. MSVIII-19 delivered intrathecally dose-dependently reduced formalin-induced spontaneous behaviors and reduced thermal hypersensitivity 3 hours after formalin injection and 24 hours after complete Freund's adjuvant-induced inflammation, but had no effect on mechanical sensitivity in the same models. Intrathecal MSVIII-19 significantly reduced both thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain, but had no effect in the acetic acid model of visceral pain. Peripheral administration of MSVIII-19 had no analgesic efficacy in any of these models. Finally, intrathecal MSVIII-19 did not alter responses in Tail-flick tests or performance on the accelerating RotaRod. These data suggest that spinal administration of MSVIII-19 reverses hypersensitivity in several models of pain in mice, supporting the clinical potential of GluK1 antagonists for the management of pain. PMID:21324591

  16. Decreasing nicotinic receptor activity and the spatial learning impairment caused by the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine in rats

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Dennis A.; Heshmati, Pooneh; Kholdebarin, Ehsan; Levin, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    Nicotinic systems have been shown by a variety of studies to be involved in cognitive function. Nicotinic receptors have an inherent property to become desensitized after activation. The relative role of nicotinic receptor activation vs. net receptor inactivation by desensitization in the cognitive effects of nicotinic drugs remains to be fully understood. In these studies, we tested the effects of the α7 nicotinic receptor antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA), the α4β2 nicotinic receptor antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE), the nonspecific nicotinic channel blocker mecamylamine and the α4β2 nicotinic receptor desensitizing agent sazetidine-A on learning in a repeated acquisition test. Adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were trained on a repeated acquisition learning procedure in an 8-arm radial maze. MLA (1–4 mg/kg), DHβE (1–4 mg/kg), mecamylamine (0.125–0.5 mg/kg) or sazetidine-A (1 and 3 mg/kg) were administered in four different studies either alone or together with the NMDA glutamate antagonist dizocilpine (0.05 and 0.10 mg/kg). MLA significantly counteracted the learning impairment caused by dizocilpine. The overall choice accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine was significantly attenuated by co-administration of DHβE. Low doses of the non-specific nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine also reduced dizocilpine-induced repeated acquisition impairment. Sazetidine-A reversed the accuracy impairment caused by dizocilpine. These studies provide evidence that a net decrease in nicotinic receptor activity can improve learning by attenuating learning impairment induced by NMDA glutamate blockade. This adds to evidence in cognitive tests that nicotinic antagonists can improve cognitive function. Further research characterizing the efficacy and mechanisms underlying nicotinic antagonist and desensitization induced cognitive improvement is warranted. PMID:25064338

  17. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs.

    PubMed

    Pediani, John D; Ward, Richard J; Godin, Antoine G; Marsango, Sara; Milligan, Graeme

    2016-06-17

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm(-2) human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  18. Dynamic Regulation of Quaternary Organization of the M1 Muscarinic Receptor by Subtype-selective Antagonist Drugs*

    PubMed Central

    Pediani, John D.; Ward, Richard J.; Godin, Antoine G.; Marsango, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Although rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors can exist as both monomers and non-covalently associated dimers/oligomers, the steady-state proportion of each form and whether this is regulated by receptor ligands are unknown. Herein we address these topics for the M1 muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, a key molecular target for novel cognition enhancers, by using spatial intensity distribution analysis. This method can measure fluorescent particle concentration and assess oligomerization states of proteins within defined regions of living cells. Imaging and analysis of the basolateral surface of cells expressing some 50 molecules·μm−2 human muscarinic M1 receptor identified a ∼75:25 mixture of receptor monomers and dimers/oligomers. Both sustained and shorter term treatment with the selective M1 antagonist pirenzepine resulted in a large shift in the distribution of receptor species to favor the dimeric/oligomeric state. Although sustained treatment with pirenzepine also resulted in marked up-regulation of the receptor, simple mass action effects were not the basis for ligand-induced stabilization of receptor dimers/oligomers. The related antagonist telenzepine also produced stabilization and enrichment of the M1 receptor dimer population, but the receptor subtype non-selective antagonists atropine and N-methylscopolamine did not. In contrast, neither pirenzepine nor telenzepine altered the quaternary organization of the related M3 muscarinic receptor. These data provide unique insights into the selective capacity of receptor ligands to promote and/or stabilize receptor dimers/oligomers and demonstrate that the dynamics of ligand regulation of the quaternary organization of G protein-coupled receptors is markedly more complex than previously appreciated. This may have major implications for receptor function and behavior. PMID:27080256

  19. Receptor-mediated binding and uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist by pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jennes, L.; Stumpf, W.E.; Conn, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The intracellular pathway of an enzyme resistant GnRH agonist (D- Lys6 -GnRH) conjugated to ferritin or to colloidal gold was followed in cultured pituitary cells. After an initial uniform distribution over the cell surface of gonadotropes, the electrondense marker was internalized, either individually or in small groups. After longer incubation times, the marker appeared in the lysosomal compartment and the Golgi apparatus, where it could be found in the vesicular as well as cisternal portion. In addition, the receptor-mediated endocytosis of the GnRH antagonist D-p-Glu1-D-Phe2-D-Trp3-D- Lys6 -GnRH was studied by light and electron microscopic autoradiography after 30 and 60 min of incubation to ensure uptake. At both time points, in in vitro as well as in vivo studies, silver grains were localized over cytoplasmic organelles of castration cells, including dilated endoplasmic reticulum, lysosomes, and clear vesicles. No consistent association with cell nuclei, mitochondria, or secretory vesicles could be observed. The results suggest that both agonist and antagonist are binding selectively to the plasma membrane of gonadotropes and subsequently are taken up via receptor-mediated endocytosis for degradation or possible action on synthetic processes.

  20. Identification of Darmstoff analogs as selective agonists and antagonists of lysophosphatidic acid receptors.

    PubMed

    Gududuru, Veeresa; Zeng, Kui; Tsukahara, Ryoko; Makarova, Natalia; Fujiwara, Yuko; Pigg, Kathryn R; Baker, Daniel L; Tigyi, Gabor; Miller, Duane D

    2006-01-15

    Darmstoff describes a family of gut smooth muscle-stimulating acetal phosphatidic acids initially isolated and characterized from the bath fluid of stimulated gut over 50 years ago. Despite similar structural and biological profiles, Darmstoff analogs have not previously been examined as potential LPA mimetics. Here, we report a facile method for the synthesis of potassium salts of Darmstoff analogs. To understand the effect of stereochemistry on lysophosphatidic acid mimetic activity, synthesis of optically pure stereoisomers of selected Darmstoff analogs was achieved starting with chiral methyl glycerates. Each Darmstoff analog was evaluated for subtype-specific LPA receptor agonist/antagonist activity, PPARgamma activation, and autotaxin inhibition. From this study we identified compound 12 as a pan-antagonist and several pan-agonists for the LPA(1-3) receptors. Introduction of an aromatic ring in the lipid chain such as analog 22 produced a subtype-specific LPA(3) agonist with an EC(50) of 692 nM. Interestingly, regardless of their LPA(1/2/3) ligand properties all of the Darmstoff analogs tested activated PPARgamma. However, these compounds are weak inhibitors of autotaxin. The results indicate that Darmstoff analogs constitute a novel class of lysophosphatidic acid mimetics. PMID:16290140

  1. Cysteinyl Leukotriene Receptor-1 Antagonists as Modulators of Innate Immune Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Theron, A. J.; Steel, H. C.; Tintinger, G. R.; Gravett, C. M.; Anderson, R.; Feldman, C.

    2014-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs) are produced predominantly by cells of the innate immune system, especially basophils, eosinophils, mast cells, and monocytes/macrophages. Notwithstanding potent bronchoconstrictor activity, cysLTs are also proinflammatory consequent to their autocrine and paracrine interactions with G-protein-coupled receptors expressed not only on the aforementioned cell types, but also on Th2 lymphocytes, as well as structural cells, and to a lesser extent neutrophils and CD8+ cells. Recognition of the involvement of cysLTs in the immunopathogenesis of various types of acute and chronic inflammatory disorders, especially bronchial asthma, prompted the development of selective cysLT receptor-1 (cysLTR1) antagonists, specifically montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast. More recently these agents have also been reported to possess secondary anti-inflammatory activities, distinct from cysLTR1 antagonism, which appear to be particularly effective in targeting neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages. Underlying mechanisms include interference with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases, 5′-lipoxygenase, and the proinflammatory transcription factor, nuclear factor kappa B. These and other secondary anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the commonly used cysLTR1 antagonists are the major focus of the current review, which also includes a comparison of the anti-inflammatory effects of montelukast, pranlukast, and zafirlukast on human neutrophils in vitro, as well as an overview of both the current clinical applications of these agents and potential future applications based on preclinical and early clinical studies. PMID:24971371

  2. GLP-1 receptor antagonist as a potential probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Eri; Toyoda, Kentaro; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Ueda, Masashi; Temma, Takashi; Hirao, Konomu; Nagakawa, Kenji; Saji, Hideo; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2009-11-20

    We examined exendin(9-39), an antagonist of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor (GLP-1R), as a potential probe for imaging of pancreatic {beta}-cells. To evaluate in vitro receptor specificity, binding assay was performed using dispersed mouse islet cells. Binding assay showed competitive inhibition of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) binding by non-radioactive exendin(9-39). To assess in vivo selectivity, the biodistribution was evaluated by intravenous administration of [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) to mice. Radioactivity of harvested pancreas reached highest levels at 60 and 120 min among organs examined except lung. Pre-administration of excess non-radioactive exendin(9-39) remarkably and specifically blocked the radioactivity of pancreas. After [{sup 125}I]BH-exendin(9-39) injection into transgenic mice with pancreatic {beta}-cells expressing GFP, fluorescent and radioactive signals of sections of pancreas were evaluated with an image analyzer. Imaging analysis showed that the fluorescent GFP signals and the radioactive signals were correspondingly located. Thus, the GLP-1R antagonist exendin(9-39) may serve as a useful probe for pancreatic {beta}-cell imaging.

  3. Discriminating agonist and antagonist ligands of the nuclear receptors using 3D-pharmacophores.

    PubMed

    Lagarde, Nathalie; Delahaye, Solenne; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) constitute an important class of therapeutic targets. We evaluated the performance of 3D structure-based and ligand-based pharmacophore models in predicting the pharmacological profile of NRs ligands using the NRLiSt BDB database. We could generate selective pharmacophores for agonist and antagonist ligands and we found that the best performances were obtained by combining the structure-based and the ligand-based approaches. The combination of pharmacophores that were generated allowed to cover most of the chemical space of the NRLiSt BDB datasets. By screening the whole NRLiSt BDB on our 3D pharmacophores, we demonstrated their selectivity towards their dedicated NRs ligands. The 3D pharmacophores herein presented can thus be used as a predictor of the pharmacological activity of NRs ligands.Graphical AbstractUsing a combination of structure-based and ligand-based pharmacophores, agonist and antagonist ligands of the Nuclear Receptors included in the NRLiSt BDB database could be separated. PMID:27602059

  4. Endothelin receptor antagonists in sickle cell disease: A promising new therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Fox, Brandon M; Kasztan, Malgorzata

    2016-08-15

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic hematologic disorder that is characterized by a variety of potentially life threatening acute and chronic complications. Currently, hydroxyurea is the only clinically approved pharmacological therapy for the treatment of SCD, and the continued prevalence of severe disease complications underscores the desperate need for the development of new therapeutic agents. Central features of the sickle cell disease milieu, including hypoxia, oxidative stress, and thrombosis, are established enhancers of endothelin-1 (ET-1) synthesis. This conceptual connection between ET-1 and SCD was confirmed by multiple studies that demonstrated markedly elevated plasma and urinary levels of ET-1 in SCD patients. Direct evidence for the involvement of ET-1 signaling in the development of SCD pathologies has come from studies using endothelin receptor antagonists in SCD mice. This review summarizes recent studies that have implicated ET-1 signaling as a mechanistic contributor to renal, vascular, pulmonary, and nociceptive complications of sickle cell disease and discusses the potential for the use of ET receptor antagonists in the treatment of SCD. PMID:27049871

  5. P2Y12 Receptor Antagonists and Morphine: A Dangerous Liaison?

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Kolokathis, Fotios; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Lekakis, John; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    P2Y12 receptor antagonists, concurrently administered with aspirin in what has come to be commonly called dual antiplatelet therapy, are a mainstay of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes. Morphine, on the contrary, is a commonly used drug in the acute phase of acute coronary syndromes to relieve pain-with the added potential benefit of attenuating acutely raised sympathetic tone. In current guidelines, though, morphine is recommended with decreasing strength of recommendation. One reason is that it raises concern regarding the potentially significant interaction with antiplatelet agents, leading to impaired inhibition of platelet activation. In any case, it is still considered a mandatory part of the inventory of available medications in prehospital acute myocardial infarction management. The goal of the present review is to present published evidence on morphine and its potential interactions with P2Y12 receptor antagonists, as well as on the central issue of whether such interactions may underlie clinically significant effects on patient outcomes. PMID:27586412

  6. Discovery of a new series of potent and selective linear tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Fedi, Valentina; Altamura, Maria; Catalioto, Rose-Marie; Giannotti, Danilo; Giolitti, Alessandro; Giuliani, Sandro; Guidi, Antonio; Harmat, Nicholas J S; Lecci, Alessandro; Meini, Stefania; Nannicini, Rossano; Pasqui, Franco; Tramontana, Manuela; Triolo, Antonio; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2007-10-01

    Starting from 1 (MEN14268), a selective tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist with an interesting in vitro pharmacological profile, a family of numerous antagonists was obtained through an optimization process focused on iterated structural modifications. The effects of the introduction of a wide variety of substituents on the lipophilic aromatic part of the molecule and the modulation of the structural constraint through the insertion of different achiral alpha,alpha-dialkylamino acids were investigated. In particular, aromatic and benzofused heteroaromatic moieties were introduced at the pseudo-N-terminal residue to replace the 2-benzothiophene moiety, and a systematic investigation of the best positioning of substituents onto the aromatic platform was reported for the benzothiophene core. Studies on the modulation of the length and the rigidity of the hydrophilic pseudo-C-terminal pendant are presented. Many heteroaliphatic groups are well tolerated by the receptor in this part of the ligand. The product 48f (MEN15596), bearing a methyl substituent on the benzothiophene and a tetrahydropyranylmethylpiperidine pendant, was finally selected for its good in vivo activity after intravenous, intraduodenal, and oral administration in guinea pigs. PMID:17850056

  7. The Dual Hypocretin Receptor Antagonist Almorexant is Permissive for Activation of Wake-Promoting Systems.

    PubMed

    Parks, Gregory S; Warrier, Deepti R; Dittrich, Lars; Schwartz, Michael D; Palmerston, Jeremiah B; Neylan, Thomas C; Morairty, Stephen R; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2016-03-01

    The dual hypocretin receptor (HcrtR) antagonist almorexant (ALM) may promote sleep through selective disfacilitation of wake-promoting systems, whereas benzodiazepine receptor agonists (BzRAs) such as zolpidem (ZOL) induce sleep through general inhibition of neural activity. Previous studies have indicated that HcrtR antagonists cause less-functional impairment than BzRAs. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying these differential profiles, we compared the effects of ALM and ZOL on functional activation of wake-promoting systems at doses equipotent for sleep induction. Sprague-Dawley rats, implanted for EEG/EMG recording, were orally administered vehicle (VEH), 100 mg/kg ALM, or 100 mg/kg ZOL during their active phase and either left undisturbed or kept awake for 90 min after which their brains were collected. ZOL-treated rats required more stimulation to maintain wakefulness than VEH- or ALM-treated rats. We measured Fos co-expression with markers for wake-promoting cell groups in the lateral hypothalamus (Hcrt), tuberomammillary nuclei (histamine; HA), basal forebrain (acetylcholine; ACh), dorsal raphe (serotonin; 5HT), and singly labeled Fos(+) cells in the locus coeruleus (LC). Following SD, Fos co-expression in Hcrt, HA, and ACh neurons (but not in 5HT neurons) was consistently elevated in VEH- and ALM-treated rats, whereas Fos expression in these neuronal groups was unaffected by SD in ZOL-treated rats. Surprisingly, Fos expression in the LC was elevated in ZOL- but not in VEH- or ALM-treated SD animals. These results indicate that Hcrt signaling is unnecessary for the activation of Hcrt, HA, or ACh wake-active neurons, which may underlie the milder cognitive impairment produced by HcrtR antagonists compared to ZOL. PMID:26289145

  8. Molecular Recognition of Agonist and Antagonist for Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-α Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyuan; Wang, Lushan; Zhao, Xian; Sun, Xun

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-α (PPAR-α) is a ligand-activated transcription factor which plays important roles in lipid and glucose metabolism. The aim of this work is to find residues which selectively recognize PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. To achieve this aim, PPAR-α/13M and PPAR-α/471 complexes were subjected to perform molecular dynamics simulations. This research suggests that several key residues only participate in agonist recognition, while some other key residues only contribute to antagonist recognition. It is hoped that such work is useful for medicinal chemists to design novel PPAR-α agonists and antagonists. PMID:24837836

  9. Potency enhancement of the κ-opioid receptor antagonist probe ML140 through sulfonamide constraint utilizing a tetrahydroisoquinoline motif.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Kevin J; Slauson, Stephen R; Lovell, Kimberly M; Phillips, Angela M; Streicher, John M; Zhou, Lei; Whipple, David A; Schoenen, Frank J; Prisinzano, Thomas E; Bohn, Laura M; Aubé, Jeffrey

    2015-07-15

    Optimization of the sulfonamide-based kappa opioid receptor (KOR) antagonist probe molecule ML140 through constraint of the sulfonamide nitrogen within a tetrahydroisoquinoline moiety afforded a marked increase in potency. This strategy, when combined with additional structure-activity relationship exploration, has led to a compound only six-fold less potent than norBNI, a widely utilized KOR antagonist tool compound, but significantly more synthetically accessible. The new optimized probe is suitably potent for use as an in vivo tool to investigate the therapeutic potential of KOR antagonists. PMID:25593096

  10. Novel benzamide-based histamine h3 receptor antagonists: the identification of two candidates for clinical development.

    PubMed

    Letavic, Michael A; Aluisio, Leah; Apodaca, Richard; Bajpai, Manoj; Barbier, Ann J; Bonneville, Anne; Bonaventure, Pascal; Carruthers, Nicholas I; Dugovic, Christine; Fraser, Ian C; Kramer, Michelle L; Lord, Brian; Lovenberg, Timothy W; Li, Lilian Y; Ly, Kiev S; Mcallister, Heather; Mani, Neelakandha S; Morton, Kirsten L; Ndifor, Anthony; Nepomuceno, S Diane; Pandit, Chennagiri R; Sands, Steven B; Shah, Chandra R; Shelton, Jonathan E; Snook, Sandra S; Swanson, Devin M; Xiao, Wei

    2015-04-01

    The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. PMID:25893048

  11. Novel Benzamide-Based Histamine H3 Receptor Antagonists: The Identification of Two Candidates for Clinical Development

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The preclinical characterization of novel phenyl(piperazin-1-yl)methanones that are histamine H3 receptor antagonists is described. The compounds described are high affinity histamine H3 antagonists. Optimization of the physical properties of these histamine H3 antagonists led to the discovery of several promising lead compounds, and extensive preclinical profiling aided in the identification of compounds with optimal duration of action for wake promoting activity. This led to the discovery of two development candidates for Phase I and Phase II clinical trials. PMID:25893048

  12. SB 242084, a selective and brain penetrant 5-HT2C receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Kennett, G A; Wood, M D; Bright, F; Trail, B; Riley, G; Holland, V; Avenell, K Y; Stean, T; Upton, N; Bromidge, S; Forbes, I T; Brown, A M; Middlemiss, D N; Blackburn, T P

    1997-01-01

    SB 242084 has a high affinity (pKi 9.0) for the cloned human 5-HT2C receptor and 100- and 158-fold selectivity over the closely related cloned human 5-HT2B and 5-HT2A subtypes respectively. SB 242084 had over 100-fold selectivity over a range of other 5-HT, dopamine and adrenergic receptors. In studies of 5-HT-stimulated phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis using SH-SY5Y cells stably expressing the cloned human 5-HT2C receptor, SB 242084 acted as an antagonist with a pKb of 9.3, which closely resembled its corresponding receptor binding affinity. SB 242084 potently inhibited m-chlorophenylpiperazine (mCPP, 7 mgkg i.p. 20 min pre-test)-induced hypolocomotion in rats, a model of in vivo central 5-HT2C receptor function, with an ID50 of 0.11 mg/kg i.p., and 2.0 mg/kg p.o. SB 242084 (0.1-1 mg/kg i.p.) exhibited an anxiolytic-like profile in the rat social interaction test, increasing time spent in social interaction, but having no effect on locomotion. SB 242084 (0.1-1 mg/kg i.p.) also markedly increased punished responding in a rat Geller-Seifter conflict test of anxiety, but had no consistent effect on unpunished responding. A large acute dose of SB 242084 (30 mg/kg p.o.) had no effect on seizure susceptibility in the rat maximal electroshock seizure threshold test. Also, while SB 242084 (2 and 6 mg/kg p.o. 1 hr pre-test) antagonized the hypophagic response to mCPP, neither acute nor subchronic administration of the drug, for 5 days at 2 or 6 mg/kg p.o. twice daily, affected food intake or weight gain. The results suggest that SB 242084 is the first reported selective potent and brain penetrant 5-HT2C receptor antagonist and has anxiolytic-like activity, but does not possess either proconvulsant or hyperphagic properties which are characteristic of mutant mice lacking the 5-HT2C receptor. PMID:9225286

  13. The effects of (RS)-alpha-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine ((RS)-CPPG), a potent and selective metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Toms, N. J.; Jane, D. E.; Kemp, M. C.; Bedingfield, J. S.; Roberts, P. J.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study we describe the potent antagonist activity of a novel metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor antagonist (RS)-alpha-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine ((RS)-CPPG) which exhibits selectivity for mGlu receptors (group II and III) negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase in the adult rat cortex. 2. Both the L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) and (2S, 1'S, 2'S)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-1) inhibition of forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation were potently reversed by (RS)-CPPG (IC50 values: 2.2 +/- 0.6 nM and 46.2 +/- 18.2 nM, respectively). 3. In contrast, (RS)-CPPG acted as a weak antagonist against group I mGlu receptors. In neonatal rat cortical slices, (RS)-CPPG antagonized (KB = 0.65 +/- 0.07 mM) (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD)-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis. (RS)-CPPG (100 microM) failed to influence L-quisqualate-stimulated phosphoinositide hydrolysis in cultured cerebellar granule cells. 4. In the rat cerebral cortex, (RS)-CPPG is the most potent antagonist of group II/III mGlu receptors yet described (with 20 fold selectivity for group III mGlu receptors), having negligible activity at group I mGlu receptors. PMID:8922731

  14. Naturally-Occurring Glucosinolates, Glucoraphanin and Glucoerucin, are Antagonists to Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor as Their Chemopreventive Potency.

    PubMed

    Abdull Razis, Ahmad Faizal; Noor, Noramaliza Mohd

    2015-01-01

    As a cytosolic transcription factor, the aryl hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor is involved in several patho- physiological events leading to immunosuppression and cancer; hence antagonists of the Ah receptor may possess chemoprevention properties. It is known to modulate carcinogen-metabolising enzymes, for instance the CYP1 family of cytochromes P450 and quinone reductase, both important in the biotransformation of many chemical carcinogens via regulating phase I and phase II enzyme systems. Utilising chemically-activated luciferase expression (CALUX) assay it was revealed that intact glucosinolates, glucoraphanin and glucoerucin, isolated from Brassica oleracea L. var. acephala sabellica and Eruca sativa ripe seeds, respectively, are such antagonists. Both glucosinolates were poor ligands for the Ah receptor; however, they effectively antagonised activation of the receptor by the avid ligand benzo[a]pyrene. Indeed, intact glucosinolate glucoraphanin was a more potent antagonist to the receptor than glucoerucin. It can be concluded that both glucosinolates effectively act as antagonists for the Ah receptor, and this may contribute to their established chemoprevention potency. PMID:26320454

  15. Identification of ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) residues essential for leukemia inhibitory factor receptor binding and generation of CNTF receptor antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Di Marco, A; Gloaguen, I; Graziani, R; Paonessa, G; Saggio, I; Hudson, K R; Laufer, R

    1996-01-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) drives the sequential assembly of a receptor complex containing the ligand-specific alpha-receptor subunit (CNTFR alpha) and the signal transducers gp130 and leukemia inhibitory factor receptor-beta (LIFR). The D1 structural motif, located at the beginning of the D-helix of human CNTF, contains two amino acid residues, F152 and K155, which are conserved among all cytokines that signal through LIFR. The functional importance of these residues was assessed by alanine mutagenesis. Substitution of either F152 or K155 with alanine was found to specifically inhibit cytokine interaction with LIFR without affecting binding to CNTFR alpha or gp130. The resulting variants behaved as partial agonists with varying degrees of residual bioactivity in different cell-based assays. Simultaneous alanine substitution of both F152 and K155 totally abolished biological activity. Combining these mutations with amino acid substitutions in the D-helix, which enhance binding affinity for the CNTFR alpha, gave rise to a potent competitive CNTF receptor antagonist. This protein constitutes a new tool for studies of CNTF function in normal physiology and disease. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 6 PMID:8799186

  16. Agonist and antagonist effects of nicotine on chick neuronal nicotinic receptors are defined by alpha and beta subunits.

