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Sample records for hiv infection risk

  1. Risk management information for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Edwards, A J

    1990-01-01

    This article discusses HIV infection in terms of the risk manager's information needs in the health care environment. The malpractice problem, increasing workman's compensation suits, the greater role of the ombudsman, implementation of the National Practitioner Data Bank, and the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care Organizations' (JCAHO) emphasis on clinical excellence are conditions which have given greater importance to the risk manager's position. Included in this article are hedges to retrieve various components of risk management and a select bibliography from AIDSLINE. PMID:10110456

  2. Sociometric risk networks and risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, S R; Neaigus, A; Jose, B; Curtis, R; Goldstein, M; Ildefonso, G; Rothenberg, R B; Des Jarlais, D C

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined whether networks of drug-injecting and sexual relationships among drug injectors are associated with individual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) serostatus and with behavioral likelihood of future infection. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey of 767 drug injectors in New York City was performed with chain-referral and linking procedures to measure large-scale (sociometric) risk networks. Graph-theoretic algebraic techniques were used to detect 92 connected components (drug injectors linked to each other directly or through others) and a 105-member 2-core within a large connected component of 230 members. RESULTS: Drug injectors in the 2-core of the large component were more likely than others to be infected with HIV. Seronegative 2-core members engaged in a wide range of high-risk behaviors, including engaging in risk behaviors with infected drug injectors. CONCLUSIONS: Sociometric risk networks seem to be pathways along which HIV travels in drug-injecting peer groups. The cores of large components can be centers of high-risk behaviors and can become pockets of HIV infection. Preventing HIV from reaching the cores of large components may be crucial in preventing widespread HIV epidemics. PMID:9279263

  3. HIV Infection and Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... Engels EA, Pfeiffer RM, Goedert JJ, et al. Trends in cancer risk among people with AIDS in ...

  4. Finding those at risk: Acute HIV infection in Newark, NJ

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Eugene G.; Salaru, Gratian; Mohammed, Debbie; Coombs, Robert W.; Paul, Sindy M.; Cadoff, Evan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background A screening strategy combining rapid HIV-1/2 (HIV) antibody testing with pooled HIV-1 RNA testing increases identification of HIV infections, but may have other limitations that restrict its usefulness to all but the highest incidence populations. Objective By combining rapid antibody detection and pooled nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) testing, we sought to improve detection of early HIV-1 infections in an urban Newark, NJ hospital setting. Study design Pooled NAAT HIV-1 RNA testing was offered to emergency department patients and out-patients being screened for HIV antibodies by fingerstick-rapid HIV testing. For those negative by rapid HIV and agreeing to NAAT testing, pooled plasma samples were prepared and sent to the University of Washington where real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification was performed. Results Of 13,226 individuals screened, 6381 had rapid antibody testing alone, and 6845 agreed to add NAAT HIV screening. Rapid testing identified 115 antibody positive individuals. Pooled NAAT increased HIV-1 case detection by 7.0% identifying 8 additional cases. Overall, acute HIV infection yield was 0.12%. While males represent only 48.1% of those tested by NAAT, all samples that screened positive for HIV-1 RNA were obtained from men. Conclusion HIV-1 RNA testing of pooled, HIV antibody-negative specimens permits identification of recent infections. In Newark, pooled NAAT increased HIV-1 case detection and provided an opportunity to focus on treatment and prevention messages for those most at risk of transmitting infection. Although constrained by client willingness to participate in testing associated with a need to return to receive further results, use of pooled NAAT improved early infection sensitivity. PMID:23953941

  5. HIV infection is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Copur, A Sinan; Smith, Peter R; Gomez, Victor; Bergman, Michael; Homel, Peter

    2002-05-01

    The reported incidence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has ranged from 0.25 to 0.96% in clinical studies, but up to 17% at autopsy. A preliminary analysis at our hospital suggested that the frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals might be higher than previously reported. To further evaluate this issue, we performed a retrospective study of patients with a diagnosis of VTE and/or HIV infection discharged from our hospital between July 1, 1998 and June 30, 1999. A total of 13,496 patients were discharged during the year of the study. There were 244 patients with VTE and 362 who were HIV-positive. Ten of the 244 patients with VTE were HIV-positive (4.1%). The frequency of VTE among HIV-positive individuals was 10/362 (2.8%) compared to 234/13134 (1.8%) in the non-HIV-positive group, but the difference is not statistically significant. However, in patients under age 50, the frequencies were significantly different: 10/302 (3.31%) versus 35/6594 (0.53%), respectively (p < 0.0001). The frequency of VTE in HIV-positive patients less than 50 years old (3.31%) was greater than in HIV-positive patients over 50 years of age (0/60), but the difference did not reach statistical significance. In contrast, in the non-HIV-positive group, VTE was significantly more frequent in those 50 and older compared to younger patients (3.04% versus 0.53%, p = 0.0001). Statistical analysis indicated that the direction of association between age and diagnosis of VTE differed for HIV-positive patients versus non-HIV-positive patients. Our results suggest that HIV-positive patients under age 50 are at increased risk for VTE compared with non-HIV-positive individuals. PMID:12055028

  6. Risk factors for acquisition and clearance of oral human papillomavirus infection among HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected adults.

    PubMed

    Beachler, Daniel C; Sugar, Elizabeth A; Margolick, Joseph B; Weber, Kathleen M; Strickler, Howard D; Wiley, Dorothy J; Cranston, Ross D; Burk, Robert D; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010-2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and "rimming" partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P < 0.05). This helps explain the consistent associations observed between these factors and prevalent oral HPV infection in previous cross-sectional studies. PMID:25480823

  7. Risk Factors for Acquisition and Clearance of Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection Among HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Beachler, Daniel C.; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Weber, Kathleen M.; Strickler, Howard D.; Wiley, Dorothy J.; Cranston, Ross D.; Burk, Robert D.; Minkoff, Howard; Reddy, Susheel; Xiao, Weihong; Guo, Yingshi; Gillison, Maura L.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes the majority of oropharyngeal cancers in the United States, yet the risk factors for and natural history of oral HPV infection are largely unknown. In 2010–2011, a US-based longitudinal cohort study of 761 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and 469 at-risk HIV-uninfected participants from the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study and the Women's Interagency HIV Study was initiated. Semiannually collected oral rinses were evaluated for 37 HPV genotypes using the Roche LINEAR ARRAY HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Molecular Systems, Pleasanton, California), and factors associated with oral HPV incidence and clearance were explored using adjusted Wei-Lin-Weissfeld modeling. Through 2013, the 2-year cumulative incidence of any type of oral HPV infection was 34% in HIV-infected persons and 19% in HIV-uninfected persons. However, many of these infections cleared. Seven percent of incident infections and 35% of prevalent infections persisted for at least 2 years. After adjustment for other risk factors, HIV infection (adjusted hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval: 1.7, 3.2), reduced current CD4 cell count, and increased numbers of oral sex and “rimming” partners increased the risk of incident oral HPV infection, whereas male sex, older age, and current smoking increased the risk of oral HPV persistence (each P < 0.05). This helps explain the consistent associations observed between these factors and prevalent oral HPV infection in previous cross-sectional studies. PMID:25480823

  8. Risk for HIV Infection among Adolescents in the Border City of Tijuana, Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Blumberg, Elaine J.; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Sipan, Carol L.; Zellner, Jennifer A.; Hughes, Suzanne

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested high rates of HIV infection and other sexually transmitted infections in theU.S.-Mexico border region. However, no information is available on the risk for HIV infection among Mexican adolescents living in this geographic area. This study examines the prevalence of HIV risk practices and psychosocial correlates…

  9. Educational software for simulating risk of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothberg, Madeleine A.; Sandberg, Sonja; Awerbuch, Tamara E.

    1994-03-01

    The AIDS epidemic is still growing rapidly and the disease is thought to be uniformly fatal. With no vaccine or cure in sight, education during high school years is a critical component in the prevention of AIDS. We propose the use of computer software with which high school students can explore via simulation their own risk of acquiring an HIV infection given certain sexual behaviors. This particular software is intended to help students understand the three factors that determine their risk of HIV infection (number of sexual acts, probability that their partners are infected, and riskiness of the specific sexual activities they choose). Users can explicitly calculate their own chances of becoming infected based on decisions they make. Use of the program is expected to personalize the risk of HIV infection and thus increase users' concern and awareness. Behavioral change may not result from increased knowledge alone. Therefore the effectiveness of this program in changing attitudes toward risky sexual behaviors would be enhanced when the simulation is embedded in an appropriate curriculum. A description of the program and an example of its use are presented.

  10. Risk of Anal Cancer in HIV-Infected and HIV-Uninfected Individuals in North America

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Bryan; Justice, Amy C.; Engels, Eric; Gill, M. John; Goedert, James J.; Kirk, Gregory D.; D’Souza, Gypsyamber; Bosch, Ronald J.; Brooks, John T.; Napravnik, Sonia; Hessol, Nancy A.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Kitahata, Mari M.; Klein, Marina B.; Moore, Richard D.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Rourke, Sean B.; Saag, Michael S.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Gebo, Kelly A.; Press, Natasha; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Dubrow, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background. Anal cancer is one of the most common cancers affecting individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), although few have evaluated rates separately for men who have sex with men (MSM), other men, and women. There are also conflicting data regarding calendar trends. Methods. In a study involving 13 cohorts from North America with follow-up between 1996 and 2007, we compared anal cancer incidence rates among 34 189 HIV-infected (55% MSM, 19% other men, 26% women) and 114 260 HIV-uninfected individuals (90% men). Results. Among men, the unadjusted anal cancer incidence rates per 100 000 person-years were 131 for HIV-infected MSM, 46 for other HIV-infected men, and 2 for HIV-uninfected men, corresponding to demographically adjusted rate ratios (RRs) of 80.3 (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.7–151.1) for HIV-infected MSM and 26.7 (95% CI, 11.5–61.7) for other HIV-infected men compared with HIV-uninfected men. HIV-infected women had an anal cancer rate of 30/100 000 person-years, and no cases were observed for HIV-uninfected women. In a multivariable Poisson regression model, among HIV-infected individuals, the risk was higher for MSM compared with other men (RR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.8–6.0), but no difference was observed comparing women with other men (RR, 1.0; 95% CI, 0.5–2.2). In comparison with the period 2000–2003, HIV-infected individuals had an adjusted RR of 0.5 (95% CI, .3–.9) in 1996–1999 and 0.9 (95% CI, .6–1.2) in 2004–2007. Conclusions. Anal cancer rates were substantially higher for HIV-infected MSM, other men, and women compared with HIV-uninfected individuals, suggesting a need for universal prevention efforts. Rates increased after the early antiretroviral therapy era and then plateaued. PMID:22291097

  11. Evaluating the Risks: A Bernoulli Process Model of HIV Infection and Risk Reduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Abramson, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    A Bernoulli process model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is used to evaluate infection risks associated with various sexual behaviors (condom use, abstinence, or monogamy). Results suggest that infection is best mitigated through measures that decrease infectivity, such as condom use. (SLD)

  12. High-Risk Enteric Pathogens Associated with HIV-Infection and HIV-Exposure in Kenyan Children with Acute Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    PAVLINAC, PB; JOHN-STEWART, GC; NAULIKHA, JM; ONCHIRI, FM; DENNO, DM; ODUNDO, EA; SINGA, BO; RICHARDSON, BA; WALSON, JL

    2015-01-01

    Objective HIV-infection is an established risk for diarrheal severity, less is known about specific enteric pathogens associated with HIV status. We determined associations of selected enteric pathogens with HIV-infection and HIV-exposure among Kenyan children. Design Cross-sectional study among 6 months to 15 year olds presenting to two Western Kenya District hospitals with acute diarrhea between 2011–2013. Methods Stool was tested using standard bacterial culture and microscopy for ova and parasites. HIV testing was obtained on children and mothers. Enteric pathogen prevalence was compared between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children and between HIV-exposed uninfected (HEU) and HIV-unexposed. Unadjusted and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) for selected pathogens by HIV-status were estimated using relative risk (RR) regression and P-values. Age, site, income, household crowding, water source/treatment, anthropometrics, cotrimoxazole use, and breastfeeding history were accounted for in multivariable models. Results Among 1,076 children, median age was 22 months (interquartile range: 11–42), 56 (5.2%) were HIV-infected, and 10.3%(105/1020) of HIV-uninfected children were HIV-exposed. The following organisms were most frequently isolated from stool: enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (13.3%), Giardia spp. (11.1%) Campylobacter (6.3%), enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) (6.1%) and Cryptosporidium spp. (3.7%). Accounting for age, HIV-infection was associated with EPEC infection (PR: 3.70, P=0.002) while HIV-exposure was associated with Cryptosporidium among HIV-uninfected children (PR: 2.81, P=0.005). Conclusion EPEC and Cryptosporidium infections were more common in HIV-infected and HIV-exposed children, respectively. This could explain the increased mortality attributed to these pathogens in other studies. Interventions targeting EPEC and Cryptosporidium may reduce morbidity and mortality in high HIV-prevalence settings. PMID:25028987

  13. Prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary tuberculosis among newly diagnosed HIV-1 infected Nigerian children

    PubMed Central

    Ebonyi, Augustine O.; Oguche, Stephen; Ejeliogu, Emeka U.; Agbaji, Oche O.; Shehu, Nathan Y.; Abah, Isaac O.; Sagay, Atiene S.; Ugoagwu, Placid O.; Okonkwo, Prosper I.; Idoko, John A.; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for tuberculosis (TB) among newly diagnosed human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce and in Nigeria there is paucity of reported data. We determined the prevalence of and risk factors for pulmonary TB (PTB) in newly diagnosed (treatment-naïve) HIV-1 infected children at the pediatric HIV clinic of the Jos University Teaching Hospital (JUTH) in Nigeria. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 876 children, aged 2 months – 13 years, diagnosed with HIV-1 infection between July 2005 and December 2012, of which 286 were diagnosed with PTB at presentation after TB screening. The study site was the AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN)-supported Pediatric HIV clinic at JUTH, Jos. A multivariate forward logistic regression modelling was used to identify risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection. Results The prevalence of PTB-HIV co-infection was 32% (286/876). Severe immunosuppression (SI) and World Health Organization (WHO) HIV clinical stage 3/4 were identified as independent risk factors for PTB-HIV co-infection in HIV infected children. The odds of PTB-HIV co-infection was increased two-fold in HIV-infected children with WHO clinical stage 3/4 compared to those with stage 1/2 (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 1.76 [1.31-2.37], p<0.001) and 1.5-fold in children with SI compared to those without SI (AOR 1.52 [1.12-2.06], p=0.007). Conclusion In our setting, the burden of PTB was high among newly diagnosed HIV-infected children, and late WHO HIV clinical stage and severe immunosuppression were associated with PTB-HIV co-infection. Therefore there is a clear need to improve strategies for early diagnosis of both HIV and PTB to optimize clinical outcomes. PMID:27019829

  14. Residual Injection Risk Behavior, HIV Infection, and the Evaluation of Syringe Exchange Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; Braine, Naomi; Yi, Huso; Turner, Charles

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed relationships between residual risk behavior (risk behavior among persons participating in effective HIV prevention programs) and HIV infection. Structured interviews and HIV tests were obtained from participants in six large U.S. syringe exchange programs. Program characteristics were obtained through interviews with the…

  15. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L.; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  16. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Adler, David H; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  17. Mortality and Risk Stratification of HIV Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Heltemes, Bradley R

    2015-01-01

    For the first decade and a half after the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) was first identified, the prognosis for most people infected with HIV was quite poor. Life insurance companies responded accordingly and insurance laboratories developed new means to test for the infection. However, it is now clear that people with HIV infection are living longer and that the majority of deaths occurring among those on treatment are now no longer due to AIDS-defining illnesses. This review examines the results of selected studies which analyzed mortality outcomes in those with HIV infection, the many factors which influence those outcomes, and the limitations in the data and in their applicability to an insurance population. PMID:27584921

  18. Understanding HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: An Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Fisher, William A.; Shuper, Paul A.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Christie, Sarah; MacDonald, Susan; Pillay, Sandy; Mahlase, Gethwana; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The current study applied the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model (J. D. Fisher & Fisher, 1992; W. A. Fisher & Fisher, 1993) to identify factors associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-infected South Africans receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART), a population of considerable significance for curtailing, or maintaining, South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. HIV prevention information, HIV prevention motivation, HIV prevention behavioral skills, and HIV transmission risk behavior were assessed in a sample of 1,388 South Africans infected with HIV and receiving ART in 16 clinics in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Results confirmed the assumptions of the IMB model and demonstrated that HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV transmission risk behavior in this population. Subanalyses confirmed these relationships for HIV transmission risk behavior overall and for HIV transmission risk behavior with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown. A consistent pattern of gender differences showed that for men, HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation may have direct links with HIV preventive behavior, while for women, the effects of HIV prevention information and HIV prevention motivation work through HIV prevention behavioral skills to affect HIV preventive behavior. These IMB model-based findings suggest directions for HIV prevention interventions with South African men and women living with HIV and on ART as an important component of overall strategies to contain South Africa’s generalized HIV epidemic. PMID:23477576

  19. HIV-Helicobacter pylori Co-Infection: Antibiotic Resistance, Prevalence, and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Nkuize, Marcel; De Wit, Stéphane; Muls, Vinciane; Delforge, Marc; Miendje Deyi, Véronique Y.; Cadière, Guy B.; Buset, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer due to the availability of more potent treatments. However, prescription of antibiotics to treat or prevent infections in these patients may increase the likelihood of co-infection with antibiotic-resistant species. Aim To compare antimicrobial susceptibility of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) in HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients and assess risk-factors for resistance. Methods We prospectively collected data from consecutive HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. Patients with H. pylori-positive gastric biopsies who had never received H. pylori treatment were included. Results Of the 353 patients included, 93 were HIV-positive and 260 HIV-negative. Among the HIV-positive patients, 56 (60%) had been infected for <10 years, the median CD4+ count was 493 cells/μl and median viral load was 61 copies/mL; 66 (71%) were receiving antiretroviral therapy. HIV-positive patients were more often male (p = 0.009), had a lower body mass index (p<0.0001), and had less frequently received antibiotics during the 12-months prior to the endoscopy (p<0.0001) than HIV-negative patients. HIV-positive patients were more likely to have H. pylori resistant to levofloxacin (p = 0.0004), metronidazole (p = 0.01), or multiple antibiotics (p = 0.006). HIV-positive Black Africans were more likely to have resistant strains than were HIV-negative Black Africans (p = 0.04). Ethnicity and HIV status were independent risk factors for H. pylori resistance in all patients and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and sex were risk factors in HIV-positive patients. Conclusions There was a higher prevalence of primary H. pylori-resistant strains in HIV-positive than in HIV-negative patients. AIDS and sex were predictors of H. pylori resistance in HIV-positive patients. PMID:26691198

  20. Risk Factors for the Spread of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections Among HIV-infected Men Who Have Sex with Men in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Clark, JL; Konda, KA; Segura, ER; Salvatierra, HJ; Leon, SR; Hall, ER; Caceres, CF; Klausner, JD; Coates, TJ

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), frequency of sexual risk behaviors, and relationship between knowledge of HIV infection status and sexual risk behavior among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) attending an STI clinic in Peru. Methods We recruited a convenience sample of 559 MSM from a municipal STI clinic in Lima, Peru. Participants completed a survey and provided blood for HIV, Syphilis, and HSV-2 antibody testing, and urine for gonorrhea and chlamydia nucleic acid testing. Results Among 124 HIV-infected MSM, 72.6% were aware of their HIV-infected status. Active syphilis (RPR≥1:8) was diagnosed in 21.0% of HIV-infected participants, HSV-2 in 79.8%, urethral gonorrhea in 1.6%, and chlamydia in 1.6%. Among 41 participants reporting insertive anal intercourse with their last sex partner, 34.2% did not use a condom. Of 86 participants reporting receptive anal intercourse, 25.6% did not use a condom. At least one episode of insertive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with an HIV-uninfected partner during the previous six months was reported by 33.6% (35/104) of participants, and receptive UAI with an HIV-uninfected partner by 44.6% (45/101). No difference in frequency of UAI, with HIV-uninfected or HIV-infected partners, was observed between men who knew their serostatus compared with those who were previously undiagnosed (all p-values >0.05). Conclusions HIV-infected MSM in Peru engaged in high-risk behaviors for spreading HIV and STIs. Knowledge of HIV-infected status was not associated with a decreased frequency of unprotected anal intercourse. Additional efforts to reduce risk behavior after the diagnosis of HIV infection are necessary. PMID:19028945

  1. Occupational HIV risk for health care workers: risk factor and the risk of infection in the course of professional activities

    PubMed Central

    Wyżgowski, Przemysław; Rosiek, Anna; Grzela, Tomasz; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Virtually created panic among health care workers about pandemic acquired immune deficiency syndrome prompted us to review the scientific literature to investigate the risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission in the daily works of health care workers, especially surgeons and anesthesiologists. In this review, we report worldwide valuations of the number of HIV infections that may occur from unsafe daily work in health care. We also present how to minimize the risk of infection by taking precautions and how to utilize postexposure prophylaxis in accordance with the latest reports of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. HIV-infected patients will be aging, and most of them will become the candidates for procedures such as major vascular reconstruction and artery bypass grafting, where the risks of blood contact and staff injury are high. For these reasons, all health care workers need to know how to prevent, and fight following the accidental exposure to HIV. PMID:27366077

  2. HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth with Psychiatric Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkington, Katherine; Teplin, Linda A.; Mericle, Amy A.; Welty, Leah J.; Romero, Erin G.; Abram, Karen M.

    2008-01-01

    The effect of psychiatric disorders on human immunodeficiency virus/sexually transmitted infection (HIV/STI) risk behaviors in juvenile justice youths is examined. Prevalence, persistence and prediction are addressed among four mutually exclusive diagnostic groups and results show a high prevalence rate of many HIV/STI sexual risk behaviors that…

  3. HIV Prevalence and Risks Associated with HIV Infection among Transgender Individuals in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Ngak, Song; Srean, Chhim; Sansothy, Neth; Mills, Stephen; Ferradini, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    = 3.25 [1.35,7.85]) were independently associated with HIV infection. Conclusions This study confirms transgender individuals as one of the highest-risk groups for HIV infection in Cambodia. It suggests the need for programmatic strategies that mitigate identified associated risks and facilitate access to HIV care for this population. PMID:27070152

  4. Microbiome in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Salas, January T.; Chang, Theresa L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV primary infection occurs at mucosa tissues, suggesting an intricate interplay between microbiome and HIV infection. Recent advanced technologies of high-throughput sequencing and bioinformatics allow researchers to explore nonculturable microbes including bacteria, virus and fungi and their association with diseases. HIV/SIV infection is associated with microbiome shifts and immune activation that may affect the outcome of disease progression. Similarly, altered microbiome and inflammation are associated with increased risks of HIV acquisition, suggesting the role of microbiome in HIV transmission. In this review, we will focus on microbiome in HIV infection at various mucosal compartments. Understanding the relationship between microbiome and HIV may offer insights into development of better strategies for HIV prevention and treatment. PMID:25439273

  5. HIV prevalence and risk behaviour among prostitutes and clients in Amsterdam: migrants at increased risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    van Haastrecht, H J; Fennema, J S; Coutinho, R A; van der Helm, T C; Kint, J A; van den Hoek, J A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To study groups of prostitutes and clients of prostitutes in order (i) to determine HIV prevalence and sexual risk behaviour, (ii) to determine differences between samples recruited within and outside a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and (iii) to determine correlates of inconsistent condom use (ICU) among both groups. DESIGN--Participants were interviewed and anonymously tested for HIV-antibody; approximately half were recruited at a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and half at prostitute working places. SETTING--An STD clinic and prostitute working places in Amsterdam in 1991. SUBJECTS--201 female prostitutes without a history of injecting drugs and 213 male clients of female prostitutes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--antibodies to HIV, consistency of condom use in commercial vaginal contacts in the preceding 6 months. RESULTS--HIV prevalence was low: three prostitutes (1.5%; 95% CI 0.5-4.6%) and one client (0.5%; 95% CI 0.1-3.3%) were infected. All three HIV positive prostitutes originated from AIDS-endemic countries, came to the Netherlands only recently and were recruited outside the STD clinic. Large differences between subgroups resulted from the two recruitment methods: while clients of prostitutes with relatively high risk behaviour were strongly represented among the STD clinic sample, high risk prostitutes were underrepresented in this sample. Consistent condom use (with 100% of contacts) was reported by 66% of prostitutes and 56% of clients of prostitutes. Inconsistent condom use was found to be high among prostitutes who had migrated from Latin America and among migrant clients of prostitutes. CONCLUSIONS--When monitoring HIV infection one must take into account imported cases. HIV prevention efforts should be particularly focused at prostitutes from Latin America and at clients of prostitutes who migrated to the Netherlands. PMID:7721282

  6. Risk Factors for Anal HPV Infection and Anal Precancer in HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Lauren M.; Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Fetterman, Barbara; Tokugawa, Diane; Lorey, Thomas S.; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Luhn, Patricia; Gage, Julia C.; Darragh, Teresa M.; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Background. Carcinogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a large proportion of anal cancers. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected men who have sex with men (MSM) are at increased risk of HPV infection and anal cancer compared with HIV-negative men. We evaluated risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer in a population of HIV-infected MSM. Methods. Our study included 305 MSM at an HIV/AIDS clinic in the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Health Maintenance Organization. Logistic regression was used to estimate associations of risk factors comparing men without anal HPV infection; men with anal HPV infection, but no precancer; and men with anal precancer. Results. Low CD4 count (<350 cells/mm3) and previous chlamydia infection were associated with an increased risk of carcinogenic HPV infection (odds ratio [OR], 3.65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.28–10.40 and OR, 4.24; 95% CI, 1.16–15.51, respectively). History of smoking (OR, 2.71 95% CI, 1.43–5.14), duration, recency, and dose of smoking increased the risk of anal precancer among carcinogenic HPV-positive men but had no association with HPV infection. Conclusions. We found distinct risk factors for anal HPV infection and anal precancer. Risk factors for HPV infection and anal precancer are similar to established risk factors for cervical cancer progression. PMID:23908478

  7. [HIV-infection as a risk factor of professional contamination of the military medical hospital personnel].

    PubMed

    Lobzin, Iu V; Belevitin, A B; Bulan'kov, Iu I; Akimkin, V G

    2009-04-01

    In Military-medical academy named by Kirov S.M., 857 HIV-infectioned patients were treated. The most part of them required in reanimation and surgical treatment, at 25.6% of patients the HIV-infection was registered in stage AIDS. More than half of cases of diseases are registered for the first time. 51.1% of patients knew about their HIV-positive status, but only 16% of patients have informed doctors. Interrogation of experts shows their low epidemiological vigilance. By calculations, registration of medical traumas occurs on the average in 7.4% of cases. There is a risk professional infection. There were defined the directions of decrease of risk of professional traumatism and infection with haemocontact infections. The algorithm of emergency chemoprophylaxis of the HIV-infection in military-medical establishment is offered. PMID:19537105

  8. The risk less known: female-to-male transgender persons' vulnerability to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, G P; Hsieh, C-M

    2005-02-01

    Studies have consistently found high levels of HIV infection among male-to-female (MTF) transgender people, particularly MTF sex workers. Due to lack of empirical data, HIV/AIDS risk among female-to-male (FTM) transgender people, however, is not well understood. This study analysed data from two needs assessment surveys to compare risk for HIV infection between 122 MTF and 62 FTM transgender people. Results show that there was a significant gender difference in HIV risk among the survey respondents. Compared to MTFs, FTMs were significantly less likely to have used protection the last time they had sex and significantly more likely to have engaged in recent high risk sexual activity. The gender difference existed even after controlling for demographic variables, AIDS knowledge, perceived AIDS knowledge, perceived effectiveness of condom usage, perceived susceptibility to AIDS and self-esteem. Findings from this study suggest that a thorough examination of HIV risk factors among FTMs is necessary. PMID:15763714

  9. [Comorbidities as risk factors of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected persons].

