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  1. Psychiatric Diagnoses among an HIV-Infected Outpatient Clinic Population.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Rosenburg, Neal; Overton, E Turner

    2016-01-01

    As individuals with HIV infection are living longer, the management of psychiatric disorders has increasingly been incorporated into comprehensive care. Individuals were recruited from an outpatient HIV clinic to assess the prevalence and related associations of current psychiatric disorders and biomarkers. Of the 201 participants who completed the interviews, the median age was 43.5 years, and the majority was male and African American. Most were receiving HIV therapy and 78% of those had achieved virologic suppression. Prevalent psychiatric diagnoses included major depressive disorder, generalized anxiety, and agoraphobia. Alcohol and cocaine/crack abuse and dependence were common substance use disorders. Current receipt of HIV therapy was less common among those diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder. Agoraphobia was the only disorder associated with unsuppressed viral load. Psychiatric and substance use disorders are highly prevalent among an urban HIV clinic population, although we identified few associations between psychiatric diagnoses and HIV diseases status. PMID:25348798

  2. HIV-Associated Oral Mucosal Melanin Hyperpigmentation: A Clinical Study in a South African Population Sample.

    PubMed

    Chandran, R; Feller, L; Lemmer, J; Khammissa, R A G

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-associated oral mucosal melanin hyperpigmentation (HIV-OMH) in a specific population of HIV-seropositive South Africans and to analyse the associations between HIV-OMH clinical features and the demographic and immunological characteristics of the study cohort. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 200 HIV-seropositive Black subjects. The collected data comprised age, gender, CD4+ T cell count, viral load, systemic disease, medications, oral site affected by HIV-OMH, extent (localized or generalized), intensity of the pigmentation (dark or light), and smoking and snuff use. Results. Overall, 18.5% of the study cohort had HIV-OMH. Twenty-two and a half percent had OMH that could not with confidence be attributed to HIV infection, and 59% did not have any OMH. There was a significant but weak association between smoking and the presence of HIV-OMH. Conclusions. The prevalence of HIV-OMH in the study population was 18.5%, the gingiva being the most commonly affected site. It appears that the CD4+ T cell count does not play any role in the biopathology of HIV-OMH. PMID:27006825

  3. HIV-Associated Oral Mucosal Melanin Hyperpigmentation: A Clinical Study in a South African Population Sample

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, R.; Feller, L.; Lemmer, J.; Khammissa, R. A. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of HIV-associated oral mucosal melanin hyperpigmentation (HIV-OMH) in a specific population of HIV-seropositive South Africans and to analyse the associations between HIV-OMH clinical features and the demographic and immunological characteristics of the study cohort. Material and Methods. This cross-sectional study included 200 HIV-seropositive Black subjects. The collected data comprised age, gender, CD4+ T cell count, viral load, systemic disease, medications, oral site affected by HIV-OMH, extent (localized or generalized), intensity of the pigmentation (dark or light), and smoking and snuff use. Results. Overall, 18.5% of the study cohort had HIV-OMH. Twenty-two and a half percent had OMH that could not with confidence be attributed to HIV infection, and 59% did not have any OMH. There was a significant but weak association between smoking and the presence of HIV-OMH. Conclusions. The prevalence of HIV-OMH in the study population was 18.5%, the gingiva being the most commonly affected site. It appears that the CD4+ T cell count does not play any role in the biopathology of HIV-OMH. PMID:27006825

  4. Prevalence and factors associated with probable HIV dementia in an African population: A cross-sectional study of an HIV/AIDS clinic population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The HIV/AIDS infection is common in sub-Saharan Africa and is associated with psychological and neuro- cognitive impairment. These conditions, however, remain largely unrecognized. In this study we aimed to determine the prevalence of probable HIV dementia (PHD) in an HIV clinic population in Uganda and to delineate the factors associated with such impairment in these HIV positive individuals. Methods Six hundred eighty HIV clinic attendees were surveyed in a cross sectional study. PHD was assessed using the International Dementia Scale (IHDS). Standardized measures were also used to assess clinical, psychological, social and demographic variables. Respondents were aged 18 years and above and did not have severe physical or mental health conditions. Multivariate analysis was conducted to identify associations between PHD and various factors. Results The prevalence of probable HIV dementia was 64.4%. PHD was significantly associated with increasing stress scores and psychosocial impairment but not with age, BMI, CD4 count, use of HAART, or a diagnosis of depression or alcohol dependence. Conclusion The prevalence of probable HIV dementia in an ambulatory adult HIV positive population in Uganda was 64.4%. Increasing stress scores and psychosocial impairment were significant contributing factors. Clinicians need to be aware of this and to make efforts to identify neuro-cognitive impairment. Secondly there is need for more studies to better understand the relationship between PHD and stress in HIV populations so as to inform patient care. PMID:23641703

  5. Clinical experience with pericardiocentesis and extended drainage in a population with a high prevalence of HIV

    PubMed Central

    Louw, V.J.; Reuter, H.; Smedema, J.P.; Katjitae, I.; Burgess, L.J.; Doubell, A.F.

    2002-01-01

    Background The data presented were generated in a prospective study on the immunopathogenesis and management of tuberculous (TB) pericarditis at Tygerberg Hospital in Cape Town. We report our experience with 2D echocardiographically guided pericardiocentesis in 170 consecutive patients who presented to us with large pericardial effusions since 1995. Methods All patients referred to our department with echocardiographically confirmed large pericardial effusions underwent a clinical assessment followed by pericardiocentesis and drainage by an indwelling pigtail catheter. The appearance and amount of drained effusion were noted and fluid was sent for diagnostic assessment. The pigtail catheter was kept in place and fluid was aspirated once daily until the aspirate was less than 100 ml, at which stage the catheter was removed. Results A chest wall puncture site was chosen in 165 of the 170 patients (97%), while the subcostal approach was only used in five patients. Echocardiographic signs of tamponade were seen in 88% of cases. In the majority of patients (68.2%) a diagnosis of TB could be established and of these 46.6% were HIV positive. TB could not be proven in only three HIV-positive patients (1.8% of all patients). Neither hospital stay nor complications were increased in the HIV-positive group when compared with the HIV-negative group and no patient developed intrapericardial sepsis. No death could be attributed with certainty to the procedure. One patient developed non-fatal tamponade within 24 hours after the tap and in another patient a left ventricular thrombus was noted on echo after 16 days. Twenty-four patients underwent a pericardial window procedure according to protocol for diagnostic purposes. In another four patients a window was performed for therapeutic reasons. The most common minor complication was local pain at the site of catheter insertion. Repeat drainage was necessary in only six (3.5%) cases. Conclusions 2D echocardiographically directed

  6. Comparison of adult HIV prevalence from national population-based surveys and antenatal clinic surveillance in countries with generalised epidemics: implications for calibrating surveillance data

    PubMed Central

    Gouws, E; Mishra, V; Fowler, T B

    2008-01-01

    Background: Estimates of the impact of HIV in countries with generalised epidemics are generally based on antenatal clinic surveillance data collected over time. In an attempt to obtain geographically more representative estimates of HIV prevalence, many countries are now also conducting national population-based surveys in which HIV testing is included. We compare adult HIV prevalence estimates from antenatal clinic surveillance to those from national population-based surveys to assess the implications for calibrating surveillance data. Methods: HIV prevalence estimates derived from fitting prevalence curves to antenatal clinic surveillance data are statistically compared to prevalence from national population-based surveys using data from 26 countries with generalised epidemics for the year in which the survey was conducted. Appropriate transformations are applied to inform the correction factors needed to adjust prevalence in countries where population-based surveys have not been conducted. Results: HIV prevalence derived from antenatal clinic surveillance data generally overestimate population-based survey prevalence by about 20% (95% confidence interval: 10% to 30%) in both urban and rural areas. Conclusions: In countries where national population-based HIV surveys have been conducted, survey estimates of HIV prevalence (adjusted for potential survey biases as appropriate) can be used directly to calibrate antenatal clinic surveillance data. In countries where national HIV surveys have not been conducted, HIV prevalence derived from antenatal clinic surveillance data should be multiplied by about 0.8 to adjust for overestimation. PMID:18647861

  7. Future challenges for clinical care of an ageing population infected with HIV: a modelling study

    PubMed Central

    Smit, Mikaela; Brinkman, Kees; Geerlings, Suzanne; Smit, Colette; Thyagarajan, Kalyani; Sighem, Ard van; de Wolf, Frank; Hallett, Timothy B

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The population infected with HIV is getting older and these people will increasingly develop age-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs). We aimed to quantify the scale of the change and the implications for HIV care in the Netherlands in the future. Methods We constructed an individual-based model of the ageing HIV-infected population, which followed patients on HIV treatment as they age, develop NCDs—including cardiovascular disease (hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, myocardial infarctions, and strokes), diabetes, chronic kidney disease, osteoporosis, and non-AIDS malignancies—and start co-medication for these diseases. The model was parameterised by use of data for 10 278 patients from the national Dutch ATHENA cohort between 1996 and 2010. We made projections up to 2030. Findings Our model suggests that the median age of HIV-infected patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) will increase from 43·9 years in 2010 to 56·6 in 2030, with the proportion of HIV-infected patients aged 50 years or older increasing from 28% in 2010 to 73% in 2030. In 2030, we predict that 84% of HIV-infected patients will have at least one NCD, up from 29% in 2010, with 28% of HIV-infected patients in 2030 having three or more NCDs. 54% of HIV-infected patients will be prescribed co-medications in 2030, compared with 13% in 2010, with 20% taking three or more co-medications. Most of this change will be driven by increasing prevalence of cardiovascular disease and associated drugs. Because of contraindications and drug–drug interactions, in 2030, 40% of patients could have complications with the currently recommended first-line HIV regimens. Interpretation The profile of patients in the Netherlands infected with HIV is changing, with increasing numbers of older patients with multiple morbidities. These changes mean that, in the near future, HIV care will increasingly need to draw on a wide range of medical disciplines, in addition to evidence

  8. Persistent HIV-related stigma among an outpatient US clinic population.

    PubMed

    Shacham, Enbal; Rosenburg, Neal; Önen, Nur F; Donovan, Michael F; Overton, E Turner

    2015-03-01

    Despite advancements in the public's understanding of HIV infection, felt stigma towards individuals living with HIV persists. Stigma has been associated with adverse health outcomes, including poor adherence to care, and increased participation in HIV transmission risk behaviours. We evaluated the level of felt stigma and its relationship to other psychosocial and medical factors among a sample of 201 individuals with HIV engaged in care. The overall mean stigma score, as measured by the Reece Stigma Scale, was 21.7 (SD 8.7). In univariate analysis, felt stigma scores were higher among women, African Americans, younger participants, and individuals with less education. Higher felt stigma scores were also found among individuals who reported having fair to poor overall health, moderate to severe symptoms of depression and anxiety, and those with a current diagnosis of alcohol dependence, generalised anxiety disorder, agoraphobia, pain disorder, and current smokers. Higher felt stigma scores were independently associated with individuals with anxiety symptoms. These analyses highlight that stigma persists among individuals with HIV and may play an important role in HIV care. The relationship between psychiatric disorders and psychosocial factors highlights an opportunity to develop interventions that will address these common comorbidities and reduce stigma. PMID:24828557

  9. Attitudes Toward HIV Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis in a United States Urban Clinic Population.

    PubMed

    Kwakwa, Helena A; Bessias, Sophia; Sturgis, Donielle; Mvula, Natasha; Wahome, Rahab; Coyle, Catelyn; Flanigan, Timothy P

    2016-07-01

    A majority of US studies on attitudes toward PrEP focus on men who have sex with men with little representation of African Americans. This cross-sectional study seeks to determine openness to PrEP, and examine motivations for openness among Philadelphia residents. Patients undergoing HIV rapid testing between May 2012 and December 2014 in a public setting were administered a survey. Questions included openness to PrEP and reasons for openness to PrEP. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to investigate associations between openness and potential predictors. Analyses were conducted using R version 3.2.4 and the epitools and car packages. Of 5606 respondents, over 90 % were African American. Men were more likely to express openness (61.4 % of men, 54.8 % of women, p < 0.0001). Predictors of openness were younger age, black race, higher perceived risk for HIV by patient or as assessed by Tester, intermittent /no condom use, greater number of partners in 12 months and previous HIV testing. The main reason for openness was fear of HIV, and for disinterest was lack of recognition of risk. Understanding openness to PrEP, and reasons for openness to or disinterest in PrEP are critical to determining the best approaches to facilitate engagement in PrEP care by communities and persons at elevated risk for HIV acquisition. Further study is needed on how best to manage disinterest in PrEP by those at high risk for HIV, and how openness to PrEP translates into concrete steps to take PrEP. PMID:27115399

  10. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials (Last updated 9/15/2015; last reviewed 9/15/2015) Key Points HIV/AIDS clinical trials are ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ...

  11. Polypharmacy in the HIV-infected older adult population

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Lauren J; Luque, Amneris E; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among people older than 50 years is increasing. Older HIV-infected patients are particularly at risk for polypharmacy because they often have multiple comorbidities that require pharmacotherapy. Overall, there is not much known with respect to both the impact of aging on medication use in HIV-infected individuals, and the potential for interactions with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coadministered medications and its clinical consequences. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of polypharmacy with a focus on its impact on the HIV-infected older adult population and to also provide some clinical considerations in this high-risk population. PMID:23818773

  12. HIV-1 RNA levels in an African population-based cohort and their relation to CD4 lymphocyte counts and World Health Organization clinical staging.

    PubMed

    Morgan, D; Rutebemberwa, A; Malamba, S; Ross, A; Whitworth, J; Kaleebu, P; Gotch, F

    1999-10-01

    Apart from a small number of reports from people who are based in hospitals, data on viral load in HIV-infected people in sub-Saharan Africa, where most infections occur, are lacking. We report serum HIV-1 RNA levels in a population-based cohort in rural Uganda using the nucleic acid sequence-based amplification procedure (NASBA) test kit and describe their relation to CD4 counts and World Health Organization (WHO) clinical staging. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) viral loads were 87,000 copies/ml (37,500-295,000 copies/ml) in 40 prevalent cases infected for >6 years, and 31,000 copies/ml (7800-174,000 copies/ml) in 65 incident cases with seroconversion dates within the previous 6 years. Although we found a correlation between viral load and absolute CD4 count (p < .0001), there was no evidence for an association with CD4 decline (p = .1). Overall, there was a significant trend of increasing viral load with worsening clinical stage from a median viral load of 15,000 for those in WHO stage 1 (asymptomatic) to 150,600 copies/ml for those in stage 4 (AIDS; p < .001). However, the association was seen only in incident cases. Thus, we found that the NASBA test on serum was a useful indicator of disease stage especially in persons known to be infected for <6 years. Such baseline data are important for vaccine research, and if antiretroviral drugs become available to more than a few people in Africa, it will be important that accurate viral load estimations are available at least in a proportion of people to monitor the effectiveness of treatment, and measure the compliance and emerging resistance to these drugs. PMID:10843531

  13. A Descriptive Analysis of HIV Prevalence, HIV Service Uptake, and HIV-Related Risk Behaviour among Patients Attending a Mental Health Clinic in Rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Lommerse, Kinke; Stewart, Robert C.; Chilimba, Queen; van den Akker, Thomas; Lund, Crick

    2013-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and mental illness are interlinked health problems; mental illness may pose a risk for contracting HIV and HIV-positive individuals are at higher risk of mental illness. However, in countries with high HIV prevalence, the main focus of HIV-related health programmes is usually on prevention and treatment of somatic complications of HIV, and mental illness is not given high priority. We examined HIV prevalence, uptake of HIV services, and HIV-related risk behaviour among people attending a mental health clinic in rural Malawi. Methodology Semi-structured interviews were performed with patients capable to consent (94%), and with those accompanied by a capable caregiver who consented. HIV counselling and testing was offered to participants. Findings Among 174 participants, we collected 162 HIV test results (91%). HIV prevalence was 14.8%. Women were three times as likely to be HIV-positive compared to men. Two-thirds of participants reported having been tested for HIV prior to this study. The uptake of HIV-services among HIV-positive patients was low: 35% did not use recommended prophylactic therapy and 44% of patients not receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART) had never been assessed for ART eligibility. The reported rate of sexual activity was 61%, and 9% of sexually active participants had multiple partners. Inconsistent condom use with stable (89%) and occasional (79%) sexual partners, and absence of knowledge of the HIV status of those partners (53%, 63%) indicate high levels of sexual risk behaviour. Conclusions HIV-prevalence among persons attending the clinic, particularly men, was lower than among the general population in a population survey. The rate of HIV testing was high, but there was low uptake of preventive measures and ART. This illustrates that HIV-positive individuals with mental illness or epilepsy constitute a vulnerable population. HIV programmes should include those with neuropsychiatric illness

  14. Endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy among populations at high risk of HIV exposure (LA VOICES).

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rudy, Ellen T; Diamant, Allison; Duan, Naihua; Nakazono, Terry; Nakazano, Terry; Cunningham, William E

    2014-06-01

    Compulsory vaccination is a frequently implemented policy option for ensuring comprehensive vaccine coverage. Ongoing controversies around human papillomavirus vaccine dissemination, and suboptimal coverage, suggest the value of assessing acceptability of compulsory vaccinations-particularly among likely target populations-in advance of their public availability to support evidence-informed interventions. With the first HIV vaccine to demonstrate partial efficacy in a large-scale clinical trial, we examined individual characteristics and attitudes associated with support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy among a diverse, representative sample of adults attending probable HIV vaccine dissemination venues in a large urban county. Participants were recruited using three-stage probability sampling from likely venues for future HIV vaccine dissemination. We used Audio-CASI to administer a 60-min structured questionnaire. Items included endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy, sociodemographic characteristics, injecting drug use, vaccine attitudes and perceived HIV risk. Among 1,225 participants (mean age = 36.8 years; 55.6 % males, 37.6 % non-English speaking Hispanic, 78.8 % heterosexual, 25.7 % injection drug users), almost half (48.2 %) endorsed a compulsory HIV vaccination policy. Non-English speaking Hispanics compared to whites, participants with less than high school education, higher positive vaccine attitude scores and higher perceived HIV risk were significantly more likely, and people who inject drugs significantly less likely to endorse compulsory HIV vaccination. Public health interventions to promote positive vaccine attitudes and accurate perceptions of HIV risk among vulnerable populations, and strategies tailored for people who inject drugs, may build support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy and promote broad HIV vaccine coverage. PMID:24464325

  15. The clinical implications of HIV infection and aging.

    PubMed

    John, M

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study, presented as part of a plenary session at WW7 in Hyderabad, India were to review (i) the epidemiology and current clinical issues of HIV infection with regard to HIV and older populations and (ii) models for increased morbidity and mortality in older HIV-positive individuals with implications for clinical care. HIV infection for those in treatment has become a complex chronic disease in which end-organ injury and resulting morbidity, functional decline, and mortality do not have a single etiology but reflect cumulative loss of organ system reserve from multiple interacting sources leading to functional decline, organ system failure, and death. Emerging guidelines and recommendations suggest a need for increased awareness and treatment of the multifaceted needs of the aging HIV-infected patient. PMID:27109276

  16. Endorsement of Compulsory HIV Vaccination Policy among Populations at High Risk of HIV Exposure (LA VOICES)

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Peter A.; Lee, Sung-Jae; Rudy, Ellen T.; Diamant, Allison; Duan, Naihua; Nakazano, Terry; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Compulsory vaccination is a frequently implemented policy option for ensuring comprehensive vaccine coverage. Ongoing controversies around human papillomavirus vaccine dissemination, and suboptimal coverage, suggest the value of assessing acceptability of compulsory vaccinations—particularly among likely target populations—in advance of their public availability to support evidence-informed interventions. With the first HIV vaccine to demonstrate partial efficacy in a large-scale clinical trial, we examined individual characteristics and attitudes associated with support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy among a diverse, representative sample of adults attending probable HIV vaccine dissemination venues in a large urban county. Participants were recruited using three-stage probability sampling from likely venues for future HIV vaccine dissemination. We used Audio-CASI to administer a 60-minute structured questionnaire. Items included endorsement of compulsory HIV vaccination policy, sociodemographic characteristics, injecting drug use, vaccine attitudes and perceived HIV risk. Among 1225 participants (mean age = 36.8 years; 55.6% males, 37.6% non-English speaking Hispanic, 78.8% heterosexual, 25.7% injection drug users), almost half (48.2%) endorsed a compulsory HIV vaccination policy. Non-English speaking Hispanics compared to whites, participants with less than high school education, higher positive vaccine attitude scores and higher perceived HIV risk were significantly more likely, and people who inject drugs significantly less likely to endorse compulsory HIV vaccination. Public health interventions to promote positive vaccine attitudes and accurate perceptions of HIV risk among vulnerable populations, and strategies tailored for people who inject drugs, may build support for compulsory HIV vaccination policy and promote broad HIV vaccine coverage. PMID:24464325

  17. Combination implementation for HIV prevention: moving from evidence to population-level impact

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Larry W; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C; Wawer, Maria J; Gray, Ronald H; Reynolds, Steven J

    2013-01-01

    Summary The promise of combination HIV prevention—the application of multiple HIV prevention interventions to maximize population-level impact—has never been greater. However, to succeed in achieving significant reductions in HIV incidence, an additional concept needs to be considered—combination implementation. Combination implementation for HIV prevention is defined here as the pragmatic, localized application of evidence-based strategies to realize high sustained uptake and quality of HIV prevention interventions. This review explores diverse implementation strategies including HIV testing and counseling models, task shifting, linkage to and retention in care, antiretroviral therapy support, behavior change, demand creation, and structural interventions and discusses how they could be used in the provision of HIV prevention interventions such as medical male circumcision and treatment as prevention. Only through careful consideration of how to implement and operationalize HIV prevention interventions will the HIV community be able to move from clinical trial evidence to population-level impact. PMID:23257232

  18. Inherited resistance to HIV-1 conferred by an inactivating mutation in CC chemokine receptor 5: studies in populations with contrasting clinical phenotypes, defined racial background, and quantified risk.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, P. A.; Buckler-White, A.; Alkhatib, G.; Spalding, T.; Kubofcik, J.; Combadiere, C.; Weissman, D.; Cohen, O.; Rubbert, A.; Lam, G.; Vaccarezza, M.; Kennedy, P. E.; Kumaraswami, V.; Giorgi, J. V.; Detels, R.; Hunter, J.; Chopek, M.; Berger, E. A.; Fauci, A. S.; Nutman, T. B.; Murphy, P. M.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CC chemokine receptor 5 (CCR5) is a cell entry cofactor for macrophage-tropic isolates of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1). Recently, an inactive CCR5 allele (designated here as CCR5-2) was identified that confers resistance to HIV-1 infection in homozygotes and slows the rate of progression to AIDS in heterozygotes. The reports conflict on the effect of heterozygous CCR5-2 on HIV-1 susceptibility, and race and risk levels have not yet been fully analyzed. Here we report our independent identification of CCR5-2 and test its effects on HIV-1 pathogenesis in individuals with contrasting clinical outcomes, defined race, and quantified risk. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Mutant CCR5 alleles were sought by directed heteroduplex analysis of genomic DNA from random blood donors. Genotypic frequencies were then determined in (1) random blood donors from North America, Asia, and Africa; (2) HIV-1+ individuals; and (3) highly exposed-seronegative homosexuals with quantified risk. RESULTS: CCR5-2 was the only mutant allele found. It was common in Caucasians, less common in other North American racial groups, and not detected in West Africans or Tamil Indians. Homozygous CCR5-2 frequencies differed reciprocally in highly exposed-seronegative (4.5%, n = 111) and HIV-1-seropositive (0%, n = 614) Caucasians relative to Caucasian random blood donors (0.8%, n = 387). This difference was highly significant (p < 0.0001). By contrast, heterozygous CCR5-2 frequencies did not differ significantly in the same three groups (21.6, 22.6, and 21.7%, respectively). A 55% increase in the frequency of heterozygous CCR5-2 was observed in both of two cohorts of Caucasian homosexual male, long-term nonprogressors compared with other HIV-1+ Caucasian homosexuals (p = 0.006) and compared with Caucasian random blood donors. Moreover, Kaplan-Meier estimates indicated that CCR5-2 heterozygous seroconvertors had a 52.6% lower risk of developing AIDS than homozygous wild-type seroconvertors

  19. Nationwide HIV prevalence survey in general population in Niger.

    PubMed

    Boisier, P; Ouwe Missi Oukem-Boyer, O N; Amadou Hamidou, A; Sidikou, F; Ibrahim, M L; Elhaj Mahamane, A; Mamadou, S; Sanda Aksenenkova, T; Hama Modibo, B; Chanteau, S; Sani, A; Louboutin-Croc, J-P

    2004-11-01

    A national population-based survey was carried out in Niger in 2002 to assess HIV prevalence in the population aged 15-49 years. A two-stage cluster sampling was used and the blood specimens were collected on filter paper and tested according to an algorithm involving up to three diagnostic tests whenever appropriate. Testing was unlinked and anonymous. The refusal rate was 1.1% and 6056 blood samples were available for analysis. The adjusted prevalence of HIV was 0.87% (95% CI, 0.5-1.3%) and the 95% CI of the estimated number of infected individuals was 22 864-59 640. HIV-1 and HIV-2 represented, respectively, 95.6% and 2.9% of infections while dual infections represented 1.5%. HIV positivity rate was 1.0% in women and 0.7% in men. It was significantly higher among urban populations than among rural ones (respectively, 2.1% and 0.6%, P < 10(-6)). Using logistic regression, the variables significantly related to the risk of being tested positive for HIV were urban housing, increasing age and being either widowed or divorced. The estimate from the national survey was lower than the prevalence assessed from antenatal clinic data (2.8% in 2001). In the future, the representativeness of sentinel sites should be improved by increasing the representation of rural areas accounting for more than 80% of the population. Compared with other sub-Saharan countries, the HIV prevalence in Niger is still moderate. This situation represents a strong argument for enhancing prevention programmes and makes realistic the projects promoting an access to potent antiretroviral therapies for the majority. PMID:15548311

  20. Population genomics of intrapatient HIV-1 evolution.

    PubMed

    Zanini, Fabio; Brodin, Johanna; Thebo, Lina; Lanz, Christa; Bratt, Göran; Albert, Jan; Neher, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Many microbial populations rapidly adapt to changing environments with multiple variants competing for survival. To quantify such complex evolutionary dynamics in vivo, time resolved and genome wide data including rare variants are essential. We performed whole-genome deep sequencing of HIV-1 populations in 9 untreated patients, with 6-12 longitudinal samples per patient spanning 5-8 years of infection. The data can be accessed and explored via an interactive web application. We show that patterns of minor diversity are reproducible between patients and mirror global HIV-1 diversity, suggesting a universal landscape of fitness costs that control diversity. Reversions towards the ancestral HIV-1 sequence are observed throughout infection and account for almost one third of all sequence changes. Reversion rates depend strongly on conservation. Frequent recombination limits linkage disequilibrium to about 100 bp in most of the genome, but strong hitch-hiking due to short range linkage limits diversity. PMID:26652000

  1. The use of HIV-1 integration site analysis information in clinical studies aiming at HIV cure.

    PubMed

    Kiselinova, Maja; De Spiegelaere, Ward; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms for the establishment and the persistence of the latent HIV-1 reservoir remain to be completely defined. HIV-1 infection is characterised by the integration of the reverse transcribed proviral DNA into the host's genome. This integrated proviral DNA can remain replication silent, but a small part of it is fully competent to restart viral replication when treatment is interrupted. Hence, this replication-competent provirus is the cause of viral rebound and is called the viral reservoir. The exact site of proviral integration within the host's cellular chromosome may affect the transcriptional activity of HIV. Thanks to recent technological advances, HIV-1 integration site analysis has been used to assess HIV-1 reservoirs in HIV-infected individuals. Analysis of HIV-1 integration sites in infected individuals undergoing suppressive ART led to identification of expanded clonal cell populations, indicating that clonal proliferation of the proviral reservoir may contribute to the long-term persistence of viral reservoirs. Here we describe the findings of several clinical studies, where a comprehensive HIV-1 integration site analysis was performed. PMID:27482458

  2. Clinical profile of HIV infected patients attending a HIV referral clinic in Pune, India

    PubMed Central

    Antwal, Megha; Gurjar, Rohan; Chidrawar, Shweta; Pawar, Jyoti; Gaikwad, Sunil; Panchal, Narayan; Kale, Varsha; Thakar, Madhuri; Risbud, Arun; Tripathy, Srikanth

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has infected several million individuals in India. Various interventions have been implemented for early detection and prevention of transmission of HIV infection. This has progressively changed the clinical profile of HIV infected individuals and this study documents the clinical presentation of individuals positive for HIV in 2010, in Pune, Maharashtra, India. Methods: This cross-sectional study included subjects who had come to the HIV referral clinic for HIV testing from January to December 2010. Children as well as individuals with indeterminate HIV result were excluded from the study, and data for 1546 subjects were finally analysed. Results: The HIV positivity rate among all referred cases for the year 2010 was 35 per cent (male 55% and females 45%). The median age (Q1, Q3) was 31 (25.75, 39) yr. The median CD4 cell count for all HIV infected individuals (whose CD4 count was available n= 345) was 241 cells/µl and for asymptomatic HIV infected individuals was 319 cells/µl. There were 673 (43.5%) symptomatic and 873 (56.5%) asymptomatic participants. Fever, breathlessness, cough with expectoration, weight loss, loss of appetite, generalized weakness, pallor and lymphadenopathy (axillary and cervical) were found to be associated (P< 0.001) with HIV positivity. On multivariate analysis, history of Herpes zoster [AOR 11.314 (6.111-20.949)] and TB [AOR 11.214 (6.111-20.949)] was associated with HIV positivity. Interpretation & conclusions: Signs and symptoms associated with HIV positivity observed in this study can be used by health care providers to detect HIV infection early. Moreover, similar to HIV testing in patients with tuberculosis, strategies can be developed for considering Herpes zoster as a predictor of HIV infection. PMID:25297361

  3. Missed Opportunities for HIV Screening in Pharmacies and Retail Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Dugdale, Caitlin; Zaller, Nickolas; Bratberg, Jeffrey; Berk, William; Flanigan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY In the wake of new recommendations to offer HIV screening to everyone aged 13–64 years and to start all people living with HIV/AIDS on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regardless of CD4 count, the need to generate widespread, scalable HIV screening programs is greater than ever. Nearly 50,000 new HIV infections occur in the United States each year, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that approximately half of these new infections are transmitted by individuals who are unaware of their HIV serostatus. Numerous barriers to screening exist, including the lack of primary care for many at-risk patients, expense of screening in traditional settings, and need for repeat testing in high-risk populations. With their relative accessibility and affordability, community pharmacies and retail clinics within those pharmacies are practical and appealing venues for expanded HIV screening. For widespread pharmacy-based testing to become a reality, policymakers and corporate pharmacy leadership would need to develop innovative solutions to the existing time pressures of pharmacists’ behind-the-counter functions and absence of reimbursement for direct patient care services. Pharmacists nationwide should also receive training to assist with risk reduction counseling and linkage to care for customers purchasing the new over-the-counter HIV test. PMID:24684638

  4. Deep sequencing of HIV: clinical and research applications.

    PubMed

    Chabria, Shiven B; Gupta, Shaili; Kozal, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exhibits remarkable diversity in its genomic makeup and exists in any given individual as a complex distribution of closely related but nonidentical genomes called a viral quasispecies, which is subject to genetic variation, competition, and selection. This viral diversity clinically manifests as a selection of mutant variants based on viral fitness in treatment-naive individuals and based on drug-selective pressure in those on antiretroviral therapy (ART). The current standard-of-care ART consists of a combination of antiretroviral agents, which ensures maximal viral suppression while preventing the emergence of drug-resistant HIV variants. Unfortunately, transmission of drug-resistant HIV does occur, affecting 5% to >20% of newly infected individuals. To optimize therapy, clinicians rely on viral genotypic information obtained from conventional population sequencing-based assays, which cannot reliably detect viral variants that constitute <20% of the circulating viral quasispecies. These low-frequency variants can be detected by highly sensitive genotyping methods collectively grouped under the moniker of deep sequencing. Low-frequency variants have been correlated to treatment failures and HIV transmission, and detection of these variants is helping to inform strategies for vaccine development. Here, we discuss the molecular virology of HIV, viral heterogeneity, drug-resistance mutations, and the application of deep sequencing technologies in research and the clinical care of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:24821496

  5. A retrospective clinical study of the treatment of high-grade anal dysplasia by infrared coagulation in a population of HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Cranston, R D; Hirschowitz, S L; Cortina, G; Moe, A A

    2008-02-01

    HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of developing human papillomavirus-associated anal squamous cell cancer. Similar to the management of cervical dysplasia, clinicians are treating high-grade anal dysplasia to prevent progression to cancer. Initial treatments such as cold scalpel excision and electrofulguration have shown limited efficacy in a HIV-positive population. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is an outpatient treatment for high-grade anal dysplasia. This retrospective clinical study reports on 68 HIV-positive MSM with 78 biopsy proven high-grade anal lesions. Each lesion was treated with the IRC with re-biopsy of the treatment site a mean of 140 days later. Of the 74 evaluable lesions; 39 had anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) 1, 20 had AIN 2, seven had AIN 3, and eight had normal epithelium. The IRC showed 64% efficacy per treated lesion and shows promise as a treatment modality for high-grade anal dysplasia in this population. PMID:18334066

  6. Development of an HIV Vaccine Attitudes Scale to Predict HIV Vaccine Acceptability among Vulnerable Populations: L.A. VOICES

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Newman, Peter A.; Duan, Naihua; Cunningham, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Decade-long delays in successful implementation of Hepatitis B vaccines and ongoing obstacles in HPV vaccine roll-out suggest the importance of an implementation science approach to prepare for the effective translation of future HIV vaccines from clinical trials into routine practice. The objective of this study wasto test HIV vaccine attitude items to develop reliable scales and to examine their association with HIV vaccine acceptability. Methods HIV vaccine attitude items were assessed as part of the L.A. VOICES survey, a large-scale study conducted among underserved residents of Los Angeles, to identify factors that may influence HIV vaccine acceptability. Participants (n=1,225) were randomly selected from public STD clinics, needle exchange sites and Latino community clinics using three-stage, venue-based time space sampling. Results Exploratory factor analysis across 20 items revealed four distinct factors—mistrust, HIV vaccine social concerns, risk compensation, and altruistic vaccination—with acceptable reliability coefficients for each subscale (Cronbach’s α range 0.61 – 0.84). We found no significant differences in reliability by gender or by vaccine acceptability. Risk compensation (Odds Ratio (OR) =1.49; 95% CI=[1.18, 1.89]; p=0.001) and altruistic vaccination (OR=1.40; 95% CI=[1.14, 1.71]; p=0.001) were significantly and positively associated with HIV vaccine acceptability. Conclusions We identified four HIV vaccine attitude scales with sound internal reliability parameters. In the aftermath of the first candidate vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against HIV infection, these scales may be helpful in bridging expectable research-to-practice gaps in future HIV vaccine dissemination among populations at risk. As HIV vaccine trials progress in the United States and globally, these measures also may be useful as a tool to assess and facilitate effective responses to community concerns about HIV vaccine trials and to target interventions

  7. Rapid HIV-1 Disease Progression in Individuals Infected with a Virus Adapted to Its Host Population

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Akihisa; Zhu, Dayong; Han, Chungyong; Nakamura, Hitomi; Koga, Michiko; Kikuchi, Tadashi; Adachi, Eisuke; Koibuchi, Tomohiko; Gao, George F.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Iwamoto, Aikichi

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 escape from CTL is predictable based on the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) class I alleles expressed by the host. As such, HIV-1 sequences circulating in a population of hosts will harbor escape mutations specific to the HLA alleles of that population. In theory, this should increase the frequency of escape mutation transmission to persons expressing the restricting HLA allele, thereby compromising host immunity to the incoming HIV-1 strain. However, the clinical impact of infection with HIV-1 containing immune escape mutations has not conclusively been demonstrated. Japan’s population features limited HLA diversity which is driving population-level HIV adaptation: for example, >60% of Japanese express HLA-A*24:02 and its associated Nef-Y135F escape mutation represents the population consensus. As such, Japan is an ideal population in which to examine this phenomenon. Here, we combine genetic and immunological analyses to identify A*24:02-positive individuals likely to have been infected with Y135F-containing HIV-1. Over a ~5 year follow-up, these individuals exhibited significantly lower CD4 counts compared to individuals inferred to have been infected with wild-type HIV-1. Our results support a significant negative clinical impact of pathogen adaptation to host pressures at the population level. PMID:26953793

  8. Prevalence of and risk factors for HIV infection in blood donors and various population subgroups in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sentjens, R E J H; Sisay, Y; Vrielink, H; Kebede, D; Adèr, H J; Leckie, G; Reesink, H W

    2002-04-01

    The aim was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection and risk factors for HIV infection in various population subgroups in Ethiopia. Serum panels from blood donors (n = 2610), from various population subgroups in Ethiopia were tested for anti-HIV-1/2 by ELISA. All ELISA repeatedly reactive samples were subjected for confirmation by immunoblot (IB) and anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 specific ELISAs. 155/2610 (5.9%) blood donors were HIV-1 infected. Of pregnant women, 84/797 (10.5%) were HIV-1 infected, and 1/797 (0.1%) was HIV-2 infected. 1/240 (0.4%) individuals from the rural population were HIV-1 infected. 198/480 (41.3%) female attendees, and 106/419 (25.3%) male attendees at sexual transmitted disease (STD) clinics were HIV-1 infected. One (0.2%) male, and 2 (0.4%) female STD patients were infected with both HIV-1 and HIV-2. It was concluded that the prevalence of HIV-1 infection varied from 0.4% among urban residents to 25.3-41.3% among STD attendees. There is a low prevalence of HIV-2 present in Ethiopian subjects. Risky sexual behaviour is significantly associated with HIV-infection in Ethiopia. PMID:12002540

  9. Short communication: feasibility and acceptability of developing a multisite clinical cohort of transgender people with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Poteat, Tonia C; Hanna, David B; Althoff, Keri N

    2015-09-01

    Transgender women bear a disproportionate burden of HIV, yet data among this population are not routinely collected in HIV clinical cohorts. Brief surveys and follow-up qualitative interviews were conducted with principal investigators or designated representatives of 17 HIV clinical cohorts to determine the acceptability and feasibility of pooling transgender-specific data from existing HIV clinical cohort studies. Twelve of 17 sites reported that they already collect gender identity data but not consistently. Others were receptive to collecting this information. Many also expressed interest in a study of clinical outcomes among HIV-infected transgender women using pooled data across cohorts. The collection of longitudinal data on transgender people living with HIV is acceptable and feasible for most North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) cohorts. HIV clinical cohort studies should make efforts to include transgender individuals and develop the tools to collect quality data on this high-need population. PMID:26126154

  10. Virology, Immunology, and Clinical Course of HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCutchan, J. Allen

    1990-01-01

    Presents overview of medical aspects of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) disease. Addresses structure and replication of virus, current methods for detecting HIV-1 in infected persons, effects of the virus on immune system, and clinical course of HIV-1 disease. Emphasizes variable causes of progression through HIV-1 infection stages;…

  11. Sexually Transmitted Infections Among HIV-Infected Adults in HIV Care Programs in Kenya: A National Sample of HIV Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Singa, Benson; Glick, Sara Nelson; Bock, Naomi; Walson, Judd; Chaba, Linda; Odek, James; McClelland, R. Scott; Djomand, Gaston; Gao, Hongjiang; John-Stewart, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying sexually transmitted infections (STI) in HIV-infected individuals has potential to benefit individual and public health. There are few guidelines regarding routine STI screening in sub-Saharan African HIV programs. We determined sexual risk behavior and prevalence and correlates of STI in a national survey of large HIV treatment programs in Kenya. Methods A mobile screening team visited 39 (95%) of the 42 largest HIV care programs in Kenya and enrolled participants using population-proportionate systematic sampling. Participants provided behavioral and clinical data. Genital and blood specimens were tested for trichomoniasis, gonorrhea, chlamydia, syphilis, and CD4 T-lymphocyte counts. Results Among 1661 adults, 41% reported no sexual partners in the past 3 months. Among those who reported sex in the past 3 months, 63% of women reported condom use during this encounter compared with 77% of men (P < 0.001). Trichomoniasis was the most common STI in women (10.9%) and men (2.8%); prevalences of gonorrhea, chlamydia, and syphilis were low (<1%–2%). Among women, younger age (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.96 per year; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.94–0.98) and primary school education or lower level (adjusted OR, 2.16; 95% CI, 1.37–3.40) were independently associated with trichomoniasis, whereas CD4 count, cotrimoxazole use, and reported condom use were not. Reported condom use at last sex was associated with reporting that the clinic provided condoms among both women (OR, 1.7; 95% CI, 1.17–2.35) and men (OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.18–4.82). Conclusions Women attending Kenyan HIV care programs had a 10.9% prevalence of trichomoniasis, suggesting that screening for this infection may be useful. Condom provision at clinics may enhance secondary HIV prevention efforts. PMID:23324977

  12. National population based HIV prevalence surveys in sub‐Saharan Africa: results and implications for HIV and AIDS estimates

    PubMed Central

    García‐Calleja, J M; Gouws, E; Ghys, P D

    2006-01-01

    Background Sentinel surveillance among pregnant women attending antenatal clinics (ANCs) has been the main source of information on HIV trends in sub‐Saharan Africa. These data have also been used to generate national HIV and AIDS estimates. New technologies and resources have allowed many countries to conduct national population based surveys that include HIV prevalence measurement, as an additional source of information on the AIDS epidemic. Methods The authors reviewed the reports of 20 national population based surveys from 19 countries carried out in sub‐Saharan Africa since 2001. They examined the sampling methodology, HIV testing and response rates, and female:male and urban:rural prevalence ratios. They also constructed adjusted prevalence scenarios assuming different relative risks for survey non‐responders. Results The national population based surveys vary considerably in quality, as reflected in the household response rate (ranging from 75.4% to 99.7%), women's testing rate (ranging from 68.2% to 97.3%), and men's testing rate (ranging from 62.2% to 95.4%), while for some surveys detailed response information is lacking. While 95% confidence intervals around the female:male and urban:rural prevalence ratios in individual countries are large, the median female:male ratio of the combined set of surveys results is 1.5 and the median urban:rural ratio 1.7. A scenario assuming that non‐responders have twice the HIV prevalence of those who fully participated in the survey suggests that individual non‐response could result in an adjusted HIV prevalence 1.03 to 1.34 times higher than the observed prevalence. Conclusions Population based surveys can provide useful information on HIV prevalence levels and distribution. This information is being used to improve national HIV and AIDS estimates. Further refinements in data collection, analysis, and reporting, combined with high participation rates, can further improve HIV and AIDS estimates at national and

  13. Clinical and Virological Efficacy of Etravirine Plus Two Active Nucleos(t)ide Analogs in an Heterogeneous HIV-Infected Population

    PubMed Central

    López-Cortés, Luis F.; Viciana, Pompeyo; Girón-González, José A.; Romero-Palacios, Alberto; Márquez-Solero, Manuel; Martinez-Perez, Maria A.; López-Ruz, Miguel A.; de la Torre-Lima, Javier; Téllez-Pérez, Francisco; Delgado-Fernández, Marcial; Garcia-Lázaro, Milagros; Lozano, Fernando; Mohamed-Balghata, Mohamed O.