    PubMed

    Hussy, N; Ballivet, M; Bertrand, D

    1994-09-01

    1. Functional neuronal nicotinic receptors were reconstituted in Xenopus oocytes by the nuclear injection of different combinations of chick and rat cDNAs encoding alpha and beta subunits. The pharmacology of these nicotinic receptors was investigated using two-electrode voltage clamp. 2. The sensitivity of the chick alpha 3/beta 2, alpha 3/beta 4, and alpha 4/beta 2 receptors to acetylcholine (ACh) and neuronal bungarotoxin differed markedly, indicating that both subunits contribute to the pharmacological properties of the receptors. 3. Nicotine acted as an agonist on the chick alpha 3/beta 4 and alpha 4/beta 2 receptors and rat alpha 3/beta 2 receptor. In contrast, nicotine (at concentrations > 3 microM) was only a weak partial agonist of the chick alpha 3/beta 2 receptor. Moreover, nicotine coapplied with 3 microM ACh on the chick alpha 3/beta 2 receptor acted as a potent competitive antagonist, with an IC50 of 0.43 microM. No antagonist effect of nicotine could be revealed on the other nicotinic receptors. 4. The effect of nicotine was tested on hybrid receptors obtained by coinjection of chick and rat cDNAs encoding the alpha 3 and beta 2 subunits (yielding the rat alpha 3/chick beta 2 and chick alpha 3/rat beta 2 receptors). Nicotine (10 microM) strongly inhibited both hybrid receptors. 5. Chimeric subunits were constructed by exchanging a segment located in the extracellular N-termini of chick alpha 3 and alpha 4 subunits and chick alpha 3 and rat alpha 3 subunits. These subunits were coexpressed in oocytes with chick or rat beta 2 subunits. The effect of nicotine on these receptors pointed to the importance of a 15 amino acid stretch located 3' of the first transmembrane segment in the determination of the agonist and antagonist action of nicotine. 6. Within this 15 amino acid segment, a single residue differs in chick and rat alpha 3 subunits, at position 198, within the ligand binding site of alpha subunits. Gln198 of the rat alpha 3 subunit was replaced

  17. The metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 antagonist fenobam is analgesic and has improved in vivo selectivity compared with the prototypical antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine.

    PubMed

    Montana, Michael C; Cavallone, Laura F; Stubbert, Kristi K; Stefanescu, Andrei D; Kharasch, Evan D; Gereau, Robert W

    2009-09-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 5 (mGlu5) has been demonstrated to play a role in the modulation of numerous nociceptive modalities. When administered via peripheral, intrathecal, or systemic routes, mGlu5 antagonists have analgesic properties in a variety of preclinical pain models. Despite a wealth of data supporting the use of mGlu5 antagonists to treat pain, studies have been limited to preclinical animal models due to a lack of mGlu5 antagonists that are approved for use in humans. It has been demonstrated previously that fenobam [N-(3-chlorophenyl)-N'-(4,5-dihydro-1-methyl-4-oxo-1H-imidazole-2-yl)urea], an anxiolytic shown to be safe and effective in human trials, is a selective and potent noncompetitive antagonist of mGlu5 (J Pharmacol Exp Ther 315:711-721, 2005). Here, we report a series of studies aimed at testing whether fenobam, similar to the prototypical mGlu5 antagonist 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)-pyridine (MPEP), has analgesic properties in mice. We show that fenobam reduces formalin-induced pain behaviors and relieves established inflammation-induced thermal hypersensitivity in mice. Similar results were seen with MPEP. Administration of fenobam resulted in an increase in locomotor activity in the open-field task but did not impair performance on the accelerating Rotarod. Analysis of brain and plasma fenobam levels indicated that fenobam is rapidly concentrated in brain after intraperitoneal administration in mice but is essentially cleared from circulation within 1 h after injection. Fenobam had no analgesic effect in mGlu5 knockout mice, whereas the prototypical antagonist MPEP retained significant analgesic efficacy in mGlu5 knockouts. These results demonstrate that fenobam is analgesic in mice and has an improved in vivo selectivity for mGlu5 over MPEP. PMID:19515968

  18. Pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel, highly potent and selective non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kiyoshi; Homma, Tsuyoshi; Morikawa, Yuka; Ubukata, Naoko; Tsuruoka, Hiyoyuki; Aoki, Kazumasa; Ishikawa, Hirokazu; Mizuno, Makoto; Sada, Toshio

    2015-08-15

    The present study was designed to characterize the pharmacological profile of CS-3150, a novel non-steroidal mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist. In the radioligand-binding assay, CS-3150 inhibited (3)H-aldosterone binding to mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 9.4nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 36 and 713nM, respectively. CS-3150 also showed at least 1000-fold higher selectivity for mineralocorticoid receptor over other steroid hormone receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor. In the reporter gene assay, CS-3150 inhibited aldosterone-induced transcriptional activation of human mineralocorticoid receptor with an IC50 value of 3.7nM, and its potency was superior to that of spironolactone and eplerenone, whose IC50s were 66 and 970nM, respectively. CS-3150 had no agonistic effect on mineralocorticoid receptor and did not show any antagonistic or agonistic effect on glucocorticoid receptor, androgen receptor and progesterone receptor even at the high concentration of 5μM. In adrenalectomized rats, single oral administration of CS-3150 suppressed aldosterone-induced decrease in urinary Na(+)/K(+) ratio, an index of in vivo mineralocorticoid receptor activation, and this suppressive effect was more potent and longer-lasting than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. Chronic treatment with CS-3150 inhibited blood pressure elevation induced by deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)/salt-loading to rats, and this antihypertensive effect was more potent than that of spironolactone and eplerenone. These findings indicate that CS-3150 is a selective and highly potent mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist with long-lasting oral activity. This agent could be useful for the treatment of hypertension, cardiovascular and renal disorders. PMID:26073023

  19. Residues remote from the binding pocket control the antagonist selectivity towards the corticotropin-releasing factor receptor-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xianqiang; Cheng, Jianxin; Wang, Xu; Tang, Yun; Ågren, Hans; Tu, Yaoquan

    2015-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factors receptor-1 and receptor-2 (CRF1R and CRF2R) are therapeutic targets for treating neurological diseases. Antagonists targeting CRF1R have been developed for the potential treatment of anxiety disorders and alcohol addiction. It has been found that antagonists targeting CRF1R always show high selectivity, although CRF1R and CRF2R share a very high rate of sequence identity. This has inspired us to study the origin of the selectivity of the antagonists. We have therefore built a homology model for CRF2R and carried out unbiased molecular dynamics and well-tempered metadynamics simulations for systems with the antagonist CP-376395 in CRF1R or CRF2R to address this issue. We found that the side chain of Tyr6.63 forms a hydrogen bond with the residue remote from the binding pocket, which allows Tyr6.63 to adopt different conformations in the two receptors and results in the presence or absence of a bottleneck controlling the antagonist binding to or dissociation from the receptors. The rotameric switch of the side chain of Tyr3566.63 allows the breaking down of the bottleneck and is a perquisite for the dissociation of CP-376395 from CRF1R.

  20. Effect of 1-Substitution on Tetrahydroisoquinolines as Selective Antagonists for the Orexin-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Perrey, David A.; German, Nadezhda A.; Decker, Ann M.; Thorn, David; Li, Jun-Xu; Gilmour, Brian P.; Thomas, Brian F.; Harris, Danni L.; Runyon, Scott P.; Zhang, Yanan

    2015-01-01

    Selective blockade of the Orexin-1 receptor has been suggested as a potential approach to drug addiction therapy because of its role in modulating the brain's reward system. We have recently reported a series of tetrahydroisoquinoline-based OX1 selective antagonists. Aimed at elucidating SAR requirements in other regions of the molecule and further enhancing OX1 potency and selectivity, we have designed and synthesized a series of analogs bearing a variety of substituents at the 1-position of the tetrahydroisoquinoline. The results show that an optimally substituted benzyl group is required for activity at the OX1 receptor. Several compounds with improved potency and/or selectivity have been identified. When combined with structural modifications that were previously found to improve selectivity, we have identified compound 73 (RTIOX-251) with an apparent dissociation constant (Ke) of 16.1 nM at the OX1 receptor and >620-fold selectivity over the OX2 receptor. In vivo, compound 73 was shown to block the development of locomotor sensitization to cocaine in rats. PMID:25643283

  1. Pharmacokinetics and central nervous system effects of the novel dopamine D2 receptor antagonist JNJ-37822681.

    PubMed

    te Beek, Erik T; Moerland, Matthijs; de Boer, Peter; van Nueten, Luc; de Kam, Marieke L; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Cohen, Adam F; van Gerven, Joop M A

    2012-08-01

    Using the rate of dissociation from the D(2) receptor as a means to screen novel compounds for antipsychotic drug candidates, the centrally acting and fast-dissociating selective dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist JNJ-37822681 was developed. In a blinded, placebo-controlled, randomized first-in-human study, JNJ-37822681 was administered orally to 27 healthy male volunteers at doses of 0.5, 2, 5, 10, 15 and 20 mg. Safety, pharmacokinetics and central nervous system effects were evaluated by measuring prolactin levels, eye movements, adaptive tracking, visual analogue scales, body sway, finger tapping and electroencephalography. JNJ-37822681 was well tolerated and somnolence was the most frequently reported adverse effect. Peak plasma concentrations increased more than proportional to dose, but increases in the area under curve (AUC) were dose-proportional. Prolactin elevations started at doses of 5 mg, whereas small decreases in adaptive tracking were demonstrated at 10 mg doses. At higher doses, JNJ-37822681 caused a small decrease in saccadic peak velocity, smooth pursuit, alertness, finger tapping and electroencephalography activity, and an increase in body sway. This effect profile is likely to be the result of the selectivity of JNJ-37822681 for the D(2) receptor, leading to strong D(2) receptor-mediated elevations in serum prolactin, but fewer effects on more complex central nervous system functions, which are likely to involve multiple neurotransmitters. PMID:21890591

  2. Blockade and reversal of spinal morphine tolerance by P2X3 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaqing; Xu, Tao; Xu, Hao; Jiang, Wei

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, studies have substantiated the view that P2X3 receptors play a part in the generation and transmission of purinergic signals in inflammatory and chronic neuropathic pain. Data have also been presented to suggest that the process of P2X3 receptor antagonism inhibits inflammatory hyperalgesia, involving the spinal opioid system. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the selective P2X3 receptor antagonist A-317491 on the development of antinociceptive tolerance to chronic morphine administration in mice. Daily systemic injection of A-317491 attenuated the morphine-induced antinociceptive tolerance to von Frey and thermal stimuli. Repeated morphine injections alone led to a significant rightward shift in the morphine dose-response curve compared with that with A-317491. A single dose of A-317491 also showed a reversal effect in morphine-tolerant mice. In a withdrawal test, co-administration of A-317491 and morphine also reduced the naloxone-induced withdrawal symptoms compared with the morphine-alone group. Thus, we propose that the P2X3 receptor is involved in the process of morphine antinociceptive tolerance and may be a new therapeutic target in the prevention of tolerance to morphine-induced antinociception. PMID:25350728

  3. Effects of NMDA-receptor antagonist treatment on c-fos expression in rat brain areas implicated in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Jussi; Ihalainen, Jouni; Tanila, Heikki; Castrén, Eero

    2004-12-01

    1. The noncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists produce behavioral responses that closely resemble both positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. These drugs also induce excitatory and neurotoxic effects in limbic cortical areas. 2. We have here mapped the brain areas which show increased activity in response to noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist administration concentrating especially to those brain areas that have been suggested to be relevant in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. 3. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with a NMDA-receptor antagonist MK801 and activation of brain areas was detected by monitoring the expression of c-fos mRNA by using in situ hybridization. 4. MK801 induced c-fos mRNA expression of in the retrosplenial, entorhinal, and prefrontal cortices. Lower c-fos expression was observed in the layer IV of the parietal and frontal cortex. In the thalamus, c-fos mRNA expression was detected in the midline nuclei and in the reticular nucleus but not in the dorsomedial nucleus. In addition, c-fos mRNA was expressed in the anterior olfactory nucleus, the ventral tegmental area, and in cerebellar granule neurons. 5. NMDA-receptor antagonist ketamine increased dopamine release in the parietal cortex, in the region where NMDA-receptor antagonist increased c-fos mRNA expression. 6. Thus, the psychotropic NMDA-receptor antagonist induced c-fos mRNA expression in most, but not all, brain areas implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. The high spatial resolution of in situ hybridization may help to define regions of interest for human imaging studies. PMID:15672679

  4. The Administration of Levocabastine, a NTS2 Receptor Antagonist, Modifies Na(+), K(+)-ATPase Properties.

    PubMed

    Gutnisky, Alicia; López Ordieres, María Graciela; Rodríguez de Lores Arnaiz, Georgina

    2016-06-01

    Neurotensin behaves as a neuromodulator or as a neurotransmitter interacting with NTS1 and NTS2 receptors. Neurotensin in vitro inhibits synaptosomal membrane Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. This effect is prevented by administration of SR 48692 (antagonist for NTS1 receptor). The administration of levocabastine (antagonist for NTS2 receptor) does not prevent Na(+), K(+)-ATPase inhibition by neurotensin when the enzyme is assayed with ATP as substrate. Herein levocabastine effect on Na(+), K(+)-ATPase K(+) site was explored. For this purpose, levocabastine was administered to rats and K(+)-p-nitrophenylphosphatase (K(+)-p-NPPase) activity in synaptosomal membranes and [(3)H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes were assayed in the absence (basal) and in the presence of neurotensin. Male Wistar rats were administered with levocabastine (50 μg/kg, i.p., 30 min) or the vehicle (saline solution). Synaptosomal membranes were obtained from cerebral cortex by differential and gradient centrifugation. The activity of K(+)-p-NPPase was determined in media laking or containing ATP plus NaCl. In such phosphorylating condition enzyme behaviour resembles that observed when ATP hydrolyses is recorded. In the absence of ATP plus NaCl, K(+)-p-NPPase activity was similar for levocabastine or vehicle injected (roughly 11 μmole hydrolyzed substrate per mg protein per hour). Such value remained unaltered by the presence of 3.5 × 10(-6) M neurotensin. In the phosphorylating medium, neurotensin decreased (32 %) the enzyme activity in membranes obtained from rats injected with the vehicle but failed to alter those obtained from rats injected with levocabastine. Levocabastine administration enhanced (50 %) basal [(3)H]-ouabain binding to cerebral cortex membranes but failed to modify neurotensin inhibitory effect on this ligand binding. It is concluded that NTS2 receptor blockade modifies the properties of neuronal Na(+), K(+)-ATPase and that neurotensin effect on Na(+), K

  5. Pyran Template Approach to the Design of Novel A3 Adenosine Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Li, An-Hu; Ji, Xiao-duo; Kim, Hak Sung; Melman, Neli; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2016-01-01

    Strategy, Management and Health PolicyVenture Capital Enabling TechnologyPreclinical ResearchPreclinical Development Toxicology, Formulation Drug Delivery, PharmacokineticsClinical Development Phases I–III Regulatory, Quality, ManufacturingPostmarketing Phase IV A3 adenosine receptor antagonists have potential as anti-inflammatory, anti-asthmatic, and anti-ischemic agents. We previously reported the preparation of chemical libraries of 1,4-dihydropyridine (DHP) and pyridine derivatives and identification of members having high affinity at A3 adenosine receptors. These derivatives were synthesized through standard three-component condensation/oxidation reactions, which permitted versatile ring substitution at five positions, i.e., the central ring served as a molecular scaffold for structurally diverse substituents. We extended this template approach from the DHP series to chemically stable pyran derivatives, in which the ring NH is replaced by O and which is similarly derived from a stepwise reaction of three components. Since the orientation of substituent groups may be conformationally similar to the 1,4-DHPs, a direct comparison between the structure activity relationships of key derivatives in binding to adenosine receptors was carried out. Affinity at human A3 receptors expressed in CHO cells was determined vs. binding of [125I]AB-MECA (N6-(4-amino-3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methyl-carbamoyladenosine). There was no potency-enhancing effect, as was observed for DHPs, of 4-styryl, 4-phenylethynyl, or 6-phenyl substitutions. The most potent ligands in this group in binding to human A3 receptors were 6-methyl and 6-phenyl analogs, 3a (MRS 1704) and 4a (MRS 1705), respectively, of 3,5-diethyl 2-methyl-4-phenyl-4H-pyran-3,5-dicarboxylate, which had Ki values of 381 and 583 nM, respectively. These two derivatives were selective for human A3 receptors vs. rat brain A1 receptors by 57-fold and 24-fold, respectively. These derivatives were inactive in binding at rat brain A

  6. Selective and Potent Agonists and Antagonists for Investigating the Role of Mouse Oxytocin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Busnelli, Marta; Bulgheroni, Elisabetta; Manning, Maurice; Kleinau, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) have been shown to play a central role in social behaviors; as a consequence, they have been recognized as potential drugs to treat neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders characterized by impaired social interactions. However, despite the basic and preclinical relevance of mouse strains carrying genetic alterations in the OT/AVP systems to basic and preclinical translational neuroscience, the pharmacological profile of mouse OT/AVP receptor subtypes has not been fully characterized. To fill in this gap, we have characterized a number of OT and AVP agonists and antagonists at three murine OT/AVP receptors expressed in the nervous system as follows: the oxytocin (mOTR) and vasopressin V1a (mV1aR) and V1b (mV1bR) subtypes. These three receptors were transiently expressed in vitro for binding and intracellular signaling assays, and then a homology model of the mOTR structure was constructed to investigate how its molecular features compare with human and rat OTR orthologs. Our data indicate that the selectivity profile of the natural ligands, OT and AVP, is conserved in humans, rats, and mice. Furthermore, we found that the synthetic peptide [Thr4Gly7]OT (TGOT) is remarkably selective for the mOTR and, like the endogenous OT ligand, activates Gq and Gi and recruits β-arrestins. Finally, we report three antagonists that exhibit remarkably high affinities and selectivities at mOTRs. These highly selective pharmacological tools will contribute to the investigation of the specific physiologic and pathologic roles of mOTR for the development of selective OT-based therapeutics. PMID:23723434

  7. No effect of nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists on exercise performance in the heat.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Ely, Brett R; Kenefick, Robert W; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B; Rood, Jennifer C; Sawka, Michael N

    2009-02-01

    Nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists can enhance endurance exercise performance in temperate environments, but their efficacy during heat stress is not well understood. This double-blinded, placebo-controlled study compared the effects of an acute dose of caffeine or quercetin on endurance exercise performance during compensable heat stress (40 degrees C, 20-30% rh). On each of three occasions, 10 healthy men each performed 30-min of cycle ergometry at 50% Vo2peak followed by a 15-min performance time trial after receiving either placebo (Group P), caffeine (Group C; 9 mg/kg), or quercetin (Group Q; 2,000 mg). Serial blood samples, physiological (heart rate, rectal, and mean skin body temperatures), perceptual (ratings of perceived exertion, pain, thermal comfort, motivation), and exercise performance measures (total work and pacing strategy) were made. Supplementation with caffeine and quercetin increased preexercise blood concentrations of caffeine (55.62 +/- 4.77 microM) and quercetin (4.76 +/- 2.56 microM) above their in vitro inhibition constants for adenosine receptors. No treatment effects were observed for any physiological or perceptual measures, with the exception of elevated rectal body temperatures (0.20-0.30 degrees C; P < 0.05) for Group C vs. Groups Q and P. Supplementation did not affect total work performed (Groups P: 153.5 +/- 28.3, C: 157.3 +/- 28.9, and Q: 151.1 +/- 31.6 kJ; P > 0.05) or the self-selected pacing strategy employed. These findings indicate that the nutritional adenosine receptor antagonists caffeine and quercetin do not enhance endurance exercise performance during compensable heat stress. PMID:19020291

  8. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Shifeng; Yu, Yangyang; Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanling; Yang, Wei; Li, Shiyou; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR). Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen), which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR. PMID:27490540

  9. Salvianolic Acid A, as a Novel ETA Receptor Antagonist, Shows Inhibitory Effects on Tumor in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiao; Wang, Shifeng; Yu, Yangyang; Sun, Shengnan; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhang, Yanling; Yang, Wei; Li, Shiyou; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2016-01-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) autocrine and paracrine signaling modulate cell proliferation of tumor cells by activating its receptors, endothelin A receptor (ETAR) and endothelin B receptor (ETBR). Dysregulation of ETAR activation promotes tumor development and progression. The potential of ETAR antagonists and the dual-ETAR and ETBR antagonists as therapeutic approaches are under preclinical and clinical studies. Salvianolic acid A (Sal A) is a hydrophilic polyphenolic derivative isolated from Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge (Danshen), which has been reported as an anti-cancer and cardio-protective herbal medicine. In this study, we demonstrate that Sal A inhibits ETAR activation induced by ET-1 in both recombinant and endogenous ETAR expression cell lines. The IC50 values were determined as 5.7 µM in the HEK293/ETAR cell line and 3.14 µM in HeLa cells, respectively. Furthermore, our results showed that Sal A suppressed cell proliferation and extended the doubling times of multiple cancer cells, including HeLa, DU145, H1975, and A549 cell lines. In addition, Sal A inhibited proliferation of DU145 cell lines stimulated by exogenous ET-1 treatment. Moreover, the cytotoxicity and cardio-toxicity of Sal A were assessed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and Human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPS-CMs), which proved that Sal A demonstrates no cytotoxicity or cardiotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that Sal A is a novel anti-cancer candidate through targeting ETAR. PMID:27490540

  10. Molecular and functional characterization of an IL-1β receptor antagonist in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella).