    PubMed

    Marchewka, Zofia; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Knysz, Brygida

    2015-01-01

    Significant survival prolongation in HIV-infected patients due to effective antiretroviral therapy is connected with increasing prevalence of chronic non-infective diseases in this population, among them chronic kidney disease. The pathogenesis of kidney disease in the setting of HIV includes conditions specific for HIV infection: direct effect of the virus, stage of immunodeficiency and drug toxicity. Chronic comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, are additional significant risk factors of kidney disease. In HIV-infected individuals some distinct features of these conditions are observed, which are partly related to the virus and antiretroviral therapy. The article summarizes the effect of comorbidities on kidney function in HIV-infected persons. PMID:26671927

  10. Risk of Window Period HIV Infection in High Infectious Risk Donors: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kucirka, Lauren M.; Sarathy, Harini; Govindan, Priyanka; Wolf, Joshua H.; Ellison, Trevor A.; Hart, Leah J.; Montgomery, Robert A.; Ros, R. Lorie; Segev, Dorry L.

    2010-01-01

    The OPTN defines high risk donors (HRDs), colloquially known as “CDC high risk donors,” as those thought to carry an increased risk of HIV window period (WP) infection prior to serologic detectability. However, the true risk of such infection remains unknown. To quantify the risk of WP infection in each HRD behavior category, we performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of studies of HIV prevalence and incidence. Of 3,476 abstracts reviewed, 27 eligible studies of HIV infection in HRD populations were identified. Pooled HIV incidence estimates were calculated for each category of HRD behavior and used to calculate the risk of WP HIV infection. Risks ranged from 0.09–12.1 per 10,000 donors based on WP for ELISA and 0.04–4.9 based on nucleic acid testing (NAT), with NAT reducing WP risk by over 50% in each category. Injection drug users had the greatest risk of WP infection (4.9 per 10,000 donors by NAT WP), followed by men who have sex with men (4.2:10,000), commercial sex workers (2.7:10,000), incarcerated donors (0.9:10,000), donors exposed to HIV through blood (0.6:10,000), donors engaging in high risk sex (0.3:10,000), and hemophiliacs (0.035:10,000). These estimates can help inform patient and provider decision-making regarding HRDs. PMID:21366859

  11. Risk factors for HIV infection among circumcised men in Uganda: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Ediau, Michael; Matovu, Joseph KB; Byaruhanga, Raymond; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M; Wanyenze, Rhoda K

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Male circumcision (MC) reduces the risk of HIV infection. However, the risk reduction effect of MC can be modified by type of circumcision (medical, traditional and religious) and sexual risk behaviours post-circumcision. Understanding the risk behaviours associated with HIV infection among circumcised men (regardless of form of circumcision) is critical to the design of comprehensive risk reduction interventions. This study assessed risk factors for HIV infection among men circumcised through various circumcision approaches. Methods This was a case-control study which enrolled 155 cases (HIV-infected) and 155 controls (HIV-uninfected), all of whom were men aged 18–35 years presenting at the AIDS Information Center for HIV testing and care. The outcome variable was HIV sero-status. Using SPSS version 17, multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify factors independently associated with HIV infection. Results Overall, 83.9% among cases and 56.8% among controls were traditionally circumcised; 7.7% of cases and 21.3% of controls were religiously circumcised while 8.4% of cases and 21.9% of controls were medically circumcised. A higher proportion of cases than controls reported resuming sexual intercourse before complete wound healing (36.9% vs. 14.1%; p<0.01). Risk factors for HIV infection prior to circumcision were:being in a polygamous marriage (AOR: 6.6, CI: 2.3–18.8) and belonging to the Bagisu ethnic group (AOR: 6.1, CI: 2.6–14.0). After circumcision, HIV infection was associated with: being circumcised at >18 years (AOR: 5.0, CI: 2.4–10.2); resuming sexual intercourse before wound healing (AOR: 3.4, CI: 1.6–7.3); inconsistent use of condoms (AOR: 2.7, CI: 1.5–5.1); and having sexual intercourse under the influence of peers (AOR: 2.9, CI: 1.5–5.5). Men who had religious circumcision were less likely to have HIV infection (AOR: 0.4, 95% CI: 0.2–0.9) than the traditionally circumcised but there was no statistically

  12. Understanding of the risk of HIV infection among the elderly in Ga-Rankuwa, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Lekalakala-Mokgele, Eucebious

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The literature pertaining to the elderly shows that HIV infection among this population is on the increase, suggesting that the elderly population engages in activities risky for HIV infection. Reports on such behaviour include frequent sexual relations with much younger people and having multiple partners. A study was carried out in Ga-Rankuwa, a black township in Gauteng Province, South Africa to explore and describe the understanding of these elderly people regarding their risks of HIV infection and AIDS. Using a qualitative, exploratory design, three focus-group interviews were conducted with 32 women aged over 50 years. Findings revealed that older persons have knowledge about transmission of HIV infection and AIDS. However, a few had misconceptions as to how HIV infection is transmitted, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities play a role. Knowledge of mechanisms of protecting themselves against infection, such as use of a condom during coitus and wearing gloves when caring for infected family members, was also evident. The elderly indicated that they would prefer an older person, who they could identify with, to educate them more about HIV infection and AIDS. Although majority of participants had knowledge of how HIV is transmitted, and issues that put them at risk of transmission, a few the older persons had misconceptions about how HIV is transmitted due to lack of knowledge, as they believed that poor nutrition and sharing facilities can transmit infection. The lack of knowledge underscores the importance of addressing sexual risk with older people. It was very clear that more needs to be done in terms of education campaigns to dispel the myths of HIV infection and to empower the elderly. PMID:24957136

  13. Using Respondent Driven Sampling in a Hidden Population at Risk of HIV Infection: Who do HIV-positive recruiters recruit?

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitz, Daniela; Volz, Erik M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Vera, Alicia; Frost, Simon D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Respondent driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based method used to recruit hidden populations. Since it is respondent-driven, RDS is prone to bias. However, these biases could facilitate recruitment of high risk networks. We examined recruitment patterns of HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) and identified factors associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU in a RDS-based study. Methods IDUs aged >=18, who injected within the last month and resided in Tijuana, Mexico, were recruited using RDS and underwent interviews and testing for HIV, syphilis, and TB. Weighted logistic regression was used to identify predictors of being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU. Results Of 1056 IDUs, HIV-positive subjects comprised 4.4% of the sample and generated 4.7% of recruits, indicating that recruitment effectiveness did not vary by HIV-status. However, 10% of the subjects recruited by HIV-positive recruiters were infected with HIV as compared to 4.1% of subjects recruited by HIV-negative recruiters, (P=0.06), a difference that, after controlling for whether the recruiter and recruit injected drugs together, attained statistical significance (P=0.04), indicating that recruitment patterns differed by HIV-status. Factors independently associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU included lifetime syphilis infection, ever having sex with an HIV-positive person, knowing someone with HIV/AIDS, being recruited at a shooting gallery, having recently used the local needle exchange program, and having a larger number of recent arrests for track-marks. Conclusion HIV-positive IDUs have different recruitment patterns than HIV-negative IDUs, with HIV-positive IDUs tending to recruit other HIV-positive IDUs. Social and environmental factors along with risk behaviors were independently associated with being the recruit of an HIV-positive IDU in Tijuana. While the goal of this study was not to recruit HIV+ or other high-risk persons, our results suggest that

  14. How Teenagers Are at Risk for HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonks, Douglas

    1993-01-01

    Significant numbers of teenagers participate in high-risk activities that place them in danger of contacting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Recently surveys have been remarkably consistent in reporting numbers of sexually active teens. (15 references) (MLF)

  15. New operative technique to reduce surgeons' risk of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Raahave, D; Bremmelgaard, A

    1991-06-01

    The surgical team is potentially at risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) from the patient. Assuming that the probability of an accidental injury during surgery is 0.01 (P2), the prevalence of HIV is 0.01 (P3) and the seroconversion rate is 0.01 (P1), we have estimated the risk (actuarial model) for a surgeon as 0.2% per year, and 5.82% for 30 years of surgery. In view of this we have made changes in surgical technique to reduce the risk to the surgical team from splash or injury. The surgeon must handle tissue with instruments only and minimize the use of fingers. Whenever possible, sharp instruments should be replaced by a blunt type. The surgical nurse loads needles to the needle carrier using forceps. Sharp instruments are placed in a neutral zone on the nurse's stand so that the surgeon and the nurse never touch the same sharp instrument at the same time. Movements should be controlled, and instrument handling accompanied by eye contact. We consider that these changes will reduce the risk of accidental injuries and thereby the transmission of HIV during operations to a greater degree than knowledge of the patient's HIV status. PMID:1716276

  16. Comprehensively Assessing Cognitive and Behavioral Risks for HIV Infection among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paniagua, Freddy A.; O'Boyle, Michael

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive survey of HIV/AIDS with middle-aged and older adults should include six domains (e.g., factual knowledge regarding the acquisition and transmission of HIV, traditionally-accepted behavioral risks for HIV infection). A sample of 23 women (54.8%) and 19 men (45.2%), ranging in age from 51 to 85 were surveyed across such domains.…

  17. HIV infection and risk behaviors among male port workers in Santos, Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Larcerda, R; Stall, R; Gravato, N; Tellini, R; Hudes, E S; Hearst, N

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. This paper measured the extent to which human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has spread among the male working-class population of Santos, Brazil. METHODS. Questionnaires on risk behaviors and blood tests were administered to a random sample (n = 395) of male port workers employed by the Santos Port Authority. RESULTS. Although the rate of HIV infection among these men- the working-class male population of Santos-remains low (1.1%), self-reported behavioral risks for HIV infection are common. CONCLUSIONS. There is still time to prevent a widespread outbreak of HIV infection among the hetero-sexual population of Santos and of the transportation corridors emanating from that city. PMID:8712280

  18. [ANALYSIS OF A LETHAL OUTCOME RISK AFTER TRAUMA IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN POLYSYSTEMIC INJURY].

    PubMed

    Guryev, S O; Solovyov, O S; Tanasiyenko, P V

    2016-02-01

    Abstract The data, concerning clinic--epidemiologic and clinic--nosological characteristic of a HIV-infected injured persons in polytrauma were adduced. There was established, that polysystemic injuries (PSI) in a HIV-infected persons occur in a younger injured patients, a trauma environment is quite a speciphic one (criminal trauma prevails), as well as mechanism of the injury occurrence (falling down is much more freqent), and the risk of a lethal outcome is determined by predominantly cranial, thoracic and abdominal components of injury. A lethal outcome occurrence risk in HIV-infected injured persons in PSI in accordance to the age signs and traumagenesis is lesser, than in a control body. It is necessary to prolong the investigations, concerning studying this phenomenon and other peculiarities of a traumatic disease in HIV-infected injured persons in polytrauma. PMID:27244924

  19. HIV-negative Men-who-Have-Sex-with-Men who Bareback are Concerned about HIV Infection: Implications for HIV Risk Reduction Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Balán, Iván C.; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ventuneac, Ana; Remien, Robert H.; Dolezal, Curtis; Ford, Jordan

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of barebacking (intentional unprotected anal intercourse in situations where there is risk of HIV infection) among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been partially attributed to a decrease in HIV-related concerns due to improved anti-retroviral treatment. It is important to understand the level of concern these men have regarding HIV infection because it can affect their interest in risk reduction behaviors as well as their possible engagement in risk reduction interventions. As part of a study on MSM who use the Internet to seek sexual partners, 89 ethnic and racially diverse men who reported never having an HIV-positive test result completed an in-depth qualitative interview and a computer-based quantitative assessment. Of the 82 men who were asked about concerns of HIV infection during the qualitative interviews, 30 expressed “significant concern” about acquiring HIV, while 42 expressed “moderate concern,” and 10 expressed “minimal concern. Themes that emerged across the different levels of concern were their perceptions of the severity of HIV infection, having friends who are HIV positive, and their own vulnerability to HIV infection. However, these themes differed depending on the level of concern. Among the most frequently mentioned approaches to decrease risk of HIV infection, participants mentioned avoiding HIV-positive sex partners, limiting the number of partners with whom they barebacked, and not allowing partners to ejaculate inside their rectum. Findings suggest that many MSM who bareback would be amenable to HIV prevention efforts that do not depend solely on condom use. PMID:22218787

  20. Prevalence of and risk factors for HIV infection in blood donors and various population subgroups in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Sentjens, R E J H; Sisay, Y; Vrielink, H; Kebede, D; Adèr, H J; Leckie, G; Reesink, H W

    2002-04-01

    The aim was to determine the prevalence of HIV infection and risk factors for HIV infection in various population subgroups in Ethiopia. Serum panels from blood donors (n = 2610), from various population subgroups in Ethiopia were tested for anti-HIV-1/2 by ELISA. All ELISA repeatedly reactive samples were subjected for confirmation by immunoblot (IB) and anti-HIV-1 and anti-HIV-2 specific ELISAs. 155/2610 (5.9%) blood donors were HIV-1 infected. Of pregnant women, 84/797 (10.5%) were HIV-1 infected, and 1/797 (0.1%) was HIV-2 infected. 1/240 (0.4%) individuals from the rural population were HIV-1 infected. 198/480 (41.3%) female attendees, and 106/419 (25.3%) male attendees at sexual transmitted disease (STD) clinics were HIV-1 infected. One (0.2%) male, and 2 (0.4%) female STD patients were infected with both HIV-1 and HIV-2. It was concluded that the prevalence of HIV-1 infection varied from 0.4% among urban residents to 25.3-41.3% among STD attendees. There is a low prevalence of HIV-2 present in Ethiopian subjects. Risky sexual behaviour is significantly associated with HIV-infection in Ethiopia. PMID:12002540

  1. The disproportionate high risk of HIV infection among the urban poor in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Magadi, Monica A

    2013-06-01

    The link between HIV infection and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) is rather complex and findings from previous studies remain inconsistent. While some argue that poverty increases vulnerability, existing empirical evidence largely support the view that wealthier men and women have higher prevalence of HIV. In this paper, we examine the association between HIV infection and urban poverty in SSA, paying particular attention to differences in risk factors of HIV infection between the urban poor and non-poor. The study is based on secondary analysis of data from the Demographic and Health Surveys from 20 countries in SSA, conducted during 2003-2008. We apply multilevel logistic regression models, allowing the urban poverty risk factor to vary across countries to establish the extent to which the observed patterns are generalizable across countries in the SSA region. The results reveal that the urban poor in SSA have significantly higher odds of HIV infection than their urban non-poor counterparts, despite poverty being associated with a significantly lower risk among rural residents. Furthermore, the gender disparity in HIV infection (i.e. the disproportionate higher risk among women) is amplified among the urban poor. The paper confirms that the public health consequence of urban poverty that has been well documented in previous studies with respect to maternal and child health outcomes does apply to the risk of HIV infection. The positive association between household wealth and HIV prevalence observed in previous studies largely reflects the situation in the rural areas where the majority of the SSA populations reside. PMID:22660933

  2. Distribution of new HIV infections among key risk population groups in Togo

    PubMed Central

    Landoh, Dadja Essoya; Maboudou, Angèle Akouavi; Deku, Kodzo; Pitche, Palokinam Vincent

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Good data on the epidemiology of modes of transmission of HIV among population at risk are important for development of prevention strategies, and resource allocation for the implementation of the interventions. We sought to estimate new HIV infections among key risk groups in Togo. Methods We conducted a systematic review of epidemiological data on HIV and AIDS as part of the HIV control strategies in Togo from 2001 to 2012 following the PRISMA guidelines. We used the Mode of Transmission (MoT) modelling tool to estimate the incidence of new HIV infections in high risk groups. The MoT tool was developed and validated by UNAIDS and implemented by several countries using data on the HIV epidemic to estimate new HIV infections that will appear in the core groups. We used Epi-MoT tool to assess the availability and the quality of data. A score of availability of data over 50% and the quality over 1.5 were required to proceed to the MoT analysis. Uncertainty analysis to assess the reliability of the results was performed. Results Incidence of new HIV infections was estimated at 6,643 (95% CI = 5274, 9005) with an incidence rate of 203 per 1,000,000 inhabitants. The proportion of new HIV infections was 61.9% (95% CI = 46.2 to 71.7) in stable heterosexual couples compare to 14.01% (95% CI = 7.2 to 23.3) in people having casual sex. In high-risk groups new HIV infections accounted for 2.4% among sex workers (SWs) (95% CI = 1.2 - 4.1), 7.9% among clients of SWs (95% CI = 3.9-14.1) and 6.9% among men who have sex with men (MSM) (95% CI = 3.1 to 13.1). Conclusion We describe the prediction of the HIV epidemic with a large contribution of stable heterosexual couples in the occurrence of new infections. But HIV incidence remains high in key risk populations. Innovative strategies for risk reduction should be strengthened to reduce the transmission especially in stable heterosexual couples. PMID:25922630

  3. Profiles of Risk Among HIV-infected Youth in Clinic Settings

    PubMed Central

    Huszti, Heather C.; Wilson, Patrick A.; Kahana, Shoshana; Nichols, Sharon; Gonin, René; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the rising number of new HIV infections among youth, few tailored interventions for youth living with HIV (YLH) have been developed and rigorously tested. Developing tailored interventions necessitates identifying different profiles of YLH and understanding how risk and protective factors cluster together. Obtaining this critical information requires accessing a sufficiently large sample of YLH from diverse geographic settings such as those available through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions (ATN). We recruited a cross-sectional sample of 1,712 YLH from ATN clinics; participants completed a survey on psychosocial and health factors. Using latent class analysis on nine composite variables representing risk factors, we identified five classes distinguished by substance use, sexual behavior, and pregnancy history and differing on health outcomes. Findings suggest a need for tailored interventions addressing multiple risky behaviors of HIV-infected youth and research to clarify how intervention effectiveness may differ by risk profile. PMID:25117556

  4. Profiles of Risk Among HIV-Infected Youth in Clinic Settings.

    PubMed

    Fernández, M Isabel; Huszti, Heather C; Wilson, Patrick A; Kahana, Shoshana; Nichols, Sharon; Gonin, René; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill G

    2015-05-01

    Despite the rising number of new HIV infections among youth, few tailored interventions for youth living with HIV (YLH) have been developed and rigorously tested. Developing tailored interventions necessitates identifying different profiles of YLH and understanding how risk and protective factors cluster together. Obtaining this critical information requires accessing a sufficiently large sample of YLH from diverse geographic settings such as those available through the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions (ATN). We recruited a cross-sectional sample of 1,712 YLH from ATN clinics; participants completed a survey on psychosocial and health factors. Using latent class analysis on nine composite variables representing risk factors, we identified five classes distinguished by substance use, sexual behavior, and pregnancy history and differing on health outcomes. Findings suggest a need for tailored interventions addressing multiple risky behaviors of HIV-infected youth and research to clarify how intervention effectiveness may differ by risk profile. PMID:25117556

  5. Antiretroviral Medication Adherence and Amplified HIV Transmission Risk Among Sexually Active HIV-Infected Individuals in Three Diverse International Settings.

    PubMed

    Magidson, Jessica F; Li, Xin; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Moore, Ayana T; Srithanaviboonchai, Kriengkrai; Friedman, Ruth Khalili; Limbada, Mohammad; Hughes, James P; Cummings, Vanessa; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Elharrar, Vanessa; Celentano, David; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2016-04-01

    Successful biomedical prevention/treatment-as-prevention (TasP) requires identifying individuals at greatest risk for transmitting HIV, including those with antiretroviral therapy (ART) nonadherence and/or 'amplified HIV transmission risk,' defined as condomless sex with HIV-uninfected/unknown-status partners when infectious (i.e., with detectable viremia or STI diagnosis according to Swiss criteria for infectiousness). This study recruited sexually-active, HIV-infected patients in Brazil, Thailand, and Zambia to examine correlates of ART nonadherence and 'amplified HIV transmission risk'. Lower alcohol use (OR = .71, p < .01) and higher health-related quality of life (OR = 1.10, p < .01) were associated with greater odds of ART adherence over and above region. Of those with viral load data available (in Brazil and Thailand only), 40 % met Swiss criteria for infectiousness, and 29 % had 'amplified HIV transmission risk.' MSM had almost three-fold (OR = 2.89, p < .001) increased odds of 'amplified HIV transmission risk' (vs. heterosexual men) over and above region. TasP efforts should consider psychosocial and contextual needs, particularly among MSM with detectable viremia. PMID:26246068

  6. How does sex trafficking increase the risk of HIV Infection? An observational study from Southern India.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Kathleen E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Silverman, Jay G; Murray, Megan B

    2013-02-01

    Studies have documented the substantial risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection endured by sex-trafficked women, but it remains unclear how exposure to trafficking puts its victims at risk. We assessed whether the association between sex trafficking and HIV could be explained by self-reported forced prostitution or young age at entry into prostitution using cross-sectional data collected from 1,814 adult female sex workers in Karnataka, India, between August 2005 and August 2006. Marginal structural logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios for HIV infection. Overall, 372 (21%) women met 1 or both criteria used to define sex trafficking: 278 (16%) began sex work before age 18 years, and 107 (5%) reported being forcibly prostituted. Thirteen (0.7%) met both criteria. Forcibly prostituted women were more likely to be HIV-infected than were women who joined the industry voluntarily, independent of age at entering prostitution (odds ratio = 2.30, 95% confidence interval: 1.08, 4.90). Conversely, after adjustment for forced prostitution and other confounders, no association between age at entry into prostitution and HIV was observed. The association between forced prostitution and HIV infection became stronger in the presence of sexual violence (odds ratio = 11.13, 95% confidence interval: 2.41, 51.40). These findings indicate that forced prostitution coupled with sexual violence probably explains the association between sex trafficking and HIV. PMID:23324332

  7. Risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal mothers in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Businge, Charles Bitamazire; Longo-Mbenza, Benjamin; Mathews, Verona

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence of HIV among antenatal clients in South Africa has remained at a very high rate of about 29% despite substantial decline in several sub-Saharan countries. There is a paucity of data on risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal mothers and women within the reproductive age bracket in local settings in the Eastern Cape, South Africa. Objective To establish the risk factors for incident HIV infection among antenatal clients aged 18–49 years attending public antenatal clinics in rural Eastern Cape, South Africa. Design This was an unmatched case–control study carried out in public health antenatal clinics of King Sabata District Municipality between January and March 2014. The cases comprised 100 clients with recent HIV infection; the controls were 200 HIV-negative antenatal clients. Socio-demographic, sexual, and behavioral data were collected using interviewer-administered questionnaires adapted from the standard DHS5 women's questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to identify the independent risk factors for HIV infection. A p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results The independent risk factors for incident HIV infection were economic dependence on the partner, having older male partners especially among women aged ≤20 years, and sex under the influence of alcohol. Conclusions Therefore, effective prevention of HIV among antenatal mothers in KSDM must target the improvement of the economic status of women, thereby reducing economic dependence on their sexual partners; address the prevalent phenomenon of cross-generation sex among women aged <20 years; and regulate the brewing, marketing, and consumption of alcohol. PMID:26800877

  8. CHRONIC DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND FRAMINGHAM CORONARY RISK IN HIV- INFECTED AND UNINFECTED WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Rebecca M.; Mansoor, Ather; Wilson, Tracey E.; Anastos, Kathryn; Everson-Rose, Susan A.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Goparaju, Lakshmi; Hessol, Nancy A.; Mack, Wendy J.; Lazar, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Depression is common in people with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and those with HIV, and is a risk factor for CVD-related mortality. However, little is known about whether HIV influences the relationship between depression and cardiovascular risk. 526 HIV-infected and 132 uninfected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study were included in an analysis of women who completed twice-yearly study visits over 9.5 years. CVD risk was calculated at baseline and approximately 9.5 years later using the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). Chronic depressive symptoms were defined as Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale scores of 16 or greater at ≥75% of study visits. Over the follow-up period, 22.8% of HIV-infected women and 15.9% of HIV-uninfected women had chronic depressive symptoms (p=0.08). Baseline FRS were similar between HIV infected and uninfected women (M=−5.70±SE=0.30 vs. M=−6.90± SE=0.60, p=0.07) as was follow-up FRS (M=0.82±SE=0.30 vs. M=−0.44± SE=0.73, p=0.11). Among HIV-infected and uninfected women, together, follow-up FRS were higher among women with chronic depressive symptoms as compared to those without (M=1.3± SE=0.6 vs. M=−0.3± SE=0.40, p<0.01), after adjusting for baseline FRS and other covariates. HIV status did not modify the relationship between chronic depressive symptoms and FRS. Chronic depressive symptoms accelerated CVD risk scores to a similar extent in both HIV infected and uninfected women. This implies that the diagnosis and treatment of depression may be an important consideration in CV risk reduction in the setting of HIV-infection. The determination of factors that mediate the depression/CVD relationship merits further study. PMID:21902560

  9. A Comparison of Men Who Have Sex with Men, People Who Inject Drugs and High-Risk Heterosexuals' Risk for HIV Infection, San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Raymond, H F; Ick, T O; Chen, Y-H

    2016-02-01

    HIV in the United States is concentrated in populations such as men who have sex with men (MSM), people who inject drugs (PWID), women of color and people living in poverty. These populations are labeled high-risk for HIV infection because of the higher levels of HIV or HIV risk taking behaviors seen in these groups compared to other sub-populations. It is also possible that a group may engage in behaviors that are "high-risk" for HIV infection but never become infected since HIV is not present or not present to a great extent in their social or sexual networks. We analyzed samples of MSM, PWID and high-risk heterosexuals (HRH) collected through the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (NHBS) system in San Francisco to examine HIV risk taking and HIV burden to determine if the label "high-risk" is appropriately applied. NHBS samples MSM using time location sampling and PWID and HRH using Respondent Driven Sampling. We sampled 508 MSM in 2011, 570 PWID in 2012 and 267 HRH in 2013. There were, as expected, differences in demographic characteristics across the three groups. HRH had a greater number of high-risk behaviors compared to MSM and PWID but had the lowest HIV prevalence. Focusing on risk behavior alone to label populations without considering the background HIV prevalence in communities, the types of risks engaged in and actual HIV infections may obscure which populations truly merit the label "high-risk" for HIV infection. PMID:26334446

  10. Marriage as a risk factor for HIV: learning from the experiences of HIV-infected women in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Wendland, Claire; Stevens, Patricia E; Kako, Peninnah M; Dressel, Anne; Kibicho, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    The gender inequalities that characterise intimate partner relationships in Malawi, a country with one of the highest HIV prevalence rates in the world, arguably place marriage as an important risk factor for HIV infection among women, yet few studies detail the complex interactions of marriage and risk. In order to develop HIV-prevention interventions that have lasting impacts in such communities, we need a deeper understanding of the intricacies of women's lives, how and why they are involved in marital relationships, and the implications of these relationships for HIV transmission or prevention. This article describes how women understand marriage's effects on their lives and their HIV risks. Drawing from focus group discussions with 72 women attending antiretroviral clinics in Malawi, we explore why women enter marriage, what women's experiences are within marriage and how they leave spouses for other relationships. Based on their narratives, we describe women's lives after separation, abandonment or widowhood, and report their reflections on marriage after being married two or three times. We then review women's narratives in light of published work on HIV, and provide recommendations that would minimise the risks of HIV attendant on marriage. PMID:23350930

