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Sample records for histone variant ratios

  1. Histone variants and epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Henikoff, Steven; Smith, M Mitchell

    2015-01-01

    Histones package and compact DNA by assembling into nucleosome core particles. Most histones are synthesized at S phase for rapid deposition behind replication forks. In addition, the replacement of histones deposited during S phase by variants that can be deposited independently of replication provide the most fundamental level of chromatin differentiation. Alternative mechanisms for depositing different variants can potentially establish and maintain epigenetic states. Variants have also evolved crucial roles in chromosome segregation, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair, and other processes. Investigations into the evolution, structure, and metabolism of histone variants provide a foundation for understanding the participation of chromatin in important cellular processes and in epigenetic memory. PMID:25561719

  2. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  3. Histone H3 Variants in Trichomonas vaginalis.

    PubMed

    Zubácová, Zuzana; Hostomská, Jitka; Tachezy, Jan

    2012-05-01

    The parabasalid protist Trichomonas vaginalis is a widespread parasite that affects humans, frequently causing vaginitis in infected women. Trichomonad mitosis is marked by the persistence of the nuclear membrane and the presence of an asymmetric extranuclear spindle with no obvious direct connection to the chromosomes. No centromeric markers have been described in T. vaginalis, which has prevented a detailed analysis of mitotic events in this organism. In other eukaryotes, nucleosomes of centromeric chromatin contain the histone H3 variant CenH3. The principal aim of this work was to identify a CenH3 homolog in T. vaginalis. We performed a screen of the T. vaginalis genome to retrieve sequences of canonical and variant H3 histones. Three variant histone H3 proteins were identified, and the subcellular localization of their epitope-tagged variants was determined. The localization of the variant TVAG_185390 could not be distinguished from that of the canonical H3 histone. The sequence of the variant TVAG_087830 closely resembled that of histone H3. The tagged protein colocalized with sites of active transcription, indicating that the variant TVAG_087830 represented H3.3 in T. vaginalis. The third H3 variant (TVAG_224460) was localized to 6 or 12 distinct spots at the periphery of the nucleus, corresponding to the number of chromosomes in G(1) phase and G(2) phase, respectively. We propose that this variant represents the centromeric marker CenH3 and thus can be employed as a tool to study mitosis in T. vaginalis. Furthermore, we suggest that the peripheral distribution of CenH3 within the nucleus results from the association of centromeres with the nuclear envelope throughout the cell cycle. PMID:22408228

  4. Histone variants and melanoma: facts and hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Ulff-Møller, Constance J; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer with rising incidence and morbidity. Despite advances in treatment, the 10-yr survival for patients with metastatic disease is less than 10%. During the past few years, ongoing research on different epigenomic aberrations in melanoma has catalyzed better understanding of its pathogenesis and identification of new therapeutics. In our review, we will focus on the role of histone variants, key epigenetic players in melanoma initiation and progression. Specifically, incorporation of histone variants enables additional layers of chromatin structure, and here, we will describe how alterations in this epigenetic behavior impact melanoma. PMID:26909678

  5. The Structural Determinants behind the Epigenetic Role of Histone Variants

    PubMed Central

    Cheema, Manjinder S.; Ausió, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants are an important part of the histone contribution to chromatin epigenetics. In this review, we describe how the known structural differences of these variants from their canonical histone counterparts impart a chromatin signature ultimately responsible for their epigenetic contribution. In terms of the core histones, H2A histone variants are major players while H3 variant CenH3, with a controversial role in the nucleosome conformation, remains the genuine epigenetic histone variant. Linker histone variants (histone H1 family) haven’t often been studied for their role in epigenetics. However, the micro-heterogeneity of the somatic canonical forms of linker histones appears to play an important role in maintaining the cell-differentiated states, while the cell cycle independent linker histone variants are involved in development. A picture starts to emerge in which histone H2A variants, in addition to their individual specific contributions to the nucleosome structure and dynamics, globally impair the accessibility of linker histones to defined chromatin locations and may have important consequences for determining different states of chromatin metabolism. PMID:26213973

  6. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants--an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants.

    PubMed

    Draizen, Eli J; Shaytan, Alexey K; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. 'HistoneDB 2.0--with variants' is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0. PMID:26989147

  7. Histone variants as emerging regulators of embryonic stem cell identity

    PubMed Central

    Turinetto, Valentina; Giachino, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of chromatin structure is an important mechanism for balancing the pluripotency and cell fate decision in embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Indeed ESCs are characterized by unusual chromatin packaging, and a wide variety of chromatin regulators have been implicated in control of pluripotency and differentiation. Genome-wide maps of epigenetic factors have revealed a unique epigenetic signature in pluripotent ESCs and have contributed models to explain their plasticity. In addition to the well known epigenetic regulation through DNA methylation, histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and non-coding RNA, histone variants are emerging as important regulators of ESC identity. In this review, we summarize and discuss the recent progress that has highlighted the central role of histone variants in ESC pluripotency and ESC fate, focusing, in particular, on H1 variants, H2A variants H2A.X, H2A.Z and macroH2A and H3 variant H3.3. PMID:26114724

  8. Examining the Impact of Gene Variants on Histone Lysine Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Van Rechem, Capucine; Whetstine, Johnathan R.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a boom in the amount of genome-wide sequencing data that has uncovered important and unappreciated links between certain genes, families of genes and enzymatic processes and diseases such as cancer. Such studies have highlighted the impact that chromatin modifying enzymes could have in cancer and other genetic diseases. In this review, we summarize characterized mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in histone lysine methyltransferases (KMTs), histone lysine demethylases (KDMs) and histones. We primarily focus on variants with strong disease correlations and discuss how they could impact histone lysine methylation dynamics and gene regulation. PMID:24859469

  9. Phosphorylation of histone variant regions in chromatin: unlocking the linker?

    PubMed

    Green, G R

    2001-01-01

    Histone variants illuminate the behavior of chromatin through their unique structures and patterns of postsynthetic modification. This review examines the literature on heteromorphous histone structures in chromatin, structures that are primary targets for histone kinases and phosphatases in vivo. Special attention is paid to certain well-studied experimental systems: mammalian culture cells, chicken erythrocytes, sea urchin sperm, wheat sprouts, Tetrahymena, and budding yeast. A common theme emerges from these studies. Specialized, highly basic structures in histone variants promote chromatin condensation in a variety of developmental situations. Before, and sometimes after condensed chromatin is formed, the chromatin is rendered soluble by phosphorylation of the heteromorphous regions, preventing their interaction with linker DNA. A simple structural model accounting for histone variation and phosphorylation is presented. PMID:11467741

  10. Linker histone variants control chromatin dynamics during early embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saeki, Hideaki; Ohsumi, Keita; Aihara, Hitoshi; Ito, Takashi; Hirose, Susumu; Ura, Kiyoe; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2005-01-01

    Complex transitions in chromatin structure produce changes in genome function during development in metazoa. Linker histones, the last component of nucleosomes to be assembled into chromatin, comprise considerably divergent subtypes as compared with core histones. In all metazoa studied, their composition changes dramatically during early embryogenesis concomitant with zygotic gene activation, leading to distinct functional changes that are still poorly understood. Here, we show that early embryonic linker histone B4, which is maternally expressed, is functionally different from somatic histone H1 in influencing chromatin structure and dynamics. We developed a chromatin assembly system with nucleosome assembly protein-1 as a linker histone chaperone. This assay system revealed that maternal histone B4 allows chromatin to be remodeled by ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factor, whereas somatic histone H1 prevents this remodeling. Structural analysis shows that histone B4 does not significantly restrict the accessibility of linker DNA. These findings define the functional significance of developmental changes in linker histone variants. We propose a model that holds that maternally expressed linker histones are key molecules specifying nuclear dynamics with respect to embryonic totipotency. PMID:15821029

  11. Germline-specific H1 variants: the "sexy" linker histones.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Montero, Salvador; Carbonell, Albert; Azorín, Fernando

    2016-03-01

    The eukaryotic genome is packed into chromatin, a nucleoprotein complex mainly formed by the interaction of DNA with the abundant basic histone proteins. The fundamental structural and functional subunit of chromatin is the nucleosome core particle, which is composed by 146 bp of DNA wrapped around an octameric protein complex formed by two copies of each core histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. In addition, although not an intrinsic component of the nucleosome core particle, linker histone H1 directly interacts with it in a monomeric form. Histone H1 binds nucleosomes near the exit/entry sites of linker DNA, determines nucleosome repeat length and stabilizes higher-order organization of nucleosomes into the ∼30 nm chromatin fiber. In comparison to core histones, histone H1 is less well conserved through evolution. Furthermore, histone H1 composition in metazoans is generally complex with most species containing multiple variants that play redundant as well as specific functions. In this regard, a characteristic feature is the presence of specific H1 variants that replace somatic H1s in the germline and during early embryogenesis. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about their structural and functional properties. PMID:25921218

  12. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, Shan M; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged H4 variant (hH4v) not described in other species. The hH4-1 and hH4-2 genes, which are 96% identical in their coding regions and encode identical proteins, were inactivated independently. Strains with inactivating mutations in either gene were phenotypically wild type, in terms of growth rates and fertility, but the double mutants were inviable. As expected, we were unable to isolate null alleles of hH2A, hH2B, or hH3. The genomic arrangement of the histone and histone variant genes was determined. hH2Az and the hH3-hH4-1 gene pair are on LG IIR, with hH2Az centromere-proximal to hH3-hH4-1 and hH3 centromere-proximal to hH4-1. hH3v and hH4-2 are on LG IIIR with hH3v centromere-proximal to hH4-2. hH4v is on LG IVR and the hH2A-hH2B pair is located immediately right of the LG VII centromere, with hH2A centromere-proximal to hH2B. Except for the centromere-distal gene in the pairs, all of the histone genes are transcribed toward the centromere. Phylogenetic analysis of the N. crassa histone genes places them in the Euascomycota lineage. In contrast to the general case in eukaryotes, histone genes in euascomycetes are few in number and contain introns. This may be a reflection of the evolution of the RIP (repeat-induced point mutation) and MIP (methylation induced premeiotically) processes that detect sizable duplications and silence associated genes. PMID:11901114

  13. HistoneDB 2.0: a histone database with variants—an integrated resource to explore histones and their variants

    PubMed Central

    Draizen, Eli J.; Shaytan, Alexey K.; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Talbert, Paul B.; Landsman, David; Panchenko, Anna R.

    2016-01-01

    Compaction of DNA into chromatin is a characteristic feature of eukaryotic organisms. The core (H2A, H2B, H3, H4) and linker (H1) histone proteins are responsible for this compaction through the formation of nucleosomes and higher order chromatin aggregates. Moreover, histones are intricately involved in chromatin functioning and provide a means for genome dynamic regulation through specific histone variants and histone post-translational modifications. ‘HistoneDB 2.0 – with variants’ is a comprehensive database of histone protein sequences, classified by histone types and variants. All entries in the database are supplemented by rich sequence and structural annotations with many interactive tools to explore and compare sequences of different variants from various organisms. The core of the database is a manually curated set of histone sequences grouped into 30 different variant subsets with variant-specific annotations. The curated set is supplemented by an automatically extracted set of histone sequences from the non-redundant protein database using algorithms trained on the curated set. The interactive web site supports various searching strategies in both datasets: browsing of phylogenetic trees; on-demand generation of multiple sequence alignments with feature annotations; classification of histone-like sequences and browsing of the taxonomic diversity for every histone variant. HistoneDB 2.0 is a resource for the interactive comparative analysis of histone protein sequences and their implications for chromatin function. Database URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/HistoneDB2.0 PMID:26989147

  14. Distinct Features of the Histone Core Structure in Nucleosomes Containing the Histone H2A.B Variant

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Masaaki; Arimura, Yasuhiro; Shirayama, Kazuyoshi; Fujita, Risa; Oba, Yojiro; Sato, Nobuhiro; Inoue, Rintaro; Oda, Takashi; Sato, Mamoru; Heenan, Richard K.; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing a human histone variant, H2A.B, in an aqueous solution were analyzed by small-angle neutron scattering utilizing a contrast variation technique. Comparisons with the canonical H2A nucleosome structure revealed that the DNA termini of the H2A.B nucleosome are detached from the histone core surface, and flexibly expanded toward the solvent. In contrast, the histone tails are compacted in H2A.B nucleosomes compared to those in canonical H2A nucleosomes, suggesting that they bind to the surface of the histone core and/or DNA. Therefore, the histone tail dynamics may function to regulate the flexibility of the DNA termini in the nucleosomes. PMID:24853749

  15. Global turnover of histone post-translational modifications and variants in human cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on the N-terminal tails of histones and histone variants regulate distinct transcriptional states and nuclear events. Whereas the functional effects of specific PTMs are the current subject of intense investigation, most studies characterize histone PTMs/variants in a non-temporal fashion and very few studies have reported kinetic information about these histone forms. Previous studies have used radiolabeling, fluorescence microscopy and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine rates of histone turnover, and have found interesting correlations between increased turnover and increased gene expression. Therefore, histone turnover is an understudied yet potentially important parameter that may contribute to epigenetic regulation. Understanding turnover in the context of histone modifications and sequence variants could provide valuable additional insight into the function of histone replacement. Results In this study, we measured the metabolic rate of labeled isotope incorporation into the histone proteins of HeLa cells by combining stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) pulse experiments with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In general, we found that most core histones have similar turnover rates, with the exception of the H2A variants, which exhibit a wider range of rates, potentially consistent with their epigenetic function. In addition, acetylated histones have a significantly faster turnover compared with general histone protein and methylated histones, although these rates vary considerably, depending on the site and overall degree of methylation. Histones containing transcriptionally active marks have been consistently found to have faster turnover rates than histones containing silent marks. Interestingly, the presence of both active and silent marks on the same peptide resulted in a slower turnover rate than either mark alone on that same peptide. Lastly, we observed

  16. Mice without MacroH2A Histone Variants

    PubMed Central

    Changolkar, Lakshmi N.; Costanzi, Carl; Leu, N. Adrian

    2014-01-01

    MacroH2A core histone variants have a unique structure that includes a C-terminal nonhistone domain. They are highly conserved in vertebrates and are thought to regulate gene expression. However, the nature of genes regulated by macroH2As and their biological significance remain unclear. Here, we examine macroH2A function in vivo by knocking out both macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 in the mouse. While macroH2As are not required for early development, the absence of macroH2As impairs prenatal and postnatal growth and can significantly reduce reproductive efficiency. The distributions of macroH2A.1- and macroH2A.2-containing nucleosomes show substantial overlap, as do their effects on gene expression. Our studies in fetal and adult liver indicate that macroH2As can exert large positive or negative effects on gene expression, with macroH2A.1 and macroH2A.2 acting synergistically on the expression of some genes and apparently having opposing effects on others. These effects are very specific and in the adult liver preferentially involve genes related to lipid metabolism, including the leptin receptor. MacroH2A-dependent gene regulation changes substantially in postnatal development and can be strongly affected by fasting. We propose that macroH2As produce adaptive changes to gene expression, which in the liver focus on metabolism. PMID:25312643

  17. The Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 Protein of Arabidopsis Has the Capacity to Interact with Multiple Proteins Including Histone 3-Binding Proteins and Histone 1 Variants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Craig; Asensi-Fabado, Maria A.; Donald, Naomi A.; Hannah, Matthew A.; Amtmann, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can adopt multiple conformations, thereby enabling interaction with a wide variety of partners. They often serve as hubs in protein interaction networks. We have previously shown that the Histone Deacetylase Complex 1 (HDC1) protein from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) interacts with histone deacetylases and quantitatively determines histone acetylation levels, transcriptional activity, and several phenotypes, including abscisic acid sensitivity during germination, vegetative growth rate, and flowering time. HDC1-type proteins are ubiquitous in plants, but they contain no known structural or functional domains. Here, we explored the protein interaction spectrum of HDC1 using a quantitative bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in tobacco (Nicotiana benthamiana) epidermal cells. In addition to binding histone deacetylases, HDC1 directly interacted with histone H3-binding proteins and corepressor-associated proteins but not with H3 or the corepressors themselves. Surprisingly, HDC1 also was able to interact with variants of the linker histone H1. Truncation of HDC1 to the ancestral core sequence narrowed the spectrum of interactions and of phenotypic outputs but maintained binding to a H3-binding protein and to H1. Thus, HDC1 provides a potential link between H1 and histone-modifying complexes. PMID:26951436

  18. Genome-wide identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants in plants.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  19. Genome-Wide Identification, Evolutionary, and Expression Analyses of Histone H3 Variants in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Jinteng; Zhang, Zhanlu; Shao, Yang; Zhang, Kezhong; Leng, Pingsheng; Liang, Zhe

    2015-01-01

    Histone variants alter the nucleosome structure and play important roles in chromosome segregation, transcription, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Histone H3 is encoded by many genes in most eukaryotic species and is the histone that contains the largest variety of posttranslational modifications. Compared with the metazoan H3 variants, little is known about the complex evolutionary history of H3 variants proteins in plants. Here, we study the identification, evolutionary, and expression analyses of histone H3 variants from genomes in major branches in the plant tree of life. Firstly we identified all the histone three related (HTR) genes from the examined genomes, then we classified the four groups variants: centromeric H3, H3.1, H3.3 and H3-like, by phylogenetic analysis, intron information, and alignment. We further demonstrated that the H3 variants have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating the conservation of HTR proteins. Expression analysis revealed that the HTR has a wide expression profile in maize and rice development and plays important roles in development. PMID:25815311

  20. Subnuclear distribution of the entire complement of linker histone variants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, R; Gantt, J S

    1999-11-01

    Linker histones (e.g. H1, H5, H1 degrees ) are thought to exert control on chromatin function by restricting nucleosomal dynamics. All higher eukaryotes possess a diverse family of linker histones, which may exhibit functional specialization. Arabidopsis thaliana apparently contains a minimal complement of linker histone structural variants and therefore is an ideal model for investigating functional differentiation among linker histones. Histones H1-1 and H1-2 are relatively similar proteins that are expressed in a wide variety of tissues and make up the majority of linker histone while H1-3 is a highly divergent minor variant protein that is induced by drought stress. We are interested in determining whether the in vivo distribution of each of these proteins also differs. To this end, we have produced subtype-specific antibodies and have localized each of the three proteins at the intranuclear and DNA sequence levels by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation, respectively. Antibodies against linker histones H1-1 and H1-2 decorate nuclei in patterns very similar to 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining, but different than the staining pattern of total histones. In contrast, antibodies made against two regions of H1-3 bind to chromatin in a diffuse pattern distinct from the DAPI-staining pattern. We also describe a technique to determine the localization of plant linker histone variants along regions of chromatin, employing in vivo chemical DNA-protein cross-linking to preserve native associations followed by immunoprecipitation with subtype-specific antibodies. We use this technique to demonstrate that, in contrast to the major linker histones, H1-3 does not bind the repetitive sequences pAL1 and 5S rDNA. In addition, we show that linker histones are bound to the compacted nucleosomal arrays at the telomere but with reduced stoichiometry. Taken together, our results suggest that plants, as has been shown for animals, possess a variant linker

  1. Depletion of Human Histone H1 Variants Uncovers Specific Roles in Gene Expression and Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sancho, Mónica; Diani, Erika; Beato, Miguel; Jordan, Albert

    2008-01-01

    At least six histone H1 variants exist in somatic mammalian cells that bind to the linker DNA and stabilize the nucleosome particle contributing to higher order chromatin compaction. In addition, H1 seems to be actively involved in the regulation of gene expression. However, it is not well known whether the different variants have distinct roles or if they regulate specific promoters. We have explored this by inducible shRNA-mediated knock-down of each of the H1 variants in a human breast cancer cell line. Rapid inhibition of each H1 variant was not compensated for by changes of expression of other variants. Microarray experiments have shown a different subset of genes to be altered in each H1 knock-down. Interestingly, H1.2 depletion caused specific effects such as a cell cycle G1-phase arrest, the repressed expression of a number of cell cycle genes, and decreased global nucleosome spacing. On its side, H1.4 depletion caused cell death in T47D cells, providing the first evidence of the essential role of an H1 variant for survival in a human cell type. Thus, specific phenotypes are observed in breast cancer cells depleted of individual histone H1 variants, supporting the theory that distinct roles exist for the linker histone variants. PMID:18927631

  2. In situ detection of histone variants and modifications in mouse brain using imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Shibojyoti; Sun, Na; Solis-Mezarino, Victor; Fedisch, Andreas; Ninkovic, Jovica; Feuchtinger, Annette; Götz, Magdalena; Walch, Axel; Imhof, Axel

    2016-02-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications and histone variants control the epigenetic regulation of gene expression and affect a wide variety of biological processes. A complex pattern of such modifications and variants defines the identity of cells within complex organ systems and can therefore be used to characterize cells at a molecular level. However, their detection and identification in situ has been limited so far due to lack of specificity, selectivity, and availability of antihistone antibodies. Here, we describe a novel MALDI imaging MS based workflow, which enables us to detect and characterize histones by their intact mass and their correlation with cytological properties of the tissue using novel statistical and image analysis tools. The workflow allows us to characterize the in situ distribution of the major histone variants and their modification in the mouse brain. This new analysis tool is particularly useful for the investigation of expression patterns of the linker histone H1 variants for which suitable antibodies are so far not available. PMID:26593131

  3. Histone modifications and a choice of variant: a language that helps the genome express itself

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Covalent post-translational modifications on histones impact chromatin structure and function. Their misfunction, along with perturbations or mutations in genes that regulate their dynamic status, has been observed in several diseases. Thus, targeting histone modifications represents attractive opportunities for therapeutic intervention and biomarker discovery. The best approach to address this challenge is to paint a comprehensive picture integrating the growing number of modifications on individual residues and their combinatorial association, the corresponding modifying enzymes, and effector proteins that bind modifications. Furthermore, how they are imposed in a distinct manner during the cell cycle and on specific histone variants are important dimensions to consider. Firstly, this report highlights innovative technologies used to characterize histone modifications, and the corresponding enzymes and effector proteins. Secondly, we examine the recent progress made in understanding the dynamics and maintenance of histone modifications on distinct variants. We also discuss their roles as potential carriers of epigenetic information. Finally, we provide examples of initiatives to exploit histone modifications in cancer management, with the potential for new therapeutic opportunities. PMID:25343033

  4. Protein profiling and histone deacetylation activities in somaclonal variants of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    PubMed

    Yaacob, Jamilah Syafawati; Loh, Hwei-San; Mat Taha, Rosna

    2013-01-01

    Mantled fruits as a result of somaclonal variation are often observed from the oil palm plantlets regenerated via tissue culture. The mantling of fruits with finger-like and thick outer coating phenotypes significantly reduces the seed size and oil content, posing a threat to oil palm planters, and may jeopardize the economic growth of countries that depend particularly on oil palm plantation. The molecular aspects of the occurrence of somaclonal variations are yet to be known, possibly due to gene repression such as DNA methylation, histone methylation and histone deacetylation. Histone deacetylases (HDACs), involved in eukaryotic gene regulation by catalyzing the acetyl groups are removal from lysine residues on histone, hence transcriptionally repress gene expression. This paper described the total protein polymorphism profiles of somaclonal variants of oil palm and the effects of histone deacetylation on this phenomenon. Parallel to the different phenotypes, the protein polymorphism profiles of the mantled samples (leaves, fruits, and florets) and the phenotypically normal samples were proven to be different. Higher HDAC activity was found in mantled leaf samples than in the phenotypically normal leaf samples, leading to a preliminary conclusion that histone deacetylation suppressed gene expression and contributed to the development of somaclonal variants. PMID:23844406

  5. The Distribution and Spreading of Rare Variants in the Histone Multigene Family of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Colby, C.; Williams, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    We surveyed the distribution of rare variant restriction sites within and among histone gene arrays of Drosophila melanogaster using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Seventy-three naturally occurring arrays were digested with restriction enzymes that had no recognition sites in the published histone sequence. Of the arrays surveyed, 68.5% had at least two nonconsensus restriction sites present as indicated by the presence of a small band or bands on the autoradiographs. These bands were almost always the length of a single repeat in the histone multigene family or a multiple of this length. In arrays with more than one band, intensity of the bands almost always decreased with increasing size. This shows that within these arrays variant restriction sites were predominantly located on adjacent repeats. If these bands are caused by spreading of variant sites, as is most likely, then variants spread along the array as an inverse function of distance. Overall, if a sequence spread it had a 92% probability of ending up in its nearest neighbor. This pattern may result from the noncontiguous nature of the histone family. PMID:7901119

  6. Distinct chromatin signature of histone H3 variant H3.3 in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Snyers, Luc; Zupkovitz, Gordin; Almeder, Marlene; Fliesser, Marianne; Stoisser, Anja; Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Actively transcribed regions of the genome have been found enriched for the histone H3 variant H3.3. This variant is incorporated into nucleosomes throughout the cell cycle whereas the canonical isoforms are predominately deposited in association with replication. In order to obtain a global picture of the deposition pattern at the single cell level we expressed H3.3 in both normal and malignant human cells and analyzed nuclei using conventional and structured illumination imaging (SIM). We found that the distribution pattern of H3.3 in interphase differs from that of the canonical histone H3 variants and this difference is conveyed to mitotic chromosomes which display a distinct H3.3 banding pattern. Histone H3.3 localization positively correlated with markers for transcriptionally active chromatin and, notably, H3.3 was almost completely absent from the inactive X chromosome. Collectively, our data show that histone variant H3.3 occupies distinct intranuclear chromatin domains and that these genomic loci are associated with gene expression. PMID:25482197

  7. Expression and functionality of histone H2A variants in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Fátima Liliana; Baptista, Tiago; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Helguero, Luisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression includes the replacement of canonical histones for non-allelic histone variants, as well as their multiple targeting by postranslational modifications. H2A variants are highly conserved between species suggesting they execute important functions that cannot be accomplished by canonical histones. Altered expression of many H2A variants is associated to cancer. MacroH2A variants are enriched in heterocromatic foci and are necessary for chromatin condensation. MacroH2A1.1 and macroH2A1.2 are two mutually exclusive isoforms. MacroH2A1.1 and macroH2A2 inhibit proliferation and are associated with better cancer prognosis; while macroH2A1.2 is associated to cancer progression. H2AX variant functions as a sensor of DNA damage and defines the cellular response towards DNA repair or apoptosis; therefore, screening approaches and therapeutic options targeting H2AX have been proposed. H2A.Z is enriched in euchromatin, acting as a proto-oncogene with established roles in hormone responsive cancers and overexpressed in endocrine-resistant disease. Other H2A family members have also been found altered in cancer, but their function remains unknown. Substantial progress has been made to understand histone H2A variants, their contribution to normal cellular function and to cancer development and progression. Yet, implementation of high resolution mass spectrometry is needed to further our knowledge on highly homologous H2A variants expression and function. PMID:25003966

  8. Binding kinetics of histone chaperone Chz1 and variant histone H2A.Z-H2B by relaxation dispersion NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, D. Flemming; Zhou, Zheng; Feng, Haniqiao; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Bai, Yawen; Kay, Lewis E.

    2009-01-01

    The genome of eukaryotic cells is packed into a compact structure called chromatin that consists of DNA as well as both histone and non-histone proteins. Histone-chaperones associate with histone proteins and play important roles in the assembly of chromatin structure and transport of histones in the cell. The recently discovered histone-chaperone Chz1 associates with the variant histone H2A.Z of budding yeast and plays a critical role in the exchange of the canonical histone pair H2A-H2B for the variant H2A.Z-H2B. Here, we present an NMR approach that provides accurate estimates for the rates of association and dissociation of Chz1 and H2A.Z-H2B. The methodology exploits the fact that in a 1:1 mixture of Chz1 and H2A.Z-H2B the small amounts of unbound proteins that are invisible in spectra produce line-broadening of signals from the complex that can be quantified in terms of the thermodynamics and kinetics of the exchange process. The dissociation rate constant measured, 22±2 s−1, provides an upper bound for the rate of transfer of H2A.Z-H2B to the chromatin remodeling complex and the faster than diffusion association rate, 108±107 M−1s−1, establishes the importance of attractive electrostatic interactions that form the chaperone:histone complex. PMID:19385041

  9. Weaver Syndrome‐Associated EZH2 Protein Variants Show Impaired Histone Methyltransferase Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Damian B.; Lewis, M.E. Suzanne; Chijiwa, Chieko; Ramos‐Arroyo, Maria A.; Tkachenko, Natália; Milano, Valentina; Fradin, Mélanie; McKinnon, Margaret L.; Townsend, Katelin N.; Xu, Jieqing; Van Allen, M.I.; Ross, Colin J.D.; Dobyns, William B.; Weaver, David D.; Gibson, William T.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Weaver syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by generalized overgrowth, macrocephaly, specific facial features, accelerated bone age, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to cancers. De novo mutations in the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) have been shown to cause WS. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase that acts as the catalytic agent of the polycomb‐repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to maintain gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). Functional studies investigating histone methyltransferase activity of mutant EZH2 from various cancers have been reported, whereas WS‐associated mutations remain poorly characterized. To investigate the role of EZH2 in WS, we performed functional studies using artificially assembled PRC2 complexes containing mutagenized human EZH2 that reflected the codon changes predicted from patients with WS. We found that WS‐associated amino acid alterations reduce the histone methyltransferase function of EZH2 in this in vitro assay. Our results support the hypothesis that WS is caused by constitutional mutations in EZH2 that alter the histone methyltransferase function of PRC2. However, histone methyltransferase activities of different EZH2 variants do not appear to correlate directly with the phenotypic variability between WS patients and individuals with a common c.553G>C (p.Asp185His) polymorphism in EZH2. PMID:26694085

  10. Weaver Syndrome-Associated EZH2 Protein Variants Show Impaired Histone Methyltransferase Function In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ana S A; Yap, Damian B; Lewis, M E Suzanne; Chijiwa, Chieko; Ramos-Arroyo, Maria A; Tkachenko, Natália; Milano, Valentina; Fradin, Mélanie; McKinnon, Margaret L; Townsend, Katelin N; Xu, Jieqing; Van Allen, M I; Ross, Colin J D; Dobyns, William B; Weaver, David D; Gibson, William T

    2016-03-01

    Weaver syndrome (WS) is a rare congenital disorder characterized by generalized overgrowth, macrocephaly, specific facial features, accelerated bone age, intellectual disability, and susceptibility to cancers. De novo mutations in the enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) have been shown to cause WS. EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase that acts as the catalytic agent of the polycomb-repressive complex 2 (PRC2) to maintain gene repression via methylation of lysine 27 on histone H3 (H3K27). Functional studies investigating histone methyltransferase activity of mutant EZH2 from various cancers have been reported, whereas WS-associated mutations remain poorly characterized. To investigate the role of EZH2 in WS, we performed functional studies using artificially assembled PRC2 complexes containing mutagenized human EZH2 that reflected the codon changes predicted from patients with WS. We found that WS-associated amino acid alterations reduce the histone methyltransferase function of EZH2 in this in vitro assay. Our results support the hypothesis that WS is caused by constitutional mutations in EZH2 that alter the histone methyltransferase function of PRC2. However, histone methyltransferase activities of different EZH2 variants do not appear to correlate directly with the phenotypic variability between WS patients and individuals with a common c.553G>C (p.Asp185His) polymorphism in EZH2. PMID:26694085

  11. Separation of Variant Methylated Histone Tails by Differential Ion Mobility

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Zheng, Yupeng; Smith, Richard D.; Kelleher, Neil

    2012-07-18

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) is emerging as a broadly useful tool for separation of isomeric modified peptides with post-translational modifications (PTMs) attached to alternative residues. Such separations were anticipated to become more challenging for smaller PTMs and longer peptides. Here we show that FAIMS can fully resolve localization variants involving a PTM as minuscule as methylation, even for larger peptides in the middle-down range.

  12. SAGA DUB-Ubp8 Deubiquitylates Centromeric Histone Variant Cse4

    PubMed Central

    Canzonetta, Claudia; Vernarecci, Stefano; Iuliani, Michele; Marracino, Cristina; Belloni, Claudia; Ballario, Paola; Filetici, Patrizia

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploidy, the unbalanced segregation of chromosomes during cell division, is recurrent in many tumors and the cause of birth defects and genetic diseases. Centromeric chromatin represents the chromosome attachment site to the mitotic spindle, marked by specialized nucleosomes containing a specific histone variant, CEN-H3/Cse4, in yeast. Mislocalization of Cse4 outside the centromere is deleterious and may cause aberrant chromosome behavior and mitotic loss. For this reason, ubiquitylation by the E3-ubiquitin ligase Psh1 and subsequent proteolysis tightly regulates its restricted localization. Among multiproteic machineries, the SAGA complex is not merely engaged in acetylation but also directly involved in deubiquitylation. In this study, we investigated the role of SAGA-DUB’s Ubp8-driven deubiquitylation of the centromeric histone variant Cse4 in budding yeast. We found that Ubp8 works in concert with the E3-ubiquitin ligase Psh1, and that its loss causes defective deubiquitylation and the accumulation of a short ubiquitin oligomer on Cse4. We also show that lack of Ubp8 and defective deubiquitylation increase mitotic instability, cause faster Cse4 proteolysis and induce mislocalization of the centromeric histone outside the centromere. Our data provide evidence for a fundamental role of DUB-Ubp8 in deubiquitylation and the stability of the centromeric histone in budding yeast. PMID:26613948

  13. Selective methylation of histone H3 variant H3.1 regulates heterochromatin replication.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Yannick; Bergamin, Elisa; Donoghue, Mark T A; Mongeon, Vanessa; LeBlanc, Chantal; Voigt, Philipp; Underwood, Charles J; Brunzelle, Joseph S; Michaels, Scott D; Reinberg, Danny; Couture, Jean-François; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-03-14

    Histone variants have been proposed to act as determinants for posttranslational modifications with widespread regulatory functions. We identify a histone-modifying enzyme that selectively methylates the replication-dependent histone H3 variant H3.1. The crystal structure of the SET domain of the histone H3 lysine-27 (H3K27) methyltransferase ARABIDOPSIS TRITHORAX-RELATED PROTEIN 5 (ATXR5) in complex with a H3.1 peptide shows that ATXR5 contains a bipartite catalytic domain that specifically "reads" alanine-31 of H3.1. Variation at position 31 between H3.1 and replication-independent H3.3 is conserved in plants and animals, and threonine-31 in H3.3 is responsible for inhibiting the activity of ATXR5 and its paralog, ATXR6. Our results suggest a simple model for the mitotic inheritance of the heterochromatic mark H3K27me1 and the protection of H3.3-enriched genes against heterochromatization during DNA replication. PMID:24626927

  14. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals Changes in Histone H2B Variants as Cells Undergo Inorganic Arsenic-Mediated Cellular Transformation.

    PubMed

    Rea, Matthew; Jiang, Tingting; Eleazer, Rebekah; Eckstein, Meredith; Marshall, Alan G; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-07-01

    Exposure to inorganic arsenic, a ubiquitous environmental toxic metalloid, leads to carcinogenesis. However, the mechanism is unknown. Several studies have shown that inorganic arsenic exposure alters specific gene expression patterns, possibly through alterations in chromatin structure. While most studies on understanding the mechanism of chromatin-mediated gene regulation have focused on histone post-translational modifications, the role of histone variants remains largely unknown. Incorporation of histone variants alters the functional properties of chromatin. To understand the global dynamics of chromatin structure and function in arsenic-mediated carcinogenesis, analysis of the histone variants incorporated into the nucleosome and their covalent modifications is required. Here we report the first global mass spectrometric analysis of histone H2B variants as cells undergo arsenic-mediated epithelial to mesenchymal transition. We used electron capture dissociation-based top-down tandem mass spectrometry analysis validated with quantitative reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction to identify changes in the expression levels of H2B variants in inorganic arsenic-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition. We identified changes in the expression levels of specific histone H2B variants in two cell types, which are dependent on dose and length of exposure of inorganic arsenic. In particular, we found increases in H2B variants H2B1H/1K/1C/1J/1O and H2B2E/2F, and significant decreases in H2B1N/1D/1B as cells undergo inorganic arsenic-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition. The analysis of these histone variants provides a first step toward an understanding of the functional significance of the diversity of histone structures, especially in inorganic arsenic-mediated gene expression and carcinogenesis. PMID:27169413

  15. macroH2A1 histone variant represses rDNA transcription.