    PubMed

    Yao, Fuli; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Xinyan; Wei, He; Zhang, Anying; Zhou, Hong

    2015-04-01

    In the present study, we discovered a novel IL-1 family member (nIL-1F) from grass carp that possessed the ability to bind with grass carp IL-1β receptor type 1 (gcIL-1R1) and attenuate grass carp IL-1β activity in head kidney leukocytes (HKLs), suggesting that it may function as an IL-1β receptor antagonist. Grass carp nIL-1F transcript was constitutively expressed with the highest levels in some lymphoid organs, including head kidney, spleen and intestine, implying its potential in grass carp immunity. In agreement with this notion, in vitro and in vivo studies showed that nIL-1F mRNA was inductively expressed in grass carp with a rapid kinetics, indicating that it may be an early response gene during immune challenges. In addition, recombinant grass carp IL-1β (rgcIL-1β) induced nIL-1F mRNA expression via NF-κB and MAPK (JNK, p38 and p42/44) signaling pathways in HKLs. Particularly, the orthologs of nIL-1F found in other fish species, including zebrafish, pufferfish and rainbow trout are not homologous to mammalian IL-1β receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), indicating that fish nIL-1F and mammalian IL-1Ra may not share a common evolutionary ancestor. Taken together, our data suggest the existence of a naturally occurring fish nIL-1F, which may function like mammalian IL-1Ra, being beneficial to understand the auto-regulatory mechanism of IL-1β activity in fish immunity. PMID:25475961

  11. Adenosine A1 Receptor Antagonist Versus Montelukast on Airway Reactivity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Nadeem, Ahmed; Obiefuna, Peter C.M.; Wilson, Constance N.; Mustafa, S. Jamal

    2006-01-01

    Adenosine produces bronchoconstriction in allergic rabbits, primates, and humans by activating adenosine A1 receptors. Previously, it is reported that a high dose of L-97-1, a water-soluble, small molecule adenosine A1 receptor antagonist, blocks early and late allergic responses, and bronchial hyper-responsiveness to histamine in a hyper-responsive rabbit model of allergic asthma. Effects of a lower dose of L-97-1 are compared to montelukast, a cysteinyl leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist on early allergic response, late allergic response, bronchial hyper-responsiveness, and inflammatory cells in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid following house dust mite administration. Rabbits received intraperitoneal injections of house dust mite extract within 24 h of birth followed by booster house dust mite injections. Hyper-responsive rabbits received aerosolized house dust mite (2500 allergen units), 1 h after intragastric administration of L-97-1 (1 mg/kg) or montelukast (0.15 mg/kg) and lung dynamic compliance was measured for 6 h. Lung dynamic compliance was significantly higher following L-97-1 at all time points and with montelukast at 60-300 min following house dust mite (P < 0.05). L-97-1 blocks both early and late allergic responses. Montelukast blocks only the late allergic response. Both L-97-1 and montelukast significantly blocked bronchial hyper-responsiveness at 24 h (P < 0.05). Both L-97-1 and montelukast significantly reduced BAL eosinophils at 6 h and neutrophils at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). L-97-1 significantly reduced BAL lymphocytes at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). Montelukast significantly reduced BAL macrophages at 6 and 24 h (P < 0.05). By blocking both bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation, L-97-1 may be an effective oral anti-asthma treatment. PMID:17027749

  12. Discovery of BMS-846372, a Potent and Orally Active Human CGRP Receptor Antagonist for the Treatment of Migraine.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guanglin; Chen, Ling; Conway, Charles M; Denton, Rex; Keavy, Deborah; Gulianello, Michael; Huang, Yanling; Kostich, Walter; Lentz, Kimberley A; Mercer, Stephen E; Schartman, Richard; Signor, Laura; Browning, Marc; Macor, John E; Dubowchik, Gene M

    2012-04-12

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have been clinically shown to be effective in the treatment of migraine, but identification of potent and orally bioavailable compounds has been challenging. Herein, we describe the conceptualization, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a potent, orally active CGRP receptor antagonist 5 (BMS-846372). Compound 5 has good oral bioavailability in rat, dog, and cynomolgus monkeys and overall attractive preclinical properties including strong (>50% inhibition) exposure-dependent in vivo efficacy in a marmoset migraine model. PMID:24900474

  13. Discovery of BMS-846372, a Potent and Orally Active Human CGRP Receptor Antagonist for the Treatment of Migraine

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonists have been clinically shown to be effective in the treatment of migraine, but identification of potent and orally bioavailable compounds has been challenging. Herein, we describe the conceptualization, synthesis, and preclinical characterization of a potent, orally active CGRP receptor antagonist 5 (BMS-846372). Compound 5 has good oral bioavailability in rat, dog, and cynomolgus monkeys and overall attractive preclinical properties including strong (>50% inhibition) exposure-dependent in vivo efficacy in a marmoset migraine model. PMID:24900474

  14. Synthesis and evaluation of carbamate and aryl ether substituted pyrazinones as corticotropin releasing factor-1 (CRF₁) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Ahuja, Vijay T; Hartz, Richard A; Molski, Thaddeus F; Mattson, Gail K; Lentz, Kimberley A; Grace, James E; Lodge, Nicholas J; Bronson, Joanne J; Macor, John E

    2016-05-01

    A series of pyrazinone-based compounds incorporating either carbamate or aryl ether groups was synthesized and evaluated as corticotropin-releasing factor-1 (CRF1) receptor antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies led to the identification of highly potent CRF1 receptor antagonists 14a (IC50=0.74 nM) and 14b (IC50=1.9 nM). The synthesis, structure-activity relationships and in vitro metabolic stability properties of compounds in this series will be described. PMID:27020524

  15. Vascular Effects of Endothelin Receptor Antagonists Depends on Their Selectivity for ETA Versus ETB Receptors and on the Functionality of Endothelial ETB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, Pauline; Wanner, Daniel; Rey, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Clozel, Martine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The goal of this study was to characterize the role of Endothelin (ET) type B receptors (ETB) on vascular function in healthy and diseased conditions and demonstrate how it affects the pharmacological activity of ET receptor antagonists (ERAs). Methods: The contribution of the ETB receptor to vascular relaxation or constriction was characterized in isolated arteries from healthy and diseased rats with systemic (Dahl-S) or pulmonary hypertension (monocrotaline). Because the role of ETB receptors is different in pathological vis-à-vis normal conditions, we compared the efficacy of ETA-selective and dual ETA/ETB ERAs on blood pressure in hypertensive rats equipped with telemetry. Results: In healthy vessels, ETB receptors stimulation with sarafotoxin S6c induced vasorelaxation and no vasoconstriction. In contrast, in arteries of rats with systemic or pulmonary hypertension, endothelial ETB-mediated relaxation was lost while vasoconstriction on stimulation by sarafotoxin S6c was observed. In hypertensive rats, administration of the dual ETA/ETB ERA macitentan on top of a maximal effective dose of the ETA-selective ERA ambrisentan further reduced blood pressure, indicating that ETB receptors blockade provides additional benefit. Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest that in pathology, dual ETA/ETB receptor antagonism can provide superior vascular effects compared with ETA-selective receptor blockade. PMID:25992919

  16. A Selective Orexin-1 Receptor Antagonist Attenuates Stress-Induced Hyperarousal without Hypnotic Effects

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L.; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D.; Shireman, Brock T.; Lebold, Terry P.; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate–induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  17. Sulforaphane is not an effective antagonist of the human pregnane X-receptor in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Poulton, Emma Jane; Levy, Lisa; Lampe, Johanna W.; Shen, Danny D.; Tracy, Julia; Shuhart, Margaret C.; Thummel, Kenneth E.; Eaton, David L.

    2013-01-01

    Sulforaphane (SFN), is an effective in vitro antagonist of ligand activation of the human pregnane and xenobiotic receptor (PXR). PXR mediated CYP3A4 up-regulation is implicated in adverse drug-drug interactions making identification of small molecule antagonists a desirable therapeutic goal. SFN is not an antagonist to mouse or rat PXR in vitro; thus, normal rodent species are not suitable as in vivo models for human response. To evaluate whether SFN can effectively antagonize ligand activation of human PXR in vivo, a three-armed, randomized, crossover trial was conducted with 24 healthy adults. The potent PXR ligand — rifampicin (300 mg/d) was given alone for 7 days in arm 1, or in daily combination with 450 μmol SFN (Broccoli Sprout extract) in arm 2; SFN was given alone in arm 3. Midazolam as an in vivo phenotype marker of CYP3A was administered before and after each treatment arm. Rifampicin alone decreased midazolam AUC by 70%, indicative of the expected increase in CYP3A4 activity. Co-treatment with SFN did not reduce CYP3A4 induction. Treatment with SFN alone also did not affect CYP3A4 activity in the cohort as a whole, although in the subset with the highest basal CYP3A4 activity there was a statistically significant increase in midazolam AUC (i.e., decrease in CYP3A4 activity). A parallel study in humanized PXR mice yielded similar results. The parallel effects of SFN between humanized PXR mice and human subjects demonstrate the predictive value of humanized mouse models in situations where species differences in ligand-receptor interactions preclude the use of a native mouse model for studying human ligand-receptor pharmacology. -- Highlights: ► The effects of SFN on PXR mediated CYP3A4 induction in humanized PXR mice and humans were examined. ► SFN had no effect on rifampicin mediated CYP3A4 induction in humans or humanized mice. ► SFN had a modest effect on basal CYP3A4 activity among subjects with higher baseline activity. ► Humanized PXR

  18. A selective orexin-1 receptor antagonist attenuates stress-induced hyperarousal without hypnotic effects.

    PubMed

    Bonaventure, Pascal; Yun, Sujin; Johnson, Philip L; Shekhar, Anantha; Fitz, Stephanie D; Shireman, Brock T; Lebold, Terry P; Nepomuceno, Diane; Lord, Brian; Wennerholm, Michelle; Shelton, Jonathan; Carruthers, Nicholas; Lovenberg, Timothy; Dugovic, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Orexins (OXs) are peptides produced by perifornical (PeF) and lateral hypothalamic neurons that exert a prominent role in arousal-related processes, including stress. A critical role for the orexin-1 receptor (OX1R) in complex emotional behavior is emerging, such as overactivation of the OX1R pathway being associated with panic or anxiety states. Here we characterize a brain-penetrant, selective, and high-affinity OX1R antagonist, compound 56 [N-({3-[(3-ethoxy-6-methylpyridin-2-yl)carbonyl]-3-azabicyclo[4.1.0]hept-4-yl}methyl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)pyrimidin-2-amine]. Ex vivo receptor binding studies demonstrated that, after subcutaneous administration, compound 56 crossed the blood-brain barrier and occupied OX1Rs in the rat brain at lower doses than standard OX1R antagonists GSK-1059865 [5-bromo-N-({1-[(3-fluoro-2-methoxyphenyl)carbonyl]-5-methylpiperidin-2-yl}methyl)pyridin-2-amine], SB-334867 [1-(2-methyl-1,3-benzoxazol-6-yl)-3-(1,5-naphthyridin-4-yl)urea], and SB-408124 [1-(6,8-difluoro-2-methylquinolin-4-yl)-3-[4-(dimethylamino)phenyl]urea]. Although compound 56 did not alter spontaneous sleep in rats and in wild-type mice, its administration in orexin-2 receptor knockout mice selectively promoted rapid eye movement sleep, demonstrating target engagement and specific OX1R blockade. In a rat model of psychological stress induced by cage exchange, the OX1R antagonist prevented the prolongation of sleep onset without affecting sleep duration. In a rat model of panic vulnerability (involving disinhibition of the PeF OX region) to threatening internal state changes (i.e., intravenous sodium lactate infusion), compound 56 attenuated sodium lactate-induced panic-like behaviors and cardiovascular responses without altering baseline locomotor or autonomic activity. In conclusion, OX1R antagonism represents a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with stress or hyperarousal states. PMID:25583879

  19. Striatal Pre- and Postsynaptic Profile of Adenosine A2A Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz, César; Beaumont, Vahri; Goldberg, Steven R.; Lluís, Carme; Cortés, Antoni; Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Canela, Enric I.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Striatal adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) are highly expressed in medium spiny neurons (MSNs) of the indirect efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs). A2ARs are also localized presynaptically in cortico-striatal glutamatergic terminals contacting MSNs of the direct efferent pathway, where they heteromerize with adenosine A1 receptors (A1Rs). It has been hypothesized that postsynaptic A2AR antagonists should be useful in Parkinson's disease, while presynaptic A2AR antagonists could be beneficial in dyskinetic disorders, such as Huntington's disease, obsessive-compulsive disorders and drug addiction. The aim or this work was to determine whether selective A2AR antagonists may be subdivided according to a preferential pre- versus postsynaptic mechanism of action. The potency at blocking the motor output and striatal glutamate release induced by cortical electrical stimulation and the potency at inducing locomotor activation were used as in vivo measures of pre- and postsynaptic activities, respectively. SCH-442416 and KW-6002 showed a significant preferential pre- and postsynaptic profile, respectively, while the other tested compounds (MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261) showed no clear preference. Radioligand-binding experiments were performed in cells expressing A2AR-D2R and A1R-A2AR heteromers to determine possible differences in the affinity of these compounds for different A2AR heteromers. Heteromerization played a key role in the presynaptic profile of SCH-442416, since it bound with much less affinity to A2AR when co-expressed with D2R than with A1R. KW-6002 showed the best relative affinity for A2AR co-expressed with D2R than co-expressed with A1R, which can at least partially explain the postsynaptic profile of this compound. Also, the in vitro pharmacological profile of MSX-2, SCH-420814, ZM-241385 and SCH-58261 was is in accordance with their mixed pre- and postsynaptic profile. On the basis of their preferential

  20. Blockade of [11C](+)-PHNO binding in human subjects by the dopamine D3 receptor antagonist ABT-925.

    PubMed

    Graff-Guerrero, Ariel; Redden, Laura; Abi-Saab, Walid; Katz, David A; Houle, Sylvain; Barsoum, Penny; Bhathena, Anahita; Palaparthy, Ramesh; Saltarelli, Mario D; Kapur, Shitij

    2010-04-01

    Dopamine D3 receptors are preferentially localized in the limbic system and midbrain, and thus may be involved in the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatry disorders. [11C](+)-PHNO is the first preferential D3 receptor radioligand in humans, yet there are no blockade studies with a D3 receptor antagonist in humans. This study characterized the blockade of [11C](+)-PHNO binding by ABT-925, a D3 receptor antagonist, in healthy male subjects. Sixteen subjects underwent 2-3 positron emission tomography (PET) scans, at baseline and following one or two doses of ABT-925 ranging from 50 mg to 600 mg. Receptor occupancies were estimated for globus pallidus, substantia nigra, caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum. At the 600-mg dose (n=9), ABT-925 receptor occupancy (mean+/-s.d.) was higher in substantia nigra (75+/-10%) and globus pallidus (64+/-22%) than in ventral striatum (44+/-17%), caudate (40+/-18%) and putamen (38+/-17%) (ANOVA: F4,140=15.02, p<0.001). The fractions of [11C](+)-PHNO binding attributable to D3 receptors in D3 receptor-rich regions were 100% (substantia nigra) and 90% (globus pallidus), and in D2 receptor-rich regions were 55% (caudate) and 53% (putamen). The ED50 of ABT-925 was 4.37 microg/ml across regions. Our results demonstrate that [11C](+)-PHNO binding can be blocked by a D3 receptor antagonist and confirm preclinical findings that [11C](+)-PHNO signal in the substantia nigra and globus pallidus is mainly reflective of its binding to D3 receptors. Thus, [11C](+)-PHNO seems a suitable PET radiotracer to estimate D3 receptor occupancy in humans. PMID:19751545

  1. Critical Evaluation of P2X7 Receptor Antagonists in Selected Seizure Models

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Wolfgang; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Müller, Heiko; Dinkel, Klaus; Lord, Brian; Letavic, Michael A.; Henshall, David C.; Engel, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    The ATP-gated P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a non-selective cation channel which senses high extracellular ATP concentrations and has been suggested as a target for the treatment of neuroinflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. The use of P2X7R antagonists may therefore be a viable approach for treating CNS pathologies, including epileptic disorders. Recent studies showed anticonvulsant potential of P2X7R antagonists in certain animal models. To extend this work, we tested three CNS-permeable P2X7R blocker (Brilliant Blue G, AFC-5128, JNJ-47965567) and a natural compound derivative (tanshinone IIA sulfonate) in four well-characterized animal seizure models. In the maximal electroshock seizure threshold test and the pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure threshold test in mice, none of the four compounds demonstrated anticonvulsant effects when given alone. Notably, in combination with carbamazepine, both AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 increased the threshold in the maximal electroshock seizure test. In the PTZ-kindling model in rats, useful for testing antiepileptogenic activities, Brilliant Blue G and tanshinone exhibited a moderate retarding effect, whereas the potent P2X7R blocker AFC-5128 and JNJ-47965567 showed a significant and long-lasting delay in kindling development. In fully kindled rats, the investigated compounds revealed modest effects to reduce the mean seizure stage. Furthermore, AFC-5128- and JNJ-47965567-treated animals displayed strongly reduced Iba 1 and GFAP immunoreactivity in the hippocampal CA3 region. In summary, our results show that P2X7R antagonists possess no remarkable anticonvulsant effects in the used acute screening tests, but can attenuate chemically-induced kindling. Further studies would be of interest to support the concept that P2X7R signalling plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of epileptic disorders. PMID:27281030

  2. 3D QSAR studies on substituted benzimidazole derivatives as angiotensin II-AT1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Vivek K; Ghate, Manjunath; Chintha, Chetan; Patel, Paresh

    2013-09-01

    This study investigated 3D quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) for a range of substituted benzimidazole derivatives as AngII-AT1 receptor antagonists by comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices (CoMSIA). The alignment strategy was used for these compounds by means of Distill function defined in SYBYL X 1.2. The best CoMFA and CoMSIA models were obtained for the training set compounds was statistically significant with leave-one-out (LOO) validation correlation coefficient (q²) of 0.613 and 0.622, cross validated coefficient (r²cv) of 0.617 and 0.607, respectively and conventional coefficient (r²ncv) of 0.886 and 0.859, respectively. Both the models were validated by a test set of 18 compounds giving satisfactory predicted correlation coefficient (r²pred) of 0.714 and 0.549 for CoMFA and CoMSIA models, respectively. Generated 3D QSAR models were used for the prediction of pIC50 of an external dataset of 10 compounds for predictive validation, which gave conventional r² of 0.893 for CoMFA model, and 0.774 for CoMSIA model. We identified some key features in substituted benzimidazole derivatives, such as the importance of lipophilicity and H-bonding at 2- and 5, 6, 7- position of benzimidazole ring, respectively, for good antagonistic activity. CoMFA and CoMSIA models generated in this work provide useful information for the design of new compounds and helped in prediction of antagonistic activity. PMID:24010938

  3. Histamine receptor antagonists, cyclooxygenase blockade, and tumor necrosis factor during acute septic insult.

    PubMed

    Leeper-Woodford, S K; Carey, D; Byrne, K; Walsh, C; Fisher, B; Sugerman, H J; Fowler, A A

    1998-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) may be a major endogenous mediator of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. We proposed that treatment of septic pigs with the combined agents ibuprofen, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, and histamine receptor antagonists, cimetidine (H2 antagonist) and diphenhydramine (H1 antagonist) would result in lower circulating levels of TNF and decreased parameters of sepsis-induced injury in these animals. To test this, plasma TNF activity, cardiac index, systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures, arterial PO2 and bronchoalveolar lavage protein content were monitored for 300 min in four groups of anesthetized pigs: saline-infused control pigs (n = 4); pigs infused for 60 min with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(8) organisms/mL, .3 mL/20 kg/min) (n = 5) and pigs infused for 60 min with P. aeruginosa plus ibuprofen (12.5 mg/kg) alone (n = 4) or ibuprofen plus cimetidine (150 mg) and diphenhydramine (30 mg/kg) at 0 and 120 min (CID, n = 4). Within 60 min, pigs infused with P. aeruginosa exhibited increased plasma TNF activity (>8-fold increase in ng/mL TNF; L929 cytolysis assay) and showed alterations in all hemodynamic and pulmonary parameters. Ibuprofen or CID administration in the septic pigs decreased peak TNF activity by 4.6 and 10.2 ng/mL, respectively, and CID treatment was correlated with better attenuation of certain sepsis-induced alterations. These results show that CID treatment attenuates sepsis-induced injury and that this is correlated with reduced plasma TNF activity in a porcine model of sepsis-induced acute organ injury. PMID:9488252

  4. Pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists: Effect of the N-5 bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Bolcato, Chiara; Cusan, Claudia; Pastorin, Giorgia; Cacciari, Barbara; Klotz, Karl Norbert; Morizzo, Erika

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, many efforts have been made to search for potent and selective human A3 adenosine antagonists. In particular, one of the most promising human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists is represented by the pyrazolo-triazolo-pyrimidine family. This class of compounds has been strongly investigated from the point of view of structure-activity relationships. In particular, it has been observed that fundamental requisites for having both potency and selectivity at the human A3 adenosine receptors are the presence of a small substituent at the N8 position and an unsubstitued phenyl carbamoyl moiety at the N5 position. In this study, we report the role of the N5-bond type on the affinity and selectivity at the four adenosine receptor subtypes. The observed structure-activity relationships of this class of antagonists are also exhaustively rationalized using the recently published ligand-based homology modeling approach. PMID:18368532

  5. Discovery of the First α-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic Acid (AMPA) Receptor Antagonist Dependent upon Transmembrane AMPA Receptor Regulatory Protein (TARP) γ-8.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Kevin M; Gernert, Douglas L; Porter, Warren J; Reel, Jon K; Ornstein, Paul L; Spinazze, Patrick; Stevens, F Craig; Hahn, Patric; Hollinshead, Sean P; Mayhugh, Daniel; Schkeryantz, Jeff; Khilevich, Albert; De Frutos, Oscar; Gleason, Scott D; Kato, Akihiko S; Luffer-Atlas, Debra; Desai, Prashant V; Swanson, Steven; Burris, Kevin D; Ding, Chunjin; Heinz, Beverly A; Need, Anne B; Barth, Vanessa N; Stephenson, Gregory A; Diseroad, Benjamin A; Woods, Tim A; Yu, Hong; Bredt, David; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-05-26

    Transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) are a family of scaffolding proteins that regulate AMPA receptor trafficking and function. TARP γ-8 is one member of this family and is highly expressed within the hippocampus relative to the cerebellum. A selective TARP γ-8-dependent AMPA receptor antagonist (TDAA) is an innovative approach to modulate AMPA receptors in specific brain regions to potentially increase the therapeutic index relative to known non-TARP-dependent AMPA antagonists. We describe here, for the first time, the discovery of a noncompetitive AMPA receptor antagonist that is dependent on the presence of TARP γ-8. Three major iteration cycles were employed to improve upon potency, CYP1A2-dependent challenges, and in vivo clearance. An optimized molecule, compound (-)-25 (LY3130481), was fully protective against pentylenetetrazole-induced convulsions in rats without the motor impairment associated with non-TARP-dependent AMPA receptor antagonists. Compound (-)-25 could be utilized to provide proof of concept for antiepileptic efficacy with reduced motor side effects in patients. PMID:27067148

  6. Long-term use of angiotensin II receptor antagonists and calcium-channel antagonists in Algerian hypertensive patients: effects on metabolic and oxidative parameters.

    PubMed

    El Hassar, Chafika; Merzouk, Hafida; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed; Malti, Nassima; Meziane, Abderrahim; Narce, Michel

    2015-02-01

    The effects of calcium antagonists (amlodipine) and angiotensin II receptor antagonists (telmisartan) on lipid profile and oxidative markers were investigated in Algerian hypertensive patients. At the beginning and after 1 year of antihypertensive therapy, blood samples are collected for determination of biochemical parameters (glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, urea, creatinine) and oxidative markers (malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins, nitric oxide, superoxide anion, vitamin C, glutathione, catalase, superoxide dismutase). The results of this study indicate that telmisartan and amlodipine are effective antihypertensive agents in the treatment of hypertension because a significant reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure was observed in all hypertensive patients after 1 year of treatment. Our results show also that telmisartan and amlodipine treatments counteracted hypertension-dependent lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. Telmisartan treatment appears to be more efficient than amlodipine treatment. In addition, telmisartan, which reversed all lipid and redox changes associated with hypertension, should be prescribed, especially in hypertensive patients with hypertriglyceridemia and with severe oxidative stress. PMID:25499852

  7. Conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, alters behavioral and neurochemical effects of ethanol in mice.