  11. Associations of sex trafficking history with recent sexual risk among HIV-infected FSWs in India.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jay G; Saggurti, Niranjan; Cheng, Debbie M; Decker, Michele R; Coleman, Sharon M; Bridden, Carly; Pardeshi, Manoj; Dasgupta, Anindita; Samet, Jeffrey H; Raj, Anita

    2014-03-01

    History of forced or coerced sex work entry and/or sex work entry prior to age 18 (i.e., sex trafficking) relate to early HIV risk; whether such risk persists is unclear. The current study assessed associations of reported sex trafficking histories and recent sexual risk among adult HIV-infected female sex workers (FSWs; n = 211) in Mumbai, India. Approximately one-half reported entering sex work prior to age 18 (50.2 %) or being forced or coerced into sex work (41.7 %). Past 90-day unprotected transactional sex was more prevalent among FSWs entering as minors than those entering as adults (AOR 2.06); in contrast, being forced or coerced into sex work related to reduction in such risk for HIV transmission (AOR 0.45). Histories of each form of sex trafficking may relate differently to later HIV risk. Intervention with HIV-infected FSWs entering sex work as minors should be prioritized based on potential elevated risk of HIV transmission. PMID:23955657

  12. Relationships Among HIV Infection, Metabolic Risk Factors, and Left Ventricular Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Overton, Edgar Turner; Mondy, Kristin; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Davila-Roman, Victor G.; Waggoner, Alan D.; Reeds, Dominic N.; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Krauss, Melissa J.; Peterson, Linda R.; Yarasheski, Kevin E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Our objective was to determine if the presence of metabolic complications (MC) conveyed an additional risk for left ventricular (LV) dysfunction in people with HIV. HIV+ and HIV− men and women were categorized into four groups: (1) HIV+ with MC (43±7 years, n=64), (2) HIV+ without MC (42±7 years, n=59), (3) HIV− with MC (44±8 years, n=37), or (4) HIV− controls without MC (42±8 years, n=41). All participants underwent two-dimensional (2-D), Doppler, and tissue Doppler echocardiography. Overall, the prevalence of systolic dysfunction (15 vs. 4%, p=0.02) and LV hypertrophy (9 vs. 1%, p=0.03) was greater in HIV+ than in HIV− participants. Participants with MC had a greater prevalence of LV hypertrophy (10% vs. 1%). Early mitral annular velocity during diastole was significantly (p<0.005) lower in groups with MC (HIV+/MC+: 11.6±2.3, HIV−/MC+: 12.0±2.3 vs. HIV+/MC−: 12.4±2.3, HIV−/MC−: 13.1±2.4 cm/s) and tended to be lower in groups with HIV (p=0.10). However, there was no interaction effect of HIV and MC for any systolic or diastolic variable. Regardless of HIV status, participants with MC had reduced LV diastolic function. Although both the presence of MC and HIV infection were associated with lower diastolic function, there was no additive negative effect of HIV on diastolic function beyond the effect of MC. Also, HIV was independently associated with lower systolic function. Clinical monitoring of LV function in individuals with metabolic risk factors, regardless of HIV status, is warranted. PMID:23574474

  13. Behavioral surveillance among people at risk for HIV infection in the U.S.: the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Kathleen M; Sullivan, Patrick S; Lansky, Amy; Onorato, Ida M

    2007-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in collaboration with 25 state and local health departments, began the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS) in 2003. The system focuses on people at risk for HIV infection and surveys the three populations at highest risk for HIV in the United States: men who have sex with men, injecting drug users, and high-risk heterosexuals. The project collects information from these three populations during rotating 12-month cycles. Methods for recruiting participants vary for each at-risk population, but NHBS uses a standardized protocol and core questionnaire for each cycle. Participating health departments tailor their questionnaire to collect information about specific prevention programs offered in their geographic area and to address local data needs. Data collected from NHBS will be used to describe trends in key behavioral risk indicators and evaluate current HIV prevention programs. This information in turn can be used to identify gaps in prevention services and target new prevention activities with the goal of reducing new HIV infections in the United States. PMID:17354525

  14. Clinical features & risk factors associated with cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected adults in India

    PubMed Central

    Ajjampur, S.S. Rao; Asirvatham, J.R.; Muthusamy, Dheepa; Gladstone, B.P.; Abraham, O.C.; Mathai, Dilip; Ward, Honorine; Wanke, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Background & objectives Cryptosporidiosis is a leading cause of protracted, life threatening diarrhoea in HIV infected patients. Although data on prevalence are available for Indian patients, no information on risk factors for transmission exists. We therefore undertook this study to identify risk factors for transmission of cryptosporidiosis in HIV infected adults. Methods Both symptomatic (diarrhoeal) and asymptomatic HIV infected patients were screened for cryptosporidiosis. All Cryptosporidium spp. positive cases were enrolled in the study and interviewed to record socio-demographic information, water supply and animal contact. Data were analysed to study clinical features and potential association with species and genotype. Results Of the 28 cryptosporidial infections identified on screening 111 HIV positive patients with diarrhoea, 10 (35.7%) had chronic diarrhoea, 14 (50%) had associated fever and 8 (28.6%) had nausea. Symptomatic patients had a significantly higher number of co-infections with other enteric parasites (P=0.04) than 20 asymptomatics of 423 HIV positive individuals screened. Eleven of 17 (64%) patients with potentially zoonotic infections had diarrhoea. Patients with zoonotic species (64%) also tended to have fever more frequently than those infected with C. hominis (58%). Association between area of residence, rural or urban, water source and contact with animals and acquisition of cryptosporidiosis was not statistically significant. Interpretation & conclusions Cryptosporidiosis is an important cause of morbidity in HIV infected individuals in India, resulting in chronic diarrhoea. Risk factors for potentially zoonotic transmission of cryptosporidiosis were described in this study, but larger studies need to be done for a clearer understanding of the transmission dynamics of different cryptosporidial species in developing countries. PMID:18219083

  15. HIV risk of transmission behaviour amongst HIV-infected prisoners and its correlates.

    PubMed

    O'Mahony, P; Barry, M

    1992-11-01

    Thirty-eight from a total of 42 known HIV-positive prisoners in the Irish prison system voluntarily cooperated in a survey of psychological attitudes, knowledge of risk behaviour, intentions with respect to future risk behaviour, and actual past risk behaviour. Of this group, 65% reported that they had put others at risk of HIV, since they became aware of their own HIV+ status. Only 16% stated that they would definitely not share their drug-taking equipment in the future and 32% that they would always use a condom in sexual intercourse. In general, psychological and biographical variables were not strongly related to whether or not the respondents had put others at risk of HIV. Nor were there any significant differences in knowledge of at risk behaviour between those who had and those who had not put others at risk. However, there was some evidence for considerable independence between risk-taking behaviour in the sexual and in the drug-taking domains, in that risk-taking in one area was not highly predictive of risk-taking in the other. PMID:1458034

  16. LIFETIME RISK FACTORS FOR HIV/STI INFECTIONS AMONG MALE-TO-FEMALE TRANSGENDER PERSONS

    PubMed Central

    Nuttbrock, Larry; Hwahng, Sel; Bockting, Walter; Rosenblum, Andrew; Mason, Mona; Macri, Monica; Becker, Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    Objective Describe and evaluate risk factors for HIV/STIs among male-to-female (MTF) transgender persons. Method Using the Life Chart Interview, potential lifetime risk factors for HIV/STIs among MTFs were measured and evaluated in conjunction with lifetime exposures for HIV, syphilis, hepatitis B and hepatitis C. The participants were 517 MTFs between the ages of 19 and 59 from the New York Metropolitan Area. Results HIV/STIs were low among Caucasian Americans and very high among Hispanics and African Americans. In the latter groups, HIV and hepatitis B were associated with an androphillic sexual orientation, lifetime number of commercial sex partners (sex work), and the social expression of transgender identity; syphilis was associated with lifetime number of casual sex partners; hepatitis C was associated with injection drug use, unemployment, and social expression of transgender identity. In multivariate models, the social expression of transgender identity was the strongest and most consistent predictor of HIV/STIs. Consistent with their lower levels of infections, Caucasian Americans reported significantly lower levels of the risk factors found to be predictive of HIV/STI among Hispanics and African Americans. Conclusion HIV/STI prevention in this population should be targeted at Hispanic and African Americans. Prevention programs should incorporate multiple components designed to address the diverse issues confronting ethnic minority transgender persons, with an emphasis on the social expression of transgender identity. PMID:19550351

  17. Marriage and the Risk of Incident HIV infection in Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nalugoda, Fred; Guwatudde, David; Bwaninka, John B; Makumbi, Fredrick E; Lutalo, Tom; Kagaayi, Joseph; Sewankambo, Nelson K; Kigozi, Godfrey; Serwadda, David M; Kong, Xiangrong; Wawer, Maria J; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Gray, Ronald H

    2013-01-01

    Objective Studies suggest that the prevalence of HIV is higher among long term marital/consensual relationships than in the unmarried. We assessed the risk of incident HIV infection by marital status in rural Rakai, Uganda. Design Longitudinal data from the Rakai Community Cohort Study (RCCS) between 1999 - 2011 Methods We estimated HIV incidence per 100 person years (py) in sexually active individuals aged 15-49 with a total of 44,179.6 person years (py) who were never married (females 2,929py, males 4,261py), currently married or in long-term consensual relationships (“currently married females 29,823py, males 21,299py) and previously married (females 3,563py, males 1,475). Poisson multivariable regression was used to estimate the unadjusted and adjusted incident rate ratios (IRRs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of HIV acquisition. Results HIV incidence among currently married persons was 0.93/100py, which was lower than the never married (1.51/100py) and previously married (2.85/100py). The risk of HIV acquisition was significantly lower in the currently married compared to the never married among women (Adj IRR=0.26, 95% CI: 0.16-0.42), but not men (Adj IRR=0.69, 95% CI: 0.31-1.52). HIV incidence was lower among first marriages (0.73/100py) compared to second or higher order marriages (1.38/100py). Multiple sex partners significantly increased the risk of HIV acquisition in both women (Adj IRR=2.53, 95% CI: 1.6, 3.97) and men (Adj IRR=1.77, 95% CI: 1.20-2.60). Conclusion Current marriage especially first order marriage was associated with reduced risk of HIV acquisition in women, but not in men, and multiple sex partnerships increased HIV risk for both sexes. PMID:24419066

  18. Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Robertson, Angela M; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D

    2014-01-01

    Deported injection drug users (IDUs) in Mexico may be vulnerable to HIV infection following expulsion from the USA. We examined factors associated with HIV risk perception among a sample of deportees in Tijuana. From January to April 2010, 313 male IDUs who reported ever being deported from the USA completed a questionnaire. Overall, 35% (N=110) of deportees perceived HIV risk. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, factors independently associated with HIV risk perception included ever having a steady female partner in Tijuana post-deportation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 2.26; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.01-5.07) and years spent in a US prison (AOR: 1.29 per year; 95% CI: 1.13-1.48). Conversely, years of drug injection use (AOR: 0.95 per year; 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), ever witnessing family members use drugs prior to first migration trip (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.65), years of residence in the USA (AOR: 0.91 per year; 95% CI: 0.84-0.98) and being a Tijuana native (AOR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16-0.99) were negatively associated with HIV risk perception. US-Mexico border cities that receive deported migrants should target HIV prevention interventions to specific subgroups, including drug-using male deportees. Interventions should consider migrant's time in the USA, the role of their social networks, and reducing missed opportunities for HIV testing/education. PMID:24650124

  19. Self-Identified Sexual Orientation and Sexual Risk Behavior Among HIV-Infected Latino Males.

    PubMed

    Champion, Jane Dimmitt; Szlachta, Alaina

    2016-01-01

    The HIV testing, disclosure, and sexual practices of ethnic minority men suggest that addressing sexual risk behavior and the underlying reasons for not receiving HIV testing or disclosing HIV-infection status-unique to differing populations-would improve public health interventions. Descriptive behaviors and underlying perspectives reported in our study suggest that public health interventions for HIV-infected Latino men who self-identify as heterosexual should explicitly identify substance use, needle sharing, and unprotected sex to current partners as behaviors placing both oneself and one's partners at high risk for contracting HIV. However, diversity of sexual behavior among gay, straight, and bisexual HIV-infected Latino men in our study ultimately suggested that clinicians should not rely on simplistic conceptions of sexuality in assessment of self-care needs. Care in presentation and discussion of self-identified sexual preference and sexual behavior is indicated, as these do not determine actual sexual orientation or behavior and vice versa. PMID:27108242

  20. Risk Factors of HIV and Other Sexually Transmitted Infections in China: A Systematic Review of Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Wong, William Chi Wai

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are a global challenge. China, once said to have eradicated STIs, is now facing a rapid rise in the prevalence of HIV/STIs. This review of reviews aims to map HIV/STI risk factors among the Chinese population, with the objective of identifying risk factors to inform the formulation of effective prevention strategies. Methods A systematic search using key terms related to HIV/STIs, risk factors and the Chinese population in both English and Chinese databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, the Cochrane Library; Wanfang data, CNKI, VIP and SINOMED) was conducted, and peer-reviewed systematic reviews on the topic from 1991 to 2014 were selected. Identified risk factors were grouped into different level determinants based on the HIV Social Epidemiology Model, and then evaluated and reported based on the PRISMA checklist. Findings Of the twenty-eight reviews included, the majority were focused on well-established, individual level risk factors within key populations, with some highlighting the complexity of interacting factors (e.g., alcohol use and higher income in male migrants). While twenty-two reviews covered individual factors, only ten mentioned social factors and five had contents on structural factors. There are gaps in the evidence on social and structural level impacts of HIV/STIs, such as on stigma, discrimination, health policy, access to care, and illicit drug control policies. Migration and social expectation appear to pose a significant threat in aggravating the HIV/STI situation in China; for example, incarceration patterns indicated a significant risk of HIV/STIs for female sex workers. Conclusions Since international guidelines recommend an integrated and multi-level approach to HIV/STI prevention, a comprehensive approach targeting interventions at all levels along the continuum of care is needed to effectively curtail HIV/STI transmission in China. More research is needed to better understand the impact of socio

  1. Recruitment of Caribbean female commercial sex workers at high risk of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Deschamps, Marie Marcelle; Zorrilla, Carmen D.; Morgan, Cecilia A.; Donastorg, Yeycy; Metch, Barbara; Madenwald, Tamra; Joseph, Patrice; Severe, Karine; Garced, Sheyla; Perez, Marta; Escamilia, Gina; Swann, Edith; Pape, Jean William

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate novel eligibility criteria and outreach methods to identify and recruit women at high risk of HIV-1 infection in the Caribbean. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted in 2009–2012 among 799 female commercial sex workers in the Dominican Republic, Haiti, and Puerto Rico. Minimum eligibility criteria included exchange of sex for goods, services, or money in the previous 6 months and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a man in the previous 6 months. Sites used local epidemiology to develop more stringent eligibility criteria and recruitment strategies. Participants were asked questions about HIV/AIDS and their level of concern about participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Logistic regression modeling was used to assess predictors of prevalent HIV infection and willingness to participate in a future HIV vaccine study. Results HIV prevalence at screening was 4.6%. Crack cocaine use [odds ratio (OR) = 4.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) (1.8–9.0)] was associated with and having sex with clients in a hotel or motel [OR = 0.5, CI (0.3–1.0)] was inversely associated with HIV infection. A total of 88.9% of enrolled women were definitely or probably willing to participate in a future HIV vaccine trial. Conclusions This study indicated that local eligibility criteria and recruitment methods can be developed to identify and recruit commercial sex workers with higher HIV prevalence than the general population who express willingness to join an HIV vaccine trial. PMID:24096973

  2. Length of secondary schooling and risk of HIV infection in Botswana: evidence from a natural experiment

    PubMed Central

    De Neve, Jan-Walter; Fink, Günther; Subramanian, SV; Moyo, Sikhulile; Bor, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Background An estimated 2·3 Million individuals are newly infected with HIV each year. Existing cross-sectional and longitudinal studies have found conflicting evidence on the association between education and HIV risk, and no randomized experiment to date has identified a causal effect of education on HIV incidence. Methods A 1996 policy reform changed the grade structure of secondary school in Botswana and increased educational attainment. We use this reform as a ‘natural experiment’ to identify the causal effect of schooling on HIV infection. Data on HIV biomarkers and demographics were obtained from the 2004 and 2008 Botswana AIDS Impact Surveys, nationally-representative household surveys (N = 7018). The association between years of schooling and HIV status was described using multivariate OLS regression models. Using exposure to the policy reform as an instrumental variable, we estimated the causal effect of years of schooling on the cumulative probability that an individual contracted HIV up to his or her age at the time of the survey. The cost-effectiveness of secondary schooling as an HIV prevention intervention was assessed in comparison to other established interventions. Findings Each additional year of secondary schooling induced by the policy change led to an absolute reduction in the cumulative risk of HIV infection of 8·1% points (p = 0·008), relative to a baseline prevalence of 25·6%. Effects were particularly large among women (11·6% points, p = 0·046). Results were robust to a wide array of sensitivity analyses. Secondary school was cost-effective as an HIV prevention intervention by standard metrics. Interpretation Additional years of secondary schooling had a large protective effect against HIV risk, particularly for women, in Botswana. Increasing progression through secondary school may be a cost-effective HIV prevention measure in HIV-endemic settings, in addition to yielding other societal benefits. Funding Takemi Program in

  3. Hepatitis B and C Co-Infection in HIV Patients from the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database: Analysis of Risk Factors and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Marcelo; Wong, Wing-Wai; Law, Matthew G.; Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Yunihastuti, Evy; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Lim, Poh Lian; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Man Po; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ditangco, Rossana; Sim, Benedict L. H.; Nguyen, Kinh Van; Pujari, Sanjay; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Zhang, Fujie; Pham, Thuy Thanh; Choi, Jun Yong; Oka, Shinichi; Kantipong, Pacharee; Mustafa, Mahiran; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Durier, Nicolas; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur

    2016-01-01

    Background We assessed the effects of hepatitis B (HBV) or hepatitis C (HCV) co-infection on outcomes of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients enrolled in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD), a multi-center cohort of HIV-infected patients in the Asia-Pacific region. Methods Patients testing HBs antigen (Ag) or HCV antibody (Ab) positive within enrollment into TAHOD were considered HBV or HCV co-infected. Factors associated with HBV and/or HCV co-infection were assessed by logistic regression models. Factors associated with post-ART HIV immunological response (CD4 change after six months) and virological response (HIV RNA <400 copies/ml after 12 months) were also determined. Survival was assessed by the Kaplan-Meier method and log rank test. Results A total of 7,455 subjects were recruited by December 2012. Of patients tested, 591/5656 (10.4%) were HBsAg positive, 794/5215 (15.2%) were HCVAb positive, and 88/4966 (1.8%) were positive for both markers. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection, age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, and HIV-1 subtype were associated with immunological recovery. Age, route of HIV infection, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA, ART regimen, prior ART and HIV-1 subtype, but not HBV or HCV co-infection, affected HIV RNA suppression. Risk factors affecting mortality included HCV co-infection, age, CDC stage, baseline CD4 count, baseline HIV RNA and prior mono/dual ART. Shortest survival was seen in subjects who were both HBV- and HCV-positive. Conclusion In this Asian cohort of HIV-infected patients, HCV co-infection, but not HBV co-infection, was associated with lower CD4 cell recovery after ART and increased mortality. PMID:26933963

  4. Yoga lifestyle intervention reduces blood pressure in HIV-infected adults with cardiovascular disease risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Cade, Todd; Reeds, Dominic N.; Mondy, Kristin E.; Overton, Turner; Grassino, Joseph; Tucker, Shawn; Bopp, Coco; Laciny, Erin; Hubert, Sara; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Yarasheski, Kevin E.

    2009-01-01

    People living with human immunodeficiency virus infection (HIV) are at increased risk for developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). Safe and effective interventions for lowering CVD risk in HIV are high priorities. Objective We conducted a prospective, randomized, controlled study to evaluate whether a yoga lifestyle intervention improves CVD risk factors, virologic or immunologic status, or quality of life in HIV-infected adults more than in a matched control group. Methods Sixty HIV-infected adults with mild-moderate CVD risk were assigned to 20 wks of supervised yoga practice or standard of care treatment. Baseline and week 20 measures were; 2hr-oral glucose tolerance test with insulin monitoring, body composition, fasting serum lipid/lipoprotein profile, resting blood pressures, CD4+ T-cell number and plasma HIV RNA, and the Medical Outcomes Study SF-36 health-related quality of life inventory. Results Resting systolic and diastolic blood pressures were reduced more (p=0.04) in the yoga group (−5±2 and −3±1 mmHg) than in the standard of care group (+1±2 and +2±2 mmHg), despite no greater reduction in body weight, fat mass, proatherogenic lipids, or improvements in glucose tolerance or overall quality of life after yoga. Immune and virologic status was not adversely affected. Conclusion Among traditional lifestyle modifications, yoga is a low cost, simple to administer, non-pharmacological, popular behavioral intervention that can lower blood pressure in pre-hypertensive HIV-infected adults with mild-moderate CVD risk factors. PMID:20059570

  5. Risk of premature atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease associated with HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Calza, Leonardo; Manfredi, Roberto; Pocaterra, Daria; Chiodo, Francesco

    2008-07-01

    The use of new potent protease inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapies in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been increasingly associated with cardiovascular risk factors, including hyperlipidaemia, fat redistribution syndrome, insulin resistance, and diabetes mellitus. The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in clinical practice has remarkably changed the natural history of HIV disease, leading to a notable extension of life expectancy, and prolonged lipid and glucose metabolism abnormalities are expected to lead to significant effects on the long-term prognosis and outcome of HIV-infected patients. Prediction modeling, surrogate markers and hard cardiovascular endpoints suggest an increased incidence of cardiovascular diseases in HIV-infected subjects receiving HAART, even though the absolute risk of cardiovascular complications remains still low, and must be balanced against the evident virological, immunological, and clinical benefits descending from combination antiretroviral therapy. Nevertheless, the assessment of cardiovascular risk should be performed on regular basis in HIV-positive individuals, especially after initiation or change of antiretroviral treatment. Appropriate lifestyle measures (including smoking cessation, dietary changes, and aerobic physical activity) are critical points, and switching HAART may be considered, although maintaining viremic control should be the main goal of therapy. Pharmacological treatment of dyslipidaemia (usually with statins and fibrates), and hyperglycaemia (with insulin-sensitizing agents and thiazolidinediones), becomes suitable when lifestyle modifications and switching therapy are ineffective or not applicable. PMID:18358535

  6. Vitamin Supplementation Increases Risk of Subclinical Mastitis in HIV-Infected Women123

    PubMed Central

    Arsenault, Joanne E.; Aboud, Said; Manji, Karim P.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.; Villamor, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Subclinical mastitis is common in HIV-infected women and is a risk factor for mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of vitamin supplementation [vitamin A + β-carotene, multivitamins (B complex, C, and E), or multivitamins, including vitamin A + β-carotene] on the risk of subclinical mastitis during the first 2 y postpartum among HIV-infected women. The study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial including 674 HIV-infected, antiretroviral naïve Tanzanian women who were recruited during pregnancy and followed-up after delivery. Breast milk samples were obtained approximately every 3 mo. Any subclinical mastitis was defined as a ratio of the sodium to potassium (Na:K) breast milk concentrations > 0.6 and further classified as either moderate (Na:K ≥ 0.6 and ≤ 1) or severe (Na:K > 1.0). Fifty-eight percent of women had at least 1 episode of any subclinical mastitis. Women assigned to multivitamins (B complex, C, and E) had a 33% greater risk of any subclinical mastitis (P = 0.005) and a 75% greater risk of severe subclinical mastitis (P = 0.0006) than women who received the placebo. Vitamin A + β-carotene also increased the risk of severe subclinical mastitis by 45% (P = 0.03). Among women with CD4+ T-cell counts ≥ 350 cells/μL, multivitamin intake resulted in a 49% increased risk of any subclinical mastitis (P = 0.006); by contrast, there were no treatment effects among women with CD4+ T-cell counts < 350 cells/μL (P- interaction for treatment × CD4+ T-cell count = 0.10). Supplementation of HIV-infected women with vitamins increased the risk of subclinical mastitis. PMID:20739447

  7. Exposure to Antiretroviral Therapy and Risk of Cancer in HIV-infected Persons

    PubMed Central

    CHAO, Chun; LEYDEN, Wendy A.; XU, Lanfang; HORBERG, Michael A.; KLEIN, Daniel; TOWNER, William J.; QUESENBERRY, Charles P.; ABRAMS, Donald I.; SILVERBERG, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The incidence of certain non-AIDS-defining cancers (NADC) in HIV patients has been reported to have increased in the combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. Studies are needed to directly evaluate the effect of ART use on cancer risk. Design We followed 12,872 HIV+ Kaiser Permanente members whose complete ART history was known for incident cancers between 1996-2008. Methods Cancers, identified from SEER-based cancer registries, were grouped as AIDS-defining cancers (ADC), infection-related NADC or infection-unrelated NADC. We also evaluated the most common individual cancer types. Rate ratios (RR) for ART use (yes/no) and cumulative duration of any ART, PI and NNRTI therapy were obtained from Poisson models adjusting for demographics, pre-treatment or recent CD4 count and HIV RNA levels, years known HIV-infected, prior antiretroviral use, HIV risk, smoking, alcohol/drug abuse, overweight/obesity, and calendar year. Results The cohort experienced 32,368 person-yrs (py) of ART, 21,249 py of PI therapy, and 15,643 py of NNRTI therapy. The mean follow-up duration was 4.5 years. ADC rates decrease with increased duration of ART use [RR/year=0.61, 95% CI (0.56-0.66)]; the effect was similar by therapy class. ART, PI or NNRTI therapy duration was not associated with infection-related or infection-unrelated NADC [RR/year ART=1.00 (0.91-1.11) and 0.96 (0.90-1.01), respectively], except a higher anal cancer risk with longer PI therapy [RR/year=1.16 (1.02-1.31)]. Conclusions No therapy class-specific effect was found for ADC. ART exposure was generally not associated with NADC risk, except for long term use of PI, which might be associated with increased anal cancer risk. PMID:22951631

  8. Myocardial dysfunction in patients infected with HIV: prevalence and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, A J; Sutherland, G R; Bird, A G; Brettle, R P; Ludlam, C A; McMillan, A; Boon, N A

    1992-01-01

    Objectives—To determine the prevalence of and risk factors for myocardial dysfunction in HIV infection. Subjects—173 patients infected with HIV underwent echocardiography. 119 were current or previous injection drug users, 38 were homosexuals, 10 were haemophiliac patients, and six were heterosexual. Main outcome measure—Detection of impaired ventricular function. Results—26 patients with abnormalities of ventricular size or function or both were identified. The abnormality was (a) dilated cardiomyopathy in 13 patients (eight homosexuals, three drug users, and two haemophiliacs) with a mean CD4 count of 38 cells/mm3, which accords with end-stage disease (in addition, three patients were identified as having borderline impairment of left ventricular function); (b) left ventricular dilatation without loss of function in a further six patients; and (c) isolated right ventricular dilation in seven patients. Follow up echocardiograms were obtained in 71 patients, 18 of whom had myocardial dysfunction (103 echocardiograms, mean (SD) 2·5 (0·6) scans per patient, mean interval 200 (116) days, range 14–538 days). These showed that in four cases of isolated right ventricular dilatation, one of isolated left ventricular dilatation, and two with borderline left ventricular dysfunction myocardial function subsequently reverted to normal. There was no excess of exposure to zidovudine in the patients with myocardial dysfunction. Similarly, patients with myocardial dysfunction had no serological evidence of excess secondary infection with Toxoplasma gondii and cytomegalovirus. Conclusions—There was a high prevalence and wide range of myocardial dysfunction in HIV positive patients. Dilated cardiomyopathy was a feature of advanced HIV disease and affected all major risk groups for HIV infection. In contrast, isolated dilatation of either ventricle occurred at an earlier stage of HIV infection and, particularly in the case of the right ventricle, often was transient