    2014-01-01

    Etravirine (ETV) is recommended in combination with a boosted protease inhibitor plus an optimized background regimen for salvage therapy, but there is limited experience with its use in combination with two nucleos(t)ide reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). This multicenter study aimed to assess the efficacy of this combination in two scenarios: group A) subjects without virologic failure on or no experience with non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) switched due to adverse events and group B) subjects switched after a virologic failure on an efavirenz- or nevirapine-based regimen. The primary endpoint was efficacy at 52 weeks analysed by intention-to-treat. Virologic failure was defined as the inability to suppress plasma HIV-RNA to <50 copies/mL after 24 weeks on treatment, or a confirmed viral load >200 copies/mL in patients who had previously achieved a viral suppression or had an undetectable viral load at inclusion. Two hundred eighty seven patients were included. Treatment efficacy rates in group A and B were 88.0% (CI95, 83.9–92.1%) and 77.4% (CI95, 65.0–89.7%), respectively; the rates reached 97.2% (CI95, 95.1–99.3%) and 90.5% (CI95, 81.7–99.3), by on-treatment analysis. The once-a-day ETV treatment was as effective as the twice daily dosing regimen. Grade 1–2 adverse events were observed motivating a treatment switch in 4.2% of the subjects. In conclusion, ETV (once- or twice daily) plus two analogs is a suitable, well-tolerated combination both as a switching strategy and after failure with first generation NNRTIs, ensuring full drug activity. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01437241 PMID:24836963

  14. The utility of population-based surveys to describe the continuum of HIV services for key and general populations.

    PubMed

    Hladik, Wolfgang; Benech, Irene; Bateganya, Moses; Hakim, Avi J

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring the cascade or continuum of HIV services - ranging from outreach services to anti-retroviral treatment - has become increasingly important as the focus in prevention moves toward biomedical interventions, in particular, 'Treatment as Prevention.' The HIV continuum typically utilises clinic-based care and treatment monitoring data and helps identify gaps and inform programme improvements. This paper discusses the merits of a population-based survey-informed continuum of services. Surveys provide individual-level, population-based data by sampling persons both in and outside the continuum, which facilitate the estimation of population fractions, such as the proportion of people living with HIV in care, as well as the examination of determinants for being in or outside the continuum. Survey-informed cascades of services may especially benefit key populations at increased risk for HIV infection for who social marginalisation, criminalisation, and stigma result in barriers to access and retention in services, a low social visibility, mobility, and outreach-based services can compromise clinic-based monitoring. Adding CD4+ T-cell count and viral load measurements to such surveys may provide population-level information on viral load suppression, stage of disease, treatment needs, and population-level transmission potential. While routine clinic-based reporting will remain the mainstay of monitoring, a survey-informed service cascade can address some of its limitations and offer additional insights. PMID:25907348

  15. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  16. “Youth friendly” clinics: Considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Amanda E.; Philbin, Morgan M.; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J. Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents’ unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how “youth friendly” clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics’ physical environment; and (3) clinics’ social environment. Working to create ‘youth friendly’ clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents’ unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth. PMID:23782040

  17. Disrupted Brain Networks in the Aging HIV+ Population

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Valcour, Victor G.; Nir, Talia M.; Kohannim, Omid; Busovaca, Edgar; Nicolas, Krista

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral therapies have become widely available, and as a result, individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer, and becoming integrated into the geriatric population. Around half of the HIV+ population shows some degree of cognitive impairment, but it is unknown how their neural networks and brain connectivity compare to those of noninfected people. Here we combined magnetic resonance imaging-based cortical parcellations with high angular resolution diffusion tensor imaging tractography in 55 HIV-seropositive patients and 30 age-matched controls, to map white matter connections between cortical regions. We set out to determine selective virus-associated disruptions in the brain's structural network. All individuals in this study were aged 60–80, with full access to antiretroviral therapy. Frontal and motor connections were compromised in HIV+ individuals. HIV+ people who carried the apolipoprotein E4 allele (ApoE4) genotype—which puts them at even greater risk for neurodegeneration—showed additional network structure deficits in temporal and parietal connections. The ApoE4 genotype interacted with duration of illness. Carriers showed greater brain network inefficiencies the longer they were infected. Neural network deficiencies in HIV+ populations exceed those typical of normal aging, and are worse in those genetically predisposed to brain degeneration. This work isolates neuropathological alterations in HIV+ elders, even when treated with antiretroviral therapy. Network impairments may contribute to the neuropsychological abnormalities in elderly HIV patients, who will soon account for around half of all HIV+ adults. PMID:23240599

  18. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eric M.; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. Objectives To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Study design Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd-or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Results Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. Conclusions The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. PMID:24342468

  19. HIV epidemiology. The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations.

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno R; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A; Baele, Guy; Bedford, Trevor; Ward, Melissa J; Tatem, Andrew J; Sousa, João D; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Pépin, Jacques; Posada, David; Peeters, Martine; Pybus, Oliver G; Lemey, Philippe

    2014-10-01

    Thirty years after the discovery of HIV-1, the early transmission, dissemination, and establishment of the virus in human populations remain unclear. Using statistical approaches applied to HIV-1 sequence data from central Africa, we show that from the 1920s Kinshasa (in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo) was the focus of early transmission and the source of pre-1960 pandemic viruses elsewhere. Location and dating estimates were validated using the earliest HIV-1 archival sample, also from Kinshasa. The epidemic histories of HIV-1 group M and nonpandemic group O were similar until ~1960, after which group M underwent an epidemiological transition and outpaced regional population growth. Our results reconstruct the early dynamics of HIV-1 and emphasize the role of social changes and transport networks in the establishment of this virus in human populations. PMID:25278604

  20. HIV epidemic among key populations in west Africa

    PubMed Central

    Djomand, Gaston; Quaye, Silas; Sullivan, Patrick S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, HIV infection remains a significant issue for key populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and female sex workers. A review of recent articles was conducted for west African countries to assess the burden of disease among female sex workers and MSM, access to services and identify barriers to implementation of services for key populations. Recent findings In west Africa, key populations engage in high-risk practices for the acquisition of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Available HIV prevalence data fluctuate across and within countries for both MSM and female sex workers and may be five to ten times as high as that of the general population. HIV prevalence varied from 15.9% in The Gambia to 68% in Benin among female sex workers, whereas it ranged from 9.8% in The Gambia to 34.9% in Nigeria for MSM. Yet, important data gaps exist, including key populations size estimations in several countries as well as HIV prevalence, incidence and other biomarkers of HIV risk. Because of sociocultural, legal, political and economic challenges, exacerbated by a poor health system infrastructure, the HIV response is not strategically directed toward programs for key populations in countries with concentrated epidemics. Noteworthy is the low coverage of prevention care and treatment interventions offered to key populations. Summary Sufficient planning and political will with legal and structural frameworks that reconcile public health and human rights are needed to prioritize HIV prevention, care and treatment programming for key populations programs in west Africa. PMID:25010898

  1. Routine HIV Screening in Portugal: Clinical Impact and Cost-Effectiveness

    PubMed Central

    Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Perelman, Julian; DiLorenzo, Madeline A.; Alves, Joana; Barros, Henrique; Mateus, Céu; Pereira, João; Mansinho, Kamal; Robine, Marion; Park, Ji-Eun; Ross, Eric L.; Losina, Elena; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Noubary, Farzad; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Paltiel, A. David

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of routine HIV screening in Portugal to the current practice of targeted and on-demand screening. Design We used Portuguese national clinical and economic data to conduct a model-based assessment. Methods We compared current HIV detection practices to strategies of increasingly frequent routine HIV screening in Portuguese adults aged 18-69. We considered several subpopulations and geographic regions with varying levels of undetected HIV prevalence and incidence. Baseline inputs for the national case included undiagnosed HIV prevalence 0.16%, annual incidence 0.03%, mean population age 43 years, mean CD4 count at care initiation 292 cells/μL, 63% HIV test acceptance, 78% linkage to care, and HIV rapid test cost €6 under the proposed routine screening program. Outcomes included quality-adjusted survival, secondary HIV transmission, cost, and incremental cost-effectiveness. Results One-time national HIV screening increased HIV-infected survival from 164.09 quality-adjusted life months (QALMs) to 166.83 QALMs compared to current practice and had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of €28,000 per quality-adjusted life year (QALY). Screening more frequently in higher-risk groups was cost-effective: for example screening annually in men who have sex with men or screening every three years in regions with higher incidence and prevalence produced ICERs of €21,000/QALY and €34,000/QALY, respectively. Conclusions One-time HIV screening in the Portuguese national population will increase survival and is cost-effective by international standards. More frequent screening in higher-risk regions and subpopulations is also justified. Given Portugal’s challenging economic priorities, we recommend prioritizing screening in higher-risk populations and geographic settings. PMID:24367639

  2. Transgender populations and HIV: unique risks, challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wansom, Tanyaporn; Guadamuz, Thomas E; Vasan, Sandhya

    2016-01-01

    Due to unique social, behavioural, structural and biological issues, transgender (TG) populations, especially TG women, are at high risk for HIV acquisition. This increased risk is multifactorial, due to differing psychosocial risk factors, poorer access to TG-specific healthcare, a higher likelihood of using exogenous hormones or fillers without direct medical supervision, interactions between hormonal therapy and antiretroviral therapy, and direct effects of hormonal therapy on HIV acquisition and immune control. Further research is needed to elucidate these mechanisms of risk and to help design interventions to reduce HIV risk among transgender populations. PMID:27482441

  3. Perception of HIV testing among attendees at an STD clinic in India.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, T; Gupte, M D; Mathai, A K; Boopathi, K; Dorairaj, V S

    2008-01-01

    This study reports perception of STD clinic attendees of Government General hospital, Chennai, India towards free HIV testing. All STD clinic attendees who were eligible for the study (511), from January to April 2001 formed the study subjects. In all, 362 (71%) subjects responded to the question on perception of risk in getting HIV/AIDS. Among them 36% perceived that they were at risk of getting infected with HIV. There was a significant difference (P=0.01) between the genders, as more males perceived risk of getting HIV than females and, with the increase in number of sexual partners in a lifetime there was an increasing trend (p<0.0001) in the perception of risk. There were 244 (55%) subjects willing for HIV testing. A significant difference between the genders (p<0.0001) was observed, as more females were willing to accept free HIV testing than males. When adjusting the effect of co-variates such as gender, age, marital status and perception of risk in getting HIV, persons having two or more sexual partners in their life time were four times more willing to be HIV tested than persons with one sexual partner (OR=4; p=0.001). The findings in this study will help optimize HIV testing in at risk patient populations in India. PMID:18278612

  4. Estimating HIV incidence among key affected populations in China from serial cross-sectional surveys in 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yan; Guo, Wei; Li, Dongmin; Wang, Liyan; Shi, Cynthia X; Brookmeyer, Ron; Detels, Roger; Ge, Lin; Ding, Zhengwei; Wu, Zunyou

    2016-01-01

    Introduction HIV incidence is an important measure for monitoring the development of the epidemic, but it is difficult to ascertain. We combined serial HIV prevalence and mortality data to estimate HIV incidence among key affected populations (KAPs) in China. Methods Serial cross-sectional surveys were conducted among KAPs from 2010 to 2014. Trends in HIV prevalence were assessed by the Cochran-Armitage test, adjusted by risk group. HIV incidence was estimated from a mathematical model that describes the relationship between changes in HIV incidence with HIV prevalence and mortality. Results The crude HIV prevalence for the survey samples remained stable at 1.1 to 1.2% from 2010 to 2014. Among drug users (DUs), HIV prevalence declined from 4.48 to 3.29% (p<0.0001), and among men who have sex with men (MSM), HIV prevalence increased from 5.73 to 7.75% (p<0.0001). Changes in HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs) and male patients of sexually transmitted disease clinics were more modest but remained statistically significant (all p<0.0001). The MSM population had the highest incidence estimates at 0.74% in 2011, 0.59% in 2012, 0.57% in 2013 and 0.53% in 2014. Estimates of the annual incidence for DUs and FSWs were very low and may not be reliable. Conclusions Serial cross-sectional prevalence data from representative samples may be another approach to construct approximate estimates of national HIV incidence among key populations. We observed that the MSM population had the highest incidence for HIV among high-risk groups in China, and we suggest that interventions targeting MSM are urgently needed to curb the growing HIV epidemic. PMID:26989062

  5. HIV testing, risk perception, and behaviour in the British population

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Soazig; Nardone, Anthony; Field, Nigel; Mercer, Catherine H.; Tanton, Clare; Macdowall, Wendy; Johnson, Anne M.; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between HIV risk behaviour, risk perception and testing in Britain. Design: A probability sample survey of the British population. Methods: We analyzed data on sexual behaviour, self-perceived HIV risk and HIV testing (excluding testing because of blood donation) from 13 751 sexually experienced men and women aged 16–74, interviewed between 2010 and 2012 using computer-assisted face-to-face and self-interviewing. Results: Altogether, 3.5% of men and 5.4% of women reported having an HIV test in the past year. Higher perceived risk of HIV was associated with sexual risk behaviours and with HIV testing. However, the majority of those rating themselves as ‘greatly’ or ‘quite a lot’ at risk of HIV (3.4% of men, 2.5% of women) had not tested in the past year. This was also found among the groups most affected by HIV: MSM and black Africans. Within these groups, the majority reporting sexual risk behaviours did not perceive themselves as at risk and had not tested for HIV. Overall, 29.6% of men and 39.9% of women who tested for HIV in the past year could be classified as low risk across a range of measures. Conclusion: Most people who perceive themselves as at risk of HIV have not recently tested, including among MSM and black Africans. Many people tested in Britain are at low risk, reflecting current policy that aims to normalize testing. Strategies to further improve uptake of testing are needed, particularly in those at greatest risk, to further reduce undiagnosed HIV infection at late diagnoses. PMID:26963528

  6. HIV-associated adult mortality in a rural Tanzanian population.

    PubMed

    Todd, J; Balira, R; Grosskurth, H; Mayaud, P; Mosha, F; ka-Gina, G; Klokke, A; Gabone, R; Gavyole, A; Mabey, D; Hayes, R

    1997-05-01

    A cohort of 12,501 adults aged 15-54 years was randomly selected from 12 rural communities in Mwanza region, Tanzania, in 1991-92 and followed for 2 years to assess the contribution of HIV/AIDS to mortality in the region. HIV seroprevalence in the sample was 4% at baseline. 73 of the 196 deaths recorded over the period occurred among HIV-positive individuals. Mortality rates per 1000 person-years were 6.0 among the HIV-seronegative and 93.5 among the HIV-seropositive. The age-adjusted mortality rate ratio was 15.68 overall. 35% of overall mortality was attributed to HIV infection, 53% among those age 20-29 years. Verbal autopsies administered for each death reported showed that HIV-positive deaths were significantly associated with fever, rash, weight loss, anemia, cough, chest pain, abdominal pain, and headache. The specificity of individual symptoms, however, was low. The World Health Organization clinical case definition of AIDS was satisfied for only 13 deaths, of which seven were HIV-positive at baseline. HIV/AIDS was mentioned during the verbal autopsy interview by only seven respondents as being associated with a given death. PMID:9143613

  7. Enrollment of racial/ethnic minorities and women with HIV in clinical research studies of HIV medicines.

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Patrick S.; McNaghten, A. D.; Begley, Elin; Hutchinson, Angela; Cargill, Victoria A.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Inclusion of women and racial/ethnic minorities is a requirement for federally supported clinical research, but data on clinical research participation from women and racial/ethnic minorities with HIV are few. To describe participation in clinical research of HIV medicines among women and racial/ethnic minorities, and associated factors, we used data from a cross-sectional behavioral surveillance interview project conducted in 15 U.S. states. METHODS: Data were from 6,892 persons living with HIV infection, recruited in facilities in seven U.S. states and using population-based methods in eight other states, between 2000-2004. We calculated self-reported participation in a clinical research study of HIV medicines, factors associated with self-reported study participation among men and women, and reasons for not participating in a study among nonparticipants. MAIN FINDINGS: Overall, 17% of respondents had ever participated in a clinical research study. For men, the odds of participation were lower for black or Hispanic men (versus white men) and were higher for men whose risk for HIV infection was male-male sex (versus men with male-female sex risk) and for men with AIDS. For men who had not participated in a study, black men were more likely than white men to report not participating in a study because they were unaware of available studies or were not offered enrollment (75% vs. 69%), and because they did not want to be a "guinea pig" (11% vs. 8%). Among women, participation was not associated with race/ethnicity or risk for HIV infection but was associated with living in an area with an NIH- or CDC- supported clinical research network. HIV-infected women were more likely than HIV-infected men with comparable modes of HIV acquisition to have participated in a study. CONCLUSIONS: Among persons with HIV interviewed in these 15 states, self-reported participation in clinical research studies was higher among women than men, but racial/ethnic minority men were

  8. Target population for clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Studenski, S

    2016-01-01

    The target population for clinical trials aimed at sarcopenia depends on the goals of treatment and the expected natural history of sarcopenia. Based on a natural history where loss of muscle mass and/or quality leads to loss of strength, and eventually to reduced mobility and functional dependence, treatment goals can be defined for both preventive and therapeutic interventions. For example, a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength could be treated to prevent the onset of mobility disability, or a target population with low muscle mass and poor strength with mobility disability could be treated therapeutically to improve mobility. Eligibility for a trial should also be based on careful consideration of factors that affect 1) the ability to respond to treatment, 2) the safety of treatment, 3) expected prevalence and 4) feasibility. PMID:19657558

  9. Nearly Full Employment Recovery Among South African HIV Patients On Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence From A Large Population Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Bor, Jacob; Tanser, Frank; Newell, Marie-Louise; Bärnighausen, Till

    2013-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy for HIV may have important economic benefits for patients and their households. We quantified the impact of HIV treatment on employment status among HIV patients in rural South Africa who were enrolled in a public-sector HIV treatment program supported by the U.S. President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief. We linked clinical data from more than 2000 patients in the treatment program with ten years of longitudinal socioeconomic data from a complete community-based population cohort of over 30,000 adults residing in the clinical catchment area. We estimated the employment effects of HIV treatment in fixed effects regressions. Four years after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, employment among HIV patients had recovered to about 90 percent of baseline rates observed in the same patients three to five years before they started treatment. Many patients initiated treatment early enough that they were able to avoid any loss of employment due to HIV. These results represent the first estimates of employment recovery among HIV patients in a general population, relative to the employment levels that these patients had prior to job-threatening illness and the decision to seek care. We find large economic benefits to HIV treatment. For some patients, further gains could be obtained from initiating antiretroviral therapy earlier, prior to HIV-related job loss. PMID:22778335

  10. Population Pharmacokinetics of Boosted-Elvitegravir in HIV-Infected Patients.

    PubMed

    Custodio, Joseph M; Gordi, Toufigh; Zhong, Lijie; Ling, Kah Hiing J; Ramanathan, Srini

    2016-06-01

    Elvitegravir (EVG) is an HIV strand transfer integrase inhibitor approved for the treatment of HIV infection as a part of antiretroviral regimens containing cobicistat (COBI) or ritonavir (RTV) as a booster. The population pharmacokinetics of EVG in treatment-naive and -experienced HIV patients was determined, and the effects of demographic, biometric, and formulation covariates on EVG pharmacokinetics (PK) were evaluated. Data from 31 clinical studies (25 in healthy subjects, 6 phase 1b to phase 3 in HIV-1-infected patients) with COBI-boosted EVG studies (as EVG/co or EVG/COBI/FTC/TDF single-tablet regimen) or RTV-boosted EVG studies (EVG/r) were analyzed using NONMEM. The effect of the covariates age, sex, race, health status (healthy volunteers vs HIV patients), weight, body mass index (BMI), body surface area (BSA), creatinine clearance (estimated GFR), and formulation were evaluated. EVG PK, with COBI or RTV, was described by a 2-compartment model, with first-order absorption and elimination and an absorption lag time. A statistically significant, but not clinically relevant, effect of BSA on EVG clearance (CL) was observed. Coadministration of atazanavir or lopinavir with EVG/r had an effect on EVG CL consistent with the known interaction with these agents. No other covariate had a meaningful effect on EVG PK. EVG PK was well described in a population PK model with HIV-infected patients, with low PK variability and no relevant effect of demographic or biometric covariates. PMID:26449283

  11. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  12. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations AGENCY: Centers for Disease Control and... Affected Populations''. Additional funding from the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act has been... (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations'' to make awards to state and county...

  13. Development and implementation of collaborative care for depression in HIV clinics.

    PubMed

    Curran, Geoffrey M; Pyne, Jeffrey; Fortney, John C; Gifford, Allen; Asch, Stephen M; Rimland, David; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria; Monson, Thomas P; Kilbourne, Amy M; Hagedorn, Hilde; Atkinson, Joseph H

    2011-12-01

    We sought to develop and implement collaborative depression care in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics in a project called HIV Translating Initiatives for Depression into Effective Solutions (HITIDES). Here we describe: (i) the formative evaluation (FE) conducted prior to implementation; (ii) the process used to adapt the primary care collaborative care model for depression to specialty HIV clinics; and (iii) the intervention itself. The overall design of HITIDES was a multi-site randomized trial in United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) HIV clinics comparing the depression collaborative care intervention to usual depression care. Qualitative methods were used for the FEs and informed the evidence-based quality improvement (EBQI) methods that were used for adapting and implementing the intervention. Baseline assessments were completed by 249 depressed HIV participants. Summaries of respective key informant interviews with eight HIV patients who were receiving depression treatment and 25 HIV or mental health (MH) providers were presented to each site. EBQI methods were used to tailor the HITIDES intervention to each site while maintaining true to the evidence base for depression collaborative care. EBQI methods provided a useful framework for intervention adaptation and implementation. The HITIDES study provides the opportunity to evaluate collaborative depression care in a specialty physical health clinic setting with a population that has a high prevalence of depression and MH comorbidity. PMID:21714689

  14. HIV, Sexual Violence and Special Populations: Adolescence and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Madan, Rebecca Pellett; Herold, Betsy C.

    2013-01-01

    The risk of male to female transmission of HIV is impacted by baseline inflammation in the female genital tract, semen viral load and seminal plasma’s ability to induce specific patterns of cervical cytokine signalling and influx of immune cell populations. Disruption of the epithelial barrier during non-consensual intercourse may trigger further inflammation and initiation of cell-signalling pathways, thus facilitating transmission of HIV and expansion of local infection. Adolescent and pregnant women are at high risk for sexual violence and may exhibit alterations of genital mucosal immunity that promote immune activation, making them uniquely vulnerable to HIV acquisition. PMID:23176128

  15. Anonymous HIV testing in the Canadian aboriginal population.

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, A. L.

    1996-01-01

    Reported numbers of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome cases among Canadian aboriginal peoples are currently relatively low. However, any increase in these numbers could have devastating human, social, and economic costs. Education and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus transmission are the most efficient and cost-effective measures available today. This paper discusses the role of anonymous HIV testing in effective HIV prevention in the Canadian aboriginal population. PMID:8828876

  16. Considerations for a Human Rights Impact Assessment of a Population Wide Treatment for HIV Prevention Intervention.

    PubMed

    Hanefeld, Johanna; Bond, Virginia; Seeley, Janet; Lees, Shelley; Desmond, Nicola

    2015-12-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the potential of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) for HIV prevention. The possibility of eliminating HIV from a population through a universal test and treat intervention, where all people within a population are tested for HIV and all positive people immediately initiated on ART, as part of a wider prevention intervention, was first proposed in 2009. Several clinical trials testing this idea are now in inception phase. An intervention which relies on universally testing the entire population for HIV will pose challenges to human rights, including obtaining genuine consent to testing and treatment. It also requires a context in which people can live free from fear of stigma, discrimination and violence, and can access services they require. These challenges are distinct from the field of medical ethics which has traditionally governed clinical trials and focuses primarily on patient researcher relationship. This paper sets out the potential impact of a population wide treatment as prevention intervention on human rights. It identifies five human right principles of particular relevance: participation, accountability, the right to health, non-discrimination and equality, and consent and confidentiality. The paper proposes that explicit attention to human rights can strengthen a treatment as prevention intervention, contribute to mediating likely health systems challenges and offer insights on how to reach all sections of the population. PMID:26524615

  17. Community-Based HIV Clinical Trials: An Integrated Approach in Underserved, Rural, Minority Communities

    PubMed Central

    Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Isler, Malika Roman; Miles, Margaret Shandor; Banks, Bahby

    2013-01-01

    Background Although racial and ethnic minorities have disproportionately high rates of HIV infection, these groups are underrepresented in HIV-related clinical trials. This illustrates the need for more innovation in attempts to engage underrepresented populations in calls for interdisciplinary and translational research. Objectives Eleven focus groups and 35 interviews were conducted with people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) to explore the perspectives of rural community leaders, service providers, and PLWHA about bringing HIV-related research, including clinical trials, into rural communities. Methods Over a period of 3 months in spring 2007, we collected qualitative data from three sources: Community leaders, service providers, and PLWHA. Text data were analyzed using the constant comparative method and content analysis techniques of theme identification. Results Respondents want an integrated approach to HIV research that builds trust, meets community needs, and respects their values. They conceptualize HIV research as part of a broader spectrum of HIV testing, prevention, and care, and suggest integrating HIV trials with existing community services, organizations, and structures, engaging various segments of the community, and conducting research using a personal approach. Conclusions These findings support calls for more relevant, translational, and engaged research. An integrated approach may be an important innovation to transform the research enterprise to meet these goals and more directly improve the health of individuals. PMID:22820222

  18. Barriers and Facilitators to Engagement of Vulnerable Populations in HIV Primary Care in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Remien, Robert H.; Bauman, Laurie J.; Mantell, Joanne; Tsoi, Benjamin; Lopez-Rios, Javier; Chhabra, Rosy; DiCarlo, Abby; Watnick, Dana; Rivera, Angelic; Teitelman, Nehama; Cutler, Blayne; Warne, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Engagement in HIV care helps to maximize viral suppression, which, in turn, reduces morbidity and mortality and prevents further HIV transmission. With more HIV cases than any other US city, New York City reported in 2012 that only 41% of all persons estimated to be living with HIV (PLWH) had a suppressed viral load, while nearly three-quarters of those in clinical care achieved viral suppression. Thus, retaining PLWH in HIV care addresses this central goal of both the US National HIV/AIDS Strategy and Governor Cuomo's plan to end the AIDS epidemic in New York State. Methods We conducted 80 in-depth qualitative interviews with PLWH in four NYC populations that were identified as being inconsistently engaged in HIV medical care: African immigrants, previously incarcerated adults, transgender women, and young men who have sex with men. Results Barriers to and facilitators of HIV care engagement fell into three domains: (1) system factors (e.g., patient-provider relationship, social service agencies, transitions between penal system and community); (2) social factors (e.g., family and other social support; stigma related to HIV, substance use, sexual orientation, gender identity, and incarceration); and (3) individual factors (e.g., mental illness, substance use, resilience). Similarities and differences in these themes across the four populations as well as research and public health implications were identified. Conclusions Engagement in care is maximized when the social challenges confronted by vulnerable groups are addressed; patient-provider communication is strong; and coordinated services are available, including housing, mental health and substance use treatment, and peer navigation. PMID:25867774

  19. Chronic pain disorders in HIV primary care: clinical characteristics and association with healthcare utilization.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jocelyn M; So, Eric; Jebakumar, Jebakaran; George, Mary Catherine; Simpson, David M; Robinson-Papp, Jessica

    2016-04-01

    Chronic pain is common in HIV, but incompletely characterized, including its underlying etiologies, its effect on healthcare utilization, and the characteristics of affected patients in the HIV primary care setting. These data are needed to design and justify appropriate clinic-based pain management services. Using a clinical data warehouse, we analyzed one year of data from 638 patients receiving standard-of-care antiretroviral therapy in a large primary care HIV clinic, located in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City. We found that 40% of patients carried one or more chronic pain diagnoses. The most common diagnoses were degenerative musculoskeletal disorders (eg, degenerative spinal disease and osteoarthritis), followed by neuropathic pain and headache disorders. Many patients (16%) had multiple chronic pain diagnoses. Women, older patients, and patients with greater burdens of medical illness, and psychiatric and substance use comorbidities were disproportionately represented among those with chronic pain diagnoses. Controlling for overall health status, HIV patients with chronic pain had greater healthcare utilization including emergency department visits and radiology procedures. In summary, our study demonstrates the high prevalence of chronic pain disorders in the primary care HIV clinic. Colocated interventions for chronic pain in this setting should not only focus on musculoskeletal pain but also account for complex multifaceted pain syndromes, and address the unique biopsychosocial features of this population. Furthermore, because chronic pain is prevalent in HIV and associated with increased healthcare utilization, developing clinic-based pain management programs could be cost-effective. PMID:26683238

  20. HIV care for geographically mobile populations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Barbara S; Garduño, L Sergio; Reyes, Emily V; Valiño, Raziel; Rojas, Rita; Donastorg, Yeycy; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between geographic mobility and risk for human immunodeficiency virus infection is well recognized, but what happens to those same individuals, once infected, as they transition to living with the infection? Does mobility affect their transition into medical care? If so, do mobile and nonmobile populations achieve similar success with antiretroviral treatment? The definition of mobility has changed over the centuries to encompass a complex phenotype including permanent migration, frequent travel, circular migration, and travel to and from treatment centers. The heterogeneity of these definitions leads to discordant findings. Investigations show that mobility has an impact on infection risk, but fewer data exist on the impact of geographic mobility on medical care and treatment outcomes. This review will examine existing data regarding the impact of geographic mobility on access to and maintenance in medical care and on adherence to antiretroviral therapy for those living with human immunodeficiency virus infection. It will also expand the concept of mobility to include data on the impact of the distance from residence to clinic on medical care and treatment adherence. Our conclusions are that the existing literature is limited by varying definitions of mobility and the inherent oversimplification necessary to apply a "mobility measure" in a statistical analysis. The impact of mobility on antiretroviral treatment outcomes deserves further exploration to both define the phenomenon and target interventions to these at-risk populations. PMID:21598261

  1. Herpes Zoster as a Predictor of HIV Infection in Taiwan: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yuan-Ti; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Tantoh, Disline Manli; Huang, Jing-Yang; Ku, Wen-Yuan; Hsu, Shu-Yi; Ko, Pei-Chieh; Hung, Hung-Chang; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the association between herpes zoster (HZ) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Data were retrieved from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Databases (LHID 2005 and 2010), Taiwan. The International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-9-CM] codes were used to identify Hz from 2001–2004. Identification of HIV infection was from 2005–2010. The hazard ratios of HIV among herpes zoster infected and non-herpes zoster infected patients were estimated using multiple Cox proportional hazard model. In general, 19685 participants were identified with Hz. The HIV incidence rates (per 104 person-months) in herpes zoster infected and non-infected patients were 0.191(95% CI 0.130–0.280) and 0.079 (95% CI 0.074–0.084), respectively while the hazard ratio (HR) of HIV among infected individuals was 3.518 (95% CI 2.375–5.211). This study concludes that herpes zoster could be considered as a predictor of HIV infection especially among Asian populations, hence it is vital to test herpes zoster infected individuals for HIV antibodies. PMID:26535574

  2. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma revealing clinically unsuspected HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Marques, Silvio Alencar; Abbade, Luciana P Fernandes; Guiotoku, Marcelo Massaki; Marques, Mariangela Esther Alencar

    2016-01-01

    Plasmablastic lymphoma is a rare subtype of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma more frequently diagnosed in immunosuppressed patients, mainly HIV-infected. Primary cutaneous plasmablastic lymphoma is extremely rare, and in this patient it was the first clinical manifestation of unsuspected HIV-infection. PMID:27579749

  3. HIV-1 transmission linkage in an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial

    SciTech Connect

    Leitner, Thomas; Campbell, Mary S; Mullins, James I; Hughes, James P; Wong, Kim G; Raugi, Dana N; Scrensen, Stefanie

    2009-01-01

    HIV-1 sequencing has been used extensively in epidemiologic and forensic studies to investigate patterns of HIV-1 transmission. However, the criteria for establishing genetic linkage between HIV-1 strains in HIV-1 prevention trials have not been formalized. The Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study (ClinicaITrials.gov NCT00194519) enrolled 3408 HIV-1 serodiscordant heterosexual African couples to determine the efficacy of genital herpes suppression with acyclovir in reducing HIV-1 transmission. The trial analysis required laboratory confirmation of HIV-1 linkage between enrolled partners in couples in which seroconversion occurred. Here we describe the process and results from HIV-1 sequencing studies used to perform transmission linkage determination in this clinical trial. Consensus Sanger sequencing of env (C2-V3-C3) and gag (p17-p24) genes was performed on plasma HIV-1 RNA from both partners within 3 months of seroconversion; env single molecule or pyrosequencing was also performed in some cases. For linkage, we required monophyletic clustering between HIV-1 sequences in the transmitting and seroconverting partners, and developed a Bayesian algorithm using genetic distances to evaluate the posterior probability of linkage of participants sequences. Adjudicators classified transmissions as linked, unlinked, or indeterminate. Among 151 seroconversion events, we found 108 (71.5%) linked, 40 (26.5%) unlinked, and 3 (2.0%) to have indeterminate transmissions. Nine (8.3%) were linked by consensus gag sequencing only and 8 (7.4%) required deep sequencing of env. In this first use of HIV-1 sequencing to establish endpoints in a large clinical trial, more than one-fourth of transmissions were unlinked to the enrolled partner, illustrating the relevance of these methods in the design of future HIV-1 prevention trials in serodiscordant couples. A hierarchy of sequencing techniques, analysis methods, and expert adjudication contributed to the linkage

  4. HIV prevalence and sexual behaviour changes measured in an antenatal clinic setting in northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Urassa, M; Kumogola, Y; Isingo, R; Mwaluko, G; Makelemo, B; Mugeye, K; Boerma, T; Calleja, T; Slaymaker, E; Zaba, B

    2006-01-01

    Objectives To assess the feasibility of collecting sexual behaviour data during HIV surveillance in antenatal care (ANC) clinics, and to establish whether these data can provide information about the correlates of HIV infection in this population. Methods Sexual behaviour surveys were conducted in the context of two HIV sentinel surveillance rounds in 11 ANC clinics in north west Tanzania between 2000 and 2002. Responses of individual women were anonymously linked to their HIV status. Three clinic catchment areas overlapped with a community based longitudinal study, which provided independent estimates of HIV prevalence and sexual behaviour. Changes between rounds and differentials between clinics were assessed and a two level logistic regression model used to identify behavioural and contextual correlates of HIV in 3689 women under 25 years of age. Results Women attending clinics were willing to participate in the study. The sexual behaviour data obtained were internally consistent and tallied reasonably well with sexual behaviour data collected in the community overlapping the clinic catchment. Clear relations emerged between HIV infection and measures of sexual exposure: OR 1.20 (95% CL 1.12 to 1.28) for each year of premarital exposure and 1.09 (1.04 to 1.16) for each year after first marriage; background prevalence OR 1.15 (1.04 to 1.26) associated with each percentage point increase in background prevalence at the clinic; and certain partnership variables such as partner's age OR 0.58 (0.45 to 0.76) if partner less than 10 years older. Conclusion Conducting sexual behaviour surveys in the context of ANC clinics surveillance is feasible and yields useful data. PMID:16877579

  5. Impact of HLA-driven HIV adaptation on virulence in populations of high HIV seroprevalence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Rebecca; Muenchhoff, Maximilian; Mann, Jaclyn; Roberts, Hannah E.; Matthews, Philippa; Adland, Emily; Hempenstall, Allison; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang; Brockman, Mark; Brumme, Zabrina; Sinclair, Marc; Miura, Toshiyuki; Frater, John; Essex, Myron; Shapiro, Roger; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung’u, Thumbi; McLean, Angela R.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Goulder, Philip J. R.