    PubMed

    Morais-Silva, Gessynger; Ferreira-Santos, Mariane; Marin, Marcelo T

    2016-05-15

    Ethanol abuse potential is mainly due to its reinforcing properties, crucial in the transition from the recreational to pathological use. These properties are mediated by mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and neuroadaptations in these pathways seem to be responsible for addiction. Both pathways are modulated by other neurotransmitters systems, including neuronal histaminergic system. Among the histamine receptors, H3 receptor stands out due to its role in modulation of histamine and other neurotransmitters release. Thus, histaminergic system, through H3 receptors, may have an important role in ethanol addiction development. Aiming to understand these interactions, conessine, an H3 receptor antagonist, was given to mice subjected to the evaluation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation, ethanol CPP and quantification of norepinephrine, dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites in mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal pathways following acute ethanol treatment. Systemic conessine administration exacerbated ethanol effects on locomotor activity. Despite of conessine reinforcing effect on CPP, this drug did not alter acquisition of ethanol CPP. Ethanol treatment affects the serotoninergic neurotransmission in the ventral tegmental area, the dopaminergic neurotransmission in the pre-frontal cortex (PFC) and caudate-putamen nucleus (CPu) and the noradrenergic neurotransmission in the CPu. In the PFC, conessine blocked ethanol effects on dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurotransmission. The blockade of H3 receptors and ethanol seem to interact in the modulation of dopaminergic neurotransmission of nigrostriatal pathway, decreasing dopamine metabolites in substantia nigra. In conclusion, conessine was able to change psychostimulant effect of ethanol, without altering its reinforcing properties. This exacerbation of ethanol-induced psychostimulation would be related to alterations in dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nigrostriatal pathway. PMID

  8. A Selective Nociceptin Receptor Antagonist to Treat Depression: Evidence from Preclinical and Clinical Studies.

    PubMed

    Post, Anke; Smart, Trevor S; Krikke-Workel, Judith; Dawson, Gerard R; Harmer, Catherine J; Browning, Michael; Jackson, Kimberley; Kakar, Rishi; Mohs, Richard; Statnick, Michael; Wafford, Keith; McCarthy, Andrew; Barth, Vanessa; Witkin, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Nociceptin/Orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) is an endogenous ligand of the N/OFQ peptide (NOP) receptor, which is a G protein-coupled receptor in brain regions associated with mood disorders. We used a novel, potent, and selective orally bioavailable antagonist, LY2940094, to test the hypothesis that blockade of NOP receptors would induce antidepressant effects. In this study we demonstrate that targeting NOP receptors with LY2940094 translates to antidepressant-like effects in rodent models and, importantly, to antidepressant efficacy in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). The proof-of-concept study (POC) was an 8-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial that evaluated LY2940094 as a novel oral medication for the treatment of patients with MDD. Once daily oral dosing of LY2940094 at 40 mg for 8 weeks vs placebo provided some evidence for an antidepressant effect based on the change from baseline to week 8 in the GRID-Hamilton Depression Rating Scale-17 item total score, although the predefined POC efficacy criterion (probability of LY2940094 being better than placebo⩾88%) was not met (82.9%). LY2940094 also had an early effect on the processing of emotional stimuli at Week 1 as shown by an increased recognition of positive relative to negative facial expressions in an emotional test battery. LY2940094 was safe and well tolerated. Overall, these are the first human data providing evidence that the blockade of NOP receptor signaling represents a promising strategy for the treatment of MDD. PMID:26585287

  9. LE135, a retinoid acid receptor antagonist, produces pain through direct activation of TRP channels

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Shijin; Luo, Jialie; Qian, Aihua; Yu, Weihua; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Background and PurposeRetinoids, through their activation of retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors, regulate diverse cellular processes, and pharmacological intervention in their actions has been successful in the treatment of skin disorders and cancers. Despite the many beneficial effects, administration of retinoids causes irritating side effects with unknown mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that LE135 [4-(7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-5,7,7,10,10-pentamethyl-5H-benzo[e]naphtho[2,3-b][1,4]diazepin-13-yl)benzoic acid], a selective antagonist of RARβ, is a potent activator of the capsaicin (TRPV1) and wasabi (TRPA1) receptors, two critical pain-initiating cation channels. Experimental ApproachWe performed to investigate the excitatory effects of LE135 on TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels expressed in HEK293T cells and in dorsal root ganglia neurons with calcium imaging and patch-clamp recordings. We also used site-directed mutagenesis of the channels to determine the structural basis of LE135-induced activation of TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels and behavioural testing to examine if pharmacological inhibition and genetic deletion of the channels affected LE135-evoked pain-related behaviours. Key ResultsLE135 activated both the capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) and the allyl isothiocyanate receptor (TRPA1) heterologously expressed in HEK293T cells and endogenously expressed by sensory nociceptors. Mutations disrupting the capsaicin-binding site attenuated LE135 activation of TRPV1 channels and a single mutation (K170R) eliminated TRPA1 activity evoked by LE135. Intraplantar injection of LE135 evoked pain-related behaviours. Both TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels were involved in LE135-elicited pain-related responses, as shown by pharmacological and genetic ablation studies. Conclusions and ImplicationsThis blocker of retinoid acid signalling also exerted non-genomic effects through activating the pain-initiating TRPV1 and TRPA1 channels. PMID:24308840

  10. Comparison of the effects of eleven histamine H1-receptor antagonists on monoamine turnover in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Oishi, R; Shishido, S; Yamori, M; Saeki, K

    1994-02-01

    To compare in vivo effects of eleven compounds of different classes of histamine H1-receptor antagonists (alcoholamines: diphenhydramine, carbinoxamine, and clemastine; ethylenediamines: mepyramine, tripelennamine, and clemizole; alkylamines: triprolidine and chlorpheniramine; piperazines: meclizine and homochlorcyclizine; phenothiazines: promethazine) on neuronal uptake of dopamine (DA), noradrenaline (NA), and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), the effects on the turnover of these monoamines were examined in the mouse brain, based on the alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine-induced depletion of DA and NA or probenecid-induced accumulation of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid. The DA turnover was reduced remarkably by diphenhydramine, tripelennamine, and promethazine, and also significantly by chlorpheniramine, mepyramine, clemizole, and homochlorcyclizine, at doses used in the ordinary animal experiments. The 5-HT turnover was reduced markedly by mepyramine, tripelennamine, and chlorpheniramine. In contrast, the NA turnover was increased by promethazine and homochlorcyclizine, possibly due to their antagonistic effects on alpha-adrenoceptors. These results suggest that (1) the degree of inhibition of the uptake of DA and 5-HT by histamine H1-receptor antagonists is considerably different, (2) most H1-antagonists have little influence on NA uptake and some compounds enhance NA release, and that (3) carbinoxamine, clemastine, triprolidine, and meclizine have comparatively weak influences on monoamine metabolism. These effects on brain monoamine systems may be related to some central actions of histamine H1-receptor antagonists, such as an addiction to these compounds combined with opioids. PMID:7513381

  11. [Suppression of conditioned fear by administration of CCKB receptor antagonist PD135158].

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, T; Isogawa, K; Kouno, Y; Hikichi, T; Nagayama, H; Akiyoshi, J

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this study is to determine whether or not CCKB receptor antagonist PD135158 suppresses conditioned fear. Rats were individually subjected to 30 min of inescapable electric footshock in a chamber with a grid floor. PD135158 or the vehicle was administered 30 min before placing the rats in the shock chamber again. The rats were observed for 5 min without receiving shock. The administration of PD135158 30 min before conditioned-fear stress significantly reduced freezing behavior. PD135158 blocked the expression of conditioned fear. PD135158 was again administered 30 min before footshock. Then, the rats were individually subjected to 30 min of inescapable electric footshock in the shock chamber. Twenty-four hours after receiving footshock, the rats were again placed in the shock chamber and observed for 5 min without shock administration. The administration of PD135158 30 min before footshock significantly reduced conditioned freezing. PD135158 blocked the anxiety of conditioned fear. PD135158 blocked not only the anxiety, but also the expression of conditioned fear. These results suggest that CCKB receptor might play an important role in conditioned-fear stress. They indicate that CCKB receptor is related to anxiety. PMID:9592807

  12. Crystal structure of the[mu]-opioid receptor bound to a morphinan antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Manglik, Aashish; Kruse, Andrew C.; Kobilka, Tong Sun; Thian, Foon Sun; Mathiesen, Jesper M.; Sunahara, Roger K.; Pardo, Leonardo; Weis, William I.; Kobilka, Brian K.; Granier, Sébastien

    2012-06-27

    Opium is one of the world's oldest drugs, and its derivatives morphine and codeine are among the most used clinical drugs to relieve severe pain. These prototypical opioids produce analgesia as well as many undesirable side effects (sedation, apnoea and dependence) by binding to and activating the G-protein-coupled {mu}-opioid receptor ({mu}-OR) in the central nervous system. Here we describe the 2.8 {angstrom} crystal structure of the mouse {mu}-OR in complex with an irreversible morphinan antagonist. Compared to the buried binding pocket observed in most G-protein-coupled receptors published so far, the morphinan ligand binds deeply within a large solvent-exposed pocket. Of particular interest, the {mu}-OR crystallizes as a two-fold symmetrical dimer through a four-helix bundle motif formed by transmembrane segments 5 and 6. These high-resolution insights into opioid receptor structure will enable the application of structure-based approaches to develop better drugs for the management of pain and addiction.

  13. The path to an angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor in the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2015-03-17

    The PARADIGM-HF (Prospective comparison of ARNi with ACEi to Determine Impact on Global Mortality and Morbidity in Heart Failure) trial demonstrated that a new angiotensin receptor antagonist-neprilysin inhibitor was superior to an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor in reducing mortality in patients with heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. This paper traces the research path that culminated in the development of this drug. The first phase, elucidation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, began with Tigerstedt's discovery of renin, followed by isolation of angiotensin, isolation of angiotensin-converting enzyme, and synthesis of its inhibitors and of angiotensin receptor blockers. Phase 2 began with de Bold's discovery of atrial natriuretic peptide, followed by isolation of the enzyme that degrades it (neprilysin) and its inhibitors. Phase 3 consists of blocking both the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and atrial natriuretic peptide-degrading systems simultaneously. A molecular complex, LCZ696, developed by scientists at Novartis, combines an angiotensin receptor blocker with a neprilysin inhibitor, is well tolerated, and represents an important step in the management of heart failure and reduced ejection fraction. PMID:25766951

  14. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of an NMDA receptor antagonist in sleep-disordered breathing.

    PubMed

    Torvaldsson, Stefan; Grote, Ludger; Peker, Yüksel; Basun, Hans; Hedner, Jan

    2005-06-01

    Hypoxemia is a powerful stimulus of glutamate release in the central nervous system (CNS) and a hallmark phenomenon in sleep disordered breathing (SDB). Glutamate effects that include neuronal damage and apoptosis following hypoxemia and apnea following microinjections in animal models are in part mediated via postjunctional N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. This was a double blind, randomized, placebo-controlled single dose cross-over study of the NMDA receptor antagonist AR-R15896AR in 15 male patients with moderate to severe SDB. Seven patients received 120 mg and eight patients received 350 mg AR-R15896AR or corresponding placebo (given by 2 h infusion) starting half an hour before estimated sleep onset. AR-R15896AR concentrations were in line with the predicting kinetic model. A standard polysomnographic montage was applied. Repeated plasma samples were obtained in nine patients for analysis of plasma glutamate. Glutamate concentration in plasma did not change overnight and was unrelated to severity of SDB. Overall AHI (apnea-hypopnea index; primary efficacy variable) or investigated oxygen saturation variables were not significantly changed after AR-R15896AR at either dosage level. Side effects were mostly confined to the higher dose level and included vivid dreams, nightmares as well as in two cases mild hallucinations. The previously postulated role of glutamate in SDB could not be confirmed after AR-R15896AR induced NMDA-receptor blockade. PMID:15910512

  15. Dopamine Receptor Antagonists Enhance Proliferation and Neurogenesis of Midbrain Lmx1a-expressing Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Hedlund, Eva; Belnoue, Laure; Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Salto, Carmen; Bye, Chris; Parish, Clare; Deng, Qiaolin; Kadkhodaei, Banafsheh; Ericson, Johan; Arenas, Ernest; Perlmann, Thomas; Simon, András

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of dopamine neurons in the midbrain causes symptoms of the movement disorder, Parkinson disease. Dopamine neurons are generated from proliferating progenitor cells localized in the embryonic ventral midbrain. However, it remains unclear for how long cells with dopamine progenitor character are retained and if there is any potential for reactivation of such cells after cessation of normal dopamine neurogenesis. We show here that cells expressing Lmx1a and other progenitor markers remain in the midbrain aqueductal zone beyond the major dopamine neurogenic period. These cells express dopamine receptors, are located in regions heavily innervated by midbrain dopamine fibres and their proliferation can be stimulated by antagonizing dopamine receptors, ultimately leading to increased neurogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists enhances neurogenesis in vitro, both from embryonic midbrain progenitors as well as from embryonic stem cells. Altogether our results indicate a potential for reactivation of resident midbrain cells with dopamine progenitor potential beyond the normal period of dopamine neurogenesis. PMID:27246266

  16. Role of leukotriene receptor antagonists in the management of pediatric asthma: an update.

    PubMed

    Dumitru, Catalina; Chan, Susan M H; Turcanu, Victor

    2012-10-01

    At present, the main indications for leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) in pediatric asthma are as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and as initial controller therapy in children with mild asthma, especially those who cannot or will not use ICS. LTRA are also useful for patients who have concomitant rhinitis, and patients with viral-induced wheeze and exercise-induced asthma. It should be noted that the benefits of LTRA therapy have been demonstrated in children as young as 6 months of age and recent clinical trials have further proven the benefits of LTRA in acute asthma exacerbations. However, considering the important pro-inflammatory effects that leukotrienes (LT) have in experimental models of asthma, it may seem surprising that LTRA treatment outcomes are not better and that in some clinical trials only a minority of patients could be classified as full responders. This could be explained by potential additional LT receptors that are not affected by LTRA. Such receptors could represent new therapeutic targets in asthma. Furthermore, progress in differentiating between asthma phenotypes that result from different pathogenic mechanisms, some of which may involve LT to a lesser degree, should lead to an improved, personalized use of LTRA for treating asthma. PMID:22897162

  17. A novel thromboxane receptor antagonist, nstpbp5185, inhibits platelet aggregation and thrombus formation in animal models.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shiu-Wen; Kuo, Heng-Lan; Hsu, Ming-Tsung; Tseng, Yufeng Jane; Lin, Shu-Wha; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Peng, Hui-Chin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Huang, Tur-Fu

    2016-08-01

    A novel benzimidazole derivative, nstpbp5185, was discovered through in vitro and in vivo evaluations for antiplatelet activity. Thromaboxane receptor (TP) is important in vascular physiology, haemostasis and pathophysiological thrombosis. Nstpbp5185 concentration-dependently inhibited human platelet aggregation caused by collagen, arachidonic acid and U46619. Nstpbp5185 caused a right-shift of the concentration-response curve of U46619 and competitively inhibited the binding of 3H-SQ-29548 to TP receptor expressed on HEK-293 cells, with an IC50 of 0.1 µM, indicating that nstpbp5185 is a TP antagonist. In murine thrombosis models, nstpbp5185 significantly prolonged the latent period in triggering platelet plug formation in mesenteric and FeCl3-induced thrombi formation, and increased the survival rate in pulmonary embolism model with less bleeding than aspirin. This study suggests nstpbp5185, an orally selective anti-thrombotic agent, acting through blockade of TXA2 receptor, may be efficacious for prevention or treatment of pathologic thrombosis. PMID:27173725

  18. Dopamine Receptor Antagonists Enhance Proliferation and Neurogenesis of Midbrain Lmx1a-expressing Progenitors.

    PubMed

    Hedlund, Eva; Belnoue, Laure; Theofilopoulos, Spyridon; Salto, Carmen; Bye, Chris; Parish, Clare; Deng, Qiaolin; Kadkhodaei, Banafsheh; Ericson, Johan; Arenas, Ernest; Perlmann, Thomas; Simon, András

    2016-01-01

    Degeneration of dopamine neurons in the midbrain causes symptoms of the movement disorder, Parkinson disease. Dopamine neurons are generated from proliferating progenitor cells localized in the embryonic ventral midbrain. However, it remains unclear for how long cells with dopamine progenitor character are retained and if there is any potential for reactivation of such cells after cessation of normal dopamine neurogenesis. We show here that cells expressing Lmx1a and other progenitor markers remain in the midbrain aqueductal zone beyond the major dopamine neurogenic period. These cells express dopamine receptors, are located in regions heavily innervated by midbrain dopamine fibres and their proliferation can be stimulated by antagonizing dopamine receptors, ultimately leading to increased neurogenesis in vivo. Furthermore, treatment with dopamine receptor antagonists enhances neurogenesis in vitro, both from embryonic midbrain progenitors as well as from embryonic stem cells. Altogether our results indicate a potential for reactivation of resident midbrain cells with dopamine progenitor potential beyond the normal period of dopamine neurogenesis. PMID:27246266

  19. Neutrophil Elastase-mediated proteolysis activates the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-36 Receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Macleod, Tom; Doble, Rosella; McGonagle, Dennis; Wasson, Christopher W.; Alase, Adewonuola; Stacey, Martin; Wittmann, Miriam

    2016-01-01

    The interleukin-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36Ra) which regulates IL-36α, -β and -γ is linked to psoriatic inflammation, especially loss-of-function mutations in pustular psoriasis subtypes. As observed with other IL-1 superfamily proteins, the IL-36 members require N-terminal cleavage for full biological activity but the mechanisms of IL-36Ra activation remain poorly defined. Using different blood leukocyte and skin resident cell preparations, and recombinant proteins, we have identified that neutrophil elastase, but not other neutrophil derived proteases, cleaves IL-36Ra into its highly active antagonistic form. The activity of this processed form of IL-36Ra was confirmed in human primary dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes and in skin equivalents. A significant dose dependent reduction of IL-36γ induced IL-8 and chemokine ligand 20 (CCL20) levels were detected following addition of the cleaved IL-36Ra compared to full length IL-36Ra. By activating IL-36Ra, the neutrophil derived protease can inhibit IL-36 induced chemokine production, including IL-8 and CCL20, and reduce further inflammatory cell infiltration. These findings strongly indicate neutrophil elastase to be a key enzyme in the biological function of IL-36Ra and that neutrophils can play a regulatory role in psoriatic inflammation with regard to balancing the pro-inflammatory activity of IL-36. PMID:27101808

  20. Nonpeptide Small Molecule Agonist and Antagonist Original Leads for Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide FF1 and FF2 receptors (NPFF1-R and NPFF2-R), and their endogenous ligand NPFF, are one of only several systems responsible for mediating opioid-induced hyperalgesia, tolerance, and dependence. Currently, no small molecules displaying good affinity or selectivity for either subtype have been reported, to decipher the role of NPFF2-R as it relates to opioid-mediated analgesia, for further exploration of NPFF1-R, or for medication development for either subtype. We report the first nonpeptide small molecule scaffold for NPFF1,2-R, the guanidino-piperidines, and SAR studies resulting in the discovery of a NPFF1 agonist (7b, Ki = 487 ± 117 nM), a NPFF1 antagonist (46, Ki = 81 ± 17 nM), and a NPFF2 partial antagonist (53a, Ki = 30 ± 5 nM), which serve as leads for the development of pharmacological probes and potential therapeutic agents. Testing of 46 alone was without effect in the mouse 48 °C warm-water tail-withdrawal test, but pretreatment with 46 prevented NPFF-induced hyperalgesia. PMID:25268943

  1. History and perspectives of A2A adenosine receptor antagonists as potential therapeutic agents.

    PubMed

    Preti, Delia; Baraldi, Pier Giovanni; Moorman, Allan R; Borea, Pier Andrea; Varani, Katia

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence emphasizes that the purine nucleoside adenosine plays an active role as a local regulator in different pathologies. Adenosine is a ubiquitous nucleoside involved in various physiological and pathological functions by stimulating A1 , A2A , A2B , and A3 adenosine receptors (ARs). At the present time, the role of A2A ARs is well known in physiological conditions and in a variety of pathologies, including inflammatory tissue damage and neurodegenerative disorders. In particular, the use of selective A2A antagonists has been reported to be potentially useful in the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD). In this review, A2A AR signal transduction pathways, together with an analysis of the structure-activity relationships of A2A antagonists, and their corresponding pharmacological roles and therapeutic potential have been presented. The initial results from an emerging polypharmacological approach are also analyzed. This approach is based on the optimization of the affinity and/or functional activity of the examined compounds toward multiple targets, such as A1 /A2A ARs and monoamine oxidase-B (MAO-B), both closely implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:25821194

  2. The conformation and activity relationship of benzofuran type of angiotensin II receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Kim, N J; Lee, D W

    2000-09-01

    As a continuing effort to establish the structure and activity relationship in a benzofuran type of angiotensin II antagonist, we synthesized various regioisomers and performed a series of QSAR analyses. The conformational analyses of target isomers were carried out using molecular mechanics and fine-tuned using the information from the NMR NOE experiment. The conformations of compounds with a good binding activity are quite similar to that of DuP753, a prototype of AII antagonist, suggesting that these compounds also bind to the same site of AII receptor. We then studied the compounds with a varied length of the hydroxyl group bearing side chain to find out the optimum distance between the hydroxyl group and the imidazole ring. The CoMFA with these compounds gave acceptable statistical measures (cross-validated r2 and conventional r2 to be 0.881 and 0.974, respectively) and the map was well consistent with the previously proposed pharmacophore. PMID:11026543

  3. Pyrazole antagonists of the CB1 receptor with reduced brain penetration.

    PubMed

    Fulp, Alan; Zhang, Yanan; Bortoff, Katherine; Seltzman, Herbert; Snyder, Rodney; Wiethe, Robert; Amato, George; Maitra, Rangan

    2016-03-01

    Type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) antagonists might be useful for treating obesity, liver disease, metabolic syndrome, and dyslipidemias. Unfortunately, inhibition of CB1 in the central nervous system (CNS) produces adverse effects, including depression, anxiety and suicidal ideation in some patients, which led to withdrawal of the pyrazole inverse agonist rimonabant (SR141716A) from European markets. Efforts are underway to produce peripherally selective CB1 antagonists to circumvent CNS-associated adverse effects. In this study, novel analogs of rimonabant (1) were explored in which the 1-aminopiperidine group was switched to a 4-aminopiperidine, attached at the 4-amino position (5). The piperidine nitrogen was functionalized with carbamates, amides, and sulfonamides, providing compounds that are potent inverse agonists of hCB1 with good selectivity for hCB1 over hCB2. Select compounds were further studied using in vitro models of brain penetration, oral absorption and metabolic stability. Several compounds were identified with predicted minimal brain penetration and good metabolic stability. In vivo pharmacokinetic testing revealed that inverse agonist 8c is orally bioavailable and has vastly reduced brain penetration compared to rimonabant. PMID:26827137

  4. Adipose tissue is a major source of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist: upregulation in obesity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Juge-Aubry, Cristiana E; Somm, Emmanuel; Giusti, Vittorio; Pernin, Agnès; Chicheportiche, Rachel; Verdumo, Chantal; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise; Burger, Danielle; Dayer, Jean-Michel; Meier, Christoph A

    2003-05-01

    The secreted form of the interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is an acute-phase protein intervening in the counterregulation of inflammatory processes. We previously showed that this cytokine antagonist is upregulated in the serum of obese patients, correlating with BMI and insulin resistance. In this study, we examined the expression pattern of IL-1Ra and showed that it is highly expressed not only in liver and spleen, but also in white adipose tissue (WAT), where it is upregulated in obesity. In WAT of obese humans, IL-1Ra was also markedly increased. Moreover, human WAT explants secreted IL-1Ra into the medium, a process that could be stimulated fivefold by interferon-beta. Finally, lipopolysaccharide administration induced a long-lasting expression of IL-1Ra in mouse WAT, suggesting that adipose tissue is an important source of IL-1Ra in both obesity and inflammation. In summary, we demonstrated that WAT is one of the most important sources of IL-1Ra quantitatively, suggesting that this tissue could represent a novel target for anti-inflammatory treatment. Moreover, it can be speculated that IL-1Ra, whose production is markedly increased in WAT in obese individuals, contributes further to weight gain because of its endocrine and paracrine effects on the hypothalamus and adipocytes, respectively. PMID:12716739

  5. Mineralocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Therapy in Resistant Hypertension: Time to Implement Guidelines!

    PubMed Central

    Maiolino, Giuseppe; Azzolini, Matteo; Rossi, Gian Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Despite the availability of anti-hypertensive medications with increasing efficacy up to 50% of hypertensive patients have blood pressure levels (BP) not at the goals set by international societies. Some of these patients are either not optimally treated or are non-adherent to the prescribed drugs. However, a proportion, despite adequate treatment, have resistant hypertension (RH), which represents an important problem in that it is associated to an excess risk of cardiovascular events. Notwithstanding a complex pathogenesis, an abundance of data suggests a key contribution for the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in RH, thus fostering a potential role for its antagonists in RH. Based on these premises randomized clinical trials aimed at testing the efficacy of MR antagonists (MRAs) in RH patients have been completed. Overall, they demonstrated the efficacy of MRAs in reducing BP and surrogate markers of target organ damage, such as microalbuminuria, either compared to placebo or to other drugs. In summary, owing to the key role of the MR in the pathogenesis of RH and on the proven efficacy of MRAs we advocate their inclusion as an essential component of therapy in patients with presumed RH. Conversely, we propose that RH should be diagnosed only in patients whose BP values show to be resistant to an up-titrated dose of these drugs. PMID:26664875

  6. Indole Glucocorticoid Receptor Antagonists Active in a Model of Dyslipidemia Act via a Unique Association with an Agonist Binding Site.