  9. Risk Factors for HIV Infection among Young Thai Men during 2005–2009

    PubMed Central

    Rangsin, Ram; Kana, Khunakorn; Chuenchitra, Thippawan; Sunantarod, Akachai; Mungthin, Mathirut; Meesiri, Supanee; Areekul, Wirote; Nelson, Kenrad E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Thailand is one of several countries with a continuing generalized HIV epidemic. We evaluated the risk factors for HIV prevalence among 17–29 year old men conscripted by a random process into the Royal Thai Army (RTA) in 8 cohorts from 2005–2009. Methods A series of case-cohort studies were conducted among the male RTA conscripts who had been tested for HIV seroprevalence after they were inducted. Men who were HIV positive were compared with a systematic random sample (1 in 30–40) of men from the total population of new conscripts. Each subject completed a detailed risk factor questionnaire. Results A total of 240,039 young Thai men were conscripted into the RTA and were screened for HIV seroprevalence between November 2005 and May 2009. Of 1,208 (0.5%) HIV positive cases, 584 (48.3%) men were enrolled into the study. There were 7,396 men who were enrolled as a comparison group. Among conscripts who had an education lower than a college-level, the independent risk factors for HIV infection were age in years (AOR 1.38, 95% CI 1.28–1.48), a history of sex with another man (AOR 3.73, 95% CI 2.70–5.13), HCV infection (AOR 3.89, 95% CI 2.56–5.90), and a history of sex with a female sex worker (FSW) (AOR 1.35, 95% CI 1.10–1.66). Among conscripts who had a college degree, the independent risk factor for HIV infection was a history of sex with another man (AOR 23.04, 95% CI 10.23–51.90). Numbers of sexual partners increased and the age at first sex, as well as the use of condoms for sex with a FSW decreased in successive cohorts. Conclusion The HIV seroprevalence among cohorts of 17–29 years old men has remained at about 0.5% overall during 2005–2009. The most significant behavior associated with HIV prevalence was a history of sex with another man. Our data indicate continuing acquisition of HIV among young men in Thailand in recent years, especially among men with a history of same sex behavior. PMID:26308085

  10. Wimbo: implications for risk of HIV infection among circumcised fishermen in Western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ombere, Stephen Okumu; Nyambedha, Erick Otieno; Bukachi, Salome Atieno

    2015-01-01

    Medical male circumcision has been shown to reduce the risk of heterosexual transmission of HIV infection in men by up to 60% in three randomised controlled trials. However, not much anthropological literature exists to provide a holistic understanding of sexual behaviour among migrating fishermen who have been circumcised. This qualitative study used cultural ecology theory and anthropological methods to develop a more holistic understanding of Luo fishermen's sexual behaviour after circumcision when they migrate (wimbo) to islands in western Kenya. Results from focus-group discussions show that during wimbo there is a deviation from community norms governing sexual expression, influenced by the belief that circumcision provides protection against HIV infection. Through the exchange of sex for fish, circumcised men access new sexual partners in the destination beaches and engage in risky sexual behaviours without any HIV prevention measures. The processes and practices associated with wimbo may therefore help explain why rates of HIV infection are increasing among fisherfolk despite new interventions to combat HIV. These results have relevant implications for HIV-related intervention and policy in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25774858

  11. Prevalence of oral lesions among HIV-infected intravenous drug abusers and other risk groups.

    PubMed

    Barone, R; Ficarra, G; Gaglioti, D; Orsi, A; Mazzotta, F

    1990-02-01

    To study the prevalence of oral manifestations, we examined 217 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Most of our patients were intravenous drug abusers (IVDAs) (65%). Other risk categories were represented by IVDAs who were also male homosexuals or bisexuals (11%), male homosexuals and bisexuals (16%), sexual partners of HIV-infected patients (5%), and hemophilic persons and recipients of blood transfusions (3%). Forty-six patients were women and 171 were men, with a median age of 27 years (range, 11 to 65 years). At the time of first examination, 38% of patients had asymptomatic HIV infection, 36% had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 17% had AIDS-related complex, and 9% had AIDS. Oral manifestations were observed in 89 (41%) patients. Of these, 15 had asymptomatic infection, 23 had lymphadenopathy syndrome, 27 had AIDS-related complex, and 24 had AIDS. Increasing severity of disease was significantly associated with higher prevalence of oral lesions (p less than or equal to 0.0001). Candidiasis was the most common oral lesion, followed by hairy leukoplakia. Kaposi's sarcoma, melanotic macules, herpes labialis, condyloma acuminatum, perioral molluscum contagiosum, and bacterial glossitis due to Escherichia coli infection were found in a small number of patients. Results of culture for fungi, available for 203 patients, revealed that 51% of patients with positive Candida cultures had clinical evidence of candidiasis. Our study demonstrates that oral lesions are also important signs of HIV infection among IVDAs. Early diagnosis of these manifestations is becoming increasingly significant in the practice of dentistry. PMID:2304743

  12. Cirrhosis, Liver Transplantation and HIV Infection Are Risk Factors Associated with Hepatitis E Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Riveiro-Barciela, Mar; Buti, María; Homs, María; Campos-Varela, Isabel; Cantarell, Carmen; Crespo, Manuel; Castells, Lluís; Tabernero, David; Quer, Josep; Esteban, Rafael; Rodriguez-Frías, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Background Acute and chronic hepatitis E have been associated with high mortality and development of cirrhosis, particularly in solid-organ recipients and patients infected by human immunodeficiency virus. However, data regarding the epidemiology of hepatitis E in special populations is still limited. Aims Investigate seroprevalence and possible factors associated with HEV infection in a large cohort of immunosuppressed patients. Methods Cross-sectional study testing IgG anti-HEV in serum samples from 1373 consecutive individuals: 332 liver-transplant, 296 kidney-transplant, 6 dual organ recipients, 301 non-transplanted patients with chronic liver disease, 238 HIV-infected patients and 200 healthy controls. Results IgG anti-HEV was detected in 3.5% controls, 3.7% kidney recipients, 7.4% liver transplant without cirrhosis and 32.1% patients who developed post-transplant cirrhosis (p<0.01). In patients with chronic liver disease, IgG anti-HEV was also statistically higher in those with liver cirrhosis (2% vs 17.5%, p<0.01). HIV-infected patients showed an IgG anti-HEV rate of 9.2%, higher than those patients without HIV infection (p<0.03). Multivariate analysis showed that the factors independently associated with anti-HEV detection were liver cirrhosis, liver transplantation and HIV infection (OR: 7.6, 3.1 and 2.4). HCV infection was a protective factor for HEV infection (OR: 0.4). Conclusions HEV seroprevalence was high in liver transplant recipients, particularly those with liver cirrhosis. The difference in anti-HEV prevalence between Liver and Kidney transplanted cases suggests an association with advanced liver disease. Further research is needed to ascertain whether cirrhosis is a predisposing factor for HEV infection or whether HEV infection may play a role in the pathogeneses of cirrhosis. PMID:25068388

  13. Exploring risk of experiencing intimate partner violence after HIV infection: a qualitative study among women with HIV attending postnatal services in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Mulrenan, Claire; Colombini, Manuela; Kikuvi, Joshua; Mayhew, Susannah H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To explore risks of experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV) after HIV infection among women with HIV in a postnatal care setting in Swaziland. Design A qualitative semistructured in-depth interview study, using thematic analysis with deductive and inductive coding, of IPV experiences after HIV infection extracted from service-integration interview transcripts. Setting Swaziland. Participants 19 women with HIV, aged 18–44, were purposively sampled for an in-depth interview about their experiences of services, HIV and IPV from a quantitative postnatal cohort participating in an evaluation of HIV and reproductive health services integration in Swaziland. Results Results indicated that women were at risk of experiencing IPV after HIV infection, with 9 of 19 disclosing experiences of physical violence and/or coercive control post-HIV. IPV was initiated through two key pathways: (1) acute interpersonal triggers (eg, status disclosure, mother-to-child transmission of HIV) and (2) chronic normative tensions (eg, fertility intentions, initiating contraceptives). Conclusions The results highlight a need to mitigate the risk of IPV for women with HIV in shorter and longer terms in Swaziland. While broader changes are needed to resolve gender disparities, practical steps can be institutionalised within health facilities to reduce, or avoid increasing, IPV pathways for women with HIV. These might include mutual disclosure between partners, greater engagement of Swazi males with HIV services, and promoting positive masculinities that support and protect women. Trial registration number NCT01694862. PMID:25976760

  14. HIV Infection Rates and Risk Behavior among Young Men undergoing community-based Testing in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Morris, Sheldon R; Little, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 80% of new HIV infections in the United States occur in men. Four out of five men diagnosed with HIV infection are men who have sex with men (MSM), with an increasing proportion of young MSM (i.e. ≤24 years of age). We performed a retrospective analysis 11,873 cisgender men participating in a community based HIV screening program in San Diego between 2008 and 2014 to characterize the HIV prevalence and sexual risk behaviors among young men. In young heterosexual men HIV prevalence was lower compared to heterosexual men between 25 and 49 years of age (0.3% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.043). Among young MSM, HIV prevalence was 5.5%, per test positivity rate 3.6%, and HIV incidence 3.4 per 100 person years (95% CI 2.2-5.4). Per test positivity rate (p = 0.008) and incidence (p < 0.001) were significantly higher among young MSM than among MSM above 24-years of age. Young MSM diagnosed with HIV infection reported significantly more serodiscordant condomless anal intercourse, bacterial sexually transmitted infections, and higher rates of methamphetamine and gamma hydroxybutyrate use when compared to young MSM who tested negative. In conclusion, young MSM are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection and may represent ideal candidates for targeted prevention interventions that increase testing uptake and/or decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection. PMID:27181715

  15. HIV Infection Rates and Risk Behavior among Young Men undergoing community-based Testing in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Hoenigl, Martin; Chaillon, Antoine; Morris, Sheldon R.; Little, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 80% of new HIV infections in the United States occur in men. Four out of five men diagnosed with HIV infection are men who have sex with men (MSM), with an increasing proportion of young MSM (i.e. ≤24 years of age). We performed a retrospective analysis 11,873 cisgender men participating in a community based HIV screening program in San Diego between 2008 and 2014 to characterize the HIV prevalence and sexual risk behaviors among young men. In young heterosexual men HIV prevalence was lower compared to heterosexual men between 25 and 49 years of age (0.3% vs. 1.4%, p = 0.043). Among young MSM, HIV prevalence was 5.5%, per test positivity rate 3.6%, and HIV incidence 3.4 per 100 person years (95% CI 2.2–5.4). Per test positivity rate (p = 0.008) and incidence (p < 0.001) were significantly higher among young MSM than among MSM above 24-years of age. Young MSM diagnosed with HIV infection reported significantly more serodiscordant condomless anal intercourse, bacterial sexually transmitted infections, and higher rates of methamphetamine and gamma hydroxybutyrate use when compared to young MSM who tested negative. In conclusion, young MSM are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection and may represent ideal candidates for targeted prevention interventions that increase testing uptake and/or decrease the risk of acquiring HIV infection. PMID:27181715

  16. Preventing HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD. Office for Substance Abuse Prevention.

    This document notes that a recent threat to American's youth is the risk of infection from the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). It views youth at high risk for alcohol or other drug use as also being, in all probability, at highest risk for exposure to HIV, and suggests that programs set up to prevent adolescents from becoming involved with…

  17. HIV Prevalence, Risk Behavior, Knowledge and Beliefs among Women Seeking Care at a Sexually Transmitted Infection Clinic in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Cooperman, Nina A.; Shastri, Jayanthi S.; Shastri, Aditi; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred women presenting to a sexually transmitted infection clinic in Mumbai, India were surveyed and HIV tested. Thirty-nine percent were HIV-infected; 80% were current sex workers, and HIV-infection was not significantly associated with past-year sex work. Only 44% always used condoms with their non-commercial sex partners. Most believed condom preparation is a male responsibility (58%), condom use is a sign that partner trust is lacking (84%), and, if a woman asks her partner to use a condom, he will lose respect for her (65%). All women at STI clinics in India need HIV testing and culturally sensitive risk intervention. PMID:23659311

  18. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus Infections and Risk Behaviors among Malaysian Fishermen.

    PubMed

    Choo, Martin K K; El-Bassel, Nabila; Adam, Philippe C G; Gilbert, Louisa; Wu, Elwin; West, Brooke S; Bazazi, Alexander R; De Wit, John B F; Ismail, Rusli; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2015-01-01

    Fishermen in Southeast Asia have been found to be highly vulnerable to HIV, with research evidence highlighting the role of sexual risk behaviors. This study aims to estimate the rate of HIV as well as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among Malaysian fishermen, and the risky sexual and injection drug use behaviors that may contribute to these infections. The study also includes an assessment of socio-demographic, occupational and behavioral correlates of testing positive for HIV or HCV, and socio-demographic and occupational correlates of risk behaviors. The study had a cross-sectional design and recruited 406 fishermen through respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Participants self-completed a questionnaire and provided biological specimens for HIV and HCV testing. We conducted and compared results of analyses of both unweighted data and data weighted with the Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool (RDSAT). Of the participating fishermen, 12.4% were HIV positive and 48.6% had HCV infection. Contrary to expectations and findings from previous research, most fishermen (77.1%) were not sexually active. More than a third had a history of injection drug use, which often occurred during fishing trips on commercial vessels and during longer stays at sea. Of the fishermen who injected drugs, 42.5% reported unsafe injection practices in the past month. Reporting a history of injection drug use increased the odds of testing HIV positive by more than 6 times (AOR = 6.22, 95% CIs [2.74, 14.13]). Most fishermen who injected drugs tested positive for HCV. HCV infection was significantly associated with injection drug use, being older than 25 years, working on a commercial vessel and spending four or more days at sea per fishing trip. There is an urgent need to strengthen current harm reduction and drug treatment programs for Malaysian fishermen who inject drugs, especially among fishermen who work on commercial vessels and engage in deep-sea fishing. PMID:26244844

  19. Prevalence and Correlates of HIV and Hepatitis C Virus Infections and Risk Behaviors among Malaysian Fishermen

    PubMed Central

    Choo, Martin K. K.; El-Bassel, Nabila; Adam, Philippe C. G.; Gilbert, Louisa; Wu, Elwin; West, Brooke S.; Bazazi, Alexander R.; De Wit, John B. F.; Ismail, Rusli; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba

    2015-01-01

    Fishermen in Southeast Asia have been found to be highly vulnerable to HIV, with research evidence highlighting the role of sexual risk behaviors. This study aims to estimate the rate of HIV as well as hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among Malaysian fishermen, and the risky sexual and injection drug use behaviors that may contribute to these infections. The study also includes an assessment of socio-demographic, occupational and behavioral correlates of testing positive for HIV or HCV, and socio-demographic and occupational correlates of risk behaviors. The study had a cross-sectional design and recruited 406 fishermen through respondent-driven sampling (RDS). Participants self-completed a questionnaire and provided biological specimens for HIV and HCV testing. We conducted and compared results of analyses of both unweighted data and data weighted with the Respondent-Driven Sampling Analysis Tool (RDSAT). Of the participating fishermen, 12.4% were HIV positive and 48.6% had HCV infection. Contrary to expectations and findings from previous research, most fishermen (77.1%) were not sexually active. More than a third had a history of injection drug use, which often occurred during fishing trips on commercial vessels and during longer stays at sea. Of the fishermen who injected drugs, 42.5% reported unsafe injection practices in the past month. Reporting a history of injection drug use increased the odds of testing HIV positive by more than 6 times (AOR = 6.22, 95% CIs [2.74, 14.13]). Most fishermen who injected drugs tested positive for HCV. HCV infection was significantly associated with injection drug use, being older than 25 years, working on a commercial vessel and spending four or more days at sea per fishing trip. There is an urgent need to strengthen current harm reduction and drug treatment programs for Malaysian fishermen who inject drugs, especially among fishermen who work on commercial vessels and engage in deep-sea fishing. PMID:26244844

  20. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Toxoplasmosis in HIV infected and non-infected individuals in Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Toxoplasmosis, a zoonotic disease distributed worldwide, is an infection caused by the ubiquitous obligatory intracellular coccidian protozoan organism, Toxoplasma gondii. It is a major public health concern because the disease is serious in terms of mortality or physical and /or psychological sequellae in patients with HIV disease. The aim of the study was to assess the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies and associated risk factors in HIV infected and non-infected individuals attending Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Bahir Dar, Northwest Ethiopia. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted at Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Bahir Dar, Amhara National Regional State. Venous blood samples were collected from 103 HIV infected pre anti-retroviral therapy patients at Felege Hiwot referral hospital and 101 HIV negative apparently healthy voluntary blood donors at the blood bank. Serum samples were analyzed for anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies using a commercially available ELISA kit. Socio-demographic and associated risk factors for Toxoplasmosis from each individual were also obtained and the data was analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results Of the examined HIV seropositive individuals, 87.4% (90/103) and 10.7% (11/103) were positive for anti-T. gondii IgG and IgM antibodies, respectively. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that anti-T. gondii seropositivity was independently significantly associated with undercooked or raw meat consumption (adjusted OR=5.73, 95% CI=1.35-24.39; P=0.02) and having contact with cat (adjusted OR= 4.29, 95% CI=1.08-16.94; P=0.04) in HIV positive individuals. In HIV negative apparently healthy blood donors, prevalence of anti-T. gondii antibodies were 70.29% and 2.97% for IgG and IgM, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that undercooked or raw meat consumption (adjusted OR=6.45, 95% CI=2.16-19.28; p=0.001) and sex (OR=6.79, 95% CI=2.14-21.60; p=0.001) were

  1. Toxoplasma gondii – Prevalence and Risk Factors in HIV-infected Patients from Songklanagarind Hospital, Southern Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Chemoh, Waenurama; Sawangjaroen, Nongyao; Siripaitoon, Pisut; Andiappan, Hemah; Hortiwakul, Thanaporn; Sermwittayawong, Natthawan; Charoenmak, Bunsri; Nissapatorn, Veeranoot

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is one of the most common opportunistic parasitic diseases in patients living with HIV/AIDS. This study aimed to determine the seroprevalence of Toxoplasma infection in HIV-infected patients and to identify associated risk factors in Toxoplasma seropositive patients. This study was conducted at a regional public hospital in Hat Yai, southern Thailand during October 2009 to June 2010. Blood samples were collected from 300 HIV-infected patients. Each subject also answered a socio-demographic and risk factors associated with Toxoplasma infection. The prevalence of anti-Toxoplasma IgG antibodies in HIV-infected patients was 109 (36.3%), of which 83 (76.2%) had past infection and 26 (23.9%) had recently acquired Toxoplasma infection as indicated by their IgG avidity. Multivariate analysis using logistic regression showed that gender difference (adjusted OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.05–2.72) was the only factor associated with Toxoplasma infection. From the results obtained, these HIV-infected patients could be at high risk of developing clinical evidence of severe toxoplasmosis. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce primary behavioral practices to prevent Toxoplasma infection among HIV-infected patients. PMID:26635769

  2. Prevalence and risk factors for Hepatitis C and HIV-1 infections among pregnant women in Central Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are a major burden to public health worldwide. Routine antenatal HIV-1 screening to prevent maternal-infant transmission is universally recommended. Our objectives were to evaluate the prevalence of and potential risk factors for HCV and HIV infection among pregnant women who attended prenatal care under the coverage of public health in Central Brazil. Methods Screening and counselling for HIV and HCV infections was offered free of charge to all pregnant women attending antenatal clinic (ANC) in the public health system, in Goiania city (~1.1 million inhabitants) during 2004–2005. Initial screening was performed on a dried blood spot collected onto standard filter paper; positive or indeterminate results were confirmed by a second blood sample. HCV infection was defined as a positive or indeterminate sample (EIA test) and confirmed HCV-RNA technique. HIV infection was defined according to standard criteria. Factors associated with HIV and HCV infections were identified with logistic regression. The number needed to screen (NNS) to prevent one case of infant HIV infection was calculated using the Monte Carlo simulation method. Results A total of 28,561 pregnant women were screened for HCV and HIV-1 in ANC. Mean maternal age was 23.9 years (SD = 5.6), with 45% of the women experiencing their first pregnancy. Prevalence of HCV infection was 0.15% (95% CI 0.11%–0.20%), and the risk increased with age (p < 0.01). The prevalence of anti-HIV infection was 0.09% (95% CI 0.06%–0.14%). Black women had a 4.9-fold (95% CI 1.42–16.95) greater risk of HIV-1 infection compared to non-black women. NNS to prevent one case of infant HIV infection ranged from 4,141 to 13,928. Conclusion The prevalence of HIV and HCV infections were low among pregnant women, with high acceptability rates in the opt-in strategy in primary care. Older maternal age was a risk factor for HCV and antenatal HCV testing

  3. Reducing the risk of HIV infection among South African sex workers: socioeconomic and gender barriers.

    PubMed Central

    Karim, Q A; Karim, S S; Soldan, K; Zondi, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. The social context within which women engaged in sex work at a popular truck stop in South Africa are placed at risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the factors that influence their ability to reduce their risk were assessed. METHODS. Using qualitative and quantitative techniques, an elected sex worker from within the group collected all data. RESULTS. Given the various pressing needs for basic survival, the risk of HIV infection is viewed as one more burden imposed on these women by their lack of social, legal, and economic power. Violence, or the threat thereof, plays an important role in their disempowerment. In the few instances in which sex workers were able to insist on condom use, it resulted in a decrease in earnings, loss of clients, and physical abuse. CONCLUSIONS. Recommendations to reduce the sex workers' risk for HIV infection include negotiation and communication skills to enable them to persuade their clients to use condoms; development of strategies through which they can maximally use their group strength to facilitate unified action; and accessibility of protective methods they can use and control, such as intravaginal microbicides. PMID:7485664

  4. Perceived risk of HIV infection among deported male injection drug users in Tijuana, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Pinedo, Miguel; Burgos, José Luis; Robertson, Angela M.; Vera, Alicia; Lozada, Remedios; Ojeda, Victoria D.

    2014-01-01

    Deported injection drug users (IDUs) in Mexico may be vulnerable to HIV infection following expulsion from the U.S. We examined factors associated with HIV risk perception among a sample of deportees in Tijuana. From January to April 2010, 313 male IDUs who reported ever being deported from the U.S. completed a questionnaire. Overall, 35% (N=110) of deportees perceived HIV risk. In multivariate logistic regression analyses, factors independently associated with HIV risk perception included: ever having a steady female partner in Tijuana post-deportation (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR): 2.26; 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.01-5.07) and years spent in a U.S. prison (AOR: 1.29 per year; 95% CI: 1.13-1.48). Conversely, years of drug injection use (AOR: 0.95 per year; 95% CI: 0.91-0.99), ever witnessing family members use drugs prior to first migration trip (AOR: 0.24; 95% CI: 0.09-0.65), years of residence in the United States (AOR: 0.91 per year; 95% CI: 0.84-0.98) and being a Tijuana-native (AOR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.16-0.99) were negatively associated HIV risk perception. U.S.-Mexico border cities that receive deported migrants should target HIV prevention interventions to specific subgroups, including drug-using male deportees. Interventions should consider migrant's time in the U.S., the role of their social networks, and reducing missed opportunities for HIV testing/education. PMID:24650124

  5. HIV infection and risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, S A; Martindale, S L; Cornelisse, P G; Miller, M L; Craib, K J; Schechter, M T; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Hogg, R S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Young gay and bisexual men may perceive that the consequences of HIV infection have dramatically improved with the availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy. We therefore sought to identify trends in HIV infection rates and associated risk behaviours among young gay and bisexual men in Vancouver. METHODS: Prospective cohort study involving gay and bisexual men aged 18-30 years who had not previously tested HIV positive. Subjects were recruited through physicians, clinics and community outreach in Vancouver. Annually participants were tested for HIV antibodies and asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire pertaining to sociodemographic characteristics, sexual behaviours and substance use. Prevalence of HIV infection and risk behaviours were determined for eligible participants who completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The primary outcome was the proportion of men who reported having protected sex during the year before enrollment and who reported any episode of unprotected sex by the time of the first follow-up visit. RESULTS: A total of 681 men completed a baseline questionnaire and HIV testing as of May 1998. The median duration between baseline and the first follow-up visit was 14 months. The median age was 25 years. Most of the subjects were white and of high socioeconomic status. The majority (549 [80.6%]) reported having sex only with men; 81 (11.9%) reported bisexual activity. Of the 503 men who had one or more regular male partners, 245 (48.7%) reported at least one episode of unprotected anal sex in the year before enrollment; the corresponding number among the 537 who had one or more casual male partners was 140 (26.1%). The prevalence and incidence of HIV seropositivity were 1.8% (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.8%-2.8%) and 1.7 per 100 person-years [95% CI 0.7-2.7], respectively. Fifty-two (26.5%) of the 196 and 55 (29.7%) of the 185 men with regular partners who reported having practiced

  6. Exploring Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High Risk for HIV Infection Recruited with Venue-based Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Gwadz, Marya; Cleland, Charles M.; Jenness, Samuel M.; Silverman, Elizabeth; Hagan, Holly; Ritchie, Amanda S.; Leonard, Noelle R.; McCright-Gill, Talaya; Martinez, Belkis; Swain, Quentin; Kutnick, Alexandra; Sherpa, Dawa

    2016-01-01

    Annual HIV testing is recommended for high-risk populations in the United States, to identify HIV infections early and provide timely linkage to treatment. However, heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, due to their residence in urban areas of high poverty and elevated HIV prevalence, test for HIV less frequently than other risk groups, and late diagnosis of HIV is common. Yet the factors impeding HIV testing in this group, which is predominantly African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic, are poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Using a systematic community-based sampling method, venue-based sampling (VBS), we estimate rates of lifetime and recent (past year) HIV testing among high-risk heterosexuals (HRH), and explore a set of putative multi-level barriers to and facilitators of recent testing, by gender. Participants were 338 HRH African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic adults recruited using VBS, who completed a computerized structured assessment battery guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence, comprised of reliable/valid measures on socio-demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and multi-level barriers to HIV testing. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HIV testing within the past year. Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually. In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis. Thus VBS identified serious gaps in rates of annual HIV testing among HRH. Improvements in access to high-quality HIV testing and leveraging of STI testing are needed to increase the proportion of HRH testing annually for HIV. Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral

  7. Individual and Contextual Factors of Sexual Risk Behavior in Youth Perinatally Infected with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Bauermeister, José A.; Robbins, Reuben N.; Gromadzka, Olga; Abrams, Elaine J.; Wiznia, Andrew; Bamji, Mahrukh; Mellins, Claude A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract This study prospectively examines the effects of maternal and child HIV infection on youth penetrative and unprotected penetrative sex, as well as the role of internal contextual, external contextual, social and self-regulatory factors in influencing the sexual behaviors of HIV−infected (PHIV+), HIV−affected (uninfected with an HIV+ caregiver), and HIV unaffected (uninfected with an HIV− caregiver) youth over time. Data (N=420) were drawn from two longitudinal studies focused on the effects of pediatric or maternal HIV on youth (51% female; 39% PHIV+) and their caregivers (92% female; 46% HIV+). PHIV+ youth were significantly less likely to engage in penetrative sex than HIV− youth at follow-up, after adjusting for contextual, social, and self-regulatory factors. Other individual- and contextual-level factors such as youth alcohol and marijuana use, residing with a biological parent, caregiver employment, caregiver marijuana use, and youth self-concept were also associated with penetrative sex. Youth who used alcohol were significantly more likely to engage in unprotected penetrative sex. Data suggest that, despite contextual, social, and self-regulatory risk factors, PHIV+ youth are less likely to engage in sexual behavior compared to HIV− youth from similar environments. Further research is required to understand delays in sexual activity in PHIV+ youth and also to understand potential factors that promote resiliency, particularly as they age into older adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:22694193