    PubMed

    Cong, Rong; Das, Sadhan; Douet, Julien; Wong, Jiemin; Buschbeck, Marcus; Mongelard, Fabien; Bouvet, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of ribosomal DNA transcription is an important step for the control of cell growth. Epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation and posttranslational modifications of canonical histones have been involved in this regulation, but much less is known about the role of histone variants. In this work, we show that the histone variant macroH2A1 is present on the promoter of methylated rDNA genes. The inhibition of the expression of macroH2A1 in human HeLa and HepG2 cells and in a mouse ES cell line resulted in an up to 5-fold increase of pre-rRNA levels. This increased accumulation of pre-rRNA is accompanied by an increase of the loading of RNA polymerase I and UBF on the rDNA without any changes in the number of active rDNA genes. The inhibition of RNA polymerase I transcription by actinomycin D or by knocking down nucleolin, induces the recruitment of macroH2A1 on the rDNA and the relocalization of macroH2A1 in the nucleolus. Interestingly, the inhibition of rDNA transcription induced by nucleolin depletion is alleviated by the inactivation of macroH2A1. These results demonstrate that macroH2A1 is a new factor involved in the regulation of rDNA transcription. PMID:24071584

  16. A drought-stress-inducible histone gene in Arabidopsis thaliana is a member of a distinct class of plant linker histone variants.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, R; Gantt, J S

    1997-07-01

    We have isolated and characterized a gene, His1-3, encoding a structurally divergent linker histone in Arabidopsis thaliana. Southern and northern hybridization data indicate that A. thaliana expresses three single-copy linker histone genes, each encoding a structurally distinct variant. H1-3 is a considerably smaller protein (167 amino acids with a mass of 19.0 kDa) than any other described linker histone from higher eukaryotes. We examined the expression of His1-3 at the RNA and protein levels and found that it is induced specifically by water stress. In contrast, expression of His1-1, His1-2 and His4 appear unaffected by water stress. Furthermore, the primary structure of the protein possesses distinct characteristics that are shared with another drought-inducible linker histone, H1-D, isolated from Lycopersicon pennellii. Based on structural characteristics of the deduced protein and its inducible expression, we hypothesize that H1-3 and H1-D are linker histone variants that have specialized roles in the structure and function of plant chromatin and therefore they can be considered to be members of a unique subclass of plant histones. Immunoblotting with an antibody produced against a short polypeptide in the conserved domain of this subtype indicates that similar proteins may exist in other plants. PMID:9247544

  17. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  18. Characterization of post-translational modifications of histone H2B-variants isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bergmüller, Eveline; Gehrig, Peter M; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2007-09-01

    Eukaryotic DNA is structurally packed into chromatin by the basic histone proteins H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. There is increasing evidence that incorporation and post-translational modifications of histone variants have a fundamental role in gene regulation. While modifications of H3 and H4 histones are now well-established, considerably less is known about H2B modifications. Here, we present the first detailed characterization of H2B-variants isolated from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We combined reversed-phase chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry to identify post-translational modifications of the H2B-variants HTB1, HTB2, HTB4, HTB9, and HTB11, isolated from total chromatin and euchromatin-enriched fractions. The HTB9-variant has acetylation sites at lysines 6, 11, 27, 32, 38, and 39, while Lys-145 can be ubiquitinated. Analogous modifications and an additional methylation of Lys-3 were identified for HTB11. HTB2 shows similar acetylation and ubiquitination sites and an additional methylation at Lys-11. Furthermore, the N-terminal alanine residues of HTB9 and HTB11 were found to be mono-, di-, or trimethylated or unmodified. No methylation of arginine residues was detected. The data suggest that most of these modification sites are only partially occupied. Our study significantly expands the map of covalent Arabidopsis histone modifications and is the first step to unraveling the histone code in higher plants. PMID:17691833

  19. Point mutations in an epigenetic factor lead to multiple types of bone tumors: role of H3.3 histone variant in bone development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Shigeaki; Ishii, Takeaki; Kouzmenko, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Coordinated post-translational modifications (PTMs) of nucleosomal histones emerge as a key mechanism of gene regulation by defining chromatin configuration. Patterns of histone modifications vary in different cells and constitute core elements of cell-specific epigenomes. Recently, in addition to canonical histone proteins produced during the S phase of cell cycle, several non-canonical histone variants have been identified and shown to express in a DNA replication-independent manner. These histone variants generate diversity in nucleosomal structures and add further complexity to mechanisms of epigenetic regulation. Cell-specific functions of histone variants remain to be determined. Several recent studies reported an association between some point mutations in the non-canonical histone H3.3 and particular types of brain and bone tumors. This suggests a possibility of differential physiological effects of histone variants in different cells and tissues, including bone. In this review, we outline the roles of histone variants and their PTMs in the epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure and discuss possible mechanisms of biological effects of the non-canonical histone mutations found in bone tumors on tumorigenesis in differentiating bone stem cells. PMID:26157578

  20. Chromatin-to-nucleoprotamine transition is controlled by the histone H2B variant TH2B

    PubMed Central

    Montellier, Emilie; Boussouar, Fayçal; Rousseaux, Sophie; Zhang, Kai; Buchou, Thierry; Fenaille, François; Shiota, Hitoshi; Debernardi, Alexandra; Héry, Patrick; Curtet, Sandrine; Jamshidikia, Mahya; Barral, Sophie; Holota, Hélène; Bergon, Aurélie; Lopez, Fabrice; Guardiola, Philippe; Pernet, Karin; Imbert, Jean; Petosa, Carlo; Tan, Minjia; Zhao, Yingming; Gérard, Matthieu; Khochbin, Saadi

    2013-01-01

    The conversion of male germ cell chromatin to a nucleoprotamine structure is fundamental to the life cycle, yet the underlying molecular details remain obscure. Here we show that an essential step is the genome-wide incorporation of TH2B, a histone H2B variant of hitherto unknown function. Using mouse models in which TH2B is depleted or C-terminally modified, we show that TH2B directs the final transformation of dissociating nucleosomes into protamine-packed structures. Depletion of TH2B induces compensatory mechanisms that permit histone removal by up-regulating H2B and programming nucleosome instability through targeted histone modifications, including lysine crotonylation and arginine methylation. Furthermore, after fertilization, TH2B reassembles onto the male genome during protamine-to-histone exchange. Thus, TH2B is a unique histone variant that plays a key role in the histone-to-protamine packing of the male genome and guides genome-wide chromatin transitions that both precede and follow transmission of the male genome to the egg. PMID:23884607

  1. The characterization of macroH2A beyond vertebrates supports an ancestral origin and conserved role for histone variants in chromatin.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Casas, Ciro; Gonzalez-Romero, Rodrigo; Cheema, Manjinder S; Ausió, Juan; Eirín-López, José M

    2016-06-01

    Histone variants play a critical role in chromatin structure and epigenetic regulation. These "deviant" proteins have been historically considered as the evolutionary descendants of ancestral canonical histones, helping specialize the nucleosome structure during eukaryotic evolution. Such view is now challenged by 2 major observations: first, canonical histones present extremely unique features not shared with any other genes; second, histone variants are widespread across many eukaryotic groups. The present work further supports the ancestral nature of histone variants by providing the first in vivo characterization of a functional macroH2A histone (a variant long defined as a specific refinement of vertebrate chromatin) in a non-vertebrate organism (the mussel Mytilus) revealing its recruitment into heterochromatic fractions of actively proliferating tissues. Combined with in silico analyses of genomic data, these results provide evidence for the widespread presence of macroH2A in metazoan animals, as well as in the holozoan Capsaspora, supporting an evolutionary origin for this histone variant lineage before the radiation of Filozoans (including Filasterea, Choanoflagellata and Metazoa). Overall, the results presented in this work help configure a new evolutionary scenario in which histone variants, rather than modern "deviants" of canonical histones, would constitute ancient components of eukaryotic chromatin. PMID:27082816

  2. Cu2+-assisted two dimensional charge-mass double focusing gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometric analysis of histone variants.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenyang; Tang, Xuemei; Ding, Mengjie; Zhong, Hongying

    2014-12-10

    Abundant isoforms and dynamic posttranslational modifications cause the separation and identification of histone variants to be experimentally challenging. To meet this need, we employ two-dimensional electrophoretic gel separation followed by mass spectrometric detection which takes advantage of the chelation of Cu(2+) with amino acid residues exposed on the surfaces of the histone proteins. Acid-extracted rat liver histones were first mixed with CuSO4 solution and then separated in one dimension with triton-acid-urea (TAU) gel electrophoresis and in a second dimension using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The separations result from both the changes in charge and mass upon Cu(2+) chelation. Identities of each separated gel bands were obtained by using matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS). It was found that the migration of H3 histone isoforms of rat liver is markedly affected by the use of Cu(2+) ions. PMID:25441888

  3. Molecular genetic analysis of the drought-inducible linker histone variant in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ascenzi, R; Gantt, J S

    1999-09-01

    Linker histones are ubiquitous structural components of chromatin that have been shown to influence the expression of a subset of genes in diverse organisms. Plants contain a minor linker histone variant that is expressed in most tissues of all organs, and is induced during drought stress. Based on reporter gene analysis in roots, His1-3 is expressed almost exclusively in emerging secondary roots in unstressed plants, but is primarily expressed in the root meristem and elongation zone of stressed plants. In shoots, expression is higher in younger tissues than older tissues. In order to investigate the function of H1-3, we have generated lines with altered levels of H1-3. Plants expressing an antisense His1-3 transcript exhibit a greatly impaired induction (5% of wild-type RNA levels during stress) of His1-3 transcripts in shoots during drought and contain decreased protein relative to wild-type control plants. In plants overexpressing His1-3, more H1-3 is bound to chromatin than in unstressed wild-type plants. None of the plants containing these transgenes display phenotypic aberrations or differences in water content during drought stress. Additionally, the expression of several drought-responsive genes is not significantly altered in lines misexpressing His1-3. PMID:10579484

  4. Pluripotency Activity of Nanog Requires Biochemical Stabilization by Variant Histone Protein H2A.Z.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiaxu; Qiao, Mengran; He, Qianqian; Shi, Ronghua; Loh, Sharon Jia Hui; Stanton, Lawrence W; Wu, Mian

    2015-07-01

    The variant histone protein H2A.Z plays a critical role in early development. Likewise, Nanog, a master regulator of embryonic stem cells (ESCs), is essential for proper development in early embryogenesis. In this study, we establish that these two factors work together to maintain pluripotency. It is shown that H2A.Z influences the protein level of Nanog through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Knockdown of H2A.Z causes differentiation of mouse ESCs and disrupts the reprogramming of somatic cells, which can be partially rescued by overexpression of Nanog. We conclude that the H2A.Z-Nanog partnership is involved in ESC pluripotency and reprogramming of somatic cells. Stem Cells 2015;33:2126-2134. PMID:25809870

  5. Characterization of centromeric histone H3 (CENH3) variants in cultivated and wild carrots (Daucus sp.).

    PubMed

    Dunemann, Frank; Schrader, Otto; Budahn, Holger; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9. PMID:24887084

  6. Characterization of Centromeric Histone H3 (CENH3) Variants in Cultivated and Wild Carrots (Daucus sp.)

    PubMed Central

    Dunemann, Frank; Schrader, Otto; Budahn, Holger; Houben, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotes, centromeres are the assembly sites for the kinetochore, a multi-protein complex to which spindle microtubules are attached at mitosis and meiosis, thereby ensuring segregation of chromosomes during cell division. They are specified by incorporation of CENH3, a centromere specific histone H3 variant which replaces canonical histone H3 in the nucleosomes of functional centromeres. To lay a first foundation of a putative alternative haploidization strategy based on centromere-mediated genome elimination in cultivated carrots, in the presented research we aimed at the identification and cloning of functional CENH3 genes in Daucus carota and three distantly related wild species of genus Daucus varying in basic chromosome numbers. Based on mining the carrot transcriptome followed by a subsequent PCR-based cloning, homologous coding sequences for CENH3s of the four Daucus species were identified. The ORFs of the CENH3 variants were very similar, and an amino acid sequence length of 146 aa was found in three out of the four species. Comparison of Daucus CENH3 amino acid sequences with those of other plant CENH3s as well as their phylogenetic arrangement among other dicot CENH3s suggest that the identified genes are authentic CENH3 homologs. To verify the location of the CENH3 protein in the kinetochore regions of the Daucus chromosomes, a polyclonal antibody based on a peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of DcCENH3 was developed and used for anti-CENH3 immunostaining of mitotic root cells. The chromosomal location of CENH3 proteins in the centromere regions of the chromosomes could be confirmed. For genetic localization of the CENH3 gene in the carrot genome, a previously constructed linkage map for carrot was used for mapping a CENH3-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker, and the CENH3 locus was mapped on the carrot chromosome 9. PMID:24887084

  7. SWI/SNF remodeling and p300-dependent transcription of histone variant H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays

    PubMed Central

    Angelov, Dimitar; Verdel, André; An, Woojin; Bondarenko, Vladimir; Hans, Fabienne; Doyen, Cécile-Marie; Studitsky, Vassily M; Hamiche, Ali; Roeder, Robert G; Bouvet, Philippe; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2004-01-01

    A histone variant H2ABbd was recently identified, but its function is totally unknown. Here we have studied the structural and functional properties of nucleosome and nucleosomal arrays reconstituted with this histone variant. We show that H2ABbd can replace the conventional H2A in the nucleosome, but this replacement results in alterations of the nucleosomal structure. The remodeling complexes SWI/SNF and ACF are unable to mobilize the variant H2ABbd nucleosome. However, SWI/SNF was able to increase restriction enzyme access to the variant nucleosome and assist the transfer of variant H2ABbd–H2B dimer to a tetrameric histone H3–H4 particle. In addition, the p300- and Gal4-VP16-activated transcription appeared to be more efficient for H2ABbd nucleosomal arrays than for conventional H2A arrays. The intriguing mechanisms by which H2ABbd affects both nucleosome remodeling and transcription are discussed. PMID:15372075

  8. Distinct factors control histone variant H3.3 localization at specific genomic regions

    PubMed Central

    Goldberg, Aaron D.; Banaszynski, Laura A.; Noh, Kyung-Min; Lewis, Peter W.; Elsaesser, Simon J.; Stadler, Sonja; Dewell, Scott; Law, Martin; Guo, Xingyi; Li, Xuan; Wen, Duancheng; Chapgier, Ariane; DeKelver, Russell C.; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Lee, Ya-Li; Boydston, Elizabeth A.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Greally, John M.; Rafii, Shahin; Yang, Chingwen; Scambler, Peter J.; Garrick, David; Gibbons, Richard J.; Higgs, Douglas R.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Zheng, Deyou; Allis, C. David

    2010-01-01

    Summary The incorporation of histone H3 variants has been implicated in the epigenetic memory of cellular state. Using genome editing with zinc finger nucleases to tag endogenous H3.3, we report genome-wide profiles of H3 variants in mammalian embryonic stem (ES) cells and neuronal precursor cells. Genome-wide patterns of H3.3 are dependent on amino acid sequence, and change with cellular differentiation at developmentally regulated loci. The H3.3 chaperone Hira is required for H3.3 enrichment at active and repressed genes. Strikingly, Hira is not essential for localization of H3.3 at telomeres and many transcription factor binding sites. Immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry reveal that the proteins Atrx and Daxx associate with H3.3 in a Hira-independent manner. Atrx is required for Hira-independent localization of H3.3 at telomeres, and for the repression of telomeric RNA. Our data demonstrate that multiple and distinct factors are responsible for H3.3 localization at specific genomic locations in mammalian cells. PMID:20211137

  9. Expression of P. falciparum var Genes Involves Exchange of the Histone Variant H2A.Z at the Promoter

    PubMed Central

    Petter, Michaela; Lee, Chin Chin; Byrne, Timothy J.; Boysen, Katja E.; Volz, Jennifer; Ralph, Stuart A.; Cowman, Alan F.; Brown, Graham V.; Duffy, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z) colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS) in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var genes are

  10. Histone Variant H2A.Z and RNA Polymerase II Transcription Elongation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Santisteban, Maria Soledad; Hang, Mingda; Smith, M. Mitchell

    2011-01-01

    Nucleosomes containing histone variant H2A.Z (Htz1) serve to poise quiescent genes for activation and transcriptional initiation. However, little is known about their role in transcription elongation. Here we show that dominant mutations in the elongation genes SPT5 and SPT16 suppress the hypersensitivity of htz1Δ strains to drugs that inhibit elongation, indicating that Htz1 functions at the level of transcription elongation. Direct kinetic measurements of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) movement across the 9.5-kb GAL10p-VPS13 gene revealed that the elongation rate of polymerase is 24% slower in the absence of Htz1. We provide evidence for two nonexclusive mechanisms. First, we observed that both the phospho-Ser2 levels in the elongating isoform of Pol II and the loading of Spt5 and Elongator over the GAL1 open reading frame (ORF) depend on Htz1. Second, in the absence of Htz1, the density of nucleosome occupancy is increased over the GAL10p-VPS13 ORF and the chromatin is refractory to remodeling during active transcription. These results establish a mechanistic role for Htz1 in transcription elongation and suggest that Htz1-containing nucleosomes facilitate Pol II passage by affecting the correct assembly and modification status of Pol II elongation complexes and by favoring efficient nucleosome remodeling over the gene. PMID:21357739

  11. Histone variant H2A.Z.2 mediates proliferation and drug sensitivity of malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Gaspar-Maia, Alexandre; Hasson, Dan; Pünzeler, Sebastian; Valle-Garcia, David; Straub, Tobias; Keilhauer, Eva C.; Strub, Thomas; Dong, Joanna; Panda, Taniya; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Yao, Jonathan L.; Singh, Rajendra; Segura, Miguel F.; Fontanals-Cirera, Barbara; Verma, Amit; Mann, Matthias; Hernando, Eva; Hake, Sandra B.; Bernstein, Emily

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone variants are emerging as key regulatory molecules in cancer. Here we report a novel role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. H2A.Z.2 is highly expressed in metastatic melanoma, correlates with decreased patient survival, and is required for cellular proliferation. Our integrated genomic analyses reveal that H2A.Z.2 controls the transcriptional output of E2F target genes in melanoma cells. These genes are highly expressed and display a distinct signature of H2A.Z occupancy. We identify BRD2 as an H2A.Z interacting protein, whose levels are also elevated in melanoma. We further demonstrate that H2A.Z.2 regulated genes are bound by BRD2 and E2F1 in a H2A.Z.2-dependent manner. Importantly, H2A.Z.2 deficiency sensitizes melanoma cells to chemotherapy and targeted therapies. Collectively, our findings implicate H2A.Z.2 as a mediator of cell proliferation and drug sensitivity in malignant melanoma, holding translational potential for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26051178

  12. Histone variant macroH2A confers resistance to nuclear reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Pasque, Vincent; Gillich, Astrid; Garrett, Nigel; Gurdon, John B

    2011-01-01

    How various layers of epigenetic repression restrict somatic cell nuclear reprogramming is poorly understood. The transfer of mammalian somatic cell nuclei into Xenopus oocytes induces transcriptional reprogramming of previously repressed genes. Here, we address the mechanisms that restrict reprogramming following nuclear transfer by assessing the stability of the inactive X chromosome (Xi) in different stages of inactivation. We find that the Xi of mouse post-implantation-derived epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) can be reversed by nuclear transfer, while the Xi of differentiated or extraembryonic cells is irreversible by nuclear transfer to oocytes. After nuclear transfer, Xist RNA is lost from chromatin of the Xi. Most epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation and Polycomb-deposited H3K27me3 do not explain the differences between reversible and irreversible Xi. Resistance to reprogramming is associated with incorporation of the histone variant macroH2A, which is retained on the Xi of differentiated cells, but absent from the Xi of EpiSCs. Our results uncover the decreased stability of the Xi in EpiSCs, and highlight the importance of combinatorial epigenetic repression involving macroH2A in restricting transcriptional reprogramming by oocytes. PMID:21552206

  13. Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Reveals that Intact Histone H1 Phosphorylations are Variant Specific and Exhibit Single Molecule Hierarchical Dependence.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hoover, Michael E; Dang, Xibei; Shomo, Alan A; Guan, Xiaoyan; Marshall, Alan G; Freitas, Michael A; Young, Nicolas L

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer was the second leading cause of cancer related mortality for females in 2014. Recent studies suggest histone H1 phosphorylation may be useful as a clinical biomarker of breast and other cancers because of its ability to recognize proliferative cell populations. Although monitoring a single phosphorylated H1 residue is adequate to stratify high-grade breast tumors, expanding our knowledge of how H1 is phosphorylated through the cell cycle is paramount to understanding its role in carcinogenesis. H1 analysis by bottom-up MS is challenging because of the presence of highly homologous sequence variants expressed by most cells. These highly basic proteins are difficult to analyze by LC-MS/MS because of the small, hydrophilic nature of peptides produced by tryptic digestion. Although bottom-up methods permit identification of several H1 phosphorylation events, these peptides are not useful for observing the combinatorial post-translational modification (PTM) patterns on the protein of interest. To complement the information provided by bottom-up MS, we utilized a top-down MS/MS workflow to permit identification and quantitation of H1 proteoforms related to the progression of breast cells through the cell cycle. Histones H1.2 and H1.4 were observed in MDA-MB-231 metastatic breast cells, whereas an additional histone variant, histone H1.3, was identified only in nonneoplastic MCF-10A cells. Progressive phosphorylation of histone H1.4 was identified in both cell lines at mitosis (M phase). Phosphorylation occurred first at S172 followed successively by S187, T18, T146, and T154. Notably, phosphorylation at S173 of histone H1.2 and S172, S187, T18, T146, and T154 of H1.4 significantly increases during M phase relative to S phase, suggesting that these events are cell cycle-dependent and may serve as markers for proliferation. Finally, we report the observation of the H1.2 SNP variant A18V in MCF-10A cells. PMID:26209608

  14. Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression associates with progression of anal neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wan-Hsiang; Miyai, Katsumi; Sporn, Judith C; Luo, Linda; Wang, Jean Y J; Cosman, Bard; Ramamoorthy, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Aims The macroH2A histone variants are epigenetic marks for inactivated chromatin. In this study, we examined the expression of macroH2A2 in anal neoplasm from anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) to anal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Methods AIN and anal SCC samples were analysed for macroH2A2 expression, HIV and human papilloma virus (HPV). The association of macroH2A2 expression with clinical grade, disease recurrence, overall survival and viral involvement was determined. Results macroH2A2 was expressed in normal squamous tissue and lower grade AIN (I and II). Expression was lost in 38% of high-grade AIN (III) and 71% of anal SCC (p=0.002). Patients with AIN with macroH2A2-negative lesions showed earlier recurrence than those with macroH2A2-positive neoplasm (p=0.017). With anal SCC, macroH2A2 loss was more prevalent in the HPV-negative tumours. Conclusions Loss of histone variant macroH2A2 expression is associated with the progression of anal neoplasm and can be used as a prognostic biomarker for high-grade AIN and SCC. PMID:26658220

  15. Mapping of six somatic linker histone H1 variants in human breast cancer cells uncovers specific features of H1.2

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Islam, Abul B. M. M. K.; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Mayor, Regina; Terme, Jean-Michel; Luque, Neus; Sancho, Mónica; López-Bigas, Núria; Jordan, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Seven linker histone H1 variants are present in human somatic cells with distinct prevalence across cell types. Despite being key structural components of chromatin, it is not known whether the different variants have specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or are differentially distributed throughout the genome. Using variant-specific antibodies to H1 and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged recombinant H1 variants expressed in breast cancer cells, we have investigated the distribution of six H1 variants in promoters and genome-wide. H1 is depleted at promoters depending on its transcriptional status and differs between variants. Notably, H1.2 is less abundant than other variants at the transcription start sites of inactive genes, and promoters enriched in H1.2 are different from those enriched in other variants and tend to be repressed. Additionally, H1.2 is enriched at chromosomal domains characterized by low guanine–cytosine (GC) content and is associated with lamina-associated domains. Meanwhile, other variants are associated with higher GC content, CpG islands and gene-rich domains. For instance, H1.0 and H1X are enriched at gene-rich chromosomes, whereas H1.2 is depleted. In short, histone H1 is not uniformly distributed along the genome and there are differences between variants, H1.2 being the one showing the most specific pattern and strongest correlation with low gene expression. PMID:24476918

  16. Contribution of the Two Genes Encoding Histone Variant H3.3 to Viability and Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Michelle C. W.; Jacobs, Shelley A.; Mattiske, Deidre M.; Soh, Yu May; Graham, Alison N.; Tran, An; Lim, Shu Ly; Hudson, Damien F.; Kalitsis, Paul; O’Bryan, Moira K.; Wong, Lee H.; Mann, Jeffrey R.

    2015-01-01

    Histones package DNA and regulate epigenetic states. For the latter, probably the most important histone is H3. Mammals have three near-identical H3 isoforms: canonical H3.1 and H3.2, and the replication-independent variant H3.3. This variant can accumulate in slowly dividing somatic cells, replacing canonical H3. Some replication-independent histones, through their ability to incorporate outside S-phase, are functionally important in the very slowly dividing mammalian germ line. Much remains to be learned of H3.3 functions in germ cell development. Histone H3.3 presents a unique genetic paradigm in that two conventional intron-containing genes encode the identical protein. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of the developmental effects of null mutations in each of these genes. H3f3a mutants were viable to adulthood. Females were fertile, while males were subfertile with dysmorphic spermatozoa. H3f3b mutants were growth-deficient, dying at birth. H3f3b heterozygotes were also growth-deficient, with males being sterile because of arrest of round spermatids. This sterility was not accompanied by abnormalities in sex chromosome inactivation in meiosis I. Conditional ablation of H3f3b at the beginning of folliculogenesis resulted in zygote cleavage failure, establishing H3f3b as a maternal-effect gene, and revealing a requirement for H3.3 in the first mitosis. Simultaneous ablation of H3f3a and H3f3b in folliculogenesis resulted in early primary oocyte death, demonstrating a crucial role for H3.3 in oogenesis. These findings reveal a heavy reliance on H3.3 for growth, gametogenesis, and fertilization, identifying developmental processes that are particularly susceptible to H3.3 deficiency. They also reveal partial redundancy in function of H3f3a and H3f3b, with the latter gene being generally the most important. PMID:25675407

  17. Two Histone Variants TH2A and TH2B Enhance Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Generation.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Linh My; Shinagawa, Toshie; Ishii, Shunsuke

    2016-02-01

    There are two major methods of reprogramming: generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by overexpressing embryonic stem cell-specific transcription factors (OCT4, SOX2, KLF4, and c-MYC) and somatic cell nuclear transfer by oocyte-specific factors. Previously, we reported oocyte-enriched histone variants TH2A, TH2B, and the histone chaperone nucleoplasmin (NPM2) enhance the reprogramming by OSKM in mice by inducing open chromatin structure. In this study, we showed that human TH2A, TH2B, and NPM2 enhance the OSKM-induced reprogramming of adult and neonatal human dermal fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Pluripotency of iPSCs generated by coexpressing OSKM, TH2A, TH2B, and NPM2 was shown by in vitro and in vivo differentiation assays. These iPSCs gave rise to highly differentiated teratomas compared to iPSCs induced by OSKM alone. Genome-wide analysis suggests a possibility that TH2A, TH2B, and NPM2 might regulate genes that are involved in naïve stem cell stage. Thus, TH2A, TH2B, and NPM2 enhance reprogramming of human somatic cells and improve the quality of human iPSCs. PMID:26649967

  18. Ion Mobility Separation of Variant Histone Tails Extending to the “Middle-down” Range

    SciTech Connect

    Shvartsburg, Alexandre A.; Zheng, Yupeng; Smith, Richard D.; Kelleher, Neil

    2012-05-15

    Differential ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) can baseline-resolve multiple variants of post-translationally modified peptides extending to the 3 - 4 kDa range, which differ in the localization of a PTM as small as acetylation. Essentially orthogonal separations for different charge states expand the total achievable peak capacity in proportion to the number of observed states that increases for longer polypeptides. This might enable resolving localization variants for even larger peptides and intact proteins.

  19. macroH2A1 Histone Variants Are Depleted on Active Genes but Concentrated on the Inactive X Chromosome†

    PubMed Central

    Changolkar, Lakshmi N.; Pehrson, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Using a novel thiol affinity chromatography approach to purify macroH2A1-containing chromatin fragments, we examined the distribution of macroH2A1 histone variants in mouse liver chromatin. We found that macroH2A1 was depleted on the transcribed regions of active genes. This depletion was observed on all of the 20 active genes that we probed, with only one site showing a small amount of enrichment. In contrast, macroH2A1 was concentrated on the inactive X chromosome, consistent with our previous immunofluorescence studies. This preferential localization was seen on genes that are active in liver, genes that are inactive in liver, and intergenic regions but was absent from four regions that escape X inactivation. These results support the hypothesis that macroH2As function as transcriptional repressors. Also consistent with this hypothesis is our finding that the heterochromatin protein HP1β copurifies with the macroH2A1-containing chromatin fragments. This study presents the first detailed examination of the distribution of macroH2A1 variants on specific sequences. Our results indicate that macroH2As have complex distribution patterns that are influenced by both local factors and long-range mechanisms. PMID:16738309

  20. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Yan; Nguyen, Hong T.; Lasky, Joseph A.; Cao, Subing; Li, Cui; Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E.; Shan, Bin

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  1. Differential association of Arabidopsis telomeres and centromeres with Histone H3 variants

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2013-01-01

    Two different groups, using ChIP-seq data, have recently published the genome-wide distribution of histones H3.1 and H3.3 in Arabidopsis thaliana. In one report, Stroud and colleagues determined that, whereas H3.1 was enriched in repetitive pericentromeric and silent chromatin, H3.3 was enriched in transcriptionally active regions. This work was performed using seedlings, which contained dividing and non-dividing cells. In a second report, Wollmann and colleagues found similar results analyzing dividing or non-dividing tissue. None of these reports addressed the analysis of telomeres or centromeres. Our group has recently described an experimental approach that allows the study of the epigenetic status of some Arabidopsis repetitive sequences by analyzing ChIP-seq data. By using this approach and the data generated by Stroud, Wollmann and colleagues, we found that telomeres are enriched in H3.3 with regard to the centromeric 178 bp repeats, whereas the centromeric repeats are enriched in H3.1 with regard to telomeres. PMID:23383372

  2. The Histone Variant MacroH2A1.2 is Necessary for the Activation of Muscle Enhancers and Recruitment of the Transcription Factor Pbx1

    PubMed Central

    Dell’Orso, Stefania; Wang, A. Hongjun; Shih, Han-Yu; Saso, Kayoko; Berghella, Libera; Gutierrez-Cruz, Gustavo; Ladurner, Andreas G.; O’Shea, John J.; Sartorelli, Vittorio; Zare, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone variants complement and integrate histone post-translational modifications in regulating transcription. The histone variant macroH2A1 (mH2A1) is almost three times the size of its canonical H2A counterpart due to the presence of a ~25kDa evolutionarily conserved non-histone macro domain. Strikingly, mH2A1 can mediate both gene repression and activation. However, the molecular determinants conferring these alternative functions remain elusive. Here, we report that mH2A1.2 is required for the activation of the myogenic gene regulatory network and muscle cell differentiation. H3K27 acetylation at prospective enhancers is exquisitely sensitive to mH2A1.2, indicating a role of mH2A1.2 in imparting enhancer activation. Both H3K27 acetylation and recruitment of the transcription factor Pbx1 at prospective enhancers are regulated by mH2A1.2. Overall, our findings indicate a role of mH2A1.2 in marking regulatory regions for activation. PMID:26832413

  3. Proteomic Analysis of Fatty-acylated Proteins in Mammalian Cells with Chemical Reporters Reveals S-Acylation of Histone H3 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, John P.; Raghavan, Anuradha S.; Yang, Yu-Ying; Charron, Guillaume; Hang, Howard C.

    2011-01-01

    Bioorthogonal chemical reporters are useful tools for visualizing and identifying post-translational modifications on proteins. Here we report the proteomic analysis of mammalian proteins targeted by a series of fatty acid chemical reporters ranging from myristic to stearic acid. The large-scale analysis of total cell lysates from fully solubilized Jurkat T cells identified known fatty-acylated proteins and many new candidates, including nuclear proteins and in particular histone H3 variants. We demonstrate that histones H3.1, H3.2, and H3.3 are modified with fatty acid chemical reporters and identify the conserved cysteine 110 as a new site of S-acylation on histone H3.2. This newly discovered modification of histone H3 could have implications for nuclear organization and chromatin regulation. The unbiased proteomic analysis of fatty-acylated proteins using chemical reporters has revealed a greater diversity of lipid-modified proteins in mammalian cells and identified a novel post-translational modification of histones. PMID:21076176

  4. Chromatin remodeling defects in pediatric and young adult glioblastoma: a tale of a variant histone 3 tail.

    PubMed

    Fontebasso, Adam M; Liu, Xiao-Yang; Sturm, Dominik; Jabado, Nada

    2013-03-01

    Primary brain tumors occur in 8 out of 100 000 people and are the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Among brain tumors, high-grade astrocytomas (HGAs) including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) are aggressive and are lethal human cancers. Despite decades of concerted therapeutic efforts, HGAs remain essentially incurable in adults and children. Recent discoveries have revolutionized our understanding of these tumors in children and young adults. Recurrent somatic driver mutations in the tail of histone 3 variant 3 (H3.3), leading to amino acid substitutions at key residues, namely lysine (K) 27 (K27M) and glycine 34 (G34R/G34V), were identified as a new molecular mechanism in pediatric GBM. These mutations represent the pediatric counterpart of the recurrent mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDH) identified in young adult gliomas and provide a much-needed new pathway that can be targeted for therapeutic development. This review will provide an overview of the potential role of these mutations in altering chromatin structure and affecting specific molecular pathways ultimately leading to gliomagenesis. The distinct changes in chromatin structure and the specific downstream events induced by each mutation need characterizing independently if progress is to be made in tackling this devastating cancer. PMID:23432647

  5. The histone variant H2A.X is a regulator of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Weyemi, Urbain; Redon, Christophe E; Choudhuri, Rohini; Aziz, Towqir; Maeda, Daisuke; Boufraqech, Myriem; Parekh, Palak R; Sethi, Taresh K; Kasoji, Manjula; Abrams, Natalie; Merchant, Anand; Rajapakse, Vinodh N; Bonner, William M

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), considered essential for metastatic cancer, has been a focus of much research, but important questions remain. Here, we show that silencing or removing H2A.X, a histone H2A variant involved in cellular DNA repair and robust growth, induces mesenchymal-like characteristics including activation of EMT transcription factors, Slug and ZEB1, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Ectopic H2A.X re-expression partially reverses these changes, as does silencing Slug and ZEB1. In an experimental metastasis model, the HCT116 parental and H2A.X-null cells exhibit a similar metastatic behaviour, but the cells with re-expressed H2A.X are substantially more metastatic. We surmise that H2A.X re-expression leads to partial EMT reversal and increases robustness in the HCT116 cells, permitting them to both form tumours and to metastasize. In a human adenocarcinoma panel, H2A.X levels correlate inversely with Slug and ZEB1 levels. Together, these results point to H2A.X as a regulator of EMT. PMID:26876487

  6. The histone variant H2A.X is a regulator of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Weyemi, Urbain; Redon, Christophe E.; Choudhuri, Rohini; Aziz, Towqir; Maeda, Daisuke; Boufraqech, Myriem; Parekh, Palak R.; Sethi, Taresh K.; Kasoji, Manjula; Abrams, Natalie; Merchant, Anand; Rajapakse, Vinodh N.; Bonner, William M.

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), considered essential for metastatic cancer, has been a focus of much research, but important questions remain. Here, we show that silencing or removing H2A.X, a histone H2A variant involved in cellular DNA repair and robust growth, induces mesenchymal-like characteristics including activation of EMT transcription factors, Slug and ZEB1, in HCT116 human colon cancer cells. Ectopic H2A.X re-expression partially reverses these changes, as does silencing Slug and ZEB1. In an experimental metastasis model, the HCT116 parental and H2A.X-null cells exhibit a similar metastatic behaviour, but the cells with re-expressed H2A.X are substantially more metastatic. We surmise that H2A.X re-expression leads to partial EMT reversal and increases robustness in the HCT116 cells, permitting them to both form tumours and to metastasize. In a human adenocarcinoma panel, H2A.X levels correlate inversely with Slug and ZEB1 levels. Together, these results point to H2A.X as a regulator of EMT. PMID:26876487

  7. Histone variant H3.3 provides the heterochromatic H3 lysine 9 tri-methylation mark at telomeres

    PubMed Central

    Udugama, Maheshi; M. Chang, Fiona T.; Chan, F. Lyn; Tang, Michelle C.; Pickett, Hilda A.; R. McGhie, James D.; Mayne, Lynne; Collas, Philippe; Mann, Jeffrey R.; Wong, Lee H.