    2014-01-01

    It is widely believed that epidemics in new hosts diminish in virulence over time, with natural selection favoring pathogens that cause minimal disease. However, a tradeoff frequently exists between high virulence shortening host survival on the one hand but allowing faster transmission on the other. This is the case in HIV infection, where high viral loads increase transmission risk per coital act but reduce host longevity. We here investigate the impact on HIV virulence of HIV adaptation to HLA molecules that protect against disease progression, such as HLA-B*57 and HLA-B*58:01. We analyzed cohorts in Botswana and South Africa, two countries severely affected by the HIV epidemic. In Botswana, where the epidemic started earlier and adult seroprevalence has been higher, HIV adaptation to HLA including HLA-B*57/58:01 is greater compared with South Africa (P = 7 × 10−82), the protective effect of HLA-B*57/58:01 is absent (P = 0.0002), and population viral replicative capacity is lower (P = 0.03). These data suggest that viral evolution is occurring relatively rapidly, and that adaptation of HIV to the most protective HLA alleles may contribute to a lowering of viral replication capacity at the population level, and a consequent reduction in HIV virulence over time. The potential role in this process played by increasing antiretroviral therapy (ART) access is also explored. Models developed here suggest distinct benefits of ART, in addition to reducing HIV disease and transmission, in driving declines in HIV virulence over the course of the epidemic, thereby accelerating the effects of HLA-mediated viral adaptation. PMID:25453107

  6. HIV-1 Genetic Variability in Cuba and Implications for Transmission and Clinical Progression.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Madeline; Machado, Liuber Y; Díaz, Héctor; Ruiz, Nancy; Romay, Dania; Silva, Eladio

    2015-10-01

    INTRODUCTION Serological and molecular HIV-1 studies in Cuba have shown very low prevalence of seropositivity, but an increasing genetic diversity attributable to introduction of many HIV-1 variants from different areas, exchange of such variants among HIV-positive people with several coinciding routes of infection and other epidemiologic risk factors in the seropositive population. The high HIV-1 genetic variability observed in Cuba has possible implications for transmission and clinical progression. OBJECTIVE Study genetic variability for the HIV-1 env, gag and pol structural genes in Cuba; determine the prevalence of B and non-B subtypes according to epidemiologic and behavioral variables and determine whether a relationship exists between genetic variability and transmissibility, and between genetic variability and clinical disease progression in people living with HIV/AIDS. METHODS Using two molecular assays (heteroduplex mobility assay and nucleic acid sequencing), structural genes were characterized in 590 people with HIV-1 (480 men and 110 women), accounting for 3.4% of seropositive individuals in Cuba as of December 31, 2013. Nonrandom sampling, proportional to HIV prevalence by province, was conducted. Relationships between molecular results and viral factors, host characteristics, and patients' clinical, epidemiologic and behavioral variables were studied for molecular epidemiology, transmission, and progression analyses. RESULTS Molecular analysis of the three HIV-1 structural genes classified 297 samples as subtype B (50.3%), 269 as non-B subtypes (45.6%) and 24 were not typeable. Subtype B prevailed overall and in men, mainly in those who have sex with men. Non-B subtypes were prevalent in women and heterosexual men, showing multiple circulating variants and recombinant forms. Sexual transmission was the predominant form of infection for all. B and non-B subtypes were encountered throughout Cuba. No association was found between subtypes and

  7. [Clinical and immunological features of concomitant HIV/tuberculosis infection and HIV infection without tuberculosis].

    PubMed

    Khaertynova, I M; Valiev, R Sh; Tsibul'kin, A P; Valiev, N R; Khamzina, R V; Lazarenko, O G; Romanenko, S E

    2009-01-01

    The clinical and hematological manifestations and functional state of the immune system were comparatively evaluated in patients with concomitant HIV/tuberculosis (TB) infection (n = 84) and in those with HIV infection without tuberculosis (n = 106). The course of concomitant HIV-TB infection was ascertained to differ from HIV monoinfection in a diversity of additional exposures that aggravated the patients' general condition. These included: the parameters of a long proceeding inflammatory process, which were accompanied by the signs of the infection-toxic syndrome, inflammatory changes in the hemogram, by a sharp stimulation of the nonspecific link of immunity. So the comparative analysis of the trend in HIV infection in combination with active tuberculosis and HIV monoinfection revealed a prompter progression of the disease in the former case. PMID:19642574

  8. Behavioral and social science in HIV vaccine clinical research: Workshop report.

    PubMed

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Swann, Edith M; Singh, Sagri

    2011-03-21

    In May 2009, a workshop was held in Washington DC to identify ways in which HIV vaccine clinical research could benefit from and better incorporate behavioral and social science (BSS) considerations. Seventy-one people from government, non-government, and private organizations participated, including HIV vaccine researchers, clinical trial scientists, BSS researchers, community representatives, and sponsors. This workshop elucidated the opportunities and challenges for integrating BSS in HIV vaccine research by highlighting insights gained from previous BSS research on HIV prevention and highlighting new BSS approaches and methodologies. Meeting participants identified priority areas where BSS methodologies could significantly impact HIV research and developed concrete recommendations for addressing current challenges encountered in HIV vaccine research relating to social impact, risk assessment, community engagement, informed consent, risk reduction, and special populations. These recommendations address the need for improving the accuracy of participant data; standardizing data collection to enable comparisons across studies; engaging the community at all levels; using evidenced-based counseling techniques; understanding the needs and concerns of target populations; and considering the impacts of macro-level forces and influences. The importance of establishing collaborations that can carry out these recommendations and facilitate necessary changes in thinking and practice was emphasized throughout the meeting. PMID:21315694

  9. Improving Ethical and Participatory Practice for Marginalized Populations in Biomedical HIV Prevention Trials: Lessons from Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Allman, Dan; Ditmore, Melissa Hope; Kaplan, Karyn

    2014-01-01

    practice in other parts of the world where biomedical HIV prevention trials occur, and where clinical trials in marginalized populations continue. PMID:24949864

  10. The 2015 Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV/AIDS in HIV-Infected Koreans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The Committee for Clinical Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of HIV/AIDS of the Korean Society for AIDS was founded in 2010. The first edition of the Korean guidelines was published in 2011, and revised in 2013. The recommendations in the guideline contain important information for physicians working with HIV/AIDS in the clinical field. However, due to the rapid discovery of new data in the field of HIV and the evolution of the clinical environment in Korea, it has become necessary to revise the guideline again. This guideline aims to provide up-to-date comprehensive information regarding the diagnosis and management of HIV/AIDS in Korea. This guideline deals with issues regarding the initial assessment of newly diagnosed patients, timing of antiretroviral treatment (ART) initiation, preferred ART regimens in treatment-naïve as well as treatment-experienced patients and special populations such as HBV/HCV co-infected patients, or pregnant women. A brief summary of the revised guidelines and key changes to the original version of the guidelines are summarized below. PMID:26483998

  11. A social vaccine? Social and structural contexts of HIV vaccine acceptability among most-at-risk populations in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Newman, Peter A; Roungprakhon, Surachet; Tepjan, Suchon; Yim, Suzy; Walisser, Rachael

    2012-01-01

    A safe and efficacious preventive HIV vaccine would be a tremendous asset for low- and middle-income country (LMIC) settings, which bear the greatest global impact of AIDS. Nevertheless, substantial gaps between clinical trial efficacy and real-world effectiveness of already licensed vaccines demonstrate that availability does not guarantee uptake. In order to advance an implementation science of HIV vaccines centred on LMIC settings, we explored sociocultural and structural contexts of HIV vaccine acceptability among most-at-risk populations in Thailand, the site of the largest HIV vaccine trial ever conducted. Cross-cutting challenges for HIV vaccine uptake - social stigma, discrimination in healthcare settings and out-of-pocket vaccine cost - emerged in addition to population-specific barriers and opportunities. A 'social vaccine' describes broad sociocultural and structural interventions - culturally relevant vaccine promotion galvanised by communitarian norms, mitigating anti-gay, anti-injecting drug user and HIV-related stigma, combating discrimination in healthcare, decriminalising adult sex work and injecting drug use and providing vaccine cost subsidies - that create an enabling environment for HIV vaccine uptake among most-at-risk populations. By approaching culturally relevant social and structural interventions as integral mechanisms to the success of new HIV prevention technologies, biomedical advances may be leveraged in renewed opportunities to promote and optimise combination prevention. PMID:22780324

  12. Universal HIV screening at a major metropolitan TB clinic: HIV prevalence and high-risk behaviors among TB patients.

    PubMed Central

    Weis, S E; Foresman, B; Cook, P E; Matty, K J

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study assessed the outcome of implementing a policy of universal screening of patients with tuberculosis (TB) for HIV infection at a major metropolitan public health TB clinic. METHODS: HIV serologic testing was completed on 768 (93%) of 825 eligible patients. Ninety-eight HIV-positive cases (13%) were compared with 670 HIV-negative cases. The presence of adult HIV risk factors was determined by structured interview and review of medical records. RESULTS: One or more HIV risk factors were present in 93% of HIV-positive cases and 42% of HIV-negative cases. CONCLUSIONS: The metropolitan TB clinic is well suited for HIV screening, and HIV-antibody testing and counseling should be provided to all TB patients. PMID:9987468

  13. HIV-1 Genetic Variability and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Maria Mercedes; Perno, Carlo Federico

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in antiretroviral therapy that have revolutionized HIV disease management, effective control of the HIV infection pandemic remains elusive. Beyond the classic non-B endemic areas, HIV-1 non-B subtype infections are sharply increasing in previous subtype B homogeneous areas such as Europe and North America. As already known, several studies have shown that, among non-B subtypes, subtypes C and D were found to be more aggressive in terms of disease progression. Luckily, the response to antiretrovirals against HIV-1 seems to be similar among different subtypes, but these results are mainly based on small or poorly designed studies. On the other hand, differences in rates of acquisition of resistance among non-B subtypes are already being observed. This different propensity, beyond the type of treatment regimens used, as well as access to viral load testing in non-B endemic areas seems to be due to HIV-1 clade specific peculiarities. Indeed, some non-B subtypes are proved to be more prone to develop resistance compared to B subtype. This phenomenon can be related to the presence of subtype-specific polymorphisms, different codon usage, and/or subtype-specific RNA templates. This review aims to provide a complete picture of HIV-1 genetic diversity and its implications for HIV-1 disease spread, effectiveness of therapies, and drug resistance development. PMID:23844315

  14. Comparison of Abnormal Cervical Cytology from HIV Positive Women, Female Sex Workers and General Population

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Homeira; Asadi, Nasrin; Foroughinia, Leila; Salehi, Alireza; Kuhnavard, Safieh; Akbarzadeh, Mojgan; Ravanbod, Hamid Reza; Mohamadalian, Ferdos; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex workers and HIV seropositive women are at high risk of abnormal cervical cytology. The objective of this study was to compare the cervical cytology among three groups of women: active sex workers, HIV-infected women, and general population in Iran. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed in Hazrat Zeinab, Lavan clinics and drop in center (DIC) in Shiraz, Iran. This study was performed from October 2009 to October 2011. A total of 266 patients were assigned into three groups: sex-workers (85), HIV positive patients (100), and general population (81). Pap smear was performed for all participants from the exocervix and endocervix, using a plastic Ayres’s spatula and cytobrush. The samples were sent to a pathology center, using a liquid-based media.  Results The risk of cervical infection in sex workers and HIV positive women was greater than the general population (OR=5.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.24, 13.40), (OR=3.71, 95% CI:1.52, 9.09), respectively. The frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in the HIV positive and sex worker groups was higher than the general population (OR=6. 76, 95% CI:2.25, 20.32), (OR=3. 80, 95% CI:1.19, 12.07), respectively. Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) were associated with CD4 cell count<200Í106/L, P=0.021 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion Vaginal infections were seen more often in the sex worker group, and abnormal cervical cytology was greater in the HIV positive group. PMID:26005687

  15. HIV research in Australia: linking basic research findings with clinical and public health outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Lewin, Sharon R; Kaldor, John M; Cooper, David A

    2006-01-01

    Despite a population of only 20 million and sustained low prevalence of HIV infection in Australia, Australian researchers have provided many substantial original findings to the fields of HIV pathogenesis, treatment and prevention. More recently, Australian clinicians and scientists have turned their attention to assisting other countries in developing effective responses, particularly within the Asia-Pacific region. It is therefore fitting that the 4th International AIDS Society (IAS) Conference on HIV Pathogenesis, Treatment and Prevention will be held in Sydney in July 2007. The meeting is expected to attract over 5000 participants and will have a dynamic and innovative programme within the three major themes of HIV basic science, clinical research and biomedical prevention. PMID:17140433

  16. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  17. [Adaptive behaviors to HIV risk of transmission in different populations].

    PubMed

    Grémy, I

    2005-05-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV epidemic in France, surveys aimed at better understanding risk perceptions of HIV infection and preventive sexual behaviors have been implemented in the general population, and in populations such as IVDU and homosexual men, more concerned by risks of HIV transmission. The objective of this article is to describe these surveys, to present their main results and to assess what has been the overall impact of prevention campaigns on the adoption of preventive sexual behaviors in these populations. The results show that very early after the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, both general and homosexual populations have adopted preventive sexual behaviors, mainly increasing condom use and implementing other preventive strategies. However, with the introduction of HAART in 1996, a slackening of these preventive behaviors is noted. The use of condom is less frequent, especially in the youngest generations of both general and homosexual populations. On the opposite, among IVDU, the use of sterile syringes increased dramatically as soon as over-the-counter sales of syringes was authorized in 1987, as well as the adoption of ways other than intravenous to take drugs. Both have contributed to almost stop the HIV epidemic in this specific group. The results of these surveys show that the benefits of prevention campaigns are different between populations and are reversible. It is necessary to renew the messages, campaigns and programs of prevention with the renewal of generations. It is also necessary to adapt these messages to the new scientific data, and to the evolution of social and individual representations of the disease. PMID:15878250

  18. Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Banks, H. T.; Davidian, M.; Hu, Shuhua; Kepler, Grace M.; Rosenberg, E.S.

    2009-01-01

    A system of ordinary differential equations is formulated to describe the pathogenesis of HIV infection, wherein certain features that have been shown to be important by recent experimental research are incorporated in the model. These include the role of CD4+ memory cells that serve as a major reservoir of latently infected cells, a critical role for T-helper cells in the generation of CD8 memory cells capable of efficient recall response, and stimulation by antigens other than HIV. A stability analysis illustrates the capability of this model in admitting multiple locally asymptotically stable (locally a.s.) off-treatment equilibria. We show that this more biologically-detailed model can exhibit the phenomenon of transient viremia experienced by some patients on therapy with viral load levels suppressed below the detection limit. We also show that the loss of CD4+ T-cell help in the generation of CD8+ memory cells leads to larger peak values for the viral load during transient viremia. Censored clinical data is used to obtain parameter estimates. We demonstrate that using a reduced set of 16 free parameters, obtained by fixing some parameters at their population averages, the model provides reasonable fits to the patient data and, moreover, that it exhibits good predictive capability. We further show that parameter values obtained for most clinical patients do not admit multiple locally a.s off-treatment equilibria. This suggests that treatment to move from a high viral load equilibrium state to an equilibrium state with a lower (or zero) viral load is not possible for these patients. PMID:19495424

  19. Performance of the Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag Test on Clinical Samples Representing Current Epidemic HIV Variants

    PubMed Central

    Lemee, Véronique; Leoz, Marie; Etienne, Manuel; De Oliveira, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    Screening for HIV infection has improved since the first immunoassays. Today, diagnosis of HIV infection can be performed with fourth-generation tests that track both the patient's antibodies and HIV antigen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the new DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay compared to another fourth-generation assay, the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo kit. This work was performed on a large panel of 900 samples, including negative samples (n = 493) and HIV-positive (n = 407) representatives of HIV-1 group M subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2 variants. The results highlight the high specificity (98.9%) and sensitivity (100%) of this new fourth-generation assay, which are consistent with its use for the screening and diagnosis of HIV infections with the current circulating strains. PMID:24966360

  20. Performance of the Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag test on clinical samples representing current epidemic HIV variants.

    PubMed

    Lemee, Véronique; Leoz, Marie; Etienne, Manuel; De Oliveira, Fabienne; Plantier, Jean-Christophe

    2014-09-01

    Screening for HIV infection has improved since the first immunoassays. Today, diagnosis of HIV infection can be performed with fourth-generation tests that track both the patient's antibodies and HIV antigen. The objective of this study was to evaluate the clinical sensitivity and specificity of the new DiaSorin Liaison XL Murex HIV Ab/Ag assay compared to another fourth-generation assay, the Abbott Architect HIV Ag/Ab Combo kit. This work was performed on a large panel of 900 samples, including negative samples (n = 493) and HIV-positive (n = 407) representatives of HIV-1 group M subtypes and circulating recombinant forms (CRFs), HIV-1 group O, and HIV-2 variants. The results highlight the high specificity (98.9%) and sensitivity (100%) of this new fourth-generation assay, which are consistent with its use for the screening and diagnosis of HIV infections with the current circulating strains. PMID:24966360

  1. Engagement in the HIV Care Continuum among Key Populations in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Smith, Laramie R; Patterson, Thomas L; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Ojeda, Victoria D; Burgos, Jose Luis; Rojas, Sarah A; Zúñiga, María Luisa; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2016-05-01

    In Tijuana, Mexico, HIV is concentrated in sub-epidemics of key populations: persons who inject drugs (PWID), sex workers (SW), and men who have sex with men (MSM). To date, data on engagement in the HIV care continuum among these key populations, particularly in resource-constrained settings, are sparse. We pooled available epidemiological data from six studies (N = 3368) to examine HIV testing and treatment uptake in these key populations; finding an overall HIV prevalence of 5.7 %. Of the 191 identified HIV-positive persons, only 11.5 % knew their HIV-positive status and 3.7 % were on ART. Observed differences between these HIV-positive key populations suggest PWID (vs. non-PWID) were least likely to have previously tested or initiate HIV care. MSM (vs. non-MSM) were more likely to have previously tested but not more likely to know their HIV-positive status. Of persons aware of their HIV-positive status, SW (vs. non-SW) were more likely to initiate HIV care. Findings suggest engagement of key populations in HIV treatment is far below estimates observed for similarly resource-constrained generalized epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa. These data provide one of the first empirical-snapshots highlighting the extent of HIV treatment disparities in key populations. PMID:26354518

  2. Minimal Cognitive Impairment in UK HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men: Effect of Case Definitions and Comparison With the General Population and HIV-Negative Men

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Jeffrey; Haddow, Lewis; Daskalopoulou, Marina; Lampe, Fiona; Speakman, Andrew; Gilson, Richard; Phillips, Andrew; Sherr, Lorraine; Wayal, Sonali; Harrison, John; Antinori, Andrea; Maruff, Paul; Schembri, Adrian; Johnson, Margaret; Collins, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in UK HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants were recruited to a cross-sectional study from 2 London clinics and completed computer-assisted neuropsychological tests and questionnaires of depression, anxiety, and activities of daily living. Published definitions of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and global deficit scores were used. Age- and education-adjusted neuropsychological test scores were directly compared with reference population data. Results: A total of 248 HIV-positive and 45 HIV-negative MSM participated. In the HIV-positive group, median time since diagnosis was 9.4 years, median CD4+ count was 550 cells per cubic millimeter, and 88% were on antiretroviral therapy. Prevalence of HAND was 21.0% in HIV-positive MSM (13.7% asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, 6.5% mild neurocognitive disorder, and 0.8% HIV-associated dementia). Using a global deficit score threshold of 0.5, the prevalence of NCI was 31.5% (when averaged over 5 neuropsychological domains) and 40.3% (over 10 neuropsychological test scores). These results were not significantly different from the HIV-negative study sample. No consistent pattern of impairment was seen in HIV-positive patients relative to general male population data (n = 380). Conclusions: We found a prevalence of HAND and degree of impairment on neuropsychological testing of HIV-positive MSM that could represent a normal population distribution. These findings suggest that NCI may be overestimated in HIV-positive MSM, and that the attribution of NCI to HIV infection implied by the term HAND requires revision. PMID:24991974

  3. Recreational drug use among individuals living with HIV in Europe: review of the prevalence, comparison with the general population and HIV guidelines recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Garin, Noe; Velasco, Cesar; De Pourcq, Jan T.; Lopez, Belen; Gutierrez, Maria del Mar; Haro, Josep M.; Feliu, Anna; Mangues, Maria A.; Trilla, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Background: Adherence problems, interactions and higher rate of risk activities have been observed in HIV individuals using recreational drugs. Our aim was to describe recreational drug use in both HIV individuals and general population in Europe, and to assess at what extent HIV guidelines address this issue. Methods: Data on recreational drug use across Europe were obtained from the European Monitoring Centre for Drugs and Drug Addiction for the general population, and through Pubmed search. for HIV patients. We assessed the incorporation of recreational drug issues in HIV treatment guidelines for the following topics: (a) recreational drugs; (b) adherence to antiretrovirals; (c) interactions; (d) transmission risk. Guidelines included: World Health Organization; European Aids Clinical Society; U.S. Department of Health and Human Services; International Antiviral Society-USA; and seven European national guidelines. Results: 29 countries reported recreational drug use in general population. The highest prevalences were observed for Cannabis (i.e., 8–10% in Spain, France, and Czech Republic) followed by cocaine, amphetamines and ecstasy. The 13 studies selected in the systematic review showed a great variability in recreational drug use on the HIV population. Apart from classical recreational drugs, we found a relevant use of new drugs including sexual experience enhancers. Polydrug consumption was about 50% in some studies. Most guidelines included general information about recreational drugs, showing great variability on the inclusion of the evaluated topics. We found more specific, evidence-based recommendations on interactions, followed by medication adherence and transmission risk. Conclusions: Available data on the people living with HIV suggest a higher use of recreational drugs than in the general population, which is already relevant. However, recreational drug issues should be included or addressed more thoroughly in most guidelines. PMID:26236288

  4. An assessment of HIV treatment outcomes among utilizers of semi-mobile clinics in rural Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Sara E; Martinez, Jose M; Olson, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Africa, and rates of retention in treatment are low. Some research has shown that mobile clinics are effective in connecting people in rural areas with health care. We compared HIV outcomes between HIV-positive patients who chose to access treatment from a regional hospital to those who chose care in one of four semi-mobile clinics closer to where they live. The subjects for this analysis were HIV-positive residents in West Pokot accessing care at one of four semi-mobile sites (Kabichbich, Chepareria, Kacheliba, and Sigor) or at the regional hospital in Kapenguria. We examined four outcome variables between the two groups: (1) retention in HIV treatment, (2) change in CD4 count, (3) adherence to ARVs, and (4) deaths. The patients who chose semi-mobile clinic care were less well educated, poorer, and sicker than those who chose to continue care in the regional hospital. There were no statistically significant differences between the groups in any of the four outcome measures. Although the population of patients attending semi-mobile clinics was on average poorer and sicker than those attending the hospital, their outcomes were similar. Care at the semi-mobile clinics did not result in significantly different outcomes from care in the district hospital. This program showed that semi-mobile clinics are a viable alternative to hospital care for very ill, isolated populations, but further measures must be taken to improve retention and adherence in these settings. PMID:25495796

  5. Individual and Population Level Impact of Key HIV Risk Factors on HIV Incidence Rates in Durban, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ramjee, Gita; Moonsamy, Suri; Abbai, Nathlee Samantha; Wand, Handan

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to estimate the individual and joint impact of age, marital status and diagnosis with sexually transmitted infections (STIs) on HIV acquisition among young women at a population level in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. A total of 3,978 HIV seronegative women were recruited for four biomedical intervention trials from 2002–2009. Point and interval estimates of partial population attributable risk (PAR) were used to quantify the proportion of HIV seroconversions which can be prevented if a combination of risk factors is eliminated from a target population. More than 70% of the observed HIV acquisitions were collectively attributed to the three risk factors: younger age (<25 years old), unmarried and not cohabiting with a stable/regular partner and diagnosis with STIs. Addressing these risks requires targeted structural, behavioural, biomedical and cultural interventions in order to impact on unacceptably high HIV incidence rates among young women and the population as a whole. PMID:27104835

  6. Screening for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) in an Urban HIV Clinic: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Robert J.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased smoking and a detrimental response to tobacco smoke in the lungs of HIV/AIDS patients result in an increased risk for COPD. We aimed to determine the predictive value of a COPD screening strategy validated in the general population and to identify HIV-related factors associated with decreased lung function. Subjects at least 35 years of age at an HIV clinic in New York City completed a COPD screening questionnaire and peak flow measurement. Those with abnormal results and a random one-third of normal screens had spirometry. 235 individuals were included and 89 completed spirometry. Eleven (12%) had undiagnosed airway obstruction and 5 had COPD. A combination of a positive questionnaire and abnormal peak flow yielded a sensitivity of 20% (specificity 93%) for detection of COPD. Peak flow alone had a sensitivity of 80% (specificity 80%). Abnormal peak flow was associated with an AIDS diagnosis (p=0.04), lower nadir (p=0.001), and current CD4 counts (p=0.001). Nadir CD4 remained associated in multivariate analysis (p=0.05). Decreased FEV1 (<80% predicted) was associated with lower CD4 count nadir (p=0.04) and detectable current HIV viral load (p=0.01) in multivariate analysis. Questionnaire and peak flow together had low sensitivity, but abnormal peak flow shows potential as a screening tool for COPD in HIV/AIDS. These data suggest that lung function may be influenced by HIV-related factors. PMID:25723842

  7. Do HIV Prevalence Trends in ANC Surveillance Represent Trends in the General Population in the ART Era? The Case of Manicaland, East Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Gregson, Simon; Dharmayat, Kanika; Pereboom, Monique; Takaruza, Albert; Mugurungi, Owen; Schur, Nadine; Nyamukapa, Constance A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective National estimates of HIV trends in generalised epidemics rely on HIV prevalence data from antenatal clinic (ANC) surveillance. We investigate whether HIV prevalence trends in ANC data reflect trends in men and women in the general population during the scale-up of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) in Manicaland, Zimbabwe. Methods Trends in HIV prevalence in local ANC attendees and adults aged 15-49yrs in towns, agricultural estates, and villages were compared using five rounds of parallel ANC (N≈1,200) and general-population surveys (N≈10,000) and multi-variable log-linear regression. Changes in the age-pattern of HIV prevalence and the age-distribution of ANC attendees were compared with those in the general population. Age-specific pregnancy prevalence rates were compared by HIV infection and ART status. Results Cumulatively, from 1998-2000 to 2009-2011, HIV prevalence fell by 60.0% (95% CI, 51.1%-67.3%) in ANC surveillance data and by 34.3% (30.8%-37.7%) in the general population. Most of the difference arose following the introduction of ART (2006-2011). The estates and villages reflected this overall pattern but HIV prevalence in the towns was lower at local ANCs than in the general population, largely due to attendance by pregnant women from outlying (lower prevalence) areas. The ageing of people living with HIV in the general population (52.4% aged >35yrs, 2009-2011) was under-represented in the ANC data (12.6%) due to lower fertility in older and HIV-infected women. Conclusion After the introduction of ART in Manicaland, HIV prevalence declined more steeply in ANC surveillance data than in the general population. Models used for HIV estimates must reflect this change in bias. PMID:26372390

  8. Invited commentary: Biological and clinical insights from epidemiologic research into HIV, HPV, and anal cancer.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Madeleine, Margaret M

    2013-09-15

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877-884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6-7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population. PMID:23900552

  9. Invited Commentary: Biological and Clinical Insights From Epidemiologic Research Into HIV, HPV, and Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Eric A.; Madeleine, Margaret M.

    2013-01-01

    Anal cancer is common among people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This cancer is caused by human papillomavirus, and immunosuppression likely contributes to its development. In this issue of the Journal, Bertisch et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2013;178(6):877–884) present the results of a case-control study of anal cancer among HIV-infected people in Switzerland. They demonstrate that anal cancer risk is increased in association with a low CD4+ cell count (a clinical measurement of immune status). In particular, HIV-induced immunosuppression was most severe among cases approximately 6–7 years prior to the diagnosis of anal cancer. A plausible biological interpretation is that immunosuppression is important at an early stage of the development of anal cancer, but that the neoplastic process becomes irreversible over time with persistent human papillomavirus infection and genetic damage. With current efforts to provide earlier combination antiretroviral therapy to HIV-infected people, anal cancer incidence may start to decline. Bertisch et al. also demonstrate a strong association between serum antibodies against the human papillomavirus type 16 protein E6 and anal cancer risk, highlighting the role of this viral oncoprotein in carcinogenesis. Additional biomarkers could help refine clinical approaches to anal cancer screening and prevention for the HIV-infected population. PMID:23900552

  10. Factors Associated with Missed Psychiatry Visits in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Ho, Christina P; Zinski, Anne; Fogger, Susanne A; Peters, Jonathan D; Westfall, Andrew O; Mugavero, Michael J; Lawrence, Sarah T; Nevin, Christa R; Raper, James L; Saag, Michael S; Willig, James H

    2015-08-01

    Psychiatric co-management is often required in HIV primary care. While rates and clinical impact of linkage and retention in HIV are well explored, fewer investigations focus specifically on linkage to psychiatry. In this investigation, we evaluate factors associated with linkage to psychiatric services using a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected patients during a two-year observation period. Descriptive statistics depict patient characteristics, and logistic regression models were fit to evaluate factors associated with failure to establish care at the co-located psychiatry clinic following referral from HIV provider. Of 370 referred, 23 % did not attend a scheduled psychiatry appointment within 6 months of initial referral. In multivariable analysis, Non-white race, younger age, non-suppressed viral load, and increased wait time to appointment (in days) were associated with failure to attend. Further exploration of barriers that contribute to disparate linkage to psychiatric care may inform future interventions to improve HIV outcomes in this population. PMID:25491027

  11. Improved Prevention Counseling by HIV Care Providers in a Multisite, Clinic-Based Intervention: Positive STEPs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thrun, Mark; Cook, Paul F.; Bradley-Springer, Lucy A.; Gardner, Lytt; Marks, Gary; Wright, Julie; Wilson, Tracey E.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd; O'Daniels, Christine; Raffanti, Stephen; Thompson, Melanie; Golin, Carol

    2009-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have recommended that HIV care clinics incorporate prevention into clinical practice. This report summarizes HIV care providers' attitudes and counseling practices before and after they received training to deliver a counseling intervention to patients. Providers at seven HIV clinics received training…

  12. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Coinfections in an Adult HIV Centre Population in Gaborone, Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Premal; Davis, Stephanie; Tolle, Michael; Mabikwa, Vincent; Anabwani, Gabriel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected adults at an HIV center in Gaborone, Botswana. A retrospective review was performed of charts of currently active HIV-infected adult patients in the Family Model Clinic (FMC) of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence (BCOE) in Gaborone, Botswana, for the results of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C IgG tests performed between January 1, 2005 and December 15, 2009. Of 308 active FMC patients, 266 underwent HBsAg serology testing within the period of study. The HBsAg coinfection prevalence was 5.3% (14/266); 2 of 252 patients had at least one positive antihepatitis C IgG serology, a 0.8% prevalence. Hepatitis B coinfection is relatively common in HIV-infected adults at our center in Botswana, whereas hepatitis C coinfection is rare. In this setting, where the diagnosis of hepatitis B coinfection with HIV has implications for choice of first-line antiretroviral therapy and prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, broader sampling to establish the true population prevalence of hepatitis B coinfection and the desirability of adding screening to HIV management should be considered. These findings provide little justification for adding hepatitis C coinfection screening to the management of HIV infection in Botswana. PMID:21813864

  13. Prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in an adult HIV centre population in Gaborone, Botswana.

    PubMed

    Patel, Premal; Davis, Stephanie; Tolle, Michael; Mabikwa, Vincent; Anabwani, Gabriel

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of hepatitis B and hepatitis C coinfections in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) -infected adults at an HIV center in Gaborone, Botswana. A retrospective review was performed of charts of currently active HIV-infected adult patients in the Family Model Clinic (FMC) of the Botswana-Baylor Children's Clinical Center of Excellence (BCOE) in Gaborone, Botswana, for the results of serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) and antihepatitis C IgG tests performed between January 1, 2005 and December 15, 2009. Of 308 active FMC patients, 266 underwent HBsAg serology testing within the period of study. The HBsAg coinfection prevalence was 5.3% (14/266); 2 of 252 patients had at least one positive antihepatitis C IgG serology, a 0.8% prevalence. Hepatitis B coinfection is relatively common in HIV-infected adults at our center in Botswana, whereas hepatitis C coinfection is rare. In this setting, where the diagnosis of hepatitis B coinfection with HIV has implications for choice of first-line antiretroviral therapy and prevention of perinatal hepatitis B transmission, broader sampling to establish the true population prevalence of hepatitis B coinfection and the desirability of adding screening to HIV management should be considered. These findings provide little justification for adding hepatitis C coinfection screening to the management of HIV infection in Botswana. PMID:21813864

  14. Catalytic antibodies to HIV: Physiological role and potential clinical utility

    PubMed Central

    Planque, Stephanie; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Salas, Maria; Hanson, Carl; Paul, Sudhir

    2008-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Igs) in uninfected humans recognize residues 421–433 located in the B cell superantigenic site (SAg) of the HIV envelope protein gp120 and catalyze its hydrolysis by a serine protease-like mechanism. The catalytic activity is encoded by germline Ig variable (V) region genes, and is expressed at robust levels by IgMs and IgAs but poorly by IgGs. Mucosal IgAs are highly catalytic and neutralize HIV, suggesting that they constitute a first line of defense against HIV. Lupus patients produce the Igs at enhanced levels. Homology of the 421–433 region with an endogenous retroviral sequence and a bacterial protein may provide clues about the antigen driving anti-SAg synthesis in lupus patients and uninfected subjects. The potency and breadth of HIV neutralization revives hopes of clinical application of catalytic anti-421–433 Igs as immunotherapeutic and topical microbicide reagents. Adaptive improvement of anti-SAg catalytic Igs in HIV infected subjects is not customary. Further study of the properties of the naturally occurring anti-SAg catalytic Igs should provide valuable guidance in designing a prophylactic vaccine that amplifies protective catalytic immunity to HIV. PMID:18558365

  15. Male sexual dysfunction and HIV--a clinical perspective.

    PubMed

    Santi, Daniele; Brigante, Giulia; Zona, Stefano; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Rochira, Vincenzo

    2014-02-01

    Sexual dysfunction in men with HIV is often overlooked by clinicians owing to many factors, including the taboo of sexuality. The improved life expectancy of patients with HIV requires physicians to consider their general wellbeing and sexual health with a renewed interest. However, data on sexual dysfunction in those with HIV are scarce. Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the most common sexual dysfunction in men, with a prevalence of ∼30-50% and is frequent even in men <40 years of age. HIV infection itself is the strongest predictor of ED, and many factors related to the infection-fear of virus transmission, changes in body image, HIV-related comorbidities, infection stigma, obligatory condom use-all impair erectile function. The diagnosis and treatment of sexual dysfunction is based on a multidisciplinary approach, which involves specialists in both infectious diseases and sexual medicine. Particular attention should be paid to the promotion of safer sex in these patients. This Review, describes the issues surrounding sexual dysfunction in men with HIV and aims to provide clinical advice for the physician treating these patients. PMID:24394405

  16. CD4 T-cell activation and reduced regulatory T-cell populations are associated with early development of cataracts among HIV-infected adults in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakanjako, Damalie; Otiti-Sengeri, Juliet; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Nabatanzi, Rose; Bayigga, Lois; Kirimunda, Samuel; Joloba, Moses; Manabe, Yukari C.; Kambugu, Andrew; Colebunders, Robert; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet

    2016-01-01

    Background Cataracts contribute 12% of visual loss among HIV-infected adults in Uganda. Immuno-pathogenesis of cataracts may differ among HIV-infected individuals; thus the need for innovative therapeutic interventions among HIV-infected adults. Methods In a laboratory based case-control study, nested in a clinical/surgical community outreach camp, 50 adults with cataracts eligible for surgery were selected consecutively. HIV testing was done for individuals with unknown HIV sero-status. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) were collected from all HIV-positive-adults-with-cataracts (cases) and HIV-negative-adults-with-cataracts (comparative group) and age-matched HIV-negative and HIV-positive- adults- without-cataracts (comparative group). Treg were measured as CD3+CD4+FoxP3+CD25+bright and immune activation as CD3+CD4+CD38+HALDR+ using a Facs Canto II flowcytometer. Mann Whitney test was used to compare expression among the four groups. Results Of 50 adults operated for cataracts, 24 (48%) were female, 25(50%) were HIV-positive. HIV-positive-individuals had cataracts earlier [median; Inter-quartile Range (IQR); 49(44-53) years] than HIV-negative [70 (IQR 59-75) years]; p=0.0005.Treg were lower among individuals with cataracts irrespective of HIV status; p=0.001; but comparable among younger HIV-positive and elderly HIV-negative with cataracts; p=0.301. Immune activation levels were comparable among HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals with cataracts. However, HIV-positive-individuals with cataracts expressed higher levels of immune activation than HIV-positive-individuals without cataracts; p=0.012 and HIV-negative-individuals-with-cataracts expressed higher levels of immune activation that HIV-negative-without-cataracts; p<0.0001. Conclusion CD4 T-cell activation and reduced regulatory T-cell populations were associated with cataracts among adults aging with HIV. We recommend studies on clinical relevance of immune modulation in the prevention of early

  17. HIV/AIDS and disability: a pilot survey of HIV/AIDS knowledge among a deaf population in Swaziland.

    PubMed

    Groce, Nora; Yousafzai, Aisha; Dlamini, Phindile; Zalud, Sarah; Wirz, Shelia

    2006-12-01

    This study sought to establish whether there were measurable differences in the level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS between hearing individuals and individuals who identified themselves as deaf sign language users in Swaziland. A cross-sectional survey of 191 rural and urban hearing and deaf adults was undertaken in Swaziland in December 2003. A structured questionnaire was administered, seeking to establish whether there were statistically significant differences between hearing and deaf populations in their level of knowledge about HIV/AIDS symptoms, transmission and prevention, as well as differences in sources of information about HIV/AIDS. Additional questions were asked regarding whether there were differences in accessibility of HIV testing services and HIV/AIDS-related healthcare for the two groups. Significant differences in levels of knowledge about HIV/AIDS were identified between the hearing and deaf respondents. The deaf population was significantly more likely (P<0.05) to believe in incorrect modes of HIV transmission (e.g. hugging and airborne transmission) and HIV prevention (e.g. avoiding sharing utensils and eating healthy foods). Almost all of the deaf respondents (99%) reported difficulties in communicating with healthcare facility staff, which may result in less use of HIV voluntary counseling and testing services. This paper reports the results of this study, and discusses the need for targeted HIV/AIDS education campaigns and improved accessibility in healthcare facilities for deaf sign language users in countries such as Swaziland. PMID:17106349

  18. High Treatment Retention Rate in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy at Two Large HIV Clinics in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Shoko; Tanuma, Junko; Mizushima, Daisuke; Nguyen, Ngoc Chi Thi; Pham, Thanh Thuy Thi; Do, Cuong Duy; Nguyen, Tuan Quang; Nguyen, Dung Thi; Nguyen, Hoai Dung Thi; Nguyen, Lam Tien; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Oka, Shinichi