  8. HIV testing and preventive services accessibility among men who have sex with men at high risk of HIV infection in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuejuan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Heng; Xia, Dongyan; Pan, Stephen W; Yue, Hai; Lu, Hongyan; Xing, Hui; He, Xiong; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2015-02-01

    The HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been increasing at an alarming rate in most areas of China in recent years. Many Chinese MSM still lack sufficient access to HIV prevention services, despite ongoing scale-up of comprehensive HIV testing and intervention services. The purpose of this study was to investigate utilization of HIV testing and prevention services, and related factors that influence the MSM people to access HIV test or other services to prevent HIV among MSM in Beijing, China.Three successive cross-sectional surveys of MSM were conducted in Beijing from September 2009 to January 2010, September 2010 to January 2011, and September 2011 to January 2012. Demographic and behavioral data were collected and analyzed. Blood samples were tested for HIV and syphilis. Three models were established to analyze factors associated with HIV testing and preventive services.Of the 1312 participants, prevalence of HIV and syphilis was 7.9% and 15.4%, respectively. Sixty-nine percent ever had an HIV test, 56.2%, 78.7%, and 46.1% received HIV test, free condom/lubricants, and sexually transmitted infection services in the past 12 months (P12M), respectively. MSM with larger social networks and who knew someone infected with HIV were more likely to receive HIV testing and preventive services; lower degrees of stigma and discriminatory attitudes toward HIV/AIDS were positively associated with having an HIV test, whereas unprotected anal intercourse in the past 6 months (P6M) was associated with less preventive services participation. The most reported barriers to HIV testing were fear of testing HIV positive (79.3%) and perceiving no risk for HIV (75.4%). Almost all participants felt that ensuring confidentiality would encourage more MSM to have an HIV test. The two main reasons for not seeking HIV test was not knowing where to go for a test (63.2%) and perceiving low risk of HIV infection (55.1%).Given a high prevalence of HIV, syphilis, and risky

  9. HIV Testing and Preventive Services Accessibility Among Men Who Have Sex With Men at High Risk of HIV Infection in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuejuan; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Heng; Xia, Dongyan; Pan, Stephen W.; Yue, Hai; Lu, Hongyan; Xing, Hui; He, Xiong; Shao, Yiming; Ruan, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The HIV epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM) has been increasing at an alarming rate in most areas of China in recent years. Many Chinese MSM still lack sufficient access to HIV prevention services, despite ongoing scale-up of comprehensive HIV testing and intervention services. The purpose of this study was to investigate utilization of HIV testing and prevention services, and related factors that influence the MSM people to access HIV test or other services to prevent HIV among MSM in Beijing, China. Three successive cross-sectional surveys of MSM were conducted in Beijing from September 2009 to January 2010, September 2010 to January 2011, and September 2011 to January 2012. Demographic and behavioral data were collected and analyzed. Blood samples were tested for HIV and syphilis. Three models were established to analyze factors associated with HIV testing and preventive services. Of the 1312 participants, prevalence of HIV and syphilis was 7.9% and 15.4%, respectively. Sixty-nine percent ever had an HIV test, 56.2%, 78.7%, and 46.1% received HIV test, free condom/lubricants, and sexually transmitted infection services in the past 12 months (P12M), respectively. MSM with larger social networks and who knew someone infected with HIV were more likely to receive HIV testing and preventive services; lower degrees of stigma and discriminatory attitudes toward HIV/AIDS were positively associated with having an HIV test, whereas unprotected anal intercourse in the past 6 months (P6M) was associated with less preventive services participation. The most reported barriers to HIV testing were fear of testing HIV positive (79.3%) and perceiving no risk for HIV (75.4%). Almost all participants felt that ensuring confidentiality would encourage more MSM to have an HIV test. The two main reasons for not seeking HIV test was not knowing where to go for a test (63.2%) and perceiving low risk of HIV infection (55.1%). Given a high prevalence of HIV, syphilis

  10. Representations of primary care professionals about the occupational risk of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marina Celly Martins Ribeiro; Freitas, Maria Imaculada de Fátima

    2010-01-01

    This was a qualitative study, based on the Social Representations Theory, with professionals that work in primary care, about the risk of HIV infection to which they are exposed in their quotidian work routine. Twelve physicians and nurses who work in two Health Centers in the city of Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil, were interviewed. The final analysis, carried out using the saturation of information criterion, was based on the method proposed by Structural Analysis of Narrative. The results show that the health professionals interviewed knew the infection risk in their work routine, representing it as very low in primary care, because they relate it to technological complexity which they consider does not exist in the level of assistance in which they work. They believed that the use of personal protection equipment may minimize the risks and that, nowadays, no primary care professional refuses to attend a patient due to fear of infection, even if not using all the recommended precautions. PMID:20922322

  11. Biomarkers and Bacterial Pneumonia Risk in Patients with Treated HIV Infection: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bjerk, Sonja M.; Baker, Jason V.; Emery, Sean; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Angus, Brian; Gordin, Fred M.; Pett, Sarah L.; Stephan, Christoph; Kunisaki, Ken M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite advances in HIV treatment, bacterial pneumonia continues to cause considerable morbidity and mortality in patients with HIV infection. Studies of biomarker associations with bacterial pneumonia risk in treated HIV-infected patients do not currently exist. Methods We performed a nested, matched, case-control study among participants randomized to continuous combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in the Strategies for Management of Antiretroviral Therapy trial. Patients who developed bacterial pneumonia (cases) and patients without bacterial pneumonia (controls) were matched 1∶1 on clinical center, smoking status, age, and baseline cART use. Baseline levels of Club Cell Secretory Protein 16 (CC16), Surfactant Protein D (SP-D), C-reactive protein (hsCRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and d-dimer were compared between cases and controls. Results Cases (n = 72) and controls (n = 72) were 25.7% female, 51.4% black, 65.3% current smokers, 9.7% diabetic, 36.1% co-infected with Hepatitis B/C, and 75.0% were on cART at baseline. Median (IQR) age was 45 (41, 51) years with CD4+ count of 553 (436, 690) cells/mm3. Baseline CC16 and SP-D were similar between cases and controls, but hsCRP was significantly higher in cases than controls (2.94 µg/mL in cases vs. 1.93 µg/mL in controls; p = 0.02). IL-6 and d-dimer levels were also higher in cases compared to controls, though differences were not statistically significant (p-value 0.06 and 0.10, respectively). Conclusions In patients with cART-treated HIV infection, higher levels of systemic inflammatory markers were associated with increased bacterial pneumonia risk, while two pulmonary-specific inflammatory biomarkers, CC16 and SP-D, were not associated with bacterial pneumonia risk. PMID:23457535

  12. Recent Hepatitis C Virus Infections in HIV-Infected Patients in Taiwan: Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Yang, Zong-Yu; Lu, Ching-Lan; Wu, Hsiu; Yeh, Chang-Ching; Liu, Wen-Chun; Hsieh, Chia-Yin; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2012-01-01

    Outbreaks of sexually transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been recently reported in HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Europe, Australia, and North America. Little is known concerning whether this also occurs in other Asia-Pacific countries. Between 1994 and 2010, a prospective observational cohort study was performed to assess the incidence of recent HCV seroconversion in 892 HIV-infected patients (731 MSM and 161 heterosexuals) who were not injecting drug users. A nested case-control study was conducted to identify associated factors with recent HCV seroconversion, and phylogenetic analysis was performed using NS5B sequences amplified from seroconverters. During a total followup duration of 4,270 person-years (PY), 30 patients (3.36%) had HCV seroconversion, with an overall incidence rate of 7.03 per 1,000 PY. The rate increased from 0 in 1994 to 2000 and 2.29 in 2001 to 2005 to 10.13 per 1,000 PY in 2006 to 2010 (P < 0.05). After adjustment for age and HIV transmission route, recent syphilis remained an independent factor associated with HCV seroconversion (odds ratio, 7.731; 95% confidence interval, 3.131 to 19.086; P < 0.01). In a nested case-control study, seroconverters had higher aminotranferase levels and were more likely to have CD4 ≥ 200 cells/μl and recent syphilis than nonseroconverters (P < 0.05). Among the 21 patients with HCV viremia, phylogenetic analysis revealed 7 HCV transmission clusters or pairs (4 within genotype 1b, 2 within genotype 2a, and 1 within genotype 3a). The incidence of HCV seroconversion that is associated with recent syphilis is increasing among HIV-infected patients in Taiwan. PMID:22189113

  13. Occupational Risk of HIV, HBV and HSV-2 Infections in Health Care Personnel Caring for AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuhls, Thomas L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Female health care workers with exposure to AIDS patients were studied. Two of the 246 workers showed evidence of opportunistic infections. This analysis confirms the low risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection when hospital infection control practices are employed around AIDS patients. (Author/VM)

  14. Factors Contributing to the Risk of HIV Infection in Rural School-Going Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Awotidebe, Adedapo; Phillips, Julie; Lens, Willy

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors that increase the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents and young adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 430 secondary school students (47.4% boys and 52.6% girls) from two rural schools in South Africa. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire on demographic information, sources of HIV/AIDS information, HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, communication and negotiation skills, self-efficacy to refuse sex, peer influence and time perspective. Out of 113 (27.2%) participants who reported being sexually active, about 48% reported having had sex before the age of 15 and 42.2% reported penetrative sex with more than one partner in their lifetime. Only 44.8% of them reported consistent and regular use of condoms for every sexual encounter. Peer influence (OR = 3.01 (95% CI = 1.97–4.60)), gender difference (OR = 6.60 (95% CI = 1.62–26.84)) and lack of HIV information (OR = 1.22 (95% CI = 1.03–1.44)) influenced the sexual risk behaviors of the adolescents. Greater numbers of school-going adolescents in rural areas are sexually active. Peer influence, especially in boys, is a factor that increases the preponderance of risky sexual behaviors in adolescents. Positively, adolescents with high knowledge of HIV infection are more likely to use condoms for every sexual encounter. There is a need to strengthen comprehensive sexual health education and youth-friendly HIV prevention strategies to promote abstinence and safe sexual behaviors, especially among boys. PMID:25405598

  15. CHARACTERISTICS OF MULTIPLE AND CONCURRENT PARTNERSHIPS AMONG WOMEN AT HIGH RISK FOR HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Hughes, James P.; Wang, Jing; Haley, Danielle F.; Golin, Carol E.; Magnus, Manya; Rompalo, Anne; Justman, Jessica; del Rio, Carlos; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Mannheimer, Sharon; Soto-Torres, Lydia; Hodder, Sally L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined parameters of sexual partnerships, including respondents’ participation in concurrency, belief that their partner had concurrent partnerships (partners’ concurrency), and partnership intervals, among the 2,099 women in HIV Prevention Trials Network 064, a study of women at high risk for HIV infection, in ten US communities. Methods We analyzed baseline survey responses about partnership dates to determine prevalence of participants’ and partners’ concurrency, intervals between partnerships, knowledge of whether recent partner(s) had undergone HIV testing, and intercourse frequency during the preceding 6 months. Results Prevalence of participants’ and partners’ concurrency was 40% and 36% respectively; 24% of respondents had both concurrent partnerships and non-monogamous partners. Among women with >1 partner and no concurrent partnerships themselves, the median gap between partners was one month. Multiple episodes of unprotected vaginal intercourse with >2 of their most recent partners was reported by 60% of women who had both concurrent partnerships and non-monogamous partners, 50% with only concurrent partners and no partners’ concurrency, and 33% with only partners’ concurrency versus 14% of women with neither type of concurrency (p<.0001). Women who had any involvement with concurrency were also more likely than women with no concurrency involvement to report lack of awareness of whether recent partners had undergone HIV testing (participants’ concurrency 41%, partners’ concurrency 40%, both participants’ and partners’ concurrency 48%, neither 17%; p<.0001). Conclusions These network patterns and short gaps between partnerships may create substantial opportunities for HIV transmission in this sample of women at high risk for HIV infection. PMID:24056163

  16. Factors contributing to the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents.

    PubMed

    Awotidebe, Adedapo; Phillips, Julie; Lens, Willy

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the factors that increase the risk of HIV infection in rural school-going adolescents and young adults. This was a cross-sectional study of 430 secondary school students (47.4% boys and 52.6% girls) from two rural schools in South Africa. Data were collected with a self-administered questionnaire on demographic information, sources of HIV/AIDS information, HIV knowledge, sexual behaviors, communication and negotiation skills, self-efficacy to refuse sex, peer influence and time perspective. Out of 113 (27.2%) participants who reported being sexually active, about 48% reported having had sex before the age of 15 and 42.2% reported penetrative sex with more than one partner in their lifetime. Only 44.8% of them reported consistent and regular use of condoms for every sexual encounter. Peer influence (OR = 3.01 (95% CI = 1.97-4.60)), gender difference (OR = 6.60 (95% CI = 1.62-26.84)) and lack of HIV information (OR = 1.22 (95% CI = 1.03-1.44)) influenced the sexual risk behaviors of the adolescents. Greater numbers of school-going adolescents in rural areas are sexually active. Peer influence, especially in boys, is a factor that increases the preponderance of risky sexual behaviors in adolescents. Positively, adolescents with high knowledge of HIV infection are more likely to use condoms for every sexual encounter. There is a need to strengthen comprehensive sexual health education and youth-friendly HIV prevention strategies to promote abstinence and safe sexual behaviors, especially among boys. PMID:25405598

  17. Hormonal Contraception and Risk of Psychiatric and Other Noncommunicable Diseases in HIV-Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Cathy A.; Shepherd, Bryan E.; Bebawy, Sally S.; Turner, Megan; Sterling, Timothy R.; Melekhin, Vlada V.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Hormonal contraception use is common among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women. Risk of psychiatric and other noninfectious complications of hormonal contraception use has not been described in this population. Methods: We performed a retrospective cohort study of HIV-infected women receiving care in Tennessee from 1998 to 2008 to examine the risks of incident psychiatric and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs), including cardiovascular, hepatic, renal, and malignant diseases, and hormonal contraception use, including depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and combined estrogen- and progestin-containing hormonal contraceptives. We used marginal structural models with inverse probability weights to account for time-varying confounders associated with hormonal contraception use. Results: Of the 392 women included, 94 (24%) used hormonal contraception during the study period. Baseline psychiatric disease was similar between women who received and did not receive hormonal contraception. There were 69 incident psychiatric diagnoses and 72 NCDs. Only time-varying DMPA use was associated with increased risk of psychiatric disease (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 3.70; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.32–10.4) and mood disorders, specifically (aOR 4.70 [1.87–11.8]). Time-varying and cumulative combined hormonal contraception use were not statistically associated with other NCDs (aOR 1.64, 95% CI 0.64–4.12 and aOR 1.16, 95% CI 0.86–1.56, respectively). However, risk of incident NCDs was increased with cumulative DMPA exposure (per year exposure aOR 1.45, 95% CI 1.01–2.08). Conclusions: Among HIV-infected women, DMPA was associated with risk of incident psychiatric diseases, particularly mood disorders, during periods of use. Cumulative DMPA exposure was also associated with risk of other NCDs. However, combined estrogen and progestin-containing hormonal contraception use was not statistically associated with risk of any NCDs

  18. Assessing Maladaptive Responses to the Stress of Being At-Risk of HIV Infection among HIV-Negative Gay Men in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Huso; Shidlo, Ariel; Sandfort, Theo

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the psychometric properties and preliminary validity of a newly developed 16-item measure to assess maladaptive responses to the stress of being at risk for HIV infection among HIV-negative gay men. The measure consisted of three factors: (1) fatalistic beliefs about maintaining an HIV-negative serostatus; (2) reduced perceived severity of HIV infection due to advances in medical treatment of HIV/AIDS; and (3) negative affective states associated with the risk of HIV infection. A total of 285 HIV-negative gay men at a counseling program in New York City participated in the study. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the three-factor model as an acceptable model fit: NNFI = .91, CFI = .92, GFI = .90, RMSEA = .07. The measure and its subscales obtained in this sample achieved adequate internal consistency coefficients. Construct validity was supported by significant positive associations with internalized homophobia, depression, self-justifications for the last unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), and actual UAI with casual sex partners. Understanding the dynamics of maladaptive responses to the epidemic and intense anxieties elicited by HIV risk among HIV-negative gay men living in a place of high seroprevalence provides useful information to guide psychosocial interventions in the population. PMID:20043254

  19. International travel and HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C. F.; Mann, J. M.; Chin, J.

    1990-01-01

    Although human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is a worldwide problem, its prevalence and pattern vary from country to country. Accordingly, the risk to international travellers of acquiring HIV infection also varies widely in different parts of the world, and depends principally on their behaviour. The risk of sexual acquisition of HIV infection can be virtually eliminated by avoiding penetrative sexual intercourse with intravenous drug users and persons who have had multiple sexual partners (such as prostitutes) or reduced by the use of condoms. The risk of parenteral exposure to HIV can be reduced by avoiding parenteral drug use and behaviour that is likely to lead to injury (with its attendant risk of requiring blood transfusion) and by seeking medical facilities with adequate capabilities to screen blood donors for HIV and to sterilize instruments. HIV screening of international travellers is an ineffective, costly, and impractical public health strategy for limiting the worldwide spread of HIV infection. Travellers infected with HIV require specialized advice regarding health precautions, prophylactic medications, and immunization. PMID:2194689

  20. Analysis of cognitive variables and sexual risk behaviors among infected and HIV-uninfected people from Spain.

    PubMed

    Bermúdez, María de la Paz; Araújo, Ludgleydson Fernandes de; Reyes, Antonio Ortega; Hernández-Quero, José; Teva, Inmaculada

    2016-07-01

    The wider availability of anti-retroviral treatment has brought about an improvement in the immunological situation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals, which in turn has led to significant reductions in AIDS-related morbidity and mortality and better quality of life for patients. However, the rate of diagnosis of new cases of HIV among the adult population is on the increase due to high-risk sexual behavior practices, particularly not using condoms, sexual relations with a large number of partners and starting sexual relations at a younger age, with unplanned pregnancies and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV. For this reason, public health managers have invested considerable effort in recent years in creating STI and HIV prevention programs. Yet, in spite of the implementation of measures for reducing the rates of infection, few studies have been published in Spain comparing individuals living with HIV with the general population about cognitive variables and the link between these variables and high-risk sexual behavior. The objective was to compare a group of individuals living with HIV with another group from the general population in terms of cognitive variables (knowledge about STIs and HIV, concern about STI/HIV and pregnancy, self-efficacy to refuse sexual relations and resilience) and sexual behavior. The sample consisted of 318 adults, 159 were from the general population and 159 were individuals living with HIV. Individuals living with HIV had higher scores for concern about HIV/AIDS, STIs, pregnancy and knowledge of STI/HIV compared with the general population. We concluded that uninfected people who had low and high level of concern about HIV/AIDS began having anal sex at a younger age than those with a medium level of concern. Overall, results indicate that the concern about HIV/AIDS should be addressed in preventive health interventions to minimize the risks of sexual behavior. PMID:26981840

  1. Herpes simplex virus type 2 and other genital ulcerative infections as a risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition.

    PubMed Central

    Keet, I P; Lee, F K; van Griensven, G J; Lange, J M; Nahmias, A; Coutinho, R A

    1990-01-01

    We studied the role of genital ulcerative infections for acquisition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in a cohort of 989 homosexual men in Amsterdam between October 1984 and December 1988. Among 53 HIV-1 seroconverters serological and anamnestic data were gathered regarding herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) and syphilis in the 6 months before seroconversion. For statistical analysis a control who remained seronegative during the same interval was selected at random for each HIV-1 seroconverter. A significant difference between the prevalence of HSV-2 antibodies among HIV-1 seroconverters and controls was found (72% vs 38%). HSV-2 seroconversions among men initially seronegative for HSV-2 were found among three of 18 HIV-1 seroconverters and among three of 36 controls. (O.R. = 2.2, 95% C.I. 0.4-12.1). Self-reported cases of anogenital herpes were found more frequently among HIV-1 seroconverters (8) than among controls (4). One case of syphilis was diagnosed among HIV-1 seroconverters, and one among controls. Summing up these cases we assessed the total number of genital ulcerative infections: 12 among HIV-1 seroconverters and eight among controls (23 vs 15%, O.R. 1.7, C.I. 0.6-4.62). These data suggest little evidence for genital ulcerative infections being an important independent risk factor for HIV-1 acquisition among homosexual men in Amsterdam during the time period studied. PMID:2245979

  2. Sexual Risk Factors for HIV Infection in Early and Advanced HIV Epidemics in Sub-Saharan Africa: Systematic Overview of 68 Epidemiological Studies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Jha, Prabhat; Stirling, Bridget; Sgaier, Sema K.; Daid, Tina; Kaul, Rupert; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2007-01-01

    Background It is commonly assumed that sexual risk factors for heterosexual HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, such as multi-partner sex, paid sex and co-infections, become less important as HIV epidemics mature and prevalence increases. Methods and Findings We conducted a systematic review of 68 African epidemiological studies from 1986 to 2006 involving 17,000 HIV positive adults and 73,000 controls. We used random-effects methods and stratified results by gender, time, background HIV prevalence rates and other variables. The number of sex partners, history of paid sex, and infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-2) or other sexually-transmitted infections (STIs) each showed significant associations with HIV infection. Among the general population, the odds ratio (OR) of HIV infection for women reporting 3+ sex partners versus 0–2 was 3.64 (95%CI [2.87–4.62]), with similar risks for men. About 9% of infected women reported ever having been paid for sex, versus 4% of control women (OR = 2.29, [1.45–3.62]). About 31% of infected men reported ever paying for sex versus 18% of uninfected men (OR = 1.75, [1.30–2.36]). HSV-2 infection carried the largest risk of HIV infection: OR = 4.62, [2.85–7.47] in women, and OR = 6.97, [4.68–10.38] in men. These risks changed little over time and stratification by lower and higher HIV background prevalence showed that risk ratios for most variables were larger in high prevalence settings. Among uninfected controls, the male-female differences in the number of sex partners and in paid sex were more extreme in the higher HIV prevalence settings than in the lower prevalence settings. Significance Multi-partner sex, paid sex, STIs and HSV-2 infection are as important to HIV transmission in advanced as in early HIV epidemics. Even in high prevalence settings, prevention among people with high rates of partner change, such as female sex workers and their male clients, is likely to reduce transmission

  3. Incidence and risk factors of hepatitis C virus infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients in a large HIV clinic in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Shinwon; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Su Jin; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jeong Eun; Cho, Heerim; Lee, Seung Geun; Chung, Joo Seop; Kwak, Ihm Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Increasing incidences of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected men who have sex were reported in the United States and Europe. However, few studies regarding the epidemiology of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients in Asian countries have been reported. Methods: To determine the prevalence and incidence of HCV infection in HIV-infected patients, a retrospective cohort study was conducted. All HIV-infected patients who visited a tertiary care hospital in Korea from 2000 to 2013 were identified. Patients with ≥ 1 HCV antibody (Ab) test were included and observed until December 2014. Results: Among 996 HIV-infected patients, 790 patients (79%) had baseline HCV Ab tests and 41 (5.2%) were positive at baseline and four at follow-up. Experience of injecting drug use (IDU; adjusted odds ratio, 16.20; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.56 to 167.89; p < 0.01) was significantly associated with prevalent HCV infection. Conversion to HCV Ab positivity was observed in four of 384 included patients, with an incidence rate of 2.22 (95% CI, 0.60 to 5.80)/1,000 person-years (PYs); 164.89 (95% CI, 34.00 to 481.88)/1,000 PYs in patients with IDU, and 1.40 (95% CI, 0.35 to 7.79)/1,000 PYs in men who have sex with men who denied IDU. There was no significant increase in incidence rate of HCV in HIV-infected patients from 2009 to 2014 (p = 0.119). Among 19 patients who were positive for HCV RNA, genotype 1b (73%) was the most common following 2a/2c (20%). Conclusions: IDU was an independent risk factor for prevalent HCV infection. Prevalence of HCV infection was low and incidence of HCV infection was not significantly increased in HIV-infected patients in South Korea. PMID:27117318

  4. Risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection among blood donors in an HIV-epidemic area in Thailand.