    2015-01-01

    In addition to being a hallmark at active genes, histone variant H3.3 is deposited by ATRX at repressive chromatin regions, including the telomeres. It is unclear how H3.3 promotes heterochromatin assembly. We show that H3.3 is targeted for K9 trimethylation to establish a heterochromatic state enriched in trimethylated H3.3K9 at telomeres. In H3f3a−/− and H3f3b−/− mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs), H3.3 deficiency results in reduced levels of H3K9me3, H4K20me3 and ATRX at telomeres. The H3f3b−/− cells show increased levels of telomeric damage and sister chromatid exchange (t-SCE) activity when telomeres are compromised by treatment with a G-quadruplex (G4) DNA binding ligand or by ASF1 depletion. Overexpression of wild-type H3.3 (but not a H3.3K9 mutant) in H3f3b−/− cells increases H3K9 trimethylation level at telomeres and represses t-SCE activity induced by a G4 ligand. This study demonstrates the importance of H3.3K9 trimethylation in heterochromatin formation at telomeres. It provides insights into H3.3 function in maintaining integrity of mammalian constitutive heterochromatin, adding to its role in mediating transcription memory in the genome. PMID:26304540

  8. Multiple facets of histone variant H2AX: a DNA double-strand-break marker with several biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Turinetto, Valentina; Giachino, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    In the last decade, many papers highlighted that the histone variant H2AX and its phosphorylation on Ser 139 (γH2AX) cannot be simply considered a specific DNA double-strand-break (DSB) marker with a role restricted to the DNA damage response, but rather as a ‘protagonist’ in different scenarios. This review will present and discuss an up-to-date view regarding the ‘non-canonical’ H2AX roles, focusing in particular on possible functional and structural parts in contexts different from the canonical DNA DSB response. We will present aspects concerning sex chromosome inactivation in male germ cells, X inactivation in female somatic cells and mitosis, but will also focus on the more recent studies regarding embryonic and neural stem cell development, asymmetric sister chromosome segregation in stem cells and cellular senescence maintenance. We will discuss whether in these new contexts there might be a relation with the canonical DNA DSB signalling function that could justify γH2AX formation. The authors will emphasize that, just as H2AX phosphorylation signals chromatin alteration and serves the canonical function of recruiting DSB repair factors, so the modification of H2AX in contexts other than the DNA damage response may contribute towards creating a specific chromatin structure frame allowing ‘non-canonical’ functions to be carried out in different cell types. PMID:25712102

  9. A Specialized Histone H1 Variant Is Required for Adaptive Responses to Complex Abiotic Stress and Related DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Rutowicz, Kinga; Puzio, Marcin; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Lirski, Maciej; Kotliński, Maciej; Kroteń, Magdalena A.; Knizewski, Lukasz; Lange, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Śniegowska-Świerk, Katarzyna; Kościelniak, Janusz; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Buza, Krisztián; Janowiak, Franciszek; Żmuda, Katarzyna; Jõesaar, Indrek; Laskowska-Kaszub, Katarzyna; Fogtman, Anna; Kollist, Hannes; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Siedlecki, Paweł; Swiezewski, Szymon; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Koblowska, Marta; Archacki, Rafał; Wilczynski, Bartek; Rapacz, Marcin; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Linker (H1) histones play critical roles in chromatin compaction in higher eukaryotes. They are also the most variable of the histones, with numerous nonallelic variants cooccurring in the same cell. Plants contain a distinct subclass of minor H1 variants that are induced by drought and abscisic acid and have been implicated in mediating adaptive responses to stress. However, how these variants facilitate adaptation remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stress-inducible variant H1.3 occurs in plants in two separate and most likely autonomous pools: a constitutive guard cell-specific pool and a facultative environmentally controlled pool localized in other tissues. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses of h1.3 null mutants demonstrate that H1.3 is required for both proper stomatal functioning under normal growth conditions and adaptive developmental responses to combined light and water deficiency. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, we show that H1.3 has superfast chromatin dynamics, and in contrast to the main Arabidopsis H1 variants H1.1 and H1.2, it has no stable bound fraction. The results of global occupancy studies demonstrate that, while H1.3 has the same overall binding properties as the main H1 variants, including predominant heterochromatin localization, it differs from them in its preferences for chromatin regions with epigenetic signatures of active and repressed transcription. We also show that H1.3 is required for a substantial part of DNA methylation associated with environmental stress, suggesting that the likely mechanism underlying H1.3 function may be the facilitation of chromatin accessibility by direct competition with the main H1 variants. PMID:26351307

  10. A Specialized Histone H1 Variant Is Required for Adaptive Responses to Complex Abiotic Stress and Related DNA Methylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Rutowicz, Kinga; Puzio, Marcin; Halibart-Puzio, Joanna; Lirski, Maciej; Kotliński, Maciej; Kroteń, Magdalena A; Knizewski, Lukasz; Lange, Bartosz; Muszewska, Anna; Śniegowska-Świerk, Katarzyna; Kościelniak, Janusz; Iwanicka-Nowicka, Roksana; Buza, Krisztián; Janowiak, Franciszek; Żmuda, Katarzyna; Jõesaar, Indrek; Laskowska-Kaszub, Katarzyna; Fogtman, Anna; Kollist, Hannes; Zielenkiewicz, Piotr; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Siedlecki, Paweł; Swiezewski, Szymon; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Koblowska, Marta; Archacki, Rafał; Wilczynski, Bartek; Rapacz, Marcin; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2015-11-01

    Linker (H1) histones play critical roles in chromatin compaction in higher eukaryotes. They are also the most variable of the histones, with numerous nonallelic variants cooccurring in the same cell. Plants contain a distinct subclass of minor H1 variants that are induced by drought and abscisic acid and have been implicated in mediating adaptive responses to stress. However, how these variants facilitate adaptation remains poorly understood. Here, we show that the single Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) stress-inducible variant H1.3 occurs in plants in two separate and most likely autonomous pools: a constitutive guard cell-specific pool and a facultative environmentally controlled pool localized in other tissues. Physiological and transcriptomic analyses of h1.3 null mutants demonstrate that H1.3 is required for both proper stomatal functioning under normal growth conditions and adaptive developmental responses to combined light and water deficiency. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis, we show that H1.3 has superfast chromatin dynamics, and in contrast to the main Arabidopsis H1 variants H1.1 and H1.2, it has no stable bound fraction. The results of global occupancy studies demonstrate that, while H1.3 has the same overall binding properties as the main H1 variants, including predominant heterochromatin localization, it differs from them in its preferences for chromatin regions with epigenetic signatures of active and repressed transcription. We also show that H1.3 is required for a substantial part of DNA methylation associated with environmental stress, suggesting that the likely mechanism underlying H1.3 function may be the facilitation of chromatin accessibility by direct competition with the main H1 variants. PMID:26351307

  11. The Histone Variant H3.3 Is Enriched at Drosophila Amplicon Origins but Does Not Mark Them for Activation

    PubMed Central

    Paranjape, Neha P.; Calvi, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication begins from multiple origins. The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds origin DNA and scaffolds assembly of a prereplicative complex (pre-RC), which is subsequently activated to initiate DNA replication. In multicellular eukaryotes, origins do not share a strict DNA consensus sequence, and their activity changes in concert with chromatin status during development, but mechanisms are ill-defined. Previous genome-wide analyses in Drosophila and other organisms have revealed a correlation between ORC binding sites and the histone variant H3.3. This correlation suggests that H3.3 may designate origin sites, but this idea has remained untested. To address this question, we examined the enrichment and function of H3.3 at the origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in the somatic follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that H3.3 is abundant at these amplicon origins. H3.3 levels remained high when replication initiation was blocked, indicating that H3.3 is abundant at the origins before activation of the pre-RC. H3.3 was also enriched at the origins during early oogenesis, raising the possibility that H3.3 bookmarks sites for later amplification. However, flies null mutant for both of the H3.3 genes in Drosophila did not have overt defects in developmental gene amplification or genomic replication, suggesting that H3.3 is not essential for the assembly or activation of the pre-RC at origins. Instead, our results imply that the correlation between H3.3 and ORC sites reflects other chromatin attributes that are important for origin function. PMID:27172191

  12. Pat1 protects centromere-specific histone H3 variant Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Prashant K.; Guo, Jiasheng; Dittman, Lauren E.; Haase, Julian; Yeh, Elaine; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved histone H3 variant Cse4 and its homologues are essential components of specialized centromere (CEN)-specific nucleosomes and serve as an epigenetic mark for CEN identity and propagation. Cse4 is a critical determinant for the structure and function of the kinetochore and is required to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. The kinetochore protein Pat1 regulates the levels and spatial distribution of Cse4 at centromeres. Deletion of PAT1 results in altered structure of CEN chromatin and chromosome segregation errors. In this study, we show that Pat1 protects CEN-associated Cse4 from ubiquitination in order to maintain proper structure and function of the kinetochore in budding yeast. PAT1-deletion strains exhibit increased ubiquitination of Cse4 and faster turnover of Cse4 at kinetochores. Psh1, a Cse4-specific E3-ubiquitin ligase, interacts with Pat1 in vivo and contributes to the increased ubiquitination of Cse4 in pat1∆ strains. Consistent with a role of Psh1 in ubiquitination of Cse4, transient induction of PSH1 in a wild-type strain resulted in phenotypes similar to a pat1∆ strain, including a reduction in CEN-associated Cse4, increased Cse4 ubiquitination, defects in spatial distribution of Cse4 at kinetochores, and altered structure of CEN chromatin. Pat1 interacts with Scm3 and is required for its maintenance at kinetochores. In conclusion, our studies provide novel insights into mechanisms by which Pat1 affects the structure of CEN chromatin and protects Cse4 from Psh1-mediated ubiquitination for faithful chromosome segregation. PMID:25833709

  13. The Histone Variant H3.3 Is Enriched at Drosophila Amplicon Origins but Does Not Mark Them for Activation.

    PubMed

    Paranjape, Neha P; Calvi, Brian R

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic DNA replication begins from multiple origins. The origin recognition complex (ORC) binds origin DNA and scaffolds assembly of a prereplicative complex (pre-RC), which is subsequently activated to initiate DNA replication. In multicellular eukaryotes, origins do not share a strict DNA consensus sequence, and their activity changes in concert with chromatin status during development, but mechanisms are ill-defined. Previous genome-wide analyses in Drosophila and other organisms have revealed a correlation between ORC binding sites and the histone variant H3.3. This correlation suggests that H3.3 may designate origin sites, but this idea has remained untested. To address this question, we examined the enrichment and function of H3.3 at the origins responsible for developmental gene amplification in the somatic follicle cells of the Drosophila ovary. We found that H3.3 is abundant at these amplicon origins. H3.3 levels remained high when replication initiation was blocked, indicating that H3.3 is abundant at the origins before activation of the pre-RC. H3.3 was also enriched at the origins during early oogenesis, raising the possibility that H3.3 bookmarks sites for later amplification. However, flies null mutant for both of the H3.3 genes in Drosophila did not have overt defects in developmental gene amplification or genomic replication, suggesting that H3.3 is not essential for the assembly or activation of the pre-RC at origins. Instead, our results imply that the correlation between H3.3 and ORC sites reflects other chromatin attributes that are important for origin function. PMID:27172191

  14. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants.

    PubMed

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones. PMID:26820416

  15. Histone H1 Variants in Arabidopsis Are Subject to Numerous Post-Translational Modifications, Both Conserved and Previously Unknown in Histones, Suggesting Complex Functions of H1 in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kotliński, Maciej; Rutowicz, Kinga; Kniżewski, Łukasz; Palusiński, Antoni; Olędzki, Jacek; Fogtman, Anna; Rubel, Tymon; Koblowska, Marta; Dadlez, Michał; Ginalski, Krzysztof; Jerzmanowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Linker histones (H1s) are conserved and ubiquitous structural components of eukaryotic chromatin. Multiple non-allelic variants of H1, which differ in their DNA/nucleosome binding properties, co-exist in animal and plant cells and have been implicated in the control of genetic programs during development and differentiation. Studies in mammals and Drosophila have revealed diverse post-translational modifications of H1s, most of which are of unknown function. So far, it is not known how this pattern compares with that of H1s from other major lineages of multicellular Eukaryotes. Here, we show that the two main H1variants of a model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana are subject to a rich and diverse array of post-translational modifications. The distribution of these modifications in the H1 molecule, especially in its globular domain (GH1), resembles that occurring in mammalian H1s, suggesting that their functional significance is likely to be conserved. While the majority of modifications detected in Arabidopsis H1s, including phosphorylation, acetylation, mono- and dimethylation, formylation, crotonylation and propionylation, have also been reported in H1s of other species, some others have not been previously identified in histones. PMID:26820416

  16. Mapping post-translational modifications of mammalian testicular specific histone variant TH2B in tetraploid and haploid germ cells and their implications on the dynamics of nucleosome structure.

    PubMed

    Pentakota, Satya Krishna; Sandhya, Sankaran; P Sikarwar, Arun; Chandra, Nagasuma; Satyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R

    2014-12-01

    Histones regulate a variety of chromatin templated events by their post-translational modifications (PTMs). Although there are extensive reports on the PTMs of canonical histones, the information on the histone variants remains very scanty. Here, we report the identification of different PTMs, such as acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of a major mammalian histone variant TH2B. Our mass spectrometric analysis has led to the identification of both conserved and unique modifications across tetraploid spermatocytes and haploid spermatids. We have also computationally derived the 3-dimensional model of a TH2B containing nucleosome in order to study the spatial orientation of the PTMs identified and their effect on nucleosome stability and DNA binding potential. From our nucleosome model, it is evident that substitution of specific amino acid residues in TH2B results in both differential histone-DNA and histone-histone contacts. Furthermore, we have also observed that acetylation on the N-terminal tail of TH2B weakens the interactions with the DNA. These results provide direct evidence that, similar to somatic H2B, the testis specific histone TH2B also undergoes multiple PTMs, suggesting the possibility of chromatin regulation by such covalent modifications in mammalian male germ cells. PMID:25252820

  17. Identification of proliferation-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Characterization of a new member of the highly evolutionarily conserved histone H2A.F/Z variant subfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Callard, D; Mazzolini, L

    1997-01-01

    The changes in gene expression associated with the reinitiation of cell division and subsequent progression through the cell cycle in Arabidopsis thaliana cell-suspension cultures were investigated. Partial synchronization of cells was achieved by a technique combining phosphate starvation and a transient treatment with the DNA replication inhibitor aphidicolin. Six cDNAs corresponding to genes highly induced in proliferating cells and showing cell-cycle-regulated expression were obtained by the mRNA differential display technique. Full-length cDNA clones (cH2BAt and cH2AvAt) corresponding to two of the display products were subsequently isolated. The cH2BAt clone codes for a novel histone H2B protein, whereas the cH2AvAt cDNA corresponds to a gene encoding a new member of the highly conserved histone H2A.F/Z subfamily of chromosomal proteins. Further studies indicated that H2AvAt mRNA expression is tightly correlated with cell proliferation in cell-suspension cultures, and that closely related analogs of the encoded protein exist in Arabidopsis. The implications of the conservation of histone H2A.F/Z variants in plants are discussed. PMID:9414552

  18. Targeting of the SUN protein Mps3 to the inner nuclear membrane by the histone variant H2A.Z

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Jennifer M.; Smoyer, Christine J.; Stensrud, Elizabeth S.; Alexander, Richard; Gogol, Madelaine; Wiegraebe, Winfried

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the relationship between chromatin and proteins at the nuclear periphery, such as the conserved SUN family of inner nuclear membrane (INM) proteins, is necessary to elucidate how three-dimensional nuclear architecture is established and maintained. We found that the budding yeast SUN protein Mps3 directly binds to the histone variant H2A.Z but not other histones. Biochemical and genetic data indicate that the interaction between Mps3 and H2A.Z requires the Mps3 N-terminal acidic domain and unique sequences in the H2A.Z N terminus and histone-fold domain. Analysis of binding-defective mutants showed that the Mps3–H2A.Z interaction is not essential for any previously described role for either protein in nuclear organization, and multiple lines of evidence suggest that Mps3–H2A.Z binding occurs independently of H2A.Z incorporation into chromatin. We demonstrate that H2A.Z is required to target a soluble Mps3 fragment to the nucleus and to localize full-length Mps3 in the INM, indicating that H2A.Z has a novel chromatin-independent function in INM targeting of SUN proteins. PMID:21518795

  19. Rare variants detection with kernel machine learning based on likelihood ratio test.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Ping; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Liwei; Huang, Shuiping; Chen, Feng

    2014-01-01

    This paper mainly utilizes likelihood-based tests to detect rare variants associated with a continuous phenotype under the framework of kernel machine learning. Both the likelihood ratio test (LRT) and the restricted likelihood ratio test (ReLRT) are investigated. The relationship between the kernel machine learning and the mixed effects model is discussed. By using the eigenvalue representation of LRT and ReLRT, their exact finite sample distributions are obtained in a simulation manner. Numerical studies are performed to evaluate the performance of the proposed approaches under the contexts of standard mixed effects model and kernel machine learning. The results have shown that the LRT and ReLRT can control the type I error correctly at the given α level. The LRT and ReLRT consistently outperform the SKAT, regardless of the sample size and the proportion of the negative causal rare variants, and suffer from fewer power reductions compared to the SKAT when both positive and negative effects of rare variants are present. The LRT and ReLRT performed under the context of kernel machine learning have slightly higher powers than those performed under the context of standard mixed effects model. We use the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 exome sequencing SNP data as an illustrative example. Some interesting results are observed from the analysis. Finally, we give the discussion. PMID:24675868

  20. New players in heterochromatin silencing: histone variant H3.3 and the ATRX/DAXX chaperone

    PubMed Central

    Voon, Hsiao P.J.; Wong, Lee H.

    2016-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated that various components of the ATRX/DAXX/Histone H3.3 complex are important for heterochromatin silencing at multiple genomic regions. We provide an overview of the individual components (ATRX, DAXX and/or H3.3) tested in each study and propose a model where the ATRX/DAXX chaperone complex deposits H3.3 to maintain the H3K9me3 modification at heterochromatin throughout the genome. PMID:26773061

  1. Structural characteristics of two wheat histone H2A genes encoding distinct types of variants and functional differences in their promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Huh, G H; Nakayama, T; Meshi, T; Iwabuchi, M

    1997-03-01

    To investigate the regulation of plant histone H2A gene expression, we isolated two H2A genes (TH254 and TH274) from wheat, which encode two variants of H2A. Both genes had an intron in the coding region. In the promoters, some characteristic sequences, such as Oct and Nona motifs, which are conserved among plant histone genes, were located in a short region (about 120 bp) upstream from the putative TATA box. Transient expression analyses of promoter activity with H2A-GUS fusion genes using tobacco protoplasts revealed novel types of positive cis-acting sequences in the TH254 promoter: a direct repeat of a 13 bp sequence (AGTTACATTATTG) and a stretch composed of an AT-rich sequence (ATATAGAAAATTAAAA) and a G-box (CACGTG). Quantitative S1 assay of the mRNA amounts from the TH254/GUS and TH274/GUS chimeric genes in stably transformed and cell cycle-synchronized tobacco cell lines showed that the promoters of both genes contained at least one cis-acting element responsible for S phase-specific expression. Histochemical analysis of transgenic tobacco plants carrying the chimeric genes showed that the promoters of the two H2A genes were active in developing seedlings and flower organs but were regulated in a different manner. PMID:9106503

  2. The NH2 Tail of the Novel Histone Variant H2BFWT Exhibits Properties Distinct from Conventional H2B with Respect to the Assembly of Mitotic Chromosomes

    PubMed Central

    Boulard, Mathieu; Gautier, Thierry; Mbele, Gaelh Ouengue; Gerson, Véronique; Hamiche, Ali; Angelov, Dimitar; Bouvet, Philippe; Dimitrov, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the functional and structural properties of nucleosomes reconstituted with H2BFWT, a recently identified putative histone variant of the H2B family with totally unknown function. We show that H2BFWT can replace the conventional histone H2B in the nucleosome. The presence of H2BFWT did not affect the overall structure of the nucleosome, and the H2BFWT nucleosomes exhibited the same stability as conventional nucleosomes. SWI/SNF was able to efficiently remodel and mobilize the H2BFWT nucleosomes. Importantly, H2BFWT, in contrast to conventional H2B, was unable to recruit chromosome condensation factors and to participate in the assembly of mitotic chromosomes. This was determined by the highly divergent (compared to conventional H2B) NH2 tail of H2BFWT. These data, in combination with the observations that H2BFWT was found by others in the sperm nuclei and appeared to be associated with the telomeric chromatin, suggest that H2BFWT could act as a specific epigenetic marker. PMID:16449661

  3. PP1α, PP1β and Wip-1 regulate H4S47 phosphorylation and deposition of histone H3 variant H3.3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Wang, Zhiquan; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation of histone H4 serine 47 (H4S47ph) is catalyzed by Pak2, a member of the p21-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (Pak) family and regulates the deposition of histone variant H3.3. However, the phosphatase(s) involved in the regulation of H4S47ph levels was unknown. Here, we show that three phosphatases (PP1α, PP1β and Wip1) regulate H4S47ph levels and H3.3 deposition. Depletion of each of the three phosphatases results in increased H4S47ph levels. Moreover, PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 bind H3-H4 in vitro and in vivo, whereas only PP1α and PP1β, but not Wip1, interact with Pak2 in vivo. These results suggest that PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 regulate the levels of H4S47ph through directly acting on H4S47ph, with PP1α and PP1β also likely regulating the activity of Pak2. Finally, depletion of PP1α, PP1β and Wip1 leads to increased H3.3 occupancy at candidate genes tested, elevated H3.3 deposition and enhanced association of H3.3 with its chaperones HIRA and Daxx. These results reveal a novel role of three phosphatases in chromatin dynamics in mammalian cells. PMID:23828041

  4. The histone variant H2A.Z is dynamically expressed in the developing mouse placenta and in differentiating trophoblast stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kafer, Georgia R; Carlton, Peter M; Lehnert, Sigrid A

    2015-11-01

    The histone variant H2A.Z is important in establishing new chromatin environments necessary for permitting changes in gene expression and thus differentiation in mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. In this study we show that H2A.Z is highly expressed in the early mouse placenta, and is specifically limited to progenitor-like trophoblast cells. Using in vitro models, we revealed distinct differences in H2A.Z abundance between undifferentiated, differentiating and differentiated mouse trophoblast stem (mTS) cells. Our work supports the hypothesis that in addition to roles in differentiating mES cells, H2A.Z is also involved in the differentiation of extra-embryonic tissues. PMID:26363621

  5. The development of a monoclonal antibody recognizing the Drosophila melanogaster phosphorylated histone H2A variant (γ-H2AV).

    PubMed

    Lake, Cathleen M; Holsclaw, Julie Korda; Bellendir, Stephanie P; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott

    2013-09-01

    The recognition of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) using a phospho-specific antibody to the histone 2A variant has become the gold standard assay for DNA damage detection. Here we report on the development of the first monoclonal antibody to the phospho-specific form of Drosophila H2AV and characterize the specificity of this antibody to programmed DSBs in oocytes and rereplication sites in endocycling cells by immunofluorescence assays and to DSBs resulting from irradiation in both cell culture and whole tissue by Western blot assays. These studies show that the antibody derived in the study is highly specific for this modification that occurs at DSB sites, and therefore will be a new useful tool within the Drosophila community for the study of DNA damage response, DSB repair, meiotic recombination and chemical agents that cause DNA damage. PMID:23833215

  6. MLL5 Orchestrates a Cancer Self-Renewal State by Repressing the Histone Variant H3.3 and Globally Reorganizing Chromatin.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Coutinho, Fiona J; Vanner, Robert J; Gayden, Tenzin; Mack, Stephen C; Murison, Alex; Remke, Marc; Li, Ren; Takayama, Naoya; Desai, Kinjal; Lee, Lilian; Lan, Xiaoyang; Park, Nicole I; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Smil, David; Sturm, Dominik; Kushida, Michelle M; Head, Renee; Cusimano, Michael D; Bernstein, Mark; Clarke, Ian D; Dick, John E; Pfister, Stefan M; Rich, Jeremy N; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Taylor, Michael D; Jabado, Nada; Bazett-Jones, David P; Lupien, Mathieu; Dirks, Peter B

    2015-12-14

    Mutations in the histone 3 variant H3.3 have been identified in one-third of pediatric glioblastomas (GBMs), but not in adult tumors. Here we show that H3.3 is a dynamic determinant of functional properties in adult GBM. H3.3 is repressed by mixed lineage leukemia 5 (MLL5) in self-renewing GBM cells. MLL5 is a global epigenetic repressor that orchestrates reorganization of chromatin structure by punctuating chromosomes with foci of compacted chromatin, favoring tumorigenic and self-renewing properties. Conversely, H3.3 antagonizes self-renewal and promotes differentiation. We exploited these epigenetic states to rationally identify two small molecules that effectively curb cancer stem cell properties in a preclinical model. Our work uncovers a role for MLL5 and H3.3 in maintaining self-renewal hierarchies in adult GBM. PMID:26626085

  7. Histone H3 Variant Regulates RNA Polymerase II Transcription Termination and Dual Strand Transcription of siRNA Loci in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, David; Hofmeister, Brigitte T.; Cliffe, Laura; Alabady, Magdy; Siegel, T. Nicolai; Schmitz, Robert J.; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Base J, β-D-glucosyl-hydroxymethyluracil, is a chromatin modification of thymine in the nuclear DNA of flagellated protozoa of the order Kinetoplastida. In Trypanosoma brucei, J is enriched, along with histone H3 variant (H3.V), at sites involved in RNA Polymerase (RNAP) II termination and telomeric sites involved in regulating variant surface glycoprotein gene (VSG) transcription by RNAP I. Reduction of J in T. brucei indicated a role of J in the regulation of RNAP II termination, where the loss of J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters led to read-through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes. We now demonstrate that the loss of H3.V leads to similar defects in RNAP II termination within gene clusters and increased expression of downstream genes. Gene derepression is intensified upon the subsequent loss of J in the H3.V knockout. mRNA-seq indicates gene derepression includes VSG genes within the silent RNAP I transcribed telomeric gene clusters, suggesting an important role for H3.V in telomeric gene repression and antigenic variation. Furthermore, the loss of H3.V at regions of overlapping transcription at the end of convergent gene clusters leads to increased nascent RNA and siRNA production. Our results suggest base J and H3.V can act independently as well as synergistically to regulate transcription termination and expression of coding and non-coding RNAs in T. brucei, depending on chromatin context (and transcribing polymerase). As such these studies provide the first direct evidence for histone H3.V negatively influencing transcription elongation to promote termination. PMID:26796527

  8. DNA Hypomethylation and Histone Variant macroH2A1 Synergistically Attenuate Chemotherapy-Induced Senescence to Promote Hepatocellular Carcinoma Progression.

    PubMed

    Borghesan, Michela; Fusilli, Caterina; Rappa, Francesca; Panebianco, Concetta; Rizzo, Giovanni; Oben, Jude A; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Faulkes, Chris; Pata, Illar; Agodi, Antonella; Rezaee, Farhad; Minogue, Shane; Warren, Alessandra; Peterson, Abigail; Sedivy, John M; Douet, Julien; Buschbeck, Marcus; Cappello, Francesco; Mazza, Tommaso; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2016-02-01

    Aging is a major risk factor for progression of liver diseases to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Cellular senescence contributes to age-related tissue dysfunction, but the epigenetic basis underlying drug-induced senescence remains unclear. macroH2A1, a variant of histone H2A, is a marker of senescence-associated heterochromatic foci that synergizes with DNA methylation to silence tumor-suppressor genes in human fibroblasts. In this study, we investigated the relationship between macroH2A1 splice variants, macroH2A1.1 and macroH2A1.2, and liver carcinogenesis. We found that protein levels of both macroH2A1 isoforms were increased in the livers of very elderly rodents and humans, and were robust immunohistochemical markers of human cirrhosis and HCC. In response to the chemotherapeutic and DNA-demethylating agent 5-aza-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC), transgenic expression of macroH2A1 isoforms in HCC cell lines prevented the emergence of a senescent-like phenotype and induced synergistic global DNA hypomethylation. Conversely, macroH2A1 depletion amplified the antiproliferative effects of 5-aza-dC in HCC cells, but failed to enhance senescence. Senescence-associated secretory phenotype and whole-transcriptome analyses implicated the p38 MAPK/IL8 pathway in mediating macroH2A1-dependent escape of HCC cells from chemotherapy-induced senescence. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing revealed that this hepatic antisenescence state also required active transcription that could not be attributed to genomic occupancy of these histones. Collectively, our findings reveal a new mechanism by which drug-induced senescence is epigenetically regulated by macroH2A1 and DNA methylation and suggest macroH2A1 as a novel biomarker of hepatic senescence that could potentially predict prognosis and disease progression. PMID:26772755

  9. Functional role of histone variant Htz1 in the stress response to oleate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Li, Guanghui; Liu, Lingjie; Wan, Yakun

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin structure is implicated in regulating gene transcription in stress response. Transcription factors, transferases and deacetylases, such as multicopy suppressor of SNF1 protein 2 (Msn2), SET domain-containing protein 1 (Set1) and sucrose NonFermenting protein 1 (Snf1), have been identified as key regulators in stress response. In the present study, we reported the dynamics of nucleosome occupancy, Histone Two A Z1 (Htz1) deposition and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethylation (H3K4me2) and histone H3 lysine 79 trimethylation (H3K79me3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under oleate stress. Our results indicated that citrate cycle-associated genes are enhanced and ribosome genes are repressed during the glucose-oleate shift. Importantly, Htz1 acts as a sensor for oleate stress. High-throughput ChIP-chip analysis showed that Htz1 has redistributed across the genome during oleate stress. The number of Htz1-bound genes increases with stress and the number of Htz1-bound ribosome genes decreases with stress. The dynamics of Htz1 and H3K79me3 around transcription factor-binding sites correlate with transcriptional changes. Moreover, we found that nucleosome dynamics are coupled with Htz1 binding changes upon stress. In unstressed conditions (2% glucose), nucleosome occupancy is comparable between Htz1-bound genes and Htz1-depleted genes; in stressed conditions (0.2% oleate for 8 h), the nucleosome occupancy of Htz1-depleted genes is significantly lower than that of Htz1-bound genes. We also found that Msn2 acts an important role in response to the oleate stress and Htz1 is dynamic in Msn2-target genes. Htz1 senses the oleate stress and undergoes a global redistribution and this change couples dynamics of nucleosome occupancy. Our analysis suggests that Htz1 and nucleosome dynamics change in response to oleate stress. PMID:26182431

  10. Nucleosome formation with the testis-specific histone H3 variant, H3t, by human nucleosome assembly proteins in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Kimura, Hiroshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2008-01-01

    Five non-allelic histone H3 variants, H3.1, H3.2, H3.3, H3t and CENP-A, have been identified in mammals. H3t is robustly expressed in the testis, and thus was assigned as the testis-specific H3 variant. However, recent proteomics and tissue-specific RT-PCR experiments revealed a small amount of H3t expression in somatic cells. In the present study, we purified human H3t as a recombinant protein, and showed that H3t/H4 forms nucleosomes with H2A/H2B by the salt-dialysis method, like the conventional H3.1/H4. We found that H3t/H4 is not efficiently incorporated into the nucleosome by human Nap1 (hNap1), due to its defective H3t/H4 deposition on DNA. In contrast, human Nap2 (hNap2), a paralog of hNap1, promotes nucleosome assembly with H3t/H4. Mutational analyses revealed that the Ala111 residue, which is conserved among H3.1, H3.2 and H3.3, but not in H3t, is the essential residue for the hNap1-mediated nucleosome assembly. These results suggest that H3t may be incorporated into chromatin by a specific chaperone-mediated pathway. PMID:18281699

  11. Human GRK4γ142V Variant Promotes Angiotensin II Type I Receptor-Mediated Hypertension via Renal Histone Deacetylase Type 1 Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Zeng, Chunyu; Villar, Van Anthony M; Chen, Shi-You; Konkalmatt, Prasad; Wang, Xiaoyan; Asico, Laureano D; Jones, John E; Yang, Yu; Sanada, Hironobu; Felder, Robin A; Eisner, Gilbert M; Weir, Matthew R; Armando, Ines; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-02-01

    The influence of a single gene on the pathogenesis of essential hypertension may be difficult to ascertain, unless the gene interacts with other genes that are germane to blood pressure regulation. G-protein-coupled receptor kinase type 4 (GRK4) is one such gene. We have reported that the expression of its variant hGRK4γ(142V) in mice results in hypertension because of impaired dopamine D1 receptor. Signaling through dopamine D1 receptor and angiotensin II type I receptor (AT1R) reciprocally modulates renal sodium excretion and blood pressure. Here, we demonstrate the ability of the hGRK4γ(142V) to increase the expression and activity of the AT1R. We show that hGRK4γ(142V) phosphorylates histone deacetylase type 1 and promotes its nuclear export to the cytoplasm, resulting in increased AT1R expression and greater pressor response to angiotensin II. AT1R blockade and the deletion of the Agtr1a gene normalize the hypertension in hGRK4γ(142V) mice. These findings illustrate the unique role of GRK4 by targeting receptors with opposite physiological activity for the same goal of maintaining blood pressure homeostasis, and thus making the GRK4 a relevant therapeutic target to control blood pressure. PMID:26667412

  12. Arabidopsis KINETOCHORE NULL2 Is an Upstream Component for Centromeric Histone H3 Variant cenH3 Deposition at Centromeres[W

    PubMed Central

    Lermontova, Inna; Kuhlmann, Markus; Friedel, Swetlana; Rutten, Twan; Heckmann, Stefan; Sandmann, Michael; Demidov, Dmitri; Schubert, Veit; Schubert, Ingo

    2013-01-01

    The centromeric histone H3 variant cenH3 is an essential centromeric protein required for assembly, maintenance, and proper function of kinetochores during mitosis and meiosis. We identified a KINETOCHORE NULL2 (KNL2) homolog in Arabidopsis thaliana and uncovered features of its role in cenH3 loading at centromeres. We show that Arabidopsis KNL2 colocalizes with cenH3 and is associated with centromeres during all stages of the mitotic cell cycle, except from metaphase to mid-anaphase. KNL2 is regulated by the proteasome degradation pathway. The KNL2 promoter is mainly active in meristematic tissues, similar to the cenH3 promoter. A knockout mutant for KNL2 shows a reduced level of cenH3 expression and reduced amount of cenH3 protein at chromocenters of meristematic nuclei, anaphase bridges during mitosis, micronuclei in pollen tetrads, and 30% seed abortion. Moreover, knl2 mutant plants display reduced expression of suppressor of variegation 3-9 homologs2, 4, and 9 and reduced DNA methylation, suggesting an impact of KNL2 on the epigenetic environment for centromere maintenance. PMID:24014547

  13. The Histone Variant MacroH2A1 Regulates Target Gene Expression in Part by Recruiting the Transcriptional Coregulator PELP1

    PubMed Central

    Hussey, Kristine M.; Chen, Hongshan; Yang, Christine; Park, Eugene; Hah, Nasun; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Gamble, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    MacroH2A1 is a histone variant harboring an ∼25-kDa carboxyl-terminal macrodomain. Due to its enrichment on the inactive X chromosome, macroH2A1 was thought to play a role in transcriptional repression. However, recent studies have shown that macroH2A1 occupies autosomal chromatin and regulates genes in a context-specific manner. The macrodomain may play a role in the modulation of gene expression outcomes via physical interactions with effector proteins, which may depend on the ability of the macrodomain to bind NAD+ metabolite ligands. Here, we identify proline, glutamic acid, and leucine-rich protein 1 (PELP1), a chromatin-associated factor and transcriptional coregulator, as a ligand-independent macrodomain-interacting factor. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with tiling microarrays (ChIP-chip) to determine the genomic localization of PELP1 in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. We find that PELP1 genomic localization is highly correlated with that of macroH2A1. Additionally, PELP1 positively correlates with heterochromatic chromatin marks and negatively correlates with active transcription marks, much like macroH2A1. MacroH2A1 specifically recruits PELP1 to the promoters of macroH2A1 target genes, but macroH2A1 occupancy occurs independent of PELP1. This recruitment allows macroH2A1 and PELP1 to cooperatively regulate gene expression outcomes. PMID:24752897

  14. Specific detection of methionine 27 mutation in histone 3 variants (H3K27M) in fixed tissue from high-grade astrocytomas.