    PubMed

    Luz, John G; Carson, Matthew W; Condon, Bradley; Clawson, David; Pustilnik, Anna; Kohlman, Daniel T; Barr, Robert J; Bean, James S; Dill, M Joelle; Sindelar, Dana K; Maletic, Milan; Coghlan, Michael J

    2015-08-27

    To further elucidate the structural activity correlation of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonism, the crystal structure of the GR ligand-binding domain (GR LBD) complex with a nonsteroidal antagonist, compound 8, was determined. This novel indole sulfonamide shows in vitro activity comparable to known GR antagonists such as mifepristone, and notably, this molecule lowers LDL (-74%) and raises HDL (+73%) in a hamster model of dyslipidemia. This is the first reported crystal structure of the GR LBD bound to a nonsteroidal antagonist, and this article provides additional elements for the design and pharmacology of clinically relevant nonsteroidal GR antagonists that may have greater selectivity and fewer side effects than their steroidal counterparts. PMID:26218343

  7. Carbamate substituted 2-amino-4,6-diphenylpyrimidines as adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sarel J; Petzer, Jacobus P; Rousseau, Amanda L; Terre'Blanche, Gisella; Petzer, Anél; Lourens, Anna C U

    2016-02-01

    A novel series of carbamate substituted 2-amino-4,6-diphenylpyrimidines was evaluated as potential dual adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonists. The majority of the synthesised compounds exhibited promising dual affinities, with A1Ki values ranging from 0.175 to 10.7 nM and A2AKi values ranging from 1.58 to 451 nM. The in vivo activity illustrated for 3-(2-amino-6-phenylpyrimidin-4-yl)phenyl morpholine-4-carboxylate (4c) is indicative of the potential of these compounds as therapeutic agents in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, although physicochemical properties may require optimisation. PMID:26776359

  8. Agonist and antagonist switch DNA motifs recognized by human androgen receptor in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Wu, Dayong; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Wang, Liguo; Sunkel, Benjamin; Grenade, Cassandra; Chen, Junsheng; Zynger, Debra L; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Jiaoti; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lin, Shili; Clinton, Steven K; Li, Wei; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-01-01

    Human transcription factors recognize specific DNA sequence motifs to regulate transcription. It is unknown whether a single transcription factor is able to bind to distinctly different motifs on chromatin, and if so, what determines the usage of specific motifs. By using a motif-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) approach, we find that agonist-liganded human androgen receptor (AR) and antagonist-liganded AR bind to two distinctly different motifs, leading to distinct transcriptional outcomes in prostate cancer cells. Further analysis on clinical prostate tissues reveals that the binding of AR to these two distinct motifs is involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Together, these results suggest that unique ligands may switch DNA motifs recognized by ligand-dependent transcription factors in vivo. Our findings also provide a broad mechanistic foundation for understanding ligand-specific induction of gene expression profiles. PMID:25535248

  9. Agonist and antagonist switch DNA motifs recognized by human androgen receptor in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Lan, Xun; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Wu, Dayong; Liu, Xiangtao; Ye, Zhenqing; Wang, Liguo; Sunkel, Benjamin; Grenade, Cassandra; Chen, Junsheng; Zynger, Debra L; Yan, Pearlly S; Huang, Jiaoti; Nephew, Kenneth P; Huang, Tim H-M; Lin, Shili; Clinton, Steven K; Li, Wei; Jin, Victor X; Wang, Qianben

    2015-02-12

    Human transcription factors recognize specific DNA sequence motifs to regulate transcription. It is unknown whether a single transcription factor is able to bind to distinctly different motifs on chromatin, and if so, what determines the usage of specific motifs. By using a motif-resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation-exonuclease (ChIP-exo) approach, we find that agonist-liganded human androgen receptor (AR) and antagonist-liganded AR bind to two distinctly different motifs, leading to distinct transcriptional outcomes in prostate cancer cells. Further analysis on clinical prostate tissues reveals that the binding of AR to these two distinct motifs is involved in prostate carcinogenesis. Together, these results suggest that unique ligands may switch DNA motifs recognized by ligand-dependent transcription factors in vivo. Our findings also provide a broad mechanistic foundation for understanding ligand-specific induction of gene expression profiles. PMID:25535248

  10. Differential involvement of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone in motivational and hedonic aspects of reward.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Miriam; Heise, Verena; Spanagel, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    In the present study dose-dependent effects of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone were investigated on the rewarding effects of sweetened condensed milk (SCM) in four behavioral paradigms addressing hedonic, consummatory as well as motivational aspects of a reward: odour-conditioned pleasure attenuation of the acoustic startle response (PAS), conditioned place preference (CPP), voluntary consumption in a limited access paradigm, as well as break point determination in a progressive ratio (PR) task. A dose-dependent reduction in reward-related behavior was observed in all paradigms, with exception of the break point in the PR task, which was not affected by naloxone at all. CPP for SCM was only affected by the highest dose of naloxone. The present results indicate that naloxone is more effective in suppressing the hedonic than motivational aspects of reward, further supporting the involvement of the endogenous opioid system in the mediation of hedonic properties of food reward. PMID:20035797

  11. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists as diuretics: Can congestive heart failure learn from liver failure?

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Fernando; Radhakrishnan, Jai; Schrier, Robert W.; Colombo, Paolo C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite significant improvements in diagnosis, understanding the pathophysiology and management of the patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF), diuretic resistance, yet to be clearly defined, is a major hurdle. Secondary hyperaldosteronism is a pivotal factor in pathogenesis of sodium retention, refractory congestion in heart failure (HF) as well as diuretic resistance. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis who suffer from ascites, similar pathophysiological complications have been recognized. Administration of natriuretic doses of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) has been well established in management of cirrhotic patients. However, this strategy in patients with ADHF has not been well studied. This article will discuss the potential use of natriuretic doses of MRAs to overcome the secondary hyperaldosteronism as an alternative diuretic regimen in patients with HF. PMID:25447845

  12. Endothelin-1 receptor antagonists in fetal development and pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    de Raaf, Michiel Alexander; Beekhuijzen, Manon; Guignabert, Christophe; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Bogaard, Harm Jan

    2015-08-15

    The Pregnancy Prevention Program (PPP) is in place to prevent drug-induced developmental malformations. Remarkably, among the ten PPP-enlisted drugs are three endothelin-1 (ET-1) receptor antagonists (ERA's: ambrisentan, bosentan and macitentan), which are approved for the treatment of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH). This review describes the effects of ERA's in PAH pathobiology and cardiopulmonary fetal development. While ERA's hamper pathological remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature and as such exert beneficial effects in PAH, they disturb fetal development of cardiopulmonary tissues. By blocking ET-1-mediated positive inotropic effects and myocardial fetal gene induction, ERA's may affect right ventricular adaptation to the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in both the fetus and the adult PAH patient. PMID:26111581

  13. Verapamil as an apparent competitive antagonist of the serotonin receptor of rabbit isolated aorta.

    PubMed

    Auguet, M; Delaflotte, S; Clostre, F; DeFeudis, F V

    1986-01-01

    The actions of four Ca2+-antagonists (verapamil, diltiazem, nifedipine and flunarizine) were tested on serotonin- (5-HT-) induced contraction of rabbit isolated aorta. Verapamil produced a dose-dependent, parallel shift to the right of the concentration-response curve for 5-HT (pA2 approximately equal to 7.13; Schild slope approximately equal to 1.01), indicative of competitive antagonism. The effects of diltiazem, nifedipine and flunarizine were much less pronounced and best characterized as non-competitive interactions. The effect of verapamil, which likely involves its antagonism of smooth muscle 5-HT2-receptors, might be useful in explaining its therapeutic actions and/or its side-effects. PMID:3699438

  14. Novel multimeric IL-1 receptor antagonist for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Shweta; Kant, Ravi; Gupta, Sarika; Surolia, Avadhesha

    2015-02-01

    Protein therapeutics targeting inflammatory mediators have shown great promise for the treatment of autoimmunities such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, a significant challenge in this area has been their low in vivo stability and consequently their severely compromised therapeutic efficacy. One such therapeutic molecule IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), used in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, has displayed only modest efficacy in human clinical trials owing to its short biological half-life. Herein, we report a novel approach to conglomerate individual protein entities into a drug depot by incorporation of an amyloidogenic motif Lys-Phe-Phe-Glu (KFFE) thereby dramatically improving their systemic persistence and in turn their therapeutic efficacy in a mice model of autoimmune arthritis. PMID:25542800

  15. Evaluation of growth hormone (GH) action in mice: discovery of GH receptor antagonists and clinical indications.

    PubMed

    Kopchick, John J; List, Edward O; Kelder, Bruce; Gosney, Elahu S; Berryman, Darlene E

    2014-04-01

    The discovery of a growth hormone receptor antagonist (GHA) was initially established via expression of mutated GH genes in transgenic mice. Following this discovery, development of the compound resulted in a drug termed pegvisomant, which has been approved for use in patients with acromegaly. Pegvisomant treatment in a dose dependent manner results in normalization of IGF-1 levels in most patients. Thus, it is a very efficacious and safe drug. Since the GH/IGF-1 axis has been implicated in the progression of several types of cancers, many have suggested the use of pegvisomant as an anti-cancer therapeutic. In this manuscript, we will review the use of mouse strains that possess elevated or depressed levels of GH action for unraveling many of GH actions. Additionally, we will describe experiments in which the GHA was discovered, review results of pegvisomant's preclinical and clinical trials, and provide data suggesting pegvisomant's therapeutic value in selected types of cancer. PMID:24035867

  16. The Use of IL-1 Receptor Antagonist (Anakinra) in Idiopathic Recurrent Pericarditis: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Baskar, Shankar; Klein, Allan L.; Zeft, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent pericarditis is a complication of acute pericarditis in 20–30% of the patients and is usually idiopathic in nature. The underlying pathogenesis of this condition remains unclear, although immune-mediated mechanisms seem likely. A subgroup of these patients with refractory symptoms can be challenging to manage, and multiple immunosuppressive medications have been used without consistent benefit. Anakinra, an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist, has been used in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and autoinflammatory syndromes. Preliminary evidence suggests that anakinra could be a promising therapy for idiopathic recurrent pericarditis. In this narrative review, we summarize the current understanding of the etiopathogenesis of idiopathic recurrent pericarditis, mechanism of action of anakinra, and the preliminary evidence, supporting the use of anakinra in pericarditis. PMID:26942035

  17. Effects of the kappa opioid receptor antagonist MR-2266-BS on the acquisition of ethanol preference

    SciTech Connect

    Sandi, C.; Borrell, J.; Guaza, C. )

    1990-01-01

    Using a paradigm by which rats forced to drink a weak ethanol solution develop ethanol preference in consecutive retention testing days, the effects of the administration of the kappa opioid antagonist MR-2266-BS, prior to or after the forced ethanol session, were studied. Pre-conditioning subcutaneous (s.c.) administration of 1 mg/kg of MR-2266-BS induced a decrease in subsequent ethanol consumption without significantly modifying the acquisition of ethanol preference. Post-conditioning administration of MR-2266-BS induced both a dose-dependent reduction in ethanol consumption and in preference throughout the three following days. The results of the present study provide further support of the involvement of kappa-type opioids on drinking behavior, and suggest that kappa receptors may be involved in the consumption and development of preference to ethanol.

  18. Involvement of IL-6 and IL-1 receptor antagonist on intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Aureli, A; Sebastiani, P; Del Beato, T; Marimpietri, A E; Graziani, A; Sechi, E; Di Loreto, S

    2014-11-01

    Imbalances in the regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines have been increasingly correlated with several neurodevelopmental disorders and their role in neuronal development is being investigated. To assess the possible influence of cytokines on the onset of intellectual disability (ID), we studied the polymorphisms of thirteen proinflammatory cytokine genes in 81 patients and 61 healthy controls. We demonstrated a significant association of interleukin-6 (IL-6) single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (-174 G/C and nt565 G/A), and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) (Mspa-I 11100) SNP with ID. Moreover, the IL-6 SNPs is an unfavorable genetic predisposition for females. The evaluation of circulating levels of IL-6 and IL-1RA showed that the serum concentrations of IL-6 were significantly higher in ID patients than in controls. These data suggest that functional cytokine gene polymorphisms may influence the development of ID. PMID:25124963

  19. The crystal structure of a bimorphinan with highly selective kappa opioid receptor antagonist activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbańczyk-Lipkowska, Zofia; Etter, Margaret C.; Lipkowski, Andrzej W.; Portoghese, Philip S.

    1987-07-01

    The crystal structure of the dihydrobromide heptahydrate of nor-binaltorphimine (17, 17'-bis(cyclopropylmethyl)-6,6',7,7'-tetrahydro-4,5α: 4',5'α-diepoxy-6,6'-imino[7,7' bimorphinan]-3,3',14,14'-tetraol)is presented. This structure is the first reported structure of a rigid bivalent opioid ligand. Two morphinan pharmacophores are connected by a rigid spacer, the pyrrole ring. The nor-binaltorphimine structure itself shows unique, high selectivity as a kappa opioid receptor antagonist. Crystal data: P3 2, Z = 3, a = b = 20.223 (4), c = 9.541(7) Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°; R = 0.079 (1765 reflections, Fobs > 1σ( F)).

  20. Characterization of SB-269970-A, a selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Jim J; Price, Gary W; Jeffrey, Phillip; Deeks, Nigel J; Stean, Tania; Piper, David; Smith, Martin I; Upton, Neil; Medhurst, Andrew D; Middlemiss, Derek N; Riley, Graham J; Lovell, Peter J; Bromidge, Steven M; Thomas, David R

    2000-01-01

    The novel 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, SB-269970-A, potently displaced [3H]-5-CT from human 5-HT7(a) (pKi 8.9±0.1) and 5-HT7 receptors in guinea-pig cortex (pKi 8.3±0.2).5-CT stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in 5-HT7(a)/HEK293 membranes (pEC50 7.5±0.1) and SB-269970-A (0.03–1 μM) inhibited the 5-CT concentration-response with no significant alteration in the maximal response. The pA2 (8.5±0.2) for SB-269970-A agreed well with the pKi determined from [3H]-5-CT binding studies.5-CT-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity in guinea-pig hippocampal membranes (pEC50 of 8.4±0.2) was inhibited by SB-269970-A (0.3 μM) with a pKB (8.3±0.1) in good agreement with its antagonist potency at the human cloned 5-HT7(a) receptor and its binding affinity at guinea-pig cortical membranes.5-HT7 receptor mRNA was highly expressed in human hypothalamus, amygdala, thalamus, hippocampus and testis.SB-269970-A was CNS penetrant (steady-state brain : blood ratio of ca. 0.83 : 1 in rats) but was rapidly cleared from the blood (CLb=ca. 140 ml min−1 kg−1). Following a single dose (3 mg kg−1) SB-269970 was detectable in rat brain at 30 (87 nM) and 60 min (58 nM). In guinea-pigs, brain levels averaged 31 and 51 nM respectively at 30 and 60 min after dosing, although the compound was undetectable in one of the three animals tested.5-CT (0.3 mg kg−1 i.p.) induced hypothermia in guinea-pigs was blocked by SB-269970-A (ED50 2.96 mg kg−1 i.p.) and the non-selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist metergoline (0.3–3 mg kg−1 s.c.), suggesting a role for 5-HT7 receptor stimulation in 5-CT induced hypothermia in guinea-pigs.SB-269970-A (30 mg kg−1) administered at the start of the sleep period, significantly reduced time spent in Paradoxical Sleep (PS) during the first 3  h of EEG recording in conscious rats. PMID:10821781

  1. Antagonists of the EP3 receptor for prostaglandin E2 are novel antiplatelet agents that do not prolong bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasbir; Zeller, Wayne; Zhou, Nian; Hategen, Georgeta; Mishra, Rama; Polozov, Alex; Yu, Peng; Onua, Emmanuel; Zhang, Jun; Zembower, David; Kiselyov, Alex; Ramírez, José L; Sigthorsson, Gudmundur; Bjornsson, Jon Mar; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Andrésson, Thorkell; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Magnusson, Olafur; Fabre, Jean-Etienne; Stefansson, Kari; Gurney, Mark E

    2009-02-20

    Myocardial infarction and stroke are caused by blood clots forming over a ruptured or denuded atherosclerotic plaque (atherothrombosis). Production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by an inflamed plaque exacerbates atherothrombosis and may limit the effectiveness of current therapeutics. Platelets express multiple G-protein coupled receptors, including receptors for ADP and PGE(2). ADP can mobilize Ca(2+) and through the P(2)Y(12) receptor can inhibit cAMP production, causing platelet activation and aggregation. Clopidogrel (Plavix), a selective P(2)Y(12) antagonist, prevents platelets from clotting but thereby increases the risk of severe or fatal bleeding. The platelet EP(3) receptor for PGE(2), like the P(2)Y(12) receptor, also inhibits cAMP synthesis. However, unlike ADP, facilitation of platelet aggregation via the PGE(2)/EP(3) pathway is dependent on co-agonists that can mobilize Ca(2+). We used a ligand-based design strategy to develop peri-substituted bicylic acylsulfonamides as potent and selective EP(3) antagonists. We show that DG-041, a selective EP(3) antagonist, inhibits PGE(2) facilitation of platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. PGE(2) can resensitize platelets to agonist even when the P(2)Y(12) receptor has been blocked by clopidogrel, and this can be inhibited by DG-041. Unlike clopidogrel, DG-041 does not affect bleeding time in rats, nor is bleeding time further increased when DG-041 is co-administered with clopidogrel. This indicates that EP(3) antagonists potentially have a superior safety profile compared to P(2)Y(12) antagonists and represent a novel class of antiplatelet agents. PMID:19193156

  2. Identification of Putative Steroid Receptor Antagonists in Bottled Water: Combining Bioassays and High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Martin; Schlüsener, Michael P.; Ternes, Thomas A.; Oehlmann, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are man-made compounds interfering with hormone signaling and thereby adversely affecting human health. Recent reports provide evidence for the presence of EDCs in commercially available bottled water, including steroid receptor agonists and antagonists. However, since these findings are based on biological data the causative chemicals remain unidentified and, therefore, inaccessible for toxicological evaluation. Thus, the aim of this study is to assess the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of bottled water and to identify the causative steroid receptor antagonists. We evaluated the antiestrogenic and antiandrogenic activity of 18 bottled water products in reporter gene assays for human estrogen receptor alpha and androgen receptor. Using nontarget high-resolution mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap Velos), we acquired corresponding analytical data. We combined the biological and chemical information to determine the exact mass of the tentative steroid receptor antagonist. Further MSn experiments elucidated the molecule’s structure and enabled its identification. We detected significant antiestrogenicity in 13 of 18 products. 16 samples were antiandrogenic inhibiting the androgen receptor by up to 90%. Nontarget chemical analysis revealed that out of 24520 candidates present in bottled water one was consistently correlated with the antagonistic activity. By combining experimental and in silico MSn data we identified this compound as di(2-ethylhexyl) fumarate (DEHF). We confirmed the identity and biological activity of DEHF and additional isomers of dioctyl fumarate and maleate using authentic standards. Since DEHF is antiestrogenic but not antiandrogenic we conclude that additional, yet unidentified EDCs must contribute to the antagonistic effect of bottled water. Applying a novel approach to combine biological and chemical analysis this is the first study to identify so far unknown EDCs in bottled water. Notably

  3. Identifying bias in CCR1 antagonists using radiolabelled binding, receptor internalization, β-arrestin translocation and chemotaxis assays

    PubMed Central

    Gilchrist, A; Gauntner, T D; Fazzini, A; Alley, K M; Pyen, D S; Ahn, J; Ha, S J; Willett, A; Sansom, S E; Yarfi, J L; Bachovchin, K A; Mazzoni, M R; Merritt, J R

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Investigators have suggested that the chemokine receptor CCR1 plays a role in multiple myeloma. Studies using antisense and neutralizing antibodies to CCR1 showed that down-regulation of the receptor altered disease progression in a mouse model. More recently, experiments utilizing scid mice injected with human myeloma cells demonstrated that the CCR1 antagonist BX471 reduced osteolytic lesions, while the CCR1 antagonist MLN-3897 prevented myeloma cell adhesion to osteoclasts. However, information is limited regarding the pharmacology of CCR1 antagonists in myeloma cells. Experimental Approach We compared several well-studied CCR1 antagonists including AZD4818, BX471, CCX354, CP-481715, MLN-3897 and PS899877 for their ability to inhibit binding of [125I]-CCL3 in vitro using membranes prepared from RPMI 8226 cells, a human multiple myeloma cell line that endogenously expresses CCR1. In addition, antagonists were assessed for their ability to modulate CCL3-mediated internalization of CCR1 and CCL3-mediated cell migration using RPMI 8226 cells. As many GPCRs signal through β–arrestin-dependent pathways that are separate and distinct from those driven by G-proteins, we also evaluated the compounds for their ability to alter β-arrestin translocation. Key Results There were clear differences between the CCR1 antagonists in their ability to inhibit CCL3 binding to myeloma cells, as well as in their ability to inhibit G–protein-dependent and -independent functional responses. Conclusions and Implications Our studies demonstrate that tissue phenotype seems to be relevant with regards to CCR1. Moreover, it appears that for CCR1 antagonists, inhibition of β-arrestin translocation is not necessarily linked to chemotaxis or receptor internalization. PMID:24990525

  4. 3D-pharmacophore models for selective A2A and A2B adenosine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing; Wang, Songqing; Gao, Shaofen; Dai, Xuedong; Gao, Qingzhi

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional pharmacophore models were generated for A2A and A2B adenosine receptors (ARs) based on highly selective A2A and A2B antagonists using the Catalyst program. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2A antagonists (Hypo-A2A) was obtained through a careful validation process. Four features contained in Hypo-A2A (one ring aromatic feature (R), one positively ionizable feature (P), one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid feature (L), and one hydrophobic feature (H)) seem to be essential for antagonists in terms of binding activity and A2A AR selectivity. The best pharmacophore model for selective A2B antagonists (Hypo-A2B) was elaborated by modifying the Catalyst common features (HipHop) hypotheses generated from the selective A2B antagonists training set. Hypo-A2B also consists of four features: one ring aromatic feature (R), one hydrophobic aliphatic feature (Z), and two hydrogen bond acceptor lipid features (L). All features play an important role in A2B AR binding affinity and are essential for A2B selectivity. Both A2A and A2B pharmacophore models have been validated toward a wide set of test molecules containing structurally diverse selective antagonists of all AR subtypes. They are capable of identifying correspondingly high potent antagonists and differentiating antagonists between subtypes. The results of our study will act as a valuable tool for retrieving structurally diverse compounds with desired biological activities and designing novel selective adenosine receptor ligands. PMID:17330954

  5. The neonicotinoid imidacloprid, and the pyrethroid deltamethrin, are antagonists of the insect Rdl GABA receptor.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Wells, Jennina; Brooke, Basil D; Bermudez, Isabel; Jones, Andrew K

    2015-11-01

    A mutation in the second transmembrane domain of the GABA receptor subunit, Rdl, is associated with resistance to insecticides such as dieldrin and fipronil. Molecular cloning of Rdl cDNA from a strain of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, which is highly resistant to dieldrin revealed this mutation (A296G) as well as another mutation in the third transmembrane domain (T345M). Wild-type, A296G, T345M and A296G + T345M homomultimeric Rdl were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and their sensitivities to fipronil, deltamethrin, 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT), imidacloprid and spinosad were measured using two-electrode voltage-clamp electrophysiology. Spinosad and DDT had no agonist or antagonist actions on Rdl. However, fipronil, deltamethrin and imidacloprid decreased GABA-evoked currents. These antagonistic actions were either reduced or abolished with the A296G and the A296G + T345M mutations while T345M alone appeared to have no significant effect. In conclusion, this study identifies another mutation in the mosquito Rdl that is associated with insecticide resistance. While T345M itself does not affect insecticide sensitivity, it may serve to offset the structural impact of A296G. The present study also highlights Rdl as a potential secondary target for neonicotinoids and pyrethroids. We show for the first time that deltamethrin (a pyrethroid insecticide) and imidacloprid (a neonicotinoid insecticide) act directly on the insect GABA receptor, Rdl. Our findings highlight Rdl as a potential secondary target of pyrethroids and neonicotinoids mutations in which may contribute to resistance to these widely used insecticides. PMID:26296809

  6. The Clinical Significance of Interleukin–1 Receptor Antagonist +2018 Polymorphism in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Endom; Nofal, Omimah Khaled Jaber; Sakthiswary, Rajalingham; Shaharir, Syahrul Sazliyana; Sridharan, Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Objective Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) acts as an inhibitor of IL-1; which is one of the culprit cytokines in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Although +2018 polymorphism of IL-1Ra has been implicated in the pathogenesis of RA, its importance remains poorly understood. Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine the clinical significance of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) +2018 polymorphism in RA. Methods Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing were used to determine the genotypes of the IL-1Ra +2018 for 77 RA patients and 18 healthy controls. All RA patients were assessed for the disease activity score that includes 28 joints (DAS28) and radiographic disease damage based on Modified Sharp Score (MSS). Results The frequency of the T/T and C/T genotypes did not differ significantly (p = 0.893) between the RA patients and the controls. The C/T genotype had significantly higher mean disease activity (DAS 28) and disease damage (MSS) scores with p values of 0.017 and 0.004, respectively. Additionally, the ESR (erythrocyte sedimentation rate), CRP (C-reactive protein), the number of swollen and tender joints were higher for the C/T individuals. On multivariate analysis the CRP, swollen joint count and MSS remained significant with the following p values i.e. 0.045, 0.046 and less than 0.05. Conclusions C/T genotype of IL-1Ra +2018 prognosticates more aggressive disease in RA. PMID:27105431

  7. Combination cannabinoid and opioid receptor antagonists improves metabolic outcomes in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Sarah H; Stefanidis, Aneta; Tschöp, Matthias H; Oldfield, Brian J

    2015-12-01

    The CB1 receptor antagonist, rimonabant, causes weight loss but also produces undesirable psychiatric side effects. We investigated using a combination of rimonabant with the opioid receptor antagonists naloxone and norBNI to treat the metabolic sequelae of long-term high fat diet feeding in mice. This combination has previously been shown to have positive effects on both weight loss and mood related behaviour. Diet-induced obese mice were treated chronically with either low dose rimonabant (1 mg/kg) or the combination of rimonabant, naloxone and norBNI (rim nal BNI). After 6 days of treatment, glucose and insulin tolerance tests were performed and body composition analysed using DEXA. Changes in BAT thermogenesis were assessed using implantable radio telemetry probes. Behavioural responses to acute rimonabant or rim nal BNI were examined in the forced swim test and elevated plus maze. Separately, we assessed shifts in Fos immunoreactivity in response to rimonabant or rim nal BNI. Rim nal BNI was significantly better than rimonabant treatment alone at reducing body weight and food intake. In addition, it improved fasting blood glucose and fat mass. Acute low dose rimonabant did not alter behaviour in either the forced swim test or elevated plus maze. Combination rim nal BNI reversed the behavioural effects of high dose (10 mg/kg) rimonabant in obese mice. Rim nal BNI altered Rimonabant-induced Fos in a number of nuclei, with particular shifts in expression in the central and basolateral amygdala, and insular cortex. This study demonstrates that the combination of rimonabant, naloxone and norBNI is effective at producing weight loss over a sustained period of time without altering performance in standardised mouse behaviour tests. Fos expression patterns offer insight into the neuroanatomical substrates subserving these physiological and behavioural changes. These results indicate that CB1-targeted drugs for weight loss may still be feasible. PMID:26360587

  8. MPZP: a novel small molecule corticotropin-releasing factor type 1 receptor (CRF1) antagonist.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Heather N; Zhao, Yu; Fekete, Eva M; Funk, Cindy K; Wirsching, Peter; Janda, Kim D; Zorrilla, Eric P; Koob, George F

    2008-02-01

    The extrahypothalamic stress peptide corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) system is an important regulator of behavioral responses to stress. Dysregulation of CRF and the CRF type 1 receptor (CRF(1)) system is hypothesized to underlie many stress-related disorders. Modulation of the CRF(1) system by non-peptide antagonists currently is being explored as a therapeutic approach for anxiety disorders and alcohol dependence. Here, we describe a new, less hydrophilic (cLogP approximately 2.95), small molecule, non-peptide CRF(1) antagonist with high affinity (K(i)=4.9 nM) and specificity for CRF(1) receptors: N,N-bis(2-methoxyethyl)-3-(4-methoxy-2-methylphenyl)-2,5-dimethyl-pyrazolo[1,5-a] pyrimidin-7-amine (MPZP). The compound was systemically administered to adult male rats in two behavioral models dependent on the CRF(1) system: defensive burying (0, 5, 20 mg/kg, n=6-11 for each dose) and alcohol dependence (0, 5, 10, 20 mg/kg, n=8 for each self-administration group). Acute administration of MPZP reduced burying behavior in the defensive burying model of active anxiety-like behavior. MPZP also attenuated withdrawal-induced excessive drinking in the self-administration model of alcohol dependence without affecting nondependent alcohol drinking or water consumption. The present findings support the proposed significance of the CRF(1) system in anxiety and alcohol dependence and introduce a promising new compound for further development in the treatment of alcohol dependence and stress-related disorders. PMID:18031798

  9. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF).