    PubMed Central

    Sawanpanyalert, P; Boonmar, S; Maeda, T; Matsuura, Y; Miyamura, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The role of sexual transmission in hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has not yet been completely elucidated. This study aimed to compare the risk factors for HCV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in an HIV epidemic area of Thailand where HIV is mainly transmitted heterosexually. DESIGN AND SUBJECTS: Sera from 3053 blood donors were collected and tested for HCV and HIV between January and March 1994. Altogether 1756 (57.5%) of the donors were interviewed about demographics and several risk factors. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of HIV and HCV infections determined by antibody assays were 2.3% and 2.2%, respectively. Sexual risk factors were clearly shown among anti-HIV positive donors. These clear associations were not found, however, among anti-HCV positive donors. In contrast, previous histories of injecting drug use and being tattooed were found in some anti-HCV positive donors but less frequently in anti-HIV positive donors. CONCLUSIONS: Sexual transmission may play a relatively minor role in HCV transmission compared with HIV, in this area. PMID:8762384

  5. The shifting locus of risk-reduction: the critical role of HIV infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Indyk, Debbie; Golub, Sarit A

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses the shifting locus of control over risk-reduction and examines its implications for the care and support of HIV-positive individuals. We begin by presenting a brief history of the continuum of HIV related risk, illustrating the ways in which advances in risk-assessment and intervention have led to this important shift. Second, we discuss the current state of risk assessment and intervention as it relates to three factors: (a) the point along the continuum of risk at which risk assessment and intervention occurs; (b) the locus of control over risk reduction; and (c) the distinction between primary and secondary risk reduction efforts. Finally, we discuss the meaning of HIV risk and the role of HIV-positive individuals in the new geometry of care that integrates treatment and prevention. How is HIV-risk defined and understood? Who is of risk to whom? Who is responsible for reducing risk?. PMID:16687378

  6. Provider Compliance With Guidelines for Management of Cardiovascular Risk in HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenstein, Kenneth A.; Buchacz, Kate; Chmiel, Joan S.; Buckner, Kern; Tedaldi, Ellen; Wood, Kathleen; Holmberg, Scott D.; Brooks, John T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Compliance with National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP) guidelines has been shown to significantly reduce incident cardiovascular events. We investigated physicians’ compliance with NCEP guidelines to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in a population infected with HIV. Methods We analyzed HIV Outpatient Study (HOPS) data, following eligible patients from January 1, 2002, or first HOPS visit thereafter to calculate 10-year cardiovascular risk (10yCVR), until September 30, 2009, death, or last office visit. We categorized participants into four 10yCVR strata, according to guidelines determined by NCEP, the Infectious Disease Society of America, and the Adult AIDS Clinical Trials Group. We calculated percentages of patients treated for dyslipidemia and hypertension, calculated percentages of patients who achieved recommended goals, and categorized them by 10yCVR stratum. Results Of 2,005 patients analyzed, 33.7% had fewer than 2 CVD risk factors. For patients who had 2 or more risk factors, 10yCVR was less than 10% for 28.2%, 10% to 20% for 18.2%, and higher than 20% for 20.0% of patients. Of patients eligible for treatment, 81% to 87% were treated for elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol/non–high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C/non–HDL-C), 2% to 11% were treated for low HDL-C, 56% to 91% were treated for high triglycerides, and 46% to 69% were treated for hypertension. Patients in higher 10yCVR categories were less likely to meet treatment goals than patients in lower 10yCVR categories. Conclusion At least one-fifth of contemporary HOPS patients have a 10yCVR higher than 20%, yet a large percentage of at-risk patients who were eligible for pharmacologic treatment did not receive recommended interventions and did not reach recommended treatment goals. Opportunities exist for CVD prevention in the HIV-infected population. PMID:23347705

  7. Incident Major Depressive Episodes increase the severity and risk of apathy in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Kamat, Rujvi; Cattie, Jordan E.; Marcotte, Thomas D.; Woods, Steven Paul; Franklin, Donald R.; Corkran, Stephanie H.; Ellis, Ronald J.; Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    2015-01-01

    Apathy and depression are inter-related yet separable and prevalent neuropsychiatric disturbances in persons infected with HIV. In the present study of 225 HIV+ persons, we investigated the role of an incident depressive episode in changes in apathy. Participants completed the apathy subscale of the Frontal Systems Behavior Scale during a detailed neuropsychiatric and neuromedical evaluation at visit 1 and again at approximately a 14 month follow-up. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview was used to obtain diagnoses of a new major depressive disorder. At their follow-up visit, participants were classified into four groups depending on their visit 1 elevation in apathy and new major depressive episode (MDE) status. Apathetic participants at baseline with a new MDE (n=23) were at risk for continued, clinically elevated apathy at follow-up, although severity of symptoms did not increase. Of the 144 participants without clinically elevated apathy at visit 1, those who developed a new MDE (n=16) had greater apathy symptomatology at follow-up than those without MDE. These findings suggest that HIV+ individuals, who do not as yet present with elevated apathy, may be at greater risk of elevated psychiatric distress should they experience a new/recurrent depressive episode. Thus, in the context of previous findings, it appears that although apathy and depression are separable constructs, they interact such that a new depressive episode is a risk factor for incident apathy. PMID:25679203

  8. Marriage, intimacy and risk of HIV infection in south west Uganda.

    PubMed

    Agol, Dorice; Bukenya, Dominic; Seeley, Janet; Kabunga, Elazabeth; Katahoire, Anne

    2014-12-01

    Long-term, monogamous, relationships are often portrayed as protective in HIV prevention campaigns. Focusing on marriage in a community in south west Uganda, we examine why and how people enter long term relationships, what their expectations are and what factors sustain those relationships. Qualitative data were collected using in-depth interviews with 50 men and women randomly selected from a General Population Cohort. The results showed that managing expectations to sustain marriage is challenging; however the socio-economic and cultural benefits of marriage: having children, property acquisition as well as securing societal status tend to overshadow the costs associated with risks from infidelity such as sexually transmitted infections (including HIV). Recognising the compromises that couples may make to sustain their marriage is an important step towards acknowledging that 'being faithful' may be about staying together and showing commitment, not sexual exclusivity. PMID:25993749

  9. Sexual risk of HIV infection among expatriates posted in AIDS endemic areas.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, R; van Zessen, G; Houweling, H; Ligthelm, R J; van den Akker, R

    1997-07-15

    A survey conducted among 864 Dutch expatriates returning home from assignment in AIDS-endemic areas in sub-Saharan Africa, Latin America, and South and South East Asia revealed a low rate of HIV infection, despite widespread high-risk sexual practices. During an average stay out of the country of 26 months in 1991-96, 41% of the 634 male respondents reported sex with casual or steady local partners and 11% with casual or steady expatriate partners. Among the 230 female expatriates, these rates were 31% and 24%, respectively. 58% of men with casual local partners paid for sex at least once. Among men, consistent condom use was practiced in 69% of encounters with casual local partners and 63% of the time with casual expatriate partners. Among women, these rates were 64% and 48%, respectively. The prevalence of consistent condom use with casual local partners in this study was three times greater than that identified in a study conducted among Dutch expatriates in 1987-89. Condom use with regular local or expatriate partners was substantially lower (16.1-27.8%), however. Inconsistent condom use with casual partners was significantly associated, among men, with being abroad for a longer period of time, failure to bring condoms with them from the Netherlands, posting in an Asian country, and a relatively low estimated HIV prevalence in the local population. Among women, these risk factors were failure to take condoms to their destination and lack of intention at departure to have sex abroad. Only one case of HIV infection was detected in the 847 respondents who underwent serologic testing. Since expatriates function as a bridge between areas with high and low HIV prevalence, educational campaigns that prepare departing workers for differences between the sexual culture at home and abroad and encourage them to take a supply of condoms are recommended. PMID:9233466

  10. [Risk factors for infection among the patrons of an HIV Control Program, Antioquia, Colombia].

    PubMed

    Gómez, R D; Arango, M V; Velázquez, G; Orozco, B

    1990-03-01

    A review is presented of the characteristics of 432 users of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Control Program sponsored by the Public Health Departmental Laboratory of Antioquia, Colombia, who were seen between July 1988 and June 1989. The prevalence of seropositivity to HIV was 29.4%, while that of AIDS was 6.7%. Eight of the seropositive subjects were women. The average age on entrance into the Program was 28.7 +/- 7.9, and it was significantly higher among the seropositive subjects. The study sample was divided into four subgroups: women, bisexual men, homosexual men, and heterosexual men. In all the subgroups the prevalence of high-risk sexual practices was high and the percentage of condom utilization was low. Frequency of exposure to different risk factors, such as injections, transfusions of blood or other fluids, surgical interventions, tattoos, consumption of alcohol and other psychoactive substances, acupuncture, and sexual preference and practices, was determined. HIV seropositivity for the group as a whole was associated with sexual relations with infected persons (OR = 3.96), active anal coitus (OR = 3.81), sexual relations with men (OR = 3.69), passive anal coitus (OR = 3.35), and sexual relations abroad (OR = 2.24). In men, HIV seropositivity was associated with anal coitus (OR = 4.0), homosexual relations (OR = 3.96), sexual relations with infected persons (OR = 3.75), and sexual relations abroad (OR = 1.88); in women there was an association with intravenous drug use (chi 2 = 10.72) and with sexual relations abroad (OR = 12.67). PMID:2143070

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand. PMID:25506754

  12. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding antiretroviral management, reproductive health, sexually transmitted infections, and sexual risk behavior among perinatally HIV-infected youth in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Lolekha, Rangsima; Boon-Yasidhi, Vitharon; Leowsrisook, Pimsiri; Naiwatanakul, Thananda; Durier, Yuitiang; Nuchanard, Wipada; Tarugsa, Jariya; Punpanich, Warunee; Pattanasin, Sarika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2015-01-01

    More than 30% of perinatally HIV-infected children in Thailand are 12 years and older. As these youth become sexually active, there is a risk that they will transmit HIV to their partners. Data on the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of HIV-infected youth in Thailand are limited. Therefore, we assessed the KAP of perinatally HIV-infected youth and youth reporting sexual risk behaviors receiving care at two tertiary care hospitals in Bangkok, Thailand and living in an orphanage in Lopburi, Thailand. From October 2010 to July 2011, 197 HIV-infected youth completed an audio computer-assisted self-interview to assess their KAP regarding antiretroviral (ARV) management, reproductive health, sexual risk behaviors, and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). A majority of youth in this study correctly answered questions about HIV transmission and prevention and the importance of taking ARVs regularly. More than half of the youth in this study demonstrated a lack of family planning, reproductive health, and STI knowledge. Girls had more appropriate attitudes toward safe sex and risk behaviors than boys. Although only 5% of the youth reported that they had engaged in sexual intercourse, about a third reported sexual risk behaviors (e.g., having or kissing boy/girlfriend or consuming an alcoholic beverage). We found low condom use and other family planning practices, increasing the risk of HIV and/or STI transmission to sexual partners. Additional resources are needed to improve reproductive health knowledge and reduce risk behavior among HIV-infected youth in Thailand. PMID:25506754

  13. Factors Affecting Glomerular Filtration Rate, as Measured by Iohexol Disappearance, in Men with or at Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Margolick, Joseph B.; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Schwartz, George J.; Abraham, Alison G.; Darilay, Annie T.; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Witt, Mallory D.; Palella, Frank J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Formulae used to estimate glomerular filtration rate (GFR) underestimate higher GFRs and have not been well-studied in HIV-infected (HIV(+)) people; we evaluated the relationships of HIV infection and known or potential risk factors for kidney disease with directly measured GFR and the presence of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Design Cross-sectional measurement of iohexol-based GFR (iGFR) in HIV(+) men (n = 455) receiving antiretroviral therapy, and HIV-uninfected (HIV(−)) men (n = 258) in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Methods iGFR was calculated from disappearance of infused iohexol from plasma. Determinants of GFR and the presence of CKD were compared using iGFR and GFR estimated by the CKD-Epi equation (eGFR). Results Median iGFR was higher among HIV(+) than HIV(−) men (109 vs. 106 ml/min/1.73 m2, respectively, p = .046), and was 7 ml/min higher than median eGFR. Mean iGFR was lower in men who were older, had chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, or had a history of AIDS. Low iGFR (≤90 ml/min/1.73 m2) was associated with these factors and with black race. Other than age, factors associated with low iGFR were not observed with low eGFR. CKD was more common in HIV(+) than HIV(−) men; predictors of CKD were similar using iGFR and eGFR. Conclusions iGFR was higher than eGFR in this population of HIV-infected and -uninfected men who have sex with men. Presence of CKD was predicted equally well by iGFR and eGFR, but associations of chronic HCV infection and history of clinically-defined AIDS with mildly decreased GFR were seen only with iGFR. PMID:24516530

  14. Substance use is a risk factor for neurocognitive deficits and neuropsychiatric distress in acute and early HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Weber, Erica; Morgan, Erin E; Iudicello, Jennifer E; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Little, Susan; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M; Moore, David J; Woods, Steven Paul

    2013-02-01

    The acute and early stages of HIV infection (AEH) are characterized by substantial viral replication, immune activation, and alterations in brain metabolism. However, little is known about the prevalence and predictors of neurocognitive deficits and neuropsychiatric disturbances during this period. The present study examined the impact of demographic, HIV disease, and substance use factors on HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and self-reported neuropsychiatric distress among 46 antiretroviral-naive adults with median duration of infection of 75 days relative to a sample of 21 HIV seronegative (HIV-) adults with comparable demographics and risk factors. Participants were administered a brief neurocognitive battery that was adjusted for demographics and assessed executive functions, memory, psychomotor speed, and verbal fluency, as well as the Profile of Mood States, a self-report measure of neuropsychiatric distress. Odds ratios revealed that AEH participants were nearly four times more likely than their seronegative counterparts to experience neurocognitive impairment, particularly in the areas of learning and information processing speed. Similarly, AEH was associated with a nearly fivefold increase in the odds of neuropsychiatric distress, most notably in anxiety and depression. Within the AEH sample, HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment was associated with problematic methamphetamine use and higher plasma HIV RNA levels, whereas neuropsychiatric distress was solely associated with high-risk alcohol use. Extending prior neuroimaging findings, the results from this study indicate that HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric distress are highly prevalent during AEH and are associated with high-risk substance use. PMID:23250704

  15. Risk Behavior and Sexually Transmitted Infections Among Transgender Women and Men Undergoing Community-Based Screening for Acute and Early HIV Infection in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Green, Nella; Hoenigl, Martin; Morris, Sheldon; Little, Susan J

    2015-10-01

    The transgender community represents an understudied population in the literature. The objective of this study was to compare risk behavior, and HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) rates between transgender women and transgender men undergoing community-based HIV testing.With this retrospective analysis of a cohort study, we characterize HIV infection rates as well as reported risk behaviors and reported STI in 151 individual transgender women and 30 individual transgender men undergoing community based, voluntary screening for acute and early HIV infection (AEH) in San Diego, California between April 2008 and July 2014.HIV positivity rate was low for both, transgender women and transgender men undergoing AEH screening (2% and 3%, respectively), and the self-reported STI rate for the prior 12 months was 13% for both. Although transgender women appeared to engage in higher rates of risk behavior overall, with 69% engaged in condomless receptive anal intercourse (CRAI) and 11% engaged in sex work, it is important to note that 91% of transgender women reported recent sexual intercourse, 73% had more than 1 sexual partner, 63% reported intercourse with males, 37% intercourse with males and females, and 30% had CRAI.Our results indicate that in some settings rates of HIV infection, as well as rates of reported STIs and sexual risk behavior in transgender men may resemble those found in transgender women. Our findings support the need for comprehensive HIV prevention in both, transgender women and men. PMID:26469928

  16. Adolescent Inpatient Behavioral Health Clients: Risk Factors and Methods of Preventing an Increase in HIV Infection among Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hackerman, Ann E.

    2002-01-01

    There has been a surge in the rates of adolescents who are becoming infected with HIV. This study of 214 at risk clients being treated on an inpatient psychiatric hospitalization basis examines why such clients continue to engage in high-risk behaviors. Results and suggestions for a psychoeducational curriculum for professionals are included.…

  17. HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Behaviors in Delinquent Youth With Psychiatric Disorders: A Longitudinal Study

    PubMed Central

    Elkington, Katherine S.; Teplin, Linda A.; Mericle, Amy A.; Welty, Leah J.; Romero, Erin G.; Abram, Karen M.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To examine the prevalence and persistence of 20 HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) sexual and drug use risk behaviors and to predict their occurrence in 4 mutually exclusive diagnostic groups of delinquent youth: (1) major mental disorders (MMD); (2) substance use disorders (SUD); (3) comorbid MMD and SUD (MMD+SUD); and (4) neither disorder. Methods At the baseline interview, HIV/STI risk behaviors were assessed in 800 juvenile detainees, aged 10 to 18 years; youth were reinterviewed approximately 3 years later. The final sample (n = 689) includes 298 females and 391 males. Results The prevalence and persistence of HIV/STI risk behaviors was high in all diagnostic groups. Youth with SUD at baseline were over 10 times more likely to be sexually active and to have vaginal sex at follow-up than youth with MMD+SUD (AOR=10.86, 95% CI=1.43–82.32; AOR=11.63, 95% CI=1.49–90.89, respectively) and four times more likely to be sexually active and to have vaginal sex than youth with neither disorder (AOR=4.20, 95% CI=1.06–16.62; AOR=4.73, 95% CI=1.21–18.50, respectively). Youth with MMD at baseline were less likely to have engaged in unprotected vaginal and oral sex at follow-up compared with youth with neither disorder (AOR=0.11, 95% CI=0.02–0.50; AOR=0.07, 95% CI=0.01–0.34, respectively), and with youth with SUD (AOR=0.10, 95% CI=0.02–0.50; OR=0.10, 95% CI=0.02–0.47, respectively). Youth with MMD+SUD were less likely (AOR=0.28, 95% CI=0.09–0.92) to engage in unprotected oral sex compared with those with neither disorder. Conclusions Irrespective of diagnostic group, delinquent youth are at great risk for HIV/STIs as they age into adulthood. SUD increases risk. Because detained youth are released after approximately 2 weeks, their risk behaviors become a community health problem. Pediatricians and child psychiatrists must collaborate with corrections professionals to develop HIV/STI interventions and ensure that programs started in detention

  18. Prevalence and mitigation strategies of HIV/AIDS infection risks in Namibian tertiary education institutional hostels

    PubMed Central

    Zimba, Roderick F.; Likando, Gilbert N.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors that could promote HIV infection amongst adolescents and young adults living in tertiary educational institutional hostels in Namibia. Employing structured questionnaires and focus group discussions, we sought to answer questions pertaining to factors, beliefs systems, values, traditions and sexual relations that could promote HIV infection in the student hostels. The data on these issues were gathered from 306 male and 314 female students aged 18–35 years living in eight hostels. Amongst other results, the data revealed that sexual promiscuity in the hostels was treated as the norm in the majority of cases, unauthorized access to hostel rooms by non-hostel dwellers was rampant, sexual harassment of female students by men who were under the influence of alcohol was reported to be common and there was general lack of support for victims of sexual abuse in the hostels. In addition, there was a general sense of insecurity in the hostels where more than 50% of the participants were afraid of being sexually attacked, some female hostel residents engaged in sexual activities for monetary and material gain and there was a general practice of older men from the community having sexual relations with young female hostel dwellers. To mitigate these and other risks it is recommended that there be provision of more HIV/AIDS prevention services, enhanced security, non-toxic entertainment (e.g. participation in sport and social clubs) and the banning of the sale of alcohol in student residences and on tertiary institution campuses. These and other results are discussed in the article and ways of mitigating the risks are proposed. PMID:24814659

  19. Prevalence and mitigation strategies of HIV/AIDS infection risks in Namibian tertiary education institutional hostels.

    PubMed

    Zimba, Roderick F; Likando, Gilbert N

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate risk factors that could promote HIV infection amongst adolescents and young adults living in tertiary educational institutional hostels in Namibia. Employing structured questionnaires and focus group discussions, we sought to answer questions pertaining to factors, beliefs systems, values, traditions and sexual relations that could promote HIV infection in the student hostels. The data on these issues were gathered from 306 male and 314 female students aged 18-35 years living in eight hostels. Amongst other results, the data revealed that sexual promiscuity in the hostels was treated as the norm in the majority of cases, unauthorized access to hostel rooms by non-hostel dwellers was rampant, sexual harassment of female students by men who were under the influence of alcohol was reported to be common and there was general lack of support for victims of sexual abuse in the hostels. In addition, there was a general sense of insecurity in the hostels where more than 50% of the participants were afraid of being sexually attacked, some female hostel residents engaged in sexual activities for monetary and material gain and there was a general practice of older men from the community having sexual relations with young female hostel dwellers. To mitigate these and other risks it is recommended that there be provision of more HIV/AIDS prevention services, enhanced security, non-toxic entertainment (e.g. participation in sport and social clubs) and the banning of the sale of alcohol in student residences and on tertiary institution campuses. These and other results are discussed in the article and ways of mitigating the risks are proposed. PMID:24814659

  20. Genital Tract HIV RNA Levels and Their Associations with Human Papillomavirus Infection and Risk of Cervical Pre-Cancer

    PubMed Central

    GHARTEY, Jeny; KOVACS, Andrea; BURK, Robert D.; MASSAD, L. Stewart; MINKOFF, Howard; XIE, Xianhong; D’SOUZA, Gypsyamber; XUE, Xiaonan; WATTS, D. Heather; LEVINE, Alexandra M.; EINSTEIN, Mark H.; COLIE, Christine; ANASTOS, Kathryn; ELTOUM, Isam-Eldin; HEROLD, Betsy C.; PALEFSKY, Joel M.; STRICKLER, Howard D.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Plasma HIV RNA levels have been associated with risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia in HIV-seropositive women. However, little is known regarding local genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with cervical HPV and neoplasia. Design/Methods In an HIV-seropositive women’s cohort with semi-annual follow-up, we conducted a nested case-control study of genital tract HIV RNA levels and their relation with incident high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions sub-classified as severe (severe HSIL), as provided for under the Bethesda 2001 classification system. Specifically, 66 incident severe HSIL were matched to 130 controls by age, CD4+ count, HAART use, and other factors. We also studied HPV prevalence, incident detection, and persistence in a random sample of 250 subjects. Results Risk of severe HSIL was associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels (odds ratio comparing HIV RNA ≥ the median among women with detectable levels versus undetectable [ORVL] 2.96; 95% CI: 0.99–8.84; Ptrend=0.03). However, this association became non-significant (Ptrend=0.51) following adjustment for plasma HIV RNA levels. There was also no association between genital tract HIV RNA levels and the prevalence of any HPV or oncogenic HPV. However, the incident detection of any HPV (Ptrend=0.02) and persistence of oncogenic HPV (Ptrend=0.04) were associated with genital tract HIV RNA levels, after controlling plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusion These prospective data suggest that genital tract HIV RNA levels are not a significant independent risk factor for cervical pre-cancer in HIV-seropositive women, but leave open the possibility that they may modestly influence HPV infection, an early stage of cervical tumoriogenesis. PMID:24694931

  1. Context of risk for HIV and sexually transmitted infections among incarcerated women in the south: individual, interpersonal, and societal factors.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Catherine I; Gelaude, Deborah J; Carry, Monique; Herbst, Jeffrey H; Parker, Sharon; Scheyette, Anna; Neevel, A

    2014-01-01

    Incarcerated women are disproportionately affected by HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) due to risk factors before, during, and after imprisonment. This study assessed the behavioral, social, and contextual conditions that contribute to continuing sexual risk behaviors among incarcerated women to inform the adaptation of an evidenced-based behavioral intervention for this population. Individual, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 current and 28 former women prisoners to assess HIV/STI knowledge, perceptions of risk, intimate relationships, and life circumstances. Interviews were independently coded using an iterative process and analyzed using established qualitative analytic methods. Major themes identified in the interviews involved three focal points: individual risk (substance abuse, emotional need, self-worth, perceptions of risk, and safer sex practices); interpersonal risk (partner pressure, betrayal, and violence); and risk environment (economic self-sufficiency and preparation for reentry). These findings highlight the critical components of HIV/STI prevention interventions for incarcerated women. PMID:25204565

  2. Low bone mineral density and associated risk factors in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiţu-Tișu, Cristina-Emilia; Barbu, Ecaterina-Constanţa; Lazăr, Mihai; Ion, Daniela Adriana; Bădărău, Ioana Anca

    2016-01-01

    Background Aging of persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) resulted in high rates of osteopenia and osteoporosis. Multiple cohort studies have reported an increased prevalence of bone demineralization among HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD) and risk factors for osteopenia/osteoporosis among HIV-positive patients attending the National Institute for Infectious Diseases “Prof.Dr. Matei Balș”, Bucharest, Romania. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study that enrolled 60 patients with HIV. The association between BMD and lifestyle habits (smoking), body mass index (BMI), nadir cluster of differentiation 4 (CD4) cell count, current CD4 cell count, HIV viral load and history of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were investigated. The BMD was measured at the lumbar spine, hips and total body using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Results In the present study, DEXA evaluation showed an overall prevalence of osteoporosis of 16.66% (ten patients) and a prevalence of osteopenia of 48.33% (29 patients). In men, low BMI and cigarette smoking showed significant association with the diagnosis of lumbar spine demineralization (p=0.034 and p=0.041, respectively). Duration of exposure to cART classes in relation to BMD was also evaluated. The use of non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) was associated with low lumbar spine BMD in all patients (p=0.015). Reduced BMD was significantly associated with protease inhibitors (PIs)-containing treatment (p=0.043) in women. Conclusion At lumbar spine DEXA, male gender was statistically associated with reduced BMD. At the left hip Ward’s area, decreased BMD T scores were significantly associated with aging. The reduced BMD was higher in patients receiving PI- or NNRTI-containing regimens. PMID:27482514

  3. [The automatization of the control over the processes determining the risk of HIV-infection spreading among servicemen].

    PubMed

    Lobzin, Iu V; Churnosov, E V; Bolekhan, V N; Zigalenko, D G; Karapats, M M

    2005-07-01

    The possibilities of the control over the processes determining the HIV-infection spreading risk are considered. In the view of that the automated system which enables to evaluate risk factors predetermining the appearance of new infection cases was proposed. These factors are systematised in a multilevel database. On the basis of the statistical analysis of the risk factors situations of the spread of the HIV infection are revealed and analysed and measures for their liquidation are worked out promptly. The system is universal and can be used for the prevention of the beginning of other extreme situations caused by the spread of different infections. The examples of the comparative analysis of the risk of sexual behaviour in various groups of servicemen are given. PMID:16134377

  4. Screening and risk factors for anal cancer precursors in men infected with HIV in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Hsing; Chu, Fang-Yeh; Wang, Chi-Chao; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2014-02-01

    Homosexual men infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at a greater risk of developing anal cancer. Men who are infected with HIV and visited the outpatient clinics in Taoyuan General Hospital were enrolled to this study. During March to December 2011, thin preparation anal Pap smear and human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping were performed in 230 subjects, of which 69 subjects underwent anoscopic biopsy. Their mean age was 32.9 ± 8.1 years, and 181 (78.6%) men were homosexual. The proportion and 95% confidence interval (CI) of subjects with anal dysplasia in cytology was 23.0% (17.56-28.44), including 13.4% (9.26-18.14) with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, 7.0% (3.70-10.30) with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 2.6% (0.54-4.66) with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. For participants having atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or higher grades, multivariate logistic regression models yielded adjusted odds ratios (95% CI) of 12.61 (1.63-97.56) for homosexuality, 1.62 (1.31-2.00) for number of oncogenic HPV types, and 1.01 (1.00-1.02) for number of lifetime sexual partners. For detection of histological grade II or III anal intraepithelial neoplasm in anoscopic biopsies, the sensitivity of sequential tests for oncogenic HPV and cytology with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance or higher grades was 100%. The positive likelihood ratio was 3.09 (P = 0.05). It is important to consider anal cancer precursors among homosexual men who are infected with HIV. Anal cytology and oncogenic HPV genotyping testing are effective screening methods. PMID:24166485

  5. Considerations About Risk Factors for Peripheral Neuropathies in Romanian HIV-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    GIUBELAN, L.I.; CUPŞA, A.; DUMITRESCU, FLORENTINA; NICULESCU, IRINA; STOIAN, ANDREEA CRISTINA

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The study aims at detecting risk factors for developing peripheral neuropathy in Romanian HIV infected subjects. Material/Methods: retrospective study (january 1990-january 2009) who analyzed data from patients hospitalized in the Regional Center Craiova. We have compared 26 patients (group N) diagnosed with peripheral neuropathy  with 40 patients (group C) without neuropsychological sufferings, randomly selected. We have analysed: age, height, HIV mode of transmission, AIDS status, the average and nadir of CD4 lymphocytes, the mean viral load, the average duration of antiretroviral treatment (ART), use and duration of use of d-drugs, the presence of certain coinfection, diabetes or ethanol abuse. Results: the following differences were statistically significant: age (31,54±14,64 vs 23,9±12,03 years, p=0.024), HIV mode of transmission  (parenteral/sexual: 13/13 vs 28/8, p = 0.044), the monitoring time duration (5,31±3,77 vs 7,75±5,4 years, p=0.043), median ART duration (37,2±9,66 vs 45,12±8,75 months, p=0.001). Close to the threshold of statistical significance are the CD4 nadir (97,33±65,6 vs 123,15±43,35 cells/mm3, p=0.058) and duration of use of d–drugs (22,5±31,94 vs 12,24±8,6 months, p=0.057). Odds ratio (OR) and relative risk (RR) increase with age. ROC analysis for the study group establishes a threshold difference of 29 years (sensitivity 50%, specificity 80%). Conclusions: higher age and advanced immunosupression are the most important risk factors for developing symptomatic peripheral neuropathy in Romanian HIV infected patients; taking into account the small number of cases studied, although not statistically significant, it should be noted the CD4 nadir and the length of d-drug use. PMID:24791204

  6. Male clients of brothel prostitutes as a bridge for HIV infection between high risk and low risk groups of women in Senegal

    PubMed Central

    d Gomes; Etheredge, G

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the extent to which male clients of prostitutes have a role as a bridge in the spread of HIV into the general population of Dakar, Senegal. Methods: A sexual behaviour HIV prevalence survey was carried out among clients of female prostitutes working in brothels recruited outside the prostitutes' rooms after the encounter. All men entering the house and leaving the women's rooms were asked to answer the questions and to donate saliva for HIV-1 and HIV-2 testing. Results: Findings suggest that a proportion of clients form a potential bridge for HIV transmission between prostitutes and partners from the general population. They have unprotected sexual contacts with both brothel prostitutes, and steady and casual partners, and expose both unmarried and married women to HIV infection. Findings also indicate that wives are more exposed to HIV than other categories of women in the population. Conclusions: Clients of brothels' prostitutes have a significant potential for spreading HIV beyond the initial high risk behaviour groups in Senegal. Efforts should be provided to target specific groups at higher risk for HIV infection, such as young men from the densely populated working class neighbourhoods of Dakar, and women outside the commercial sex networks for HIV education and prevention. PMID:16061544