    PubMed

    Bechet, Denise; Gielen, Gerrit G H; Korshunov, Andrey; Pfister, Stefan M; Rousso, Caterina; Faury, Damien; Fiset, Pierre-Olivier; Benlimane, Naciba; Lewis, Peter W; Lu, Chao; David Allis, C; Kieran, Mark W; Ligon, Keith L; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellezam, Benjamin; Albrecht, Steffen; Jabado, Nada

    2014-11-01

    Studies in pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (HGA) by our group and others have uncovered recurrent somatic mutations affecting highly conserved residues in histone 3 (H3) variants. One of these mutations leads to analogous p.Lys27Met (K27M) mutations in both H3.3 and H3.1 variants, is associated with rapid fatal outcome, and occurs specifically in HGA of the midline in children and young adults. This includes diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (80 %) and thalamic or spinal HGA (>90 %), which are surgically challenging locations with often limited tumor material available and critical need for specific histopathological markers. Here, we analyzed formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues from 143 pediatric HGA and 297 other primary brain tumors or normal brain. Immunohistochemical staining for H3K27M was compared to tumor genotype, and also compared to H3 tri-methylated lysine 27 (H3K27me3) staining, previously shown to be drastically decreased in samples carrying this mutation. There was a 100 % concordance between genotype and immunohistochemical analysis of H3K27M in tumor samples. Mutant H3K27M was expressed in the majority of tumor cells, indicating limited intra-tumor heterogeneity for this specific mutation within the limits of our dataset. Both H3.1 and H3.3K27M mutants were recognized by this antibody while non-neoplastic elements, such as endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells or lymphocytes, did not stain. H3K27me3 immunoreactivity was largely mutually exclusive with H3K27M positivity. These results demonstrate that mutant H3K27M can be specifically identified with high specificity and sensitivity using an H3K27M antibody and immunohistochemistry. Use of this antibody in the clinical setting will prove very useful for diagnosis, especially in the context of small biopsies in challenging midline tumors and will help orient care in the context of the extremely poor prognosis associated with this mutation. PMID:25200321

  15. Histone phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Rossetto, Dorine; Avvakumov, Nikita; Côté, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Histone posttranslational modifications are key components of diverse processes that modulate chromatin structure. These marks function as signals during various chromatin-based events, and act as platforms for recruitment, assembly or retention of chromatin-associated factors. The best-known function of histone phosphorylation takes place during cellular response to DNA damage, when phosphorylated histone H2A(X) demarcates large chromatin domains around the site of DNA breakage. However, multiple studies have also shown that histone phosphorylation plays crucial roles in chromatin remodeling linked to other nuclear processes. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of histone phosphorylation and describe the many kinases and phosphatases that regulate it. We discuss the key roles played by this histone mark in DNA repair, transcription and chromatin compaction during cell division and apoptosis. Additionally, we describe the intricate crosstalk that occurs between phosphorylation and other histone modifications and allows for sophisticated control over the chromatin remodeling processes. PMID:22948226

  16. Diversity and Divergence of Dinoflagellate Histone Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Marinov, Georgi K.; Lynch, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Histone proteins and the nucleosomal organization of chromatin are near-universal eukaroytic features, with the exception of dinoflagellates. Previous studies have suggested that histones do not play a major role in the packaging of dinoflagellate genomes, although several genomic and transcriptomic surveys have detected a full set of core histone genes. Here, transcriptomic and genomic sequence data from multiple dinoflagellate lineages are analyzed, and the diversity of histone proteins and their variants characterized, with particular focus on their potential post-translational modifications and the conservation of the histone code. In addition, the set of putative epigenetic mark readers and writers, chromatin remodelers and histone chaperones are examined. Dinoflagellates clearly express the most derived set of histones among all autonomous eukaryote nuclei, consistent with a combination of relaxation of sequence constraints imposed by the histone code and the presence of numerous specialized histone variants. The histone code itself appears to have diverged significantly in some of its components, yet others are conserved, implying conservation of the associated biochemical processes. Specifically, and with major implications for the function of histones in dinoflagellates, the results presented here strongly suggest that transcription through nucleosomal arrays happens in dinoflagellates. Finally, the plausible roles of histones in dinoflagellate nuclei are discussed. PMID:26646152

  17. Genome Distribution of Replication-independent Histone H1 Variants Shows H1.0 Associated with Nucleolar Domains and H1X Associated with RNA Polymerase II-enriched Regions*

    PubMed Central

    Mayor, Regina; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Bustillos, Alberto; Sampaio, Cristina; Luque, Neus; Jordan, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Unlike core histones, the linker histone H1 family is more evolutionarily diverse, and many organisms have multiple H1 variants or subtypes. In mammals, the H1 family includes seven somatic H1 variants; H1.1 to H1.5 are expressed in a replication-dependent manner, whereas H1.0 and H1X are replication-independent. Using ChIP-sequencing data and cell fractionation, we have compared the genomic distribution of H1.0 and H1X in human breast cancer cells, in which we previously observed differential distribution of H1.2 compared with the other subtypes. We have found H1.0 to be enriched at nucleolus-associated DNA repeats and chromatin domains, whereas H1X is associated with coding regions, RNA polymerase II-enriched regions, and hypomethylated CpG islands. Further, H1X accumulates within constitutive or included exons and retained introns and toward the 3′ end of expressed genes. Inducible H1X knockdown does not affect cell proliferation but dysregulates a subset of genes related to cell movement and transport. In H1X-depleted cells, the promoters of up-regulated genes are not occupied specifically by this variant, have a lower than average H1 content, and, unexpectedly, do not form an H1 valley upon induction. We conclude that H1 variants are not distributed evenly across the genome and may participate with some specificity in chromatin domain organization or gene regulation. PMID:25645921

  18. Molecular cloning and expression of hctB encoding a strain-variant chlamydial histone-like protein with DNA-binding activity.

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, T J; Barry, C E; Hackstadt, T

    1993-01-01

    Two DNA-binding proteins with similarity to eukaryotic histone H1 have been described in Chlamydia trachomatis. In addition to the 18-kDa histone H1 homolog Hc1, elementary bodies of C. trachomatis possess an antigenically related histone H1 homolog, which we have termed Hc2, that varies in apparent molecular mass among strains. We report the molecular cloning, expression, and nucleotide sequence of the hctB gene encoding Hc2 and present evidence for in vivo DNA-binding activity of the expressed product. Expression of Hc2 in Escherichia coli induces a compaction of bacterial chromatin that is distinct from that observed upon Hc1 expression. Moreover, isolated nucleoids from Hc2-expressing E. coli exhibit markedly reduced sensitivity to DNase I. These properties of Hc2 are consistent with a postulated role in establishing the nucleoid structure of elementary bodies. Images PMID:7687246

  19. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turton, Keren B.; Annis, Douglas S.; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6±4.0 % (mean±SD, n=21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina’s “BodyMap” RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3. PMID:25984943

  20. A genome-wide approach to screen for genetic variants in broilers (Gallus gallus) with divergent feed conversion ratio.

    PubMed

    Shah, Tejas M; Patel, Namrata V; Patel, Anand B; Upadhyay, Maulik R; Mohapatra, Amitbikram; Singh, Krishna M; Deshpande, Sunil D; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2016-08-01

    Feed conversion ratio (FCR) is an economically important trait in broilers and feed accounts for a significant proportion of the costs involved in broiler production. To explore the contribution of functional variants to FCR trait, we analyzed coding and non-coding single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) across the genome by exome sequencing in seven pairs of full-sibs broilers with divergent FCR and with a sequence coverage at an average depth of fourfold. We identified 192,119 high-quality SNVs, including 30,380 coding SNVs (cSNVs) in the experimental population. We discovered missense SNVs in PGM2, NOX4, TGFBR3, and TMX4, and synonymous SNVs in TSNAX, ITA, HSP90B1, and COL18A1 associated with FCR. Haplotype analyses of genome-wide significant SNVs in PGM2, PHKG1, DGKZ, and SOD2 were also observed with suggestive evidence of haplotype association with FCR. Single-variant and FCR QTL-related genes-based association analyses of SNVs identified newly associated genes for FCR in the regions subjected to targeted exome sequencing. The top seven SNVs were next evaluated in independent replication data sets where SNV chr. 3: 13,990,160 (c. 961G>C) at TMX4 was replicated (p < 0.05). Collectively, we have detected SNVs associated with FCR in broiler as well as identification of SNVs in known FCR QTL region. These findings should facilitate the discovery of causative variants for FCR and contribute to marker-assisted selection. PMID:27174137

  1. Characterization of a Novel Chromatin Sorting Tool Reveals Importance of Histone Variant H3.3 in Contextual Fear Memory and Motor Learning

    PubMed Central

    McNally, Anna G.; Poplawski, Shane G.; Mayweather, Brittany A.; White, Kyle M.; Abel, Ted

    2016-01-01

    The consolidation of short-term labile memories for long-term storage requires transcription and there is growing interest in defining the epigenetic mechanisms regulating these transcriptional events. In particular, it has been hypothesized that combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) have the potential to store memory by dynamically defining the transcriptional status of any given gene loci. Studying epigenetic phenomena during long-term memory consolidation, however, is complicated by the complex cellular heterogeneity of the brain, in which epigenetic signal from memory-relevant cells can be obscured or diluted by the surrounding milieu. To address this issue, we have developed a transgenic mouse line expressing a tetO-regulated, hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged histone H3.3 exclusively in excitatory neurons of the forebrain. Unlike canonical histones, histone H3.3 is incorporated at promoter regions of transcriptionally active genes in a DNA replication-independent manner, stably “barcoding” active regions of the genome in post-mitotic cells. Immunoprecipitating H3.3-HA containing nucleosomes from the hippocampus will therefore enrich for memory-relevant chromatin by isolating actively transcribed regions of the excitatory neuron genome. To evaluate the validity of using H3.3 “barcoding” to sort chromatin, we performed a molecular and behavioral characterization of the H3.3-HA transgenic mouse line. Expectedly, we find that H3.3-HA is incorporated preferentially at promoter regions of actively-transcribed neuronal genes and that expression can be effectively regulated by doxycycline. Additionally, H3.3-HA overexpression does not adversely affect exploratory or anxiety-related behaviors, nor does it affect spatial memory. Transgenic animals do, however, exhibit deficits in contextual memory and motor learning, revealing the importance of this histone isoform in the brain. Future studies in the H3.3-HA transgenic mouse line will define

  2. High-performance capillary electrophoresis of histones

    SciTech Connect

    Gurley, L.R.; London, J.E.; Valdez, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    A high performance capillary electrophoresis (HPCE) system has been developed for the fractionation of histones. This system involves electroinjection of the sample and electrophoresis in a 0.1M phosphate buffer at pH 2.5 in a 50 {mu}m {times} 35 cm coated capillary. Electrophoresis was accomplished in 9 minutes separating a whole histone preparation into its components in the following order of decreasing mobility; (MHP) H3, H1 (major variant), H1 (minor variant), (LHP) H3, (MHP) H2A (major variant), (LHP) H2A, H4, H2B, (MHP) H2A (minor variant) where MHP is the more hydrophobic component and LHP is the less hydrophobic component. This order of separation is very different from that found in acid-urea polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and in reversed-phase HPLC and, thus, brings the histone biochemist a new dimension for the qualitative analysis of histone samples. 27 refs., 8 figs.

  3. Depletion of nuclear histone H2A variants is associated with chronic DNA damage signaling upon drug-evoked senescence of human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Mary F.; Tollervey, James; Krastins, Bryan; Garces, Alejandra; Sarracino, David; Prakash, Amol; Vogelsang, Maryann; Geesman, Glenn; Valderrama, Augusto; Jordan, I. King; Lunyak, Victoria V.

    2012-01-01

    Cellular senescence is associated with global chromatin changes, altered gene expression, and activation of chronic DNA damage signaling. These events ultimately lead to morphological and physiological transformations in primary cells. In this study, we show that chronic DNA damage signals caused by genotoxic stress impact the expression of histones H2A family members and lead to their depletion in the nuclei of senescent human fibroblasts. Our data reinforce the hypothesis that progressive chromatin destabilization may lead to the loss of epigenetic information and impaired cellular function associated with chronic DNA damage upon drug-evoked senescence. We propose that changes in the histone biosynthesis and chromatin assembly may directly contribute to cellular aging. In addition, we also outline the method that allows for quantitative and unbiased measurement of these changes. PMID:23235539

  4. AFM of self-assembled lambda DNA-histone networks.

    PubMed

    Liu, YuYing; Guthold, Martin; Snyder, Matthew J; Lu, HongFeng

    2015-10-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to investigate the self-assembly behavior of λ-DNA and histones at varying histone:DNA ratios. Without histones and at the lowest histone:DNA ratio (less than one histone per 1000 base pairs of DNA), the DNA appeared as individual (uncomplexed), double-stranded DNA molecules. At increasing histone concentrations (one histone per 500, 250 and 167 base pairs of DNA), the DNA molecules started to form extensive polygonal networks of mostly pentagons and hexagons. The observed networks might be one of the naturally occurring, stable DNA-histone structures. The condensing effects of the divalent cations Mg(2+) and Ca(2+) on the DNA-histone complexes were also investigated. The networks persisted at high Mg(2+) concentration (20mM) and the highest histone concentration. At high Ca(2+) concentration and the highest histone concentration, the polygonal network disappeared and, instead, individual, tightly condensed aggregates were formed. PMID:26141439

  5. Histone Deacetylases

    PubMed Central

    Parbin, Sabnam; Kar, Swayamsiddha; Shilpi, Arunima; Sengupta, Dipta; Deb, Moonmoon; Rath, Sandip Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In the current era of genomic medicine, diseases are identified as manifestations of anomalous patterns of gene expression. Cancer is the principal example among such maladies. Although remarkable progress has been achieved in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the genesis and progression of cancer, its epigenetic regulation, particularly histone deacetylation, demands further studies. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are one of the key players in the gene expression regulation network in cancer because of their repressive role on tumor suppressor genes. Higher expression and function of deacetylases disrupt the finely tuned acetylation homeostasis in both histone and non-histone target proteins. This brings about alterations in the genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and other cellular processes. Moreover, the reversible nature of epigenetic modulation by HDACs makes them attractive targets for cancer remedy. This review summarizes the current knowledge of HDACs in tumorigenesis and tumor progression as well as their contribution to the hallmarks of cancer. The present report also describes briefly various assays to detect histone deacetylase activity and discusses the potential role of histone deacetylase inhibitors as emerging epigenetic drugs to cure cancer. PMID:24051359

  6. Association Studies with Imputed Variants Using Expectation-Maximization Likelihood-Ratio Tests

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kuan-Chieh; Sun, Wei; Wu, Ying; Chen, Mengjie; Mohlke, Karen L.; Lange, Leslie A.; Li, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Genotype imputation has become standard practice in modern genetic studies. As sequencing-based reference panels continue to grow, increasingly more markers are being well or better imputed but at the same time, even more markers with relatively low minor allele frequency are being imputed with low imputation quality. Here, we propose new methods that incorporate imputation uncertainty for downstream association analysis, with improved power and/or computational efficiency. We consider two scenarios: I) when posterior probabilities of all potential genotypes are estimated; and II) when only the one-dimensional summary statistic, imputed dosage, is available. For scenario I, we have developed an expectation-maximization likelihood-ratio test for association based on posterior probabilities. When only imputed dosages are available (scenario II), we first sample the genotype probabilities from its posterior distribution given the dosages, and then apply the EM-LRT on the sampled probabilities. Our simulations show that type I error of the proposed EM-LRT methods under both scenarios are protected. Compared with existing methods, EM-LRT-Prob (for scenario I) offers optimal statistical power across a wide spectrum of MAF and imputation quality. EM-LRT-Dose (for scenario II) achieves a similar level of statistical power as EM-LRT-Prob and, outperforms the standard Dosage method, especially for markers with relatively low MAF or imputation quality. Applications to two real data sets, the Cebu Longitudinal Health and Nutrition Survey study and the Women’s Health Initiative Study, provide further support to the validity and efficiency of our proposed methods. PMID:25383782

  7. Histone tyrosine phosphorylation comes of age

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Histones were discovered over a century ago and have since been found to be the most extensively post-translationally modified proteins, although tyrosine phosphorylation of histones had remained elusive until recently. The year 2009 proved to be a landmark year for histone tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation as five research groups independently discovered this modification. Three groups describe phosphorylation of Y142 in the variant histone H2A.X, where it may be involved in the cellular decision making process to either undergo DNA repair or apoptosis in response to DNA damage. Further, one group suggests that phosphorylation of histone H3 on Y99 is crucial for its regulated proteolysis in yeast, while another found that Y41 phosphorylation modulates chromatin architecture and oncogenesis in mammalian cells. These pioneering studies provide the initial conceptual framework for further analyses of the diverse roles of tyrosine phosphorylation on different histones, with far reaching implications for human health and disease. PMID:20935492

  8. The D-isoAsp-25 variant of histone H2B is highly enriched in active chromatin: potential role in the regulation of gene expression?

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhenxia; Zhu, Jeff X; Aswad, Dana W

    2016-02-01

    Approximately 12 % of histone H2B in mammalian brain contains an unusual D-aspartate residue in its N-terminal tail. Most of this D-aspartate is linked to the C-flanking glycine via an isopeptide bond. To explore the possible significance of these modifications, we generated an antibody to the D-isoaspartyl form of H2B, and used it to assess its levels in H2B associated with "active" vs. "silent" chromatin. We found that the D-isoaspartyl form of H2B appears to be highly enriched in the former. This irreversible modification could serve a novel regulatory function in gene expression. PMID:26666674

  9. Histone H1 null vertebrate cells exhibit altered nucleosome architecture

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Hideharu; Takami, Yasunari; Sonoda, Eiichiro; Iwasaki, Tomohito; Iwano, Hidetomo; Tachibana, Makoto; Takeda, Shunichi; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Kimura, Hiroshi; Shinkai, Yoichi

    2010-01-01

    In eukaryotic nuclei, DNA is wrapped around an octamer of core histones to form nucleosomes, and chromatin fibers are thought to be stabilized by linker histones of the H1 type. Higher eukaryotes express multiple variants of histone H1; chickens possess six H1 variants. Here, we generated and analyzed the phenotype of a complete deletion of histone H1 genes in chicken cells. The H1-null cells showed decreased global nucleosome spacing, expanded nuclear volumes, and increased chromosome aberration rates, although proper mitotic chromatin structure appeared to be maintained. Expression array analysis revealed that the transcription of multiple genes was affected and was mostly downregulated in histone H1-deficient cells. This report describes the first histone H1 complete knockout cells in vertebrates and suggests that linker histone H1, while not required for mitotic chromatin condensation, plays important roles in nucleosome spacing and interphase chromatin compaction and acts as a global transcription regulator. PMID:20156997

  10. Rare variant associations with waist-to-hip ratio in European-American and African-American women from the NHLBI-Exome Sequencing Project.

    PubMed

    Kan, Mengyuan; Auer, Paul L; Wang, Gao T; Bucasas, Kristine L; Hooker, Stanley; Rodriguez, Alejandra; Li, Biao; Ellis, Jaclyn; Adrienne Cupples, L; Ida Chen, Yii-Der; Dupuis, Josée; Fox, Caroline S; Gross, Myron D; Smith, Joshua D; Heard-Costa, Nancy; Meigs, James B; Pankow, James S; Rotter, Jerome I; Siscovick, David; Wilson, James G; Shendure, Jay; Jackson, Rebecca; Peters, Ulrike; Zhong, Hua; Lin, Danyu; Hsu, Li; Franceschini, Nora; Carlson, Chris; Abecasis, Goncalo; Gabriel, Stacey; Bamshad, Michael J; Altshuler, David; Nickerson, Deborah A; North, Kari E; Lange, Leslie A; Reiner, Alexander P; Leal, Suzanne M

    2016-08-01

    Waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), a relative comparison of waist and hip circumferences, is an easily accessible measurement of body fat distribution, in particular central abdominal fat. A high WHR indicates more intra-abdominal fat deposition and is an established risk factor for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous common genetic loci influencing WHR, but the contributions of rare variants have not been previously reported. We investigated rare variant associations with WHR in 1510 European-American and 1186 African-American women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-Exome Sequencing Project. Association analysis was performed on the gene level using several rare variant association methods. The strongest association was observed for rare variants in IKBKB (P=4.0 × 10(-8)) in European-Americans, where rare variants in this gene are predicted to decrease WHRs. The activation of the IKBKB gene is involved in inflammatory processes and insulin resistance, which may affect normal food intake and body weight and shape. Meanwhile, aggregation of rare variants in COBLL1, previously found to harbor common variants associated with WHR and fasting insulin, were nominally associated (P=2.23 × 10(-4)) with higher WHR in European-Americans. However, these significant results are not shared between African-Americans and European-Americans that may be due to differences in the allelic architecture of the two populations and the small sample sizes. Our study indicates that the combined effect of rare variants contribute to the inter-individual variation in fat distribution through the regulation of insulin response. PMID:26757982

  11. The Drosophila histone variant H2A.V works in concert with HP1 to promote kinetochore-driven microtubule formation.

    PubMed

    Vernì, Fiammetta; Cenci, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    Unlike other organisms that have evolved distinct H2A variants for different functions, Drosophila melanogaster has just one variant which is capable of filling many roles. This protein, H2A.V, combines the features of the conserved variants H2A.Z and H2A.X in transcriptional control/heterochromatin assembly and DNA damage response, respectively. Here we show that mutations in the gene encoding H2A.V affect chromatin compaction and perturb chromosome segregation in Drosophila mitotic cells. A microtubule (MT) regrowth assay after cold exposure revealed that loss of H2A.V impairs the formation of kinetochore-driven (k) fibers, which can account for defects in chromosome segregation. All defects are rescued by a transgene encoding H2A.V that lacks the H2A.X function in the DNA damage response, suggesting that the H2A.Z (but not H2A.X) functionality of H2A.V is required for chromosome segregation. We also found that loss of H2A.V weakens HP1 localization, specifically at the pericentric heterochromatin of metaphase chromosomes. Interestingly, loss of HP1 yielded not only telomeric fusions but also mitotic defects similar to those seen in H2A.V null mutants, suggesting a role for HP1 in chromosome segregation. We also show that H2A.V precipitates HP1 from larval brain extracts indicating that both proteins are part of the same complex. Moreover, we found that the overexpression of HP1 rescues chromosome missegregation and defects in the kinetochore-driven k-fiber regrowth of H2A.V mutants indicating that both phenotypes are influenced by unbalanced levels of HP1. Collectively, our results suggest that H2A.V and HP1 work in concert to ensure kinetochore-driven MT growth. PMID:25591068

  12. Toxoplasma histone acetylation remodelers as novel drug targets

    PubMed Central

    Vanagas, Laura; Jeffers, Victoria; Bogado, Silvina S; Dalmasso, Maria C; Sullivan, William J; Angel, Sergio O

    2013-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a leading cause of neurological birth defects and a serious opportunistic pathogen. The authors and others have found that Toxoplasma uses a unique nucleosome composition supporting a fine gene regulation together with other factors. Post-translational modifications in histones facilitate the establishment of a global chromatin environment and orchestrate DNA-related biological processes. Histone acetylation is one of the most prominent post-translational modifications influencing gene expression. Histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases have been intensively studied as potential drug targets. In particular, histone deacetylase inhibitors have activity against apicomplexan parasites, underscoring their potential as a new class of antiparasitic compounds. In this review, we summarize what is known about Toxoplasma histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases, and discuss the inhibitors studied to date. Finally, the authors discuss the distinct possibility that the unique nucleosome composition of Toxoplasma, which harbors a nonconserved H2Bv variant histone, might be targeted in novel therapeutics directed against this parasite. PMID:23199404

  13. Role of several histone lysine methyltransferases in tumor development

    PubMed Central

    LI, JIFU; ZHU, SHUNQIN; KE, XIAO-XUE; CUI, HONGJUAN

    2016-01-01

    The field of cancer epigenetics has been evolving rapidly in recent decades. Epigenetic mechanisms include DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs. Histone modifications are important markers of function and chromatin state. Aberrant histone methylation frequently occurs in tumor development and progression. Multiple studies have identified that histone lysine methyltransferases regulate gene transcription through the methylation of histone, which affects cell proliferation and differentiation, cell migration and invasion, and other biological characteristics. Histones have variant lysine sites for different levels of methylation, catalyzed by different lysine methyltransferases, which have numerous effects on human cancers. The present review focused on the most recent advances, described the key function sites of histone lysine methyltransferases, integrated significant quantities of data to introduce several compelling histone lysine methyltransferases in various types of human cancers, summarized their role in tumor development and discussed their potential mechanisms of action. PMID:26998265

  14. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 regulates proteolysis of centromeric histone H3 variant Cse4 and prevents its mislocalization to euchromatin

    PubMed Central

    Ohkuni, Kentaro; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Fulp, Alyona; Lawrimore, Josh; Au, Wei-Chun; Pasupala, Nagesh; Levy-Myers, Reuben; Warren, Jack; Strunnikov, Alexander; Baker, Richard E.; Kerscher, Oliver; Bloom, Kerry; Basrai, Munira A.

    2016-01-01

    Centromeric histone H3, CENP-ACse4, is essential for faithful chromosome segregation. Stringent regulation of cellular levels of CENP-ACse4 restricts its localization to centromeres. Mislocalization of CENP-ACse4 is associated with aneuploidy in yeast and flies and tumorigenesis in human cells; thus defining pathways that regulate CENP-A levels is critical for understanding how mislocalization of CENP-A contributes to aneuploidy in human cancers. Previous work in budding yeast shows that ubiquitination of overexpressed Cse4 by Psh1, an E3 ligase, partially contributes to proteolysis of Cse4. Here we provide the first evidence that Cse4 is sumoylated by E3 ligases Siz1 and Siz2 in vivo and in vitro. Ubiquitination of Cse4 by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL) Slx5 plays a critical role in proteolysis of Cse4 and prevents mislocalization of Cse4 to euchromatin under normal physiological conditions. Accumulation of sumoylated Cse4 species and increased stability of Cse4 in slx5∆ strains suggest that sumoylation precedes ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4. Slx5-mediated Cse4 proteolysis is independent of Psh1, since slx5∆ psh1∆ strains exhibit higher levels of Cse4 stability and mislocalization than either slx5∆ or psh1∆ strains. Our results demonstrate a role for Slx5 in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis of Cse4 to prevent its mislocalization and maintain genome stability. PMID:26960795

  15. Oncogenic potential of histone-variant H2A.Z.1 and its regulatory role in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition in liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Jung Woo; Shen, Qingyu; Kim, Hyung Seok; Shin, Woo Chan; Ahn, Young Min; Park, Won Sang; Lee, Jung Young; Nam, Suk Woo

    2016-01-01

    H2A.Z is a highly conserved H2A variant, and two distinct H2A.Z isoforms, H2A.Z.1 and H2A.Z.2, have been identified as products of two non-allelic genes, H2AFZ and H2AFV. H2A.Z has been reported to be overexpressed in breast, prostate and bladder cancers, but most studies did not clearly distinguish between isoforms. One recent study reported a unique role for the H2A.Z isoform H2A.Z.2 as a driver of malignant melanoma. Here we first report that H2A.Z.1 plays a pivotal role in the liver tumorigenesis by selectively regulating key molecules in cell cycle and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). H2AFZ expression was significantly overexpressed in a large cohort of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, and high expression of H2AFZ was significantly associated with their poor prognosis. H2A.Z.1 overexpression was demonstrated in a subset of human HCC and cell lines. H2A.Z.1 knockdown suppressed HCC cell growth by transcriptional deregulation of cell cycle proteins and caused apoptotic cell death of HCC cells. We also observed that H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the metastatic potential of HCC cells by selectively modulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition regulatory proteins such as E-cadherin and fibronectin. In addition, H2A.Z.1 knockdown reduced the in vivo tumor growth rate in a mouse xenograft model. In conclusion, our findings suggest the oncogenic potential of H2A.Z.1 in liver tumorigenesis and that it plays established role in accelerating cell cycle transition and EMT during hepatocarcinogenesis. This makes H2A.Z.1 a promising target in liver cancer therapy. PMID:26863632

  16. Histones in protistan evolution.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, P J

    1985-01-01

    The potential of comparative studies on histones for use in protistan evolution is discussed, using algal histones as specific examples. A basic premise for the importance of histones in protistan evolution is the observation that these proteins are completely absent in prokaryotes (and cytoplasmic organelles), but with few exceptions, the same five major histone types are found in all higher plants and animals. Since the histone content of the algae and other protists is not constant, some of these organisms may represent transition forms between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic modes of packaging the genetic material. Comparative studies of protistan histones may thus be of help in determining evolutionary relationships. However, several problems are encounter with protistan histones, including difficulties in isolating nuclei, proteolytic degradation, anomalous gel migration of histones, and difficulties in histone identification. Because of the above problems, and the observed variability in protistan histones, it is suggested that several criteria be employed for histone identification in protists. PMID:3910133

  17. Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Pownceby, Mark I.; Madsen, Ian C.; Studer, Andrew J.; Manuel, James R.; Kimpton, Justin A.

    2014-12-01

    Effects of basicity, B (CaO:SiO2 ratio) on the thermal range, concentration, and formation mechanisms of silico-ferrite of calcium and aluminum (SFCA) and SFCA-I iron ore sinter bonding phases have been investigated using an in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction-based methodology with subsequent Rietveld refinement-based quantitative phase analysis. SFCA and SFCA-I phases are the key bonding materials in iron ore sinter, and improved understanding of the effects of processing parameters such as basicity on their formation and decomposition may assist in improving efficiency of industrial iron ore sintering operations. Increasing basicity significantly increased the thermal range of SFCA-I, from 1363 K to 1533 K (1090 °C to 1260 °C) for a mixture with B = 2.48, to ~1339 K to 1535 K (1066 °C to 1262 °C) for a mixture with B = 3.96, and to ~1323 K to 1593 K (1050 °C to 1320 °C) at B = 4.94. Increasing basicity also increased the amount of SFCA-I formed, from 18 wt pct for the mixture with B = 2.48 to 25 wt pct for the B = 4.94 mixture. Higher basicity of the starting sinter mixture will, therefore, increase the amount of SFCA-I, considered to be more desirable of the two phases. Basicity did not appear to significantly influence the formation mechanism of SFCA-I. It did, however, affect the formation mechanism of SFCA, with the decomposition of SFCA-I coinciding with the formation of a significant amount of additional SFCA in the B = 2.48 and 3.96 mixtures but only a minor amount in the highest basicity mixture. In situ neutron diffraction enabled characterization of the behavior of magnetite after melting of SFCA produced a magnetite plus melt phase assemblage.

  18. Genetic Variants Associated with Optic Nerve Vertical Cup-to-Disc Ratio Are Risk Factors for Primary Open Angle Glaucoma in a US Caucasian Population

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Bao Jian; Wang, Dan Yi; Pasquale, Louis R.; Haines, Jonathan L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Genetically complex disorders, such as primary open angle glaucoma (POAG), may include highly heritable quantitative traits as part of the overall phenotype, and mapping genes influencing the related quantitative traits may effectively identify genetic risk factors predisposing to the complex disease. Recent studies have identified SNPs associated with optic nerve area and vertical cup-to-disc ratio (VCDR). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between these SNPs and POAG in a US Caucasian case-control sample. Methods. Five SNPs previously associated with optic disc area, or VCDR, were genotyped in 539 POAG cases and 336 controls. Genotype data were analyzed for single SNP associations and SNP interactions with VCDR and POAG. Results. SNPs associated with VCDR rs1063192 (CDKN2B) and rs10483727 (SIX1/SIX6) were also associated with POAG (P = 0.0006 and P = 0.0043 for rs1063192 and rs10483727, respectively). rs1063192, associated with smaller VCDR, had a protective effect (odds ratio [OR] = 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.58–0.90), whereas rs10483727, associated with larger VCDR, increased POAG risk (OR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.08–1.65). POAG risk associated with increased VCDR was significantly influenced by the C allele of rs1900004 (ATOH7), associated with increased optic nerve area (P-interaction = 0.025; OR = 1.89; 95% CI, 1.22–2.94). Conclusions. Genetic variants influencing VCDR are associated with POAG in a US Caucasian population. Variants associated with optic nerve area are not independently associated with disease but can influence the effects of VCDR variants suggesting that increased optic disc area can significantly contribute to POAG risk when coupled with risk factors controlling VCDR. PMID:21398277

  19. Familial Alzheimer's disease-linked presenilin 1 variants elevate Abeta1-42/1-40 ratio in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Borchelt, D R; Thinakaran, G; Eckman, C B; Lee, M K; Davenport, F; Ratovitsky, T; Prada, C M; Kim, G; Seekins, S; Yager, D; Slunt, H H; Wang, R; Seeger, M; Levey, A I; Gandy, S E; Copeland, N G; Jenkins, N A; Price, D L; Younkin, S G; Sisodia, S S

    1996-11-01

    Mutations in the presenilin 1 (PS1) and presenilin 2 genes cosegregate with the majority of early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (FAD) pedigrees. We now document that the Abeta1-42(43)/Abeta1-40 ratio in the conditioned media of independent N2a cell lines expressing three FAD-linked PS1 variants is uniformly elevated relative to cells expressing similar levels of wild-type PS1. Similarly, the Abeta1-42(43)/Abeta1-40 ratio is elevated in the brains of young transgenic animals coexpressing a chimeric amyloid precursor protein (APP) and an FAD-linked PS1 variant compared with brains of transgenic mice expressing APP alone or transgenic mice coexpressing wild-type human PS1 and APP. These studies provide compelling support for the view that one mechanism by which these mutant PS1 cause AD is by increasing the extracellular concentration of Abeta peptides terminating at 42(43), species that foster Abeta deposition. PMID:8938131

  20. A Variant in LIN28B Is Associated with 2D:4D Finger-Length Ratio, a Putative Retrospective Biomarker of Prenatal Testosterone Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Medland, Sarah E.; Zayats, Tetyana; Glaser, Beate; Nyholt, Dale R.; Gordon, Scott D.; Wright, Margaret J.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Campbell, Megan J.; Henders, Anjali K.; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Peltonen, Leena; Wolke, Dieter; Ring, Susan M.; Deloukas, Panos; Martin, Nicholas G.; Smith, George Davey; Evans, David M.

    2010-01-01

    The ratio of the lengths of an individual's second to fourth digit (2D:4D) is commonly used as a noninvasive retrospective biomarker for prenatal androgen exposure. In order to identify the genetic determinants of 2D:4D, we applied a genome-wide association approach to 1507 11-year-old children from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) in whom 2D:4D ratio had been measured, as well as a sample of 1382 12- to 16-year-olds from the Brisbane Adolescent Twin Study. A meta-analysis of the two scans identified a single variant in the LIN28B gene that was strongly associated with 2D:4D (rs314277: p = 4.1 × 10−8) and was subsequently independently replicated in an additional 3659 children from the ALSPAC cohort (p = 1.53 × 10−6). The minor allele of the rs314277 variant has previously been linked to increased height and delayed age at menarche, but in our study it was associated with increased 2D:4D in the direction opposite to that of previous reports on the correlation between 2D:4D and age at menarche. Our findings call into question the validity of 2D:4D as a simplistic retrospective biomarker for prenatal testosterone exposure. PMID:20303062

  1. Linker histones in hormonal gene regulation.

    PubMed

    Vicent, G P; Wright, R H G; Beato, M

    2016-03-01

    In the present review, we summarize advances in our knowledge on the role of the histone H1 family of proteins in breast cancer cells, focusing on their response to progestins. Histone H1 plays a dual role in gene regulation by hormones, both as a structural component of chromatin and as a dynamic modulator of transcription. It contributes to hormonal regulation of the MMTV promoter by stabilizing a homogeneous nucleosome positioning, which reduces basal transcription whereas at the same time promoting progesterone receptor binding and nucleosome remodeling. These combined effects enhance hormone dependent gene transcription, which eventually requires H1 phosphorylation and displacement. Various isoforms of histone H1 have specific functions in differentiated breast cancer cells and compact nucleosomal arrays to different extents in vitro. Genome-wide studies show that histone H1 has a key role in chromatin dynamics of hormone regulated genes. A complex sequence of enzymatic events, including phosphorylation by CDK2, PARylation by PARP1 and the ATP-dependent activity of NURF, are required for H1 displacement and gene de-repression, as a prerequisite for further nucleosome remodeling. Similarly, during hormone-dependent gene repression a dedicated enzymatic mechanism controls H1 deposition at promoters by a complex containing HP1γ, LSD1 and BRG1, the ATPase of the BAF complex. Thus, a broader vision of the histone code should include histone H1, as the linker histone variants actively participate in the regulation of the chromatin structure. How modifications of the core histones tails affect H1 modifications and vice versa is one of the many questions that remains to be addressed to provide a more comprehensive view of the histone cross-talk mechanisms. PMID:26518266

  2. Expression ratio of histone demethylase KDM3A to protamine-1 mRNA is predictive of successful testicular sperm extraction in men with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia.