    PubMed

    Capuano, Annalisa; Scavone, Cristina; Vitale, Cristiana; Sportiello, Liberata; Rossi, Francesco; Rosano, Giuseppe M C; Coats, Andrew J Stewart

    2015-12-01

    The role of spironolactone and eplerenone in patients with Heart Failure with preserved Ejection Fraction (HFpEF) is not well defined. Since a growing medical literature has suggested that mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists may be beneficial for patients with HFpEF, this review gives an in-depth update on the role of spironolactone and eplerenone and their implications for therapy in the setting of HFpEF. Eleven clinical studies, including seven randomized trials, were reviewed. Two randomized controlled trials evaluated the effect of eplerenone on different end-points, including 6 minute walk distance (6 MWD), cardiovascular mortality, non-fatal reinfarction, hospitalization for unstable angina and congestive heart failure. Eplerenone did not affect either 6 MWD or event-free survival rates in the overall study population in these two reports. The effects of spironolactone on similar composite endpoints were evaluated in 7 studies in patients with HFpEF. Compared to placebo, hospitalization for heart failure was significantly lower in the spironolactone group and spironolactone was also shown to improve diastolic function and induced beneficial remodeling through a reduction in myocardial fibrosis. The safety profile of spironolactone and eplerenone has been assessed in two recent studies. Data showed that eplerenone and spironolactone are both associated with the occurrence of gynecomastia, mastodynia, and abnormal vaginal bleeding and in addition, they can increase natriuresis and cause renal retention of potassium; furthermore, eplerenone may cause hyperkalemia and promote the onset of metabolic acidosis or hyponatremia. In conclusion although the mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists eplerenone and spironolactone improve clinical outcomes in patients with HFrEF, additional data will be necessary to better define their risk-benefit profile, especially for eplerenone, in the treatment of HFpEF. PMID:26404747

  10. Pharmacokinetics of cefaclor AF: effects of age, antacids and H2-receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Satterwhite, J H; Cerimele, B J; Coleman, D L; Hatcher, B L; Kisicki, J; DeSante, K A

    1992-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and bioavailability of cefaclor advanced formulation (cefaclor AF) were investigated in two studies, one comparing healthy elderly and younger volunteers and the other assessing the effects of an antacid and H2-receptor antagonist on cefaclor AF bioavailability. The pharmacokinetics of a 750 mg dose of cefaclor AF were studied in 30 subjects ranging in age from 65 to 84 years and 10 control subjects 21-45 years of age. Compared with controls, elderly subjects exhibited higher plasma concentrations of cefaclor which were attributed to lower plasma clearance. There was a strong association between age and renal function, and the plasma clearance of cefaclor was highly dependent upon renal function. Thus, elderly patients with impaired renal function had a reduced ability to eliminate cefaclor. Due to a short elimination half-life and wide therapeutic index, dosage adjustments are not necessary in patients exhibiting moderate renal dysfunction. The 15 healthy men in the second trial were crossed over to receive five treatments, including cefaclor AF (500 mg) alone, cefaclor AF with or preceded by cimetidine, cefaclor AF followed by Maalox TC and cefaclor immediate release (500 mg) alone. Cefaclor AF and immediate release cefaclor had similar bioavailability, but plasma concentrations were maintained for a longer period of time when cefaclor AF was administered. Cimetidine did not alter the bioavailability of cefaclor AF but Maalox TC, coadministered with cefaclor AF, reduced the extent of absorption. This suggests that cefaclor AF bioavailability is influenced by the antacid Maalox TC but not by H2-receptor antagonist cimetidine. PMID:1287615

  11. Antinociceptive activity of NK1 receptor antagonists: non-specific effects of racemic RP67580.

    PubMed Central

    Rupniak, N. M.; Boyce, S.; Williams, A. R.; Cook, G.; Longmore, J.; Seabrook, G. R.; Caeser, M.; Iversen, S. D.; Hill, R. G.

    1993-01-01

    1. Release of substance P in the dorsal horn is considered a primary event in the perception of pain. The profile of racemic RP67580, a non-peptide antagonist at the NK1 (substance P) receptor, was examined in a range of antinociception tests on rodents. 2. At doses up to 30 mg kg-1, s.c. racemic RP67580 exhibited antinociceptive activity in writhing and formalin paw tests in mice and gerbils. Acetic acid induced writhing and the licking response to formalin were reduced to 40-50% of the level observed in vehicle-treated animals (P < 0.05). However, this agent was not active in mouse tail flick, rat paw pressure or rat and guinea-pig formalin paw tests. 3. Like racemic RP67580, the calcium channel blockers nifedipine (30 mg kg-1, i.p.) and verapamil (10 or 20 mg kg-1, s.c.) inhibited the response to formalin by approximately 60% in gerbils (P < 0.05 compared with vehicle-treated animals). 4. Evidence for calcium channel antagonist activity of RP67580 was obtained in vitro. Racemic RP67580 inhibited calcium entry into depolarized strips of guinea-pig ileum longitudinal muscle myenteric plexus (apparent KB = 587 +/- 115 nM), inhibited [3H]-diltiazem binding to rabbit skeletal membranes (IC50 = 298 nM) and depressed high threshold calcium currents in neurones cultured from rat cortex (10% inhibition at 10 microM). 5. These findings indicate that the acute antinociceptive effects of RP67580 may not be attributable to a specific interaction with NK1 receptors and may be mediated via calcium channel blockade. PMID:8306108

  12. The role of leukotriene receptor antagonists in the treatment of chronic asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Warner, J O

    2001-01-01

    A considerable increase in the prevalence of childhood asthma over the last few decades has been mirrored by a dramatic increase in usage of anti-asthma drugs; however, there has been no reduction in the numbers of patients dying of asthma. Concern has been expressed about the development of tolerance with continuous use of inhaled beta-agonist bronchodilators and about the potential adverse systemic effects of high-dose inhaled corticosteroids in children. Moreover, patient compliance with inhaled therapy tends to be poor. The leukotriene receptor antagonists, including montelukast, pranlukast and zafirlukast, are orally administered agents with proven benefits in asthma. In a large, placebo-controlled pediatric trial, montelukast significantly (P < 0.02) reduced requirements for rescue beta-agonist bronchodilators, improved quality of life, reduced the circulating level of blood eosinophils and produced improvements in lung function. In adult studies, montelukast reduced sputum eosinophils and attenuated early and late phase allergen-induced reactions. Montelukast has also demonstrated protective effects against exercise-induced bronchospasm in both adults and children, and this protection was maintained during the trough period at the end of the once-daily administration interval (namely, 20-24 h post-dose). Several studies have demonstrated that the formation of cysteinyl leukotrienes in the airways of asthmatic patients is not suppressed by corticosteroids; thus, it is not surprising that montelukast demonstrates complementary effects when given with inhaled corticosteroids. Currently, the most compelling evidence from published trials suggests that leukotriene receptor antagonists can be used as add-on therapy to inhaled corticosteroids to allow tapering of corticosteroid dose and reduction in beta-agonist use. Recent clinical trial results suggest there may also be a role for these agents as first-line therapy in children with mild asthma. PMID:11421938

  13. CGP 36,742, an orally active GABAB receptor antagonist, facilitates memory in a social recognition test in rats.

    PubMed

    Mondadori, C; Moebius, H J; Zingg, M

    1996-05-01

    CGP 36,742, an orally active GABAB receptor antagonist, improves the retention performance of rats in a social recognition test. This effect is detectable over a very wide range of doses (0.03 to 300 mg/kg, p.o.). Considering its binding (32 mumol affinity for the GABAB site) the surprisingly potent activity of CGP 36,742 makes it appear quite possible that the effect is mediated by an as yet unknown receptor subtype. PMID:8762176

  14. Cardiac and gastric effects of histamine H2 receptor antagonists: no evidence for a correlation between lipophilicity and receptor affinity.

    PubMed Central

    Coruzzi, G.; Adami, M.; Pozzoli, C.; Giorgi, F.; Bertaccini, G.

    1996-01-01

    1. A series of histamine H2 receptor antagonists with different lipophilicity were tested in cardiac and gastric assays in order to reveal possible differences in receptor affinity. Lipophilicity of the compounds was expressed as CLOG P (theoretically-determined logarithm of octanol:water partition coefficient) and log k' (logarithm of capacity factor, experimentally-determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography). 2. Aminopotentidine (APT) and iodoaminopotentidine (I-APT), which are both lipophilic compounds, behaved as insurmountable antagonists of histamine responses in rat isolated gastric fundus (pKB = 6.20 +/- 0.16 and 6.89 +/- 0.19, respectively) and guinea-pig isolated papillary muscle (pKB = 6.34 +/- 0.37 and 6.81 +/- 0.26, respectively). They were approximately as effective as ranitidine (RAN) in reducing histamine-induced acid secretion in the anaesthetized rat, ID50 values being 0.018 +/- 0.02, 0.020 +/- 0.03 and 0.036 +/- 0.01 mumol kg-1 i.v. for APT, I-APT and RAN, respectively. Both APT and I-APT had a significantly longer duration of action than RAN. 3. The hydrophilic compound, SK&F 92857, was inactive up to 10 microM in modifying histamine-induced acid secretion in the isolated rat stomach. In the papillary muscle, low concentrations (0.1-1 microM) of this compound produced a competitive antagonism of the histamine responses (pA2 value = 7.38 +/- 0.11), while a higher concentration (10 microM) significantly reduced the maximal response to histamine. 4. RAN competitively antagonized histamine effects with a comparable affinity in cardiac and gastric preparations (pA2 values were 6.42 +/- 0.09 and 6.78 +/- 0.38 in heart and stomach, respectively). 5. Results obtained in this study clearly showed that the discrepancies between gastric and cardiac effects observed for some H2 antagonists are not explained solely by differences in lipophilicity of compounds. Moreover, the significant correlation found between CLOG P and log k

  15. Novel selective agonists and antagonists confirm neurokinin NK1 receptors in guinea-pig vas deferens.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, J. M.; Morton, I. K.

    1991-01-01

    1. This study investigated the recognition characteristics of neurokinin receptors mediating potentiation of the contractile response to field stimulation in the guinea-pig vas deferens. 2. A predominant NK1 receptor population is strongly suggested by the relative activities of the common naturally-occurring tachykinin agonists, which fall within less than one order of magnitude. This conclusion is supported by the relative activities of the synthetic NK1 selective agonists substance P methyl ester, [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) and delta-aminovaleryl-[L-Pro9,N-MeLeu10]- SP(7-11) (GR73632) which were 0.78, 9.3 and 120 as active as substance P, respectively. Furthermore, the NK2 selective agonist [Lys3, Gly8,-R-gamma-lactam-Leu9]-NKA(3-10) (GR64349) was active only at the highest concentrations tested (greater than 10 microM), and the NK3 selective agonist, succ-[Asp6,N-MePhe8]-SP(6-11) (senktide) was essentially inactive (10 nM-32 microM). 3. [D-Arg1,D-Pro2,D-Trp7,9,Leu11]-SP(1-11) antagonized responses to neurokinin A, neurokinin B, physalaemin, eledoisin, [Glp6,D-Pro9]-SP(6-11), GR73632 and GR64349 (apparent pKB s 5.6-6.2), but was less potent in antagonizing responses to substance P, substance P methyl ester and [Glp6,L-Pro9]-SP(6-11) (apparent pKB s less than or equal to 5.0-5.0). 4. In contrast, the recently developed NK1-selective receptor antagonist [D-Pro9[Spiro-gamma-lactam]Leu10,Trp11]-SP(1-11) (GR71251) did not produce agonist-dependent pKB estimates. Schild plot analysis indicated a competitive interaction with a single receptor population where the antagonist had an estimated overall pKB of 7.58 +/- 0.13 for the four agonists of differing subtype selectivity tested (GR73632, GR64349, substance P methyl ester and neurokinin B).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707714

  16. Discovery of 1H-pyrazolo[3,4-b]pyridines as potent dual orexin receptor antagonists (DORAs).

    PubMed

    Behnke, Dirk; Cotesta, Simona; Hintermann, Samuel; Fendt, Markus; Gee, Christine E; Jacobson, Laura H; Laue, Grit; Meyer, Arndt; Wagner, Trixie; Badiger, Sangamesh; Chaudhari, Vinod; Chebrolu, Murali; Pandit, Chetan; Hoyer, Daniel; Betschart, Claudia

    2015-12-01

    Compound rac-1 was identified by high throughput screening. Here we report SAR studies and MedChem optimization towards the highly potent dual orexin receptor antagonists (S)-2 and (S)-3. Furthermore, strategies to overcome the suboptimal physicochemical properties are highlighted and the pharmacokinetic profiles of representative compounds is presented. PMID:26522950

  17. Molecular docking and 3D-QSAR studies on the glucocorticoid receptor antagonistic activity of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Luo, Y; Fu, J; Zhou, J; Kyzas, G Z

    2016-02-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities of hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyls (HO-PCBs) were recently characterised. To further explore the interactions between HO-PCBs and the GR, and to elucidate structural characteristics that influence the GR antagonistic activity of HO-PCBs, molecular docking and three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) studies were performed. Comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was performed using both ligand- and receptor-based alignment schemes. Results generated from the receptor-based model were found to be more satisfactory, with q(2) of 0.632 and r(2) of 0.931 compared with those from the ligand-based model. Some internal validation strategies (e.g. cross-validation analysis, bootstrapping analysis and Y-randomisation) and an external validation method were used respectively to further assess the stability and predictive ability of the derived model. Graphical interpretation of the model provided some insights into the structural features that affected the GR antagonistic activity of HO-PCBs. Molecular docking studies revealed that some key residues were critical for ligand-receptor interactions by forming hydrogen bonds (Glu540) and hydrophobic interactions with ligands (Ile539, Val543 and Trp577). Although CoMSIA sometimes depends on the alignment of the molecules, the information provided is beneficial for predicting the GR antagonistic activities of HO-PCB homologues and is helpful for understanding the binding mechanisms of HO-PCBs to GR. PMID:26848875

  18. Spatial Discrimination Reversal Learning in Weanling Rats Is Impaired by Striatal Administration of an NMDA-Receptor Antagonist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Deborah J.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum plays a major role in both motor control and learning and memory, including executive function and "behavioral flexibility." Lesion, temporary inactivation, and infusion of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist into the dorsomedial striatum (dmSTR) impair reversal learning in adult rats. Systemic administration of MK-801…

  19. Further analysis of anomalous pKB values for histamine H2-receptor antagonists on the mouse isolated stomach assay.

    PubMed Central

    Black, J. W.; Leff, P.; Shankley, N. P.

    1985-01-01

    Agonist-antagonist interactions at histamine receptors have been re-examined using improved techniques, on the mouse isolated, lumen-perfused, stomach gastric acid assay. Using histamine as agonist, pKB values have been estimated for burimamide, metiamide, cimetidine, ranitidine, oxmetidine and famotidine on both the gastric and guinea-pig isolated right atrium assays. With the exception of oxmetidine on the atrial assay, these compounds behaved as competitive antagonists on both assays. Oxmetidine significantly depressed basal rate on the atrial assay and the Schild plot slope parameter (0.81) was significantly less than one. The pKB values estimated on the gastric assay were lower than those on the atrial assay. However, the difference between the values on the gastric and atrial assays was not constant. The difference between the two assays for famotidine was not significant. We conclude that the apparent varying selectivity of the antagonists for gastric and atrial histamine H2-receptors may be explained by the differential loss of antagonists into the gastric secretion from the receptor compartment and that there is no need to postulate heterogeneity of histamine H2-receptors. PMID:2866002

  20. Effects of dopamine D1-like and D2-like antagonists on cocaine discrimination in muscarinic receptor knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Morgane; Caine, Simon Barak

    2016-04-01

    Muscarinic and dopamine brain systems interact intimately, and muscarinic receptor ligands, like dopamine ligands, can modulate the reinforcing and discriminative stimulus (S(D)) effects of cocaine. To enlighten the dopamine/muscarinic interactions as they pertain to the S(D) effects of cocaine, we evaluated whether muscarinic M1, M2 or M4 receptors are necessary for dopamine D1 and/or D2 antagonist mediated modulation of the S(D) effects of cocaine. Knockout mice lacking M1, M2, or M4 receptors, as well as control wild-type mice and outbred Swiss-Webster mice, were trained to discriminate 10mg/kg cocaine from saline in a food-reinforced drug discrimination procedure. Effects of pretreatments with the dopamine D1 antagonist SCH 23390 and the dopamine D2 antagonist eticlopride were evaluated. In intact mice, both SCH 23390 and eticlopride attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect, as expected. SCH 23390 similarly attenuated the cocaine discriminative stimulus effect in M1 knockout mice, but not in mice lacking M2 or M4 receptors. The effects of eticlopride were comparable in each knockout strain. These findings demonstrate differences in the way that D1 and D2 antagonists modulate the S(D) effects of cocaine, D1 modulation being at least partially dependent upon activity at the inhibitory M2/M4 muscarinic subtypes, while D2 modulation appeared independent of these systems. PMID:26874213

  1. Discovery of selective probes and antagonists for G-protein-coupled receptors FPR/FPRL1 and GPR30.

    PubMed

    Arterburn, Jeffrey B; Oprea, Tudor I; Prossnitz, Eric R; Edwards, Bruce S; Sklar, Larry A

    2009-01-01

    Recent technological advances in flow cytometry provide a versatile platform for high throughput screening of compound libraries coupled with high-content biological testing and drug discovery. The G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) constitute the largest class of signaling molecules in the human genome with frequent roles in disease pathogenesis, yet many examples of orphan receptors with unknown ligands remain. The complex biology and potential for drug discovery within this class provide strong incentives for chemical biology approaches seeking to develop small molecule probes to facilitate elucidation of mechanistic pathways and enable specific manipulation of the activity of individual receptors. We have initiated small molecule probe development projects targeting two distinct families of GPCRs: the formylpeptide receptors (FPR/FPRL1) and G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30). In each case the assay for compound screening involved the development of an appropriate small molecule fluorescent probe, and the flow cytometry platform provided inherently biological rich assays that enhanced the process of identification and optimization of novel antagonists. The contributions of cheminformatics analysis tools, virtual screening, and synthetic chemistry in synergy with the biomolecular screening program have yielded valuable new chemical probes with high binding affinity, selectivity for the targeted receptor, and potent antagonist activity. This review describes the discovery of novel small molecule antagonists of FPR and FPRL1, and GPR30, and the associated characterization process involving secondary assays, cell based and in vivo studies to define the selectivity and activity of the resulting chemical probes. PMID:19807662

  2. Successful virtual screening for a submicromolar antagonist of the neurokinin-1 receptor based on a ligand-supported homology model.

    PubMed

    Evers, Andreas; Klebe, Gerhard

    2004-10-21

    The neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor belongs to the family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which represents one of the most relevant target families in small-molecule drug design. In this paper, we describe a homology modeling of the NK1 receptor based on the high-resolution X-ray structure of rhodopsin and the successful virtual screening based on this protein model. The NK1 receptor model has been generated using our new MOBILE (modeling binding sites including ligand information explicitly) approach. Starting with preliminary homology models, it generates improved models of the protein binding pocket together with bound ligands. Ligand information is used as an integral part in the homology modeling process. For the construction of the NK1 receptor, antagonist CP-96345 was used to restrain the modeling. The quality of the obtained model was validated by probing its ability to accommodate additional known NK1 antagonists from structurally diverse classes. On the basis of the generated model and on the analysis of known NK1 antagonists, a pharmacophore model was deduced, which subsequently guided the 2D and 3D database search with UNITY. As a following step, the remaining hits were docked into the modeled binding pocket of the NK1 receptor. Finally, seven compounds were selected for biochemical testing, from which one showed affinity in the submicromolar range. Our results suggest that ligand-supported homology models of GPCRs may be used as effective platforms for structure-based drug design. PMID:15481976

  3. Intracerebroventricular responses to neuropeptide gamma in the conscious rat: characterization of its receptor with selective antagonists.

    PubMed Central

    Picard, P.; Couture, R.