  7. A CLUSTER ANALYSIS OF DRUG USE AND SEXUAL HIV RISKS AND THEIR CORRELATES IN A SAMPLE OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN CRACK COCAINE SMOKERS WITH HIV INFECTION

    PubMed Central

    Schönnesson, Lena Nilsson; Atkinson, John; Williams, Mark L.; Bowen, Anne; Ross, Michael W.; Timpson, Sandra C.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to classify a sample of HIV seropositive African American crack cocaine smokers into homogenous HIV drug use and sexual risk groups using a two step multivariate cluster analysis. Two hundred and fifty eight crack cocaine smokers participated in the study. Cluster analysis revealed three distinct HIV risk groups. The highest risk group, the largest one, was characterized by frequent, daily crack use, multiple sex partners, trading sex, and inconsistent condom use. The consistent condom use group, the smallest group, was characterized by consistent condom use. The inconsistent condom use group, the second largest group, was distinguished by inconsistent condom use. Comparisons of the three HIV risk groups revealed that the highest risk group had a higher proportion of illegal sources of income, higher proportion of binged crack use, frequent, daily, alcohol use, same gender sex partners, and scored higher on depressive symptoms. Members of the consistent condom use group were more likely to have been HIV diagnosed for a shorter time, to have HIV serodiscordant casual sex partners, higher psychological motivation for condom use, and a lower frequency of vaginal sex. Members of the inconsistent condom use group were more likely to have a main sex partner, to be married, to be on public assistance, to know the HIV serostatus of their casual partner, and less likely to conceal their HIV serostatus. An alarming finding was that a large number of participants inconsistently used condoms with HIV serodiscordant sex partners. Interventions aiming to prevent the secondary spread of HIV infection in African American crack cocaine smokers should take this variability in account and focus on the differences. PMID:18495380

  8. A cluster analysis of drug use and sexual HIV risks and their correlates in a sample of African-American crack cocaine smokers with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Schönnesson, Lena Nilsson; Atkinson, John; Williams, Mark L; Bowen, Anne; Ross, Michael W; Timpson, Sandra C

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to classify a sample of HIV-seropositive African-American crack cocaine smokers into homogenous HIV drug use and sexual risk groups using a two step multivariate cluster analysis. Two hundred and fifty-eight crack cocaine smokers participated in the study. Cluster analysis revealed three distinct HIV risk groups. The highest risk group, the largest one, was characterized by frequent, daily crack use, multiple sex partners, trading sex, and inconsistent condom use. The consistent condom use group, the smallest group, was characterized by consistent condom use. The inconsistent condom use group, the second largest group, was distinguished by inconsistent condom use. Comparisons of the three HIV risk groups revealed that the highest risk group had a higher proportion of illegal sources of income, higher proportion of binged crack use, frequent, daily, alcohol use, same gender sex partners, and scored higher on depressive symptoms. Members of the consistent condom use group were more likely to have been HIV diagnosed for a shorter time, to have HIV serodiscordant casual sex partners, higher psychological motivation for condom use, and a lower frequency of vaginal sex. Members of the inconsistent condom use group were more likely to have a main sex partner, to be married, to be on public assistance, to know the HIV serostatus of their casual partner, and less likely to conceal their HIV serostatus. An alarming finding was that a large number of participants inconsistently used condoms with HIV serodiscordant sex partners. Interventions aiming to prevent the secondary spread of HIV infection in African-American crack cocaine smokers should take this variability in account and focus on the differences. PMID:18495380

  9. HIV infection and lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Grogg, K L; Miller, R F; Dogan, A

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of lymphoma in patients with HIV infection greatly exceeds that of the general population. The increased risk for lymphoma appears related to multiple factors, including the transforming properties of the retrovirus itself, the immunosuppression and cytokine dysregulation that results from the disease, and, most importantly, opportunistic infections with other lymphotrophic herpes viruses such as Epstein–Barr virus and human herpesvirus 8. Histologically lymphomas fall into three groups: (1) those also occurring in immunocompetent patients; (2) those occurring more specifically in HIV‐positive patients; and (3) those also occurring in patients with other forms of immunosuppression. Aggressive lymphomas account for the vast majority cases. They frequently present with advanced stage, bulky disease with high tumour burden and, typically, involve extranodal sites. Clinical outcome appears to be worse than in similar aggressive lymphomas in the general population. However, following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy, the risk for developing lymphoma in the context of HIV infection has decreased and the clinical outcome has improved. PMID:18042692

  10. Risk behaviour associated with HIV infection among drug abusers seen at the general Hospital, Kota Bharu, Kelantan.

    PubMed

    Suarn, S; Nor Adam, M

    1993-06-01

    Sixty-one serologically positive HIV infected drug abusers admitted to the Drug Ward, General Hospital, Kota Bharu, were interviewed for possible risk behaviour and AIDS awareness. Fifty-eight subjects were IV abusers while the other 3 were non-IV abusers. All the IV abusers had shared injecting equipment with no regard for sterility. There was non-usage of condoms among those sexually active. Though AIDS awareness was high, there was a lack of risk behaviour change. The drug abusers appear to be a problem group in HIV control measures. Educating the drug abusers and commitment by them to alter risk behaviour is needed. PMID:8350785

  11. Albuminuria Is Associated with Traditional Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Viral Load in HIV-Infected Patients in Rural South Africa

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Context As life expectancy improves among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) patients, renal and cardiovascular diseases are increasingly prevalent in this population. Renal and cardiovascular disease are mutual risk factors and are characterized by albuminuria. Understanding the interactions between HIV, cardiovascular risk factors and renal disease is the first step in tackling this new therapeutic frontier in HIV. Methods In a rural primary health care centre, 903 HIV-infected adult patients were randomly selected and data on HIV-infection and cardiovascular risk factors were collected. Glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated. Albuminuria was defined as an Albumin-Creatinine-Ratio above 30 mg/g. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to analyse albuminuria and demographic, clinical and HIV-associated variables. Results The study population consisted of 903 HIV-infected patients, with a median age of 40 years (Inter-Quartile Range (IQR) 34–48 years), and included 625 (69%) women. The median duration since HIV diagnosis was 26 months (IQR 12–58 months) and 787 (87%) received antiretroviral therapy. Thirty-six (4%) of the subjects were shown to have diabetes and 205 (23%) hypertension. In the cohort, 21% had albuminuria and 2% an eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2. Albuminuria was associated with hypertension (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 1.59; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.05–2.41; p<0.05), total cholesterol (aOR 1.31; 95% CI 1.11–1.54; p<0.05), eGFR (aOR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97–0.99; p<0.001) and detectable viral load (aOR 2.74; 95% CI 1.56–4.79; p<0.001). Hypertension was undertreated: 78% were not receiving treatment, while another 11% were inadequately treated. No patients were receiving lipid-lowering medication. Conclusion Glomerular filtration rate was well conserved, while albuminuria was common amongst HIV-infected patients in rural South Africa. Both cardiovascular and HIV-specific variables were associated with albuminuria. Improved

  12. Mitochondrial DNA Haplogroup A Decreases the Risk of Drug Addiction but Conversely Increases the Risk of HIV-1 Infection in Chinese Addicts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-Mei; Hu, Qiu-Xiang; Liu, Feng-Liang; Bi, Rui; Yang, Bi-Qing; Zhang, Wen; Guo, Hao; Logan, Ian; Zheng, Yong-Tang; Yao, Yong-Gang

    2016-08-01

    Drug addiction is one of the most serious social problems in the world today and addicts are always at a high risk of acquiring HIV infection. Mitochondrial impairment has been reported in both drug addicts and in HIV patients undergoing treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroup could affect the risk of drug addiction and HIV-1 infection in Chinese. We analyzed mtDNA sequence variations of 577 Chinese intravenous drug addicts (289 with HIV-1 infection and 288 without) and compared with 2 control populations (n = 362 and n = 850). We quantified the viral load in HIV-1-infected patients with and without haplogroup A status and investigated the potential effect of haplogroup A defining variants m.4824A > G and m.8794C > T on the cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by using an allotopic expression assay. mtDNA haplogroup A had a protective effect against drug addiction but appeared to confer an increased risk of HIV infection in addicts. HIV-1-infected addicts with haplogroup A had a trend for a higher viral load, although the mean viral load was similar between carriers of haplogroup A and those with other haplogroup. Hela cells overexpressing allele m.8794 T showed significantly decreased ROS levels as compared to cells with the allele m.8794C (P = 0.03). Our results suggested that mtDNA haplogroup A might protect against drug addiction but increase the risk of HIV-1 infection. The contradictory role of haplogroup A might be caused by an alteration in mitochondrial function due to a particular mtDNA ancestral variant. PMID:26162319

  13. Sexual risk-reduction strategies among HIV-infected men receiving ART in Kibera, Nairobi.

    PubMed

    Ragnarsson, Anders; Thorson, Anna; Dover, Paul; Carter, Jane; Ilako, Festus; Indalo, Dorcas; Ekstrom, Anna Mia

    2011-03-01

    This paper explores motivational factors and barriers to sexual behaviour change among men receiving antiretroviral treatment (ART). Twenty in-depth interviews were undertaken with male patients enrolled at the African Medical and Research Foundation clinic in Africa's largest urban informal settlement, Kibera in Nairobi, Kenya. All participants experienced prolonged and severe illness prior to the initiation of ART. Fear of symptom relapse was the main trigger for sexual behaviour change. Partner reduction was reported as a first option for behaviour change since this decision could be made by the individual. Condom use was perceived as more difficult as it had to be negotiated with female partners. Cultural norms regarding expectations for reproduction and marriage were not supportive of sexual risk-reduction strategies. Thus, local sociocultural contexts of HIV-infected people must be incorporated into the contextual adaptation and design of ART programmes and services as they have an over-riding influence on sexual behaviour and programme effectiveness. Also, HIV-prevention interventions need to address both personal, micro- and macro-level factors of behaviour to encourage individuals to take on sexual risk-reduction strategies. In order to achieve the anticipated preventive effect of ART, these issues are important for the donor community and policy-makers, who are the major providers of ART programme support within weak health systems in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:21347894

  14. A brief screening tool to assess the risk of contracting HIV infection among active injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Dawn K.; Pan, Yi; Rose, Charles E.; Pals, Sherri L.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.; Herbst, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To incorporate preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) and other biomedical or intensive behavioral interventions into the care of injection drug users, healthcare providers need validated, rapid, risk screening tools for identifying persons at highest risk of incident HIV infection. Methods To develop and validate a brief screening tool for assessing the risk of contracting HIV (ARCH), we included behavioral and HIV test data from 1904 initially HIV-uninfected men and women enrolled and followed in the ALIVE prospective cohort study between 1988 and 2008. Using logistic regression analyses with generalized estimating equations (GEE), we identified significant predictors of incident HIV infection, then rescaled and summed their regression coefficients to create a risk score. Results The final logistic regression model included age, engagement in a methadone maintenance program, and a composite injection risk score obtained by counting the number of the following five behaviors reported during the past six months: injection of heroin, injection of cocaine, sharing a cooker, sharing needles, or visiting a shooting gallery. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.720, possible scores on index ranged from 0 to 100 and a score ≥46 had a sensitivity of 86.2% and a specificity of 42.5%, appropriate for a screening tool. Discussion We developed an easy to administer 7-question screening tool with a cutoff that is predictive of incident HIV infection in a large prospective cohort of injection drug users in Baltimore. The ARCH-IDU screening tool can be used to prioritize persons who are injecting illicit drugs for consideration of PrEP and other intensive HIV prevention efforts. PMID:25961495

  15. Attitudes toward Sexuality and Sexual Behaviors of Asian-American Adolescents. Implications for Risk of HIV Infection. An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Connie S.

    There has been a widespread perception that Asian Americans are at lower risk for HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases than the population as a whole. This report assesses the knowledge of Asian American adolescents about AIDS and their sexual behaviors and explores whether there is a difference between a Cambodian group (half the…

  16. The use of antiretroviral therapy for the prevention of new HIV infection in populations at high risk for HIV sero-conversion in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Idoko, John; Folayan, Morenike O

    2014-09-01

    The last few years have witnessed a renewed commitment to HIV prevention. The evidence to support the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for prevention of new HIV infection in the form of Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among men who have sex with men, transgender, people who inject drugs, heterosexual men and women and HIV-1 serodiscordant couples, or treatment as prevention (TasP) for serodiscordant couples have also grown. The need to explore the possible use of ART for HIV prevention in Nigeria has become imperative in view of its high HIV burden and the current slow pace of effort to achieve the universal target of reducing its HIV incidence by 50%. While PrEP and TasP are welcome addendum to the existing HIV prevention armamentarium, it is still important to conduct a demonstration project to identify strategies that can facilitate access to PrEP and TasP taking cognizance of the peculiar local challenges with respect to ART and HIV prevention commodity access. The country has therefore drawn a roadmap for itself on how to introduce ART for use for HIV prevention as either PrEP or TasP. This paper discusses the three year national roadmap that would enable the country generated the needed scientific evidence as well as extensive community support for use of ART for HIV prevention in Nigeria. This process includes the conduct of modeling and formative studies, and the implementation of a 24 months demonstration project. The outcome of the demonstration project would inform plans for the scale up of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) access for population(s) at high risk for HIV infection in Nigeria. PMID:26050385

  17. Sexual risk behaviour and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Freedman, Mark; Fagan, Jennifer L.; Frazier, Emma L.; Beer, Linda; Huang, Ping; Valverde, Eduardo E.; Johnson, Christopher; Sanders, Catherine; McNaghten, A.D.; Sullivan, Patrick; Lansky, Amy; Mermin, Jonathan; Heffelfinger, James; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the prevalence and association of sexual risk behaviours and viral suppression among HIV-infected adults in the United States. Design: Cross-sectional analysis of weighted data from a probability sample of HIV-infected adults receiving outpatient medical care. The facility and patient response rates were 76 and 51%, respectively. Methods: We analysed 2009 interview and medical record data. Sexual behaviours were self-reported in the past 12 months. Viral suppression was defined as all viral load measurements in the medical record during the past 12 months less than 200 copies/ml. Results: An estimated 98 022 (24%) HIV-infected adults engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex; 50 953 (12%) engaged in unprotected vaginal or anal sex with at least one partner of negative or unknown HIV status; 23 933 (6%) did so while not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in vaginal or anal sex [prevalence ratio, 0.88; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.82–0.93]; unprotected vaginal or anal sex (prevalence ratio, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.73–0.98); and unprotected vaginal or anal sex with a partner of negative or unknown HIV status (prevalence ratio, 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99). Conclusion: The majority of HIV-infected adults receiving medical care in the U.S. did not engage in sexual risk behaviours that have the potential to transmit HIV, and of the 12% who did, approximately half were not virally suppressed. Persons who were virally suppressed were less likely than persons who were not suppressed to engage in sexual risk behaviours. PMID:25000558

  18. HIV infections in otolaryngology

    PubMed Central

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Olszewska, Ewa; Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection may produce no clinical symptoms for 10 years on average. However, after many years of infection most people develop symptoms that indicate progression of the disease. There are no regular characteristic symptoms or early stage, and no logical sequence of AIDS indicator disorders has been observed. People who are not aware of the infection are referred to physicians of various specializations, including otolaryngologists. It is on their knowledge about HIV infections, among other factors, that early diagnosis of the disease depends. Appropriate and quick introduction of anti-retroviral drugs may let a person with HIV live decades longer. PMID:22367140

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Sleep Disturbance in a Large HIV-Infected Adult Population.

    PubMed

    Allavena, C; Guimard, T; Billaud, E; De la Tullaye, S; Reliquet, V; Pineau, S; Hüe, H; Supiot, C; Chennebault, J-M; Michau, C; Hitoto, H; Vatan, R; Raffi, F

    2016-02-01

    This cross-sectional study evaluates the prevalence and factors associated with sleep disturbances in French adult HIV-infected outpatients. Patients fullfilled a self-administered questionnaire on their health behavior, sleep attitudes (Pittsburgh sleep quality index, PSQI), quality of life and depression; 1354 patients were enrolled. Median sleeping time was 7 h. Poor sleep quality was observed in 47 % of the patients, and moderate to serious depressive symptoms in 19.7 %. Factors significantly associated with sleep disturbances were depression, male gender, active employment, living single, tobacco-smoking, duration of HIV infection, nevirapine or efavirenz-including regimen. Prevalence of poor sleepers is high in this HIV adult outpatient population. Associated factors seem poorly specific to HIV infection and more related to social and psychological status. Taking care of these disturbances may prove to be an effective health management strategy. PMID:26271816

  20. Engagement and Substance Dependence in a Primary Care-Based Addiction Treatment Program for People Infected with HIV and People at High-Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Walley, Alexander Y; Palmisano, Joseph; Sorensen-Alawad, Amy; Chaisson, Christine; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H; Drainoni, Mari-Lynn

    2015-12-01

    To improve outcomes for people with substance dependence and HIV infection or at risk for HIV infection, patients were enrolled in a primary care-based addiction treatment program from 2008-2012 that included a comprehensive substance use assessment, individual and group counseling, addiction pharmacotherapy and case management. We examined whether predisposing characteristics (depression, housing status, polysubstance use) and an enabling resource (buprenorphine treatment) were associated with engagement in the program and persistent substance dependence at 6 months. At program enrollment 61% were HIV-infected, 53% reported heroin use, 46% reported alcohol use, 37% reported cocaine use, and 28% reported marijuana use in the past 30 days, 72% reported depression, 19% were homeless, and 53% had polysubstance use. Within 6-months 60% had been treated with buprenorphine. Engagement (defined as 2 visits in first 14 days and 2 additional visits in next 30 days) occurred in 64%; 49% had substance dependence at 6-months. Receipt of buprenorphine treatment was associated with engagement (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 8.32 95% CI: 4.13-16.77). Self-reported depression at baseline was associated with substance dependence at 6-months (AOR 3.30 95% CI: 1.65-6.61). Neither housing status nor polysubstance use was associated with engagement or substance dependence. The FAST PATH program successfully engaged and treated patients in a primary care-based addiction treatment program. Buprenorphine, a partial opioid agonist, was a major driver of addiction treatment engagement. Given depression's association with adverse outcomes in this clinical population, including mental health treatment as part of integrated care holds potential to improve addiction treatment outcomes. PMID:26298399

  1. Factors Associated with Time Since Last HIV Test Among Persons at High Risk for HIV Infection, National Survey of Family Growth, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    Van Handel, Michelle; Lyons, Bridget; Oraka, Emeka; Nasrullah, Muazzam; DiNenno, Elizabeth; Dietz, Patricia

    2015-10-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends annual HIV screening for persons at high risk for HIV infection. We assessed the testing history and factors associated with recent testing (tested in the last 12 months) among persons at high risk for HIV infection. We analyzed 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth data and classified respondents aged 15-44 who reported a sexual or drug-use risk behavior in the past year as 'high-risk'. Logistic regression models estimated prevalence ratios assessing the association between demographic and health-related factors and having been recently tested for HIV compared with never been tested. Among high-risk men, 29.3% had recently tested for HIV, 30.7% tested more than 12 months ago, and 40.0% had never been tested. Among high-risk women, 38.0% had recently tested, 36.9% tested more than 12 months ago, and 26.1% had never been tested. Compared with men who were aged 15-19, white, heterosexual, and had not recently visited a doctor, men who were aged 40-44, black/African American, homosexual/gay or bisexual, and had visited a doctor in the past year were more likely to have recently tested. Compared with women who were white, had not recently visited a doctor, and had never been pregnant, women more likely to have recently tested were black/African American, had visited a doctor in the past year, and had been pregnant. Approximately two-thirds of high-risk men and women had not been recently tested for HIV. CDC recommendations for annual screening are not being implemented for the majority of persons at risk. PMID:26196537

  2. Risk of congenital cytomegalovirus infection among HIV-exposed uninfected infants is not decreased by maternal nelfinavir use during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Gantt, Soren; Leister, Erin; Jacobson, Denise L.; Boucoiran, Isabelle; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R.; Jourdain, Gonzague; Ngo-Giang-Huong, Nicole; Burchett, Sandra; Frenkel, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Background Congenital cytomegalovirus (cCMV) infection is common among infants born to HIV-infected women. Nelfinavir (NFV), an antiretroviral drug that is safe during pregnancy, inhibits CMV replication in vitro at concentrations that standard doses achieve in plasma. We hypothesized that infants born to women receiving NFV for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) would have a reduced prevalence of cCMV infection. Methods The prevalence of cCMV infection was compared among HIV-uninfected infants whose HIV-infected mothers either received NFV for ≥4 weeks during pregnancy (NFV-exposed) or did not receive any NFV in pregnancy (NFV-unexposed). CMV PCR was performed on infant blood samples collected at <3 weeks from birth. Results Of the 1,255 women included, 314 received NFV for ≥4 weeks during pregnancy and 941 did not receive any NFV during pregnancy. The overall prevalence of cCMV infection in the infants was 2.2%, which did not differ by maternal NFV use. Maternal CD4 T cell counts were inversely correlated with risk of cCMV infection, independent of the time NFV was initiated during gestation. Infants with cCMV infection were born 0.7 weeks earlier (p=0.010) and weighed 170 grams less (p=0.009) than uninfected infants. Conclusion Among HIV-exposed uninfected infants, cCMV infection was associated with adverse perinatal outcomes. NFV use in pregnancy was not associated with protection against cCMV. Safe and effective strategies to prevent cCMV infection are needed. PMID:26519647

  3. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Francis, Suzanna C; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R; Hayes, Richard J; Shattock, Robin J

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  4. Immune Activation in the Female Genital Tract: Expression Profiles of Soluble Proteins in Women at High Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Suzanna C.; Hou, Yanwen; Baisley, Kathy; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Watson-Jones, Deborah; Ao, Trong T.; Herrera, Carolina; Maganja, Kaballa; Andreasen, Aura; Kapiga, Saidi; Coulton, Gary R.; Hayes, Richard J.; Shattock, Robin J.

    2016-01-01

    Soluble cervicovaginal biomarkers of inflammation, immune activation and risk of HIV acquisition are needed to reliably assess the safety of new biomedical prevention strategies including vaccines and microbicides. However, a fuller understanding of expression profiles in women at high risk for HIV infection is crucial to the effective use of these potential biomarkers in Phase 3 trial settings. We have measured 45 soluble proteins and peptides in cervicovaginal lavage samples from 100 HIV negative women at high risk for HIV infection. Women were followed over one menstrual cycle to investigate modulation by hormonal contraception, menstrual cycle phase, recent sexual exposure and intravaginal practices. Women using injectable DMPA had increased concentration of several soluble proteins of the innate and adaptive immune system, including IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-2, MIP-1β, IP-10, IL-8, TGF-β, HBD4, IgA, IgG1, and IgG2. Women using combined oral contraceptives had a similar signature. There were differences in concentrations among samples from post-ovulation compared to pre-ovulation, notably increased immunoglobulins. Increased prostate-specific antigen, indicative of recent sexual exposure, was correlated with increased IL-6, MCP-1, and SLPI, and decreased GM-CSF and HBD3. The identified signature profiles may prove critical in evaluating the potential safety and impact on risk of HIV acquisition of different biomedical intervention strategies. PMID:26814891

  5. [HIV infection : Test and treatment].

    PubMed

    Rockstroh, J K; Wasmuth, J-C

    2016-08-01

    In Europe depending on the country 15-80 % of all individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are either not aware of the diagnosis or are diagnosed later. An early HIV diagnosis could, however, considerably improve the prognosis of individuals infected with HIV and decrease the risk of new infections; therefore, in the presence of indicator diseases, such as sexually transmitted diseases, oral thrush, herpes zoster and lymphoma, the performance of a HIV test is of utmost importance. A newly diagnosed HIV infection represents an indication for starting antiretroviral combination therapy independent of the clinical stage or CD4 cell count. A decline of the viral burden to below the limit of detection and subsequent continuous suppression of viral replication can prevent transition from HIV to acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and if started early enough a normal life expectancy can be achieved. Challenges which remain in HIV therapy are the lifelong daily intake of medication and the complex long-term adverse effects. PMID:27368530

  6. Dyslipidemia and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factor Management in HIV-1-Infected Subjects Treated with HAART in the Spanish VACH Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, Pere; Suarez-Lozano, Ignacio; Teira, Ramón; Lozano, Fernando; Terrón, Alberto; Viciana, Pompeyo; González, Juan; Galindo, Mª José; Geijo, Paloma; Vergara, Antonio; Cosín, Jaime; Ribera, Esteban; Roca, Bernardino; Garcia-Alcalde, Mª Luisa; Sánchez, Trinitario; Torres, Ferran; Lacalle, Juan Ramón; Garrido, Myriam

    2008-01-01

    Background: There is increasing evidence that metabolic adverse effects associated with antiretroviral therapy may translate into an increased cardiovascular risk in HIV-1-infected patients. Objectives: To determine the prevalence of risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD) among HIV-1-infected persons, and to investigate any association between them, stage of HIV-1 disease, and use of antiretroviral therapies. Methods: Multicentric, cross-sectional analysis of CVD risk factors of treated patients in the VACH cohort. The data collected includes: demographic variables, cigarette smoking, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, dyslipidemia, body mass index, stage of HIV-1 infection, and antiretroviral therapy. Results: The analysis included 2358 patients. More than 18% of the study population was at an age of appreciable risk of CVD. 1.7% had previous CVD and 59.2% were smokers. Increased prevalence of elevated total cholesterol was observed among subjects receiving an NNRTI but no PI [odds ratio (OR), 3.34; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.77–6.31], PI but no NNRTI (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 2.12–7.71), or NNRTI + PI (OR, 17.77; 95% CI, 7.24–43.59) compared to patients treated only with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI). Higher CD4 cell count, lower plasma HIV-1 RNA levels, clinical signs of lipodystrophy, longer exposure times to NNRTI and PI, and older age were all also associated with elevated cholesterol levels. The use of lipid lowering agents was very low among our patients. Conclusion: Patients in the VACH cohort present multiple known risk factors for CVD, and a very low rate of lipid lowering therapy use. NNRTI and/or PI-based antiretroviral therapies are associated with the worst lipid profile. This is more frequent in older subjects with greater CD4 counts and controlled HIV-1 replication. PMID:18923695

  7. Prevalence and risk factors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions among HIV-infected women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enju; McCree, Renicha; Mtisi, Expeditho; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Aris, Eric; Lema, Irene A; Hertzmark, Ellen; Chalamilla, Guerino; Li, Nan; Vermund, Sten H; Spiegelman, Donna

    2016-03-01

    To determine the prevalence and predictors of cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) among HIV-infected women in Tanzania, a cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-infected women at HIV care and treatment clinics. A Papanicolaou (Pap) smear was used as a screening tool for detection of cervical SIL. From December 2006 to August 2009, 1365 HIV-infected women received cervical screening. The median age was 35 (interquartile range [IQR]: 30-42) years, and the median CD4 + cell count was 164 (IQR: 80-257) cells/mm(3). The prevalence of cervical SIL was 8.7% (119/1365). In multivariate analysis, older age (≥50 versus 30-<40 years: prevalence ratio [PR], 2.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.45-3.84, p for trend = 0.001), lower CD4 + cell counts (<100 versus ≥200 cells/mm(3): PR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.01-2.36, p for trend = 0.03) and cervical inflammation (PR, 1.73; 95% CI, 1.16-2.60, p = 0.008) were associated with an increased risk of cervical SIL. Women with advanced WHO HIV disease stage (IV versus I/II: PR, 3.45; 95% CI, 1.35-8.85, p for trend = 0.01) had an increased risk for high-grade SIL. In resource-limited settings where it is not feasible to provide cervical cancer prevention services to all HIV-infected women, greater efforts should focus on scaling-up services among those who are older than 50 years, with lower CD4 cell counts and advanced HIV disease stage. PMID:25957324