    PubMed

    Javadirad, S M; Hojati, Z; Ghaedi, K; Nasr-Esfahani, M H

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of histone demethylase KDM3A to protamine 1 (PRM1) mRNA expression ratio as a reliable marker of sperm retrieval in men with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia (NOA). Fifty eight azoospermic men, including 44 with NOA and 14 with obstructive azoospermia (OA). Testis tissue samples were collected from azoospermic men who have been referred for testicular sperm extraction (TESE) and micro-TESE. Relative expression ratio of KDM3A to PRM1 was analyzed after selection of approved reference genes. Histological classification of testis biopsies was performed. Sperm retrieval following TESE and micro-TESE was evaluated. A sperm retrieval prediction sensitivity of 95% was established when the Cq of PRM1 became smaller than the Cq of both KDM3A and GAPDH genes. However, azoospermic men with down-regulated KDM3A and decreased expression of PRM1 mRNA showed very low success for sperm retrieval (<25%), even after micro-TESE surgery. The KDM3A to PRM1 mRNA expression ratio can be used as a reliable marker of successful testicular sperm extraction in men with obstructive and non-obstructive azoospermia with 95% sensitivity. PMID:27027467

  3. Histone modification and chromatin remodeling during NER.

    PubMed

    Waters, Raymond; van Eijk, Patrick; Reed, Simon

    2015-12-01

    Here we review our developments of and results with high resolution studies on global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Technologies were developed to examine NER at nucleotide resolution in yeast sequences of choice and to determine how these related to local changes in chromatin. We focused on how GG-NER relates to histone acetylation for its functioning and we identified the histone acetyltransferase Gcn5 and acetylation at lysines 9/14 of histone H3 as a major factor in enabling efficient repair. Factors influencing this Gcn5-mediated event are considered which include Rad16, a GG-NER specific SWI/SNF factor and the yeast histone variant of H2AZ (Htz1). We describe results employing primarily MFA2 as a model gene, but also those with URA3 located at subtelomeric sequences. In the latter case we also see a role for acetylation at histone H4. We then consider the development of a high resolution genome-wide approach that enables one to examine correlations between histone modifications and the NER of UV-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers throughout entire yeast genome. This is an approach that will enable rapid advances in understanding the complexities of how compacted chromatin in chromosomes is processed to access DNA damage before it is returned to its pre-damaged status to maintain epigenetic codes. PMID:26422133

  4. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry as a novel tool for detecting histone modifications in clinical tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Lahiri, Shibojyoti; Sun, Na; Buck, Achim; Imhof, Axel; Walch, Axel

    2016-03-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs), histone variants and enzymes responsible for the incorporation or the removal of the PTMs are being increasingly associated with human disease. Combinations of histone PTMs and the specific incorporation of variants contribute to the establishment of cellular identity and hence are potential markers that could be exploited in disease diagnostics and prognostics and therapy response prediction. Due to the scarcity of suitable antibodies and the pre-requirement of tissue homogenization for more advanced analytical techniques, comprehensive information regarding the spatial distribution of these factors at the tissue level has been lacking. MALDI imaging mass spectrometry provides an ideal platform to measure histone PTMs and variants from tissues while maintaining the information about their spatial distribution. Discussed in this review are the relevance of histones in the context of human disease and the contribution of MALDI imaging mass spectrometry in measuring histones in situ. PMID:26808584

  5. ChIp-seq of bovine cells (MDBK) to study butyrate-induced histone modification with 10 datasets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next-generation sequencing was combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) technology to analyze histone modification (acetylation) induced by butyrate and to map the epigenomic landscape of normal histone H3, H4 in rumen cells of the cow. Ten variants of histone H3 and H4 modification were m...

  6. Endocytic Sorting of CFTR variants Monitored by Single Cell Fluorescence Ratio Image Analysis (FRIA) in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Barriere, H.; Apaja, P.; Okiyoneda, T.; Lukacs, G. L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The wild-type CFTR channel undergoes constitutive internalization and recycling at the plasma membrane. This process is initiated by the recognition of the Tyr- and di-Leu-based endocytic motifs of CFTR by the AP-2 adaptor complex, leading to the formation of clathrin-coated vesicles and the channel delivery to sorting/recycling endosomes. Accumulating evidence suggests that conformationally defective mutant CFTRs (e.g. rescued ΔF508 and glycosylation-deficient channel) are unstable at the plasma membrane and undergo augmented ubiquitination in post-Golgi compartments. Ubiquitination conceivably accounts for the metabolic instability at cell surface by provoking accelerated internalization, as well as rerouting the channel from recycling towards lysosomal degradation. We developed an in vivo fluorescence ratio imaging assay (FRIA) that in concert with genetic manipulation can be utilized to establish the post-endocytic fate and sorting determinants of mutant CFTRs. PMID:21594793

  7. Histone Modifiers in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Idan; Poręba, Elżbieta; Kamieniarz, Kinga; Schneider, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Covalent modifications of histones can regulate all DNA-dependent processes. In the last few years, it has become more and more evident that histone modifications are key players in the regulation of chromatin states and dynamics as well as in gene expression. Therefore, histone modifications and the enzymatic machineries that set them are crucial regulators that can control cellular proliferation, differentiation, plasticity, and malignancy processes. This review discusses the biology and biochemistry of covalent histone posttranslational modifications (PTMs) and evaluates the dual role of their modifiers in cancer: as oncogenes that can initiate and amplify tumorigenesis or as tumor suppressors. PMID:21941619

  8. Histones and histone modifications in perinuclear chromatin anchoring: from yeast to man.

    PubMed

    Harr, Jennifer C; Gonzalez-Sandoval, Adriana; Gasser, Susan M

    2016-02-01

    It is striking that within a eukaryotic nucleus, the genome can assume specific spatiotemporal distributions that correlate with the cell's functional states. Cell identity itself is determined by distinct sets of genes that are expressed at a given time. On the level of the individual gene, there is a strong correlation between transcriptional activity and associated histone modifications. Histone modifications act by influencing the recruitment of non-histone proteins and by determining the level of chromatin compaction, transcription factor binding, and transcription elongation. Accumulating evidence also shows that the subnuclear position of a gene or domain correlates with its expression status. Thus, the question arises whether this spatial organization results from or determines a gene's chromatin status. Although the association of a promoter with the inner nuclear membrane (INM) is neither necessary nor sufficient for repression, the perinuclear sequestration of heterochromatin is nonetheless conserved from yeast to man. How does subnuclear localization influence gene expression? Recent work argues that the common denominator between genome organization and gene expression is the modification of histones and in some cases of histone variants. This provides an important link between local chromatin structure and long-range genome organization in interphase cells. In this review, we will evaluate how histones contribute to the latter, and discuss how this might help to regulate genes crucial for cell differentiation. PMID:26792937

  9. A SULT2A1 genetic variant identified by GWAS as associated with low serum DHEAS does not impact on the actual DHEA/DHEAS ratio

    PubMed Central

    Haring, Robin; Wallaschofski, Henri; Teumer, Alexander; Kroemer, Heyo; Taylor, Angela E; Shackleton, Cedric H L; Nauck, Matthias; Völker, Uwe; Homuth, Georg; Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    DHEA is the major precursor of human sex steroid synthesis and is inactivated via sulfonation to DHEAS. A previous genome-wide association study related the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs2637125, located near the coding region of DHEA sulfotransferase, SULT2A1, to serum DHEAS concentrations. However, the functional relevance of this SNP with regard to DHEA sulfonation is unknown. Using data from 3300 participants of the population-based cohort Study of Health in Pomerania, we identified 43 individuals being homozygote for the minor allele of the SNP rs2637125 (AA) and selected two sex- and age-matched individuals with AG and GG genotype (n=172) respectively. Steroid analysis including measurement of serum DHEA and DHEAS was carried out by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, employing steroid oxime analysis for enhancing the sensitivity of DHEA detection. We applied quantile regression models to compare median hormone levels across SULT2A1 genotypes. Median comparisons by SULT2A1 genotype (AA vs AG and GG genotypes respectively) showed no differences in the considered hormones including DHEAS, DHEA, androstenedione, as well as cortisol and cortisone concentrations. SULT2A1 genotype also had no effect on the DHEA/DHEAS ratio. Sex-stratified analyses, as well as alternative use of the SULT2A1 SNP rs182420, yielded similar negative results. Genetic variants of SULT2A1 do not appear to have an effect on individual DHEA and DHEAS concentrations or the DHEA/DHEAS ratio as a marker of DHEA sulfonation capacity. PMID:23132913

  10. The dissociation of histone from deoxyribonucleohistone by gamma-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, P H; Peacocke, A R

    1968-09-01

    1. Experiments were carried out to determine the extent of dissociation of histone from deoxyribonucleohistone as a result of irradiation with gamma-rays from (60)Co. 2. The bulk of the nucleohistone was removed from the irradiated solutions either by sedimentation or by precipitation with dilute sodium chloride solution. The supernatants were then analysed for DNA and histone. 3. The ratios of histone to DNA in these supernatants were less than for the original nucleohistone. This indicated that histone was dissociated by the irradiation, and then aggregated either with itself or with other nucleohistone molecules, and so was removed with the bulk of the nucleohistone during sedimentation or precipitation. PMID:5685855

  11. Countercurrent-distribution studies on histones

    PubMed Central

    Butler, J. A. V.; Power, D. F.; Palau, J.

    1967-01-01

    1. The possibilities of fractionating histones and histone fractions by means of countercurrent distribution between two phases formed by water and butan-2-ol, in the presence of various concentrations of trichloroacetic acid, have been examined. 2. Although the principal histone fractions differ considerably in their partition ratios, a satisfactory resolution of the principal histone fractions from the whole histone has not been achieved. 3. The histone fractions obtained by other methods can be resolved with suitable concentrations of trichloroacetic acid. Besides the main peak several subsidiary peaks are obtained in most cases, the composition of which corresponds with others of the main fractions. 4. The method is therefore capable of removing from the principal fractions as previously prepared contamination by other fractions. 5. Except in one case, no fraction with composition unlike other fractions has been obtained. In several cases the material isolated from the principal peak behaves as a single component on running again. In two cases fractions with similar compositions were distinguished by countercurrent distribution. PMID:6029613

  12. The specification and global reprogramming of histone epigenetic marks during gamete formation and early embryo development in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Samson, Mark; Jow, Margaret M; Wong, Catherine C L; Fitzpatrick, Colin; Aslanian, Aaron; Saucedo, Israel; Estrada, Rodrigo; Ito, Takashi; Park, Sung-kyu Robin; Yates, John R; Chu, Diana S

    2014-10-01

    In addition to the DNA contributed by sperm and oocytes, embryos receive parent-specific epigenetic information that can include histone variants, histone post-translational modifications (PTMs), and DNA methylation. However, a global view of how such marks are erased or retained during gamete formation and reprogrammed after fertilization is lacking. To focus on features conveyed by histones, we conducted a large-scale proteomic identification of histone variants and PTMs in sperm and mixed-stage embryo chromatin from C. elegans, a species that lacks conserved DNA methylation pathways. The fate of these histone marks was then tracked using immunostaining. Proteomic analysis found that sperm harbor ∼2.4 fold lower levels of histone PTMs than embryos and revealed differences in classes of PTMs between sperm and embryos. Sperm chromatin repackaging involves the incorporation of the sperm-specific histone H2A variant HTAS-1, a widespread erasure of histone acetylation, and the retention of histone methylation at sites that mark the transcriptional history of chromatin domains during spermatogenesis. After fertilization, we show HTAS-1 and 6 histone PTM marks distinguish sperm and oocyte chromatin in the new embryo and characterize distinct paternal and maternal histone remodeling events during the oocyte-to-embryo transition. These include the exchange of histone H2A that is marked by ubiquitination, retention of HTAS-1, removal of the H2A variant HTZ-1, and differential reprogramming of histone PTMs. This work identifies novel and conserved features of paternal chromatin that are specified during spermatogenesis and processed in the embryo. Furthermore, our results show that different species, even those with diverged DNA packaging and imprinting strategies, use conserved histone modification and removal mechanisms to reprogram epigenetic information. PMID:25299455

  13. Local generation of fumarate promotes DNA repair through inhibition of histone H3 demethylation

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuhui; Qian, Xu; Shen, Jianfeng; Wang, Yugang; Li, Xinjian; Liu, Rui; Xia, Yan; Chen, Qianming; Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih; Lu, Zhimin

    2016-01-01

    Histone methylation regulates DNA repair. However, the mechanisms that underlie the regulation of histone methylation during this repair remain to be further defined. Here, we show that ionizing radiation (IR) induces DNA-PK-dependent phosphorylation of nuclear fumarase at T236, which leads to an interaction between fumarase and the histone variant H2A.Z at DNA double-strand break (DSB) regions. Locally generated fumarate inhibits KDM2B histone demethylase activity, resulting in enhanced dimethylation of histone H3 K36; in turn, this increases the accumulation of the Ku70-containing DNA-PK at DSB regions for non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) DNA repair and cell survival. These findings reveal a feedback mechanism that underlies DNA-PK regulation by chromatin-associated fumarase and an instrumental function of fumarase in regulating histone H3 methylation and DNA repair. PMID:26237645

  14. Application of histone modification-specific interaction domains as an alternative to antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kungulovski, Goran; Kycia, Ina; Tamas, Raluca; Jurkowska, Renata Z; Kudithipudi, Srikanth; Henry, Chisato; Reinhardt, Richard; Labhart, Paul; Jeltsch, Albert

    2014-11-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones constitute a major chromatin indexing mechanism, and their proper characterization is of highest biological importance. So far, PTM-specific antibodies have been the standard reagent for studying histone PTMs despite caveats such as lot-to-lot variability of specificity and binding affinity. Herein, we successfully employed naturally occurring and engineered histone modification interacting domains for detection and identification of histone PTMs and ChIP-like enrichment of different types of chromatin. Our results demonstrate that histone interacting domains are robust and highly specific reagents that can replace or complement histone modification antibodies. These domains can be produced recombinantly in Escherichia coli at low cost and constant quality. Protein design of reading domains allows for generation of novel specificities, addition of affinity tags, and preparation of PTM binding pocket variants as matching negative controls, which is not possible with antibodies. PMID:25301795

  15. Epigenetic regulation of the histone-to-protamine transition during spermiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Jianqiang; Bedford, Mark T.

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, male germ cells differentiate from haploid round spermatids to flagella-containing motile sperm, in a process called spermiogenesis. This process is distinct from somatic cell differentiation in that the majority of the core histones are replaced sequentially, first by transition proteins and then protamines, facilitating chromatin hyper-compaction. This histone-to-protamine transition process represents an excellent model for the investigation of how epigenetic regulators interact with each other to remodel chromatin architecture. While early work in the field highlighted the critical roles of testis-specific transcription factors in controlling the haploid-specific developmental program, recent studies underscore the essential functions of epigenetic players involved in the dramatic genome remodeling that takes place during wholesale histone replacement. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how epigenetic players, like histone variants and histone writers/readers/erasers, rewire the haploid spermatid genome to facilitate histone substitution by protamines in mammals. PMID:26850883

  16. Critical Role of Histone Turnover in Neuronal Transcription and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Maze, Ian; Wenderski, Wendy; Noh, Kyung-Min; Bagot, Rosemary C; Tzavaras, Nikos; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Elsässer, Simon J; Guo, Yin; Ionete, Carolina; Hurd, Yasmin L; Tamminga, Carol A; Halene, Tobias; Farrelly, Lorna; Soshnev, Alexey A; Wen, Duancheng; Rafii, Shahin; Birtwistle, Marc R; Akbarian, Schahram; Buchholz, Bruce A; Blitzer, Robert D; Nestler, Eric J; Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Garcia, Benjamin A; Shen, Li; Molina, Henrik; Allis, C David

    2015-07-01

    Turnover and exchange of nucleosomal histones and their variants, a process long believed to be static in post-replicative cells, remains largely unexplored in brain. Here, we describe a novel mechanistic role for HIRA (histone cell cycle regulator) and proteasomal degradation-associated histone dynamics in the regulation of activity-dependent transcription, synaptic connectivity, and behavior. We uncover a dramatic developmental profile of nucleosome occupancy across the lifespan of both rodents and humans, with the histone variant H3.3 accumulating to near-saturating levels throughout the neuronal genome by mid-adolescence. Despite such accumulation, H3.3-containing nucleosomes remain highly dynamic-in a modification-independent manner-to control neuronal- and glial-specific gene expression patterns throughout life. Manipulating H3.3 dynamics in both embryonic and adult neurons confirmed its essential role in neuronal plasticity and cognition. Our findings establish histone turnover as a critical and previously undocumented regulator of cell type-specific transcription and plasticity in mammalian brain. PMID:26139371

  17. Complete Workflow for Analysis of Histone Post-translational Modifications Using Bottom-up Mass Spectrometry: From Histone Extraction to Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sidoli, Simone; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Karch, Kelly R.; Wang, Xiaoshi; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleosomes are the smallest structural unit of chromatin, composed of 147 base pairs of DNA wrapped around an octamer of histone proteins. Histone function is mediated by extensive post-translational modification by a myriad of nuclear proteins. These modifications are critical for nuclear integrity as they regulate chromatin structure and recruit enzymes involved in gene regulation, DNA repair and chromosome condensation. Even though a large part of the scientific community adopts antibody-based techniques to characterize histone PTM abundance, these approaches are low throughput and biased against hypermodified proteins, as the epitope might be obstructed by nearby modifications. This protocol describes the use of nano liquid chromatography (nLC) and mass spectrometry (MS) for accurate quantification of histone modifications. This method is designed to characterize a large variety of histone PTMs and the relative abundance of several histone variants within single analyses. In this protocol, histones are derivatized with propionic anhydride followed by digestion with trypsin to generate peptides of 5 - 20 aa in length. After digestion, the newly exposed N-termini of the histone peptides are derivatized to improve chromatographic retention during nLC-MS. This method allows for the relative quantification of histone PTMs spanning four orders of magnitude. PMID:27286567

  18. Autoacetylation of the Histone Acetyltransferase Rtt109*

    PubMed Central

    Albaugh, Brittany N.; Arnold, Kevin M.; Lee, Susan; Denu, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Rtt109 is a yeast histone acetyltransferase (HAT) that associates with histone chaperones Asf1 and Vps75 to acetylate H3K56, H3K9, and H3K27 and is important in DNA replication and maintaining genomic integrity. Recently, mass spectrometry and structural studies of Rtt109 have shown that active site residue Lys-290 is acetylated. However, the functional role of this modification and how the acetyl group is added to Lys-290 was unclear. Here, we examined the mechanism of Lys-290 acetylation and found that Rtt109 catalyzes intramolecular autoacetylation of Lys-290 ∼200-times slower than H3 acetylation. Deacetylated Rtt109 was prepared by reacting with a sirtuin protein deacetylase, producing an enzyme with negligible HAT activity. Autoacetylation of Rtt109 restored full HAT activity, indicating that autoacetylation is necessary for HAT activity and is a fully reversible process. To dissect the mechanism of activation, biochemical, and kinetic analyses were performed with Lys-290 variants of the Rtt109-Vps75 complex. We found that autoacetylation of Lys-290 increases the binding affinity for acetyl-CoA and enhances the rate of acetyl-transfer onto histone substrates. This study represents the first detailed investigation of a HAT enzyme regulated by single-site intramolecular autoacetylation. PMID:21606491

  19. Histone H2A.Z subunit exchange controls consolidation of recent and remote memory.

    PubMed

    Zovkic, Iva B; Paulukaitis, Brynna S; Day, Jeremy J; Etikala, Deepa M; Sweatt, J David

    2014-11-27

    Memory formation is a multi-stage process that initially requires cellular consolidation in the hippocampus, after which memories are downloaded to the cortex for maintenance, in a process termed systems consolidation. Epigenetic mechanisms regulate both types of consolidation, but histone variant exchange, in which canonical histones are replaced with their variant counterparts, is an entire branch of epigenetics that has received limited attention in the brain and has never, to our knowledge, been studied in relation to cognitive function. Here we show that histone H2A.Z, a variant of histone H2A, is actively exchanged in response to fear conditioning in the hippocampus and the cortex, where it mediates gene expression and restrains the formation of recent and remote memory. Our data provide evidence for H2A.Z involvement in cognitive function and specifically implicate H2A.Z as a negative regulator of hippocampal consolidation and systems consolidation, probably through downstream effects on gene expression. Moreover, alterations in H2A.Z binding at later stages of systems consolidation suggest that this histone has the capacity to mediate stable molecular modifications required for memory retention. Overall, our data introduce histone variant exchange as a novel mechanism contributing to the molecular basis of cognitive function and implicate H2A.Z as a potential therapeutic target for memory disorders. PMID:25219850

  20. Altered ratios of pro- and anti-angiogenic VEGF-A variants and pericyte expression of DLL4 disrupt vascular maturation in infantile haemangioma.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xi; Abou-Rayyah, Yassir; Bischoff, Joyce; Ritchie, Alison; Sebire, Neil J; Watts, Patrick; Churchill, Amanda J; Bates, David O

    2016-06-01

    Infantile haemangioma (IH), the most common neoplasm in infants, is a slowly resolving vascular tumour. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A), which consists of both the pro- and anti-angiogenic variants, contributes to the pathogenesis of IH. However, the roles of different VEGF-A variants in IH progression and its spontaneous involution is unknown. Using patient-derived cells and surgical specimens, we showed that the relative level of VEGF-A165 b was increased in the involuting phase of IH and the relative change in VEGF-A isoforms may be dependent on endothelial differentiation of IH stem cells. VEGFR signalling regulated IH cell functions and VEGF-A165 b inhibited cell proliferation and the angiogenic potential of IH endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The inhibition of angiogenesis by VEGF-A165 b was associated with the extent of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and degradation and Delta-like ligand 4 (DLL4) expression. These results indicate that VEGF-A variants can be regulated by cell differentiation and are involved in IH progression. We also demonstrated that DLL4 expression was not exclusive to the endothelium in IH but was also present in pericytes, where the expression of VEGFR2 is absent, suggesting that pericyte-derived DLL4 may prevent sprouting during involution, independently of VEGFR2. Angiogenesis in IH therefore appears to be controlled by DLL4 within the endothelium in a VEGF-A isoform-dependent manner, and in perivascular cells in a VEGF-independent manner. The contribution of VEGF-A isoforms to disease progression also indicates that IH may be associated with altered splicing. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26957058

  1. Altered ratios of pro‐ and anti‐angiogenic VEGF‐A variants and pericyte expression of DLL4 disrupt vascular maturation in infantile haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xi; Abou‐Rayyah, Yassir; Bischoff, Joyce; Ritchie, Alison; Sebire, Neil J; Watts, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Infantile haemangioma (IH), the most common neoplasm in infants, is a slowly resolving vascular tumour. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF‐A), which consists of both the pro‐ and anti‐angiogenic variants, contributes to the pathogenesis of IH. However, the roles of different VEGF‐A variants in IH progression and its spontaneous involution is unknown. Using patient‐derived cells and surgical specimens, we showed that the relative level of VEGF‐A165b was increased in the involuting phase of IH and the relative change in VEGF‐A isoforms may be dependent on endothelial differentiation of IH stem cells. VEGFR signalling regulated IH cell functions and VEGF‐A165b inhibited cell proliferation and the angiogenic potential of IH endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. The inhibition of angiogenesis by VEGF‐A165b was associated with the extent of VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) activation and degradation and Delta‐like ligand 4 (DLL4) expression. These results indicate that VEGF‐A variants can be regulated by cell differentiation and are involved in IH progression. We also demonstrated that DLL4 expression was not exclusive to the endothelium in IH but was also present in pericytes, where the expression of VEGFR2 is absent, suggesting that pericyte‐derived DLL4 may prevent sprouting during involution, independently of VEGFR2. Angiogenesis in IH therefore appears to be controlled by DLL4 within the endothelium in a VEGF‐A isoform‐dependent manner, and in perivascular cells in a VEGF‐independent manner. The contribution of VEGF‐A isoforms to disease progression also indicates that IH may be associated with altered splicing. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Pathology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. PMID:26957058

  2. Replication-dependent histone genes are actively transcribed in differentiating and aging retinal neurons.

    PubMed

    Banday, Abdul Rouf; Baumgartner, Marybeth; Al Seesi, Sahar; Karunakaran, Devi Krishna Priya; Venkatesh, Aditya; Congdon, Sean; Lemoine, Christopher; Kilcollins, Ashley M; Mandoiu, Ion; Punzo, Claudio; Kanadia, Rahul N

    2014-01-01

    In the mammalian genome, each histone family contains multiple replication-dependent paralogs, which are found in clusters where their transcription is thought to be coupled to the cell cycle. Here, we wanted to interrogate the transcriptional regulation of these paralogs during retinal development and aging. We employed deep sequencing, quantitative PCR, in situ hybridization (ISH), and microarray analysis, which revealed that replication-dependent histone genes were not only transcribed in progenitor cells but also in differentiating neurons. Specifically, by ISH analysis we found that different histone genes were actively transcribed in a subset of neurons between postnatal day 7 and 14. Interestingly, within a histone family, not all paralogs were transcribed at the same level during retinal development. For example, expression of Hist1h1b was higher embryonically, while that of Hist1h1c was higher postnatally. Finally, expression of replication-dependent histone genes was also observed in the aging retina. Moreover, transcription of replication-dependent histones was independent of rapamycin-mediated mTOR pathway inactivation. Overall, our data suggest the existence of variant nucleosomes produced by the differential expression of the replication-dependent histone genes across retinal development. Also, the expression of a subset of replication-dependent histone isotypes in senescent neurons warrants re-examining these genes as "replication-dependent." Thus, our findings underscore the importance of understanding the transcriptional regulation of replication-dependent histone genes in the maintenance and functioning of neurons. PMID:25486194

  3. Two distinct modes for propagation of histone PTMs across the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Alabert, Constance; Barth, Teresa K.; Reverón-Gómez, Nazaret; Sidoli, Simone; Schmidt, Andreas; Jensen, Ole N.

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic states defined by chromatin can be maintained through mitotic cell division. However, it remains unknown how histone-based information is transmitted. Here we combine nascent chromatin capture (NCC) and triple-SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture) labeling to track histone modifications and histone variants during DNA replication and across the cell cycle. We show that post-translational modifications (PTMs) are transmitted with parental histones to newly replicated DNA. Di- and trimethylation marks are diluted twofold upon DNA replication, as a consequence of new histone deposition. Importantly, within one cell cycle, all PTMs are restored. In general, new histones are modified to mirror the parental histones. However, H3K9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) and H3K27me3 are propagated by continuous modification of parental and new histones because the establishment of these marks extends over several cell generations. Together, our results reveal how histone marks propagate and demonstrate that chromatin states oscillate within the cell cycle. PMID:25792596

  4. A nucleosome turnover map reveals that the stability of histone H4 Lys20 methylation depends on histone recycling in transcribed chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, J. Peter; Shukla, Manu; Menendez-Benito, Victoria; Norman-Axelsson, Ulrika; Audergon, Pauline; Sinha, Indranil; Tanny, Jason C.; Allshire, Robin C.; Ekwall, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Nucleosome composition actively contributes to chromatin structure and accessibility. Cells have developed mechanisms to remove or recycle histones, generating a landscape of differentially aged nucleosomes. This study aimed to create a high-resolution, genome-wide map of nucleosome turnover in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The recombination-induced tag exchange (RITE) method was used to study replication-independent nucleosome turnover through the appearance of new histone H3 and the disappearance or preservation of old histone H3. The genome-wide location of histones was determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation–exonuclease methodology (ChIP-exo). The findings were compared with diverse chromatin marks, including histone variant H2A.Z, post-translational histone modifications, and Pol II binding. Finally, genome-wide mapping of the methylation states of H4K20 was performed to determine the relationship between methylation (mono, di, and tri) of this residue and nucleosome turnover. Our analysis showed that histone recycling resulted in low nucleosome turnover in the coding regions of active genes, stably expressed at intermediate levels. High levels of transcription resulted in the incorporation of new histones primarily at the end of transcribed units. H4K20 was methylated in low-turnover nucleosomes in euchromatic regions, notably in the coding regions of long genes that were expressed at low levels. This transcription-dependent accumulation of histone methylation was dependent on the histone chaperone complex FACT. Our data showed that nucleosome turnover is highly dynamic in the genome and that several mechanisms are at play to either maintain or suppress stability. In particular, we found that FACT-associated transcription conserves histones by recycling them and is required for progressive H4K20 methylation. PMID:25778913

  5. Histone Modifications and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Audia, James E; Campbell, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYHistone posttranslational modifications represent a versatile set of epigenetic marks involved not only in dynamic cellular processes, such as transcription and DNA repair, but also in the stable maintenance of repressive chromatin. In this article, we review many of the key and newly identified histone modifications known to be deregulated in cancer and how this impacts function. The latter part of the article addresses the challenges and current status of the epigenetic drug development process as it applies to cancer therapeutics. PMID:27037415

  6. Zinc deficiency and metabolism of histones and non-histone proteins in Euglena gracilis

    SciTech Connect

    Czupryn, M.; Falchuk, K.H.; Vallee, B.L.

    1987-12-15

    Histones and most other basic chromosomal proteins are not extracted from zinc-deficient (-Zn) Euglena gracilis chromatin either by 0.25 M HCl or by 0.3-0.6 M NaCl/7 M urea. Instead, a class of 3-5-kilodalton (kDa) polypeptides, which is absent in zinc-sufficient (+Zn) cells, is solubilized. These heterogeneous polypeptides are comprised of Asn, Arg, Cys, and Gln. The partial sequence of one of these, which is composed only of Arg and Asn, is Arg-Asn-Asn-Arg-Arg-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-Asn-. This demonstrates they are not proteolytic fragments of the histones, proteins which do not contain contiguous Arg-Asn or Asn-Asn sequences. Once -Zn chromatin is depleted of this 3-5-kDa material, nearly all of the histones and most non-histone proteins are extracted. On the other hand, if chromatin first is depleted of, and subsequently is reconstituted with, the 3-5-kDa material, the chromosomal proteins are not solubilized, as observed with intact chromatin. Histone H4 is an exception. Electrophoretic analysis of the solubilized H4 reveals that the degree to which it is acetylated in -Zn is lower than in +Zn chromatin. Jointly, these data indicate that chromosomal proteins bind much more tightly to DNA of -Zn than +Zn cells. The histone/DNA weight ratio in -Zn chromatin is 0.44 compared to 1.04 in +Zn chromatin. However, the 3-5-kDa polypeptide fraction maintains the amount of total basic proteins per unit mass of DNA at approximately 1. Further, four non-histone proteins extractable with 5% HClO/sub 4/ or 0.35 M NaCl and characterized by high electrophoretic mobility have been purified from +Zn nuclei. Only one of these proteins is found in -Zn chromatin. Thus, zinc deficiency induces changes in the amounts and types of histones and non-histone proteins, as well as in their interaction with DNA. These findings are discussed in relation to recent advances in understanding of the role of zinc in replication and transcription.

  7. Histone mimics: digging down under

    PubMed Central

    LIN, Yiwei; ZHOU, Binhua P.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic deregulation is intimately associated with the development of human diseases. Intensive studies are currently underway to clarify the mechanism for the sake of achieving ideal diagnostic and therapeutic goals. It has been demonstrated that enzymes with histone-modifying activities can also target non-histone proteins, with the underlying mechanism remaining obscure. In this review, we focus on a novel histone mimicry strategy that may be wildly adapted during the non-histone substrate recognition process. Its potential clinical implications are also discussed. PMID:24966873

  8. Plasticity of fission yeast CENP-A chromatin driven by relative levels of histone H3 and H4.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Araceli G; Mellone, Barbara G; Partridge, Janet F; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Allshire, Robin C; Pidoux, Alison L

    2007-07-01

    The histone H3 variant CENP-A assembles into chromatin exclusively at centromeres. The process of CENP-A chromatin assembly is epigenetically regulated. Fission yeast centromeres are composed of a central kinetochore domain on which CENP-A chromatin is assembled, and this is flanked by heterochromatin. Marker genes are silenced when placed within kinetochore or heterochromatin domains. It is not known if fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin is confined to specific sequences or whether histone H3 is actively excluded. Here, we show that fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) can assemble on noncentromeric DNA when it is inserted within the central kinetochore domain, suggesting that in fission yeast CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly is driven by the context of a sequence rather than the underlying DNA sequence itself. Silencing in the central domain is correlated with the amount of CENP-A(Cnp1) associated with the marker gene and is also affected by the relative level of histone H3. Our analyses indicate that kinetochore integrity is dependent on maintaining the normal ratio of H3 and H4. Excess H3 competes with CENP-A(Cnp1) for assembly into central domain chromatin, resulting in less CENP-A(Cnp1) and other kinetochore proteins at centromeres causing defective kinetochore function, which is manifest as aberrant mitotic chromosome segregation. Alterations in the levels of H3 relative to H4 and CENP-A(Cnp1) influence the extent of DNA at centromeres that is packaged in CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin and the composition of this chromatin. Thus, CENP-A(Cnp1) chromatin assembly in fission yeast exhibits plasticity with respect to the underlying sequences and is sensitive to the levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) and other core histones. PMID:17677001

  9. Cellulase variants

    SciTech Connect

    Blazej, Robert; Toriello, Nicholas; Emrich, Charles; Cohen, Richard N.; Koppel, Nitzan

    2015-07-14

    This invention provides novel variant cellulolytic enzymes having improved activity and/or stability. In certain embodiments the variant cellulotyic enzymes comprise a glycoside hydrolase with or comprising a substitution at one or more positions corresponding to one or more of residues F64, A226, and/or E246 in Thermobifida fusca Cel9A enzyme. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a family 9 glycoside hydrolase. In certain embodiments the glycoside hydrolase is a variant of a theme B family 9 glycoside hydrolase.

  10. Proteomic analysis reveals the differential histone programs between male germline cells and vegetative cells in Lilium davidii.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hao; Yang, Ning; Wang, Tai

    2016-03-01

    In flowering plants, male germline fate is determined after asymmetric division of the haploid microspore. Daughter cells have distinct fates: the generative cell (GC) undergoes further mitosis to generate sperm cells (SCs), and the vegetative cell (VC) terminally differentiates. However, our understanding of the mechanisms underlying germline development remains limited. Histone variants and modifications define chromatin states, and contribute to establishing and maintaining cell identities by affecting gene expression. Here, we constructed a lily protein database, then extracted and detailed histone entries into a comprehensive lily histone database. We isolated large amounts of nuclei from VCs, GCs and SCs from lily, and profiled histone variants of all five histone families in all three cell types using proteomics approaches. We revealed 92 identities representing 32 histone variants: six for H1, 11 for H2A, eight for H2B, five for H3 and two for H4. Nine variants, including five H1, two H2B, one H3 and one H4 variant, specifically accumulated in GCs and SCs. We also detected H3 modification patterns in the three cell types. GCs and SCs had almost identical histone profiles and similar H3 modification patterns, which were significantly different from those of VCs. Our study also revealed the presence of multiple isoforms, and differential expression patterns between isoforms of a variant. The results suggest that differential histone programs between the germline and companion VCs may be established following the asymmetric division, and are important for identity establishment and differentiation of the male germline as well as the VC. PMID:26846354

  11. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis. PMID:25875381

  12. Anti-phosphorylated histone H2AThr120: a universal microscopic marker for centromeric chromatin of mono- and holocentric plant species.