    2015-01-01

    Background Loss to follow-up (LTFU) is viewed as a major challenge in improving retention in HIV treatment. In Vietnam, the reasons for disengagement from clinics and the effect of injection drug use (IDU) on LTFU with unknown outcome (true LTFU) are not well known. Methods Patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from two HIV clinics in Hanoi were included in this observational study between 2007 and 2012, and followed up every 6 months until the end of 2013. The reasons for disengagement from the clinic, and ART status during imprisonment were investigated in patients with a history of IDU to identify true LTFU. The retention rate at 6–54 months and true LTFU rate were calculated. Cox proportional hazards regression models were performed to identify factors associated with true LTFU. Results There were 1,431 patients, with a follow-up time of 4,371 person-years (median 2.49 years). At the end of the follow-up period, 71 (5.0%) patients died, 79 (5.5%) transferred to other clinics, 16 (1.1%) disengaged from the clinics, and the calculated true LTFU was 45 (3.1%), with 12-month ART retention rate of 95.3% for the entire study population. Imprisonment was the most frequent reason for disengagement from the clinics. True LTFU correlated significantly with low CD4 count and high plasma viral load, but not history of IDU. Conclusion Imprisonment is a major cause of disengagement from HIV care among patients with a history of IDU. PMID:26422474

  19. Drug resistance pattern of mycobacterial isolates in HIV and non-HIV population in South India

    PubMed Central

    Shivaswamy, Umamaheshwari; Neelambike, Sumana M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of drug resistance has complicated the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). WHO reports India to be one among 27 “high burden” multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB countries. Objective: To diagnose TB and detect drug resistance of mycobacterial isolates in acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear negative HIV reactive patients (Group A) and compare them with HIV seropositive AFB smear positive (Group B) and HIV-seronegative AFB positive cases (Group C). Materials and Methods: Clinical specimens collected in all groups were processed as per the standard protocol except blood, which was processed by lysis centrifugation technique. They were then inoculated with Lowenstein-Jensen media and the isolates obtained were subjected to drug susceptibility test (DST) by proportion method and genotype MTBDR plus assay. Results: In Group A, 162 patients were included. Of the 443 clinical samples collected, 76 mycobacterial strains were obtained from 67 (41%) patients. Of these, 50 (65.8%) were sensitive to all drugs and 26 (34.2%) resistant to one or more anti-tubercular drugs. Antibiogram of Group A when compared with Group B and C showed that the MDR rate 6.6%, 6.7% and 8% respectively) did not differ much; but resistance to at least single drug was (26 [34.2%], 3 [10%], and 8 [16%]), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that HIV has no influence on the anti-tubercular resistance pattern, but increased MDR rate along with HIV in high TB burden setting stresses the need for early diagnosis and DST in providing proper regimens and improve prognosis. PMID:26933303

  20. The clinical applications of genome editing in HIV.

    PubMed

    Wang, Cathy X; Cannon, Paula M

    2016-05-26

    HIV/AIDS has long been at the forefront of the development of gene- and cell-based therapies. Although conventional gene therapy approaches typically involve the addition of anti-HIV genes to cells using semirandomly integrating viral vectors, newer genome editing technologies based on engineered nucleases are now allowing more precise genetic manipulations. The possible outcomes of genome editing include gene disruption, which has been most notably applied to the CCR5 coreceptor gene, or the introduction of small mutations or larger whole gene cassette insertions at a targeted locus. Disruption of CCR5 using zinc finger nucleases was the first-in-human application of genome editing and remains the most clinically advanced platform, with 7 completed or ongoing clinical trials in T cells and hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs). Here we review the laboratory and clinical findings of CCR5 editing in T cells and HSPCs for HIV therapy and summarize other promising genome editing approaches for future clinical development. In particular, recent advances in the delivery of genome editing reagents and the demonstration of highly efficient homology-directed editing in both T cells and HSPCs are expected to spur the development of even more sophisticated applications of this technology for HIV therapy. PMID:27053530

  1. Feasibility of nurse-led antidepressant medication management of depression in an HIV clinic in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julie L.; Almond, Maria L. G.; Ringo, Edward J.; Shangali, Wahida H.; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest HIV prevalence worldwide and depression is highly prevalent among those infected. The negative impact of depression on HIV outcomes highlights the need to identify and treat it in this population. A model for doing this in lower-resourced settings involves task-shifting depression treatment to primary care; however, HIV-infected individuals are often treated in a parallel HIV specialty setting. We adapted a model of task-shifting, measurement based care (MBC), for an HIV clinic setting and tested its feasibility in Tanzania. MBC involves measuring depressive symptoms at meaningful intervals and adjusting antidepressant medication treatment based on the measure of illness. Method Twenty adults presenting for care at an outpatient HIV clinic in Tanzania were enrolled and followed by a nurse care manager who measured depressive symptoms at baseline and every four weeks for 12 weeks. An algorithm-based decision-support tool was utilized by the care manager to recommend individualized antidepressant medication doses to participants’ HIV providers at each visit. Results Retention was high and fidelity of the care manager to the MBC protocol was exceptional. Follow through of antidepressant prescription dosing recommendations by the prescriber was low. Limited availability of antidepressants was also noted. Despite challenges, baseline depression scores decreased over the 12- week period. Conclusions Overall, the model of algorithm-based nursing support of prescription decisions was feasible. Future studies should address implementation issues of medication supply and dosing. Further task-shifting to relatively more abundant and lower-skilled health workers, such as nurses’ aides warrants examination. PMID:22849034

  2. HIV/AIDS Interventions in an Aging U.S. Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobson, Stephanie A.

    2011-01-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 25 percent of people living with HIV in the United States in 2006 were age 50 and older. HIV prevention for people over 50 is an important health concern, especially as the U.S. population grows older. Scholarly research has identified the need for HIV/AIDS interventions in the…

  3. Clinical features of HIV/AIDS patients presenting to an inner city clinic in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Klotz, Stephen A; Nguyen, Hao Cong; Van Pham, Tam; Nguyen, Liem Thanh; Ngo, Dong Thi Anh; Vu, Son Nhoc

    2007-07-01

    An outpatient HIV clinic was opened in March 2005 in Binh Thanh District, a poor section of Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Over 1500 patients were seen in the first year. The average age of patients was 27 years. Men represented 77% of the clinic population, women, 23% and children under the age of 16 years of age, 5% of the population. The most common risk factor among men was being an injecting drug user (IDU), 76%, and among women, being married to an IDU HIV-positive man, 35%. Physical signs of disease were uncommon: lymphadenopathy in 24% and hepatomegaly and splenomegaly in 4% and 3%, respectively. Men and women were anaemic at presentation, with a mean haemoglobin of 11.9 g/dL and 11.1 g/dL, respectively. An overwhelming majority of patients had profound immunodeficiency. The mean CD4+ cell count was 164 cells/mL and the median was 69 cells/mL. No correlation was found between the World Health Organization's stage of disease and the CD4+ cell count. Thus, the former is a poor predictor of immunity in this population. Data regarding opportunistic infections diagnosed at the first visit were studied. Candidiasis of the oral pharynx, oesophagus or vagina was found in 34.5% of the patients, and pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis was found in 32% of the patients. Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) was diagnosed in only 3% of the patients. Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis is advocated for HIV-infected Vietnamese, but the incidence of PCP is negligible and resources could be spent elsewhere. The various opportunistic infections seen in this resource-poor clinic setting is likely to be a pattern of presentation of HIV-infected Vietnamese for some time to come. PMID:17623507

  4. Is the clinical course of HIV-1 changing? Cohort study.

    PubMed Central

    Sinicco, A.; Fora, R.; Raiteri, R.; Sciandra, M.; Bechis, G.; Calvo, M. M.; Gioannini, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess whether the clinical course of HIV infection has changed from 1985 to 1995. DESIGN: Cohort Study. SETTING: Infectious disease clinic. SUBJECTS: 285 patients recruited from September 1985 to January 1995 with < or = 12 months between the dates of their last seronegative and first seropositive test result and with first follow up visit in the six months after seroconversion and at least 12 months' follow up. Patients were grouped according to the date of seroconversion. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Time to CD4 cell count of < 500, 400, and 200 x 10(6) cells/l, and clinical outcome defining AIDS; variation in cell count per day between consecutive visits, and ratio between this variation and time from estimated date of seroconversion at each visit. RESULTS: The groups were similar in age, number with acute primary HIV infection, CD4 cell count at intake, and cell count at the beginning of antiretroviral treatment; they differed in sex ratio, risk factors for HIV, probability of CD4 cell decline to < 500, 400, and 200 x 10(6) cells/l. and risk of developing AIDS. Acute infection, seroconversion after December 1989, and serum beta 2 microglobulin > 296 nmol/l were independent predictors of poor clinical course. The speed of CD4 cell decline, expressed as cell variation divided by the number of days between consecutive visits, increased with more recent seroconversion (P = 0.02). Ratio between the speed of CD4 cell decline and time from estimated date of seroconversion at each visit was also higher in the patients who seroconverted after December 1989. CONCLUSIONS: The faster disease progression and the higher speed of CD4 cell decline at early stages in the patients with recently acquired HIV infection suggest changes in the clinical course of HIV infection. PMID:9154026

  5. Observational Research on NCDs in HIV-Positive Populations: Conceptual and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Justice, Amy; Egger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for a growing burden of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy interact with NCD risk factors in complex ways, and research into this “web of causation” has so far been largely based on data from high-income countries. However, improving the understanding, treatment, and prevention of NCDs in LMICs requires region-specific evidence. Priority research areas include: (1) defining the burden of NCDs among people living with HIV, (2) understanding the impact of modifiable risk factors, (3) evaluating effective and efficient care strategies at individual and health systems levels, and (4) evaluating cost-effective prevention strategies. Meeting these needs will require observational data, both to inform the design of randomized trials and to replace trials that would be unethical or infeasible. Focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss data resources currently available to inform this effort and consider key limitations and methodological challenges. Existing data resources often lack population-based samples; HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and antiretroviral therapy–naive comparison groups; and measurements of key NCD risk factors and outcomes. Other challenges include loss to follow-up, competing risk of death, incomplete outcome ascertainment and measurement of factors affecting clinical decision making, and the need to control for (time-dependent) confounding. We review these challenges and discuss strategies for overcoming them through augmented data collection and appropriate analysis. We conclude with recommendations to improve the quality of data and analyses available to inform the response to HIV and NCD comorbidity in LMICs. PMID:25117964

  6. Using Respondent Driven Sampling in a Hidden Population at Risk of HIV Infection: Who do HIV-positive recruiters recruit?

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitz, Daniela; Volz, Erik M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Vera, Alicia; Frost, Simon D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Respondent driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based method used to recruit hidden populations. Since it is respondent-driven, RDS is prone to bias. However, these biases could facilitate recruitment of high risk networks. We examined recruitment patterns of HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) and identified factors associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU in a RDS-based study. Methods IDUs aged >=18, who injected within the last month and resided in Tijuana, Mexico, were recruited using RDS and underwent interviews and testing for HIV, syphilis, and TB. Weighted logistic regression was used to identify predictors of being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU. Results Of 1056 IDUs, HIV-positive subjects comprised 4.4% of the sample and generated 4.7% of recruits, indicating that recruitment effectiveness did not vary by HIV-status. However, 10% of the subjects recruited by HIV-positive recruiters were infected with HIV as compared to 4.1% of subjects recruited by HIV-negative recruiters, (P=0.06), a difference that, after controlling for whether the recruiter and recruit injected drugs together, attained statistical significance (P=0.04), indicating that recruitment patterns differed by HIV-status. Factors independently associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU included lifetime syphilis infection, ever having sex with an HIV-positive person, knowing someone with HIV/AIDS, being recruited at a shooting gallery, having recently used the local needle exchange program, and having a larger number of recent arrests for track-marks. Conclusion HIV-positive IDUs have different recruitment patterns than HIV-negative IDUs, with HIV-positive IDUs tending to recruit other HIV-positive IDUs. Social and environmental factors along with risk behaviors were independently associated with being the recruit of an HIV-positive IDU in Tijuana. While the goal of this study was not to recruit HIV+ or other high-risk persons, our results suggest that

  7. HIV Treatment Outcomes Among HIV-Infected, Opioid-Dependent Patients Receiving Buprenorphine/Naloxone Treatment within HIV Clinical Care Settings: Results From a Multisite Study

    PubMed Central

    Altice, Frederick L.; Bruce, R. Douglas; Lucas, Gregory M.; Lum, Paula J.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Cunningham, Chinazo O.; Sullivan, Lynn E.; Vergara-Rodriguez, Pamela; Fiellin, David A.; Cajina, Adan; Botsko, Michael; Nandi, Vijay; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Finkelstein, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    .49]), and increased general health quality of life (β = 1.02 [1.00,1.04]) were also independently correlated with viral suppression. Improvements in CD4 lymphocyte count were significantly associated with being on ART and increased over time. Conclusions Initiating BUP/NX in HIV clinical care settings is feasible and correlated with initiation of ART and improved CD4 lymphocyte counts. Longer retention on BPN/NX was not associated with improved prescription of ART, viral suppression, or CD4 lymphocyte counts for the overall sample in which the majority was already prescribed ART at baseline. Among those retained on BUP/NX, HIV treatment outcomes did not worsen and were sustained. Increasing time on BUP/NX, however, was especially important for improving HIV treatment outcomes for those not on ART at baseline, the group at highest risk for clinical deterioration. Retaining subjects on BUP/NX is an important goal for sustaining HIV treatment outcomes for those on ART and improving them for those who are not. Comorbid substance use disorders (especially alcohol), mental health problems, and quality–of-life indicators independently contributed to HIV treatment outcomes among HIV-infected persons with opioid dependence, suggesting the need for multidisciplinary treatment strategies for this population. PMID:21317590

  8. Sexual Risk Behaviors for HIV/AIDS in Chuuk State, Micronesia: The Case for HIV Prevention in Vulnerable Remote Populations

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Toya V.; Do, Ann N.; Setik, Eleanor; Sullivan, Patrick S.; Rayle, Victoria D.; Fridlund, Carol A.; Quan, Vu M.; Voetsch, Andrew C.; Fleming, Patricia L.

    2007-01-01

    Background After the first two cases of locally-acquired HIV infection were recognized in Chuuk State, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), a public health response was initiated. The purpose of the response was to assess the need for HIV education and prevention services, to develop recommendations for controlling further spread of HIV in Chuuk, and to initiate some of the prevention measures. Methodology/Principal Findings A public health team conducted a survey and rapid HIV testing among a sample of residents on the outer islands in Chuuk. Local public health officials conducted contact tracing and testing of sex partners of the two locally-acquired cases of HIV infection. A total of 333 persons completed the survey. The majority knew that HIV is transmitted through unprotected sexual contact (81%), injection drug use (61%), or blood transfusion (64%). Sexual activity in the past 12 months was reported among 159 participants, including 90 females and 69 males. Compared to women, men were more likely to have had multiple sex partners, to have been drunk during sex, but less likely to have used a condom in the past 12 months. The two men with locally acquired HIV infection had unprotected anal sex with a third Chuukese man who likely contracted HIV while outside of Chuuk. All 370 persons who received voluntary, confidential HIV counseling and testing had HIV negative test results. Conclusions/Significance Despite the low HIV seroprevalence, risky sexual behaviors in this small isolated population raise concerns about the potential for rapid spread of HIV. The lack of knowledge about risks, along with stigmatizing attitudes towards persons infected with HIV and high risk sexual behaviors indicate the need for resources to be directed toward HIV prevention in Chuuk and on other Pacific Islands. PMID:18074009

  9. The neurobiology of HIV and its impact on cognitive reserve: A review of cognitive interventions for an aging population.

    PubMed

    Cody, Shameka L; Vance, David E

    2016-08-01

    The medications used to treat HIV have reduced the severity of cognitive deficits; yet, nearly half of adults with HIV still exhibit some degree of cognitive deficits, referred to as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder or HAND. These cognitive deficits interfere with everyday functioning such as emotional regulation, medication adherence, instrumental activities of daily living, and even driving a vehicle. As adults are expected to live a normal lifespan, the process of aging in this clinical population may exacerbate such cognitive deficits. Therefore, it is important to understand the neurobiological mechanisms of HIV on cognitive reserve and develop interventions that are either neuroprotective or compensate for such cognitive deficits. Within the context of cognitive reserve, this article delivers a state of the science perspective on the causes of HAND and provides possible interventions for addressing such cognitive deficits. Suggestions for future research are also provided. PMID:26776767

  10. Classification Models for Neurocognitive Impairment in HIV Infection Based on Demographic and Clinical Variables

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz-Moreno, Jose A.; Pérez-Álvarez, Núria; Muñoz-Murillo, Amalia; Prats, Anna; Garolera, Maite; Jurado, M. Àngels; Fumaz, Carmina R.; Negredo, Eugènia; Ferrer, Maria J.; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2014-01-01

    Objective We used demographic and clinical data to design practical classification models for prediction of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in people with HIV infection. Methods The study population comprised 331 HIV-infected patients with available demographic, clinical, and neurocognitive data collected using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. Classification and regression trees (CART) were developed to obtain detailed and reliable models to predict NCI. Following a practical clinical approach, NCI was considered the main variable for study outcomes, and analyses were performed separately in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced patients. Results The study sample comprised 52 treatment-naïve and 279 experienced patients. In the first group, the variables identified as better predictors of NCI were CD4 cell count and age (correct classification [CC]: 79.6%, 3 final nodes). In treatment-experienced patients, the variables most closely related to NCI were years of education, nadir CD4 cell count, central nervous system penetration-effectiveness score, age, employment status, and confounding comorbidities (CC: 82.1%, 7 final nodes). In patients with an undetectable viral load and no comorbidities, we obtained a fairly accurate model in which the main variables were nadir CD4 cell count, current CD4 cell count, time on current treatment, and past highest viral load (CC: 88%, 6 final nodes). Conclusion Practical classification models to predict NCI in HIV infection can be obtained using demographic and clinical variables. An approach based on CART analyses may facilitate screening for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders and complement clinical information about risk and protective factors for NCI in HIV-infected patients. PMID:25237895

  11. Factors Associated with Variations in Population HIV Prevalence across West Africa: Findings from an Ecological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Prudden, Holly J.; Beattie, Tara S.; Bobrova, Natalia; Panovska-Griffiths, Jasmina; Mukandavire, Zindoga; Gorgens, Marelize; Wilson, David; Watts, Charlotte H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Population HIV prevalence across West Africa varies substantially. We assess the national epidemiological and behavioural factors associated with this. Methods National, urban and rural data on HIV prevalence, the percentage of younger (15–24) and older (25–49) women and men reporting multiple (2+) partners in the past year, HIV prevalence among female sex workers (FSWs), men who have bought sex in the past year (clients), and ART coverage, were compiled for 13 countries. An Ecological analysis using linear regression assessed which factors are associated with national variations in population female and male HIV prevalence, and with each other. Findings National population HIV prevalence varies between 0 4–2 9% for men and 0 4–5.6% for women. ART coverage ranges from 6–23%. National variations in HIV prevalence are not shown to be associated with variations in HIV prevalence among FSWs or clients. Instead they are associated with variations in the percentage of younger and older males and females reporting multiple partners. HIV prevalence is weakly negatively associated with ART coverage, implying it is not increased survival that is the cause of variations in HIV prevalence. FSWs and younger female HIV prevalence are associated with client population sizes, especially older men. Younger female HIV prevalence is strongly associated with older male and female HIV prevalence. Interpretation In West Africa, population HIV prevalence is not significantly higher in countries with high FSW HIV prevalence. Our analysis suggests, higher prevalence occurs where more men buy sex, and where a higher percentage of younger women, and older men and women have multiple partnerships. If a sexual network between clients and young females exists, clients may potentially bridge infection to younger females. HIV prevention should focus both on commercial sex and transmission between clients and younger females with multiple partners. PMID:26698854

  12. Clinic Network Collaboration and Patient Tracing to Maximize Retention in HIV Care

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, James H.; Moore, Richard; Eu, Beng; Tee, Ban-Kiem; Chen, Marcus; El-Hayek, Carol; Street, Alan; Woolley, Ian; Buggie, Andrew; Collins, Danielle; Medland, Nicholas; Hoy, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Background Understanding retention and loss to follow up in HIV care, in particular the number of people with unknown outcomes, is critical to maximise the benefits of antiretroviral therapy. Individual-level data are not available for these outcomes in Australia, which has an HIV epidemic predominantly focused amongst men who have sex with men. Methods and Findings A network of the 6 main HIV clinical care sites was established in the state of Victoria, Australia. Individuals who had accessed care at these sites between February 2011 and June 2013 as assessed by HIV viral load testing but not accessed care between June 2013 and February 2014 were considered individuals with potentially unknown outcomes. For this group an intervention combining cross-referencing of clinical data between sites and phone tracing individuals with unknown outcomes was performed. 4966 people were in care in the network and before the intervention estimates of retention ranged from 85.9%–95.8% and the proportion with unknown outcomes ranged from 1.3-5.5%. After the intervention retention increased to 91.4–98.8% and unknown outcomes decreased to 0.1–2.4% (p<.01 for all sites for both outcomes). Most common reasons for disengagement from care were being too busy to attend or feeling well. For those with unknown outcomes prior to the intervention documented active psychiatric illness at last visit was associated with not re-entering care (p = 0.04) Conclusions The network demonstrated low numbers of people with unknown outcomes and high levels of retention in care. Increased levels of retention in care and reductions in unknown outcomes identified after the intervention largely reflected confirmation of clinic transfers while a smaller number were successfully re-engaged in care. Factors associated with disengagement from care were identified. Systems to monitor patient retention, care transfer and minimize disengagement will maximise individual and population-level outcomes for

  13. Potential Health Impacts of Heavy Metals on HIV-Infected Population in USA

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaohui; Hu, Hui; Dailey, Amy B.; Kearney, Greg; Talbott, Evelyn O.; Cook, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Noninfectious comorbidities such as cardiovascular diseases have become increasingly prevalent and occur earlier in life in persons with HIV infection. Despite the emerging body of literature linking environmental exposures to chronic disease outcomes in the general population, the impacts of environmental exposures have received little attention in HIV-infected population. The aim of this study is to investigate whether individuals living with HIV have elevated prevalence of heavy metals compared to non-HIV infected individuals in United States. Methods We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-2010 to compare exposures to heavy metals including cadmium, lead, and total mercury in HIV infected and non-HIV infected subjects. Results In this cross-sectional study, we found that HIV-infected individuals had higher concentrations of all heavy metals than the non-HIV infected group. In a multivariate linear regression model, HIV status was significantly associated with increased blood cadmium (p=0.03) after adjusting for age, sex, race, education, poverty income ratio, and smoking. However, HIV status was not statistically associated with lead or mercury levels after adjusting for the same covariates. Conclusions Our findings suggest that HIV-infected patients might be significantly more exposed to cadmium compared to non-HIV infected individuals which could contribute to higher prevalence of chronic diseases among HIV-infected subjects. Further research is warranted to identify sources of exposure and to understand more about specific health outcomes. PMID:24023932

  14. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  15. HIV type 1 gag genetic diversity among antenatal clinic attendees in North Rift Valley, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Nyagaka, Benuel; Kiptoo, Michael K; Lihana, Raphael W; Khamadi, Samoel A; Makokha, Ernest P; Kinyua, Joyceline G; Mwangi, Joseph; Osman, Saida; Lagat, Nancy J; Muriuki, Joseph; Okoth, Vincent; Gicheru, Michael; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Songok, Elijah M

    2012-05-01

    HIV genetic recombination and high mutation rate increase diversity allowing it to escape from host immune response or antiretroviral drugs. This diversity has enabled specific viral subtypes to be predominant in specific regions. To determine HIV-1 subtypes among seropositive antenatal clinic attendees in Kenya's North Rift Valley, a cross-sectional study was carried out on 116 HIV-1-positive blood samples. Proviral DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by DNAzol lysis and ethanol precipitation. Polymerase chain reactions using specific primers for HIV-1 gag and population sequencing on resulting amplicons were carried out. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 81 (70%) were subtype A1, 13 (11%) subtype D, 8 (7%) subtype C, 3 (3%) subtype A2, 1 (1%) subtype G, and 10 showed possible recombinants: 5 (4%) subtype A1D, 4 (3%) subtype A1C, and 1 (1%) subtype A2C. These data support the need to establish circulating subtypes for better evaluation of effective HIV diagnostic and treatment options in Kenya. PMID:21827277

  16. Thoracic Diseases Associated with HIV Infection in the Era of Antiretroviral Therapy: Clinical and Imaging Findings

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Somnath J.; Crothers, Kristina; Stern, Eric J.; Godwin, J. David; Pipavath, Sudhakar N.

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic has entered its 4th decade. Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) in 1996, the number of AIDS-related deaths has plateaued worldwide. Today, owing to the effectiveness of ART, the HIV-infected population is aging and HIV infection has become a chronic illness. Non-AIDS comorbidities are increasing, and the spectrum of HIV-related thoracic diseases is evolving. In developed countries, bacterial pneumonia has become more common than Pneumocystis pneumonia. Its imaging appearance depends on the responsible organism, most commonly Streptococcus pneumoniae. Mycobacterium tuberculosis continues to be a major threat. Its imaging patterns vary depending on CD4 count. Primary lung cancer and Hodgkin lymphoma are two important non–AIDS-defining malignancies that are increasingly encountered at chest imaging. Human herpesvirus 8, also known as Kaposi sarcoma–associated herpesvirus (KSHV), is strongly linked to HIV-related diseases, including Kaposi sarcoma, multicentric Castleman disease, KSHV inflammatory cytokine syndrome, and primary effusion lymphoma. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome is a direct complication of ART whose manifestations vary with the underlying disease. Given the high rate of smoking among HIV-infected patients, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is another important cause of morbidity and mortality. A high degree of suspicion is required for the early diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension and lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia, given their nonspecific manifestations. Finally, multilocular thymic cyst manifests as a cystic anterior mediastinal mass. Recognition of the clinical and radiologic manifestations of these less traditional HIV-related diseases can expedite diagnosis and treatment in the ART era. © RSNA, 2014 PMID:25019430

  17. Improving cervical cancer screening rates in an urban HIV clinic

    PubMed Central

    Cross, Sara L.; Suharwardy, Sanaa H.; Bodavula, Phani; Schechtman, Kenneth; Overton, E. Turner; Onen, Nur F.; Lane, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-infected women are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer, however screening rates remain low. The objectives of this study were to analyze a quality improvement intervention to increase cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic and to identify factors associated with inadequate screening. Barriers to screening were identified by a multi-disciplinary quality improvement committee at the Washington University Infectious Diseases clinic. Several strategies were developed to address these barriers. The years pre- and post-implementation were analyzed to examine the clinical impact of the intervention. A total of 422 women were seen in both the pre-implementation and post-implementation periods. In the pre-implementation period, 222 women (53%) underwent cervical cancer screening in the form of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing. In the post-implementation period, 318 women (75.3%) underwent cervical cancer screening (p<0.01). Factors associated with lack of screening included fewer visits attended (pre: 4.2 ± 1.5; post: 3.4 ± 1.4; p<0.01). A multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention was successful in overcoming barriers and increasing cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic. PMID:24625234

  18. HIV testing in community pharmacies and retail clinics: A model to expand access to screening for HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Weidle, Paul J.; Lecher, Shirley; Botts, Linda W.; Jones, LaDawna; Spach, David H.; Alvarez, Jorge; Jones, Rhondette; Thomas, Vasavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test the feasibility of offering rapid, point-of-care human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) testing at community pharmacies and retail clinics. Design Pilot program to determine how to implement confidential HIV testing services in community pharmacies and retail clinics. Setting 21 community pharmacies and retail clinics serving urban and rural patients in the United States, from August 2011 to July 2013. Participants 106 community pharmacy and retail clinic staff members. Intervention A model was developed to implement confidential HIV counseling and testing services using community pharmacy and retail clinic staff as certified testing providers, or through collaborations with organizations that provide HIV testing. Training materials were developed and sites selected that serve patients from urban and rural areas to pilot test the model. Each site established a relationship with its local health department for HIV testing policies, developed referral lists for confirmatory HIV testing/care, secured a CLIA Certificate of Waiver, and advertised the service. Staff were trained to perform a rapid point-of-care HIV test on oral fluid, and provide patients with confidential test results and information on HIV. Patients with a preliminary positive result were referred to a physician or health department for confirmatory testing and, if needed, HIV clinical care. Main outcome measures Number of HIV tests completed and amount of time required to conduct testing. Results The 21 participating sites administered 1,540 HIV tests, with 1,087 conducted onsite by staff during regular working hours and 453 conducted at 37 different HIV testing events (e.g., local health fairs). The median amount of time required for pretest counseling/consent, waiting for test results, and posttest counseling was 4, 23, and 3 minutes, respectively. A majority of the sites (17) said they planned to continue HIV testing after the project period ended and would seek assistance or support

  19. Improved Quality of Life for Opioid Dependent Patients Receiving Buprenorphine Treatment in HIV Clinics

    PubMed Central

    Korthuis, P. Todd; Tozzi, Mary Jo; Nandi, Vijay; Fiellin, David A.; Weiss, Linda; Egan, James E.; Botsko, Michael; Acosta, Angela; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Hersh, David; Hsu, Jeffrey; Boverman, Joshua; Altice, Frederick L.

    2011-01-01

    Background Opioid dependence and HIV infection are associated with poor health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Buprenorphine/naloxone (bup/nx) provided in HIV care settings may improve HRQOL. Methods We surveyed 289 HIV-infected opioid-dependent persons treated with clinic-based bup/nx about HRQOL using the Short Form Health Survey (SF-12) administered at baseline, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months. We used normalized SF-12 scores which correspond to a mean HRQOL of 50 for the general U.S. population (SD 10, possible range 0–100). We compared mean normalized mental and physical composite and component scores in quarters 1, 2, 3, and 4 with baseline scores using GEE models. We assessed the effect of clinic-based bup/nx prescription on HRQOL composite scores using mixed effects regression with site as random effect and time as repeated effect. Results Baseline normalized SF-12 scores were lower than the general U.S. population for all HRQOL domains. Average composite mental HRQOL improved from 38.3 (SE 12.5) to 43.4 (SE 13.2) (β 1.13 [95% CI 0.72, 1.54]) and composite physical HRQOL remained unchanged (β 0.21 [95% CI −0.16, 0.57]) over 12 months follow-up. Continued bup/nx treatment across all four quarters was associated with improvements in both physical (β 2.38 [95% CI 0.63, 4.12]) and mental (β 2.51 [95% CI 0.42, 4.60]) HRQOL after adjusting for other contributors to HRQOL. Conclusions Clinic-based bup/nx maintenance therapy is potentially effective in ameliorating some of the adverse effects of opioid dependence on HRQOL for HIV-infected populations. PMID:21317593

  20. Suppression of HIV Replication by Lymphoid Tissue CD8+ Cells Correlates with the Clinical State of HIV-Infected Individuals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackbourn, David J.; Mackewicz, Carl E.; Barker, Edward; Hunt, Thomas K.; Herndier, Brian; Haase, Ashley T.; Levy, Jay A.

    1996-11-01

    Lymphoid tissues from asymptomatic HIV-infected individuals, as compared with symptomatic HIV-infected subjects, show limited histopathological changes and lower levels of HIV expression. In this report we correlate the control of HIV replication in lymph nodes to the non-cytolytic anti-HIV activity of lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells. Five subjects at different stages of HIV-related disease were studied and the ability of their CD8+ cells, isolated from both lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood, to inhibit HIV replication was compared. CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood of two HIV-infected long-term survivors suppressed HIV replication at a low CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.1. The CD8+ cells from the lymphoid tissue of a third asymptomatic subject suppressed HIV replication at a CD8+:CD4+ cell ratio of 0.25; the subject's peripheral blood CD8+ cells showed this antiviral response at a lower ratio of 0.05. The lymphoid tissue CD8+ cells from two AIDS patients were not able to suppress HIV replication, and the peripheral blood CD8+ cells of only one of them suppressed HIV replication. The plasma viremia, cellular HIV load as well as the extent of pathology and virus expression in the lymphoid tissue of the two long-term survivors, were reduced compared with these parameters in the three other subjects. The data suggest that the extent of anti-HIV activity by CD8+ cells from lymphoid tissue relative to peripheral blood correlates best with the clinical state measured by lymphoid tissue pathology and HIV burden in lymphoid tissues and blood. The results and further emphasis to the importance of this cellular immune response in controlling HIV pathogenesis.

  1. Population-Based Assessment of Hypertension Epidemiology and Risk Factors among HIV-Positive and General Populations in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Balzer, Laura; Heller, David; Kotwani, Prashant; Chamie, Gabriel; Clark, Tamara; Ayieko, James; Mwangwa, Florence; Jain, Vivek; Byonanebye, Dathan; Petersen, Maya; Havlir, Diane; Kamya, Moses R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy scale-up in Sub-Saharan Africa has created a growing, aging HIV-positive population at risk for non-communicable diseases such as hypertension. However, the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in this population remain incompletely understood. Methods We measured blood pressure and collected demographic data on over 65,000 adults attending multi-disease community health campaigns in 20 rural Ugandan communities (SEARCH Study: NCT01864603). Our objectives were to determine (i) whether HIV is an independent risk factor for hypertension, and (ii) awareness and control of hypertension in HIV-positive adults and the overall population. Results Hypertension prevalence was 14% overall, and 11% among HIV-positive individuals. 79% of patients were previously undiagnosed, 85% were not taking medication, and 50% of patients on medication had uncontrolled blood pressure. Multivariate predictors of hypertension included older age, male gender, higher BMI, lack of education, alcohol use, and residence in Eastern Uganda. HIV-negative status was independently associated with higher odds of hypertension (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1–1.4). Viral suppression of HIV did not significantly predict hypertension among HIV-positives. Significance The burden of hypertension is substantial and inadequately controlled, both in HIV-positive persons and overall. Universal HIV screening programs could provide counseling, testing, and treatment for hypertension in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27232186

  2. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Rona L; Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T; Broder, Gail B; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W; Renzullo, Philip O

    2016-08-15

    In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health-funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve the health of

  3. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T.; Broder, Gail B.; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W.; Renzullo, Philip O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health–funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve

  4. Exploring Decision-Making of HIV-Infected Hispanics and African Americans Participating in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Goba, Migdalia V.; Dominguez, Dinora C.; Stoll, Pamela; Grady, Christine; Ramos, Catalina; Mican, JoAnn M.