    1996-01-01

    1. The cardiovascular and behavioural effects elicited by the intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) administration of neuropeptide gamma (NP gamma) in the conscious rat were assessed before and 5 min after i.c.v. pretreatment with antagonists selective for NK1 (RP 67,580), NK2 (SR 48,968) and NK3 (R 820) receptors. In addition, the central effects of NP gamma before and after desensitization of the NK1 and NK2 receptors with high doses of substance P (SP) and neurokinin A (NKA) were compared. 2. Intracerebroventricular injection of NP gamma (10-780 pmol) evoked dose- and time-dependent increases in mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), heart rate (HR), face washing, head scratching, grooming and wet-dog shake behaviours. Similar injection of vehicle or 1 pmol NP gamma had no significant effect on those parameters. 3. The cardiovascular and behavioural responses elicited by NP gamma (25 pmol) were significantly and dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment with 650 pmol and 6.5 nmol of SR 48,968. No inhibition of NP gamma responses was observed when 6.5 nmol of RP 67,580 was used in a similar study. Moreover, the prior co-administration of SR 48,968 (6.5 nmol) and RP 67,580 (6.5 nmol) with or without R 820 (6.5 nmol) did not reduce further the central effects of NP gamma and significant residual responses (30-50%) remained. 4. No tachyphylaxis to NP gamma-induced cardiovascular and behavioural changes was observed when two consecutive injections of 25 pmol NP gamma were given 24 h apart. 5. Simultaneous NK1 and NK2 receptor desensitization reduced significantly central effects mediated by 25 pmol NP gamma. However, significant residual responses persisted as seen after pretreatment with SR 48,968. 6. The results suggest that the central effects of NP gamma are mediated partly by NK2 receptors and by another putative tachykinin receptor subtype (NP gamma receptor?) that appears to be different from NK1 and NK3 receptors. PMID:8789375

  4. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of platelet adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Christopher N; Passacquale, Gabriella; Ferro, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Over the last two decades or more, anti-platelet therapy has become established as a cornerstone in the treatment of patients with ischaemic cardiovascular disease, since such drugs effectively reduce arterial thrombotic events. The original agent used in this context was aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) but, with the advent of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists, the use of dual anti-platelet therapy has resulted in further improvement in cardiovascular outcomes when compared with aspirin alone. The first group of platelet ADP receptor antagonists to be developed was the thienopyridine class, which comprise inactive pro-drugs that require in vivo metabolism to their active metabolites before exerting their inhibitory effect on the P2Y(12) receptor. Clopidogrel has been the principal ADP receptor antagonist in use over the past decade, but is limited by variability in its in vivo inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA). The pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel are unpredictable due to their vulnerability to multiple independent factors including genetic polymorphisms. Expression of the 3435T/T genetic variant encoding the MDR1 gene for the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter results in a significantly reduced maximum drug concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve as intestinal absorption of clopidogrel is reduced; and the expression of the mutant *2 allele of CYP2C19 results in similar pharmacokinetic effects as the two cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated steps required for the production of the active metabolite of clopidogrel are impaired. These variable pharmacokinetics lead to erratic pharmacodynamics and cannot reliably be overcome with increased dosing. Both prasugrel, a third-generation thienopyridine, and ticagrelor, a cyto-pentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine, have more predictable pharmacokinetics and enhanced pharmacodynamics than clopidogrel. Neither appears to be affected by the same genetic polymorphisms as clopidogrel; prasugrel requires

  5. Design of novel chimeric melanotropin-deltorphin analogues. Discovery of the first potent human melanocortin 1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Han, G; Quillan, J M; Carlson, K; Sadée, W; Hruby, V J

    2003-02-27

    A number of novel alpha-melanotropin (alpha-MSH) analogues have been designed, synthesized, and assayed for bioactivity at the melanocortin-1 (MC1) receptor from Xenopus frog skin, and selected potent analogues were examined at recombinant human MC1, MC3, and MC4 receptors expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. These ligands were designed from Deltorphin-II, by a new hybrid approach, which incorporates the hydrophobic tail and the address sequence of Deltorphin-II (Glu-Val-Val-Gly-NH(2)) and key pharmacophore elements of melanotropins. Some of the ligands designed, c[Xxx-Yyy-Zzz-Arg-Trp-Glu]-Val-Val-Gly-NH(2) [XXX = nothing, Gly, beta-Ala, gamma-Abu, 6-Ahx; YYY = His, His(3-Bom), (S)-cyclopentylglycine (Cpg); ZZZ = Phe, d-Phe; d-Nal(2')], show high potency at melanocortin receptors. One ligand, GXH-32B-c[beta-Ala-His-d-Nal(2')-Arg-Trp-Glu]-Val-Val-Gly-NH(2), the most potent of the chimeric analogues tested, displayed agonist activity at each of the MC receptor subtypes analyzed, with an EC(50) of 2 nM at the amphibian MC1 receptor. In contrast, GXH-38B-c[Gly-Cpg-d-Nal(2')-Arg-Trp-Glu]-Val-Val-Gly-NH(2) (Cpg = cyclopentyl glycine) was an antagonist with a IC(50) of 43 nM at the amphibian receptor, and among the human subtypes tested, was the most potent at the MC1 receptor subtype where it also acted as an antagonist (K(i) = 53 nM), which is the first potent antagonist discovered for the human MC1 receptor. These results provide strong evidence supporting our hypothesis that ligand scaffolds for different G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) can be used to design ligands for other GPCRs and to design more potent ligands to treat diseases associated with the human MC1 receptor. PMID:12593660

  6. 2-Phenylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one as a new scaffold to obtain potent and selective human A3 adenosine receptor antagonists: new insights into the receptor-antagonist recognition.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Ombretta; Colotta, Vittoria; Catarzi, Daniela; Varano, Flavia; Poli, Daniela; Filacchioni, Guido; Varani, Katia; Vincenzi, Fabrizio; Borea, Pier Andrea; Paoletta, Silvia; Morizzo, Erika; Moro, Stefano

    2009-12-10

    A molecular simplification approach of previously reported 2-arylpyrazolo[3,4-c]quinolin-4-ones was applied to design 2-arylpyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one derivatives as new human A(3) adenosine receptor antagonists. Substituents with different lipophilicity and steric hindrance were introduced at the 5-position of the bicyclic scaffold (R(5) = H, Me, Et, Ph, CH(2)Ph) and on the 2-phenyl ring (OMe, Me). Most of the synthesized derivatives were highly potent hA(3) adenosine receptor antagonists, the best being the 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)pyrazolo[4,3-d]pyrimidin-7-one (K(i) = 1.2 nM). The new compounds were also highly selective, being completely devoid of affinity toward hA(1), hA(2A), and hA(2B) adenosine receptors. On the basis of the recently published human A(2A) receptor crystallographic information, we propose a novel receptor-driven hypothesis to explain both A(3) AR affinity and A(3) versus A(2A) selectivity profiles of these new antagonists. PMID:19743865

  7. Design, synthesis, structure-activity relationships, and docking studies of pyrazole-containing derivatives as a novel series of potent glucagon receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Shu, Shuangjie; Cai, Xiaoqing; Li, Jia; Feng, Yang; Dai, Antao; Wang, Jiang; Yang, Dehua; Wang, Ming-Wei; Liu, Hong

    2016-06-15

    Glucagon receptor antagonists possess a great potential for treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. A series of pyrazole-containing derivatives were designed, synthesized and evaluated by biological assays as glucagon receptor antagonists. Most of the compounds exhibited good in vitro efficacy. Two of them, compounds 17f and 17k, displayed relatively potent antagonist effects on glucagon receptors with IC50 values of 3.9 and 3.6μM, respectively. The possible binding modes of 17f and 17k with the cognate receptor were explored by molecular docking simulation. PMID:27161876

  8. Discovery of 2-aryloxy-4-amino-quinazoline derivatives as novel protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) antagonists.

    PubMed

    Cho, Nam-Chul; Cha, Ji Hyoun; Kim, Hyojin; Kwak, Jinsook; Kim, Dohee; Seo, Seung-Hwan; Shin, Ji-Sun; Kim, TaeHun; Park, Ki Duk; Lee, Jiyoun; No, Kyoung Tai; Kim, Yun Kyung; Lee, Kyung-Tae; Pae, Ae Nim

    2015-12-15

    Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) is a member of G protein-coupled receptor and its activation initiates diverse inflammatory responses. Recent studies suggest that antagonists of PAR2 may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for inflammatory diseases. In this study, we have developed a series of 2-aryloxy-4-amino-quinazoline derivatives as PAR2 antagonists and examined their effects against LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW 264.7 macrophages. Among these derivatives, compound 2f displayed the greatest antagonistic activity with the IC50 value of 2.8μM. Binding modes of the newly identified PAR2 antagonists were analyzed by molecular docking using IFD/MM-GBSA methods in the putative binding site of PAR2 homology model. Moreover, 2f demonstrated significant inhibitory effects on the LPS-activated pro-inflammatory mediators including nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) through the regulation of various intracellular signaling pathways involving nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), activator protein 1 (AP-1) and the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK). Furthermore, administration of 2f significantly reduced the mortality of LPS-induced sepsis in mice. These results provide useful insights into the development of novel PAR2 antagonists with anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26631441

  9. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past.

    PubMed

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-05-26

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  10. Suppression of conditioned fear by administration of CCKB receptor antagonist PD135158.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, T; Akiyoshi, J; Isogawa, K; Kohno, Y; Hikichi, T; Nagayama, H

    1999-12-01

    In order to examine the involvement of CCK in the formation of anxiety, we have investigated whether CCKB receptor antagonist PD135158 suppressed conditioned fear stress. Rats were individually subjected to 30 min of inescapable electric footshock in a chamber with a grid floor. First, the rats were individually subjected to 30 min of footshock. Twenty-four h after the footshock, the rats were again placed in the chamber and observed for 5 min without shocks. PD135158 was administered 30 min before placing the rats in the chamber again. Secondly, PD135158 was administered 30 min before footshock. Thirdly, PD135158 was administered 5 min after footshock. Administration of PD135158 30 min before conditioned fear stress significantly reduced freezing behavior. Administration of PD135158 30 min before footshock also significantly reduced freezing behavior. But, administration of PD135158 5 min after footshock did not significantly reduce freezing behavior. PD135158 blocked not only the acquisition but also the expression of conditioned fear. These results suggest that the CCKB receptor might play an important role in conditioned fear stress and that it might be related to anxiety. PMID:10657528

  11. Potential therapeutic uses of interleukin 1 receptor antagonists in human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hallegua, D; Weisman, M

    2002-01-01

    Methods: The National Library of Medicine's PubMed database was searched for articles about pharmaceutical agents that reduce the biological actions of IL1. Results: Fish oils and corticosteroids were identified as non-selective pharmacological interventions that reduce the activity of IL1, whereas a recombinant human IL1 receptor antagonist (anakinra) and a soluble recombinant type I IL1 receptor act selectively. To date, anakinra is the only selective intervention that has been shown in controlled clinical trials to be effective and well tolerated in the treatment of a specific human disorder, RA. In controlled clinical trials, anakinra provided significant clinical improvement and slowed radiographic disease progression in patients with active RA. Moreover, addition of anakinra to existing methotrexate treatment significantly reduced signs and symptoms of active disease. Conclusions: The clinical use of anakinra has been demonstrated in the management of RA, but blocking of IL1 in other human disorders, as well as the safety of the use of these blocking agents in chronic diseases, still needs to be defined by controlled clinical investigations. PMID:12379516

  12. Inhibitory effects of H2-receptor antagonists on cytochrome P450 in male ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, D H; Kim, E J; Han, S S; Roh, J K; Jeong, T C; Park, J H

    1995-08-01

    1. The present study was undertaken to examine the effects of H2-receptor antagonists including newly developed mifentidine derivatives, IY-80843 and IY-80845, on cytochrome P450(P450) in vitro and in vivo. 2. Initially, 3-methylcholanthrene-, phenobarbital-, ethanol- and dexamethasone-induced liver microsomes were prepared from male ICR mice to study in vitro effects of above chemicals on ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase(EROD), pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylase(PROD), p-nitrophenol hydroxylase and erythromycin N-demethylase(ERDM) activities, respectively. It was found that histamine, cimetidine and famotidine were not inhibitory to four enzyme activities. Meanwhile, mifentidine slightly inhibited EROD and PROD activities and its derivatives IY-80843 and IY-80845 strongly inhibited PROD, EROD and ERDM activities. 3. Prolongation of hexobarbital-induced sleeping time was determined in male ICR mice to confirm in vitro inhibitory effects of mifentidine and its derivatives in vivo. It was observed that cimetidine, mifentidine, IY-80843 and IY-80845 caused dose-dependent increases in the sleeping time, indicating the inhibition of P450 responsible for hexobarbital metabolism. 4. It was concluded that mifentidine and its derivatives are P450 inhibitors and that our newly synthesized IY-80843 is most inhibitory. 5. The present results indicate that mifentidine and its derivatives not only antagonise the H2-receptor but also inhibit P450 enzymes. PMID:7576828

  13. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  14. Synthesis and biological evaluation of a new angiotensin II receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Zheng, H-l; Zhu, W-b; Wu, D; Da, Y-j; Yan, Y-J; Bian, J; Chen, Z-l

    2014-12-01

    The design, synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of (2 R,6 S)-4-({1-[2-(1 H-tetrazol-5-yl)phenyl]-1 H-indol-4-yl}methyl)-2,6-dimethylmorpholine, compound 1, as a novel angiotensin II receptor antagonist is outlined. Radioligand binding assays showed that 1 displayed a high affinity for the angiotensin II type 1receptor with IC50 value of 0.82 nM. It acted as a potent anti-hypertensive derivative (maximal reduction of mean arterial pressure of 47 mm Hg at 10 mg/kg po in spontaneously hypertensive rat producing a dose-dependent fall in blood pressure following oral administration lasting beyond 10 h. Acute toxicity tests measured the LD50 of 1 value as 2431.7 mg/kg, which is higher than Losartan (LD50=2248 mg/kg). In addition further testing showed that 1 also demonstrated efficient anti-proliferative activity in vitro and anti-prostate cancer activity in vivo were also found. Taken together this compound could be considered as an effective and durable anti-hypertension drug candidate with additional anti-prostate cancer activity. These encouraging results are deserved of further investigation towards its use for therapeutic benefit. PMID:24573978

  15. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel potent angiotensin II receptor antagonists with anti-hypertension effect.

    PubMed

    Nie, Yong-yan; Da, Ya-jing; Zheng, Hao; Yang, Xiao-xia; Jia, Lin; Wen, Cai-hong; Liang, Li-sha; Tian, Juan; Chen, Zhi-long

    2012-04-15

    A series of novel angiotensin II type 1 receptor antagonists were prepared. Radioligand binding assay suggested that compounds 1b and 1c could be recognized by the AT(1) receptor with an IC(50) value of 1.6 ± 0.09 nM and 2.64 ± 0.7 nM, respectively. In vivo anti-hypertension experiments showed that compounds (1a, 1b, 1c, 1e) elicited a significant decrease in SBP and DBP of spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs). The antihypertensive effects maintained for 10 h, which indicated that these compounds had a favorable blood pressure-lowering effect. Acute toxicity testing suggested that the LD(50) value of compound 1b was 2316.8 mg/kg which was lower than valsartan (LD(50)=307.50 mg/kg) but higher than losartan (LD(50)=2248 mg/kg). So they could be considered as novel anti-hypertension candidates and deserved for further investigation. PMID:22410249

  16. Powerful anticonvulsant action of IL-1 receptor antagonist on intracerebral injection and astrocytic overexpression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Vezzani, A.; Moneta, D.; Conti, M.; Richichi, C.; Ravizza, T.; De Luigi, A.; De Simoni, M. G.; Sperk, G.; Andell-Jonsson, S.; Lundkvist, J.; Iverfeldt, K.; Bartfai, T.

    2000-01-01

    IL-1β and its endogenous receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) are rapidly induced by seizures in the rodent hippocampus. Exogenously applied IL-1β prolongs seizures in an IL-1R type I-mediated manner. This effect depends on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor activation. We report here that intrahippocampal application of recombinant IL-1Ra or its selective endogenous overexpression in astrocytes under the control of glial acidic fibrillary protein promoter potently inhibits motor and electroencephalographic seizures induced by bicuculline methiodide in mice. Accordingly, transgenic mice show a reduced seizure-related c-fos mRNA expression in various forebrain areas compared with their wild-type littermates. Recombinant IL-1Ra was ineffective in mice deficient in IL-1R type I, having per se a delayed onset to generalized convulsions. These results demonstrate that IL-1Ra mediates potent anticonvulsant effects acting on IL-1R type I and suggest that the balance between brain IL-1β and IL-1Ra represents a crucial mechanism to control seizure generalization. PMID:11016948

  17. JB-9322, a new selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with potent gastric mucosal protective properties.

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, B.; Montero, M. J.; Sevilla, M. A.; Román, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    1. JB-9322 is a selective histamine H2-receptor antagonist with gastric antisecretory activity and mucosal protective properties. 2. The affinity of JB-9322 for the guinea-pig atria histamine H2-receptor was approximately 2 times greater than that of ranitidine. 3. In vivo, the ID50 value for the inhibition of gastric acid secretion in pylorus-ligated rats was 5.28 mg kg-1 intraperitoneally. JB-9322 also dose-dependently inhibited gastric juice volume and pepsin secretion. In gastric lumen-perfused rats, intravenous injection of JB-9322 dose-dependently reduced histamine-, pentagastrin- and carbachol-stimulated gastric acid secretion. 4. JB-9322 showed antiulcer activity against aspirin and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions and was more potent than ranitidine. 5. JB-9322 effectively inhibited macroscopic gastric haemorrhagic lesions induced by ethanol. Intraperitoneal injection was effective in preventing the lesions as well as oral treatment. The oral ID50 value for these lesions was 1.33 mg kg-1. By contrast, ranitidine (50 mg kg-1) failed to reduce these lesions. In addition, the protective effect of JB-9322 was independent of prostaglandin synthesis. 6. These results indicate that JB-9322 is a new antiulcer drug that exerts a potent cytoprotective effect in addition to its gastric antisecretory activity. PMID:7647984

  18. Aldosterone and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists modulate elastin and collagen deposition in human skin.

    PubMed

    Mitts, Thomas F; Bunda, Severa; Wang, Yanting; Hinek, Aleksander

    2010-10-01

    We have shown that the steroid hormone aldosterone, recognized for its action on the kidney and the cardiovascular system, also modulates deposition of extracellular matrix in human skin. We have shown that treatment of primary cultures of normal skin fibroblasts with aldosterone (10 n-1 μM), in addition to stimulation of collagen type I expression, induces elastin gene expression and elastic fiber deposition. We have further shown that the elastogenic effect of aldosterone, which can be enhanced in the presence of mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonists spironolactone and eplerenone, is executed in a MR-independent manner via amplification of IGF-I receptor-mediated signaling. Because aldosterone applied alone stimulates both collagen and elastin deposition in cultures of fibroblasts and in cultures of skin explants derived from dermal stretch marks, we postulate that this steroid should be used in the treatment of damaged skin that loses its volume and elasticity. Moreover, aldosterone applied in conjunction with spironolactone or eplerenone induces matrix remodeling and exclusively enhances elastogenesis in cultures of fibroblasts and explants derived from dermal scars and keloids. We therefore propose that intra-lesional injection of these factors should be considered in therapy for disfiguring dermal lesions and especially in prevention of their recurrence after surgical excision. PMID:20535129

  19. NMDA Receptor Antagonist Ketamine Distorts Object Recognition by Reducing Feedback to Early Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Anouk M; Fahrenfort, Johannes J; van der Velde, Bauke; Lirk, Philipp B; Vulink, Nienke C C; Hollmann, Markus W; Scholte, H Steven; Lamme, Victor A F

    2016-05-01

    It is a well-established fact that top-down processes influence neural representations in lower-level visual areas. Electrophysiological recordings in monkeys as well as theoretical models suggest that these top-down processes depend on NMDA receptor functioning. However, this underlying neural mechanism has not been tested in humans. We used fMRI multivoxel pattern analysis to compare the neural representations of ambiguous Mooney images before and after they were recognized with their unambiguous grayscale version. Additionally, we administered ketamine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, to interfere with this process. Our results demonstrate that after recognition, the pattern of brain activation elicited by a Mooney image is more similar to that of its easily recognizable grayscale version than to the pattern evoked by the identical Mooney image before recognition. Moreover, recognition of Mooney images decreased mean response; however, neural representations of separate images became more dissimilar. So from the neural perspective, unrecognizable Mooney images all "look the same", whereas recognized Mooneys look different. We observed these effects in posterior fusiform part of lateral occipital cortex and in early visual cortex. Ketamine distorted these effects of recognition, but in early visual cortex only. This suggests that top-down processes from higher- to lower-level visual areas might operate via an NMDA pathway. PMID:25662715

  20. Designed abscisic acid analogs as antagonists of PYL-PP2C receptor interactions.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Jun; Okamoto, Masanori; Akiyama, Tomonori; Muto, Takuya; Yajima, Shunsuke; Sue, Masayuki; Seo, Mitsunori; Kanno, Yuri; Kamo, Tsunashi; Endo, Akira; Nambara, Eiji; Hirai, Nobuhiro; Ohnishi, Toshiyuki; Cutler, Sean R; Todoroki, Yasushi

    2014-06-01

    The plant stress hormone abscisic acid (ABA) is critical for several abiotic stress responses. ABA signaling is normally repressed by group-A protein phosphatases 2C (PP2Cs), but stress-induced ABA binds Arabidopsis PYR/PYL/RCAR (PYL) receptors, which then bind and inhibit PP2Cs. X-ray structures of several receptor-ABA complexes revealed a tunnel above ABA's 3' ring CH that opens at the PP2C binding interface. Here, ABA analogs with sufficiently long 3' alkyl chains were predicted to traverse this tunnel and block PYL-PP2C interactions. To test this, a series of 3'-alkylsulfanyl ABAs were synthesized with different alkyl chain lengths. Physiological, biochemical and structural analyses revealed that a six-carbon alkyl substitution produced a potent ABA antagonist that was sufficiently active to block multiple stress-induced ABA responses in vivo. This study provides a new approach for the design of ABA analogs, and the results validated structure-based design for this target class. PMID:24792952

  1. Leukotriene receptor antagonists--risks and benefits for use in paediatric asthma.

    PubMed

    Spahr, Jonathan E; Krawiec, Marzena E

    2004-05-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are important mediators of the pathophysiology of asthma, specifically, bronchoconstriction, airway inflammation and oedema and mucus hypersecretion. The LT receptor antagonists (LTRAs) inhibit these potent effects by selectively blocking the cysteinyl LT 1 receptor. These are the first novel therapies for asthma since the introduction of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) in 1972. Unlike generalised inhibition of airway inflammation by ICS, the LTRAs target inhibition of specific mediators. In general, paediatric data concerning these agents remain quite limited. However, they have demonstrated efficacy against allergen- and exercise-induced bronchospasm in both adults and children. Recently, their potential role for the treatment of viral-induced wheeze in young children has been explored. In multiple, placebo-controlled trials, the LTRAs have demonstrated efficacy for the treatment of mild persistent asthma, additive benefit in the management of symptomatic moderate asthmatics on maintenance ICS and evidence of significant steroid-sparing. Findings from these clinical trials and real-world experience support the use of the LTRAs as controller agents for persistent asthma. Based on their excellent safety profiles, tolerance and ease of administration (including once daily dosing with montelukast), this drug class may offer several important features for use as controller therapy, particularly in asthmatic children as young as 1 year of age, however, this must continue to be reviewed as new paediatric data become available. PMID:15155146

  2. Clinical trials with endothelin receptor antagonists: what went wrong and where can we improve?

    PubMed

    Kohan, Donald E; Cleland, John G; Rubin, Lewis J; Theodorescu, Dan; Barton, Matthias

    2012-10-15

    In the early 1990s, within three years of cloning of endothelin receptors, orally active endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs) were tested in humans and the first clinical trial of ERA therapy in humans was published in 1995. ERAs were subsequently tested in clinical trials involving heart failure, pulmonary arterial hypertension, resistant arterial hypertension, stroke/subarachnoid hemorrhage and various forms of cancer. The results of most of these trials - except those for pulmonary arterial hypertension and scleroderma-related digital ulcers - were either negative or neutral. Problems with study design, patient selection, drug toxicity, and drug dosing have been used to explain or excuse failures. Currently, a number of pharmaceutical companies who had developed ERAs as drug candidates have discontinued clinical trials or further drug development. Given the problems with using ERAs in clinical medicine, at the Twelfth International Conference on Endothelin in Cambridge, UK, a panel discussion was held by clinicians actively involved in clinical development of ERA therapy in renal disease, systemic and pulmonary arterial hypertension, heart failure, and cancer. This article provides summaries from the panel discussion as well as personal perspectives of the panelists on how to proceed with further clinical testing of ERAs and guidance for researchers and decision makers in clinical drug development on where future research efforts might best be focused. PMID:22967485

  3. Systemic and renal effects of an ETA receptor subtype-specific antagonist in healthy subjects

    PubMed Central

    Schmetterer, Leopold; Dallinger, Susanne; Bobr, Barbara; Selenko, Nicole; Eichler, Hans-Georg; Wolzt, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Endothelins (ETs) might play a pathophysiological role in a variety of vascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to characterize the effects of BQ-123, a specific ETA receptor antagonist on systemic and renal haemodynamics in healthy subjects. This was done at baseline and during infusion of exogenous ET-1.The study was performed in a balanced, randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind 4 way cross-over design in 10 healthy male subjects. Subjects received co-infusions of ET-1 (2.5 ng kg−1 min−1 for 120 min) or placebo and BQ-123 (15 μg min−1 for 60 min and subsequently 60 μg min−1 for 60 min) or placebo. Renal plasma flow (RPF) and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) were assessed by the para-aminohippurate (PAH) and the inulin plasma clearance method, respectively.BQ-123 alone had no renal or systemic haemodynamic effect. ET-1 significantly reduced RPF (−24%, P<0.001) and GFR (−12%, P=0.034). These effects were abolished by co-infusion of either dose of BQ-123 (RPF: P=0.0012; GFR: P=0.020).BQ-123 reversed the renal haemodynamic effects induced by exogenous ET-1 in vivo. This indicates that vasoconstriction in the kidney provoked by ET-1 is predominantly mediated by the ETA receptor subtype. PMID:9692778

  4. Memantine, an NMDA receptor antagonist, improves working memory deficits in DGKβ knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kakefuda, Kenichi; Ishisaka, Mitsue; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Hara, Hideaki

    2016-09-01

    Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) β is a type 1 isozyme of the DGK family. We previously reported that DGKβ was deeply involved in neurite spine formation, and DGKβ knockout (KO) mice exhibited behavioral abnormalities concerning spine formation, such as cognitive, emotional, and attentional impairment. Moreover, some of these abnormalities were ameliorated by the administration of a mood stabilizer. However, there is no data about how memory-improving drugs used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease affect DGKβ KO mice. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of an anti-Alzheimer's drug, memantine on the working memory deficit observed in DGKβ KO mice. In the Y-maze test, the administration of memantine significantly improved working memory of DGKβ KO mice. We also found that the expression levels of the NR2A and NR2B N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunits were increased in the prefrontal cortex, but decreased in the hippocampus of DGKβ KO mice. These altered expression levels of NR2 subunits might be related to the effect of an NMDA receptor antagonist, memantine. Taken together, these findings may support the hypothesis that DGKβ has a pivotal role in cognitive function. PMID:27495014