    PubMed

    Demidov, D; Schubert, V; Kumke, K; Weiss, O; Karimi-Ashtiyani, R; Buttlar, J; Heckmann, S; Wanner, G; Dong, Q; Han, F; Houben, A

    2014-01-01

    Based on the analysis of 20 different monocot and eudicot species, we propose that the centromeric distribution of the phosphorylated histone H2AThr120 is evolutionary highly conserved across species with mono- and holocentric chromosomes. Therefore, antibodies recognizing the phosphorylated threonine 120 of the histone H2A can serve as a universal marker for the cytological detection of centromeres of mono- and holokinetic plant species. In addition, super resolution microscopy of signals specific to the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENH3 and to H2AThr120ph revealed that these histone variants are incorporated into different nucleosomes, which form distinct, partly intermingled chromatin domains. This specific arrangement of both histone variants suggests different centromeric functions during the cell cycle. PMID:24642790

  13. Histone-modifying enzymes, histone modifications and histone chaperones in nucleosome assembly: Lessons learned from Rtt109 histone acetyltransferases

    PubMed Central

    Dahlin, Jayme L; Chen, Xiaoyue; Walters, Michael A.; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    During DNA replication, nucleosomes ahead of replication forks are disassembled to accommodate replication machinery. Following DNA replication, nucleosomes are then reassembled onto replicated DNA using both parental and newly synthesized histones. This process, termed DNA replication-coupled nucleosome assembly (RCNA), is critical for maintaining genome integrity and for the propagation of epigenetic information, dysfunctions of which have been implicated in cancers and aging. In recent years, it has been shown that RCNA is carefully orchestrated by a series of histone modifications, histone chaperones and histone-modifying enzymes. Interestingly, many features of RCNA are also found in processes involving DNA replication-independent nucleosome assembly like histone exchange and gene transcription. In yeast, histone H3 lysine K56 acetylation (H3K56ac) is found in newly synthesized histone H3 and is critical for proper nucleosome assembly and for maintaining genomic stability. The histone acetyltransferase (HAT) regulator of Ty1 transposition 109 (Rtt109) is the sole enzyme responsible for H3K56ac in yeast. Much research has centered on this particular histone modification and histone-modifying enzyme. This Critical Review summarizes much of our current understanding of nucleosome assembly and highlights many important insights learned from studying Rtt109 HATs in fungi. We highlight some seminal features in nucleosome assembly conserved in mammalian systems and describe some of the lingering questions in the field. Further studying fungal and mammalian chromatin assembly may have important public health implications, including deeper understandings of human cancers and aging as well as the pursuit of novel anti-fungal therapies. PMID:25365782

  14. Histone and Non-Histone Targets of Dietary Deacetylase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunah; Bisson, William H; Löhr, Christiane V; Williams, David E; Ho, Emily; Dashwood, Roderick H; Rajendran, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Acetylation is an important, reversible post-translational modification affecting histone and non-histone proteins with critical roles in gene transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Key regulatory enzymes include histone deacetylase (HDACs) and histone acetyltransferases (HATs). Overexpressed HDACs have been identified in many human cancers, resulting in repressed chromatin states that interfere with vital tumor suppressor functions. Inhibition of HDAC activity has been pursued as a mechanism for re-activating repressed genes in cancers, with some HDAC inhibitors showing promise in the clinical setting. Dietary compounds and their metabolites also have been shown to modulate HDAC activity or expression. Out of this body of research, attention increasingly has shifted towards non-histone targets of HDACs and HATs, such as transcriptions factors, hormone receptors, DNA repair proteins, and cytoskeletal components. These aspects are covered in present review, along with the possible clinical significance. Where such data are available, examples are cited from the literature of studies with short chain fatty acids, polyphenols, isoflavones, indoles, organosulfur compounds, organoselenium compounds, sesquiterpene lactones, isoflavones, and various miscellaneous agents. By virtue of their effects on both histone and non-histone proteins, dietary chemopreventive agents modulate the cellular acetylome in ways that are only now becoming apparent. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms will likely enhance the potential to more effectively combat diseases harboring altered epigenetic landscapes and dysregulated protein signaling. PMID:26303421

  15. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the C(1D) + H2 reaction and isotopomeric variants: kinetic isotope effect and CD/CH branching ratio.

    PubMed

    Joseph, S; Caridade, P J S B; Varandas, A J C

    2011-07-14

    The recently proposed ab initio single-sheeted double many-body expansion potential energy for the methylene molecule has been used to perform quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations for the title reaction. Thermal and initial state-specific (v = 0, j = 0) rate constants for the C((1)D) + H(2)/HD/D(2) reactions have been obtained over a wide range of temperatures. Cross sections for the reaction C((1)D) + H(2) and its deuterated isotopes have also been calculated, as well as the CD/CH branching ratios for the C((1)D) + HD reaction. It is found that the CD + H product channel in the C((1)D) + HD reaction is preferred relative to the CH + D channel. The estimated rate constants are predicted to be in the order k(H2) > k(HD) > k(D2) and the calculated cross sections and rate constants compared with available theoretical and experimental data. PMID:21644798

  16. Histone H3.3 and its proteolytically processed form drive a cellular senescence program

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Luis F.; Young, Andrew R. J.; Wang, Zichen; Wu, Hsan-Au; Panda, Taniya; Kou, Yan; Kapoor, Avnish; Hasson, Dan; Mills, Nicholas R.; Ma’ayan, Avi; Narita, Masashi; Bernstein, Emily

    2014-01-01

    The process of cellular senescence generates a repressive chromatin environment, however, the role of histone variants and histone proteolytic cleavage in senescence remains unclear. Using models of oncogene-induced and replicative senescence, here we report novel histone H3 tail cleavage events mediated by the protease Cathepsin L. We find that cleaved forms of H3 are nucleosomal and the histone variant H3.3 is the preferred cleaved form of H3. Ectopic expression of H3.3 and its cleavage product (H3.3cs1), which lacks the first twenty-one amino acids of the H3 tail, is sufficient to induce senescence. Further, H3.3cs1 chromatin incorporation is mediated by the HUCA histone chaperone complex. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling revealed that H3.3cs1 facilitates transcriptional silencing of cell cycle regulators including RB/E2F target genes, likely via the permanent removal of H3K4me3. Collectively, our study identifies histone H3.3 and its proteolytically processed forms as key regulators of cellular senescence. PMID:25394905

  17. Quantification of histone modifications by parallel-reaction monitoring: a method validation.

    PubMed

    Sowers, James L; Mirfattah, Barsam; Xu, Pei; Tang, Hui; Park, In Young; Walker, Cheryl; Wu, Ping; Laezza, Fernanda; Sowers, Lawrence C; Zhang, Kangling

    2015-10-01

    Abnormal epigenetic reprogramming is one of the major causes leading to irregular gene expression and regulatory pathway perturbations, in the cells, resulting in unhealthy cell development or diseases. Accurate measurements of these changes of epigenetic modifications, especially the complex histone modifications, are very important, and the methods for these measurements are not trivial. By following our previous introduction of PRM to targeting histone modifications (Tang, H.; Fang, H.; Yin, E.; Brasier, A. R.; Sowers, L. C.; Zhang, K. Multiplexed parallel reaction monitoring targeting histone modifications on the QExactive mass spectrometer. Anal. Chem. 2014, 86 (11), 5526-34), herein we validated this method by varying the protein/trypsin ratios via serial dilutions. Our data demonstrated that PRM with SILAC histones as the internal standards allowed reproducible measurements of histone H3/H4 acetylation and methylation in the samples whose histone contents differ at least one-order of magnitude. The method was further validated by histones isolated from histone H3 K36 trimethyltransferase SETD2 knockout mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) cells. Furthermore, histone acetylation and methylation in human neural stem cells (hNSC) treated with ascorbic acid phosphate (AAP) were measured by this method, revealing that H3 K36 trimethylation was significantly down-regulated by 6 days of treatment with vitamin C. PMID:26356480

  18. The roles of histone modifications and small RNA in centromere function.

    PubMed

    Ekwall, Karl

    2004-01-01

    Here, epigenetic regulation of centromeric chromatin in fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) is reviewed, focussing on the role of histone modifications and the link to RNA interference (RNAi). Fission yeast centromeres are organized into two structurally and functionally distinct domains, both of which are required for centromere function. The central core domain anchors the kinetochore structure while the flanking heterochromatin domain is important for sister centromere cohesion. The chromatin structure of both domains is regulated epigenetically. In the central core domain, the histone H3 variant Cnp1(CENP-A) plays a key role. In the flanking heterochromatin domain, histones are kept underacetylated by the histone deacetylases (HDACs) Clr3, Clr6 and Sir2, and methylated by Clr4 methyltransferase (HMTase) to create a specific binding site for the Swi6 protein. Swi6 then directly mediates cohesin binding to the centromeric heterochromatin. Recently, a surprising link was made between heterochromatin formation and RNAi. PMID:15289661

  19. A new approach combining LC-MS and multivariate statistical analysis for revealing changes in histone modification levels.

    PubMed

    Bilgraer, Raphaël; Gillet, Sylvie; Gil, Sophie; Evain-Brion, Danièle; Laprévote, Olivier

    2014-11-01

    While acting upon chromatin compaction, histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) are involved in modulating gene expression through histone-DNA affinity and protein-protein interactions. These dynamic and environment-sensitive modifications are constitutive of the histone code that reflects the transient transcriptional state of the chromatin. Here we describe a global screening approach for revealing epigenetic disruption at the histone level. This original approach enables fast and reliable relative abundance comparison of histone PTMs and variants in human cells within a single LC-MS experiment. As a proof of concept, we exposed BeWo human choriocarcinoma cells to sodium butyrate (SB), a universal histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor. Histone acid-extracts (n = 45) equally representing 3 distinct classes, Control, 1 mM and 2.5 mM SB, were analysed using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer (UPLC-QTOF-MS). Multivariate statistics allowed us to discriminate control from treated samples based on differences in their mass spectral profiles. Several acetylated and methylated forms of core histones emerged as markers of sodium butyrate treatment. Indeed, this untargeted histonomic approach could be a useful exploratory tool in many cases of xenobiotic exposure when histone code disruption is suspected. PMID:25167371

  20. Histone Regulation in the CNS: Basic Principles of Epigenetic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Maze, Ian; Noh, Kyung-Min; Allis, C David

    2013-01-01

    Postmitotic neurons are subject to a vast array of environmental influences that require the nuclear integration of intracellular signaling events to promote a wide variety of neuroplastic states associated with synaptic function, circuit formation, and behavioral memory. Over the last decade, much attention has been paid to the roles of transcription and chromatin regulation in guiding fundamental aspects of neuronal function. A great deal of this work has centered on neurodevelopmental and adulthood plasticity, with increased focus in the areas of neuropharmacology and molecular psychiatry. Here, we attempt to provide a broad overview of chromatin regulation, as it relates to central nervous system (CNS) function, with specific emphasis on the modes of histone posttranslational modifications, chromatin remodeling, and histone variant exchange. Understanding the functions of chromatin in the context of the CNS will aid in the future development of pharmacological therapeutics aimed at alleviating devastating neurological disorders. PMID:22828751

  1. The histone chaperone sNASP binds a conserved peptide motif within the globular core of histone H3 through its TPR repeats

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Andrew; Lercher, Lukas; Singh, Hari R.; Zinne, Daria; Timinszky, Gyula; Carlomagno, Teresa; Ladurner, Andreas G.

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is a complex yet dynamic structure, which is regulated in part by the assembly and disassembly of nucleosomes. Key to this process is a group of proteins termed histone chaperones that guide the thermodynamic assembly of nucleosomes by interacting with soluble histones. Here we investigate the interaction between the histone chaperone sNASP and its histone H3 substrate. We find that sNASP binds with nanomolar affinity to a conserved heptapeptide motif in the globular domain of H3, close to the C-terminus. Through functional analysis of sNASP homologues we identified point mutations in surface residues within the TPR domain of sNASP that disrupt H3 peptide interaction, but do not completely disrupt binding to full length H3 in cells, suggesting that sNASP interacts with H3 through additional contacts. Furthermore, chemical shift perturbations from 1H-15N HSQC experiments show that H3 peptide binding maps to the helical groove formed by the stacked TPR motifs of sNASP. Our findings reveal a new mode of interaction between a TPR repeat domain and an evolutionarily conserved peptide motif found in canonical H3 and in all histone H3 variants, including CenpA and have implications for the mechanism of histone chaperoning within the cell. PMID:26673727

  2. Histone acetylation: from code to web and router via intrinsically disordered regions.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Masami

    2013-01-01

    Structural changes of chromatin, which consists of nucleosomes and nucleosome-associated factors, lead to functional changes that are important determinants of eukaryotic gene regulation. These structural changes are regulated by modifications of histones and DNA, both of which are components of nucleosomes, as well as by replacement of histone variants and the actions of noncoding RNAs. In studies of chromatin modifications, a great deal of attention has been paid to histone acetylation. Progress in understanding this subject has been extensive, including i) elucidation of the relationship of histone acetylation and gene activity; ii) the first isolation of a histonemodifying enzyme; iii) the first identification of a factor that recognizes a modified site; iv) elucidation of the mechanism by which histone modification leads to structural changes in nucleosomes; and v) elucidation of the mechanism of border formation between euchromatin and heterochromatin. Histone acetylation is considered to be fundamental in several fields, including studies of a) the role of chromatin and epigenetics in higher-order biochemical systems such as transcription, DNA replication, and repair; b) biological phenomena such as cell proliferation and differentiation; and c) cancer and aging, potentially leading to clinical applications. In this review, I will discuss the histone code hypothesis, at one time believed to represent a unified theory regarding the functions of histone modification. In addition, I will describe the "modification web theory, " by which the problems in the histone code hypothesis can be overcome, as well as the "signal router theory, " which explains the mechanisms of formation, development, and evolution of the modification web from a structural viewpoint. Lastly, I will illustrate how these novel theories partially explain the robustness of biological systems against various perturbations, and elucidate the strategy that a cell employs to avoid fatal

  3. Interactions between the lysine-rich histone F1 and deoxyribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Johns, E W; Forrester, S

    1969-02-01

    1. The interactions of the lysine-rich histone F1 with DNA have been studied at various histone to DNA ratios, in water and in the presence of uni- and bi-valent cations. In water only, histone F1, even in fourfold excess, is unable to precipitate all the DNA. In 0.14m-sodium chloride, 0.8mg. of histone F1 is required to precipitate 1mg. of DNA, whereas in 0.07m-magnesium chloride only 0.4mg. is required. 2. Bivalent cations are also shown to be more effective in dissociating the DNA-histone complex. Histone F1 can be selectively removed from deoxyribonucleoprotein with 0.1m-magnesium chloride. 3. The precipitation of DNA by histone F1 is a reversible process and the complex can be taken in and out of solution by changing the ionic environment. 4. The bearing of these results on the observed ability of various DNA-histone complexes to act as templates for RNA synthesis is discussed. PMID:4975020

  4. Elevated histone expression promotes life span extension.

    PubMed

    Feser, Jason; Truong, David; Das, Chandrima; Carson, Joshua J; Kieft, Jeffrey; Harkness, Troy; Tyler, Jessica K

    2010-09-10

    Changes to the chromatin structure accompany aging, but the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and the accompanying changes to the chromatin are unclear. Here, we report a mechanism whereby altering chromatin structure regulates life span. We show that normal aging is accompanied by a profound loss of histone proteins from the genome. Indeed, yeast lacking the histone chaperone Asf1 or acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56 are short lived, and this appears to be at least partly due to their having decreased histone levels. Conversely, increasing the histone supply by inactivation of the histone information regulator (Hir) complex or overexpression of histones dramatically extends life span via a pathway that is distinct from previously known pathways of life span extension. This study indicates that maintenance of the fundamental chromatin structure is critical for slowing down the aging process and reveals that increasing the histone supply extends life span. PMID:20832724

  5. A unique binding mode enables MCM2 to chaperone histones H3-H4 at replication forks.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hongda; Strømme, Caroline B; Saredi, Giulia; Hödl, Martina; Strandsby, Anne; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Chen, Shoudeng; Groth, Anja; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-08-01

    During DNA replication, chromatin is reassembled by recycling of modified old histones and deposition of new ones. How histone dynamics integrates with DNA replication to maintain genome and epigenome information remains unclear. Here, we reveal how human MCM2, part of the replicative helicase, chaperones histones H3-H4. Our first structure shows an H3-H4 tetramer bound by two MCM2 histone-binding domains (HBDs), which hijack interaction sites used by nucleosomal DNA. Our second structure reveals MCM2 and ASF1 cochaperoning an H3-H4 dimer. Mutational analyses show that the MCM2 HBD is required for MCM2-7 histone-chaperone function and normal cell proliferation. Further, we show that MCM2 can chaperone both new and old canonical histones H3-H4 as well as H3.3 and CENPA variants. The unique histone-binding mode of MCM2 thus endows the replicative helicase with ideal properties for recycling histones genome wide during DNA replication. PMID:26167883

  6. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Kiat Lim, Kim; Rui Ong, Terenze Yao; Rong Tan, Yue; Guorong Yang, Eugene; Ren, Bingbing; Shan Seah, Kwi; Yang, Zhe; Soo Tan, Tsu; Dymock, Brian W.; Sin Chen, Ee

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2+ could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-Acnp1-1 was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words] PMID:26369364

  7. Mutation of histone H3 serine 86 disrupts GATA factor Ams2 expression and precise chromosome segregation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kim Kiat; Ong, Terenze Yao Rui; Tan, Yue Rong; Yang, Eugene Guorong; Ren, Bingbing; Seah, Kwi Shan; Yang, Zhe; Tan, Tsu Soo; Dymock, Brian W; Chen, Ee Sin

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are packed into discrete units, referred to as nucleosomes, by organizing around scaffolding histone proteins. The interplay between these histones and the DNA can dynamically regulate the function of the chromosomal domain. Here, we interrogated the function of a pair of juxtaposing serine residues (S86 and S87) that reside within the histone fold of histone H3. We show that fission yeast cells expressing a mutant histone H3 disrupted at S86 and S87 (hht2-S86AS87A) exhibited unequal chromosome segregation, disrupted transcriptional silencing of centromeric chromatin, and reduced expression of Ams2, a GATA-factor that regulates localization of the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A. We found that overexpression of ams2(+) could suppress the chromosome missegregation phenotype that arose in the hht2-S86AS87A mutant. We further demonstrate that centromeric localization of SpCENP-A(cnp1-1) was significantly compromised in hht2-S86AS87A, suggesting synergism between histone H3 and the centromere-targeting domain of SpCENP-A. Taken together, our work presents evidence for an uncharacterized serine residue in fission yeast histone H3 that affects centromeric integrity via regulating the expression of the SpCENP-A-localizing Ams2 protein. [173/200 words]. PMID:26369364

  8. Beyond Histone and Deacetylase: An Overview of Cytoplasmic Histone Deacetylases and Their Nonhistone Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Acetylation of lysines is a prominent form of modification in mammalian proteins. Deacetylation of proteins is catalyzed by histone deacetylases, traditionally named after their role in histone deacetylation, transcriptional modulation, and epigenetic regulation. Despite the link between histone deacetylases and chromatin structure, some of the histone deacetylases reside in various compartments in the cytoplasm. Here, we review how these cytoplasmic histone deacetylases are regulated, the identification of nonhistone substrates, and the functional implications of their nondeacetylase enzymatic activities. PMID:21234400

  9. H3K36ac Is an Evolutionary Conserved Plant Histone Modification That Marks Active Genes.

    PubMed

    Mahrez, Walid; Arellano, Minerva Susana Trejo; Moreno-Romero, Jordi; Nakamura, Miyuki; Shu, Huan; Nanni, Paolo; Köhler, Claudia; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Hennig, Lars

    2016-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, histones are subject to a large number of posttranslational modifications whose sequential or combinatorial action affects chromatin structure and genome function. We identified acetylation at Lys-36 in histone H3 (H3K36ac) as a new chromatin modification in plants. The H3K36ac modification is evolutionary conserved in seed plants, including the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the angiosperms rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In Arabidopsis, H3K36ac is highly enriched in euchromatin but not in heterochromatin. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed that H3K36ac peaks at the 5' end of genes, mainly on the two nucleosomes immediately distal to the transcription start site, independently of gene length. H3K36ac overlaps with H3K4me3 and the H2A.Z histone variant. The histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and the histone deacetylase HDA19 are required for H3K36ac homeostasis. H3K36ac and H3K36me3 show negative crosstalk, which is mediated by GCN5 and the histone methyl transferase SDG8. Although H3K36ac is associated with gene activity, we did not find a linear relationship between H3K36ac and transcript levels, suggesting that H3K36ac is a binary indicator of transcription. PMID:26764380

  10. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Valente, Luis P; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Promisel Cooper, Julia

    2013-01-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function—the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Teb1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip analysis reveals robust Teb1 binding at many promoters, notably including all of those controlling canonical histone gene expression. A hypomorphic allele, teb1-1, confers reduced binding and reduced levels of histone transcripts. Prompted by previously suggested connections between histone expression and centromere identity, we examined localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 and found reduced centromeric binding along with reduced centromeric silencing. These data identify Teb1 as a master regulator of histone levels and centromere identity. PMID:23314747

  11. Myb-domain protein Teb1 controls histone levels and centromere assembly in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Valente, Luis P; Dehé, Pierre-Marie; Klutstein, Michael; Aligianni, Sofia; Watt, Stephen; Bähler, Jürg; Cooper, Julia Promisel

    2013-02-01

    The TTAGGG motif is common to two seemingly unrelated dimensions of chromatin function-the vertebrate telomere repeat and the promoter regions of many Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes, including all of those encoding canonical histones. The essential S. pombe protein Teb1 contains two Myb-like DNA binding domains related to those found in telomere proteins and binds the human telomere repeat sequence TTAGGG. Here, we analyse Teb1 binding throughout the genome and the consequences of reduced Teb1 function. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip analysis reveals robust Teb1 binding at many promoters, notably including all of those controlling canonical histone gene expression. A hypomorphic allele, teb1-1, confers reduced binding and reduced levels of histone transcripts. Prompted by previously suggested connections between histone expression and centromere identity, we examined localization of the centromeric histone H3 variant Cnp1 and found reduced centromeric binding along with reduced centromeric silencing. These data identify Teb1 as a master regulator of histone levels and centromere identity. PMID:23314747

  12. Histone and DNA Modifications as Regulators of Neuronal Development and Function.

    PubMed

    Lomvardas, Stavros; Maniatis, Tom

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARYDNA and histone modifications, together with constraints imposed by nuclear architecture, contribute to the transcriptional regulatory landscape of the nervous system. Here, we provide select examples showing how these regulatory layers, often referred to as epigenetic, contribute to neuronal differentiation and function. We describe the interplay between DNA methylation and Polycomb-mediated repression during neuronal differentiation, the role of DNA methylation and long-range enhancer-promoter interactions in Protocadherin promoter choice, and the contribution of heterochromatic silencing and nuclear organization in singular olfactory receptor expression. Finally, we explain how the activity-dependent expression of a histone variant determines the longevity of olfactory sensory neurons. PMID:27371659

  13. Phenotypic variation of erythrocyte linker histone H1.c in a pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L.) population.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pa Yga, Jan; Górnicka-Michalska, Ewa; Bernacki, Zenon; Adamski, Marek

    2010-07-01

    Our goal was to characterize a phenotypic variation of the pheasant erythrocyte linker histone subtype H1.c. By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis three histone H1.c phenotypes were identified. The differently migrating allelic variants H1.c1 and H1.c2 formed either two homozygous phenotypes, c1 and c2, or a single heterozygous phenotype, c1c2. In the pheasant population screened, birds with phenotype c2 were the most common (frequency 0.761) while individuals with phenotype c1 were rare (frequency 0.043). PMID:21637419

  14. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Michael; Ji, Lexiang; Santos, Alex M.; Kamei, Masayuki; Sasaki, Takahiko; Basenko, Evelina Y.; Schmitz, Robert J.; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lewis, Zachary A.

    2016-01-01

    Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the ΔhH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq). Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq) revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the ΔhH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa. PMID:27172195

  15. Histone H1 Limits DNA Methylation in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Seymour, Michael; Ji, Lexiang; Santos, Alex M; Kamei, Masayuki; Sasaki, Takahiko; Basenko, Evelina Y; Schmitz, Robert J; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lewis, Zachary A

    2016-01-01

    Histone H1 variants, known as linker histones, are essential chromatin components in higher eukaryotes, yet compared to the core histones relatively little is known about their in vivo functions. The filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa encodes a single H1 protein that is not essential for viability. To investigate the role of N. crassa H1, we constructed a functional FLAG-tagged H1 fusion protein and performed genomic and molecular analyses. Cell fractionation experiments showed that H1-3XFLAG is a chromatin binding protein. Chromatin-immunoprecipitation combined with sequencing (ChIP-seq) revealed that H1-3XFLAG is globally enriched throughout the genome with a subtle preference for promoters of expressed genes. In mammals, the stoichiometry of H1 impacts nucleosome repeat length. To determine if H1 impacts nucleosome occupancy or nucleosome positioning in N. crassa, we performed micrococcal nuclease digestion in the wild-type and the [Formula: see text]hH1 strain followed by sequencing (MNase-seq). Deletion of hH1 did not significantly impact nucleosome positioning or nucleosome occupancy. Analysis of DNA methylation by whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (MethylC-seq) revealed a modest but global increase in DNA methylation in the [Formula: see text]hH1 mutant. Together, these data suggest that H1 acts as a nonspecific chromatin binding protein that can limit accessibility of the DNA methylation machinery in N. crassa. PMID:27172195

  16. Histone Chaperone HIRA in Regulation of Transcription Factor RUNX1.

    PubMed

    Majumder, Aditi; Syed, Khaja Mohieddin; Joseph, Sunu; Scambler, Peter J; Dutta, Debasree

    2015-05-22

    RUNX1 (Runt-related transcription factor 1) is indispensable for the generation of hemogenic endothelium. However, the regulation of RUNX1 during this developmental process is poorly understood. We investigated the role of the histone chaperone HIRA (histone cell cycle regulation-defective homolog A) from this perspective and report that HIRA significantly contributes toward the regulation of RUNX1 in the transition of differentiating mouse embryonic stem cells from hemogenic to hematopoietic stage. Direct interaction of HIRA and RUNX1 activates the downstream targets of RUNX1 implicated in generation of hematopoietic stem cells. At the molecular level, HIRA-mediated incorporation of histone H3.3 variant within the Runx1 +24 mouse conserved noncoding element is essential for the expression of Runx1 during endothelial to hematopoietic transition. An inactive chromatin at the intronic enhancer of Runx1 in absence of HIRA significantly repressed the transition of cells from hemogenic to hematopoietic fate. We expect that the HIRA-RUNX1 axis might open up a novel approach in understanding leukemogenesis in future. PMID:25847244

  17. Histone hyperacetylation can induce unfolding of the nucleosome core particle.

    PubMed Central

    Oliva, R; Bazett-Jones, D P; Locklear, L; Dixon, G H

    1990-01-01

    A direct correlation exists between the level of histone H4 hyperacetylation induced by sodium butyrate and the extent to which nucleosomes lose their compact shape and become elongated (62.0% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6; overall mean in the length/width ratio = 1.83 +/- 0.48) when bound to electron microscope specimen grids at low ionic strength (1mM EDTA, 10mM Tris, pH 8.0). A marked proportion of elongated core particles is also observed in the naturally occurring hyperacetylated chicken testis chromatin undergoing spermatogenesis when analyzed at low ionic strength (36.8% of the particles have a length/width ratio over 1.6). Core particles of elongated shape (length/width ratio over 1.6) generated under low ionic strength conditions are absent in the hypoacetylated chicken erythrocyte chromatin and represent only 2.3% of the untreated Hela S3 cell core particles containing a low proportion of hyperacetylated histones. The marked differences between control and hyperacetylated core particles are absent if the particles are bound to the carbon support film in the presence of 0.2 M NaCl, 6mM MgCl2 and 10mM Tris pH 8.0, conditions known to stabilize nucleosomes. A survey of the published work on histone hyperacetylation together with the present results indicate that histone hyperacetylation does not produce any marked disruption of the core particle 'per se', but that it decreases intranucleosomal stabilizing forces as judged by the lowered stability of the hyperacetylated core particle under conditions of shearing stress such as cationic competition by the carbon support film of the EM grid for DNA binding. Images PMID:2339060

  18. Folate deficiency affects histone methylation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Benjamin A; Luka, Zigmund; Loukachevitch, Lioudmila V; Bhanu, Natarajan V; Wagner, Conrad

    2016-03-01

    Formaldehyde is extremely toxic reacting with proteins to crosslinks peptide chains. Formaldehyde is a metabolic product in many enzymatic reactions and the question of how these enzymes are protected from the formaldehyde that is generated has largely remained unanswered. Early experiments from our laboratory showed that two liver mitochondrial enzymes, dimethylglycine dehydrogenase (DMGDH) and sarcosine dehydrogenase (SDH) catalyze oxidative demethylation reactions (sarcosine is a common name for monomethylglycine). The enzymatic products of these enzymes were the demethylated substrates and formaldehyde, produced from the removed methyl group. Both DMGDH and SDH contain FAD and both have tightly bound tetrahydrofolate (THF), a folate coenzyme. THF binds reversibly with formaldehyde to form 5,10-methylene-THF. At that time we showed that purified DMGDH, with tightly bound THF, reacted with formaldehyde generated during the reaction to form 5,10-methylene-THF. This effectively scavenged the formaldehyde to protect the enzyme. Recently, post-translational modifications on histone tails have been shown to be responsible for epigenetic regulation of gene expression. One of these modifications is methylation of lysine residues. The first enzyme discovered to accomplish demethylation of these modified histones was histone lysine demethylase (LSD1). LSD1 specifically removes methyl groups from di- and mono-methylated lysines at position 4 of histone 3. This enzyme contained tightly bound FAD and the products of the reaction were the demethylated lysine residue and formaldehyde. The mechanism of LSD1 demethylation is analogous to the mechanism previously postulated for DMGDH, i.e. oxidation of the N-methyl bond to the methylene imine followed by hydrolysis to generate formaldehyde. This suggested that THF might also be involved in the LSD1 reaction to scavenge the formaldehyde produced. Our hypotheses are that THF is bound to native LSD1 by analogy to DMGDH and SDH and

  19. EpiProfile Quantifies Histone Peptides With Modifications by Extracting Retention Time and Intensity in High-resolution Mass Spectra*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C.; Cao, Xing-Jun; Bhanu, Natarajan V.; Wang, Xiaoshi; Sidoli, Simone; Liu, Shichong; Garcia, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications contribute to chromatin function through their chemical properties which influence chromatin structure and their ability to recruit chromatin interacting proteins. Nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (nanoLC-MS/MS) has emerged as the most suitable technology for global histone modification analysis because of the high sensitivity and the high mass accuracy of this approach that provides confident identification. However, analysis of histones with this method is even more challenging because of the large number and variety of isobaric histone peptides and the high dynamic range of histone peptide abundances. Here, we introduce EpiProfile, a software tool that discriminates isobaric histone peptides using the distinguishing fragment ions in their tandem mass spectra and extracts the chromatographic area under the curve using previous knowledge about peptide retention time. The accuracy of EpiProfile was evaluated by analysis of mixtures containing different ratios of synthetic histone peptides. In addition to label-free quantification of histone peptides, EpiProfile is flexible and can quantify different types of isotopically labeled histone peptides. EpiProfile is unique in generating layouts (i.e. relative retention time) of histone peptides when compared with manual quantification of the data and other programs (such as Skyline), filling the need of an automatic and freely available tool to quantify labeled and non-labeled modified histone peptides. In summary, EpiProfile is a valuable nanoflow liquid chromatography coupled with high resolution tandem mass spectrometry-based quantification tool for histone peptides, which can also be adapted to analyze nonhistone protein samples. PMID:25805797

  20. Histone Acetylation in Fungal Pathogens of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Junhyun; Kwon, Seomun; Lee, Yong-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    Acetylation of histone lysine residues occurs in different organisms ranging from yeast to plants and mammals for the regulation of diverse cellular processes. With the identification of enzymes that create or reverse this modification, our understanding on histone acetylation has expanded at an amazing pace during the last two decades. In fungal pathogens of plants, however, the importance of such modification has only just begun to be appreciated in the recent years and there is a dearth of information on how histone acetylation is implicated in fungal pathogenesis. This review covers the current status of research related to histone acetylation in plant pathogenic fungi and considers relevant findings in the interaction between fungal pathogens and host plants. We first describe the families of histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Then we provide the cases where histone acetylation was investigated in the context of fungal pathogenesis. Finally, future directions and perspectives in epigenetics of fungal pathogenesis are discussed. PMID:25288980

  1. Release and activity of histone in diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, R; Kang, R; Fan, X-G; Tang, D

    2014-01-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Anti-histone treatment (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, recombinant thrombomodulin, and heparin) protect mice against lethal endotoxemia, sepsis, ischemia/reperfusion injury, trauma, pancreatitis, peritonitis, stroke, coagulation, and thrombosis. In addition, elevated serum histone and nucleosome levels have been implicated in multiple pathophysiological processes and progression of diseases including autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, and cancer. Therefore, extracellular histones could serve as biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets in human diseases. PMID:25118930

  2. Coupling histone homeostasis to centromere integrity via the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In many eukaryotes, histone gene expression is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, with a spike pattern at S phase. In fission yeast the GATA-type transcription factor Ams2 is required for transcriptional activation of all the core histone genes during S phase and Ams2 protein levels per se show concomitant periodic patterns. We have recently unveiled the molecular mechanisms underlying Ams2 fluctuation during the cell cycle. We have found that Ams2 stability varies during the cell cycle, and that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for Ams2 instability. Intriguingly, Ams2 proteolysis requires Hsk1-a Cdc7 homologue in fission yeast generally called Dbf4-dependent protein kinase (DDK)-and the SCF ubiquitin ligase containing the substrate receptor Pof3 F-box protein. Here, we discuss why histone synthesis has to occur only during S phase. Our results indicate that excess synthesis of core histones outside S phase results in deleterious effects on cell survival. In particular, functions of the centromere, in which the centromere-specific H3 variant CENP-A usually form centromeric nucleosomes, are greatly compromised. This defect is, at least in part, ascribable to abnormal incorporation of canonical histone H3 into these nucleosomes. Finally, we address the significance and potential implications of our work from an evolutionary point of view. PMID:20604974

  3. Physical properties of inner histone-DNA complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, P N; Wright, E B; Hsie, M H; Olins, A L; Olins, D E

    1978-01-01

    Chicken-erythrocyte inner histone tetramer has been complexed with several natural and synthetic DNA duplexes by salt-gradient dialysis at various protein/DNA ratios. The resulting complexes, in low-ionic-strength buffer, have been examined by electron microscopy, circular dichroism, and thermal denaturation. Electron microscopy reveals nucleosomes (nu bodies) randomly arranged along DNA fibers, including poly(dA-dT)-poly(dA-dT), poly(dI-dC)-poly(dI-dC), but not poly(dA)-poly(dT). Circular dichroism studies showed prominent histone alpha-helix and "suppression" of nucleic acid ellipticity (lambda less than 240 nm). Thermal denaturation experiments revealed Tm behavior comparable to that of H1- (or H5-) depleted chromatin. Tm III and Tm IV increased linearly with G + C%(natural DNAs), but were virtually independent of the histone/DNA ratio; therefore, the melting of nucleosomes along a DNA chain is insensitive to adjacent "spacer" DNA lengths. This suggests that Tm III and Tm IV arise from the melting of different domains of DNA associated with the core nu body. Images PMID:214760

  4. Characterization of neurohistone variants and post-translational modifications by electron capture dissociation mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Benjamin A.; Siuti, Nertila; Thomas, C. Eric; Mizzen, Craig A.; Kelleher, Neil L.