    2011-01-01

    Underrepresentation of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans in clinical trials seriously limits our understanding of the benefits and risks of treatment in these populations. This qualitative study examined factors that racial/ethnic minority patients consider when making decisions regarding research participation. Thirty-five HIV-infected Hispanic and African American patients enrolled in clinical research protocols at the National Institutes of Health were recruited to participate in focus groups and in-depth interviews. The sample of mostly men (n = 22), had a mean age of 45, nearly equal representation of race/ethnicity, and diagnosed 2 to 22 years ago. Baseline questionnaires included demographics and measures of social support and acculturation. Interviewers had similar racial/ethnic, cultural, and linguistic backgrounds as the participants. Four major themes around participants’ decisions to enroll in clinical trials emerged: Enhancers, Barriers, Beliefs, and Psychosocial Context. Results may help researchers develop strategies to facilitate inclusion of HIV-infected Hispanics and African Americans into clinical trials. PMID:21256054

  5. Early Clinical Signs and Symptoms of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Miedzinski, Lil J.

    1992-01-01

    Early clinical signs and symptoms of human immunodeficiency virus infection are protean and can reflect the effects of the virus or represent early manifestations of an illness associated with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Knowledge of a patient's potential risk for HIV infection and of the natural history of the illness allow early signs and symptoms to be recognized. Early intervention can delay progression to AIDS. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:21221397

  6. T-cell therapies for HIV: Preclinical successes and current clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Jones, R Brad; Nixon, Douglas F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been successful in controlling HIV infection, it does not provide a permanent cure, requires lifelong treatment, and HIV-positive individuals are left with social concerns such as stigma. The recent application of T cells to treat cancer and viral reactivations post-transplant offers a potential strategy to control HIV infection. It is known that naturally occurring HIV-specific T cells can inhibit HIV initially, but this response is not sustained in the majority of people living with HIV. Genetically modifying T cells to target HIV, resist infection, and persist in the immunosuppressive environment found in chronically infected HIV-positive individuals might provide a therapeutic solution for HIV. This review focuses on successful preclinical studies and current clinical strategies using T-cell therapy to control HIV infection and mediate a functional cure solution. PMID:27265874

  7. HIV testing and counselling for migrant populations living in high-income countries: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monge, Susana; Azcoaga, Amaya; Rio, Isabel; Hernando, Victoria; Gonzalez, Cristina; Alejos, Belen; Caro, Ana Maria; Perez-Cachafeiro, Santiago; Ramirez-Rubio, Oriana; Bolumar, Francisco; Noori, Teymur; Del Amo, Julia

    2013-01-01

    Background: The barriers to HIV testing and counselling that migrants encounter can jeopardize proactive HIV testing that relies on the fact that HIV testing must be linked to care. We analyse available evidence on HIV testing and counselling strategies targeting migrants and ethnic minorities in high-income countries. Methods: Systematic literature review of the five main databases of articles in English from Europe, North America and Australia between 2005 and 2009. Results: Of 1034 abstracts, 37 articles were selected. Migrants, mainly from HIV-endemic countries, are at risk of HIV infection and its consequences. The HIV prevalence among migrants is higher than the general population’s, and migrants have higher frequency of delayed HIV diagnosis. For migrants from countries with low HIV prevalence and for ethnic minorities, socio-economic vulnerability puts them at risk of acquiring HIV. Migrants have specific legal and administrative impediments to accessing HIV testing—in some countries, undocumented migrants are not entitled to health care—as well as cultural and linguistic barriers, racism and xenophobia. Migrants and ethnic minorities fear stigma from their communities, yet community acceptance is key for well-being. Conclusions: Migrants and ethnic minorities should be offered HIV testing, but the barriers highlighted in this review may deter programs from achieving the final goal, which is linking migrants and ethnic minorities to HIV clinical care under the public health perspective. PMID:23002238

  8. Seroconversion risk perception among jail populations: a call for gender-specific HIV prevention programming.

    PubMed

    Alarid, Leanne Fiftal; Hahl, Jeannie M

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV/AIDS infection among prisoners is 3 to 4 times higher than in the U.S. population. Given that one in seven HIV-positive Americans pass through a correctional facility every year, the criminal justice system is in an ideal position to aggressively implement effective HIV education, treatment, and prevention. This study examines barriers to the effective delivery of these services and evaluates differences in risk perception among nearly 600 female and male inmates. The results underscore gender differences in Perceived Risk of Seroconversion and Exposure to HIV Education, suggesting that jails should implement gender-specific HIV prevention programming. PMID:24659758

  9. Contribution of Genetic Background and Clinical Risk Factors to Low-Trauma Fractures in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive Persons: The Swiss HIV Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Junier, Thomas; Rotger, Margalida; Biver, Emmanuel; Ledergerber, Bruno; Barceló, Catalina; Bartha, Istvan; Kovari, Helen; Schmid, Patrick; Fux, Christoph; Bernasconi, Enos; Brun del Re, Claudia; Weber, Rainer; Fellay, Jacques; Tarr, Philip E.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The impact of human genetic background on low-trauma fracture (LTF) risk has not been evaluated in the context of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and clinical LTF risk factors. Methods. In the general population, 6 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associate with LTF through genome-wide association study. Using genome-wide SNP arrays and imputation, we genotyped these SNPs in HIV-positive, white Swiss HIV Cohort Study participants. We included 103 individuals with a first, physician-validated LTF and 206 controls matched on gender, whose duration of observation and whose antiretroviral therapy start dates were similar using incidence density sampling. Analyses of nongenetic LTF risk factors were based on 158 cases and 788 controls. Results. A genetic risk score built from the 6 LTF-associated SNPs did not associate with LTF risk, in both models including and not including parental hip fracture history. The contribution of clinical LTF risk factors was limited in our dataset. Conclusions. Genetic LTF markers with a modest effect size in the general population do not improve fracture prediction in persons with HIV, in whom clinical LTF risk factors are prevalent in both cases and controls. PMID:27419173

  10. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV–Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  11. Sleep Apnea Symptoms as a Predictor of Fatigue in an Urban HIV Clinic.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Umesh; Baker, Jason V; Wang, Qi; Khalil, Wajahat; Kunisaki, Ken M

    2015-11-01

    Fatigue is common among persons living with HIV (PLWH), and risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) such as older age and obesity are increasingly prevalent. Studies of OSA among PLWH are lacking, so we aimed to characterize OSA symptoms and associated clinical consequences (e.g., fatigue) among a contemporary population of PLWH. Self-administered surveys containing 23 items that included self-reported snoring, witnessed apneas, estimated sleep duration, the Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), and the FACIT-Fatigue score were mailed to PLWH receiving care at an urban HIV clinic. Clinical/demographic data were collected from the medical record. Multivariable linear regression models were created to study relationships between fatigue, clinical variables, and OSA symptoms. Of 535 surveys, 203 (38%) responded. Eight patients (3.9%) had known OSA. Among those without known OSA, mean respondent characteristics included: age 47 years; 80% male, 41% African American, 48% Caucasian, BMI 26.4 kg/m(2), duration of HIV diagnosis 12 years, 93% on antiretroviral therapy, and 81% with <50 HIV RNA copies/mL. 27% reported snoring, 24% reported witnessed apneas, and 38% had excessive daytime sleepiness. Witnessed apnea was the strongest independent predictor of fatigue (lower FACIT-Fatigue score; β = -6.49; p < 0.001); this difference of 6.49 points exceeds the accepted minimal clinically important difference of 3.0 points. Other predictors included opioid use (β = -5.53; p < 0.001), depression (β = -4.18; p = 0.02), antidepressant use (β = -4.25; p = 0.02), and sleep duration < 6 h (β = -3.42; p = 0.02). Our data strongly support the need for increased efforts directed at OSA screening and treatment in PLWH. PMID:26376124

  12. Surveillance of HIV and syphilis infections among antenatal clinic attendees in Tanzania-2003/2004

    PubMed Central

    Swai, Roland O; Somi G, Geofrey R; Matee, Mecky IN; Killewo, Japhet; Lyamuya, Eligius F; Kwesigabo, Gideon; Tulli, Tuhuma; Kabalimu, Titus K; Ng'ang'a, Lucy; Isingo, Raphael; Ndayongeje, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Background This paper presents the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and syphilis infections among women attending antenatal clinics (ANC) in Tanzania obtained during the 2003/2004 ANC surveillance. Methods Ten geographical regions; six of them were involved in a previous survey, while the remaining four were freshly selected on the basis of having the largest population among the remaining 20 regions. For each region, six ANC were selected, two from each of three strata (urban, peri-urban and rural). Three of the sites did not participate, resulting into 57 surveyed clinics. 17,813 women who were attending the chosen clinics for the first time for any pregnancy between October 2003 and January 2004. Patient particulars were obtained by interview and blood specimens were drawn for HIV and syphilis testing. HIV testing was done anonymously and the results were unlinked. Results Of the 17,813 women screened for HIV, 1,545 (8.7% (95% CI = 8.3–9.1)) tested positive with the highest prevalence in women aged 25–34 years (11%), being higher among single women (9.7%) than married women (8.6%) (p < 0.07), and increased with level of education from 5.2% among women with no education to 9.3% among those at least primary education (p < 0.001). Prevalence ranged from 4.8% (95% CI = 3.8% – 9.8%) in Kagera to 15.3% (95% CI = 13.9% – 16.8%) in Mbeya and was; 3.7%, 4.7%, 9.1%, 11.2% and 15.3% for rural, semi-urban, road side, urban and 15.3% border clinics, respectively (p < 0.001). Of the 17,323 women screened for syphilis, 1265 (7.3% (95%CI = 6.9–7.7)) were positive, with highest prevalence in the age group 35–49 yrs (10.4%) (p < 0.001), and being higher among women with no education than those with some education (9.8% versus 6.8%) (p < 0.0001), but marital status had no influence. Prevalence ranged from 2.1% (95% CI = 1.4% – 3.0%) in Kigoma to 14.9% (95% CI = 13.3%-16.6%) in Kagera and was 16.0% (95% CI = 13.3–18.9), 10.5% (95% CI = 9.5–11

  13. Estimating HIV Prevalence in Zimbabwe Using Population-Based Survey Data

    PubMed Central

    Chinomona, Amos; Mwambi, Henry Godwell

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of HIV prevalence computed using data obtained from sampling a subgroup of the national population may lack the representativeness of all the relevant domains of the population. These estimates are often computed on the assumption that HIV prevalence is uniform across all domains of the population. Use of appropriate statistical methods together with population-based survey data can enhance better estimation of national and subgroup level HIV prevalence and can provide improved explanations of the variation in HIV prevalence across different domains of the population. In this study we computed design-consistent estimates of HIV prevalence, and their respective 95% confidence intervals at both the national and subgroup levels. In addition, we provided a multivariable survey logistic regression model from a generalized linear modelling perspective for explaining the variation in HIV prevalence using demographic, socio-economic, socio-cultural and behavioural factors. Essentially, this study borrows from the proximate determinants conceptual framework which provides guiding principles upon which socio-economic and socio-cultural variables affect HIV prevalence through biological behavioural factors. We utilize the 2010–11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (2010–11 ZDHS) data (which are population based) to estimate HIV prevalence in different categories of the population and for constructing the logistic regression model. It was established that HIV prevalence varies greatly with age, gender, marital status, place of residence, literacy level, belief on whether condom use can reduce the risk of contracting HIV and level of recent sexual activity whereas there was no marked variation in HIV prevalence with social status (measured using a wealth index), method of contraceptive and an individual’s level of education. PMID:26624280

  14. Estimating HIV Prevalence in Zimbabwe Using Population-Based Survey Data.

    PubMed

    Chinomona, Amos; Mwambi, Henry Godwell

    2015-01-01

    Estimates of HIV prevalence computed using data obtained from sampling a subgroup of the national population may lack the representativeness of all the relevant domains of the population. These estimates are often computed on the assumption that HIV prevalence is uniform across all domains of the population. Use of appropriate statistical methods together with population-based survey data can enhance better estimation of national and subgroup level HIV prevalence and can provide improved explanations of the variation in HIV prevalence across different domains of the population. In this study we computed design-consistent estimates of HIV prevalence, and their respective 95% confidence intervals at both the national and subgroup levels. In addition, we provided a multivariable survey logistic regression model from a generalized linear modelling perspective for explaining the variation in HIV prevalence using demographic, socio-economic, socio-cultural and behavioural factors. Essentially, this study borrows from the proximate determinants conceptual framework which provides guiding principles upon which socio-economic and socio-cultural variables affect HIV prevalence through biological behavioural factors. We utilize the 2010-11 Zimbabwe Demographic and Health Survey (2010-11 ZDHS) data (which are population based) to estimate HIV prevalence in different categories of the population and for constructing the logistic regression model. It was established that HIV prevalence varies greatly with age, gender, marital status, place of residence, literacy level, belief on whether condom use can reduce the risk of contracting HIV and level of recent sexual activity whereas there was no marked variation in HIV prevalence with social status (measured using a wealth index), method of contraceptive and an individual's level of education. PMID:26624280

  15. From population to HIV: the organizational and structural determinants of HIV outcomes in sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There exists no consistent explanation for why some countries are successful in combating HIV/AIDS and others are not, and we need such an explanation in order to design effective policies and programmes. Research evaluating HIV interventions from a biomedical or public health perspective does not always take full account of the historical and organizational characteristics of countries likely to influence HIV outcomes. The analysis in this paper addresses this shortcoming by testing the impact of organizational and structural factors, particularly those resulting from population interventions, on HIV outcomes at the country level in sub-Saharan Africa. Methods The primary independent variables are factors that originated from efforts to slow population growth: whether a country has a long-time affiliate of the International Planned Parenthood Federation and whether a country has a population policy. Additional structural factors likely to impact HIV outcomes include the level of wealth, the level of cultural fractionalization, and the former colonial power. The present study uses multivariate regression techniques with countries in sub-Saharan Africa as the unit of analysis, and four measures of success in addressing HIV: the change in prevalence between 2001 and 2009; the change in incidence between 2001 and 2009; the level of overall antiretroviral coverage in 2009; and the level of antiretroviral coverage for prevention of vertical transmission in 2009. Results Countries with the greatest declines in HIV prevalence and incidence had older International Planned Parenthood Federation affiliates and had adopted population policies, even after controlling for age of epidemic, level of antiretroviral coverage, and funding for HIV. Population policies are also important predictors of levels of overall antiretroviral coverage and of coverage of HIV-positive pregnant women to prevent vertical transmission. Structural factors with significant impacts include

  16. Representational Fluency in HIV Clinical Practice: A Model of Instructor Discourse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banach, Mary A.; Gifford, Bernard R.; Holodniy, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Clinicians treating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients are expected to stay up-to-date with rapidly changing knowledge and practice. Continuing medical education (CME) programs are one source of new knowledge about HIV clinical management. Little is known about instructor-participant discourse in HIV CME programs and whether…

  17. Clinical management of dyslipidaemia associated with combination antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Manfredi, Roberto; Bon, Isabella; Re, Maria Carla; Viale, Pierluigi

    2016-06-01

    The introduction of potent combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has had a remarkable impact on the natural history of HIV infection, leading to a dramatic decline in the mortality rate and a considerable increase in the life expectancy of HIV-positive people. However, cART use is frequently associated with several metabolic complications, mostly represented by lipid metabolism alterations, which are reported very frequently among persons treated with antiretroviral agents. In particular, hyperlipidaemia occurs in up to 70%-80% of HIV-positive subjects receiving cART and is mainly associated with specific antiretroviral drugs belonging to three classes of antiretroviral agents: NRTIs, NNRTIs and PIs. The potential long-term consequences of cART-associated dyslipidaemia are not completely understood, but an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease has been reported in HIV-infected patients on cART, so prompt correction of lipid metabolism abnormalities is mandatory in this population. Dietary changes, regular aerobic exercise and switching to a different antiretroviral regimen associated with a more favourable metabolic profile are the first steps in clinical management, but lipid-lowering therapy with fibrates or statins is often required. In this case, the choice of hypolipidaemic drugs should take into account the potential pharmacokinetic interactions with many antiretroviral agents. PMID:26846208

  18. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  19. Demographical, Viro-Immunological, Clinical and Therapeutical Characteristics of HIV-Infected Patients in an “Epidemiologically Unexplored” Region of Italy (Calabria Region): the CalabrHIV Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Postorino, Maria Concetta; Luciani, Filippo; Mangano, Carmelo; Carpentieri, Maria Stella; Scerbo, Paolo; Priamo, Armando; Berardelli, Giuseppina; Marino, Roberto; Vallone, Alfredo; Serrao, Nicola; Pisani, Vincenzo; Costa, Chiara; Terremoto, Albano; Foti, Giuseppe; Cosco, Lucio; Calderazzo, Massimo; Corigliano, Domenico; Scordo, Preziosa; Strazzulla, Alessio; Torti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives HIV epidemics may differ among epidemiological contexts. We aimed at constructing an HIV clinical cohort whose main epidemiological, clinical and therapeutical characteristics are described (the CalabrHIV cohort, Calabria Region, Southern Italy). Methods The CalabrHIV Cohort includes all HIV patients on active follow-up in all infectious disease centers in the Calabria Region as at October 2014. All information was recorded in a common electronic database. Not-infectious co-morbidities (such as cardiovascular diseases, bone fractures, diabetes, renal failure and hypertension) were also studied. Results 548 patients (68% males; 59% aged <50 years) were included in the CalabrHIV cohort. Major risk factors were: sexual transmission (49%) and intravenous drug use (34%). 39% patients had HCV and/or HBV co-infection. Amongst 404 patients who had a complete clinical history, 34% were AIDS presenters and 49.3% had CD4 count ≤350/mm3 at HIV diagnosis. 83% patients on HAART had undetectable HIV-RNA. Hypertension was the most frequent co-morbidity (21.5%). Multimorbidity was more frequent in >50 years old patients than in <50 years old ones (30% vs. 6%; p<0.0001). Co-morbidity was more frequent in HCV and/or HBV co-infected than in HIV mono-infected patients (46.6% vs. 31.7%: p=0.0006). Conclusion This cohort presentation study sheds light, for the first time, on HIV patients’ characteristics in the Calabria Region. We showed that HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis were affected by concomitant not-infectious co-morbidities more than the HIV mono-infected individuals. New HCV treatments are therefore to be implemented in the co-infected population. PMID:26543523

  20. Models and estimation methods for clinical HIV-1 data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verotta, Davide

    2005-12-01

    Clinical HIV-1 data include many individual factors, such as compliance to treatment, pharmacokinetics, variability in respect to viral dynamics, race, sex, income, etc., which might directly influence or be associated with clinical outcome. These factors need to be taken into account to achieve a better understanding of clinical outcome and mathematical models can provide a unifying framework to do so. The first objective of this paper is to demonstrate the development of comprehensive HIV-1 dynamics models that describe viral dynamics and also incorporate different factors influencing such dynamics. The second objective of this paper is to describe alternative estimation methods that can be applied to the analysis of data with such models. In particular, we consider: (i) simple but effective two-stage estimation methods, in which data from each patient are analyzed separately and summary statistics derived from the results, (ii) more complex nonlinear mixed effect models, used to pool all the patient data in a single analysis. Bayesian estimation methods are also considered, in particular: (iii) maximum posterior approximations, MAP, and (iv) Markov chain Monte Carlo, MCMC. Bayesian methods incorporate prior knowledge into the models, thus avoiding some of the model simplifications introduced when the data are analyzed using two-stage methods, or a nonlinear mixed effect framework. We demonstrate the development of the models and the different estimation methods using real AIDS clinical trial data involving patients receiving multiple drugs regimens.

  1. Living well with HIV in Nigeria? Stigma and survival challenges preventing optimum benefit from an ART clinic.

    PubMed

    Aransiola, Joshua; Imoyera, Winifred; Olowookere, Samuel; Zarowsky, Christina

    2014-03-01

    Thirty years into the HIV pandemic, the interactions of stigma, social and economic survival, and clinical interventions continue to be key to understanding and managing HIV at both personal and societal levels. With antiretroviral therapy, HIV is increasingly a chronic condition requiring lifelong treatment, near-perfect adherence, and support from both social networks and formal services. This study asked: is stigma still a significant problem for people living with HIV (PLHIV) who have secured access to antiretrovirals (ARVs)? How do PLHIV accessing ARVs in Nigeria experience the social, economic and health service supports intended to address their needs? What are the concerns and challenges of PLHIV and health workers regarding these supports? What are the implications for approaches to stigma and discrimination? This qualitative study at the Antiretroviral (ART) Clinic of the Osogbo State Hospital, Osun State, Nigeria involved in-depth interviews with 15 PLHIV who have been attending the clinic for at least one year, and three health workers. The results reveal both the diversity among even a small number of patients, and persistent cross-cutting themes of stigma, discrimination, poverty, and the psychological impacts of insecure livelihoods and well-intentioned but ultimately stigmatizing supports such as selective food parcels. Both population-based interventions against stigma and poverty, as well as micro-level, contextualized attention to patients', families' and health workers' fear of social exclusion and infection at a clinic and community level are needed if patients - and society - are to live well with HIV in Nigeria. PMID:24569837

  2. Diagnosis of paediatric HIV infection in a primary health care setting with a clinical algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, C.; Liebeschuetz, S.; Blaauw, D.; Cassol, S.; Qazi, S.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the validity of an algorithm used by primary care health workers to identify children with symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This HIV algorithm is being implemented in South Africa as part of the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness (IMCI), a strategy that aims to improve childhood morbidity and mortality by improving care at the primary care level. As AIDS is a leading cause of death in children in southern Africa, diagnosis and management of symptomatic HIV infection was added to the existing IMCI algorithm. METHODS: In total, 690 children who attended the outpatients department in a district hospital in South Africa were assessed with the HIV algorithm and by a paediatrician. All children were then tested for HIV viral load. The validity of the algorithm in detecting symptomatic HIV was compared with clinical diagnosis by a paediatrician and the result of an HIV test. Detailed clinical data were used to improve the algorithm. FINDINGS: Overall, 198 (28.7%) enrolled children were infected with HIV. The paediatrician correctly identified 142 (71.7%) children infected with HIV, whereas the IMCI/HIV algorithm identified 111 (56.1%). Odds ratios were calculated to identify predictors of HIV infection and used to develop an improved HIV algorithm that is 67.2% sensitive and 81.5% specific in clinically detecting HIV infection. CONCLUSIONS: Children with symptomatic HIV infection can be identified effectively by primary level health workers through the use of an algorithm. The improved HIV algorithm developed in this study could be used by countries with high prevalences of HIV to enable IMCI practitioners to identify and care for HIV-infected children. PMID:14997238

  3. Adverse childhood experiences, gender, and HIV risk behaviors: Results from a population-based sample.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lin; Chuang, Deng-Min; Lee, Yookyong

    2016-12-01

    Recent HIV research suggested assessing adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) as contributing factors of HIV risk behaviors. However, studies often focused on a single type of adverse experience and very few utilized population-based data. This population study examined the associations between ACE (individual and cumulative ACE score) and HIV risk behaviors. We analyzed the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) from 5 states. The sample consisted of 39,434 adults. Eight types of ACEs that included different types of child abuse and household dysfunctions before the age of 18 were measured. A cumulative score of ACEs was also computed. Logistic regression estimated of the association between ACEs and HIV risk behaviors using odds ratio (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for males and females separately. We found that ACEs were positively associated with HIV risk behaviors overall, but the associations differed between males and females in a few instances. While the cumulative ACE score was associated with HIV risk behaviors in a stepwise manner, the pattern varied by gender. For males, the odds of HIV risk increased at a significant level as long as they experienced one ACE, whereas for females, the odds did not increase until they experienced three or more ACEs. Future research should further investigate the gender-specific associations between ACEs and HIV risk behaviors. As childhood adversities are prevalent among general population, and such experiences are associated with increased risk behaviors for HIV transmission, service providers can benefit from the principles of trauma-informed practice. PMID:27413671

  4. Alcohol Drinking Pattern: A Comparison between HIV-Infected Patients and Individuals from the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Maria Leticia R.; Barcellos, Nemora T.; Alencastro, Paulo R.; Wolff, Fernando H.; Moreira, Leila B.; Gus, Miguel; Brandão, Ajacio B. M.; Fuchs, Flavio D.; Fuchs, Sandra C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Alcohol consumption is highly prevalent in the general population and among HIV-infected population. This study aimed to compare the pattern of alcohol consumption and to describe characteristics associated with heavy alcohol consumption in individuals from the general population with patients infected with HIV. Methods Participants for this analysis came from a population-based cross-sectional study and from a consecutive sampling of patients infected with HIV. Participants aged 18 years or older were interviewed using similar questionnaires with questions pertaining to socio-demographic characteristics, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, and HIV-related characteristics, among others. Blood pressure and anthropometric measures were measured using standardized procedures. Results Weekly alcohol consumption was more prevalent among individuals from the general population than HIV-infected patients: 57.0 vs. 31.1%, P<0.001. The prevalence of heavy episodic drinking was higher in the population sample as well: 46.1 vs. 17.0%, P<0.001. In the general population, heavy alcohol consumption was more prevalent in men. Cigarette smoking was independently associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV infected (Prevalence Ratio; PR = 5.9; 95%CI 2.6–13.9; P<0,001) and general population (PR = 2.6; 95%CI 1.9–3.0; P<0.001). Years at school were inversely associated with heavy alcohol consumption among HIV-infected patients and directly associated among participants from the general population, even after controlling for sex, age, skin color, and smoking. Conclusions Heavy alcohol consumption is more prevalent in the general population than among HIV-infected patients. Individuals aware about their disease may reduce the amount of alcoholic beverages consumption comparatively to healthy individuals from the general population. PMID:27362541

  5. The early spread and epidemic ignition of HIV-1 in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Nuno R.; Rambaut, Andrew; Suchard, Marc A.; Baele, Guy; Bedford, Trevor; Ward, Melissa J.; Tatem, Andrew J.; Sousa, João D.; Arinaminpathy, Nimalan; Pépin, Jacques; Posada, David; Peeters, Martine; Pybus, Oliver G.; Lemey, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Thirty years after the discovery of HIV-1, the early transmission, dissemination, and establishment of the virus in human populations remain unclear. Using statistical approaches applied to HIV-1 sequence data from central Africa, we show that from the 1920s Kinshasa (in what is now the Democratic Republic of Congo) was the focus of early transmission and the source of pre-1960 pandemic viruses elsewhere. Location and dating estimates were validated using the earliest HIV-1 archival sample, also from Kinshasa. The epidemic histories of HIV-1 group M and nonpandemic group O were similar until ~1960, after which group M underwent an epidemiological transition and outpaced regional population growth. Our results reconstruct the early dynamics of HIV-1 and emphasize the role of social changes and transport networks in the establishment of this virus in human populations. PMID:25278604

  6. HIV among people who use drugs: a global perspective of populations at risk.

    PubMed

    Stockman, Jamila K; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2010-12-01

    This article examines the epidemiology of HIV among selected subgroups of drug users around the world who are "most at risk"--men who have sex with men, female sex workers, prisoners, and mobile populations. The underlying determinants of HIV infection among these populations include stigma, physical and sexual violence, mental illness, social marginalization, and economic vulnerability. HIV interventions must reach beyond specific risk groups and individuals to address the micro-level and macro-level determinants that shape their risk environments. Public health interventions that focus on the physical, social, and health policy environments that influence HIV risk-taking in various settings are significantly more likely to impact the incidence of HIV and other blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections across larger population groups. PMID:21045594

  7. Estimating the net effect of HIV on child mortality in African populations affected by generalized HIV epidemics.

    PubMed

    Marston, Milly; Zaba, Basia; Salomon, Joshua A; Brahmbhatt, Heena; Bagenda, Danstan

    2005-02-01

    For a given prevalence, HIV has a relatively higher impact on child mortality when mortality from other causes is low. To project the effect of the epidemic on child mortality, it is necessary to estimate a realistic schedule of "net" age-specific mortality rates that would operate if HIV were the only cause of child death observable. We assume that this net pattern would be independent of mortality from other causes. We used African studies that measured the survival of HIV-infected children (direct data) or survival of children of HIV-infected mothers (indirect data). We developed a mathematic procedure to estimate the mortality of infected children from indirect data sources and obtained net HIV mortality patterns for each study population. The net age-specific HIV mortality pattern for infected children can be described by a double Weibull curve fitted to empiric data; this gives a functional representation of age-specific mortality rates that decline after infancy and rise in the preteens. The fitted curve that we would expect if HIV were the only effective cause of death shows 67% net survival at 1 year and 39% at 5 years. The curve also predicts 13% net survival at 10 years using constraints based on survival of infected adults. PMID:15671809

  8. Critical Review: Building on the HIV Cascade: A Complementary "HIV States and Transitions" Framework for Describing HIV Diagnosis, Care, and Treatment at the Population Level.

    PubMed

    Powers, Kimberly A; Miller, William C

    2015-07-01

    The HIV cascade--often referred to as "the HIV continuum"--provides a valuable framework for population-level representations of engagement with the HIV healthcare system. The importance and appeal of this framework are evidenced by a large body of scientific literature, as well as by the adoption of cascade-related indicators by medical and public health organizations worldwide. Despite its centrality in the fields of HIV treatment and prevention, however, the traditional cascade provides limited description of the processes affecting the numbers it represents. Representations that describe these processes and capture the dynamic nature of HIV-infected persons' pathways through the healthcare system are essential for monitoring and predicting intervention effects and epidemic trends. We propose here a complementary schema--termed the "HIV States and Transitions" framework--designed to maintain key strengths of the traditional cascade while addressing key limitations and more fully describing the dynamic aspects of HIV testing, care, and treatment at the population level. PMID:25835604

  9. HIV/AIDS Misconceptions among Latinos: Findings from a Population-Based Survey of California Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritieni, Assunta; Moskowitz, Joel; Tholandi, Maya

    2008-01-01

    Misconceptions about HIV/AIDS among Latino adults (N=454) in California were examined using data from a population-based telephone survey conducted in 2000. Common misconceptions concerning modes of HIV transmission included transmission via mosquito or animal bite (64.1%), public facilities (48.3%), or kissing someone on the cheek (24.8%). A…

  10. Population mobility and spread of HIV across the Indo-Nepal border.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Binod

    2007-09-01

    The article reviews information on the epidemiology of HIV/AIDS and behavioural networking to examine the role of population mobility in spreading HIV across the Indo-Nepal border. Documents were collected through a systematic search of electronic databases and web-based information resources, and the review focuses on studies about types of the virus, prevalence of HIV, and sexual and injecting networking. HIV-1 (subtype C) and HIV-2 were identified in Nepal. The prevalence of HIV was higher among male labour migrants and female sex workers (FSWs) who returned from India, especially from Mumbai, than in similar non-migrant groups. In the early 2000s, about 6-10% of Mumbai returnee men, compared to up to 4% of India returnee men and up to 3% of non-migrant men in the far-west Nepal, were identified with HIV. Likewise, when the prevalence of HIV among sex workers in Kathmandu was found to be 17% in 1999-2000, up to 44% of India returnee and 73% of Mumbai returnee FSWs were identified with the virus. These data are, however, based on small samples with questionable representativeness of the target populations and need to be interpreted cautiously. They also generate a biased impression that HIV was coming into Nepal from India. Recently, the possibility of a two-way flow of HIV across the Indo-Nepal border through injecting and sexual networking have been indicated by serological and behavioural data from a south-eastern cluster of Nepal and a north-eastern district of India. Although similar behavioural networks exist along other segments of the border, serological data are unavailable to assess whether and how extensively this phenomenon has caused the spread of HIV. Collaborative research and interventions covering both sides of the border are desirable to fully understand and address the prospect of HIV epidemics associated with cross-border population mixing. PMID:18330059

  11. Amebiasis in HIV-1-infected Japanese men: clinical features and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Koji; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Escueta-de Cadiz, Aleyla; Tanuma, Junko; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Oka, Shinichi

    2011-09-01

    Invasive amebic diseases caused by Entamoeba histolytica are increasing among men who have sex with men and co-infection of ameba and HIV-1 is an emerging problem in developed East Asian countries. To characterize the clinical and epidemiological features of invasive amebiasis in HIV-1 patients, the medical records of 170 co-infected cases were analyzed retrospectively, and E. histolytica genotype was assayed in 14 cases. In this series of HIV-1-infected patients, clinical presentation of invasive amebiasis was similar to that described in the normal host. High fever, leukocytosis and high CRP were associated with extraluminal amebic diseases. Two cases died from amebic colitis (resulting in intestinal perforation in one and gastrointestinal bleeding in one), and three cases died from causes unrelated to amebiasis. Treatment with metronidazole or tinidazole was successful in the other 165 cases. Luminal treatment was provided to 83 patients following metronidazole or tinidazole treatment. However, amebiasis recurred in 6 of these, a frequency similar to that seen in patients who did not receive luminal treatment. Recurrence was more frequent in HCV-antibody positive individuals and those who acquired syphilis during the follow-up period. Various genotypes of E. histolytica were identified in 14 patients but there was no correlation between genotype and clinical features. The outcome of metronidazole and tinidazole treatment of uncomplicated amebiasis was excellent even in HIV-1-infected individuals. Luminal treatment following metronidazole or tinidazole treatment does not reduce recurrence of amebiasis in high risk populations probably due to amebic re-infection. PMID:21931875

  12. Dolutegravir: clinical efficacy and role in HIV therapy.

    PubMed

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Mezzaroma, Ivano

    2014-07-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integrase enzyme has recently emerged as a primary alternative target to block viral replication, and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are now considered an alternative 'third agent' class of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Dolutegravir is the first next-generation INSTI showing some novel and intriguing characteristics: it has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile with a prolonged intracellular halflife, rendering feasible a once daily dosing without the need for pharmacokinetic boosting. Secondly, it is largely metabolized via uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 with a minor component of cytochrome P450 isoforms, thus allowing a low grade of drug-drug interactions, so that its metabolic profile consents co-administration with the majority of the other ARV drugs without dose adjustments. Lastly, but no less important, virological studies have clearly demonstrated that dolutegravir has a significant activity against HIV-1 isolates showing raltegravir and/or elvitegravir associated resistance mutations. The attributes of once daily administration and the potential to treat INSTI-resistant viruses make dolutegravir an interesting and promising new agent in the treatment of both naïve and experienced HIV-1 subjects. In this review, the main concerns on dolutegravir efficacy are focused through the analysis of the currently available data from clinical studies in naïve and experienced patients, evaluating its possible place within the anti-HIV-1 drug armamentarium. The development of newer once daily, single tablet coformulations improved drug adherence and maximized the success of ARV therapy. Pharmacokinetic studies and dose-ranging trials suggested that dolutegravir is a good candidate for a single tablet regimen in one or more new coformulated pills that will be available in the near future. PMID:24982751

  13. Dolutegravir: clinical efficacy and role in HIV therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fantauzzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) integrase enzyme has recently emerged as a primary alternative target to block viral replication, and integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are now considered an alternative ‘third agent’ class of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. Dolutegravir is the first next-generation INSTI showing some novel and intriguing characteristics: it has a favorable pharmacokinetic profile with a prolonged intracellular halflife, rendering feasible a once daily dosing without the need for pharmacokinetic boosting. Secondly, it is largely metabolized via uridine diphosphate glucuronosyltransferase-1A1 with a minor component of cytochrome P450 isoforms, thus allowing a low grade of drug–drug interactions, so that its metabolic profile consents co-administration with the majority of the other ARV drugs without dose adjustments. Lastly, but no less important, virological studies have clearly demonstrated that dolutegravir has a significant activity against HIV-1 isolates showing raltegravir and/or elvitegravir associated resistance mutations. The attributes of once daily administration and the potential to treat INSTI-resistant viruses make dolutegravir an interesting and promising new agent in the treatment of both naïve and experienced HIV-1 subjects. In this review, the main concerns on dolutegravir efficacy are focused through the analysis of the currently available data from clinical studies in naïve and experienced patients, evaluating its possible place within the anti-HIV-1 drug armamentarium. The development of newer once daily, single tablet coformulations improved drug adherence and maximized the success of ARV therapy. Pharmacokinetic studies and dose-ranging trials suggested that dolutegravir is a good candidate for a single tablet regimen in one or more new coformulated pills that will be available in the near future. PMID:24982751

  14. Differences in Clinical Manifestations of Acute and Early HIV-1 Infection between HIV-1 Subtypes in African Women

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Richard R.; Morrison, Charles S.; Kwok, Cynthia; Chipato, Tsungai; Musoke, Robert; Arts, Eric J.; Nankya, Immaculate; Salata, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the differences in clinical manifestations between women with various HIV-1 subtypes during acute (AI) and early (EI) HIV infection. In a longitudinal cohort study, clinical signs and symptoms among Uganda and Zimbabwe women with AI and EI were compared with HIV-negative controls; symptoms were assessed quarterly for 15 to 24 months. Early HIV infection was defined as the first visit during which a woman tested HIV antibody positive. Women who were HIV negative serologically but DNA polymerase chain reaction positive were considered AI. In all, 26 women were classified AI and 192 EI, with 654 HIV-negative controls. Primary HIV infection (AI and EI) was associated with unexplained fever (P <.01), weight loss (P <.01), fatigue (P <.01), inguinal adenopathy (P <.01), and cervical friability (P =.01). More women with subtype C infection had unexplained fever, fatigue, and abnormal vaginal discharge compared to subtype A or D infection. Inguinal adenopathy occurred less often in women with subtype A infection than those with subtype C or D infection. PMID:24106054

  15. Developing clinical practice guidelines in HIV rehabilitation: process recommendations and guiding principles.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Kelly K; Wilkins, Annette; Zack, Elisse; Solomon, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Our purpose was to develop process recommendations and guiding principles for future clinical practice guidelines in HIV rehabilitation. We conducted a scoping study that included focus group and interview consultations with 28 participants including people living with HIV, researchers, clinicians, educators, and policy stakeholders with expertise in HIV and rehabilitation. We used qualitative content analysis techniques to identify emergent themes related to the development of clinical practice guidelines. Results included seven recommendations for the process of developing clinical practice guidelines in HIV rehabilitation that spanned areas of flexibility, scope, adopting existing evidence from concurrent health conditions, format, interprofessional approach to development and implementation, terminology, and knowledge translation. Three guiding principles emerged to inform the philosophical approach for guideline development. These findings serve as a foundation for the development of clinical practice guidelines in HIV rehabilitation to enhance the care and treatment of people living with HIV. PMID:22010809

  16. Expanding clinical applications of population pharmacodynamic modelling

    PubMed Central

    Minto, Charles; Schnider, Thomas

    1998-01-01

    Population pharmacokinetics or pharmacodynamics is the study of the variability in drug concentration or pharmacological effect between individuals when standard dosage regimens are administered. We provide an overview of pharmacokinetic models, pharmacodynamic models, population models and residual error models. We outline how population modelling approaches seek to explain interpatient variability with covariate analysis, and, in some approaches, to characterize the unexplained interindividual variability. The interpretation of the results of population modelling approaches is facilitated by shifting the emphasis from the perspective of the modeller to the perspective of the clinician. Both the explained and unexplained interpatient variability should be presented in terms of their impact on the dose–response relationship. Clinically relevant questions relating to the explained and unexplained variability in the population can be posed to the model, and confidence intervals can be obtained for the fraction of the population that is estimated to fall within a specific therapeutic range given a certain dosing regimen. Such forecasting can be used to develop optimal initial dosing guidelines. The development of population models (with random effects) permits the application of Bayes’s formula to obtain improved estimates of an individual’s pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in the light of observed responses. An important challenge to clinical pharmacology is to identify the drugs that might benefit from such adaptive-control-with-feedback dosing strategies. Drugs used for life threatening diseases with a proven pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic relationship, a small therapeutic range, large interindividual variability, small interoccasion variability and severe adverse effects are likely to be good candidates. Rapidly evolving changes in health care economics and consumer expectations make it unlikely that traditional drug development approaches

  17. Suicidal ideation among attendees of a West African HIV clinic.

    PubMed

    Ogundipe, Olasimbo A; Olagunju, Andrew T; Adeyemi, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    The paucity of information on suicide and its related issues among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) can impair evidence guided intervention. This study was set to determine the prevalence of suicidal ideation and the associated risk factors among PLWHA. A total of 295 participants made up of HIV positive individuals were subjected to a sociodemographic/clinical profile questionnaire. This was followed by the 28-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), suicidal intention item from the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) and World Health Organisation Quality of Life (WHOQOL)--Bref scale to assess emotional distress, suicidal ideation, and quality of life respectively. The prevalence of suicidal ideation among PLWHA was 13.6%; and being unmarried, poor medication adherence, and poorer quality of life were significantly associated (p < 0.05) with suicidal ideation; while unemployment (odds ratio [OR] = 0.200; 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.084-0.476; P < 0.001), emotional distress (OR = 5.734; 95% CI = 2.119-15.519; P--0.001), religion (OR = 4.829; 95% CI = 1.639-14.231; P--0.004), HIV status non-disclosure (OR = 2.630; 95% CI = 1.015-6.809; P--0.046) and previous suicidal attempt (OR = 0.172, 95% CI = 0.042-0.705; P--0.014) were not only associated but predictive of suicidal ideation in PLWHA. These findings indicate a significant burden of suicidal ideation, and psychosocial with clinical factors constitute identifiable risk factors among PLWHA. The development of evidence guided preventive and treatment measures against suicide among PLWHA are implied. PMID:25058473

  18. HIV and dentistry in Australia: clinical and legal issues impacting on dental care.

    PubMed

    McLean, A T; Wheeler, E K; Cameron, S; Baker, D

    2012-09-01

    The number of people in Australia living with HIV is growing. This reflects a consistent rate of new HIV infections combined with an increased life expectancy of people with HIV. Dentists are ideally positioned to identify, manage and treat HIV-associated oral manifestations and have a responsibility to themselves and to their patients to be up-to-date with the evolving area of HIV and related issues. Those issues include medico-legal implications associated with HIV diagnosis and treatment. This article provides a review of the current clinical and medico-legal aspects of HIV in Australia. The oral manifestations of HIV can be divided into five categories: microbiological infections (fungal, bacterial and viral); oral neoplasms; neurological conditions; other oral conditions that may be associated with HIV infection; and oral conditions associated with HIV treatment. Current treatment options in the scope of general dental practice are outlined. Medico-legal issues related to the management of patients with HIV are explored, including rights of the patient regarding disclosure of HIV status; an algorithm for the management of a patient with signs or symptoms indicating possible HIV infection, including referral pathways; and an algorithm for dealing with patient management and referral issues. PMID:22924347

  19. Effects of density of infected population to the spreading of HIV epidemic in communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukwembi, Simon

    2011-10-01

    We present a dynamical model for the spread of HIV in a finite discrete population of size n represented by the set V. The model takes into account the structure of the sexual network, the density of infected population in each individual’s sexual partners, and a reasonable amount of the influence of noninfectious HIV positive individuals on HIV infectious partners which may occur in communities. In our analytic results, we give a precise epidemic threshold which, together with certain network properties, is then used to analyse and investigate the existence of epidemic and stability in the HIV spreading dynamics. Our results reproduce common observed patterns in the dynamics of HIV spreading in communities.