  5. Molecular basis for antagonistic activity of anifrolumab, an anti-interferon-α receptor 1 antibody.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Oganesyan, Vaheh; Wu, Herren; Dall'Acqua, William F; Damschroder, Melissa M

    2015-01-01

    Anifrolumab (anifrolumab) is an antagonist human monoclonal antibody that targets interferon α receptor 1 (IFNAR1). Anifrolumab has been developed to treat autoimmune diseases and is currently in clinical trials. To decipher the molecular basis of its mechanism of action, we engaged in multiple epitope mapping approaches to determine how it interacts with IFNAR1 and antagonizes the receptor. We identified the epitope of anifrolumab using enzymatic fragmentation, phage-peptide library panning and mutagenesis approaches. Our studies revealed that anifrolumab recognizes the SD3 subdomain of IFNAR1 with the critical residue R(279). Further, we solved the crystal structure of anifrolumab Fab to a resolution of 2.3 Å. Guided by our epitope mapping studies, we then used in silico protein docking of the anifrolumab Fab crystal structure to IFNAR1 and characterized the corresponding mode of binding. We find that anifrolumab sterically inhibits the binding of IFN ligands to IFNAR1, thus blocking the formation of the ternary IFN/IFNAR1/IFNAR2 signaling complex. This report provides the molecular basis for the mechanism of action of anifrolumab and may provide insights toward designing antibody therapies against IFNAR1. PMID:25606664

  6. Using the self-administration of apomorphine and cocaine to measure the pharmacodynamic potencies and pharmacokinetics of competitive dopamine receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Norman, Andrew B; Tabet, Michael R; Norman, Mantana K; Tsibulsky, Vladimir L

    2011-01-15

    Competitive dopamine receptor antagonists accelerate psychomotor stimulant self-administration. According to pharmacological theory of competitive antagonism antagonists raise the equiactive agonist concentration. In the self-administration paradigm this is assumed to be the satiety threshold or C(min). The magnitude of the proportional increase in satiety threshold (agonist concentration ratio) as a function of antagonist dose should reflect the antagonist pharmacodynamic potency. The time course of this effect should reflect the rate of change of antagonist occupancy of receptors and, therefore, antagonist concentration, i.e. pharmacokinetics. Rats self-administered apomorphine or cocaine at a stable rate and were then injected i.v. with one of four competitive D₁-like or D₂-like dopamine receptor antagonists and the session continued. The agonist concentrations at the time of each self-administration (satiety thresholds) were calculated during the session. The antagonists accelerated self-administration of both agonists with a concomitant increase in the calculated satiety thresholds. The maximum agonist concentration ratio was proportional to the dose of antagonist. The time courses of the changes in agonist concentration ratio were independent of the agonist and of the dose of antagonist. Schild analysis of the maximum agonist concentration ratio as a function of the antagonist dose allowed apparent pA₂ (or K(dose)) to be measured. Antagonist K(dose) values should provide a quantitative basis for receptor identification in behavioral pharmacology. The assay system may also measure the pharmacokinetics of antagonist elimination from the brain. Agonist self-administration represents a sensitive in vivo pharmacological assay system that provides information useful for pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling of antagonist effects. PMID:20974176

  7. S961, an insulin receptor antagonist causes hyperinsulinemia, insulin-resistance and depletion of energy stores in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vikram, Ajit; Jena, Gopabandhu

    2010-07-23

    Research highlights: {yields}Insulin receptor antagonist S961 causes hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance in rats. {yields}Peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma agonist pioglitazone improves S961 induced hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance. {yields}Long term treatment with insulin receptor antagonist S961 results in the decreased adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. {yields}Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. -- Abstract: Impairment in the insulin receptor signaling and insulin mediated effects are the key features of type 2 diabetes. Here we report that S961, a peptide insulin receptor antagonist induces hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia ({approx}18-fold), glucose intolerance and impairment in the insulin mediated glucose disposal in the Sprague-Dawley rats. Further, long-term S961 treatment (15 day, 10 nM/kg/day) depletes energy storage as evident from decrease in the adiposity and hepatic glycogen content. However, peroxysome-proliferator-activated-receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist pioglitazone significantly (P < 0.001) restored S961 induced hyperglycemia (196.73 {+-} 16.32 vs. 126.37 {+-} 27.07 mg/dl) and glucose intolerance ({approx}78%). Improvement in the hyperglycemia and glucose intolerance by pioglitazone clearly demonstrates that S961 treated rats can be successfully used to screen the novel therapeutic interventions having potential to improve glucose disposal through receptor independent mechanisms. Further, results of the present study reconfirms and provide direct evidence to the crucial role of insulin receptor signaling in the glucose homeostasis and fuel metabolism.

  8. Design, Synthesis, and Biological Evaluation of Novel Nonsteroidal Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR) Antagonists: Molecular Basis of FXR Antagonism.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huang; Si, Pei; Wang, Lei; Xu, Yong; Xu, Xin; Zhu, Jin; Jiang, Hualiang; Li, Weihua; Chen, Lili; Li, Jian

    2015-07-01

    Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) plays an important role in the regulation of cholesterol, lipid, and glucose metabolism. Recently, several studies on the molecular basis of FXR antagonism have been reported. However, none of these studies employs an FXR antagonist with nonsteroidal scaffold. On the basis of our previously reported FXR antagonist with a trisubstituted isoxazole scaffold, a novel nonsteroidal FXR ligand was designed and used as a lead for structural modification. In total, 39 new trisubstituted isoxazole derivatives were designed and synthesized, which led to pharmacological profiles ranging from agonist to antagonist toward FXR. Notably, compound 5s (4'-[(3-{[3-(2-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-thienyl)isoxazol-4-yl]methoxy}-1H-pyrazol-1-yl)methyl]biphenyl-2-carboxylic acid), containing a thienyl-substituted isoxazole ring, displayed the best antagonistic activity against FXR with good cellular potency (IC50 =12.2 ± 0.2 μM). Eventually, this compound was used as a probe in a molecular dynamics simulation assay. Our results allowed us to propose an essential molecular basis for FXR antagonism, which is consistent with a previously reported antagonistic mechanism; furthermore, E467 on H12 was found to be a hot-spot residue and may be important for the future design of nonsteroidal antagonists of FXR. PMID:25982493

  9. Differential effects of m1 and m2 receptor antagonists in perirhinal cortex on visual recognition memory in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Saunders, Richard C; Mishkin, Mortimer; Turchi, Janita

    2012-07-01

    Microinfusions of the nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into perirhinal cortex impairs performance on visual recognition tasks, indicating that muscarinic receptors in this region play a pivotal role in recognition memory. To assess the mnemonic effects of selective blockade in perirhinal cortex of muscarinic receptor subtypes, we locally infused either the m1-selective antagonist pirenzepine or the m2-selective antagonist methoctramine in animals performing one-trial visual recognition, and compared these scores with those following infusions of equivalent volumes of saline. Compared to these control infusions, injections of pirenzepine, but not of methoctramine, significantly impaired recognition accuracy. Further, similar doses of scopolamine and pirenzepine yielded similar deficits, suggesting that the deficits obtained earlier with scopolamine were due mainly, if not exclusively, to blockade of m1 receptors. The present findings indicate that m1 and m2 receptors have functionally dissociable roles, and that the formation of new visual memories is critically dependent on the cholinergic activation of m1 receptors located on perirhinal cells. PMID:22561485

  10. Differential effects of m1 and m2 receptor antagonists in perirhinal cortex on visual recognition memory in monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Saunders, Richard C.; Mishkin, Mortimer; Turchi, Janita

    2012-01-01

    Microinfusions of the nonselective muscarinic antagonist scopolamine into perirhinal cortex impairs performance on visual recognition tasks, indicating that muscarinic receptors in this region play a pivotal role in recognition memory. To assess the mnemonic effects of selective blockade in perirhinal cortex of muscarinic receptor subtypes, we locally infused either the m1-selective antagonist pirenzepine or the m2-selective antagonist methoctramine in animals performing one-trial visual recognition, and compared these scores with those following infusions of equivalent volumes of saline. Compared to these control infusions, injections of pirenzepine, but not of methoctramine, significantly impaired recognition accuracy. Further, similar doses of scopolamine and pirenzepine yielded similar deficits, suggesting that the deficits obtained earlier with scopolamine were due mainly, if not exclusively, to blockade of m1 receptors. The present findings indicate that m1 and m2 receptors have functionally dissociable roles, and that the formation of new visual memories is critically dependent on the cholinergic activation of m1 receptors located on perirhinal cells. PMID:22561485

  11. Casopitant: a novel NK1-receptor antagonist in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting

    PubMed Central

    Ruhlmann, Christina; Herrstedt, Jørn

    2009-01-01

    Chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV) are among the most feared and distressing symptoms experienced by patients with cancer. The knowledge of the pathogenesis and neuropharmacology of CINV has expanded enormously over the last decades, the most significant discoveries being the role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)3- and neurokinin (NK)1 receptors in the emetic reflex arch. This has led to the development of two new classes of antiemetics acting as highly selective antagonists at one of these receptors. These drugs have had a huge impact in the protection from chemotherapy-induced vomiting, whereas the effect on nausea seems to be limited. The first NK1 receptor antagonist, aprepitant, became clinically available in 2003, and casopitant, the second in this class of antiemetics, has now completed phase III trials. This review delineates the properties and clinical use of casopitant in the prevention of CINV. PMID:19536319

  12. Structure of the Human Dopamine D3 Receptor in Complex with a D2/D3 Selective Antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Ellen Y.T.; Liu, Wei; Zhao, Qiang; Katritch, Vsevolod; Han, Gye Won; Hanson, Michael A.; Shi, Lei; Newman, Amy Hauck; Javitch, Jonathan A.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2010-11-30

    Dopamine modulates movement, cognition, and emotion through activation of dopamine G protein-coupled receptors in the brain. The crystal structure of the human dopamine D3 receptor (D3R) in complex with the small molecule D2R/D3R-specific antagonist eticlopride reveals important features of the ligand binding pocket and extracellular loops. On the intracellular side of the receptor, a locked conformation of the ionic lock and two distinctly different conformations of intracellular loop 2 are observed. Docking of R-22, a D3R-selective antagonist, reveals an extracellular extension of the eticlopride binding site that comprises a second binding pocket for the aryl amide of R-22, which differs between the highly homologous D2R and D3R. This difference provides direction to the design of D3R-selective agents for treating drug abuse and other neuropsychiatric indications.

  13. Pharmacological and pharmacokinetic characterization of 2-piperazine-alpha-isopropyl benzylamine derivatives as melanocortin-4 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen; Tucci, Fabio C; Jiang, Wanlong; Tran, Joe A; Fleck, Beth A; Hoare, Sam R; Wen, Jenny; Chen, Takung; Johns, Michael; Markison, Stacy; Foster, Alan C; Marinkovic, Dragan; Chen, Caroline W; Arellano, Melissa; Harman, John; Saunders, John; Bozigian, Haig; Marks, Daniel

    2008-05-15

    A series of 2-piperazine-alpha-isopropylbenzylamine derivatives were synthesized and characterized as melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) antagonists. Attaching an amino acid to benzylamines 7 significantly increased their binding affinity, and the resulting compounds 8-12 bound selectively to MC4R over other melanocortin receptor subtypes and behaved as functional antagonists. These compounds were also studied for their permeability using Caco-2 cell monolayers and metabolic stability in human liver microsomes. Most compounds exhibited low permeability and high efflux ratio possibly due to their high molecular weights. They also showed moderate metabolic stability which might be associated with their moderate to high lipophilicity. Pharmacokinetic properties of these MC4R antagonists, including brain penetration, were studied in mice after oral and intravenous administrations. Two compounds identified to possess high binding affinity and selectivity, 10d and 11d, were studied in a murine cachexia model. After intraperitoneal (ip) administration of 1mg/kg dose, mice treated with 10d had significantly more food intake and weight gain than the control animals, demonstrating efficacy by blocking the MC4 receptor. Similar in vivo effects were also observed when 11d was dosed orally at 20mg/kg. These results provide further evidence that a potent and selective MC4R antagonist has potential in the treatment of cancer cachexia. PMID:18417348

  14. New phenylglycine derivatives with potent and selective antagonist activity at presynaptic glutamate receptors in neonatal rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Jane, D E; Pittaway, K; Sunter, D C; Thomas, N K; Watkins, J C

    1995-08-01

    The depression of the monosynaptic excitation of neonatal rat motoneurones produced by the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists (1S,3S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1, 3-dicarboxylate (ACPD) or L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyrate (L-AP4) was antagonized by three novel phenylglycine analogues: (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) and (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). The potencies of all the new compounds were greater than that of the previously reported (RS)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). For L-AP4-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs, the order of antagonist potency found was MPPG > MSPG > MTPG > MCPG. In contrast, the order of antagonist potency found for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive presynaptic mGluRs was MTPG > MPPG > MSPG > MCPG. To date, MPPG (KD 9.2 microM) is the most potent L-AP4-sensitive receptor antagonist yet tested on the neonatal rat spinal cord. In addition, MTPG (KD 77 microM) is the most potent antagonist yet tested for (1S,3S)-ACPD-sensitive receptors in this preparation. PMID:8532166

  15. Impact on monoclonal antibody production in murine hybridoma cell cultures of adenosine receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelso, Geoffrey F; Kazi, Shahid A; Harris, Simon J; Boysen, Reinhard I; Chowdhury, Jamil; Hearn, Milton T W

    2016-01-15

    The effects of different adenosine receptor antagonists and cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors on monoclonal antibody (mAb) titer and cell viability of murine hybridoma cells in culture were measured as part of our investigations to discover additives that enhance mAb production. Specific adenosine receptor antagonists and PDE inhibitors were found to enhance or decrease the titer of immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) mAbs relative to negative controls, depending on the specific compound and cell line employed. The observed enhancements or decreases in IgG1 mAb titer appeared to be mainly due to an increase or decrease in specific productivity rates (ngmAb/cell), respectively. The different effects of the selective adenosine antagonists suggest that antagonism at the level of the adenosine A2A and A1 or the adenosine A3 receptors result in either enhancement or suppression of IgG1 mAb production by hybridoma cells. Overall, these studies have identified hitherto unknown activities of specific adenosine antagonists and PDE inhibitors which indicate they may have valuable roles as cell culture additives in industrial biomanufacturing processes designed to enhance the yields of mAbs or other recombinant proteins produced by mammalian cell culture procedures. PMID:26646217

  16. A Novel Binding Mode Reveals Two Distinct Classes of NMDA Receptor GluN2B-selective Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Stroebel, David; Buhl, Derek L; Knafels, John D; Chanda, Pranab K; Green, Michael; Sciabola, Simone; Mony, Laetitia; Paoletti, Pierre; Pandit, Jayvardhan

    2016-05-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) are glutamate-gated ion channels that play key roles in brain physiology and pathology. Because numerous pathologic conditions involve NMDAR overactivation, subunit-selective antagonists hold strong therapeutic potential, although clinical successes remain limited. Among the most promising NMDAR-targeting drugs are allosteric inhibitors of GluN2B-containing receptors. Since the discovery of ifenprodil, a range of GluN2B-selective compounds with strikingly different structural motifs have been identified. This molecular diversity raises the possibility of distinct binding sites, although supporting data are lacking. Using X-ray crystallography, we show that EVT-101, a GluN2B antagonist structurally unrelated to the classic phenylethanolamine pharmacophore, binds at the same GluN1/GluN2B dimer interface as ifenprodil but adopts a remarkably different binding mode involving a distinct subcavity and receptor interactions. Mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that this novel binding site is physiologically relevant. Moreover, in silico docking unveils that GluN2B-selective antagonists broadly divide into two distinct classes according to binding pose. These data widen the allosteric and pharmacological landscape of NMDARs and offer a renewed structural framework for designing next-generation GluN2B antagonists with therapeutic value for brain disorders. PMID:26912815

  17. Antinociceptive profile of the pseudopeptide B2 bradykinin receptor antagonist NPC 18688 in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Corrêa, C. R.; Kyle, D. J.; Chakraverty, S.; Calixto, J. B.

    1996-01-01

    1. The purpose of this study was to investigate the topical and systemic anti-hyperalgesic effect of the newly-developed pseudopeptide B2 receptor antagonist, NPC 18688, in different models of nociception in mice. 2. Given systemically 30 min beforehand, NPC 18688 (10-300 nmol kg-1, i.p.) caused no agonist effect, but produced a dose-related and significant inhibition of abdominal constrictions caused by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid (0.6%), acetylcholine (ACh, 4.5 mg kg-1) or kaolin (50 mg kg-1). The calculated mean ID50s and the percentages of maximal inhibitions (MI) for these effects were: 77, 34 and > 300 nmol kg-1 and 65 +/- 6, 70 +/- 5 and 40 +/- 3%, respectively. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of NPC 18688 (100 nmol kg-1, i.p.) occurred rapidly (30 min) and lasted for at least 150 min. Hoe 140 (3-30 nmol kg-1, i.p.) given 30 min beforehand also inhibited, in a graded manner, acetic acid and ACh-induced writhing, with mean ID50s and MI of 6 and 9 nmol kg-1 and 56 +/- 7 and 62 +/- 6%, respectively. 3. NPC 18688 (10-300 nmol kg-1, i.p.) caused a graded inhibition of both phases of formalin (2.5%)-induced pain, its effects being more potent in relation to the second phase of the formalin test. The calculated mean ID50s and the MI were > 300 and 60 nmol kg-1 and 20 +/- 3 and 60 +/- 5% against the first and second phases of formalin-induced nociception, respectively. NPC 18688 at the same doses also inhibited, in a dose-related manner, formalin-induced paw oedema (MI of 35 +/- 3%). 4. When injected locally in the mouse paw, NPC 18688 (2, 10 and 20 nmol/paw) had no agonist activity. However, when co-injected with formalin NPC 18688 (2-20 nmol/paw), it produced significant inhibition of both phases of formalin response, with MI of 40 +/- 3 and 33 +/- 2%, respectively. NPC 18688 at 10 nmol/paw also significantly inhibited formalin-induced paw oedema (25 +/- 2%). 5. Given intraperitoneally, NPC 18688 (30-300 nmol kg-1) determined a graded inhibition of the

  18. Discovery of APD334: Design of a Clinical Stage Functional Antagonist of the Sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 Receptor

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    APD334 was discovered as part of our internal effort to identify potent, centrally available, functional antagonists of the S1P1 receptor for use as next generation therapeutics for treating multiple sclerosis (MS) and other autoimmune diseases. APD334 is a potent functional antagonist of S1P1 and has a favorable PK/PD profile, producing robust lymphocyte lowering at relatively low plasma concentrations in several preclinical species. This new agent was efficacious in a mouse experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS and a rat collagen induced arthritis (CIA) model and was found to have appreciable central exposure. PMID:25516790

  19. Structure-guided optimization of estrogen receptor binding affinity and antagonist potency of pyrazolopyrimidines with basic side chains.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, H.; Sheng, S.; Compton, D.; Kim, Y.; Joachimiak, A.; Sharma, S.; Carlson, K.; Katzenellenbogen, B.; Nettles, K.; Greene, G.; Katzenellenbogen, J.; Biosciences Division; Univ. of Illinois; Univ. of Chicago; The Scripps Research Inst.

    2007-01-01

    2,3-Diarylpyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidines are estrogen receptor (ER) antagonists of modest potency that we have described previously. Guided by the crystal structure of an ER-ligand complex that we have obtained with one of these compounds, we prepared analogs that contain a basic side chain at the 2- or 3-aryl group and quickly found one that, according to the structure-based prediction, shows an increase in binding affinity and antagonist potency and a loss of residual agonist activity.

  20. Synthesis and SAR of thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea derivatives as urotensin-II receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Jo; Oh, Seung Ae; Lee, Byung Ho; Oh, Kwang-Seok; Yi, Kyu Yang

    2014-12-15

    The preparation and SAR profile of thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea derivatives as novel and potent urotensin-II receptor antagonists are described. An activity optimization study, probing the effects of substituents on thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl core and benzyl group of the piperidinyl moiety, led to the identification of p-fluorobenzyl substituted thieno[3,2-b]pyridinyl urea 6n as a highly potent UT antagonist with an IC50 value of 13nM. Although 6n displays good metabolic stability and low hERG binding activity, it has an unacceptable oral bioavailability. PMID:25452001

  1. Substituted indoles as selective protease activated receptor 4 (PAR-4) antagonists: Discovery and SAR of ML354.

    PubMed

    Wen, Wandong; Young, Summer E; Duvernay, Matthew T; Schulte, Michael L; Nance, Kellie D; Melancon, Bruce J; Engers, Julie; Locuson, Charles W; Wood, Michael R; Daniels, J Scott; Wu, Wenjun; Lindsley, Craig W; Hamm, Heidi E; Stauffer, Shaun R

    2014-10-01

    Herein we report the discovery and SAR of an indole-based protease activated receptor-4 (PAR-4) antagonist scaffold derived from a similarity search of the Vanderbilt HTS collection, leading to MLPCN probe ML354 (VU0099704). Using a novel PAC-1 fluorescent αIIbβ3 activation assay this probe molecule antagonist was found to have an IC50 of 140nM for PAR-4 with 71-fold selectivity versus PAR-1 (PAR-1IC50=10μM). PMID:25176330

  2. Antagonistic actions of analogs related to growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) on receptors for GHRH and vasoactive intestinal peptide on rat pituitary and pineal cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rekasi, Zoltan; Varga, Jozsef L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Halmos, Gabor; Groot, Kate; Czompoly, Tamas

    2000-01-01

    Peptide analogs of growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) can potentially interact with vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) receptors (VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R) because of the structural similarities of these two hormones and their receptors. We synthesized four new analogs related to GHRH (JV-1–50, JV-1–51, JV-1–52, and JV-1–53) with decreased GHRH antagonistic activity and increased VIP antagonistic potency. To characterize various peptide analogs for their antagonistic activity on receptors for GHRH and VIP, we developed assay systems based on superfusion of rat pituitary and pineal cells. Receptor-binding affinities of peptides to the membranes of these cells were also evaluated by radioligand competition assays. Previously reported GHRH antagonists JV-1–36, JV-1–38, and JV-1–42 proved to be selective for GHRH receptors, because they did not influence VIP-stimulated VPAC2 receptor-dependent prolactin release from pituitary cells or VPAC1 receptor-dependent cAMP efflux from pinealocytes but strongly inhibited GHRH-stimulated growth hormone (GH) release. Analogs JV-1–50, JV-1–51, and JV-1–52 showed various degrees of VPAC1-R and VPAC2-R antagonistic potency, although also preserving a substantial GHRH antagonistic effect. Analog JV-1–53 proved to be a highly potent VPAC1 and VPAC2 receptor antagonist, devoid of inhibitory effects on GHRH-evoked GH release. The antagonistic activity of these peptide analogs on processes mediated by receptors for GHRH and VIP was consistent with the binding affinity. The analogs with antagonistic effects on different types of receptors expressed on tumor cells could be utilized for the development of new approaches to treatment of various human cancers. PMID:10655511

  3. Effects of TAK-637, a novel neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist, on colonic function in vivo.

    PubMed

    Okano, S; Nagaya, H; Ikeura, Y; Natsugari, H; Inatomi, N

    2001-08-01

    Substance P (SP) is an important neurotransmitter that mediates various gut functions; however, its precise pathophysiological role remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of SP on colonic function and the effect of TAK-637 [(aR,9R)-7-[3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzyl]-8,9,10,11-tetrahydro-9-methyl-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7H-[1,4]diazocino[2,1-g][1,7]naphthyridine-6,13-dione] a new neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptor antagonist, on colonic responses to SP or stress in Mongolian gerbils. SP and the selective NK1 agonist [pGlu6]SP6-11 significantly increased fecal pellet output. TAK-637 reduced [pGlu6]SP6-11-induced defecation, but did not significantly affect neurokinin A-, 5-hydroxytryptamine- or carbachol-stimulated defecation. Oral TAK-637 decreased restraint stress-stimulated fecal pellet output with an ID50 value of 0.33 mg/kg. Ondansetron and atropine, but not the peripheral kappa-receptor agonist trimebutine, also reduced restraint stress-stimulated defecation. TAK-637 inhibited the increase in fecal pellet output stimulated by intracerebroventricular injection of corticotropin-releasing factor, but did not affect the stress-induced increase in plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. Denervation of the sensory neurons with capsaicin did not affect stress-stimulated defecation. These results suggest that NK1 receptors in the ente