    2007-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones are intimately involved in chromatin structure and thus have roles in cellular processes through their impact on gene activation or repression. At the forefront in histone PTM analysis are mass spectrometry-based techniques, which have capabilities to produce improved views of processes affected by chromatin remodeling via histone modifications. In this report, we take the first mass spectrometric look at histone variant expression and post-translational modifications from histones isolated from rat brain tissue. Analyses of whole rat brain identified specific histone H2A and H2B gene family members and several H4 and H3 post-translational modification sites by electron capture dissociation (ECD) mass spectrometry. We subsequently compared these results to selected rat brain regions. Major differences in the expression profiles of H2A and H2B gene family members or in the post-translational modifications on histone H4 were not observed from the different brain regions using a Top Down approach. However, "Middle Down" mass spectrometry facilitating improved characterization of the histone H3 tail (1-50 residues), revealed an enrichment of trimethylation on Lys9 from cerebellum tissue compared to H3 extracted from whole brain, cerebral cortex or hypothalamus tissue. We forward this study in honor of Professor Donald F. Hunt, whose pioneering efforts in protein and PTM analyses have spawned new eras and numerous careers, many exemplified in this special issue.

  5. Effect of histone deacetylase on prostate carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanfeng; Xu, Qingchun; Liu, Guoyuan; Huang, Hong; Lin, Weiqiang; Huang, Yueying; Chi, Zepai; Chen, Shaochuan; Lan, Kaijian; Lin, Jiahua; Zhang, Yonghai

    2015-01-01

    Commonly occurred in aged males, the incidence of prostate carcinoma is increasing by years. Histone deacetylase (HDACs) as one key enzyme in regulating gene transcription has been found to be related with cancer occurrence. Trichostatin A (TSA) is one HDAC inhibitor for suppressing tumor growth. This study thus treated prostate carcinoma cell line PC3 with TSA, to analyze the effect of HDAC on the occurrence and progression of HDAC. PC3 cells were treated with gradient concentrations of TSA. MTT assay was employed to detect the proliferation of PC3 cells, while flow cytometry was used to detect the cell apoptosis and cell cycle. Apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2 were further quantified by Western blotting. MTT assays showed a dose- and time-dependent manner of TSA in inhibiting PC3 cell proliferation. Most of PC3 cells were arrested at G1 phase after treating with TSA. The apoptotic ratio of cells was also elevated by higher concentrations of drugs. Apoptotic proteins including caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2 were all up-regulated by TSA. HDAC inhibitor can effectively suppress the proliferation of prostate carcinoma cells, which can be arrested at G1 phase. The elevated apoptotic ratio was caused by up-regulation of apoptosis-related proteins caspase-3, caspase-9 and bcl-2, in both dose- and time-dependent manners. PMID:26823840

  6. Histone exchange and histone modifications during transcription and aging☆

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandrima; Tyler, Jessica K.

    2014-01-01

    The organization of the eukaryotic genome into chromatin enables DNA to fit inside the nucleus while also regulating the access of proteins to the DNA to facilitate genomic functions such as transcription, replication and repair. The basic repeating unit of chromatin is the nucleosome, which includes 147 bp of DNA wrapped 1.65 times around an octamer of core histone proteins comprising two molecules each of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 [1]. Each nucleosome is a highly stable unit, being maintained by over 120 direct protein–DNA interactions and several hundred water mediated ones [1]. Accordingly, there is considerable interest in understanding how processive enzymes such as RNA polymerases manage to pass along the coding regions of our genes that are tightly packaged into arrays of nucleosomes. Here we present the current mechanistic understanding of this process and the evidence for profound changes in chromatin dynamics during aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Histone chaperones and Chromatin assembly. PMID:24459735

  7. Investigating Histone Acetylation Stoichiometry and Turnover Rate.

    PubMed

    Fan, J; Baeza, J; Denu, J M

    2016-01-01

    Histone acetylation is a dynamic epigenetic modification that functions in the regulation of DNA-templated reactions, such as transcription. This lysine modification is reversibly controlled by histone (lysine) acetyltransferases and deacetylases. Here, we present methods employing isotopic labeling and mass spectrometry (MS) to comprehensively investigate histone acetylation dynamics. Turnover rates of histone acetylation are determined by measuring the kinetics of labeling from (13)C-labeled precursors of acetyl-CoA, which incorporates (13)C-carbon onto histones via the acetyltransferase reaction. Overall histone acetylation states are assessed from complete protease digestion to single amino acids, which is followed by MS analysis. Determination of site-specific acetylation stoichiometry is achieved by chemically acetylating endogenous histones with isotopic acetic anhydride, followed by trypsin digestion and LC-MS analysis. Combining metabolic labeling with stoichiometric analysis permits determination of both acetylation level and acetylation dynamics. When comparing genetic, diet, or environmental perturbations, these methods permit both a global and site-specific evaluation of how histone acetylation is dynamically regulated. PMID:27423860

  8. Imaging Histone Methylations in Living Animals.

    PubMed

    Sekar, Thillai V; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2016-01-01

    Histone modifications (methylation, acetylation, phosphorylation, sumoylation, etc.,) are at the heart of cellular regulatory mechanisms, which control expression of genes in an orderly fashion and control the entire cellular regulatory networks. Histone lysine methylation has been identified as one of the several posttranslational histone modifications that plays crucial role in regulating gene expressions in facultative heterochromatic DNA regions while maintaining structural integrity in constitutive heterochromatic DNA regions. Since histone methylation is dysregulated in various cellular diseases, it has been considered a potential therapeutic target for drug development. Currently there is no simple method available to screen and preclinically evaluate drugs modulating this cellular process, we recently developed two different methods by adopting reporter gene technology to screen drugs and to preclinically evaluate them in living animals. Method detects and quantitatively monitors the level of histone methylations in intact cells, is of a prerequisite to screen small molecules that modulate histone lysine methylation. Here, we describe two independent optical imaging sensors developed to image histone methylations in cells and in living animals. Since we used standard PCR-based cloning strategies to construct different plasmid vectors shown in this chapter, we are not providing any details regarding the construction methods, instead, we focus on detailing various methods used for measuring histone methylation-assisted luciferase quantitation in cells and imaging in living animals. PMID:27424907

  9. Acetylated histone H3 increases nucleosome dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Marek; Manohar, Mridula; Ottesen, Jennifer; Poirier, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Chromatin's basic unit structure is the nucleosome, i.e. genomic DNA wrapped around a particular class of proteins -- histones -- which due to their physical hindrance, block vital biological processes, such as DNA repair, DNA replication, and RNA transcription. Histone post-translational modifications, which are known to exist in vivo, are hypothesized to regulate these biological processes by directly altering DNA-histone interactions and thus nucleosome structure and stability. Using magnetic tweezers technique we studied the acetylation of histone H3 in the dyad region, i.e. at K115 and K122, on reconstituted arrays of nucleosomes under constant external force. Based on the measured increase in the probability of dissociation of modified nucleosomes, we infer that this double modification could facilitate histone chaperone mediated nucleosome disassembly in vivo.

  10. H3K36ac Is an Evolutionary Conserved Plant Histone Modification That Marks Active Genes1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Minerva Susana Trejo; Shu, Huan; Gruissem, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, histones are subject to a large number of posttranslational modifications whose sequential or combinatorial action affects chromatin structure and genome function. We identified acetylation at Lys-36 in histone H3 (H3K36ac) as a new chromatin modification in plants. The H3K36ac modification is evolutionary conserved in seed plants, including the gymnosperm Norway spruce (Picea abies) and the angiosperms rice (Oryza sativa), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). In Arabidopsis, H3K36ac is highly enriched in euchromatin but not in heterochromatin. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing experiments revealed that H3K36ac peaks at the 5′ end of genes, mainly on the two nucleosomes immediately distal to the transcription start site, independently of gene length. H3K36ac overlaps with H3K4me3 and the H2A.Z histone variant. The histone acetyl transferase GCN5 and the histone deacetylase HDA19 are required for H3K36ac homeostasis. H3K36ac and H3K36me3 show negative crosstalk, which is mediated by GCN5 and the histone methyl transferase SDG8. Although H3K36ac is associated with gene activity, we did not find a linear relationship between H3K36ac and transcript levels, suggesting that H3K36ac is a binary indicator of transcription. PMID:26764380

  11. Inhibition of mitotic-specific histone phophorylation by sodium arsenite

    SciTech Connect

    Cobo, J.M.; Valdez, J.G.; Gurley, L.R.

    1994-10-01

    Synchronized cultures of Chinese hamster cells (line CHO) were used to measure the effects of 10{mu}M sodium arsenite on histone phosphorylation. This treatment caused cell proliferation to be temporarily arrested, after which the cells spontaneously resumed cell proliferation in a radiomimetric manner. Immediately following treatment, it was found that sodium arsenite affected only mitotic-specific HI and H3 phosphorylations. Neither interphase, nor mitotic, H2A and H4 phosphorylations were affected, nor was interphase HI Phosphorylation affected. The phosphorylation of HI was inhibited only in mitosis, reducing HI phosphorylation to 38.1% of control levels, which was the level of interphase HI phosphorylation. The phosphorylation of both H3 variants was inhibited in mitosis, the less hydrophobic H3 to 19% and the more hydrophobic H3 to 24% of control levels. These results suggest that sodium arsenite may inhibite cell proliferation by interfering with the cyclin B/p34{sup cdc2} histone kinase activity which is thought to play a key role in regulating the cell cycle. It has been proposed by our laboratory that HI and H3 phosphorylations play a role in restructuring interphase chromatin into metaphase chromosomes. Interference of this process by sodium arsenite may lead to structurally damaged chromosomes resulting in the increased cancer risks known to be produced by arsenic exposure from the environment.

  12. Histone H3.3 and cancer: A potential reader connection

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Fei; Shi, Yang

    2015-01-01

    The building block of chromatin is nucleosome, which consists of 146 base pairs of DNA wrapped around a histone octamer composed of two copies of histone H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. Significantly, the somatic missense mutations of the histone H3 variant, H3.3, are associated with childhood and young-adult tumors, such as pediatric high-grade astrocytomas, as well as chondroblastoma and giant-cell tumors of the bone. The mechanisms by which these histone mutations cause cancer are by and large unclear. Interestingly, two recent studies identified BS69/ZMYND11, which was proposed to be a candidate tumor suppressor, as a specific reader for a modified form of H3.3 (H3.3K36me3). Importantly, some H3.3 cancer mutations are predicted to abrogate the H3.3K36me3/BS69 interaction, suggesting that this interaction may play an important role in tumor suppression. These new findings also raise the question of whether H3.3 cancer mutations may lead to the disruption and/or gain of interactions of additional cellular factors that contribute to tumorigenesis. PMID:25453099

  13. Dynamics of histone H3 acetylation in the nucleosome core during mouse pre-implantation development.

    PubMed

    Ziegler-Birling, Céline; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena

    2016-08-01

    In mammals, the time period that follows fertilization is characterized by extensive chromatin remodeling, which enables epigenetic reprogramming of the gametes. Major changes in chromatin structure persist until the time of implantation, when the embryo develops into a blastocyst, which comprises the inner cell mass and the trophectoderm. Changes in DNA methylation, histone variant incorporation, and covalent modifications of the histones tails have been intensively studied during pre-implantation development. However, modifications within the core of the nucleosomes have not been systematically analyzed. Here, we report the first characterization and temporal analysis of 3 key acetylated residues in the core of the histone H3: H3K64ac, H3K122ac, and H3K56ac, all located at structurally important positions close to the DNA. We found that all 3 acetylations occur during pre-implantation development, but with different temporal kinetics. Globally, H3K64ac and H3K56ac were detected throughout cleavage stages, while H3K122ac was only weakly detectable during this time. Our work contributes to the understanding of the contribution of histone modifications in the core of the nucleosome to the "marking" of the newly established embryonic chromatin and unveils new modification pathways potentially involved in epigenetic reprogramming. PMID:26479850

  14. Nucleosome Dancing at the Tempo of Histone Tail Acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Angélique; Thiriet, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    The impact of histone acetylation on transcription was revealed over 50 years ago by Allfrey and colleagues. However, it took decades for an understanding of the fine mechanism by which this posttranslational modification affects chromatin structure and promotes transcription. Here, we review breakthroughs linking histone tail acetylation, histone dynamics, and transcription. We also discuss the histone exchange during transcription and highlight the important function of a pool of non-chromatinized histones in chromatin dynamics. PMID:26184324

  15. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches to Studying Histone Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M; Young, Nicolas L; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2011-01-01

    Histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) positively and negatively regulate gene expression, and are consequently a vital influence on the genomic profile of all eukaryotic species. The study of histone PTMs using classical methods in molecular biology, such as immunofluorescence and Western blotting, is challenging given the technical issues of the approaches, and chemical diversity and combinatorial patterns of the modifications. In light of these many technical limitations, mass spectrometry (MS) is emerging as the most unbiased and rigorous experimental platform to identify and quantify histone PTMs in a high-throughput manner. This review covers the latest developments in mass spectrometry for the analysis of histone PTMs, with the hope of inspiring the continued integration of proteomic, genomic and epigenetic research. PMID:21966350

  16. Western Analysis of Histone Modifications (Aspergillus nidulans)

    PubMed Central

    Soukup, Alexandra; Keller, Nancy P.

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting allows for the specific detection of proteins and/or modifications of proteins by an antibody of interest. This protocol utilizes a crude nuclei extraction protocol for Aspergillus nidulans to enrich for histones and other nuclear proteins prior to gel electrophoresis. Post translational modifications of histones may then be easily detected. After electrophoresis, the selected antibodies are used to detect and quantify levels of the modifications of interest.

  17. Inhibition of Histone Acetyltransferase by Glycosaminoglycans

    PubMed Central

    Buczek-Thomas, Jo Ann; Hsia, Edward; Rich, Celeste B.; Foster, Judith A.; Nugent, Matthew A.

    2008-01-01

    Histone acetyltransferases (HATs) are a class of enzymes that participate in modulating chromatin structure and gene expression. Altered HAT activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, yet little is known about the regulation of HATs. In this study, we report that glycosaminoglycans are potent inhibitors of p300 and pCAF HAT activities in vitro, with heparin and heparan sulfate proteoglycans being the most potent inhibitors. The mechanism of inhibition by heparin was investigated. The ability of heparin to inhibit HAT activity was in part dependent upon its size and structure, as small heparin-derived oligosaccharides (> 8 sugars) and N-desulfated or O-desulfated heparin showed reduced inhibitory activity. Heparin was shown to bind to pCAF; and enzyme assays indicated that heparin shows the characteristics of a competitive-like inhibitor causing an ~50-fold increase in the apparent Km of pCAF for histone H4. Heparan sulfate proteoglycans isolated from corneal and pulmonary fibroblasts inhibited HAT activity with similar effectiveness as heparin. As evidence that endogenous glycosaminoglycans might be involved in modulating histone acetylation, the direct addition of heparin to pulmonary fibroblasts resulted in an ~50% reduction of histone H3 acetylation after 6 hours of treatment. In addition, Chinese hamster ovary cells deficient in glycosaminoglycan synthesis showed increased levels of acetylated histone H3 compared to wild-type parent cells. Glycosaminoglycans represent a new class of HAT inhibitors that might participate in modulating cell function by regulating histone acetylation. PMID:18459114

  18. Interpreting thelanguage of histone and DNA modifications

    PubMed Central

    Rothbart, Scott B.; Strahl, Brian D.

    2014-01-01

    A major mechanism regulating the accessibility and function of eukaryotic genomes are the covalent modifications to DNA and histone proteins that dependably package our genetic information inside the nucleus of every cell. Formally postulated over a decade ago, it is becoming increasingly clear that post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones act singly and in combination to form a language or ‘code’ that is read by specialized proteins to facilitate downstream functions in chromatin. Underappreciated at the time was the level of complexity harbored both within histone PTMs and their combinations, as well as within the proteins that read and interpret the language. In addition to histone PTMs, newly-identified DNA modifications that can recruit specific effector proteins has raised further awareness that histone PTMs operate within a broader language of epigenetic modifications to orchestrate the dynamic functions associated with chromatin. Here, we highlight key recent advances in our understanding of the epigenetic language encompassing histone and DNA modifications and foreshadow challenges that lie ahead as we continue our quest to decipher the fundamental mechanisms of chromatin regulation. PMID:24631868

  19. Assaying Pharmacodynamic Endpoints with Targeted Therapy: Flavopiridol and 17AAG Induced Dephosphorylation of Histone H1.5 in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liwen; Harshman, Sean W.; Liu, Shujun; Ren, Chen; Xu, Hua; Sallans, Larry; Grever, Michael; Byrd, John C.; Marcucci, Guido; Freitas, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    Histone H1 is commonly used to assay kinase activity in vitro. As many promising targeted therapies affect kinase activity of specific enzymes involved in cancer transformation, H1 phosphorylation can serve as potential pharmacodynamic marker for drug activity within the cell. In this report we utilized a phosphoproteomic workflow to characterize histone H1 phosphorylation changes associated with two targeted therapies in the Kasumi-1 Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) cell line. The phosphoproteomic workflow was first validated with standard casein phosphoproteins and then applied to the direct analysis of histone H1 from Kasumi-1 nuclear lysates. Ten H1 phosphorylation sites were identified on the H1 variants, H1.2, H1.3, H1.4, H1.5 and H1.x. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry profiling of intact H1s demonstrated global dephosphorylation of H1.5 associated with therapy by the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, and the Hsp90 inhibitor, 17AAG (17-(Allylamino)-17-demethoxygeldanamycin). In contrast, independent treatments with a nucleotide analog, proteosome inhibitor and histone deacetylase inhibitor did not exhibit decreased H1.5 phosphorylation. The data presented herein demonstrate that potential of histones to assess the cellular response of reagents that have direct and indirect effects on kinase activity that alters histone phosphorylation. As such, this approach may be a highly informative marker for response to targeted therapies influencing histone phosphorylation. PMID:21110323

  20. Histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation and HP1γ favor inclusion of alternative exons.

    PubMed

    Saint-André, Violaine; Batsché, Eric; Rachez, Christophe; Muchardt, Christian

    2011-03-01

    Pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs) maturation is initiated cotranscriptionally. It is therefore conceivable that chromatin-borne information participates in alternative splicing. Here we find that elevated levels of trimethylation of histone H3 on Lys9 (H3K9me3) are a characteristic of the alternative exons of several genes including CD44. On this gene the chromodomain protein HP1γ, frequently defined as a transcriptional repressor, facilitates inclusion of the alternative exons via a mechanism involving decreased RNA polymerase II elongation rate. In addition, accumulation of HP1γ on the variant region of the CD44 gene stabilizes association of the pre-mRNA with the chromatin. Altogether, our data provide evidence for localized histone modifications impacting alternative splicing. They further implicate HP1γ as a possible bridging molecule between the chromatin and the maturating mRNA, with a general impact on splicing decisions. PMID:21358630

  1. Histone turnover and chromatin accessibility: Critical mediators of neurological development, plasticity, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenderski, Wendy; Maze, Ian

    2016-01-01

    In postmitotic neurons, nucleosomal turnover was long considered to be a static process that is inconsequential to transcription. However, our recent studies in human and rodent brain indicate that replication-independent (RI) nucleosomal turnover, which requires the histone variant H3.3, is dynamic throughout life and is necessary for activity-dependent gene expression, synaptic connectivity, and cognition. H3.3 turnover also facilitates cellular lineage specification and plays a role in suppressing the expression of heterochromatic repetitive elements, including mutagenic transposable sequences, in mouse embryonic stem cells. In this essay, we review mechanisms and functions for RI nucleosomal turnover in brain and present the hypothesis that defects in histone dynamics may represent a common mechanism underlying neurological aging and disease. PMID:26990528

  2. The Histone Chaperones FACT and Spt6 Restrict H2A.Z from Intragenic Locations

    PubMed Central

    Jeronimo, Célia; Watanabe, Shinya; Kaplan, Craig D.; Peterson, Craig L.; Robert, François

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY H2A.Z is a highly conserved histone variant involved in several key nuclear processes. It is incorporated into promoters by SWR-C-related chromatin remodeling complexes, but whether it is also actively excluded from non-promoter regions is not clear. Here, we provide genomic and biochemical evidence that RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) elongation-associated histone chaperones FACT and Spt6 both contribute to restricting H2A.Z from intragenic regions. In the absence of FACT or Spt6, the lack of efficient nucleosome reassembly coupled to pervasive incorporation of H2A.Z by mislocalized SWR-C alters chromatin composition and contributes to cryptic initiation. Thus, chaperone-mediated H2A.Z confinement is crucial for restricting the chromatin signature of gene promoters, which otherwise may license or promote cryptic transcription. PMID:25959393

  3. Increased Histone Deacetylase Activity Involved in the Suppressed Invasion of Cancer Cells Survived from ALA-Mediated Photodynamic Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pei-Tzu; Tsai, Yi-Jane; Lee, Ming-Jen; Chen, Chin-Tin

    2015-01-01

    Previously, we have found that cancer cells survived from 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT) have abnormal mitochondrial function and suppressed cellular invasiveness. Here we report that both the mRNA expression level and enzymatic activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) were elevated in the PDT-derived variants with dysfunctional mitochondria. The activated HDAC deacetylated histone H3 and further resulted in the reduced migration and invasion, which correlated with the reduced expression of the invasion-related genes, matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), paternally expressed gene 1 (PEG1), and miR-355, the intronic miRNA. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we further demonstrate the reduced amount of acetylated histone H3 on the promoter regions of MMP9 and PEG1, supporting the down-regulation of these two genes in PDT-derived variants. These results indicate that HDAC activation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction could modulate the cellular invasiveness and its related gene expression. This argument was further verified in the 51-10 cybrid cells with the 4977 bp mtDNA deletion and A375 ρ0 cells with depleted mitochondria. These results indicate that mitochondrial dysfunction might suppress tumor invasion through modulating histone acetylation. PMID:26473836

  4. Histone Deacetylases and Mechanisms of Regulation of Gene Expression (Histone deacetylases in cancer)

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong Ping; Zhao, Yu Tina; Zhao, Ting C

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, it has become widely recognized that histone modification plays a pivotal role in controlling gene expression, and is involved in a wide spectrum of disease regulation. Histone acetylation is a major modification that affects gene transcription and is controlled by histone acetyltransferases (HATs) and histone deacetylases (HDAC). HATs acetylate lysines of histone proteins, resulting in relaxation of chromatin structure, and they also facilitate gene activation. Conversely, HDACs remove acetyl groups from hyperacetylated histones and suppress general gene transcription. In addition to histones, numerous non-histone proteins can be acetylated and deacetylated, and they are also involved in a wide range of disease regulation. To date, there are 18 HDACs in mammals classified into four classes based on homology to yeast HDACs. Accumulating evidence has revealed that HDACs play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes including inflammation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current state of knowledge of HDACs in carcinogenesis and describe the involvement of HDACs in cancer-associated molecular processes. It is hoped than our understanding of the role of HDACs in cancer will lead to the design of more potent and specific drugs targeting selective HDAC proteins for the treatment of the disease. PMID:25746103

  5. Defective histone supply causes changes in RNA polymerase II elongation rate and cotranscriptional pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Jimeno-González, Silvia; Payán-Bravo, Laura; Muñoz-Cabello, Ana M.; Guijo, Macarena; Gutierrez, Gabriel; Prado, Félix; Reyes, José C.

    2015-01-01

    RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription elongation is a highly regulated process that greatly influences mRNA levels as well as pre-mRNA splicing. Despite many studies in vitro, how chromatin modulates RNAPII elongation in vivo is still unclear. Here, we show that a decrease in the level of available canonical histones leads to more accessible chromatin with decreased levels of canonical histones and variants H2A.X and H2A.Z and increased levels of H3.3. With this altered chromatin structure, the RNAPII elongation rate increases, and the kinetics of pre-mRNA splicing is delayed with respect to RNAPII elongation. Consistent with the kinetic model of cotranscriptional splicing, the rapid RNAPII elongation induced by histone depletion promotes the skipping of variable exons in the CD44 gene. Indeed, a slowly elongating mutant of RNAPII was able to rescue this defect, indicating that the defective splicing induced by histone depletion is a direct consequence of the increased elongation rate. In addition, genome-wide analysis evidenced that histone reduction promotes widespread alterations in pre-mRNA processing, including intron retention and changes in alternative splicing. Our data demonstrate that pre-mRNA splicing may be regulated by chromatin structure through the modulation of the RNAPII elongation rate. PMID:26578803

  6. Replacement of histone H3 with CENP-A directs global nucleosome array condensation and loosening of nucleosome superhelical termini.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, Tanya; Sorensen, Troy C; Woodcock, Christopher L; Kan, Zhong-Yuan; Wood, Stacey; Resch, Michael G; Luger, Karolin; Englander, S Walter; Hansen, Jeffrey C; Black, Ben E

    2011-10-01

    Centromere protein A (CENP-A) is a histone H3 variant that marks centromere location on the chromosome. To study the subunit structure and folding of human CENP-A-containing chromatin, we generated a set of nucleosomal arrays with canonical core histones and another set with CENP-A substituted for H3. At the level of quaternary structure and assembly, we find that CENP-A arrays are composed of octameric nucleosomes that assemble in a stepwise mechanism, recapitulating conventional array assembly with canonical histones. At intermediate structural resolution, we find that CENP-A-containing arrays are globally condensed relative to arrays with the canonical histones. At high structural resolution, using hydrogen-deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry (H/DX-MS), we find that the DNA superhelical termini within each nucleosome are loosely connected to CENP-A, and we identify the key amino acid substitution that is largely responsible for this behavior. Also the C terminus of histone H2A undergoes rapid hydrogen exchange relative to canonical arrays and does so in a manner that is independent of nucleosomal array folding. These findings have implications for understanding CENP-A-containing nucleosome structure and higher-order chromatin folding at the centromere. PMID:21949362

  7. Levels of histone acetylation in thyroid tumors.

    PubMed

    Puppin, Cinzia; Passon, Nadia; Lavarone, Elisa; Di Loreto, Carla; Frasca, Francesco; Vella, Veronica; Vigneri, Riccardo; Damante, Giuseppe

    2011-08-12

    Histone acetylation is a major mechanism to regulate gene transcription. This post-translational modification is modified in cancer cells. In various tumor types the levels of acetylation at several histone residues are associated to clinical aggressiveness. By using immunohistochemistry we show that acetylated levels of lysines at positions 9-14 of H3 histone (H3K9-K14ac) are significantly higher in follicular adenomas (FA), papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC), follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC) and undifferentiated carcinomas (UC) than in normal tissues (NT). Similar data have been obtained when acetylated levels of lysine 18 of H3 histone (H3K18ac) were evaluated. In this case, however, no difference was observed between NT and UC. When acetylated levels of lysine 12 of H4 histone (H4K12ac) were evaluated, only FA showed significantly higher levels in comparison with NT. These data indicate that modification histone acetylation is an early event along thyroid tumor progression and that H3K18 acetylation is switched off in the transition between differentiated and undifferentiated thyroid tumors. By using rat thyroid cell lines that are stably transfected with doxycyclin-inducible oncogenes, we show that the oncoproteins RET-PTC, RAS and BRAF increase levels of H3K9-K14ac and H3K18ac. In the non-tumorigenic rat thyroid cell line FRTL-5, TSH increases levels of H3K18ac. However, this hormone decreases levels of H3K9-K14ac and H4K12ac. In conclusion, our data indicate that neoplastic transformation and hormonal stimulation can modify levels of histone acetylation in thyroid cells. PMID:21763277

  8. The role of histone ubiquitination during spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Kai; Liang, Xiaotong; Huang, Sizhou; Xu, Wenming

    2014-01-01

    Protein ubiquitin-proteasome (ubiquitin-proteasome) system is the major mechanism responsible for protein degradation in eukaryotic cell. During spermatogenesis, the replacement of histone by protamine is vital for normal sperm formation, which is involved in ubiquitination enzymes expressed in testis. Recently, histone ubiquitin ligases have been shown to play critical roles in several aspects of spermatogenesis, such as meiotic sex chromosome inactivation (MSCI), DNA damage response, and spermiogenesis. In this review, we highlight recent progress in the discovery of several histone ubiquitin ligases and elaborate mechanisms of how these enzymes are involved in these processes through knockout mouse model. Using Huwe1, UBR2, and RNF8 as examples, we emphasized the diverse functions for each enzyme and the broad involvement of these enzymes in every stage, from spermatogonia differentiation and meiotic division to spermiogenesis; thus histone ubiquitin ligases represent a class of enzymes, which play important roles in spermatogenesis through targeting histone for ubiquitination and therefore are involved in transcription regulation, epigenetic modification, and other processes essential for normal gametes formation. PMID:24963488

  9. Epigenetic Modifications of Histones in Periodontal Disease.

    PubMed

    Martins, M D; Jiao, Y; Larsson, L; Almeida, L O; Garaicoa-Pazmino, C; Le, J M; Squarize, C H; Inohara, N; Giannobile, W V; Castilho, R M

    2016-02-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic infectious disease driven by dysbiosis, an imbalance between commensal bacteria and the host organism. Periodontitis is a leading cause of tooth loss in adults and occurs in about 50% of the US population. In addition to the clinical challenges associated with treating periodontitis, the progression and chronic nature of this disease seriously affect human health. Emerging evidence suggests that periodontitis is associated with mechanisms beyond bacteria-induced protein and tissue degradation. Here, we hypothesize that bacteria are able to induce epigenetic modifications in oral epithelial cells mediated by histone modifications. In this study, we found that dysbiosis in vivo led to epigenetic modifications, including acetylation of histones and downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1. In addition, in vitro exposure of oral epithelial cells to lipopolysaccharides resulted in histone modifications, activation of transcriptional coactivators, such as p300/CBP, and accumulation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). Given that oral epithelial cells are the first line of defense for the periodontium against bacteria, we also evaluated whether activation of pathogen recognition receptors induced histone modifications. We found that activation of the Toll-like receptors 1, 2, and 4 and the nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein 1 induced histone acetylation in oral epithelial cells. Our findings corroborate the emerging concept that epigenetic modifications play a role in the development of periodontitis. PMID:26496800

  10. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  11. Citrullination regulates pluripotency and histone H1 binding to chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christophorou, Maria A.; Castelo-Branco, Gonçalo; Halley-Stott, Richard P.; Oliveira, Clara Slade; Loos, Remco; Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Mowen, Kerri A.; Bertone, Paul; Silva, José C. R.; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena; Nielsen, Michael L.; Gurdon, John B.; Kouzarides, Tony

    2014-03-01

    Citrullination is the post-translational conversion of an arginine residue within a protein to the non-coded amino acid citrulline. This modification leads to the loss of a positive charge and reduction in hydrogen-bonding ability. It is carried out by a small family of tissue-specific vertebrate enzymes called peptidylarginine deiminases (PADIs) and is associated with the development of diverse pathological states such as autoimmunity, cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, prion diseases and thrombosis. Nevertheless, the physiological functions of citrullination remain ill-defined, although citrullination of core histones has been linked to transcriptional regulation and the DNA damage response. PADI4 (also called PAD4 or PADV), the only PADI with a nuclear localization signal, was previously shown to act in myeloid cells where it mediates profound chromatin decondensation during the innate immune response to infection. Here we show that the expression and enzymatic activity of Padi4 are also induced under conditions of ground-state pluripotency and during reprogramming in mouse. Padi4 is part of the pluripotency transcriptional network, binding to regulatory elements of key stem-cell genes and activating their expression. Its inhibition lowers the percentage of pluripotent cells in the early mouse embryo and significantly reduces reprogramming efficiency. Using an unbiased proteomic approach we identify linker histone H1 variants, which are involved in the generation of compact chromatin, as novel PADI4 substrates. Citrullination of a single arginine residue within the DNA-binding site of H1 results in its displacement from chromatin and global chromatin decondensation. Together, these results uncover a role for citrullination in the regulation of pluripotency and provide new mechanistic insights into how citrullination regulates chromatin compaction.

  12. Epigenomic functional characterization of genetic susceptibility variants in systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sawalha, Amr H; Dozmorov, Mikhail G

    2016-02-01

    Systemic vasculitides are poorly understood inflammatory diseases of the blood vessels that are frequently associated with significant organ damage. Genetic risk variants contribute to the susceptibility of vasculitis, but functional consequences of these genetic variants are largely unknown. Most genetic risk variants in immune-mediated diseases, including systemic vasculitis, are localized to non-coding genetic regions suggesting they might increase disease risk by influencing regulatory elements within the genome. Long range regulatory interactions pose an additional obstacle in localizing functional consequences associated with risk variants to specific genes or cell types. We used cell-type specific enrichment patterns of histone changes that mark poised, primed, and active enhancers, and DNase hypersensitivity to identify specific immune cells mediating genetic risk in vasculitis. Our data suggest that genetic risk variants in ANCA-associated vasculitis are significantly enriched in enhancer elements in Th17 cells, supporting a role for Th17 cells in this disease. Primed and active enhancer elements in B cells can be potentially affected by genetic risk variants associated with Kawasaki disease. Genetic risk in Behçet's disease and Takayasu arteritis might affect enhancer elements in multiple cell types, possibly explained by influencing enhancers in hematopoietic stem cells. Interestingly, our analyses indicate a role for B cells in Kawasaki disease, Behçet's disease, and Takayasu arteritis, and suggest that further work to characterize the involvement of B cells in these diseases is warranted. PMID:26492816

  13. Histone modifications: implications in renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Swathi; Ellis, Leigh; Pili, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, an estimated 64,770 men and women were diagnosed with malignancy of the kidney and renal pelvis, of which 13,570 succumbed to their disease. Common genetic aberrations in renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) include loss of function of the VHL gene in clear-cell RCC, overexpression of the c-MET gene in papillary RCC type I, deficiency in the FH gene in papillary RCC type II and loss of heterozygozity of the BHD gene in chromophobe RCC. Recent studies illustrate epigenetic silencing of VHL, as well as alterations in histone modifications and their governing enzymes. The possibility of reversing these epigenetic marks has resulted in efforts to target these changes by utilizing inhibitors of HDACs, DNA methyltransferases and, recently, histone methyltransferases in preclinical and clinical studies. This article focuses on potential therapeutic interventions, and the implications of histone modifications and related enzyme alterations in RCC. PMID:23895657

  14. The Cajal Body and Histone Locus Body

    PubMed Central

    Nizami, Zehra; Deryusheva, Svetlana; Gall, Joseph G.

    2010-01-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear organelle present in all eukaryotes that have been carefully studied. It is identified by the signature protein coilin and by CB-specific RNAs (scaRNAs). CBs contain high concentrations of splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and other RNA processing factors, suggesting that they are sites for assembly and/or posttranscriptional modification of the splicing machinery of the nucleus. The histone locus body (HLB) contains factors required for processing histone pre-mRNAs. As its name implies, the HLB is associated with the genes that code for histones, suggesting that it may function to concentrate processing factors at their site of action. CBs and HLBs are present throughout the interphase of the cell cycle, but disappear during mitosis. The biogenesis of CBs shows the features of a self-organizing structure. PMID:20504965

  15. Chemical and semisynthesis of modified histones.

    PubMed

    Maity, Suman Kumar; Jbara, Muhammad; Brik, Ashraf

    2016-05-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones play critical roles in the epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic genome by directly altering the biophysical properties of chromatin or by recruiting effector proteins. The large number of PTMs and the inherent complexity in their population and signaling processes make it highly challenging to understand epigenetics-related processes. To address these challenges, accesses to homogeneously modified histones are obligatory. Over the last decade, synthetic protein chemists have been devising novel synthetic tools and applying state-of-the-art chemoselective ligation strategies to prepare precious materials useful in answering fundamental questions in this area. In this short review, we cover some of the recent breakthroughs in these directions in particular the synthesis and semi-synthesis of modified histones and their use to unravel the mysteries of epigenetics. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26778211

  16. Histone methyltransferases: novel targets for tumor and developmental defects

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Xin; Jiang, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Yan; Jiang, Ding-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Histone lysine methylation plays a critical role in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotes. To date, studies have shown that lysine residues of K4, K9, K27, K36 and K79 in histone H3 and K20 in histone H4 can be modified by histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Such histone methylation can specifically activate or repress the transcriptional activity to play a key role in gene expression/regulation and biological genetics. Importantly, abnormities of patterns or levels of histone methylation in higher eukaryotes may result in tumorigenesis and developmental defects, suggesting histone methylation will be one of the important targets or markers for treating these diseases. This review will outline the structural characteristics, active sites and specificity of HMTs, correlation between histone methylation and human diseases and lay special emphasis on the progress of the research on H3K36 methylation. PMID:26807165

  17. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    SciTech Connect

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-04-15

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis.