  20. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Acceptability of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis among Individuals Living with HIV in an Urban HIV Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Jayakumaran, Jenani Sarah; Aaron, Erika; Gracely, Ed J.; Schriver, Emily; Szep, Zsofia

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is an effective tool to reduce HIV transmission. The primary objective of this study was to assess awareness of PrEP by individuals living with HIV (HIV+) and acceptance of its use for their HIV negative (HIV-) partners. Methods A cross sectional survey was conducted among individuals living with HIV who received care at an urban HIV clinic between January 2013 and June 2013. The survey examined knowledge, attitudes, and acceptability of PrEP, and perception of transmission risk of HIV. Chi-Square test and Fisher's Exact test were used to compare proportions. Results Among 206 subjects living with HIV, 15.3% (32) had heard of PrEP. Men who have sex with men (MSM) were more likely to be aware of PrEP than all others (p = 0.003). Once educated about PrEP those who believed PrEP would reduce their partner’s risk for HIV were more likely to recommend PrEP to their partner (p<0.001). 92% of all respondents said they would be “extremely likely/likely” to discuss PrEP use with their provider. Of 159 subjects whose main partner was HIV-, MSM (p = 0.007), male participants (p = 0.044), and those who were consistently taking meds (p = 0.049) were more likely to be aware of PrEP. Those who perceived they were at risk of transmitting HIV (p<0.001) and those who were consistently taking meds (0.049) were more likely to agree that PrEP could reduce the risk of HIV to their partners. Conclusion This study illustrates a low awareness of PrEP but once educated the willingness of a cohort of individuals living with HIV to recommend PrEP to their partners. Our findings demonstrate the importance of providers informing their patients living with HIV about PrEP, as these persons are an underutilized link to support the uptake of PrEP by their HIV- partners. PMID:26862744

  1. True User Involvement by People Living With HIV is Possible: Description of a User-driven HIV Clinic in Norway.

    PubMed

    Berg, Rigmor C; Gamst, Are; Said, Maryan; Aas, Kristin Bårdsen; Songe, Solveig Helene; Fangen, Kim; Rysstad, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The Greater Involvement of People Living with or Affected by HIV principle highlights the various contributions HIV-infected people can make in HIV program development and implementation. We present a unique example of how service users' involvement led to a complete organizational redesign of an outpatient HIV clinic in Southern Norway. We applied a user-driven, case study method, which showed that establishing a user board laid the foundation for the redesign process, as the board provided a clear infrastructure of user involvement and developed a set of user-defined targets for services. The main targets-optimal health, holistic care and treatment, and empowerment-were operationalized as a set of action points, such as establishing HIV nurse coordinators. While there is no single method for user involvement, we offer useful ideas that can help others develop an involvement project that is effective and sustainable. PMID:26255897

  2. HIV sexual transmission risks in the context of clinical care: a prospective study of behavioural correlates of HIV suppression in a community sample, Atlanta, GA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Kalichman, Seth C; Cherry, Chauncey; Kalichman, Moira O; Washington, Christopher; Grebler, Tamar; Merely, Cindy; Welles, Brandi; Pellowski, Jennifer; Kegler, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Antiretroviral therapy (ART) improves the health of people living with HIV and has the potential to reduce HIV infectiousness, thereby preventing HIV transmission. However, the success of ART for HIV prevention hinges on sustained ART adherence and avoiding sexually transmitted infections (STI). Objectives To determine the sexual behaviours and HIV transmission risks of individuals with suppressed and unsuppressed HIV replication (i.e., viral load). Methods Assessed HIV sexual transmission risks among individuals with clinically determined suppressed and unsuppressed HIV. Participants were 760 men and 280 women living with HIV in Atlanta, GA, USA, who completed behavioural assessments, 28-daily prospective sexual behaviour diaries, one-month prospective unannounced pill counts for ART adherence, urine screening for illicit drug use and medical record chart abstraction for HIV viral load. Results Individuals with unsuppressed HIV demonstrated a constellation of behavioural risks for transmitting HIV to uninfected sex partners that included symptoms of STI and substance use. In addition, 15% of participants with suppressed HIV had recent STI symptoms/diagnoses, indicating significant risks for sexual infectiousness despite their HIV suppression in blood plasma. Overall, 38% of participants were at risk for elevated sexual infectiousness and just as many engaged in unprotected sexual intercourse with non-HIV-infected partners. Conclusions Implementation strategies for using HIV treatments as HIV prevention requires enhanced behavioural interventions that extend beyond ART to address substance use and sexual health that will otherwise undermine the potential preventive impact of early ART. PMID:26249127

  3. Emergency department use by people with HIV in Ontario: a population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ryan; Kendall, Claire E.; Burchell, Ann N.; Bayoumi, Ahmed M.; Loutfy, Mona R.; Raboud, Janet; Glazier, Richard H.; Rourke, Sean; Antoniou, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergency department use may reflect poor access to primary care. Our objective was to compare rates and causes of emergency department use between adults living with and without HIV. Methods: We conducted a population-based study involving Ontario residents living with and without HIV between Apr. 1, 2011, and Mar. 31, 2012. We frequency matched adults with HIV to 4 HIV-negative people by age, sex and census division, and used random-effects negative binomial regression to compare rates of emergency department use. We classified visits as low urgency or high urgency, and also examined visits for ambulatory care sensitive conditions. Hospital admission following an emergency department visit was a secondary outcome. Results: We identified 14 534 people with HIV and 58 136 HIV-negative individuals. Rates of emergency department use were higher among people with HIV (67.3 v. 31.2 visits per 100 person-years; adjusted rate ratio 1.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.51-1.65). Similar results were observed for low-urgency visits. With the exception of hypertension, visit rates for ambulatory care sensitive conditions were higher among people with HIV. People with HIV were also more likely than HIV-negative individuals to be admitted to hospital following an emergency department visit (adjusted odds ratio 1.55, 95% CI 1.43-1.69). Interpretation: Compared with HIV-negative individuals, people with HIV had high rates of emergency department use, including potentially avoidable visits. These findings strongly support the need for comprehensive care for people with HIV. PMID:27398370

  4. Expanded HAART Coverage is Associated with Decreased Population-level HIV-1-RNA and Annual New HIV Diagnoses in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Montaner, Julio S.G.; Lima, Viviane D.; Barrios, Rolando; Yip, Benita; Wood, Evan; Kerr, Thomas; Shannon, Kate; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hogg, Robert S.; Daly, Patricia; Kendall, Perry

    2010-01-01

    Background Cohort studies and mathematical models have suggested that expanded coverage with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) could decrease HIV transmission. This study focuses on the HIV epidemic, stratified by injection drug use, in the province of British Columbia, Canada, and seeks to estimate the association between plasma HIV-1-viral load, HAART coverage and number of new cases of HIV at the population-level. Methods HAART use, plasma HIV-1-viral level determinations, and rates of reportable sexually transmitted infections, including HIV, are all recorded in province-wide registries allowing for temporal comparisons of these parameters. Trends of new HIV positive tests and number of individuals on HAART were modeled using generalized additive models. Poisson log-linear regression models were used to estimate the association between the outcome new HIV positive tests (per 100 population) and the covariates viral load (log10 transformed), year, and number of individuals on HAART. Conclusions Our results demonstrate a strong association at the population-level between increasing levels of HAART coverage, decreased viral load and decreased new HIV diagnoses/year, against a background of increased HIV testing and increased rates of other STIs in the province. Our results support the proposed secondary benefit of HAART, used within current medical guidelines, on HIV transmission at a population level. PMID:20638713

  5. Total HIV-1 DNA, a Marker of Viral Reservoir Dynamics with Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Avettand-Fènoël, Véronique; Hocqueloux, Laurent; Ghosn, Jade; Cheret, Antoine; Frange, Pierre; Melard, Adeline; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine

    2016-10-01

    HIV-1 DNA persists in infected cells despite combined antiretroviral therapy (cART), forming viral reservoirs. Recent trials of strategies targeting latent HIV reservoirs have rekindled hopes of curing HIV infection, and reliable markers are thus needed to evaluate viral reservoirs. Total HIV DNA quantification is simple, standardized, sensitive, and reproducible. Total HIV DNA load influences the course of the infection and is therefore clinically relevant. In particular, it is predictive of progression to AIDS and death, independently of HIV RNA load and the CD4 cell count. Baseline total HIV DNA load is predictive of the response to cART. It declines during cART but remains quantifiable, at a level that reflects both the history of infection (HIV RNA zenith, CD4 cell count nadir) and treatment efficacy (residual viremia, cumulative viremia, immune restoration, immune cell activation). Total HIV DNA load in blood is also predictive of the presence and severity of some HIV-1-associated end-organ disorders. It can be useful to guide individual treatment, notably, therapeutic de-escalation. Although it does not distinguish between replication-competent and -defective latent viruses, the total HIV DNA load in blood, tissues, and cells provides insights into HIV pathogenesis, probably because all viral forms participate in host cell activation and HIV pathogenesis. Total HIV DNA is thus a biomarker of HIV reservoirs, which can be defined as all infected cells and tissues containing all forms of HIV persistence that participate in pathogenesis. This participation may occur through the production of new virions, creating new cycles of infection and disseminating infected cells; maintenance or amplification of reservoirs by homeostatic cell proliferation; and viral transcription and synthesis of viral proteins without new virion production. These proteins can induce immune activation, thus participating in the vicious circle of HIV pathogenesis. PMID:27559075

  6. Helicobacter pylori, HIV and Gastric Hypochlorhydria in the Malawian Population

    PubMed Central

    Geraghty, Joe; Thumbs, Alexander; Kankwatira, Anstead; Andrews, Tim; Moore, Andrew; Malamba, Rose; Mtunthama, Neema; Hellberg, Kai; Kalongolera, Lughano; O’Toole, Paul; Varro, Andrea; Pritchard, D. Mark; Gordon, Melita

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV and Helicobacter pylori are common chronic infections in sub-Saharan Africa. Both conditions can predispose to gastric hypochlorhydria that may be a risk factor for enteric infections and reduced drug absorption. We have investigated to what extent HIV and H. pylori infections are associated with hypochlorhydria in a Malawian cohort of patients undergoing endoscopy. Methods 104 sequential symptomatic adults referred for gastroscopy at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital, Blantyre, Malawi, had blood taken for rapid HIV testing and fasting serum gastrin analysis. Gastric fluid was aspirated for pH testing, and gastric biopsies were taken. Results After 9/104 HIV-infected patients who were already established on anti-retroviral therapy were excluded, 17/95 (25.0%) were seropositive for untreated HIV, and 68/95 (71.6%) patients were H. pylori positive by histology. Hypochlorhydria (fasting gastric pH>4.0) was present in 55.8% (53/95) of patients. H. pylori infection was significantly associated with hypochlorhydria (OR 2.91, [1.02-7.75], p=0.046). While single infection with HIV was not significantly independently associated with hypochlorhydria. H. pylori and HIV co-infection was more strongly associated with hypochlorhydria (OR 6.25, [1.33-29.43], p=0.020) than either infection alone, suggesting an additive effect of co-infection. HIV infection was associated with higher serum gastrin levels (91.3pM vs. 53.1pM, p=0.040), while H. pylori infection was not (63.1pM vs. 55.1pM, p=0.610). Irrespective of H. pylori and HIV status, most patients (>90%) exhibited pangastritis. Only three patients had histological evidence of gastric atrophy, of which only one was HIV-infected. Conclusion H. pylori infection was associated with fasting hypochlorhydria, while HIV was not independently associated. HIV and H. pylori co-infection, however, was more strongly associated with hypochlorhydria than H. pylori infection alone. The mechanism of this apparent additive effect

  7. Retention in Early Care at an HIV Outpatient Clinic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, 2000-2013.

    PubMed

    Silva, Daniel S; De Boni, Raquel B; Lake, Jordan E; Cardoso, Sandra W; Ribeiro, Sayonara; Moreira, Ronaldo I; Clark, Jesse L; Veloso, Valdilea G; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Luz, Paula M

    2016-05-01

    Retention in early HIV care has been associated with virologic suppression and improved survival, but remains understudied in Brazil. We estimated retention in early HIV care for the period 2000-2013, and identified socio-demographic and clinical factors associated with good retention in an urban cohort from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Antiretroviral therapy-naïve, HIV-infected persons ≥18 years old linked to care between 2000 and 2011 were included. Retention in the first 2 years post-linkage (i.e. early care) was defined by the proportion of 6-month intervals with ≥1 HIV laboratory result. "Good" retention was defined as ≥1 HIV laboratory result recorded in at least three intervals. Overall, 80 % of participants met criteria for good retention and retention significantly improved over the study period. Older age, higher education level and early antiretroviral therapy initiation were associated with good retention. Efforts to improve retention in early care in this population should target younger and less-educated HIV-infected persons. PMID:26525222

  8. A study on epidemiological profile of anxiety disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS in a sub-Saharan Africa HIV clinic.

    PubMed

    Olagunju, Andrew T; Adeyemi, Joseph D; Ogbolu, Raphael E; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the prevalence, types and correlates of anxiety disorders among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) attending a sub-Saharan Africa HIV clinic. Three hundred HIV positive adults were subjected to semi-structured clinical interview using the Schedule for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry to diagnose anxiety disorders in them. Additionally, a socio-demographic/clinical profile questionnaire designed for the study was administered to the study participants. The prevalence of anxiety disorders among PLWHA in this study was 21.7 %, and anxiety disorder unspecified (6.2 %), mixed anxiety-depressive disorder (5.3 %) and social phobia (4 %) among others were the subtypes of anxiety disorders elicited among the participants. Lack of family support [correlation coefficient (r) = 0.212, P < 0.001], unemployment (r = 0.168, P = 0.004) and being unmarried (r = 0.182, P = 0.002) were much more likely to be found among participants with anxiety disorders; while younger age group (r = -0.126, P = 0.039) and negative previous mental illness (r = -0.894, P = 0.021) seem protective against anxiety disorders in this study. Our findings suggest a high burden of anxiety disorders among PLWHA and up to five-folds when compared to the general population. Thus, integration of proactive mental health screening as well as treatment services with inclusion of targeted intervention for anxiety disorders among PLWHA is recommended. PMID:22772942

  9. Measuring energy expenditure in clinical populations: rewards and challenges.

    PubMed

    Psota, T; Chen, K Y

    2013-05-01

    The measurement of energy expenditure (EE) is recommended as an important component of comprehensive clinical nutrition assessments in patients with altered metabolic states, who failed to respond to nutrition support and with critical illness that require individualized nutrition support. There is evidence that EE is variable in patients with metabolic diseases, such as chronic renal disease, cirrhosis, HIV, cancer cachexia, cystic fibrosis and patients under intensive care. By using appropriate techniques and interpretations of basal or resting EE, clinicians can facilitate the adequate nutrition support with minimum negative impacts from under- or overfeeding in these patients. This review is based on our current understanding of the different components of EE and the techniques to measure them, and to re-examine advances and challenges to determine energy needs in clinical populations with more focuses on the obese, pediatric and elderly patients. In addition, technological advances have expanded the choices of market-available equipments for assessing EE, which also bring specific challenges and rewards in selecting the right equipment with specific performance criteria. Lastly, analytical considerations of interpreting the results of EE in the context of changing body composition are presented and discussed. PMID:23443826

  10. Health, human rights, and the conduct of clinical research within oppressed populations

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Edward J; Singh, Sonal

    2007-01-01

    Background Clinical trials evaluating interventions for infectious diseases require enrolling participants that are vulnerable to infection. As clinical trials are conducted in increasingly vulnerable populations, issues of protection of these populations become challenging. In settings where populations are forseeably oppressed, the conduct of research requires considerations that go beyond common ethical concerns and into issues of international human rights law. Discussion Using examples of HIV prevention trials in Thailand, hepatitis-E prevention trials in Nepal and malaria therapeutic trials in Burma (Myanmar), we address the inadequacies of current ethical guidelines when conducting research within oppressed populations. We review existing legislature in the United States and United Kingdom that may be used against foreign investigators if trial hardships exist. We conclude by making considerations for research conducted within oppressed populations. PMID:17996056

  11. Subtype-independent near full-length HIV-1 genome sequencing and assembly to be used in large molecular epidemiological studies and clinical management

    PubMed Central

    Grossmann, Sebastian; Nowak, Piotr; Neogi, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Introduction HIV-1 near full-length genome (HIV-NFLG) sequencing from plasma is an attractive multidimensional tool to apply in large-scale population-based molecular epidemiological studies. It also enables genotypic resistance testing (GRT) for all drug target sites allowing effective intervention strategies for control and prevention in high-risk population groups. Thus, the main objective of this study was to develop a simplified subtype-independent, cost- and labour-efficient HIV-NFLG protocol that can be used in clinical management as well as in molecular epidemiological studies. Methods Plasma samples (n=30) were obtained from HIV-1B (n=10), HIV-1C (n=10), CRF01_AE (n=5) and CRF01_AG (n=5) infected individuals with minimum viral load >1120 copies/ml. The amplification was performed with two large amplicons of 5.5 kb and 3.7 kb, sequenced with 17 primers to obtain HIV-NFLG. GRT was validated against ViroSeq™ HIV-1 Genotyping System. Results After excluding four plasma samples with low-quality RNA, a total of 26 samples were attempted. Among them, NFLG was obtained from 24 (92%) samples with the lowest viral load being 3000 copies/ml. High (>99%) concordance was observed between HIV-NFLG and ViroSeq™ when determining the drug resistance mutations (DRMs). The N384I connection mutation was additionally detected by NFLG in two samples. Conclusions Our high efficiency subtype-independent HIV-NFLG is a simple and promising approach to be used in large-scale molecular epidemiological studies. It will facilitate the understanding of the HIV-1 pandemic population dynamics and outline effective intervention strategies. Furthermore, it can potentially be applicable in clinical management of drug resistance by evaluating DRMs against all available antiretrovirals in a single assay. PMID:26115688

  12. Feasibility of HIV Universal Voluntary Counseling and Testing in a Thai General Practice Clinic.

    PubMed

    Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Chunloy, Krongtip; Smith, Kimberly

    2016-05-01

    An HIV transmission prevention program incorporating universal voluntary counseling and testing (UVCT) was conducted in a general practice (GP) clinic of a Thai hospital. Of the 494 participating patients, 356 (72%) accepted HIV-UVCT. Independent factors associated with HIV-UVCT acceptance included participating in the program after office hours (4-8 pm; P < .001), living with domestic partner with no marriage (P = .01), and having primary school education or less (P = .02). The main reasons for declining HIV-UVCT were time constraint (38%) and perceiving self as no risk (35%). Among the 356 patients undergoing HIV-UVCT, having moderate to high HIV risk (P < .001) and male sex (P = .01) were independently associated with low HIV risk perception. By HIV-UVCT, the rate of new HIV infection was 4 (1.1%) of 356 patients. Of these 4 newly diagnosed HIV-infected patients, 3 (75%) were homosexual men. The findings suggest feasibility of HIV-UVCT in our GP clinic and factors to be considered for improving the program. PMID:24759448

  13. Determinants of utilization of a no-cost HIV transition clinic: a cross-sectional study of young adults living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Nyabigambo, Agnes; Muliira, Joshua Kanaabi; Atuyambe, Lynn; Babikako, Harriet M; Kambugu, Andrew; Ndoleriire, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There is minimal research that has been conducted among young adults to understand the determinants of the utilization of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) health services in this population. The purpose of this study was to explore the levels and determinants of HIV transition clinic (HTC) services utilization by young adults living with HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (YALHA). The study used a cross-sectional design and quantitative methods to collect data from a sample of 379 YALHA between the ages of 15–24 years who were registered clients of an HTC in Uganda. During data analysis, utilization was categorized into two levels: regular (kept all appointment visits) and irregular (missed one or more appointment visits) utilization. Univariable, bivariable, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to examine the determinants associated with HTC utilization. The HTC services that were most utilized by the YALHA were those based at the clinic and provided by professional health care providers and these were: clinical examination (96%); laboratory services (87.1%); and counseling (69.7%). The services that were least utilized were home visiting (5.8%) and peer support services (19.8%). Of the 379 YALHA, only 32.4% regularly utilized the HTC. Multivariable analysis showed that the main determinants of HTC utilization were CD4 count category of ≥251/μL (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] =0.36–0.95); not being on antiretroviral therapy (AOR =0.27, 95% CI =0.15–0.47); and not receiving counseling services (AOR =0.47, 95% CI =0.27–0.83). Regular utilization of the HTC by YALHA was low and utilization seems to be influenced by HIV infection stage and HIV counseling services, but not sociodemographic factors or community factors. PMID:24966709

  14. Behavioral risk assessment in HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) clinical trials: A qualitative study exploring HVTN staff perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele Peake; Karuna, Shelly T.; Nebergall, Michelle; Koblin, Beryl A.; Kublin, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    In HIV vaccine trials, the collection and analysis of participant behavior data associated with risk of acquiring HIV-infection is important for a number of reasons. Although the rationale for behavioral risk assessment in HIV vaccine clinical trials is clear, consistent collection of behavioral data over time and across protocols has been challenging for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN). Integrating biomedical and behavioral research within the same preventive vaccine clinical trial has proven difficult. The HVTN conducted an internal landscape analysis to: (1) evaluate the challenges of behavioral risk assessment in HIV vaccine trials and observational studies; (2) explore the impact of the Step Study on behavioral risk assessment measures; and (3) identify strategies to overcome existing challenges and improve the quality of data resulting from behavioral risk analysis. These analyses of behavioral risk within the HVTN revealed several challenges and recommendations for improved behavioral risk data collection in future protocols. The recommendations for improvement include: (1) establishment of protocol-specific behavioral risk working groups that include social and behavioral experts; (2) provision of behavioral rationale and objectives to the development team; (3) creation of a template for geographic- and population-specific assessment of low and high risk behaviors; and (4) pilot testing of behavioral risk assessments. Results also underscored the need for routinely conducted analyses of behavioral data. PMID:23859840

  15. Effectiveness and safety of oral HIV preexposure prophylaxis for all populations

    PubMed Central

    Fonner, Virginia A.; Dalglish, Sarah L.; Kennedy, Caitlin E.; Baggaley, Rachel; O’Reilly, Kevin R.; Koechlin, Florence M.; Rodolph, Michelle; Hodges-Mameletzis, Ioannis; Grant, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) offers a promising new approach to HIV prevention. This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluated the evidence for use of oral PrEP containing tenofovir disoproxil fumarate as an additional HIV prevention strategy in populations at substantial risk for HIV based on HIV acquisition, adverse events, drug resistance, sexual behavior, and reproductive health outcomes. Design: Rigorous systematic review and meta-analysis. Methods: A comprehensive search strategy reviewed three electronic databases and conference abstracts through April 2015. Pooled effect estimates were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. Results: Eighteen studies were included, comprising data from 39 articles and six conference abstracts. Across populations and PrEP regimens, PrEP significantly reduced the risk of HIV acquisition compared with placebo. Trials with PrEP use more than 70% demonstrated the highest PrEP effectiveness (risk ratio = 0.30, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.45, P < 0.001) compared with placebo. Trials with low PrEP use did not show a significantly protective effect. Adverse events were similar between PrEP and placebo groups. More cases of drug-resistant HIV infection were found among PrEP users who initiated PrEP while acutely HIV-infected, but incidence of acquiring drug-resistant HIV during PrEP use was low. Studies consistently found no association between PrEP use and changes in sexual risk behavior. PrEP was not associated with increased pregnancy-related adverse events or hormonal contraception effectiveness. Conclusion: PrEP is protective against HIV infection across populations, presents few significant safety risks, and there is no evidence of behavioral risk compensation. The effective and cost-effective use of PrEP will require development of best practices for fostering uptake and adherence among people at substantial HIV risk. PMID:27149090

  16. HIV/AIDS Related Stigma and Discrimination against PLWHA in Nigerian Population

    PubMed Central

    Bulgiba, Awang; Oche, Oche Mansur; Adekunjo, Felix Oluyemi

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS remain a major public health concern in Nigeria. People living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) face not only personal medical problems but also social problems associated with the disease such as stigma and discriminatory attitudes. This study provides an insight into HIV/AIDS related stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in Nigeria. Methods The data for this study was extracted from the 2013 Nigeria Demographic and Health Survey conducted by the National Population Commission. All men and women aged 15–49 years, permanent residents and visitors of the households were eligible for the interview. Several questionnaires were used in the survey, some covering questions on HIV/AIDS. Results A total of 56 307 men and women aged 15–49 years participated in this national survey. About half of the population in Nigeria have HIV stigma. Younger persons, men, those without formal education and those within poor wealth index are more likely to have stigma towards PLWHA. In addition, married people are more likely to have stigma on PLWHA and are more likely to blame PLWHA for bringing the disease to the community. Also about half of the population discriminates against PLWHA. However, those with higher levels of education and those from higher wealth index seem to be more compassionate towards PLWHA. About 70% in the population are willing to care for relative with AIDS, even more so among those with higher level of education. Conclusion There is a high level of HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA in the Nigerian population. Education seems to play a major role in the society with respect to HIV stigma and discrimination against PLWHA. Educating the population with factual information on HIV/AIDS is needed to reduce stigma and discrimination towards PLWHA in the community. PMID:26658767

  17. The HIV Care Continuum among Female Sex Workers: A Key Population in Lilongwe, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Kathryn Elizabeth; Powers, Kimberly A.; Lungu, Thandie; Mmodzi, Pearson; Hosseinipour, Mina C.; Chadwick, Katy; Go, Vivian F.; Pence, Brian W.; Hoffman, Irving F.; Miller, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The HIV care continuum among female sex workers (FSW), a key population, has not been well characterized, especially within the generalized epidemics of sub-Saharan Africa. This was the first study to characterize the HIV care continuum among FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi. Methods From July through September 2014, we used venue-based sampling to enroll 200 adult FSW in Lilongwe, Malawi into a cross-sectional evaluation assessing HIV care continuum outcomes. Seropositive FSW, identified using HIV rapid testing, received rapid CD4 counts in addition to viral loads using dried blood spots. We calculated proportions of HIV-infected FSW who had history of care, were on ART, and had suppressed viral load and we used Poisson regression to estimate the associations of demographic characteristics and transmission risk behaviors with each outcome. Results HIV seroprevalence was 69% (n = 138). Among all FSW the median age was 24 years (IQR: 22–28). Among the 20% who were newly diagnosed and reported previously testing negative, the median time since last HIV test was 11 months (interquartile range: 3–17). The majority (69%) of HIV-infected FSW had a history of HIV care, 52% reported current ART use, and 45% were virally suppressed. Of the FSW who reported current ART use, 86% were virally suppressed. Transmission risk behaviors were not associated with continuum outcomes. Conclusions FSW in Lilongwe were predominately young and have a high HIV prevalence. Only half of HIV-infected FSW reported current ART use, but the majority of those on ART were virally suppressed. To reduce ongoing transmission and improve health outcomes, increased HIV testing, care engagement, and ART coverage is urgently needed among FSW. Universal testing and treatment strategies for all FSW in Malawi must be strongly considered. PMID:26808043

  18. Modelling HIV in the injecting drug user population and the male homosexual population in a developed country context.

    PubMed

    Sutton, A J; House, T; Hope, V D; Ncube, F; Wiessing, L; Kretzschmar, M

    2012-03-01

    In many high income countries men who have sex with men (MSM) and injecting drug users (IDUs) are the two groups with the highest HIV prevalence. Yet these two groups are not mutually exclusive, and those MSM who are also IDUs (MSM-IDUs) may be particularly vulnerable to HIV infection. This may be particularly relevant to the IDU population in countries, like the UK, with a much lower HIV prevalence amongst IDUs than MSM, as the MSM-IDUs could provide a route of HIV infection into the IDU population. In this research two alternative modelling approaches that describe the transmission dynamics of HIV within the IDU, MSM, and heterosexual populations are proposed. These models are constructed with two aims. The first is to investigate the possible impact of interventions that target HIV transmission in the MSM and IDU populations, and the second aim is to investigate the impact of the model structure on the model results. An examination of the assortativity of mixing between risk groups is also undertaken. The models are parameterised for England and Wales. While the MSM-IDU population is small, targeting MSM-IDUs was the most efficient intervention strategy in terms of cases averted per 100 individuals targeted with the intervention. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations in the assumed assortativity of mixing between the population groups in both models have a large impact on model results. This means that to generate quantitatively robust estimates for the impact of different intervention strategies it will be necessary to obtain estimates for assortativity values through empirical work. PMID:22325014

  19. Identification of inflections in T-cell counts among HIV-1-infected individuals and relationship with progression to clinical AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gange, Stephen J.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Chmiel, Joan S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.; Kirstein, Lynn M.; Detels, Roger; Margolick, Joseph B.

    1998-01-01

    Studies of circulating T (CD3+) lymphocytes have shown that on a population basis T-cell numbers remain stable for many years after HIV-1 infection (blind T-cell homeostasis), but decline rapidly beginning approximately 1.5–2.5 years before the onset of clinical AIDS. We derived a general method for defining the loss of homeostasis on the individual level and for determining the prevalence of homeostasis loss according to HIV status and the occurrence of AIDS in more than 5,000 men enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. We used a segmented regression model for log10 CD3+ cell counts that included separate T-cell trajectories before and after a time (the T-cell inflection point) where the loss of T-cell homeostasis was most likely to have occurred. The average slope of CD3+ lymphocyte counts before the inflection point was close to zero for HIV− and HIV+ men, consistent with blind T-cell homeostasis. After the inflection point, the HIV+ individuals who developed AIDS generally showed a dramatic decline in CD3+ cell counts relative to HIV− men and HIV+ men not developing AIDS. A CD3+ cell decline of greater than 10 percent per year was present in 77% of HIV+ men developing AIDS but in only 23% of HIV+ men with no onset of AIDS. Our findings at the individual level support the blind T-cell homeostasis hypothesis and provide strong evidence that the loss of homeostasis is an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of the severe immunodeficiency that characterizes the late stages of HIV infection. PMID:9724793

  20. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I.; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K.; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-03-15

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR{sub 2}) than on HIV-1 protease (PR{sub 1}). We solved the crystal structure of PR{sub 2} with APV at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR{sub 1} mutant (PR{sub 1M}) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR{sub 2}. PR{sub 1M} more closely resembled PR{sub 2} than PR{sub 1} in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR{sub 1M} with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR{sub 1} and PR{sub 2} complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 1}, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR{sub 1M}. Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 2} relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR{sub 1}, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR{sub 1M} partially replicates the specificity of PR{sub 2} and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2.

  1. HIV in Children in a General Population Sample in East Zimbabwe: Prevalence, Causes and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Pufall, Erica L.; Nyamukapa, Constance; Eaton, Jeffrey W.; Mutsindiri, Reggie; Chawira, Godwin; Munyati, Shungu; Robertson, Laura; Gregson, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background There are an estimated half-million children living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. The predominant source of infection is presumed to be perinatal mother-to-child transmission, but general population data about paediatric HIV are sparse. We characterise the epidemiology of HIV in children in sub-Saharan Africa by describing the prevalence, possible source of infection, and effects of paediatric HIV in a southern African population. Methods From 2009 to 2011, we conducted a household-based survey of 3389 children (aged 2–14 years) in Manicaland, eastern Zimbabwe (response rate: 73.5%). Data about socio-demographic correlates of HIV, risk factors for infection, and effects on child health were analysed using multi-variable logistic regression. To assess the plausibility of mother-to-child transmission, child HIV infection was linked to maternal survival and HIV status using data from a 12-year adult HIV cohort. Results HIV prevalence was (2.2%, 95% CI: 1.6–2.8%) and did not differ significantly by sex, socio-economic status, location, religion, or child age. Infected children were more likely to be underweight (19.6% versus 10.0%, p = 0.03) or stunted (39.1% versus 30.6%, p = 0.04) but did not report poorer physical or psychological ill-health. Where maternal data were available, reported mothers of 61/62 HIV-positive children were deceased or HIV-positive. Risk factors for other sources of infection were not associated with child HIV infection, including blood transfusion, vaccinations, caring for a sick relative, and sexual abuse. The observed flat age-pattern of HIV prevalence was consistent with UNAIDS estimates which assumes perinatal mother-to-child transmission, although modelled prevalence was higher than observed prevalence. Only 19/73 HIV-positive children (26.0%) were diagnosed, but, of these, 17 were on antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions Childhood HIV infection likely arises predominantly from mother-to-child transmission and is

  2. HIV testing and clinical status upon admission to a specialized health care unit in Pará, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Abati, Paulo Afonso Martins; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the clinical and laboratory characteristics of HIV-infected individuals upon admission to a reference health care center. METHODS This cross-sectional study was conducted between 1999 and 2010 on 527 individuals with confirmed serological diagnosis of HIV infection who were enrolled in an outpatient health care service in Santarém, PA, Northern Brazil. Data were collected from medical records and included the reason for HIV testing, clinical status, and count of peripheral CD4+ T lymphocytes upon enrollment. The data were divided into three groups, according to the patient’s year of admission – P1 (1999-2002), P2 (2003-2006), and P3 (2007-2010) – for comparative analysis of the variables of interest. RESULTS In the study group, 62.0% of the patients were assigned to the P3 group. The reason for undergoing HIV testing differed between genders. In the male population, most tests were conducted because of the presence of symptoms suggesting infection. Among women, tests were the result of knowledge of the partner’s seropositive status in groups P1 and P2. Higher proportion of women undergoing testing because of symptoms of HIV/AIDS infection abolished the difference between genders in the most recent period. A higher percentage of patients enrolling at a more advanced stage of the disease was observed in P3. CONCLUSIONS Despite the increased awareness of the number of HIV/AIDS cases, these patients have identified their serological status late and were admitted to health care units with active disease. The HIV/AIDS epidemic in Pará presents specificities in its progression that indicate the complex characteristics of the epidemic in the Northern region of Brazil and across the country. PMID:25741647

  3. Detectable HIV Viral Load in Kenya: Data from a Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Cherutich, Peter; Kim, Andrea A.; Kellogg, Timothy A.; Sherr, Kenneth; Waruru, Anthony; De Cock, Kevin M.; Rutherford, George W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction At the individual level, there is clear evidence that Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) transmission can be substantially reduced by lowering viral load. However there are few data describing population-level HIV viremia especially in high-burden settings with substantial under-diagnosis of HIV infection. The 2nd Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey (KAIS 2012) provided a unique opportunity to evaluate the impact of antiretroviral therapy (ART) coverage on viremia and to examine the risks for failure to suppress viral replication. We report population-level HIV viral load suppression using data from KAIS 2012. Methods Between October 2012 to February 2013, KAIS 2012 surveyed household members, administered questionnaires and drew serum samples to test for HIV and, for those found to be infected with HIV, plasma viral load (PVL) was measured. Our principal outcome was unsuppressed HIV viremia, defined as a PVL ≥ 550 copies/mL. The exposure variables included current treatment with ART, prior history of an HIV diagnosis, and engagement in HIV care. All point estimates were adjusted to account for the KAIS 2012 cluster sampling design and survey non-response. Results Overall, 61·2% (95% CI: 56·4–66·1) of HIV-infected Kenyans aged 15–64 years had not achieved virological suppression. The base10 median (interquartile range [IQR]) and mean (95% CI) VL was 4,633 copies/mL (0–51,596) and 81,750 copies/mL (59,366–104,134), respectively. Among 266 persons taking ART, 26.1% (95% CI: 20.0–32.1) had detectable viremia. Non-ART use, younger age, and lack of awareness of HIV status were independently associated with significantly higher odds of detectable viral load. In multivariate analysis for the sub-sample of patients on ART, detectable viremia was independently associated with younger age and sub-optimal adherence to ART. Discussion This report adds to the limited data of nationally-representative surveys to report population- level virological

  4. Cervical Cytopathology in a Population of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Patrícia Abreu Pinheiro; García-Zapata, Marco Túlio Antonio; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    The association between abnormal cervical cytology and HIV infection status in women was evaluated to correlate with CD4 cell count and viral load in HIV-positive patients with the presence of low-grade (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Cervical samples were collected at the Tropical Disease Hospital, Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital and at the Nascer Cidadão Maternity Hospital in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. An Ayre's spatula was used to collect samples from the ectocervix and a cytology brush to collect samples from the endocervix. Of a total of 237 women, 125 were HIV positive and 112 were HIV negative. Abnormal cytology (n = 21; 8.9%) was more common in the HIV positive group (n = 15; 12.1%) compared to the HIV-negative group (n = 6; 5.4%) (P = 0.05). Cytological abnormalities were not found to be associated with immunosuppression, defined as CD4 count < 200 cells/mm3. A higher frequency was found between higher viral loads (>10,000/mm3) and the presence of abnormal cytology. Pregnant women, irrespective of whether they were HIV positive or negative, were less likely to have lesions compared to the nonpregnant women in the same groups. The higher frequency of abnormal findings in Papanicolaou cytology in HIV-positive women with higher viral loads suggests the association between preinvasive cervical lesions and human immunodeficiency. PMID:22888358

  5. Expanding provider-initiated HIV testing at STI clinics in China.

    PubMed

    Tucker, Joseph D; Walensky, Rochelle P; Yang, Li-Gang; Yang, Bin; Bangsberg, David R; Chen, Xiang-Sheng; Cohen, Myron S

    2012-01-01

    Despite expanding sexually transmitted epidemics in South China, the majority of patients presenting to sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinics are not routinely screened for HIV infection. Identifying barriers to offering HIV testing among STI care providers is an important public health priority. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of offering HIV testing among STI care providers in South China and reported physician barriers to offering HIV testing. More detailed operational data regarding HIV test offer frequency and barriers to testing may enhance routine HIV testing at STI clinics. A sample of 62 STI care providers within the Pearl River Delta Region of South China completed a survey including socio-demographic and training background information (including sex, age, medical education, year of terminal medical degree, and HIV-specific training), reasons for not offering HIV testing routinely, and physical examination and sexual history taking practices. Frequency of offering HIV testing was calculated based on reports from research assistants and operational data. STI care providers offered HIV testing to 3011/10,592 (28.4%) of their patients. There was substantial variability across providers in the frequency of offering testing, ranging from 3 to 100%. None of the identified physician factors were associated with offering HIV testing 100% of the time in the multivariate model. The most commonly physician reported barriers to HIV testing included: (1) low perceived prevalence of disease and (2) not recommended by current guidelines. Forty-seven providers (76%) reported asking about same sex behaviors rarely or never. Further research on HIV screening practices of STI care providers may help scale up HIV provider-initiated testing and counseling programs. PMID:22512378

  6. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification. PMID:21459813

  7. A Case of Primary HIV Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus Coinfection Presenting with Widespread Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Singer, Elyse J.; Bonelli, Laura; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Coinfection of HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may occur given the shared routes of transmission, and the clinical presentations of each process overlap. We present a case of acute HIV-1 and CMV coinfection presenting with an acute febrile illness complicated by meningitis, hepatitis, and retinopathy. This and other similar cases demonstrate the need to consider CMV coin-fection in acute HIV-1 disease, particularly in situations with significant end-organ damage. PMID:24476962

  8. Clinically Significant Depressive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for HIV Infection Among Black MSM in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Skeer, Margie; Bright, Donna; Cranston, Kevin; Isenberg, Deborah; Bland, Sean; Barker, Thomas A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    High rates of depression have been observed among men who have sex with men (MSM) relative to the general adult male population; however, a dearth of research has explored depression among Black MSM. Black MSM (n = 197) recruited via modified respondent-driven sampling between January and July 2008 completed an interviewer-administered quantitative assessment and voluntary HIV counseling and testing. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined the associations of demographics, behavioral HIV risk factors, and psychosocial variables with depressive symptoms by severity, using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Adjusting for demographic and behavioral variables, significant factors associated with (1) clinically significant depressive symptoms (33%; CES-D score ≥ 16): being publicly insured by Medicaid, having serodiscordant anal sex with a casual male partner, and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (2) moderate depressive symptoms (19%; CES-D score 16–26): having serodiscordant unprotected anal sex with a casual male partner and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (3) severe depressive symptoms (14%; CES-D score 27+): being publicly insured by Medicaid and reporting difficulty accessing healthcare in the past 12 months. Moderately depressed Black MSM may be more likely to engage in behaviors that place them at increased risk for HIV and other STDs. HIV prevention interventions for Black MSM may benefit from incorporating screening and/or treatment for depression, allowing MSM who are depressed to respond more effectively to behavioral change approaches. PMID:19462228

  9. Early uptake of HIV clinical care after testing HIV-positive during home-based testing and counseling in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Medley, Amy; Ackers, Marta; Amolloh, Manase; Owuor, Patrick; Muttai, Helen; Audi, Beryl; Sewe, Manquins; Laserson, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Home-based HIV testing and counseling (HBTC) has the potential to increase access to HIV testing. However, the extent to which HBTC programs successfully link HIV-positive individuals into clinical care remains unclear. To determine factors associated with early enrollment in HIV clinical care, adult residents (aged ≥13 years) in the Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Kisumu, Kenya were offered HBTC. All HIV-positive residents were referred to nearby HIV clinical care centers. Two to four months after HBTC, peer educators conducted home visits to consenting HIV-positive residents. Overall, 9,895 (82 %) of 12,035 residents accepted HBTC; 1,087 (11 %) were HIV-positive; and 737 (68 %) received home visits. Of those receiving home visits, 42 % reported HIV care attendance. Factors associated with care attendance included: having disclosed, living with someone attending HIV care, and wanting to seek care after diagnosis. Residents who reported their current health as excellent or who doubted their HBTC result were less likely to report care attendance. While findings indicate that HBTC was well-received in this setting, less than half of HIV-positive individuals reported current care attendance. Identification of effective strategies to increase early enrollment and retention in HIV clinical care is critical and will require coordination between testing and treatment program staff and systems. PMID:23076720

  10. HIV testing in national population-based surveys: experience from the Demographic and Health Surveys.

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Vinod; Vaessen, Martin; Boerma, J. Ties; Arnold, Fred; Way, Ann; Barrere, Bernard; Cross, Anne; Hong, Rathavuth; Sangha, Jasbir

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the methods used in the Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) to collect nationally representative data on the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and assess the value of such data to country HIV surveillance systems. METHODS: During 2001-04, national samples of adult women and men in Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Dominican Republic, Ghana, Mali, Kenya, United Republic of Tanzania and Zambia were tested for HIV. Dried blood spot samples were collected for HIV testing, following internationally accepted ethical standards. The results for each country are presented by age, sex, and urban versus rural residence. To estimate the effects of non-response, HIV prevalence among non-responding males and females was predicted using multivariate statistical models for those who were tested, with a common set of predictor variables. RESULTS: Rates of HIV testing varied from 70% among Kenyan men to 92% among women in Burkina Faso and Cameroon. Despite large differences in HIV prevalence between the surveys (1-16%), fairly consistent patterns of HIV infection were observed by age, sex and urban versus rural residence, with considerably higher rates in urban areas and in women, especially at younger ages. Analysis of non-response bias indicates that although predicted HIV prevalence tended to be higher in non-tested males and females than in those tested, the overall effects of non-response on the observed national estimates of HIV prevalence are insignificant. CONCLUSIONS: Population-based surveys can provide reliable, direct estimates of national and regional HIV seroprevalence among men and women irrespective of pregnancy status. Survey data greatly enhance surveillance systems and the accuracy of national estimates in generalized epidemics. PMID:16878227

  11. HIV-Related Research in Correctional Populations: Now is the Time

    PubMed Central

    Wohl, David A.; Beckwith, Curt G.; Spaulding, Anne C.; Lepp, Nathaniel E.; Baillargeon, Jacques; Gardner, Adrian; Avery, Ann; Altice, Frederick L.; Springer, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    The incarcerated population has increased to unprecedented levels following the 1970 US declaration of war on illicit drug use. A substantial proportion of people with or at risk for HIV infection, including those with substance use and mental health disorders, have become incarcerated. The overlapping epidemics of incarceration and HIV present a need for academic medical centers to collaborate with the criminal justice system to improve the health of incarcerated populations. With coordinated collaboration and new programmatic initiatives it is possible to reduce HIV-associated risk behaviors and the likelihood of acquisition and transmission of HIV. Centers for AIDS Research (CFAR), funded by the National Institutes of Health, have proactively responded to this need through Collaboration on HIV in Corrections (CHIC) to improve the diagnosis, treatment, linkage to care, and prevention of HIV. This collaboration serves as a model for aligning academic expertise with criminal justice to confront this challenge to individual and public health. This is especially relevant given recent evidence of the effectiveness of antiretroviral therapy in reducing HIV transmission PMID:21904902

  12. How fast could HIV change gene frequencies in the human population?

    PubMed

    Cromer, Deborah; Wolinsky, Steven M; McLean, Angela R

    2010-07-01

    Infectious diseases have the potential to act as strong forces for genetic selection on the populations they affect. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a prime candidate to impose such genetic selection owing to the vast number of people it infects and the varying susceptibility of different human leucocyte antigen (HLA) types to HIV disease progression. We have constructed a model of HIV infection that differentiates between these HLA types, and have used reported estimates of the number of people infected with HIV and the different rates of progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) to provide a lower bound estimate on the length of time it would take for HIV to impose major genetic change in humans. We find that an HIV infection similar to that currently affecting sub-Saharan Africa could not yet have caused more than a 3 per cent decrease in the proportion of individuals who progress quickly to disease. Such an infection is unlikely to cause major genetic change (defined as a decrease in the proportion of quickly progressing individuals to under 50 per cent of their starting proportion) until 400 years have passed since HIV emergence. However, in very severely affected populations, there is a chance of observing such major genetic changes after another 50 years. PMID:20219734

  13. Considerations for Reaching the Latino Population with Sexuality and HIV/AIDS Information and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Vega, Ernesto

    1990-01-01

    Latino and Latina sexual attitudes and behaviors must be understood if educators and counselors hope to reach this population with effective sexuality and Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS) information and education. The general U.S. Latino population is mostly sexually conservative; direct talk in public…

  14. HCV co-infection in HIV positive population in British Columbia, Canada

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As HIV and hepatitis C (HCV) share some modes of transmission co-infection is not uncommon. This study used a population-based sample of HIV and HCV tested individuals to determine the prevalence of HIV/HCV co-infection, the sequence of virus diagnoses, and demographic and associated risk factors. Methods Positive cases of HIV were linked to the combined laboratory database (of negative and positive HCV antibody results) and HCV reported cases in British Columbia (BC). Results Of 4,598 HIV cases with personal identifiers, 3,219 (70%) were linked to the combined HCV database, 1,700 (53%) of these were anti-HCV positive. HCV was diagnosed first in 52% of co-infected cases (median time to HIV identification 3 1/2 years). HIV and HCV was diagnosed within a two week window in 26% of cases. Among individuals who were diagnosed with HIV infection at baseline, subsequent diagnoses of HCV infection was independently associated with: i) intravenous drug use (IDU) in males and females, Hazard Ratio (HR) = 6.64 (95% CI: 4.86-9.07) and 9.76 (95% CI: 5.76-16.54) respectively; ii) reported Aboriginal ethnicity in females HR = 2.09 (95% CI: 1.34-3.27) and iii) males not identified as men-who-have-sex-with-men (MSM), HR = 2.99 (95% CI: 2.09-4.27). Identification of HCV first compared to HIV first was independently associated with IDU in males and females OR = 2.83 (95% CI: 1.84-4.37) and 2.25 (95% CI: 1.15-4.39) respectively, but not Aboriginal ethnicity or MSM. HIV was identified first in 22%, with median time to HCV identification of 15 months; Conclusion The ability to link BC public health and laboratory HIV and HCV information provided a unique opportunity to explore demographic and risk factors associated with HIV/HCV co-infection. Over half of persons with HIV infection who were tested for HCV were anti-HCV positive; half of these had HCV diagnosed first with HIV identification a median 3.5 years later. This highlights the importance of public health follow-up and

  15. Clinical management of HIV-associated hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chia-Ching J; Kaplan, Lawrence D

    2016-01-01

    HIV is associated with an excess risk for lymphoid malignancies. Although the risk of lymphoma has decreased in HIV-infected individuals in the era of effective combination antiretroviral therapy, it remains high. Treatment outcomes have improved due to improvements in HIV and cancer therapeutics for the common HIV-associated lymphomas. R-CHOP/R-EPOCH are the standard of care for HIV-associated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. HIV-infected patients with Burkitt lymphoma and good performance status should receive dose-intensive regimens. HIV-infected patients with primary central nervous system lymphoma can respond favorably to high-dose methotrexate-based therapy. In many cases, treatment and expected outcomes for HIV-infected patients with either Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are very similar to HIV-negative patients. There is currently no standard treatment for HIV-associated multicentric Castleman disease or primary effusion lymphoma. For those hematologic cancers in which transplantation is part of standard care, this modality should be considered an option in those with well-controlled HIV infection. PMID:26652941

  16. Attitudes and beliefs regarding depression, HIV/AIDS, and HIV risk-related sexual behaviors among clinically depressed African American adolescent females.

    PubMed

    Brawner, Bridgette M

    2012-12-01

    Individuals' attitudes and beliefs toward behaviors are key indicators of behavioral performance. The purposes of this study were to elucidate attitudes and beliefs about depression, HIV/AIDS, and HIV risk-related sexual behaviors among clinically depressed African American adolescent females and to develop an understanding of their context for HIV risk. For this descriptive qualitative inquiry, semistructured interviews and surveys were employed (N = 24). The narratives reveal that behavioral sequelae of depression (i.e., loneliness) can produce risk for HIV. These findings may guide psychiatric nurse educators, scientists, and practitioners to modify HIV risk among clinically depressed African American adolescent females. PMID:23164403

  17. Attitudes and beliefs regarding depression, HIV/AIDS and HIV risk-related sexual behaviors among clinically depressed African American adolescent females

    PubMed Central

    Brawner, Bridgette M.

    2012-01-01

    Individuals’ attitudes and beliefs toward behaviors are key indicators of behavioral performance. The purpose of this study was to elucidate attitudes and beliefs about depression, HIV/AIDS and HIV risk-related sexual behaviors among clinically depressed African American adolescent females and to develop an understanding of their context for HIV risk. For this descriptive qualitative inquiry, semi-structured interviews and surveys were employed (N = 24). The narratives reveal that behavioral sequelae of depression (i.e. loneliness) can produce risk for HIV. These findings may guide psychiatric nurse educators, scientists, and practitioners to modify HIV risk among clinically depressed African American adolescent females. PMID:23164403

  18. Acceptability of a Mobile Health Unit for Rural HIV Clinical Trial Enrollment and Participation

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Margaret Shandor; Banks, Bahby; Corbie-Smith, Giselle

    2013-01-01

    Few rural minorities participate in HIV clinical trials. Mobile health units (MHUs) may be one strategy to increase participation. We explored community perceptions of MHU acceptability to increase clinical trial participation for rural minorities living with HIV/AIDS. We conducted 11 focus groups (service providers and community leaders) and 35 interviews (people living with HIV/AIDS). Responses were analyzed using constant comparative and content analysis techniques. Acceptable MHU use included maintaining accessibility and confidentiality while establishing credibility, community ownership and control. Under these conditions, MHUs can service rural locations and overcome geographic barriers to reaching major medical centers for clinical trials. PMID:22350829

  19. HIV Rapid Testing in Substance Abuse Treatment: Implementation Following a Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, L. F.; Korte, J. E.; Holmes, B. E.; Gooden, L.; Matheson, T.; Feaster, D. J.; Leff, J. A.; Wilson, L.; Metsch, L. R.; Schackman, B. R.

    2011-01-01

    The Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration has promoted HIV testing and counseling as an evidence-based practice. Nevertheless, adoption of HIV testing in substance abuse treatment programs has been slow. This article describes the experience of a substance abuse treatment agency where, following participation in a clinical trial,…

  20. Understanding HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: An Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Fisher, William A.; Shuper, Paul A.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Christie, Sarah; MacDonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Mahlase, Gethwana; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study applied the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model (J. D. Fisher & Fisher, 1992; W. A. Fisher & Fisher, 1993) to identify factors associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-infected South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a population of considerable significance for curtailing, or maintaining, South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. HIV prevention information, HIV prevention motivation, HIV prevention behavioral skills, and HIV transmission risk behavior were assessed in a sample of 1,388 South Africans infected with HIV and receiving ART in 16 clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Results confirmed the assumptions of the IMB model and demonstrated that HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV transmission risk behavior in this population. Subanalyses confirmed these relationships for HIV transmission risk behavior overall and for HIV transmission risk behavior with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown. A consistent pattern of gender differences showed that for men, HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation may have direct links with HIV preventive behavior, while for women, the effects of HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV preventive behavior. These IMB model-based findings suggest directions for HIV prevention interventions with South African men and women living with HIV and on ART as an important component of overall strategies to contain South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. PMID:23477576

  1. Relation between humoral responses to HIV gag and env proteins at seroconversion and clinical outcome of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cheingsong-Popov, R; Panagiotidi, C; Bowcock, S; Aronstam, A; Wadsworth, J; Weber, J

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To study the contribution of the humoral response to HIV-I at seroconversion to disease outcome after 84 months. DESIGN--A retrospective longitudinal study. SETTING--Two haemophilia centres in the United Kingdom. PATIENTS--88 Haemophiliac patients infected with HIV-I for whom sera were available from before seroconversion and in whom clinical follow up data were available. RESULTS--Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a significant difference between a high titre (greater than 1600) p24 antibody response at seroconversion and prolonged time before the development of HIV related disease (p = 0.0008). In contrast, higher titres of antibody to gp120 at seroconversion (greater than 25,600) correlated with more rapid clinical deterioration (p = 0.025). CONCLUSIONS--The first humoral response to HIV proteins at seroconversion is associated with clinical outcome; patients with an initial low titre antibody response to the gagp24 protein have a significantly faster rate of progression to CDC stage IV disease. Patients with a high titre p24 antibody response progress to AIDS more slowly, and these data provide an explanation why p24 antigenaemia is not universally detected in patients with AIDS. It is unclear whether the association between a strong initial p24 antibody response and slower progression of HIV disease is causal and if so whether it is due to viral or host factors. PMID:1899349

  2. The Vermont Model for Rural HIV Care Delivery: Eleven Years of Outcome Data Comparing Urban and Rural Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grace, Christopher; Kutzko, Deborah; Alston, W. Kemper; Ramundo, Mary; Polish, Louis; Osler, Turner

    2010-01-01

    Context: Provision of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) care in rural areas has encountered unique barriers. Purpose: To compare medical outcomes of care provided at 3 HIV specialty clinics in rural Vermont with that provided at an urban HIV specialty clinic. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study. Findings: Over an 11-year period 363 new…

  3. Substance abuse, adherence with antiretroviral therapy, and clinical outcomes among HIV-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Gregory M

    2011-05-23

    Substance abuse and addiction are highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. Substance abuse is an important comorbidity that affects the delivery and outcomes of HIV medical management. In this paper I will review data examining the associations between substance abuse and HIV treatment and potential strategies to improve outcomes in this population that warrant further investigation. Current - but not past - substance abuse adversely affects engagement in care, acceptance of antiretroviral therapy, adherence with therapy, and long-term persistence in care. Substance abuse treatment appears to facilitate engagement in HIV care, and access to evidence-based treatment for substance abuse is central to addressing the HIV epidemic. Strategies that show promise for HIV-infected substance abusers include integrated treatment models, directly observed therapy, and incentive-based interventions. PMID:20888839

  4. Substance abuse, adherence with antiretroviral therapy, and clinical outcomes among HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Substance abuse and addiction are highly prevalent in HIV-infected individuals. Substance abuse is an important comorbidity that affects the delivery and outcomes of HIV medical management. In this paper I will review data examining the associations between substance abuse and HIV treatment and potential strategies to improve outcomes in this population that warrant further investigation. Current - but not past - substance abuse adversely affects engagement in care, acceptance of antiretroviral therapy, adherence with therapy, and long-term persistence in care. Substance abuse treatment appears to facilitate engagement in HIV care, and access to evidence-based treatment for substance abuse is central to addressing the HIV epidemic. Strategies that show promise for HIV-infected substance abusers include integrated treatment models, directly observed therapy, and incentive-based interventions. PMID:20888839

  5. The Genomic Signature of Population Reconnection Following Isolation: From Theory to HIV.

    PubMed

    Alcala, Nicolas; Jensen, Jeffrey D; Telenti, Amalio; Vuilleumier, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Ease of worldwide travel provides increased opportunities for organisms not only to colonize new environments but also to encounter related but diverged populations. Such events of reconnection and secondary contact of previously isolated populations are widely observed at different time scales. For example, during the quaternary glaciation, sea water level fluctuations caused temporal isolation of populations, often to be followed by secondary contact. At shorter time scales, population isolation and reconnection of viruses are commonly observed, and such events are often associated with epidemics and pandemics. Here, using coalescent theory and simulations, we describe the temporal impact of population reconnection after isolation on nucleotide differences and the site frequency spectrum, as well as common summary statistics of DNA variation. We identify robust genomic signatures of population reconnection after isolation. We utilize our development to infer the recent evolutionary history of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in Asia and South America, successfully retrieving the successive HIV subtype colonization events in these regions. Our analysis reveals that divergent HIV-1 subtype populations are currently admixing in these regions, suggesting that HIV-1 may be undergoing a process of homogenization, contrary to popular belief. PMID:26546308

  6. The Genomic Signature of Population Reconnection Following Isolation: From Theory to HIV

    PubMed Central

    Alcala, Nicolas; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Telenti, Amalio; Vuilleumier, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    Ease of worldwide travel provides increased opportunities for organisms not only to colonize new environments but also to encounter related but diverged populations. Such events of reconnection and secondary contact of previously isolated populations are widely observed at different time scales. For example, during the quaternary glaciation, sea water level fluctuations caused temporal isolation of populations, often to be followed by secondary contact. At shorter time scales, population isolation and reconnection of viruses are commonly observed, and such events are often associated with epidemics and pandemics. Here, using coalescent theory and simulations, we describe the temporal impact of population reconnection after isolation on nucleotide differences and the site frequency spectrum, as well as common summary statistics of DNA variation. We identify robust genomic signatures of population reconnection after isolation. We utilize our development to infer the recent evolutionary history of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) in Asia and South America, successfully retrieving the successive HIV subtype colonization events in these regions. Our analysis reveals that divergent HIV-1 subtype populations are currently admixing in these regions, suggesting that HIV-1 may be undergoing a process of homogenization, contrary to popular belief. PMID:26546308

  7. Characteristics of Women Enrolled into a Randomized Clinical Trial of Dapivirine Vaginal Ring for HIV-1 Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Palanee-Phillips, Thesla; Schwartz, Katie; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Govender, Vaneshree; Mgodi, Nyaradzo; Kiweewa, Flavia Matovu; Nair, Gonasagrie; Mhlanga, Felix; Siva, Samantha; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Jeenarain, Nitesha; Gaffoor, Zakir; Martinson, Francis; Makanani, Bonus; Naidoo, Sarita; Pather, Arendevi; Phillip, Jessica; Husnik, Marla J.; van der Straten, Ariane; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Baeten, Jared

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Women in sub-Saharan Africa are a priority population for evaluation of new biomedical HIV-1 prevention strategies. Antiretroviral pre-exposure prophylaxis is a promising prevention approach; however, clinical trials among young women using daily or coitally-dependent products have found low adherence. Antiretroviral-containing vaginal microbicide rings, which release medication over a month or longer, may reduce these adherence challenges. Methods ASPIRE (A Study to Prevent Infection with a Ring for Extended Use) is a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial testing the safety and effectiveness of a vaginal ring containing the non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor dapivirine for prevention of HIV-1 infection. We describe the baseline characteristics of African women enrolled in the ASPIRE trial. Results Between August 2012 and June 2014, 5516 women were screened and 2629 HIV-1 seronegative women between 18–45 years of age were enrolled from 15 research sites in Malawi, South Africa, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. The median age was 26 years (IQR 22–31) and the majority (59%) were unmarried. Nearly 100% of participants reported having a primary sex partner in the prior three months but 43% did not know the HIV-1 status of their primary partner; 17% reported additional concurrent partners. Nearly two-thirds (64%) reported having disclosed to primary partners about planned vaginal ring use in the trial. Sexually transmitted infections were prevalent: 12% had Chlamydia trachomatis, 7% Trichomonas vaginalis, 4% Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and 1% syphilis. Conclusions African HIV-1 seronegative women at risk of HIV -1 infection were successfully enrolled into a phase III trial of dapivirine vaginal ring for HIV-1 prevention. PMID:26061040

  8. Evidence of at Least Two Introductions of HIV-1 in the Amerindian Warao Population from Venezuela

    PubMed Central

    Rangel, Héctor R.; Maes, Mailis; Villalba, Julian; Sulbarán, Yoneira; de Waard, Jacobus H.; Bello, Gonzalo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The Venezuelan Amerindians were, until recently, free of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, in 2007, HIV-1 infection was detected for the first time in the Warao Amerindian population living in the Eastern part of Venezuela, in the delta of the Orinoco river. The aim of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity of the HIV-1 circulating in this population. Methodology/Principal Findings The pol genomic region was sequenced for 16 HIV-1 isolates and for some of them, sequences from env, vif and nef genomic regions were obtained. All HIV-1 isolates were classified as subtype B, with exception of one that was classified as subtype C. The 15 subtype B isolates exhibited a high degree of genetic similarity and formed a highly supported monophyletic cluster in each genomic region analyzed. Evolutionary analyses of the pol genomic region indicated that the date of the most recent common ancestor of the Waraos subtype B clade dates back to the late 1990s. Conclusions/Significance At least two independent introductions of HIV-1 have occurred in the Warao Amerindians from Venezuela. The HIV-1 subtype B was successfully established and got disseminated in the community, while no evidence of local dissemination of the HIV-1 subtype C was detected in this study. These results warrant further surveys to evaluate the burden of this disease, which can be particularly devastating in this Amerindian population, with a high prevalence of tuberculosis, hepatitis B, among other infectious diseases, and with limited access to primary health care. PMID:22808212

  9. Clinical outcomes of HIV care delivery models in the US: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kimmel, April D; Martin, Erika G; Galadima, Hadiza; Bono, Rose S; Tehrani, Ali Bonakdar; Cyrus, John W; Henderson, Margaret; Freedberg, Kenneth A; Krist, Alexander H

    2016-10-01

    With over 1 million people living with HIV, the US faces national challenges in HIV care delivery due to an inadequate HIV specialist workforce and the increasing role of non-communicable chronic diseases in driving morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients. Alternative HIV care delivery models, which include substantial roles for advanced practitioners and/or coordination between specialty and primary care settings in managing HIV-infected patients, may address these needs. We aimed to systematically review the evidence on patient-level HIV-specific and primary care health outcomes for HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient care across HIV care delivery models. We identified randomized trials and observational studies from bibliographic and other databases through March 2016. Eligible studies met pre-specified eligibility criteria including on care delivery models and patient-level health outcomes. We considered all available evidence, including non-experimental studies, and evaluated studies for risk of bias. We identified 3605 studies, of which 13 met eligibility criteria. Of the 13 eligible studies, the majority evaluated specialty-based care (9 studies). Across all studies and care delivery models, eligible studies primarily reported mortality and antiretroviral use, with specialty-based care associated with mortality reductions at the clinician and practice levels and with increased antiretroviral initiation or use at the clinician level but not the practice level. Limited and heterogeneous outcomes were reported for other patient-level HIV-specific outcomes (e.g., viral suppression) as well as for primary care health outcomes across all care delivery models. No studies addressed chronic care outcomes related to aging. Limited evidence was available across geographic settings and key populations. As re-design of care delivery in the US continues to evolve, better understanding of patient-level HIV-related and primary care health outcomes, especially

  10. Detection of microsporidia in local HIV-positive population in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lono, Angela; Kumar, Suresh; Chye, Tan Tian

    2011-07-01

    The HIV-positive population, due to their immuno-compromised nature, is considered more susceptible to parasitic infections than other populations. However despite the reports of other opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptosporidium and tuberculosis reported in vulnerable communities, microsporidia have not been highlighted in the local HIV-positive population in Malaysia. This study aimed to provide preliminary information on the prevalence of microsporidia in the local HIV-population. Microsporidia were detected in 21/247 (8.5%) stool samples from the HIV-infected individuals, a significantly higher (P-value <0.05) prevalence than in the control group, in which 5/173 (2.9%) were positive. HIV patients were 3x more at risk for acquiring microspordium (OR: 3.12; 95% CI 1.15-8.44). Spores were ellipsoid in shape with outlines that stained dark pink with the interior a lighter shade. Approximately 21% of the positive specimens were from individuals in the 40-49 years age group. Ten individuals who were positive for microsporidia were also positive for other enteric parasites such as Blastocystis hominis and Giardia lamblia. We detected Encephalitozoon intestinalis DNA following nested PCR from three of 10 samples analysed, as demonstrated by an amplicon of 370bp. From the findings reported, it appears that microsporidial infection in humans may actually be more common than reported. We strongly advocate greater emphasis on personal hygiene through public education on personal hygiene and the consumption of boiled or filtered water. PMID:21596411

  11. Improving HIV Surveillance Among Transgender Populations in Tennessee

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiro, Peter F.; McGoy, Shanell L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: HIV prevalence and outcome disparities among sexual and gender minorities are profound in the United States. Tennessee HIV surveillance practices have not been uniform for transgender status, although data collection capabilities exist. We, therefore, describe current reporting of data on transgender individuals in Tennessee to identify targets for improvement. Methods: Data for all HIV-diagnosed individuals living in Tennessee as of December 31, 2013, were extracted from the Enhanced HIV/AIDS Reporting System (eHARS). The birth_sex (“Male” or “Female”) and current_gender (“Male,” “Female,” “Male-to-Female,” “Female-to-Male,” or “Additional Gender Identity”) variables were examined, and proportion missing current_gender data by region was ascertained. Transgender individuals were defined as having different birth_sex and current_gender values. To ensure the protection of health information, data were cleaned, deidentified, and aggregated using Statistical Analysis Software (SAS) Version 9.3 (SAS Institute, Inc., Cary, NC). Results: Among 16,063 HIV-diagnosed individuals in Tennessee, 27 were transgender: 52% (n = 14) with “Male-to-Female,” 26% (n = 7) with “Female,” and 22% (n = 6) with “Male” as their current_gender values. Proportions missing current_gender differed significantly by region across Tennessee (global, P < 0.01). Conclusion: While HIV-positive transgender individuals should be recognized as integral members of the LGBT community, they should also be acknowledged as a separate subgroup when appropriate. Collecting information about current self-identified gender identity should no longer be optional in Tennessee HIV surveillance. Although making efforts to collect both birth_sex and current_gender mandatory with each interview will improve surveillance, it is critical to train all staff properly on the correct way to inquire about gender identity in a culturally sensitive manner

  12. Record linkage to correct under-ascertainment of cancers in HIV cohorts: The Sinikithemba HIV clinic linkage project.

    PubMed

    Sengayi, Mazvita; Spoerri, Adrian; Egger, Matthias; Kielkowski, Danuta; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Cloete, Christie; Giddy, Janet; Bohlius, Julia

    2016-09-15

    The surveillance of HIV-related cancers in South Africa is hampered by the lack of systematic collection of cancer diagnoses in HIV cohorts and the absence of HIV status in cancer registries. To improve cancer ascertainment and estimate cancer incidence, we linked records of adults (aged ≥ 16 years) on antiretroviral treatment (ART) enrolled at Sinikithemba HIV clinic, McCord Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) with the cancer records of public laboratories in KZN province using probabilistic record linkage (PRL) methods. We calculated incidence rates for all cancers, Kaposi sarcoma (KS), cervix, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and non-AIDS defining cancers (NADCs) before and after inclusion of linkage-identified cancers with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A total of 8,721 records of HIV-positive patients were linked with 35,536 cancer records. Between 2004 and 2010, we identified 448 cancers, 82% (n = 367) were recorded in the cancer registry only, 10% (n = 43) in the HIV cohort only and 8% (n = 38) both in the HIV cohort and the cancer registry. The overall cancer incidence rate in patients starting ART increased from 134 (95% CI 91-212) to 877 (95% CI 744-1,041) per 100,000 person-years after inclusion of linkage-identified cancers. Incidence rates were highest for KS (432, 95% CI 341-555), followed by cervix (259, 95% CI 179-390) and NADCs (294, 95% CI 223-395) per 100,000 person-years. Ascertainment of cancer in HIV cohorts is incomplete, PRL is both feasible and essential for cancer ascertainment. PMID:27098265

  13. Heterologous Prime-Boost HIV-1 Vaccination Regimens in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott A.; Surman, Sherri L.; Sealy, Robert; Jones, Bart G.; Slobod, Karen S.; Branum, Kristen; Lockey, Timothy D.; Howlett, Nanna; Freiden, Pamela; Flynn, Patricia; Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there are more than 30 million people infected with HIV-1 and thousands more are infected each day. Vaccination is the single most effective mechanism for prevention of viral disease, and after more than 25 years of research, one vaccine has shown somewhat encouraging results in an advanced clinical efficacy trial. A modified intent-to-treat analysis of trial results showed that infection was approximately 30% lower in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group. The vaccine was administered using a heterologous prime-boost regimen in which both target antigens and delivery vehicles were changed during the course of inoculations. Here we examine the complexity of heterologous prime-boost immunizations. We show that the use of different delivery vehicles in prime and boost inoculations can help to avert the inhibitory effects caused by vector-specific immune responses. We also show that the introduction of new antigens into boost inoculations can be advantageous, demonstrating that the effect of ‘original antigenic sin’ is not absolute. Pre-clinical and clinical studies are reviewed, including our own work with a three-vector vaccination regimen using recombinant DNA, virus (Sendai virus or vaccinia virus) and protein. Promising preliminary results suggest that the heterologous prime-boost strategy may possibly provide a foundation for the future prevention of HIV-1 infections in humans. PMID:20407589

  14. Clinical and Virological Outcome of European Patients Infected With HIV

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-29

    HIV; Hepatitis B; Hepatitis C; AIDS; Coinfection; Cardiovascular Diseases; Diabetes Mellitus; Acidosis, Lactic; Renal Insufficiency; Fractures, Bone; End Stage Liver Disease; Kidney Failure, Chronic; Proteinuria

  15. HIV/AIDS interventions in an aging U.S. population.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Stephanie A

    2011-05-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 25 percent of people living with HIV in the United States in 2006 were age 50 and older. HIV prevention for people over 50 is an important health concern, especially as the U.S. population grows older. Scholarly research has identified the need for HIV/AIDS interventions in the population of people over age 50, but few interventions have been established. The ecological perspective, which integrates intrapersonal, interpersonal, organizational, community, and policy factors, was used to review the current interventions and propose possible new HIV/AIDS prevention efforts for older adults. Intrapersonal interventions are often based on the health belief model. The precaution adoption process model was explored as an alternative intrapersonal theory for modeling prevention efforts. Community interventions using diffusion of innovations theory are fully explored, and new interventions are proposed as an option for preventing HIV/AIDS in older adults. An agenda for future research and interventions is proposed. Social workers will be at the forefront of the effort to prevent HIV/AIDS in older adults. They must accept this responsibility, propose interventions, and evaluate their effectiveness. PMID:21661304

  16. Distribution of new HIV infections among key risk population groups in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Maboudou, Angèle Akouavi; Deku, Kodzo; Pitche, Palokinam Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Good data on the epidemiology of modes of transmission of HIV among population at risk are important for development of prevention strategies, and resource allocation for the implementation of the interventions. We sought to estimate new HIV infections among key risk groups in Togo. Methods We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological data on HIV and AIDS as part of the HIV control strategies in Togo from 2001 to 2012 following the PRISMA guidelines. We used the Mode of Transmission (MoT) modelling tool to estimate the incidence of new HIV infections in high risk groups. The MoT tool was developed and validated by UNAIDS and implemented by several countries using data on the HIV epidemic to estimate new HIV infections that will appear in the core groups. We used Epi-MoT tool to assess the availability and the quality of data. A score of availability of data over 50% and the quality over 1.5 were required to proceed to the MoT analysis. Uncertainty analysis to assess the reliability of the results was performed. Results Incidence of new HIV infections was estimated at 6,643 (95% CI = 5274, 9005) with an incidence rate of 203 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. The proportion of new HIV infections was 61.9% (95% CI = 46.2 to 71.7) in stable heterosexual couples compare to 14.01% (95% CI = 7.2 to 23.3) in people having casual sex. In high-risk groups new HIV infections accounted for 2.4% among sex workers (SWs) (95% CI = 1.2 - 4.1), 7.9% among clients of SWs (95% CI = 3.9-14.1) and 6.9% among men who have sex with men (MSM) (95% CI = 3.1 to 13.1). Conclusion We describe the prediction of the HIV epidemic with a large contribution of stable heterosexual couples in the occurrence of new infections. But HIV incidence remains high in key risk populations. Innovative strategies for risk reduction should be strengthened to reduce the transmission especially in stable heterosexual couples. PMID:25922630

  17. Population-Level Immune-Mediated Adaptation in HIV-1 Polymerase during the North American Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    Kinloch, Natalie N.; MacMillan, Daniel R.; Le, Anh Q.; Cotton, Laura A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Buchbinder, Susan; Carrington, Mary; Fuchs, Jonathan; Harrigan, P. Richard; Koblin, Beryl; Kushel, Margot; Markowitz, Martin; Mayer, Kenneth; Milloy, M. J.; Schechter, Martin T.; Wagner, Theresa; Walker, Bruce D.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Poon, Art F. Y.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I-associated polymorphisms in HIV-1 that persist upon transmission to HLA-mismatched hosts may spread in the population as the epidemic progresses. Transmission of HIV-1 sequences containing such adaptations may undermine cellular immune responses to the incoming virus in future hosts. Building upon previous work, we investigated the extent of HLA-associated polymorphism accumulation in HIV-1 polymerase (Pol) through comparative analysis of linked HIV-1/HLA class I genotypes sampled during historic (1979 to 1989; n = 338) and modern (2001 to 2011; n = 278) eras from across North America (Vancouver, BC, Canada; Boston, MA; New York, NY; and San Francisco, CA). Phylogenies inferred from historic and modern HIV-1 Pol sequences were star-like in shape, with an inferred most recent common ancestor (epidemic founder virus) sequence nearly identical to the modern North American subtype B consensus sequence. Nevertheless, modern HIV-1 Pol sequences exhibited roughly 2-fold-higher patristic (tip-to-tip) genetic distances than historic sequences, with HLA pressures likely driving ongoing diversification. Moreover, the frequencies of published HLA-associated polymorphisms in individuals lacking the selecting HLA class I allele was on average ∼2.5-fold higher in the modern than in the historic era, supporting their spread in circulation, though some remained stable in frequency during this time. Notably, polymorphisms restricted by protective HLA alleles appear to be spreading to a greater relative extent than others, though these increases are generally of modest absolute magnitude. However, despite evidence of polymorphism spread, North American hosts generally remain at relatively low risk of acquiring an HIV-1 polymerase sequence substantially preadapted to their HLA profiles, even in the present era. IMPORTANCE HLA class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) escape mutations in HIV-1 that persist upon transmission may

  18. The MANGUA Project: A Population-Based HIV Cohort in Guatemala

    PubMed Central

    García, Juan Ignacio; Samayoa, Blanca; Sabidó, Meritxell; Prieto, Luis Alberto; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Pinzón, Rodolfo; Santa Marina de León, Luis Roberto; Ortiz, José Fernando; Ponce, Ernesto; Mejía, Carlos Rodolfo; Arathoon, Eduardo; Casabona, Jordi; Study Group, The Mangua Cohort

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The MANGUA cohort is an ongoing multicenter, observational study of people living with HIV/AIDS in Guatemala. The cohort is based on the MANGUA application which is an electronic database to capture essential data from the medical records of HIV patients in care. Methods. The cohort enrolls HIV-positive adults ≥16 years of age. A predefined set of sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and laboratory data are registered at entry to the cohort study. Results. As of October 1st, 2012, 21 697 patients had been included in the MANGUA cohort (median age: 33 years, 40.3% female). At enrollment 74.1% had signs of advanced HIV infection and only 56.3% had baseline CD4 cell counts. In the first 12 months after starting antiretroviral treatment 26.9% (n = 3938) of the patients were lost to the program. Conclusions. The implementation of a cohort of HIV-positive patients in care in Guatemala is feasible and has provided national HIV indicators to monitor and evaluate the HIV epidemic. The identified percentages of late presenters and high rates of LTFU will help the Ministry to target their current efforts in improving access to diagnosis and care. PMID:26425365

  19. The MANGUA Project: A Population-Based HIV Cohort in Guatemala.

    PubMed

    García, Juan Ignacio; Samayoa, Blanca; Sabidó, Meritxell; Prieto, Luis Alberto; Nikiforov, Mikhail; Pinzón, Rodolfo; Santa Marina de León, Luis Roberto; Ortiz, José Fernando; Ponce, Ernesto; Mejía, Carlos Rodolfo; Arathoon, Eduardo; Casabona, Jordi; Study Group, The Mangua Cohort

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The MANGUA cohort is an ongoing multicenter, observational study of people living with HIV/AIDS in Guatemala. The cohort is based on the MANGUA application which is an electronic database to capture essential data from the medical records of HIV patients in care. Methods. The cohort enrolls HIV-positive adults ≥16 years of age. A predefined set of sociodemographic, behavioral, clinical, and laboratory data are registered at entry to the cohort study. Results. As of October 1st, 2012, 21 697 patients had been included in the MANGUA cohort (median age: 33 years, 40.3% female). At enrollment 74.1% had signs of advanced HIV infection and only 56.3% had baseline CD4 cell counts. In the first 12 months after starting antiretroviral treatment 26.9% (n = 3938) of the patients were lost to the program. Conclusions. The implementation of a cohort of HIV-positive patients in care in Guatemala is feasible and has provided national HIV indicators to monitor and evaluate the HIV epidemic. The identified percentages of late presenters and high rates of LTFU will help the Ministry to target their current efforts in improving access to diagnosis and care. PMID:26425365

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sleep Disturbance in a Large HIV-Infected Adult Population.