  18. Regulation and function of histone acetyltransferase MOF.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Han, Xiaofei; Guan, Jingyun; Li, Xiangzhi

    2014-03-01

    The mammalian MOF (male absent on the first), a member of the MYST (MOZ, YBF2, SAS2, and Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs), is the major enzyme that catalyzes the acetylation of histone H4 on lysine 16. Acetylation of K16 is a prevalent mark associated with chromatin decondensation. MOF has recently been shown to play an essential role in maintaining normal cell functions. In this study, we discuss the important roles of MOF in DNA damage repair, apoptosis, and tumorigenesis. We also analyze the role of MOF as a key regulator of the core transcriptional network of embryonic stem cells. PMID:24452550

  19. Histone deacetylases: Targets for antifungal drug development

    PubMed Central

    Kmetzsch, Livia

    2015-01-01

    The interaction of pathogens and its hosts causes a drastic change in the transcriptional landscape in both cells. Among the several mechanisms of gene regulation, transcriptional initiation is probably the main point. In such scenario, the access of transcriptional machinery to promoter is highly regulated by post-translational modification of histones, such as acetylation, phosphorylation and others. Inhibition of histone deacetylases is able to reduce fungal pathogens fitness during infection and, therefore, is currently being considered for the development of new antifungal therapy strategies. PMID:26151486

  20. Balancing Histone Methylation Activities in Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Cyril Jayakumar; Akbarian, Schahram

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in histone lysine methylation and other epigenetic regulators of gene expression contribute to changes in brain transcriptomes in mood and psychosis spectrum disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Genetic association studies and animal models implicate multiple lysine methyltransferases (KMTs) and demethylases (KDMs) in the neurobiology of emotion and cognition. Here, we review the role of histone lysine methylation and transcriptional regulation in normal and diseased neurodevelopment and discuss various KMTs and KDMs as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of neuropsychiatric disease. PMID:21429800

  1. Endometriosis Is Characterized by a Distinct Pattern of Histone 3 and Histone 4 Lysine Modifications

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Janice B.; Colón-Díaz, Maricarmen; García, Miosotis; Gutierrez, Sylvia; Colón, Mariano; Seto, Edward; Laboy, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    Background: The histone modification patterns in endometriosis have not been fully characterized. This gap in knowledge results in a poor understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms (and potential therapeutic targets) at play. We aimed to (1) assess global acetylation status of histone 3 (H3) and histone 4 (H4), (2) measure levels of H3 and H4 lysine (K) acetylation and methylation, and (3) to identify histone acetylation patterns in promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues from patients and controls. Methods: Global and K-specific acetylation/methylation levels of histones were measured in 24 lesions, 15 endometrium from patients, and 26 endometrium from controls. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)–polymerase chain reaction was used to determine the histone acetylation status of the promoter regions of candidate genes in tissues. Results: The lesions were globally hypoacetylated at H3 (but not H4) compared to eutopic endometrium from controls. Lesions had significantly lower levels of H3K9ac and H4K16ac compared to eutopic endometrium from patients and controls. Tissues from patients were hypermethylated at H3K4, H3K9, and H3K27 compared to endometrium from controls. The ChIP analysis showed hypoacetylation of H3/H4 within promoter regions of candidate genes known to be downregulated in endometriosis (e.g., HOXA10, ESR1, CDH1, and p21WAF1/Cip1) in lesions versus control endometrium. The stereoidogenic factor 1 (SF1) promoter region was enriched for acetylated H3 and H4 in lesions versus control tissues, correlating with its reported high expression in lesions. Conclusions: This study describes the histone code of lesions and endometrium from patients with endometriosis and provides support for a possible role of histone modification in modulation of gene expression in endometriosis. PMID:23899551

  2. IDH1, Histone Methylation, and So Forth.

    PubMed

    Penard-Lacronique, Virginie; Bernard, Olivier A

    2016-08-01

    IDH mutants cause aberrant DNA and histone methylation and contribute to hematological and neuronal malignancies. In this issue of Cancer Cell, Inoue et al. describe a potential specific effect of IDH1 mutations that reduces Atm expression via inhibition of H3K9 demethylases, which may represent a first step toward cellular transformation. PMID:27505668

  3. WHSC1 links transcription elongation to HIRA-mediated histone H3.3 deposition.

    PubMed

    Sarai, Naoyuki; Nimura, Keisuke; Tamura, Tomohiko; Kanno, Tomohiko; Patel, Mira C; Heightman, Tom D; Ura, Kiyoe; Ozato, Keiko

    2013-08-28

    Actively transcribed genes are enriched with the histone variant H3.3. Although H3.3 deposition has been linked to transcription, mechanisms controlling this process remain elusive. We investigated the role of the histone methyltransferase Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1) (NSD2/MMSET) in H3.3 deposition into interferon (IFN) response genes. IFN treatment triggered robust H3.3 incorporation into activated genes, which continued even after cessation of transcription. Likewise, UV radiation caused H3.3 deposition in UV-activated genes. However, in Whsc1(-/-) cells IFN- or UV-triggered H3.3 deposition was absent, along with a marked reduction in IFN- or UV-induced transcription. We found that WHSC1 interacted with the bromodomain protein 4 (BRD4) and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) and facilitated transcriptional elongation. WHSC1 also associated with HIRA, the H3.3-specific histone chaperone, independent of BRD4 and P-TEFb. WHSC1 and HIRA co-occupied IFN-stimulated genes and supported prolonged H3.3 incorporation, leaving a lasting transcriptional mark. Our results reveal a previously unrecognized role of WHSC1, which links transcriptional elongation and H3.3 deposition into activated genes through two molecularly distinct pathways. PMID:23921552

  4. Histone demethylase KDM5B is a key regulator of genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Liu, Ling; Yang, Shangda; Song, Nan; Zhou, Xing; Gao, Jie; Yu, Na; Shan, Lin; Wang, Qian; Liang, Jing; Xuan, Chenghao; Wang, Yan; Shang, Yongfeng; Shi, Lei

    2014-01-01

    Maintenance of genomic stability is essential for normal organismal development and is vital to prevent diseases such as cancer. As genetic information is packaged into chromatin, it has become increasingly clear that the chromatin environment plays an important role in DNA damage response. However, how DNA repair is controlled by epigenetic mechanisms is not fully understood. Here we report the identification and characterization of lysine-specific histone demethylase 5B (KDM5B), a member of the JmjC domain-containing histone demethylases, as an important player in multiple aspects of DNA double-strand break (DSB) response in human cells. We found that KDM5B becomes enriched in DNA-damage sites after ironizing radiation and endonuclease treatment in a poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1- and histone variant macroH2A1.1-dependent manner. We showed that KDM5B is required for efficient DSB repair and for the recruitment of Ku70 and BRCA1, the essential component of nonhomologous end-joining and homologous recombination, respectively. Significantly, KDM5B deficiency disengages the DNA repair process, promotes spontaneous DNA damage, activates p53 signaling, and sensitizes cells to genotoxic insults. Our results suggest that KDM5B is a bona fide DNA damage response protein and indicate that KDM5B is an important genome caretaker and a critical regulator of genome stability, adding to the understanding of the roles of epigenetics in the maintenance of genetic fidelity. PMID:24778210

  5. Biphasic incorporation of centromeric histone CENP-A in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Yuko; Sato, Hiroshi; Saitoh, Shigeaki; Ogiyama, Yuki; Masuda, Fumie; Takahashi, Kohta

    2008-02-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is essential for kinetochore formation. Here, we report that the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe has at least two distinct CENP-A deposition phases across the cell cycle: S and G2. The S phase deposition requires Ams2 GATA factor, which promotes histone gene activation. In Delta ams2, CENP-A fails to retain during S, but it reaccumulates onto centromeres via the G2 deposition pathway, which is down-regulated by Hip1, a homologue of HIRA histone chaperon. Reducing the length of G2 in Delta ams2 results in failure of CENP-A accumulation, leading to chromosome missegregation. N-terminal green fluorescent protein-tagging reduces the centromeric association of CENP-A, causing cell death in Delta ams2 but not in wild-type cells, suggesting that the N-terminal tail of CENP-A may play a pivotal role in the formation of centromeric nucleosomes at G2. These observations imply that CENP-A is normally localized to centromeres in S phase in an Ams2-dependent manner and that the G2 pathway may salvage CENP-A assembly to promote genome stability. The flexibility of CENP-A incorporation during the cell cycle may account for the plasticity of kinetochore formation when the authentic centromere is damaged. PMID:18077559

  6. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-11-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs. PMID:25266856

  7. FACT plays a major role in histone dynamics affecting VSG expression site control in Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Denninger, Viola; Rudenko, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin remodelling is involved in the transcriptional regulation of the RNA polymerase I transcribed variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) expression sites (ESs) of Trypanosoma brucei. We show that the T. brucei FACT complex contains the Pob3 and Spt16 subunits, and plays a key role in ES silencing. We see an inverse correlation between transcription and condensed chromatin, whereby FACT knockdown results in ES derepression and more open chromatin around silent ES promoters. Derepressed ESs show increased sensitivity to micrococcal nuclease (MNase) digestion, and a decrease in histones at silent ES promoters but not telomeres. In contrast, FACT knockdown results in more histones at the active ES, correlated with transcription shut-down. ES promoters are derepressed in cells stalled at the G2/M cell cycle stage after knockdown of FACT, but not in G2/M cells stalled after knockdown of cyclin 6. This argues that the observed ES derepression is a direct consequence of histone chaperone activity by FACT at the G2/M cell cycle stage which could affect transcription elongation, rather than an indirect consequence of a cell cycle checkpoint. These experiments highlight the role of the FACT complex in cell cycle-specific chromatin remodelling within VSG ESs. PMID:25266856

  8. Histone H3.3 regulates dynamic chromatin states during spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Benjamin T. K.; Bush, Kelly M.; Barrilleaux, Bonnie L.; Cotterman, Rebecca; Knoepfler, Paul S.

    2014-01-01

    The histone variant H3.3 is involved in diverse biological processes, including development, transcriptional memory and transcriptional reprogramming, as well as diseases, including most notably malignant brain tumors. Recently, we developed a knockout mouse model for the H3f3b gene, one of two genes encoding H3.3. Here, we show that targeted disruption of H3f3b results in a number of phenotypic abnormalities, including a reduction in H3.3 histone levels, leading to male infertility, as well as abnormal sperm and testes morphology. Additionally, null germ cell populations at specific stages in spermatogenesis, in particular spermatocytes and spermatogonia, exhibited increased rates of apoptosis. Disruption of H3f3b also altered histone post-translational modifications and gene expression in the testes, with the most prominent changes occurring at genes involved in spermatogenesis. Finally, H3f3b null testes also exhibited abnormal germ cell chromatin reorganization and reduced protamine incorporation. Taken together, our studies indicate a major role for H3.3 in spermatogenesis through regulation of chromatin dynamics. PMID:25142466

  9. Histone chaperone Chz1p regulates H2B ubiquitination and subtelomeric anti-silencing

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Yakun; Chiang, Jung-Hsien; Lin, Chan-Hsien; Arens, Christina E.; Saleem, Ramsey A.; Smith, Jennifer J.; Aitchison, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Chz1p is a histone chaperone that interacts physically and functionally with the histone variant Htz1p, which has been implicated in establishing and maintaining boundaries between transcriptionally inactive heterochromatin and active euchromatin. To investigate the role of Chz1p in chromatin organization, we performed genome-wide expression arrays and chromatin immunoprecipitations of SIR complex components and modified histones in a CHZ1 deletion strain. Deletion of CHZ1 led to reduced ubiquitination of subtelomere-associated H2B, reduced subtelomeric H3K79 di-methylation, and increased binding of Sir3p, and Sir4p at telomere-distal euchromatin regions, correlating with decreased gene expression in subtelomeric regions. This anti-silencing defect appears to be mediated by enhanced association of de-ubiquitinase Ubp10p with subtelomeric DNA, as detected by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. In support of this, we show that deletion of UBP10 can antagonize the subtelomeric silencing phenotype of Δchz1. Taken together, the results demonstrate a novel role for Chz1p in epigenetic regulation, through H2B de-ubiquitination by Ubp10p. PMID:20008511

  10. Substantial Histone Reduction Modulates Genomewide Nucleosomal Occupancy and Global Transcriptional Output

    PubMed Central

    Celona, Barbara; Weiner, Assaf; Di Felice, Francesca; Mancuso, Francesco M.; Cesarini, Elisa; Rossi, Riccardo L.; Gregory, Lorna; Baban, Dilair; Rossetti, Grazisa; Grianti, Paolo; Pagani, Massimiliano; Bonaldi, Tiziana; Ragoussis, Jiannis; Friedman, Nir; Camilloni, Giorgio; Bianchi, Marco E.; Agresti, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    The basic unit of genome packaging is the nucleosome, and nucleosomes have long been proposed to restrict DNA accessibility both to damage and to transcription. Nucleosome number in cells was considered fixed, but recently aging yeast and mammalian cells were shown to contain fewer nucleosomes. We show here that mammalian cells lacking High Mobility Group Box 1 protein (HMGB1) contain a reduced amount of core, linker, and variant histones, and a correspondingly reduced number of nucleosomes, possibly because HMGB1 facilitates nucleosome assembly. Yeast nhp6 mutants lacking Nhp6a and -b proteins, which are related to HMGB1, also have a reduced amount of histones and fewer nucleosomes. Nucleosome limitation in both mammalian and yeast cells increases the sensitivity of DNA to damage, increases transcription globally, and affects the relative expression of about 10% of genes. In yeast nhp6 cells the loss of more than one nucleosome in four does not affect the location of nucleosomes and their spacing, but nucleosomal occupancy. The decrease in nucleosomal occupancy is non-uniform and can be modelled assuming that different nucleosomal sites compete for available histones. Sites with a high propensity to occupation are almost always packaged into nucleosomes both in wild type and nucleosome-depleted cells; nucleosomes on sites with low propensity to occupation are disproportionately lost in nucleosome-depleted cells. We suggest that variation in nucleosome number, by affecting nucleosomal occupancy both genomewide and gene-specifically, constitutes a novel layer of epigenetic regulation. PMID:21738444

  11. Diverse Activities of Histone Acylations Connect Metabolism to Chromatin Function.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Arnob; Abmayr, Susan M; Workman, Jerry L

    2016-08-18

    Modifications of histones play important roles in balancing transcriptional output. The discovery of acyl marks, besides histone acetylation, has added to the functional diversity of histone modifications. Since all modifications use metabolic intermediates as substrates for chromatin-modifying enzymes, the prevalent landscape of histone modifications in any cell type is a snapshot of its metabolic status. Here, we review some of the current findings of how differential use of histone acylations regulates gene expression as response to metabolic changes and differentiation programs. PMID:27540855

  12. Nonenzymatic biotinylation of histone H2A

    PubMed Central

    Healy, Shannon; Heightman, Tom D; Hohmann, Laura; Schriemer, David; Gravel, Roy A

    2009-01-01

    Holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS, eukaryotic enzyme) and BirA (prokaryotic) are biotin protein ligases that catalyze the ATP-dependent attachment of biotin to apocarboxylases via the reactive intermediate, bio-5′-AMP. In this study, we examined the in vitro mechanism of biotin attachment to histone H2A in the presence of HCS and BirA. The experiment derives from our observations that HCS is found in the nucleus of cells in addition to the cytoplasm, and it has the ability to attach biotin to histones in vitro (Narang et al., Hum Mol Genet 2004; 13:15–23). Using recombinant HCS or BirA, the rate of biotin attachment was considerably slower with histone H2A than with the biotin binding domain of an apocarboxylase. However, on incubation of recombinant H2A with chemically synthesized bio-5′-AMP, H2A was observed to be rapidly labeled with biotin in the absence of enzyme. Nonenzymatic biotinylation of a truncated apocarboxylase (BCCP87) has been previously reported (Streaker and Beckett, Protein Sci 2006; 15:1928–1935), though at a much slower rate than we observe for H2A. The specific attachment sites of nonenzymatically biotinylated recombinant H2A at different time points were identified using mass spectrometry, and were found to consist of a similar pattern of biotin attachment as seen in the presence of HCS, with preference for lysines in the highly basic N-terminal region of the histone. None of the lysine sites within H2A resembles the biotin attachment consensus sequence seen in carboxylases, suggesting a novel mechanism for histone biotinylation. PMID:19160459

  13. INFECTIVITY OF HISTONE-POLIOVIRUS RIBONUCLEIC ACID PREPARATIONS.

    PubMed

    LUDWIG, E H; SMULL, C E

    1963-06-01

    Ludwig, Ernest H. (The Pennsylvania State University, University Park) and Christine E. Smull. Infectivity of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid preparations. J. Bacteriol. 85:1334-1338. 1963.-Some properties of histone-poliovirus ribonucleic acid (RNA) preparations, as relate to infectivity for HeLa cell monolayers, were investigated. The histone-RNA preparations were found to lose their infectivity rapidly at room temperature. They were considerably more stable at ice-bath temperature. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing an appropriate amount of histone yielded a plaque count which was proportional to the dilution factor, and which regressed linearly through the point of origin. Dilution of a histone-RNA preparation in a diluent containing no histone resulted in a rapidly decreasing plaque count which was not proportional to the dilution factor. The ability of histone to enhance the infectivity of poliovirus RNA was found to be dependent upon the presence of a low concentration of a monovalent salt in the histone-RNA preparations. Histone-RNA preparations containing approximately isotonic levels of NaCl exhibited a high degree of infectivity. When concentrations of NaCl outside this range were used, a great loss in infectivity of the histone-RNA preparations occurred. The NaCl could be replaced by KCl but not by CaCl(2), MgCl(2), or MgSO(4). PMID:14047226

  14. Cadmium Induces Histone H3 Lysine Methylation by Inhibiting Histone Demethylase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Chunlian; Liu, Yin; Xie, Chengfeng; Tu, Wei; Xia, Yujie; Costa, Max; Zhou, Xue

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium is an established human lung carcinogen with weak mutagenicity. However, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis remain obscure. It has been suggested that epigenetic mechanisms may play a role in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigated the effects of cadmium on histone methylation and histone demethylases, and the role of histone methylation in transformation of immortalized normal human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells. Exposure to 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 μM of cadmium for 6, 24, and 48 h increased global trimethylated histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3) and dimethylated histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9me2) in BEAS-2B cells compared with untreated cells, and most of these changes remained after the removal of cadmium (P < .05 or P < .01 for most modifications). Meanwhile, cadmium inhibited the activities of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4) and histone H3 on lysine 9 (H3K9) demethylases which were detected by histone demethylation assay. However, there was no significant change in the protein levels of the H3K4 demethylase lysine-specific demethylase 5A (KDM5A) and the H3K9 demethylase lysine-specific demethylase 3A (KDM3A). Interestingly, during transformation of BEAS-2B cells by 20 weeks of exposure to 2.0 μM cadmium as assessed by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, global H3K4me3, and H3K9me2 were significantly increased at 4 weeks (P < .05 or P < .01), whereas no significant change was observed at 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks compared with control. Our study suggests that cadmium increases global H3K4me3 and H3K9me2 by inhibiting the activities of histone demethylases, and aberrant histone methylation that occurs early (48 h) and at 4 weeks is associated with cadmium-induced transformation of BEAS-2B cells at the early stage. PMID:25673502

  15. Distinct roles for histone chaperones in the deposition of Htz1 in chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongde; Zhu, Min; Mu, Yawen; Liu, Lingjie; Li, Guanghui; Wan, Yakun

    2014-01-01

    Histone variant Htz1 substitution for H2A plays important roles in diverse DNA transactions. Histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) are important for the deposition Htz1 into nucleosomes. In literatures, it was suggested that Chz1 is a Htz1–H2B-specific chaperone, and it is relatively unstructured in solution but it becomes structured in complex with the Htz1–H2B histone dimer. Nap1 (nucleosome assembly protein 1) can bind (H3–H4)2 tetramers, H2A–H2B dimers and Htz1–H2B dimers. Nap1 can bind H2A–H2B dimer in the cytoplasm and shuttles the dimer into the nucleus. Moreover, Nap1 functions in nucleosome assembly by competitively interacting with non-nucleosomal histone–DNA. However, the exact roles of these chaperones in assembling Htz1-containing nucleosome remain largely unknown. In this paper, we revealed that Chz1 does not show a physical interaction with chromatin. In contrast, Nap1 binds exactly at the genomic DNA that contains Htz1. Nap1 and Htz1 show a preferential interaction with AG-rich DNA sequences. Deletion of chz1 results in a significantly decreased binding of Htz1 in chromatin, whereas deletion of nap1 dramatically increases the association of Htz1 with chromatin. Furthermore, genome-wide nucleosome-mapping analysis revealed that nucleosome occupancy for Htz1p-bound genes decreases upon deleting htz1 or chz1, suggesting that Htz1 is required for nucleosome structure at the specific genome loci. All together, these results define the distinct roles for histone chaperones Chz1 and Nap1 to regulate Htz1 incorporation into chromatin. PMID:25338502

  16. Msc1 acts through histone H2A.Z to promote chromosome stability in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shakil; Dul, Barbara; Qiu, Xinxing; Walworth, Nancy C

    2007-11-01

    As a central component of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway, the conserved protein kinase Chk1 mediates cell cycle progression when DNA damage is generated. Msc1 was identified as a multicopy suppressor capable of facilitating survival in response to DNA damage of cells mutant for chk1. We demonstrate that loss of msc1 function results in an increased rate of chromosome loss and that an msc1 null allele exhibits genetic interactions with mutants in key kinetochore components. Multicopy expression of msc1 robustly suppresses a temperature-sensitive mutant (cnp1-1) in the centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, and localization of CENP-A to the centromere is compromised in msc1 null cells. We present several lines of evidence to suggest that Msc1 carries out its function through the histone H2A variant H2A.Z, encoded by pht1 in fission yeast. Like an msc1 mutant, a pht1 mutant also exhibits chromosome instability and genetic interactions with kinetochore mutants. Suppression of cnp1-1 by multicopy msc1 requires pht1. Likewise, suppression of the DNA damage sensitivity of a chk1 mutant by multicopy msc1 also requires pht1. We present the first genetic evidence that histone H2A.Z may participate in centromere function in fission yeast and propose that Msc1 acts through H2A.Z to promote chromosome stability and cell survival following DNA damage. PMID:17947424

  17. Mucopolysaccharidosis: A New Variant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Primrose, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    Described is a possibly new variant of mucopolysaccharidosis characterized by progressive mental and motor deficiency, bone abnormalities, a generalized skin lesion, and abnormal mucopolysaccharides in the urine as seen in a 20-year-old female. (DB)

  18. Normal Variants in Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Daniel R; Bryg, Robert J

    2016-11-01

    Echocardiography is a powerful and convenient tool used routinely in the cardiac evaluation of many patients. Improved resolution and visualization of cardiac anatomy has led to the discovery of many normal variant structures that have no known pathologic consequence. Importantly, these findings may masquerade as pathology prompting unnecessary further evaluation at the expense of anxiety, cost, or potential harm. This review provides an updated and comprehensive collection of normal anatomic variants on both transthoracic and transesophageal imaging. PMID:27612473

  19. DNA and histone methylation in gastric carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Calcagno, Danielle Queiroz; Gigek, Carolina Oliveira; Chen, Elizabeth Suchi; Burbano, Rommel Rodriguez; Smith, Marília de Arruda Cardoso

    2013-01-01

    Epigenetic alterations contribute significantly to the development and progression of gastric cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer death worldwide. Epigenetics refers to the number of modifications of the chromatin structure that affect gene expression without altering the primary sequence of DNA, and these changes lead to transcriptional activation or silencing of the gene. Over the years, the study of epigenetic processes has increased, and novel therapeutic approaches that target DNA methylation and histone modifications have emerged. A greater understanding of epigenetics and the therapeutic potential of manipulating these processes is necessary for gastric cancer treatment. Here, we review recent research on the effects of aberrant DNA and histone methylation on the onset and progression of gastric tumors and the development of compounds that target enzymes that regulate the epigenome. PMID:23482412

  20. HDAC8 Substrates: Histones and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Noah A.; Pitcairn, Carol Ann; Fierke, Carol A.

    2012-01-01

    The lysine deacetylase family of enzymes (HDACs) was first demonstrated to catalyze deacetylation of acetyllysine residues on histones. In subsequent years, HDACs have been shown to recognize a large pool of acetylated non-histone proteins as substrates. Recently, thousands of acetylated proteins have been discovered, yet in most cases, the HDAC that catalyzes deacetylation in vivo has not been identified. This gap has created the need for better in vivo, in vitro, and in silico approaches for determining HDAC substrates. While HDAC8 is the best kinetically and structurally characterized HDAC, few efficient substrates have yet been substantiated in vivo. In this review we delineate factors that may be important for determining HDAC8 substrate recognition and catalytic activity, including structure, complex formation, and post-translational modifications. This summary provides insight into the challenges of identifying in vivo substrates for HDAC8, and provides a good vantage point for understanding the variables important for predicting HDAC substrate recognition. PMID:23175386

  1. LSD1 Histone Demethylase Assays and Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Hayward, D; Cole, P A

    2016-01-01

    The lysine-specific demethylase (LSD1) is a flavin-dependent amine oxidase that selectively removes one or two methyl groups from histone H3 at the Lys4 position. Along with histone deacetylases 1 and 2, LSD1 is involved in epigenetically silencing gene expression. LSD1 has been implicated as a potential therapeutic target in cancer and other diseases. In this chapter, we discuss several approaches to measure LSD1 demethylase activity and their relative strengths and limitations for inhibitor discovery and mechanistic characterization. In addition, we review the principal established chemical functional groups derived from monoamine oxidase inhibitors that have been investigated in the context of LSD1 as demethylase inhibitors. Finally, we highlight a few examples of recently developed LSD1 mechanism-based inactivators and their biomedical applications. PMID:27372757

  2. Linker Histones Incorporation Maintains Chromatin Fiber Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Recouvreux, Pierre; Lavelle, Christophe; Barbi, Maria; Conde e Silva, Natalia; Le Cam, Eric; Victor, Jean-Marc; Viovy, Jean-Louis

    2011-01-01

    Genomic DNA in eukaryotic cells is organized in supercoiled chromatin fibers, which undergo dynamic changes during such DNA metabolic processes as transcription or replication. Indeed, DNA-translocating enzymes like polymerases produce physical constraints in vivo. We used single-molecule micromanipulation by magnetic tweezers to study the response of chromatin to mechanical constraints in the same range as those encountered in vivo. We had previously shown that under positive torsional constraints, nucleosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive topology. We demonstrate here that chromatin fibers comprising linker histones present a torsional plasticity similar to that of naked nucleosome arrays. Chromatosomes can undergo a reversible chiral transition toward a state of positive torsion (reverse chromatosome) without loss of linker histones. PMID:21641318

  3. Histone H1--DNA interaction. On the mechanism of DNA strands crosslinking by histone H1.

    PubMed Central

    Glotov, B O; Nikolaev, L G; Severin, E S

    1978-01-01

    Crosslinking of DNA fibers by histone H1 or phosphorylated on Ser-37 histone H1, and by the individual fragments of the H1 polypeptide chain was studied by the method of turbidimetry. The dependence of the turbidity of DNA-protein complexes on the ionic strength in solution suggests that the condensation of H1.DNA complexes in vitro is apparently due to both specific histone-DNA interactions with the contribution of hydrogen and/or hydrophobic bonds and the formation of polycationic "bridges" fastening the DNA fibers. The effectiveness of the condensation is postulated to be a function of a proportion between the two mechanisms which in turn can be controlled by slight changes in ionic surroundings. The sharp dependence of shrinkage of H1.DNA complexes on ionic strength at "physiological" salt concentrations could provide a mechanism to regulate density and consequently the total activity of chromatin in the cell nuclei. The phosphorylation of histone H1 on Ser-37 by a specific histone kinase does not noticeably affect the pattern of DNA crosslinking by the H1. Images PMID:27766

  4. Binding of the histone chaperone ASF1 to the CBP bromodomain promotes histone acetylation.

    PubMed

    Das, Chandrima; Roy, Siddhartha; Namjoshi, Sarita; Malarkey, Christopher S; Jones, David N M; Kutateladze, Tatiana G; Churchill, Mair E A; Tyler, Jessica K

    2014-03-25

    The multifunctional Creb-binding protein (CBP) protein plays a pivotal role in many critical cellular processes. Here we demonstrate that the bromodomain of CBP binds to histone H3 acetylated on lysine 56 (K56Ac) with higher affinity than to its other monoacetylated binding partners. We show that autoacetylation of CBP is critical for the bromodomain-H3 K56Ac interaction, and we propose that this interaction occurs via autoacetylation-induced conformation changes in CBP. Unexpectedly, the bromodomain promotes acetylation of H3 K56 on free histones. The CBP bromodomain also interacts with the histone chaperone anti-silencing function 1 (ASF1) via a nearby but distinct interface. This interaction is necessary for ASF1 to promote acetylation of H3 K56 by CBP, indicating that the ASF1-bromodomain interaction physically delivers the histones to the histone acetyl transferase domain of CBP. A CBP bromodomain mutation manifested in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome has compromised binding to both H3 K56Ac and ASF1, suggesting that these interactions are important for the normal function of CBP. PMID:24616510

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitors enhance phosphorylation of histone H2AX after ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Yubin; Adachi, Masaaki . E-mail: adachi@sapmed.ac.jp; Zou Huichao; Hareyama, Masato; Imai, Kohzoh; Shinomura, Yasuhisa

    2006-07-01

    Purpose Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are believed to be promising radiosensitizers. To explore their effects on ionizing radiation (IR), we examined whether the HDAC inhibitors m-carboxycinnamic acid bis-hydroxamide (CBHA) and depsipeptide FK228 affect H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}-H2AX), a landmark of DNA double-strand breaks after IR exposure. Methods and Materials We evaluated the effects of the HDAC inhibitors on clonogenic assay in human lung carcinoma A549 cells and progression of A549 xenograft tumors. IR-induced DNA damage was evaluated by histone {gamma}-H2AX. Histone hyperacetylation was induced by overexpression of histone acetyltransferase p300 and evaluated by Western blots. Results M-carboxycinnamic acid bishydroxyamide pretreatment radiosensitized A549 cells and strongly inhibited A549 xenograft tumor progression. CBHA and FK228, but not 5-fluorouracil, enhanced IR-induced {gamma}-H2AX in A549 and other cancer cell lines. Overexpression of p300 similarly augmented IR-induced {gamma}-H2AX. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that HDAC inhibitors enhance IR-induced {gamma}-H2AX, most likely through histone hyperacetylation, and radiosensitize various cancers.

  6. Histone demethylase LSD1 regulates adipogenesis.

    PubMed

    Musri, Melina M; Carmona, Mari Carmen; Hanzu, Felicia A; Kaliman, Perla; Gomis, Ramon; Párrizas, Marcelina

    2010-09-24

    Epigenetic mechanisms, in particular the enzymatic modification of histones, are a crucial element of cell differentiation, a regulated process that allows a precursor cell basically to turn into a different cell type while maintaining the same genetic equipment. We have previously described that the promoters of adipogenic genes display significant levels of dimethylation at the Lys(4) of histone H3 (H3K4) in preadipocytes, where these genes are still silenced, thus maintaining the chromatin of the precursor cell in a receptive state. Here, we show that the expression of several histone demethylases and methyltransferases increases during adipogenesis, suggesting an important role for these proteins in this process. Knockdown of the H3K4/K9 demethylase LSD1 results in markedly decreased differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This outcome is associated with decreased H3K4 dimethylation and increased H3K9 dimethylation at the promoter of transcription factor cebpa, whose expression must be induced >200-fold upon stimulation of differentiation. Thus, our data suggest that LSD1 acts to maintain a permissive state of the chromatin in this promoter by opposing the action of a H3K9 methyltransferase. Knockdown of H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 produced the opposite results, by decreasing H3K9 dimethylation and increasing H3K4 dimethylation levels at the cebpa promoter and favoring differentiation. These findings indicate that the histone methylation status of adipogenic genes as well as the expression and function of the proteins involved in its maintenance play a crucial role in adipogenesis. PMID:20656681

  7. Histone Demethylase LSD1 Regulates Adipogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Musri, Melina M.; Carmona, Mari Carmen; Hanzu, Felicia A.; Kaliman, Perla; Gomis, Ramon; Párrizas, Marcelina

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms, in particular the enzymatic modification of histones, are a crucial element of cell differentiation, a regulated process that allows a precursor cell basically to turn into a different cell type while maintaining the same genetic equipment. We have previously described that the promoters of adipogenic genes display significant levels of dimethylation at the Lys4 of histone H3 (H3K4) in preadipocytes, where these genes are still silenced, thus maintaining the chromatin of the precursor cell in a receptive state. Here, we show that the expression of several histone demethylases and methyltransferases increases during adipogenesis, suggesting an important role for these proteins in this process. Knockdown of the H3K4/K9 demethylase LSD1 results in markedly decreased differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. This outcome is associated with decreased H3K4 dimethylation and increased H3K9 dimethylation at the promoter of transcription factor cebpa, whose expression must be induced >200-fold upon stimulation of differentiation. Thus, our data suggest that LSD1 acts to maintain a permissive state of the chromatin in this promoter by opposing the action of a H3K9 methyltransferase. Knockdown of H3K9 methyltransferase SETDB1 produced the opposite results, by decreasing H3K9 dimethylation and increasing H3K4 dimethylation levels at the cebpa promoter and favoring differentiation. These findings indicate that the histone methylation status of adipogenic genes as well as the expression and function of the proteins involved in its maintenance play a crucial role in adipogenesis. PMID:20656681

  8. Cloning and characterization of the major histone H2A genes completes the cloning and sequencing of known histone genes of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Gorovsky, M A

    1996-08-01

    A truncated cDNA clone encoding Tetrahymena thermophila histone H2A2 was isolated using synthetic degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from H2A protein sequences of Tetrahymena pyriformis. The cDNA clone was used as a homologous probe to isolate a truncated genomic clone encoding H2A1. The remaining regions of the genes for H2A1 (HTA1) and H2A2 (HTA2) were then isolated using inverse PCR on circularized genomic DNA fragments. These partial clones were assembled into intact HTA1 and HTA2 clones. Nucleotide sequences of the two genes were highly homologous within the coding region but not in the noncoding regions. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with protein sequences of T. pyriformis H2As showed only two and three differences respectively, in a total of 137 amino acids for H2A1, and 132 amino acids for H2A2, indicating the two genes arose before the divergence of these two species. The HTA2 gene contains a TAA triplet within the coding region, encoding a glutamine residue. In contrast with the T. thermophila HHO and HTA3 genes, no introns were identified within the two genes. The 5'- and 3'-ends of the histone H2A mRNAs; were determined by RNase protection and by PCR mapping using RACE and RLM-RACE methods. Both genes encode polyadenylated mRNAs and are highly expressed in vegetatively growing cells but only weakly expressed in starved cultures. With the inclusion of these two genes, T. thermophila is the first organism whose entire complement of known core and linker histones, including replication-dependent and basal variants, has been cloned and sequenced. PMID:8760889

  9. Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhns, L.R.; Seeger, J.

    1983-01-01

    Atlas of Computed Tomography Variants is unique in that, while others of its kind may include plain film, roentgen variants, it concentrates solely on CT images of variants which may simulate disease. Organized into four regions, it presents dicussions covering CT variants of the skull, neck and spine; thorax; abdomen; and extremities-featuring a section on the head.

  10. Interactions of aflatoxin with histones and DNA.

    PubMed

    Black, H S; Jirgensons, B

    1967-05-01

    The interactions of aflatoxin B(1) with certain histone fractions and DNA were investigated by means of viscosity measurements and equilibrium dialysis. Two main histone fractions (F2b and F1), both lysine-rich, were examined after treatment with the toxin. Fraction 2b and 1 differ in amino acid composition and behave differently, in regard to gross conformation, in the presence of electrolytes. Aflatoxin increased the viscosity of fraction 2b but affected the viscosity of fraction 1 only slightly. Equilibrium dialysis experiments showed that aflatoxin was bound to both histone fractions. Aflatoxin also increased the viscosity of DNA and equilibrium dialysis showed that 1 molecule of the toxin was bound to approximately every 5 nucleotides of the nucleic acid. Binding constants for the aflatoxin complexes were calculated as 1000 for F2b, 700 for F1, and 5500 for DNA. The biological implications of these data, in regard to the effect aflatoxin has on the information-transcription process, are discussed. PMID:6039901