    PubMed

    Allavena, C; Guimard, T; Billaud, E; De la Tullaye, S; Reliquet, V; Pineau, S; Hüe, H; Supiot, C; Chennebault, J-M; Michau, C; Hitoto, H; Vatan, R; Raffi, F

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances in French adult HIV-infected outpatients. Patients fullfilled a self-administered questionnaire on their health behavior, sleep attitudes (Pittsburgh sleep quality index, PSQI), quality of life and depression; 1354 patients were enrolled. Median sleeping time was 7 h. Poor sleep quality was observed in 47 % of the patients, and moderate to serious depressive symptoms in 19.7 %. Factors significantly associated with sleep disturbances were depression, male gender, active employment, living single, tobacco-smoking, duration of HIV infection, nevirapine or efavirenz-including regimen. Prevalence of poor sleepers is high in this HIV adult outpatient population. Associated factors seem poorly specific to HIV infection and more related to social and psychological status. Taking care of these disturbances may prove to be an effective health management strategy. PMID:26271816

  1. Populations at Increased Risk for HIV Infection in Kenya: Results From a National Population-Based Household Survey, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Githuka, George; Hladik, Wolfgang; Mwalili, Samuel; Cherutich, Peter; Muthui, Mercy; Gitonga, Joshua; Maina, William K.; Kim, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Populations with higher risks for HIV exposure contribute to the HIV epidemic in Kenya. We present data from the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey to estimate the size and HIV prevalence of populations with high-risk characteristics. Methods The Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey 2012 was a national survey of Kenyans aged 18 months to 64 years which linked demographic and behavioral information with HIV results. Data were weighted to account for sampling probability. This analysis was restricted to adults aged 18 years and older. Results Of 5088 men and 6745 women, 0.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.14] were persons who inject drugs (PWID). Among men, 0.6% (CI: 0.3 to 0.8) had ever had sex with other men, and 3.1% (CI: 2.4 to 3.7) were males who had ever engaged in transactional sex work (MTSW). Among women, 1.9% (CI: 1.3 to 2.5) had ever had anal sex, and 4.1% (CI: 3.5 to 4.8) were women who had ever engaged in transactional sex work (FTSW). Among men, 17.6% (CI: 15.7 to 19.6) had been male clients of transactional sex workers (TSW). HIV prevalence was 0% among men who have sex with men, 6.3% (CI: 0 to 18.1) among persons who injected drugs, 7.1% (CI: 4.8 to 9.4) among male clients of TSW, 7.6% (CI: 1.8 to 13.4) among MTSW, 12.1% (CI: 7.1 to 17.1) among FTSW, and 12.1% (CI: 5.0 to 19.2) among females who ever had engaged in anal sex. Conclusions Population-based data on high-risk populations can be used to set realistic targets for HIV prevention, care, and treatment for these groups. These data should inform priorities for high-risk populations in the upcoming Kenyan strategic plan on HIV/AIDS. PMID:24732821

  2. Effect of rapid HIV testing on HIV incidence and services in populations at high risk for HIV exposure: an equity-focused systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Pottie, Kevin; Medu, Olanrewaju; Welch, Vivian; Dahal, Govinda P; Tyndall, Mark; Rader, Tamara; Wells, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of rapid voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) for HIV on HIV incidence and uptake of HIV/AIDS services in people at high risk for HIV exposure. Design Cochrane systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources We searched PubMed, EMBASE, AIDSearch, LILACS, Global Health, Medline Africa, PsychInfo, CINAHL, Cochrane CENTRAL, Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group Specialized Register and grey literature from 1 January 2001 to 5 June 2014 without language restriction. Data selection We included controlled studies that compared rapid VCT with conventional testing among people at risk for HIV exposure. Data extraction Two reviewers extracted data. We used Cochrane risk of bias tool and GRADE criteria: risk of bias, inconsistency, indirectness, imprecision and publication bias. For observational studies we used the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. We used the PRISMA-Equity reporting guideline. Results From 2441 articles, we included 8 randomised controlled trials and 5 observational studies. Rapid VCT was associated with a threefold increase in HIV-testing uptake (relative risk (RR)=2.95 95% CI 1.69 to 5.16) and a twofold increase in the receipt of test results (RR=2.14, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.24). Women accepted testing more often than men in rapid VCT arm, but no differences in effect for age or socioeconomic status. Observational studies also showed rapid VCT led to higher rates of uptake of testing. Heterogeneity was high. A cluster-randomised trial reported an 11% reduction in HIV incidence in intervention communities (RR=0.89, 95% CI=0.63 to 1.24) over 3 years trial. Conclusions Rapid VCT in health facilities and communities was associated with a large increase in HIV-testing uptake and receipt of results. This has implications for WHO guidelines. The routine use of rapid VCT may also help avoid human rights violations among marginalised populations where testing may occur without informed consent and where existing stigma may create barriers to testing

  3. Cost-Effectiveness of Frequent HIV Testing of High-Risk Populations in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Farnham, Paul G.; Sansom, Stephanie L.; Yaylali, Emine; Mermin, Jonathan H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Data showing a high incidence of HIV infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) who had annual testing suggest that more frequent HIV testing may be warranted. Testing technology is also a consideration given the availability of sensitive testing modalities and the increased use of less-sensitive rapid, point-of-care antibody tests. We assessed the cost-effectiveness of HIV testing of MSM and injection drug users (IDUs) at 3- and 6-month intervals using fourth-generation and rapid tests. Methods: We used a published mathematical model of HIV transmission to evaluate testing intervals for each population using cohorts of 10,000 MSM and IDU. We incorporated HIV transmissions averted due to serostatus awareness and viral suppression. We included costs for HIV testing and treatment initiation, and also treatment costs saved from averted transmissions. Results: For MSM, HIV testing was cost saving or cost effective over a 1-year period for both 6-month compared with annual testing and quarterly compared with 6-month testing using either test. Testing IDU every 6 months compared with annually was moderately cost effective over a 1-year period with a fourth-generation test, while testing with rapid, point-of-care tests or quarterly was not cost effective. MSM results remained robust in sensitivity analysis, whereas IDU results were sensitive to changes in HIV incidence and continuum-of-care parameters. Threshold analyses on costs suggested that additional implementation costs could be incurred for more frequent testing for MSM while remaining cost effective. Conclusions: HIV testing of MSM as frequently as quarterly is cost effective compared with annual testing, but testing IDU more frequently than annually is generally not cost effective. PMID:26361172

  4. Monitoring HIV Prevention Programme Outcomes among Key Populations in Kenya: Findings from a National Survey.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Parinita; McClarty, Leigh M; Musyoki, Helgar; Anthony, John; Kioko, Japheth; Kaosa, Shem; Ogwang, Bernard E; Githuka, George; Sirengo, Martin; Birir, Sarah; Blanchard, James F; Muraguri, Nicholas; Isac, Shajy; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for the implementation of the Kenya AIDS Strategic Framework 2014/15-2018/19, the Kenya National AIDS and STI Control Programme facilitated a national polling booth survey as part of a baseline assessment of HIV-related risk behaviours among FSWs, MSM, and PWID, and their utilization of existing preventive interventions, as well as structural factors that may influence KPs' vulnerability to HIV. The survey was conducted among "key populations" (female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs) to understand current HIV risk and prevention behaviours, utilization of existing programmes and services, and experiences of violence. In total, 3,448 female sex workers, 1,308 men who have sex with men, and 690 people who inject drugs were randomly selected to participate in polling booth survey sessions from seven priority sites. Survey responses were aggregated and descriptive statistics derived. In general, reported condom use among all key populations was quite high with paying clients, and lower with regular, non-paying partners. Many participants reported unavailability of condoms or clean injecting equipment within the past month. Exposure to, and utilization of, existing HIV prevention services varied significantly among the groups, and was reported least commonly by female sex workers. Encouragingly, approximately three-quarters of all key population members reported receiving an HIV test in the past three months. All key population groups reported experiencing high levels of physical and sexual violence from partners/clients, and/or arrest and violence by law enforcement officials. Although some of the findings are encouraging, there is room for improvement in HIV prevention programmes and services for key populations across Kenya. PMID:26313642

  5. Evaluating HIV prevention strategies for populations in key affected groups: The example of Cabo Verde

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, João Filipe G.; Galea, Sandro; Flanigan, Timothy; Monteiro, Maria de Lourdes; Friedman, Samuel R.; Marshall, Brandon DL

    2015-01-01

    Objectives We used an individual-based model to evaluate the effects of hypothetical prevention interventions on HIV incidence trajectories in a concentrated, mixed epidemic setting from 2011 to 2021, and using Cabo Verde as an example. Methods Simulations were conducted to evaluate the extent to which early HIV treatment and optimization of care, HIV testing, condom distribution, and substance abuse treatment could eliminate new infections (i.e., reduce incidence to less than 10 cases per 10,000 person-years) among non-drug users, female sex workers (FSW), and people who use drugs (PWUD). Results Scaling up all four interventions resulted in the largest decreases in HIV, with estimates ranging from 1.4 (95%CI:1.36–1.44) per 10,000 person-years among non-drug users to 8.2 (95%CI:7.8–8.6) per 10,000 person-years among PWUD in 2021. Intervention scenarios targeting FWS and PWUD also resulted in HIV incidence estimates at or below 10 per 10,000 person-years by 2021 for all population sub-groups. Conclusions Our results suggest that scaling up multiple interventions among entire population is necessary to achieve elimination. However, prioritizing key populations with this combination prevention strategy may also result in a substantial decrease in total incidence. PMID:25838121

  6. Clinical Population Pharmacokinetics and Toxicodynamics of Linezolid

    PubMed Central

    Boak, Lauren M.; Rayner, Craig R.; Grayson, M. Lindsay; Paterson, David L.; Spelman, Denis; Khumra, Sharmila; Capitano, Blair; Forrest, Alan; Li, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Thrombocytopenia is a common side effect of linezolid, an oxazolidinone antibiotic often used to treat multidrug-resistant Gram-positive bacterial infections. Various risk factors have been suggested, including linezolid dose and duration of therapy, baseline platelet counts, and renal dysfunction; still, the mechanisms behind this potentially treatment-limiting toxicity are largely unknown. A clinical study was conducted to investigate the relationship between linezolid pharmacokinetics and toxicodynamics and inform strategies to prevent and manage linezolid-associated toxicity. Forty-one patients received 42 separate treatment courses of linezolid (600 mg every 12 h). A new mechanism-based, population pharmacokinetic/toxicodynamic model was developed to describe the time course of plasma linezolid concentrations and platelets. A linezolid concentration of 8.06 mg/liter (101% between-patient variability) inhibited the synthesis of platelet precursor cells by 50%. Simulations predicted treatment durations of 5 and 7 days to carry a substantially lower risk than 10- to 28-day therapy for platelet nadirs of <100 ×109/liter. The risk for toxicity did not differ noticeably between 14 and 28 days of therapy and was significantly higher for patients with lower baseline platelet counts. Due to the increased risk of toxicity after longer durations of linezolid therapy and large between-patient variability, close monitoring of patients for development of toxicity is important. Dose individualization based on plasma linezolid concentration profiles and platelet counts should be considered to minimize linezolid-associated thrombocytopenia. Overall, oxazolidinone therapy over 5 to 7 days even at relatively high doses was predicted to be as safe as 10-day therapy of 600 mg linezolid every 12 h. PMID:24514086

  7. HIV Prevention Counseling Intervention Delivered During Routine Clinical Care Reduces HIV Risk Behavior in HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: The Izindlela Zokuphila/Options for Health Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Shuper, Paul A.; Christie, Sarah; Pillay, Sandy; Macdonald, Susan; Ngcobo, Ntombenhle; Amico, K. Rivet; Lalloo, Umesh; Friedland, Gerald; Fisher, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Sustainable interventions are needed to minimize HIV risk behavior among people living with HIV (PLWH) in South Africa on antiretroviral therapy (ART), a significant proportion of whom do not achieve viral suppression. Objective To determine whether a brief lay counselor delivered intervention implemented during routine care can reduce risky sex among PLWH on ART. Design Cluster randomized 16 HIV clinical care sites in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, to intervention or standard-of-care. Setting Publicly funded HIV clinical care sites. Patients 1891 PLWH on ART received the HIV prevention counseling intervention (n = 967) or standard-of-care counseling (n = 924). Intervention Lay counselors delivered a brief intervention using motivational interviewing strategies based on the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model during routine clinical care. Main Outcome Measures Number of sexual events without a condom in the past four weeks with partners of any HIV status, and with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown, assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Intervention participants reported significantly greater reductions in HIV risk behavior on both primary outcomes, compared to standard-of-care participants. Differences in STI incidence between arms were not observed. Conclusion Effective behavioral interventions, delivered by lay counselors within the clinical care setting, are consistent with the strategy of linking HIV care and HIV prevention and integrating biomedical and behavioral approaches to stemming the HIV epidemic. PMID:25230288

  8. HIV infection among internally displaced women and women residing in river populations along the Congo River, Democratic Republic of Congo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Andrea A; Malele, Faustin; Kaiser, Reinhard; Mama, Nicaise; Kinkela, Timothée; Mantshumba, Jean-Caurent; Hynes, Michelle; De Jesus, Stacy; Musema, Godefoid; Kayembe, Patrick K; Hawkins Reed, Karen; Diaz, Theresa

    2009-10-01

    We conducted a reproductive health assessment among women aged 15-49 years residing in an internally displaced persons (IDP) camp and surrounding river populations in the Democratic Republic of Congo. After providing informed consent, participants were administered a behavioral questionnaire on demographics, sexual risk, reproductive health behavior, and a history of gender based violence. Participants provided a blood specimen for HIV and syphilis testing and were referred to HIV counseling and testing services established for this study to learn their HIV status. HIV prevalence was significantly higher among women in the IDP population compared to women in the river population. Sexually transmitted infection symptoms in the past 12 months and a history of sexual violence during the conflict were associated with HIV infection the river and IDP population, respectively. Targeted prevention, care, and treatment services are urgently needed for the IDP population and surrounding host communities during displacement and resettlement. PMID:19319674

  9. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  10. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. PMID:26929669

  11. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. PMID:26929669

  12. Monitoring HIV Prevention Programme Outcomes among Key Populations in Kenya: Findings from a National Survey

    PubMed Central

    Musyoki, Helgar; Anthony, John; Kioko, Japheth; Kaosa, Shem; Ogwang, Bernard E.; Githuka, George; Sirengo, Martin; Birir, Sarah; Blanchard, James F.; Muraguri, Nicholas; Isac, Shajy; Moses, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    In preparation for the implementation of the Kenya AIDS Strategic Framework 2014/15-2018/19, the Kenya National AIDS and STI Control Programme facilitated a national polling booth survey as part of a baseline assessment of HIV-related risk behaviours among FSWs, MSM, and PWID, and their utilization of existing preventive interventions, as well as structural factors that may influence KPs’ vulnerability to HIV. The survey was conducted among “key populations” (female sex workers, men who have sex with men, and people who inject drugs) to understand current HIV risk and prevention behaviours, utilization of existing programmes and services, and experiences of violence. In total, 3,448 female sex workers, 1,308 men who have sex with men, and 690 people who inject drugs were randomly selected to participate in polling booth survey sessions from seven priority sites. Survey responses were aggregated and descriptive statistics derived. In general, reported condom use among all key populations was quite high with paying clients, and lower with regular, non-paying partners. Many participants reported unavailability of condoms or clean injecting equipment within the past month. Exposure to, and utilization of, existing HIV prevention services varied significantly among the groups, and was reported least commonly by female sex workers. Encouragingly, approximately three-quarters of all key population members reported receiving an HIV test in the past three months. All key population groups reported experiencing high levels of physical and sexual violence from partners/clients, and/or arrest and violence by law enforcement officials. Although some of the findings are encouraging, there is room for improvement in HIV prevention programmes and services for key populations across Kenya. PMID:26313642

  13. High prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2 and other sexually transmitted infections among women attending two sexual health clinics in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau, West Africa.

    PubMed

    Månsson, F; Camara, C; Biai, A; Monteiro, M; da Silva, Z J; Dias, F; Alves, A; Andersson, S; Fenyö, E M; Norrgren, H; Unemo, M

    2010-09-01

    The objective was to examine the prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2 and 10 other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and to explore the relationship between HIV and those STIs in women attending two sexual health clinics in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. In all, 711 women with urogenital problems were included. Clinical examination was performed and HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-1, HTLV-2 and syphilis were diagnosed by serology. Trichomonas vaginalis was examined using wet mount microscopy. Cervical samples (and swabs from visible ulcers, if present) were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Haemophilus ducreyi, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2, and culture diagnosis of Neisseria gonorrhoeae. The prevalence of HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 (dual infection) was 9.5%, 1.8% and 1.1%, respectively. The prevalence of HTLV-1 was 2.8%, HTLV-2 0%, HSV-1 1.4%, HSV-2 7.7%, T. vaginalis 20.4%, syphilis 1.0%, N. gonorrhoeae 1.3%, H. ducreyi 2.7%, M. genitalium 7.7% and C. trachomatis 12.6%. HIV-1 and/or HIV-2 infection was significantly associated with active HSV-2 and HIV-1 was significantly associated with M. genitalium infection. In conclusion, HIV-1 and HIV-2 prevalence was higher compared with previous studies of pregnant women in Guinea-Bissau. The prevalence of co-infection of HIV and other STIs is high. National evidence-based guidelines for the management of STIs in Guinea-Bissau are essential. PMID:21097735

  14. Special Populations and Pharmacogenetic Issues in Tuberculosis Drug Development and Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McIlleron, Helen; Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Dave, Joel Alex; Blockman, Marc; Owen, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Special populations, including children and pregnant women, have been neglected in tuberculosis drug development. Patients in developing countries are inadequately represented in pharmacology research, and postmarketing pharmacovigilance activities tend to be rudimentary in these settings. There is an ethical imperative to generate evidence at an early stage to support optimal treatment in these populations and in populations with common comorbid conditions, such as diabetes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article highlights the research needed to support equitable access to new antituberculosis regimens. Efficient and opportunistic pharmacokinetic study designs, typically using sparse sampling and population analysis methods, can facilitate optimal dose selection for children and pregnant women. Formulations suitable for children should be developed early and used in pharmacokinetic studies to guide dose selection. Drug–drug interactions between commonly coprescribed medications also need to be evaluated, and when these are significant, alternative approaches should be sought. A potent rifamycin-sparing regimen could revolutionize the treatment of adults and children requiring a protease inhibitor as part of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV infection. A sufficiently wide formulary of drugs should be developed for those with contraindications to the standard approaches. Because genetic variations may influence an individual's response to tuberculosis treatment, depending on the population being treated, it is important that samples be collected and stored for pharmacogenetic study in future clinical trials. PMID:26009615

  15. Special populations and pharmacogenetic issues in tuberculosis drug development and clinical research.

    PubMed

    McIlleron, Helen; Abdel-Rahman, Susan; Dave, Joel Alex; Blockman, Marc; Owen, Andrew

    2015-06-15

    Special populations, including children and pregnant women, have been neglected in tuberculosis drug development. Patients in developing countries are inadequately represented in pharmacology research, and postmarketing pharmacovigilance activities tend to be rudimentary in these settings. There is an ethical imperative to generate evidence at an early stage to support optimal treatment in these populations and in populations with common comorbid conditions, such as diabetes and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This article highlights the research needed to support equitable access to new antituberculosis regimens. Efficient and opportunistic pharmacokinetic study designs, typically using sparse sampling and population analysis methods, can facilitate optimal dose selection for children and pregnant women. Formulations suitable for children should be developed early and used in pharmacokinetic studies to guide dose selection. Drug-drug interactions between commonly coprescribed medications also need to be evaluated, and when these are significant, alternative approaches should be sought. A potent rifamycin-sparing regimen could revolutionize the treatment of adults and children requiring a protease inhibitor as part of antiretroviral treatment regimens for HIV infection. A sufficiently wide formulary of drugs should be developed for those with contraindications to the standard approaches. Because genetic variations may influence an individual's response to tuberculosis treatment, depending on the population being treated, it is important that samples be collected and stored for pharmacogenetic study in future clinical trials. PMID:26009615

  16. Distribution of CD4 Lymphocyte Cells Among Apparently Healthy HIV Seropositive and Seronegative Populations

    PubMed Central

    Abubakar, Abdulazeez A

    2012-01-01

    Background: CD4 lymphocyte cells are often used as prognostic markers for monitoring the progression of immunosupression such as HIV infection. Aim: This study was conducted to assess the distribution of CD4 lymphocytes among apparently healthy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seronegative and seropositive populations in a Nigerian state. Materials and Methods: A total of 1520 apparently healthy subjects aged 18–64 years, composed of 800 males and 720 females attending some selected health institutions in the state, participated in the study. Ten milliliters of blood was collected from each subject; 5 ml of this was used for HIV antibodies sero-typing while the remaining 5 ml was anticoagulated and used for CD4 lymphocytes level determination. Only samples tested positive both with Capillus and Determine HIV test kits were further differentiated into sero-types with a standard diagnostic HIV test kit. The CD4 lymphocyte levels of all the sample were determined; mean CD4 levels of 205.1±0.09 and 287.4±0.3 cells/μl were recorded among females seropositives and seronagatives respectively. Statistical analysis by the Student t-test showed a significant difference in the mean CD4 lymphocyte count by gender. Results: Findings showed a mean CD4 level of 311.7±1.2 cells/μl among seropositive males while 399.3±0.6 cells/μl was recorded among seronegatives (t=5.86). The study also recorded a CD4 lymphocyte range of 232–464 cells/μl among apparently healthy seronegative population in this locality. Conclusion: The findings showed a significantly higher mean CD4 lymphocyte count among adult male HIV seronegatives (χ2=9.22) and seropositives (χ2=15.07) than their female counterparts. Further research work using the automation technique is suggested to confirm this new range for monitoring HIV subjects on antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22454823

  17. Covariate effects and population pharmacokinetics of lamivudine in HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Piana, Chiara; Zhao, Wei; Adkison, Kimberly; Burger, David; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Danhof, Meindert; Della Pasqua, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Aim Lamivudine is used as first line therapy in HIV-infected children. Yet, like many other paediatric drugs, its dose rationale has been based on limited clinical data, without thorough understanding of the effects of growth on drug disposition. Here we use lamivudine to show how a comprehensive population pharmacokinetic model can account for the influence of demographic covariates on exposure (i.e. AUC and Cmax). Methods Data from three paediatric trials were used to describe the pharmacokinetics across the overall population. Modelling was based on a non-linear mixed effects approach. A stepwise procedure was used for covariate model building. Results A one compartment model with first order elimination best described the pharmacokinetics of lamivudine in children. The effect of weight on clearance (CL) and volume of distribution (V) was characterized by an exponential function, with exponents of 0.705 and 0.635, respectively. For a child with median body weight (17.6 kg), CL and V were 16.5 (95% CI 15.2, 17.7) l h−1 and 46.0 (95% CI 42.4, 49.5) l, respectively. There were no differences between formulations (tablet and solution). The predicted AUC(0,12 h) after twice daily doses of 4 mg kg−1 ranged from 4.44 mg l−1 h for children <14 kg to 7.25 mg l−1 h for children >30 kg. Conclusions The use of meta-analysis is critical to identify the correct covariate-parameter relationships, which must be assessed before a model is applied for predictive purposes (e.g. defining dosing recommendations for children). In contrast to prior modelling efforts, we show that the covariate distribution in the target population must be considered. PMID:24118070

  18. Accuracy of Clinical Diagnosis of Dengue Episodes in the RV144 HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trial in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Stablein, Donald; Dawson, Peter; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Robb, Merlin L; O'Connell, Robert J; Yoon, In-Kyu; Fernandez, Stefan; Excler, Jean-Louis

    2015-01-01

    RV144 was a community-based HIV vaccine efficacy trial conducted in HIV-uninfected adults in Thailand, where dengue virus continues to cause a large number of infections every year. We attempted to document the accuracy of clinically diagnosed dengue episodes reported as serious adverse events (SAEs) and adverse events (AEs) and examine whether dengue serology would support the clinical diagnosis. Subjects without a clinical dengue diagnosis but with an infection or idiopathic fever were selected as a control population. Dengue serology was performed by hemagglutination inhibition on plasma samples. A total of 124 clinical dengue episodes were reported (103 SAEs and 21 AEs). Overall 82.6% of the clinically diagnosed dengue episodes were supported by a positive dengue serology: 71.4% of the AEs and 85.0% of the SAEs. Of the 100 subjects with both clinical dengue and positive serology, all presented with fever, 83% with leucopenia, 54% with thrombocytopenia, and 27% with hemorrhagic symptoms. All episodes resolved spontaneously without sequellae. Only two of 15 subjects with a negative serology presented with fever. The sensitivity and specificity of clinical dengue diagnosis were 90.9% and 74.4%, respectively, when compared to the control population, and with a positive predictive value of 82.6% and negative predictive value of 84.7% when compared to dengue serology. Clinical diagnosis of dengue is an accurate method of dengue diagnosis in adults in Thailand. Large-scale clinical trials offer the opportunity to systematically study infectious diseases such as dengue and other infections that may occur during the trial. PMID:26011728

  19. Integrating HIV care and treatment into primary healthcare: Are clinics equipped?

    PubMed Central

    Stellenberg, Ethelwynn L.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background The demand for HIV care and treatment services is increasing rapidly and strategies to sustain long-term care should be employed. The decentralisation and integration of HIV care and treatment services into primary healthcare (PHC) is vitally important in order to ensure optimal access to life-saving antiretroviral therapy and ongoing chronic care. Conversely, the PHC system is fraught with the current burden of disease. Setting The study was conducted in PHC clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, Kwa-Zulu Natal. Aim The objectives of the study were to assess whether PHC clinics were equipped to deliver integrated HIV services and to evaluate the availability of resources as well as support systems for HIV care and treatment in PHC clinics. Methods A quantitative, cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken in 20 randomly-selected, eligible clinics in the uMgungundlovu district, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. An evaluation instrument was completed through observations and review of the clinic data records. Criteria were based on the World Health Organization's guide to indicators for antiretroviral programmes as well as South African HIV standards for PHC facilities. Results None of the clinics were equipped adequately. Clinics with a higher patient load had poorer scores, whilst clinics providing antiretroviral therapy were better equipped in terms of human resources and infrastructure. Conclusion HIV services are an essential part of primary healthcare and clinics need to be equipped adequately in order to render this service. It is unlikely that the over-burdened health system would be able to cope with an increased number of patients on antiretroviral therapy in the long term, whilst maintaining quality of services, without support being given to PHC clinics. PMID:26245407

  20. Migration, sexual behaviour, and HIV risk: a general population cohort in rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Nuala; Eaton, Jeffrey W; Newell, Marie-Louise; Hosegood, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Increased sexual risk behaviour and HIV prevalence have been reported in migrants compared with non-migrants in sub-Saharan Africa. We investigated the association of residential and migration patterns with sexual HIV risk behaviours and HIV prevalence in an open, general population cohort in rural KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Methods In a mainly rural demographic surveillance area in northern KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, we collected longitudinal demographic, migration, sexual behaviour, and HIV status data through household surveillance twice per year and individual surveillance once per year. All resident household members and a sample of non-resident household members (stratified by sex and migration patterns) were eligible for participation. Participants reported sexual risk behaviours, including data for multiple, concurrent, and casual sexual partners and condom use, and gave a dried blood spot sample via fingerprick for HIV testing. We investigated population-level differences in sexual HIV risk behaviours and HIV prevalence with respect to migration indicators using logistic regression models. Findings Between Jan 1, 2005, and Dec 31, 2011, the total eligible population at each surveillance round ranged between 21 129 and 22 726 women (aged 17–49 years) and between 20 399 and 22 100 men (aged 17–54 years). The number of eligible residents in any round ranged from 24 395 to 26 664 and the number of eligible non-residents ranged from 17 002 to 18 891 between rounds. The stratified sample of non-residents included between 2350 and 3366 individuals each year. Sexual risk behaviours were significantly more common in non-residents than in residents for both men and women. Estimated differences in sexual risk behaviours, but not HIV prevalence, varied between the migration indicators: recent migration, mobility, and migration type. HIV prevalence was significantly increased in current residents with a recent history of

  1. Feasibility and acceptability of a specialist clinical service for HIV-infected mineworkers in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, S; Grant, A D; Day, J H; Rothwell, E; Chaisson, R E; Hayes, R J; Churchyard, G J

    2004-01-01

    Occupational settings offer an ideal opportunity to provide preventive health services for HIV-infected workers. A specialized clinic was established in a mining hospital in the Free State, South Africa, with the primary aim of delivering preventive therapy such as isoniazid to those at high risk of tuberculosis (individuals with HIV infection or silicosis), and cotrimoxazole to those at highest risk for opportunistic infections. The clinic design has taken regard of the importance of minimizing stigma, protecting confidentiality, monitoring potential side effects, supporting adherence and identification of prophylaxis failure. The clinic opened in April 1999 and, by August 2001, 1773 patients had attended at least once; 1762 are HIV-infected and 11 have silicosis. Of those with HIV infection, most were asymptomatic at their first visit. The clinic has achieved high acceptability: 99% of persons who were actively recruited to the service agreed to attend. The number still attending after a median of 13 months from recruitment was 1,270 (72%) and only 48 (2.7%) have declined continued attendance. Most losses were due to termination of employment unrelated to a medical condition. The clinic has already been successfully replicated in two other regions of the mining health service in South Africa and provides a model for workplace HIV clinical services that could be used for implementation of further interventions such as antiretroviral therapy. PMID:14660143

  2. Sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical correlates of inconsistent condom use in HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, K; van der Straten, A; Saul, J; Shiboski, S C; Gomez, C A; Padian, N

    2001-11-01

    We examined sociodemographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics associated with inconsistent condom use in a cross-sectional analysis of 145 sexually active HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples who participated in the California Partners Study II. All couples were aware of their HIV-serodiscordant status. Forty-five percent of couples reported having had unprotected vaginal or anal sex in the previous 6 months. In the multivariate couple-level analyses, factors independently associated with inconsistent (i.e., <100%) condom use in the previous 6 months included lower educational level, unemployment, African-American ethnicity, and practice of anal sex by the couple. Injection drug use was associated with inconsistent condom use among couples with younger HIV-infected partners. In addition, couples with HIV-infected partners who had higher CD4 cell counts and couples in which the HIV-infected male partner ever had sex with a man were more likely to use condoms inconsistently. Consistency of condom use did not depend on the gender of the HIV-infected partner or duration of sexual relationship. The findings suggest that many HIV-serodiscordant heterosexual couples remain at high risk of HIV transmission and may benefit not only from behavioral interventions but also from structural interventions aimed at improving their social and economic conditions. PMID:11694839

  3. Clinical and pharmacogenomic implications of genetic variation in a Southern Ethiopian population.

    PubMed

    Tekola-Ayele, F; Adeyemo, A; Aseffa, A; Hailu, E; Finan, C; Davey, G; Rotimi, C N; Newport, M J

    2015-02-01

    Africa is home to genetically diverse human populations. We compared the genetic structure of the Wolaita ethnic population from Southern Ethiopia (WETH, n=120) with HapMap populations using genome-wide variants. We investigated allele frequencies of 443 clinically and pharmacogenomically relevant genetic variants in WETH compared with HapMap populations. We found that WETH were genetically most similar to the Kenya Maasai and least similar to the Japanese in HapMap. Variant alleles associated with increased risk of adverse reactions to drugs used for treating tuberculosis (rs1799929 and rs1495741 in NAT2), thromboembolism (rs7294, rs9923231 and rs9934438 in VKORC1), and HIV/AIDS and solid tumors (rs2242046 in SLC28A1) had significantly higher frequencies in WETH compared with African ancestry HapMap populations. Our results illustrate that clinically relevant pharmacogenomic loci display allele frequency differences among African populations. We conclude that drug dosage guidelines for important global health diseases should be validated in genetically diverse African populations. PMID:25069476

  4. Clinical and Pharmacogenomic Implications of Genetic Variation in a Southern Ethiopian Population

    PubMed Central

    Tekola-Ayele, Fasil; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Aseffa, Abraham; Hailu, Elena; Finan, Chris; Davey, Gail

    2014-01-01

    Africa is home to genetically diverse human populations. We compared the genetic structure of the Wolaita ethnic population from southern Ethiopia (WETH, n=120) with HapMap populations using genome-wide variants. We investigated allele frequencies of 443 clinically and pharmacogenomically relevant genetic variants in WETH compared to HapMap populations. We found that WETH were genetically most similar to the Kenya Maasai and least similar to the Japanese in HapMap. Variant alleles associated with increased risk of adverse reactions to drugs used for treating tuberculosis (rs1799929 and rs1495741 in NAT2), thromboembolism (rs7294, rs9923231 and rs9934438 in VKORC1), and HIV/AIDS and solid tumors (rs2242046 in SLC28A1) had significantly higher frequencies in WETH compared to African ancestry HapMap populations. Our results illustrate that clinically relevant pharmacogenomic loci display allele frequency differences among African populations. We conclude that drug dosage guidelines for important global health diseases should be validated in genetically diverse African populations. PMID:25069476

  5. Sex, Race, and Geographic Region Influence Clinical Outcomes Following Primary HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    MaWhinney, Samantha; Allshouse, Amanda; Feser, William; Markowitz, Martin; Little, Susan; Hecht, Richard; Daar, Eric S.; Collier, Ann C.; Margolick, Joseph; Kilby, J. Michael; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Conway, Brian; Kaldor, John; Levy, Jay; Schooley, Robert; Cooper, David A.; Altfeld, Marcus; Richman, Douglas; Connick, Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether sex and race influence clinical outcomes following primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Methods. Data were evaluated from an observational, multicenter, primarily North American cohort of HIV-1 seroconverters. Results. Of 2277 seroconverters, 5.4% were women. At enrollment, women averaged .40 log10 fewer copies/mL of HIV-1 RNA (P < .001) and 66 more CD4+ T cells/μL (P = .006) than men, controlling for age and race. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was less likely to be initiated at any time point by nonwhite women and men compared to white men (P < .005), and by individuals from the southern United States compared to others (P = .047). Sex and race did not affect responses to ART after 6 months (P > .73). Women were 2.17-fold more likely than men to experience >1 HIV/AIDS-related event (P < .001). Nonwhite women were most likely to experience an HIV/AIDS-related event compared to all others (P = .035), after adjusting for intravenous drug use and ART. Eight years after diagnosis, >1 HIV/AIDS-related event had occurred in 78% of nonwhites and 37% of whites from the southern United States, and 24% of whites and 17% of nonwhites from other regions (P < .001). Conclusions. Despite more favorable clinical parameters initially, female HIV-1-seroconverters had worse outcomes than did male seroconverters. Elevated morbidity was associated with being nonwhite and residing in the southern United States. PMID:21245157

  6. HIV-associated tuberculosis in developing countries: clinical features, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Raviglione, M. C.; Narain, J. P.; Kochi, A.

    1992-01-01

    This article reviews the clinical aspects and diagnosis of HIV-associated tuberculosis in developing countries, and summarizes WHO's recommendations for treatment. According to WHO estimates (early 1992) over 4 million persons worldwide have been infected with HIV and tuberculosis; 95% of them are in the developing countries. Clinical features of HIV-associated pulmonary tuberculosis in adults are frequently atypical, particularly in the late stage of HIV infection, with non-cavitary disease, lower lobe infiltrates, hilar lymphadenopathy and pleural effusion. More typical post-primary tuberculosis with upper lobe infiltrates and cavitations is seen in the earlier stages of HIV infection. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis is reported more frequently, despite the difficulties in diagnosing it. WHO's recent guidelines recommend 6-month short-course chemotherapy with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol for patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis. The older 12-month regimen without rifampicin is much less effective. Streptomycin should not be used, because of the risk of transmitting blood-borne pathogens through contaminated needles. Thioacetazone should be abandoned, because of severe adverse reactions observed among HIV-infected patients. The roles of preventive chemotherapy and BCG vaccination for prevention of tuberculosis are also briefly discussed. PMID:1394786

  7. The use of antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of new HIV infection in populations at high risk for HIV sero-conversion in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Idoko, John; Folayan, Morenike O

    2014-09-01

    The last few years have witnessed a renewed commitment to HIV prevention. The evidence to support the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of new HIV infection in the form of Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among men who have sex with men, transgender, people who inject drugs, heterosexual men and women and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, or treatment as prevention (TasP) for serodiscordant couples have also grown. The need to explore the possible use of ART for HIV prevention in Nigeria has become imperative in view of its high HIV burden and the current slow pace of effort to achieve the universal target of reducing its HIV incidence by 50%. While PrEP and TasP are welcome addendum to the existing HIV prevention armamentarium, it is still important to conduct a demonstration project to identify strategies that can facilitate access to PrEP and TasP taking cognizance of the peculiar local challenges with respect to ART and HIV prevention commodity access. The country has therefore drawn a roadmap for itself on how to introduce ART for use for HIV prevention as either PrEP or TasP. This paper discusses the three year national roadmap that would enable the country generated the needed scientific evidence as well as extensive community support for use of ART for HIV prevention in Nigeria. This process includes the conduct of modeling and formative studies, and the implementation of a 24 months demonstration project. The outcome of the demonstration project would inform plans for the scale up of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) access for population(s) at high risk for HIV infection in Nigeria. PMID:26050385

  8. Seroprevalence of HIV-type 1 in a northern California health plan population: an unlinked survey.

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, R A; Capell, F J; Ascher, M S

    1992-01-01

    We conducted an unlinked seroprevalence survey for human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) of 9821 persons who had a routine personal health appraisal examination in 1989 while members of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in northern California. An outside laboratory performed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analyses, and the California Viral and Rickettsial Diseases Laboratory confirmed EIA-reactive samples by immunofluorescent assay and Western blot assay. Only 20 specimens (0.2%) were confirmed as positive, and 18 were from men. These data suggest that, at the time of this survey, HIV-1 infection was not widespread in the northern California population represented by this health plan membership. PMID:1546773

  9. A picture is worth a thousand words: maps of HIV indicators to inform research, programs, and policy from NA-ACCORD and CCASAnet clinical cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Althoff, Keri N; Rebeiro, Peter F; Hanna, David B; Padgett, Denis; Horberg, Michael A; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Abraham, Alison G; Hogg, Robert; Gill, M John; Wolff, Marcelo J; Mayor, Angel; Rachlis, Anita; Williams, Carolyn; Sterling, Timothy R; Kitahata, Mari M; Buchacz, Kate; Thorne, Jennifer E; Cesar, Carina; Cordero, Fernando M; Rourke, Sean B; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Pape, Jean W; Cahn, Pedro; McGowan, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Maps are powerful tools for visualization of differences in health indicators by geographical region, but multi-country maps of HIV indicators do not exist, perhaps due to lack of consistent data across countries. Our objective was to create maps of four HIV indicators in North, Central, and South American countries. Methods Using data from the North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) and the Caribbean, Central, and South America network for HIV epidemiology (CCASAnet), we mapped median CD4 at presentation for HIV clinical care, proportion retained in HIV primary care, proportion prescribed antiretroviral therapy (ART), and the proportion with suppressed plasma HIV viral load (VL) from 2010 to 2012 for North, Central, and South America. The 15 Canadian and US clinical cohorts and 7 clinical cohorts in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Haiti, Honduras, Mexico, and Peru represented approximately 2–7% of persons known to be living with HIV in these countries. Results Study populations were selected for each indicator: median CD4 at presentation for care was estimated among 14,811 adults; retention was estimated among 87,979 adults; ART use was estimated among 84,757 adults; and suppressed VL was estimated among 51,118 adults. Only three US states and the District of Columbia had a median CD4 at presentation >350 cells/mm3. Haiti, Mexico, and several states had >85% retention in care; lower (50–74%) retention in care was observed in the US West, South, and Mid-Atlantic, and in Argentina, Brazil, and Peru. ART use was highest (90%) in Mexico. The percentages of patients with suppressed VL in the US South and Northeast were lower than in most of Central and South America. Conclusions These maps provide visualization of gaps in the quality of HIV care and allow for comparison between and within countries as well as monitoring policy and programme goals within geographical boundaries. PMID:27049052

  10. Pharmacokinetics of antiretroviral drug varies with formulation in the target population of children with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Kasirye, P; Kendall, L; Adkison, K K; Tumusiime, C; Ssenyonga, M; Bakeera-Kitaka, S; Nahirya-Ntege, P; Mhute, T; Kekitiinwa, A; Snowden, W; Burger, D M; Gibb, D M; Walker, A S

    2012-02-01

    The bioequivalence of formulations is usually evaluated in healthy adult volunteers. In our study in 19 HIV-1-infected Ugandan children (1.8-4 years of age, weight 12 to <15 kg) receiving zidovudine, lamivudine, and abacavir solutions twice a day for ≥24 weeks, the use of scored tablets allowed comparison of plasma pharmacokinetics of oral solutions vs. tablets. Samples were collected 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 h after each child's last morning dose of oral solution before changing to scored tablets of Combivir (coformulated zidovudine + lamivudine) and abacavir; this was repeated 4 weeks later. Dose-normalized area under curve (AUC)(0-12) and peak concentration (C(max)) for the tablet formulation were bioequivalent with those of the oral solution with respect to zidovudine and abacavir (e.g., dose-normalized geometric mean ratio (dnGMR) (tablet:solution) for zidovudine and abacavir AUC(0-12) were 1.01 (90% confidence interval (CI) 0.87-1.18) and 0.96 (0.83-1.12), respectively). However, lamivudine exposure was ~55% higher with the tablet formulation (AUC(0-12) dnGMR = 1.58 (1.37-1.81), C(max) dnGMR = 1.55 (1.33-1.81)). Although the clinical relevance of this finding is unclear, it highlights the impact of the formulation and the importance of conducting bioequivalence studies in target pediatric populations. PMID:22190066