  8. HIV-infected men who have sex with men who engage in very high levels of transmission risk behaviors: establishing a context for novel prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Wade Taylor, S; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2013-01-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) comprise the largest risk group of individuals living with HIV in the USA and have the highest rates of new infections. A minority of HIV-infected MSM engage in unprotected anal intercourse after learning about their infection, potentially transmitting the virus to others. The current study sought to generate self-generated descriptive themes, from a group of HIV-infected MSM who reported high rates of sexual transmission risk behavior that may be relevant for understanding sexual risk in this group. Five descriptive themes emerged during content analysis: (a) serostatus attribution, (b) assumption of sexual partner's responsibility for safer sex, (c) sexual sensation seeking, (d) ongoing substance use, and (e) dissatisfaction with current relationships. Traditional HIV transmission risk reduction interventions that have been known to have only modest effects should be augmented by developing HIV prevention strategies for this subgroup of MSM to address these salient themes. PMID:23323526

  9. Gender Expression and Risk of HIV Infection Among Black South African Men Who Have Sex with Men.

    PubMed

    Sandfort, Theodorus G M; Lane, Tim; Dolezal, Curtis; Reddy, Vasu

    2015-12-01

    To explore demographic, behavioral and psychosocial risk factors for HIV infection in South African MSM we recruited 480 MSM (aged 18 and 44 years) using respondent-driven sampling. Data were collected through individual computer-assisted face-to-face interviews. Participants were tested for HIV. RDS-adjusted HIV prevalence is 30.1 % (unadjusted 35.6 %). Few participants had ever engaged in both receptive and insertive anal sex; sex with women was frequently reported. Independent demographic and behavioral correlates of HIV infection include age, education, number of male sexual partners, ever having been forced to have sex, and ever having engaged in transactional sex; engagement in sex with women was a protective factor. Psychosocial risk factors independently associated with HIV infection were feminine identification, internalized homophobia, and hazardous drinking. Our findings confirm what has been found in other studies, but also suggest that the dynamics and context of sexual transmission among MSM in South Africa differ from those among MSM in Western countries. PMID:25869555

  10. HIV infection among heterosexuals at increased risk--United States, 2010.

    PubMed

    2013-03-15

    In 2009, an estimated 27% of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in the United States were attributed to heterosexual contact. During 2006-2007, as part of the data collection for the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System (NHBS), CDC surveyed heterosexuals who lived in urban areas with a high prevalence of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and found an overall HIV prevalence of 2.0% and a prevalence of 2.3% among persons with annual household incomes at or below the poverty level and 2.8% among persons with less than a high school education. This report summarizes HIV testing results from the second cycle of NHBS, conducted in 2010, which focused on heterosexual persons with low socioeconomic status (SES) living in areas with high AIDS case rates. The results indicated that HIV prevalence was 2.3% overall and 1.1% among participants who did not report a previous positive HIV test result. Overall, 25.8% of participants had never been tested for HIV until the NHBS survey. Given the high HIV prevalence in this sample, additional research should be conducted to identify culturally appropriate interventions that overcome barriers to HIV testing and increase linkage to care for heterosexuals with low SES in urban areas with high prevalence of AIDS. PMID:23486383

  11. Substance Use is a Risk Factor for Neurocognitive Deficits and Neuropsychiatric Distress in Acute and Early HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Erica; Morgan, Erin E.; Iudicello, Jennifer E.; Blackstone, Kaitlin; Grant, Igor; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott L.; Little, Susan; Morris, Sheldon; Smith, Davey M.; Moore, David J.; Woods, Steven Paul

    2012-01-01

    The acute and early stages of HIV infection (AEH) are characterized by substantial viral replication, immune activation, and alterations in brain metabolism. However, little is known about the prevalence and predictors of neurocognitive deficits and neuropsychiatric disturbances during this period. The present study examined the impact of demographic, HIV disease, and substance use factors on HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and self-reported neuropsychiatric distress among 46 antiretroviral-naïve adults with median duration of infection of 75 days, relative to sample a of 21 HIV seronegative (HIV-) adults with comparable demographics and risk factors. Participants were administered a brief neurocognitive battery that was adjusted for demographics and assessed executive functions, memory, psychomotor speed, and verbal fluency, as well as the Profile of Mood States (POMS), a self-report measure of neuropsychiatric distress. Odds ratios revealed that AEH participants were nearly four times more likely than their seronegative counterparts to experience neurocognitive impairment, particularly in the areas of learning and information processing speed. Similarly, AEH was associated with a nearly five-fold increase in the odds of neuropsychiatric distress, most notably in anxiety and depression. Within the AEH sample, HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment was associated with problematic methamphetamine use and higher plasma HIV RNA levels, whereas neuropsychiatric distress was solely associated with high-risk alcohol use. Extending prior neuroimaging findings, results from this study indicate that HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment and neuropsychiatric distress are highly prevalent during AEH and are associated with high-risk substance use. PMID:23250704

  12. HIV and childbearing.1. Uncertain risks and bitter realities: the reproductive choices of HIV-infected women.

    PubMed

    Levine, C; Dubler, N N

    1990-01-01

    Although most babies born to women with HIV will not develop AIDS, many health professionals and segments of the public object when these women will not forgo pregnancy. Such a view fails to consider fully the cultural, political, and socioeconomic contexts in which seropositive women make reproductive choices. HIV infection is only one of many conditions of chronic disease that can be passed from a woman to her fetus, and should not be singled out as a target for coercive policies. Rather, government and society have an obligation to empower women to protect themselves against HIV infection in the first place, and to offer them options for self-esteem and achievement independent of reproduction. PMID:2266922

  13. GB Virus C (GBV-C) Infection in Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) Seropositive Women with or at Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blackard, Jason T.; Ma, Gang; Welge, Jeffrey A.; King, Caroline C.; Taylor, Lynn E.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Klein, Robert S.; Celentano, David D.; Sobel, Jack D.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Gardner, Lytt

    2014-01-01

    Background GB virus C (GBV-C) may have a beneficial impact on HIV disease progression; however, the epidemiologic characteristics of this virus are not well characterized. Behavioral factors and gender may lead to differential rates of GBV-C infection; yet, studies have rarely addressed GBV-C infections in women or racial/ethnic minorities. Therefore, we evaluated GBV-C RNA prevalence and genotype distribution in a large prospective study of high-risk women in the US. Results 438 hepatitis C virus (HCV) seropositive women, including 306 HIV-infected and 132 HIV-uninfected women, from the HIV Epidemiologic Research Study were evaluated for GBV-C RNA. 347 (79.2%) women were GBV-C RNA negative, while 91 (20.8%) were GBV-C RNA positive. GBV-C positive women were younger than GBV-C negative women. Among 306 HIV-infected women, 70 (22.9%) women were HIV/GBV-C co-infected. Among HIV-infected women, the only significant difference between GBV-negative and GBV-positive women was age (mean 38.4 vs. 35.1 years; p<0.001). Median baseline CD4 cell counts and plasma HIV RNA levels were similar. The GBV-C genotypes were 1 (n = 31; 44.3%), 2 (n = 36; 51.4%), and 3 (n = 3; 4.3%). The distribution of GBV-C genotypes in co-infected women differed significantly by race/ethnicity. However, median CD4 cell counts and log10 HIV RNA levels did not differ by GBV-C genotype. GBV-C incidence was 2.7% over a median follow-up of 2.9 (IQR: 1.5, 4.9) years, while GBV-C clearance was 35.7% over a median follow-up of 2.44 (1.4, 3.5) years. 4 women switched genotypes. Conclusions Age, injection drug use, a history of sex for money or drugs, and number of recent male sex partners were associated with GBV-C infection among all women in this analysis. However, CD4 cell count and HIV viral load of HIV/HCV/GBV-C co-infected women were not different although race was associated with GBV-C genotype. PMID:25493916

  14. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in 2–4 year olds in a rural HIV-prevalent setting

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J. R.; Fielding, K. L.; Mzembe, T.; Mulawa, D.; Chiumya, R.; Fine, P. E. M.; Koole, O.; Kranzer, K.; Crampin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children acts as a sentinel for infectious tuberculosis. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk factors associated with tuberculous infection in pre-school children. METHOD: We conducted a population-wide tuberculin skin test (TST) survey from January to December 2012 in Malawi. All children aged 2–4 years residing in a demographic surveillance area were eligible. Detailed demographic data, including adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and clinical and sociodemographic data on all diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) patients were available. RESULTS: The prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 1.1% using a TST induration cut-off of 15 mm (estimated annual risk of infection of 0.3%). The main identifiable risk factors were maternal HIV infection at birth (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.6, 95%CI 1.1–12.2), having three or more adult members in the household over a lifetime (aOR 2.4, 95%CI 1.2–4.8) and living in close proximity to a known case of infectious TB (aOR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4), modelled as a linear variable across categories (>200 m, 100–200 m, <100 m, within household). Less than 20% of the infected children lived within 200 m of a known diagnosed case. CONCLUSION: Household and community risk factors identified do not explain the majority of M. tuberculosis infections in children in our setting. PMID:27046715

  15. Transient Peripheral Immune Activation follows Elective Sigmoidoscopy or Circumcision in a Cohort Study of MSM at Risk of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lama, Javier R.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Grant, Shannon P.; Swann, Edith M.; Ganoza, Carmela; Segura, Patricia; Montano, Silvia M.; Lacherre, Martin; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Buchbinder, Susan; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M. Juliana; Lemos, Maria P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rectal and genital sampling in HIV prevention trials permits assessments at the site of HIV entry. Yet the safety and acceptability of circumcision and sigmoidoscopy (and associated abstinence recommendations) are unknown in uncircumcised men who have sex with men (MSM) at high risk of HIV infection. Methods Twenty-nine HIV-seronegative high-risk Peruvian MSM agreed to elective sigmoidoscopy biopsy collections (weeks 2 and 27) and circumcision (week 4) in a 28-week cohort study designed to mimic an HIV vaccine study mucosal collection protocol. We monitored adherence to abstinence recommendations, procedure-related complications, HIV infections, peripheral immune activation, and retention. Results Twenty-three (79.3%) underwent a first sigmoidoscopy, 21 (72.4%) were circumcised, and 16 (55.2%) completed a second sigmoidoscopy during the study period. All who underwent procedures completed the associated follow-up safety visits. Those completing the procedures reported they were well tolerated, and complication rates were similar to those reported in the literature. Immune activation was detected during the healing period (1 week post-sigmoidoscopy, 6 weeks post-circumcision), including increases in CCR5+CD4+T cells and α4β7+CD4+T cells. Most participants adhered to post-circumcision abstinence recommendations whereas reduced adherence occurred post-sigmoidoscopy. Conclusion Rectosigmoid mucosal and genital tissue collections were safe in high-risk MSM. Although the clinical implications of the post-procedure increase in peripheral immune activation markers are unknown, they reinforce the need to provide ongoing risk reduction counseling and support for post-procedure abstinence recommendations. Future HIV vaccine studies should also consider the effects of mucosal and tissue collections on peripheral blood endpoints in trial design and analysis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02630082 PMID:27536938

  16. High Prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV and Co-Infection and Associated Risk Factors among Injecting Drug Users in Yunnan Province, China

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng-Liang; Li, Hong; Jiang, Li; Zhu, Jia-Wu; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2012-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence of HIV, HCV, HBV and co-infection with 2 or 3 viruses and evaluate risk factors among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Yunnan province, China. Methods 2080 IDUs were recruited from 5 regions of Yunnan Province, China to detect the infection status of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate risk factors related to HIV, HCV and HBV infections. Results The infection rates among all participants were 25.5% for HIV, 77.7% for HCV, 19.2% for HBV, 15% for HIV/HCV, 0.3% for HIV/HBV, 7.8% for HCV/HBV and 7.1% for HIV/HCV/HBV. The prevalence of virus infection varied widely by region in Yunnan of China. Statistical analyses indicated that high prevalence of HIV and HCV among IDUs was positively associated with the duration of drug injection and sharing needles/syringes; besides, HCV infection was associated with the frequency of drug injection. Conclusions HIV, HCV, HBV infections and co-infections were still very prevalent among IDUs in Yunnan province because of drug use behaviors. PMID:22916185

  17. Homelessness and Other Risk Factors for HIV Infection in the Current Outbreak Among Injection Drug Users in Athens, Greece.

    PubMed

    Sypsa, Vana; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Malliori, Meni; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K; Panopoulos, Anastasios; Kantzanou, Maria; Katsoulidou, Antigoni; Psichogiou, Mina; Fotiou, Anastasios; Pharris, Anastasia; Van De Laar, Marita; Wiessing, Lucas; Jarlais, Don Des; Friedman, Samuel R; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined HIV prevalence and risk factors among injection drug users (IDUs) in Athens, Greece, during an HIV outbreak. Methods. We used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to recruit 1404 IDUs to the Aristotle intervention in August to October 2012. We interviewed participants and tested for HIV. We performed bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results. Estimated HIV prevalence was 19.8% (RDS-weighted prevalence = 14.8%). Odds of infection were 2.3 times as high in homeless as in housed IDUs and 2.1 times as high among IDUs who injected at least once per day as among less frequent injectors (both, P < .001). Six percent of men and 23.5% of women reported transactional sex in the past 12 months, and condom use was low. Intercourse with non-IDUs was common (53.2% of men, 25.6% of women). Among IDUs who had been injecting for 2 years or less the estimated incidence rate was 23.4 new HIV cases per 100 person-years at risk. Conclusions. Efforts to reduce HIV transmission should address homelessness as well as scaling up prevention services, such as needle and syringe distribution and other risk reduction interventions. PMID:24524508

  18. Homelessness and Other Risk Factors for HIV Infection in the Current Outbreak Among Injection Drug Users in Athens, Greece

    PubMed Central

    Sypsa, Vana; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Malliori, Meni; Nikolopoulos, Georgios K.; Panopoulos, Anastasios; Kantzanou, Maria; Katsoulidou, Antigoni; Psichogiou, Mina; Fotiou, Anastasios; Pharris, Anastasia; Van De Laar, Marita; Wiessing, Lucas; Des Jarlais, Don; Friedman, Samuel R.; Hatzakis, Angelos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We examined HIV prevalence and risk factors among injection drug users (IDUs) in Athens, Greece, during an HIV outbreak. Methods We used respondent-driven sampling (RDS) to recruit 1404 IDUs to the Aristotle intervention in August to October 2012. We interviewed participants and tested for HIV. We performed bivariate and multivariate analyses. Results Estimated HIV prevalence was 19.8% (RDS-weighted prevalence = 14.8%). Odds of infection were 2.3 times as high in homeless as in housed IDUs and 2.1 times as high among IDUs who injected at least once per day as among less frequent injectors (both, P < .001). Six percent of men and 23.5% of women reported transactional sex in the past 12 months, and condom use was low. Intercourse with non-IDUs was common (53.2% of men, 25.6% of women). Among IDUs who had been injecting for 2 years or less the estimated incidence rate was 23.4 new HIV cases per 100 person-years at risk. Conclusions Efforts to reduce HIV transmission should address homelessness as well as scaling up prevention services, such as needle and syringe distribution and other risk reduction interventions. PMID:24524508

  19. Prevalence and Incidence of HIV Infection, Trends, and Risk Factors Among Persons Aged 15–64 Years in Kenya: Results From a Nationally Representative Study

    PubMed Central

    Kimanga, Davies O.; Ogola, Samuel; Umuro, Mamo; Ng’ang’a, Anne; Kimondo, Lucy; Murithi, Patrick; Muttunga, James; Waruiru, Wanjiru; Mohammed, Ibrahim; Sharrif, Shahnaaz; De Cock, Kevin M.; (UK), FRCP; Kim, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enhanced HIV surveillance using demographic, behavioral, and biologic data from national surveys can provide information to evaluate and respond to HIV epidemics efficiently. Methods From October 2012 to February 2013, we conducted a 2-stage cluster sampling survey of persons aged 18 months to 64 years in 9 geographic regions in Kenya. Participants answered questionnaires and provided blood for HIV testing. We estimated HIV prevalence, HIV incidence, described trends in HIV prevalence over the past 5 years, and identified factors associated with HIV infection. This analysis was restricted to persons aged 15–64 years. Results HIV prevalence was 5.6% [95% confidence interval (CI): 4.9 to 6.3] in 2012, a significant decrease from 2007, when HIV prevalence, excluding the North Eastern region, was 7.2% (95% CI: 6.6 to 7.9). HIV incidence was 0.5% (95% CI: 0.2 to 0.9) in 2012. Among women, factors associated with undiagnosed HIV infection included being aged 35–39 years, divorced or separated, from urban residences and Nyanza region, self-perceiving a moderate risk of HIV infection, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and reporting 4 or more lifetime number of partners. Among men, widowhood, condom use with the last partner in the previous 12 months, and lack of circumcision were associated with undiagnosed HIV infection. Conclusions HIV prevalence has declined in Kenya since 2007. With improved access to treatment, HIV prevalence has become more challenging to interpret without data on new infections and mortality. Correlates of undiagnosed HIV infection provide important information on where to prioritize prevention interventions to reduce transmission of HIV in the broader population. PMID:24445338

  20. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Low Bone Mineral Density in Korean HIV-Infected Patients: Impact of Abacavir and Zidovudine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sung; Chin, Bum Sik

    2013-01-01

    Low bone mineral density (BMD) is common in HIV-infected patients. We aimed to describe the prevalence of low BMD and risk factors in Korean HIV-infected patients and to assess the effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on BMD. We retrospectively evaluated 224 HIV infected-patients. The prevalence of osteopenia and osteoporosis were 41.5% and 12.9%. These were much higher in 53 patients aged 50 yr and older (52.8% and 34.0%). Older age, lower body mass index, and ART > 3 months were independent risk factors for low BMD. Osteoporosis was more prevalent in patients on the abacavir-based regimen for < 1 yr than ≥ 1 yr; however, it was more prevalent in patients on the zidovudine-based regimen for ≥ 1 yr than < 1 yr (P = 0.017). Osteoporosis in patients on the abacavir-based regimen was more common in the spine than in the femur (P = 0.01). Given such a high prevalence of low BMD, close monitoring of BMD for HIV-infected patients on ART is required. The different prevalence of osteoporosis over time and affected areas between two regimens suggest they may play roles in different mechanisms in bone loss. PMID:23772145

  1. The risk of domestic violence and women with HIV infection: implications for partner notification, public policy, and the law.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, K H; Paskey, S J

    1995-01-01

    Partner notification has emerged as an important strategy in the fight against acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and states have now adopted a plethora of laws that encourage or mandate notification, often without the patient's consent. As human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continues to spread among women, the future development of AIDS control strategies and public health laws must be shaped by concern for the safety and autonomy of patients who face a risk of domestic violence. Three distinct recommendations flow from this premise. First, all HIV-infected women should be assessed for the risk of domestic violence and offered appropriate interventions. Second, where a risk of abuse is indicated, partners should never be notified without the patient's consent. State laws that presently permit involuntary notification should be repealed or amended. Third, laws that punish a patient's refusal to notify partners should also be modified or repealed. PMID:7485675

  2. Sex trafficking and initiation-related violence, alcohol use, and HIV risk among HIV-infected female sex workers in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Jay G; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M; Decker, Michele R; Coleman, Sharon; Bridden, Carly; Pardeshi, Manoj; Saggurti, Niranjan; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2011-12-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) are the group at greatest risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in India. Women and girls trafficked (ie, forced or coerced) into sex work are thought to be at even greater risk because of high exposure to violence and unprotected sex, particularly during the early months of sex work, that is, at initiation. Surveys were completed with HIV-infected FSWs (n = 211) recruited from an HIV-related service organization in Mumbai, India. Approximately 2 in 5 participants (41.7%) reported being forced or coerced into sex work. During the first month in sex work, such FSWs had higher odds of sexual violence (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 3.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-6.1), ≥ 7 clients per day (AOR, 3.3; 1.8-6.1), no use of condoms (AOR, 3.8, 2.1-7.1), and frequent alcohol use (AOR, 1.9; 1.0-3.4) than HIV-infected FSWs not entering involuntarily. Those trafficked into sex work were also at higher odds for alcohol use at first sex work episode (AOR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0). These results suggest that having been trafficked into sex work is prevalent among this population and that such FSWs may face high levels of sexual violence, alcohol use, and exposure to HIV infection in the first month of sex work. Findings call into question harm reduction approaches to HIV prevention that rely primarily on FSW autonomy. PMID:22043037

  3. CROI 2016: Neurologic Complications of HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2016-01-01

    The brain remains a major target for HIV infection and a site of potential complications for HIV-infected individuals. Emerging data presented at the 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections suggest that during the early stages of infection, activated CD4+ cells may traffic the virus into the central nervous system (CNS). HIV is detectable in cells and tissues of the CNS in some individuals despite suppressive antiretroviral treatment. A potential source of cerebrospinal fluid HIV escape may be compartmentalized HIV replication within macrophage lineage cells. Virally infected cells can traffic out of the CNS and may have the potential to reseed the systemic compartment. Additional modifiers of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) were identified, including female sex and hepatic dysfunction. Large epidemiologic studies reported an elevated risk of stroke among HIV-infected individuals, related to traditional vascular risk factors, history of recreational drug use, and HIV measures (lower CD4+ cell nadir and higher viral load). Brain imaging may provide a noninvasive means for detecting early changes in the brain associated with HIV infection and may assist in prognosis of HAND. Some potential adjunctive therapies to standard antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected individuals were considered. PMID:27398860

  4. Improving Ascertainment of Risk Factors for HIV Infection: Results of a Group-Randomized Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Kathleen McDavid; Pals, Sherri L.; Sajak, Tammy; Chase, Jennifer; Kajese, Tebitha

    2010-01-01

    To allow appropriate allocation of prevention and care funding, HIV/AIDS surveillance data must include risk factor information, currently available for less than 70% of cases reported in the United States. The authors evaluated an intervention consisting of provider training and materials to improve risk factor reporting. Facilities were matched…

  5. Cardiovascular Diseases in HIV-infected Subjects (HIV-HEART Study)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-05-07

    Detection of Frequency, Severity and Progression of Cardiovascular Diseases in Patients With HIV-infection.; Effect on Cardiovascular Risk and Life Quality by Age, Gender, Classic Cardiovascular Risk Factors,; HIV-specific Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Cardiovascular Medication, Antiretroviral Medication

  6. Insulin resistance predicts endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected persons on long-term highly active antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mondy, Kristin E.; de las Fuentes, Lisa; Waggoner, Alan; Önen, Nur F.; Bopp, Coco S.; Lassa-Claxton, Sherry; Powderly, William G.; Dávila-Román, Victor; Yarasheski, Kevin E.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cardiovascular disease risk among persons with HIV is likely multifactorial, thus testing a variety of available noninvasive vascular ultrasound and other surrogate tests may yield differing results. To address this issue, we assessed multiple metabolic and clinical predictors of endothelial function and carotid intima–media thickness in HIV-infected subjects and compared results with HIV-negative controls. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study of 50 HIV-infected, healthy adults on stable highly active antiretroviral therapy matched to 50 HIV-negative controls by age, sex, race, and body mass index. Methods Flow-mediated vasodilation of the brachial artery, carotid intima–media thickness, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (HIV-infected subjects), and fasting insulin, lipids, and oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Results were compared between HIV-infected and control groups. Results Fifty percent of subjects were African–American with 34% women. Among HIV-infected, mean CD4 cell count was 547 cells/ µl; 90% had HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml. There were no significant differences between HIV-infected and control subjects with regard to brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation or carotid intima–media thickness. In multivariate analyses of the HIV cohort, independent predictors of endothelial dysfunction (lower flow-mediated vasodilation) were increasing insulin resistance, greater alcohol consumption, and higher baseline brachial artery diameter (P < 0.05); predictors of increased carotid intima–media thickness were hypertension, higher trunk/limb fat ratio, and insulin resistance (P < 0.05). Conclusion In this HIV cohort on modern highly active antiretroviral therapy with well controlled HIV, there were no significant differences with regard to preclinical markers of cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance was a strong predictor of impaired brachial artery flow-mediated vasodilation and increased carotid intima

  7. Characterizing the HIV risks and potential pathways to HIV infection among transgender women in Côte d'Ivoire, Togo and Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Stahlman, Shauna; Liestman, Benjamin; Ketende, Sosthenes; Kouanda, Seni; Ky-Zerbo, Odette; Lougue, Marcel; Diouf, Daouda; Anato, Simplice; Tchalla, Jules; Bamba, Amara; Drame, Fatou Maria; Ezouatchi, Rebecca; Kouamé, Abo; Baral, Stefan D

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Transgender women are at high risk for the acquisition and transmission of HIV. However, there are limited empiric data characterizing HIV-related risks among transgender women in sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of these analyses is to determine what factors, including sexual behaviour stigma, condom use and engagement in sex work, contribute to risk for HIV infection among transgender women across three West African nations. Methods Data were collected via respondent-driven sampling from men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender women during three- to five-month intervals from December 2012 to October 2015 across a total of six study sites in Togo, Burkina Faso and Côte d'Ivoire. During the study visit, participants completed a questionnaire and were tested for HIV. Chi-square tests were used to compare the prevalence of variables of interest between transgender women and MSM. A multilevel generalized structural equation model (GSEM) was used to account for clustering of observations within study sites in the multivariable analysis, as well as to estimate mediated associations between sexual behaviour stigma and HIV infection among transgender women. Results In total, 2456 participants meeting eligibility criteria were recruited, of which 453 individuals identified as being female/transgender. Transgender women were more likely than MSM to report selling sex to a male partner within the past 12 months (p<0.01), to be living with HIV (p<0.01) and to report greater levels of sexual behaviour stigma as compared with MSM (p<0.05). In the GSEM, sexual behaviour stigma from broader social groups was positively associated with condomless anal sex (adjusted odds ratio (AOR)=1.33, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.09, 1.62) and with selling sex (AOR=1.23, 95% CI=1.02, 1.50). Stigma from family/friends was also associated with selling sex (AOR=1.42, 95% CI=1.13, 1.79), although no significant associations were identified with prevalent HIV infection

  8. Prevalence of HIV Infection and Associated Risk Factors among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Harbin, P. R. China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ling; Zhang, Dandan; Yu, Baowen; Wang, Shangbo; Liu, Yanlin; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Shang, Xiaoyun; Li, Hongyuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess the prevalence of HIV infection and characteristically risk of factors which associated with HIV infection among MSM in Harbin, China. Methods A face-to-face questionnaire interview was conducted among 463 Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) who were recruited by the snowball sampling in Harbin from April, 2011 to July, 2011. The questionnaire mainly included demographics, AIDS knowledge, homosexual behavior and the status of intervention in MSM. Blood specimens were obtained and tested for the diagnoses of HIV, syphilis and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Associations between above exposed factors and HIV infection were analyzed using a univariate analysis and forward stepwise logistic regression. Results The prevalence of HIV and syphilis was 9.5 and 14.3%. The awareness rate of AIDS was 86.8%. The rate of unprotected sexual behavior was 57.6% of MSM during the past 6 months. The univariate analysis identified that the age (age≥35 years old), cohabitation, more than 10 years of homosexual behavior and more than 10 homosexual partners were risk factors which associated with the HIV infection, and that protected sex during the past 6 months was a protective factor for the HIV infection. The multivariate analysis identified that the duration of homosexual behavior and commercial sexual behavior were independent risk factors which associated with the HIV infection, and the protected sex during the past 6 months was a protective factor for the HIV infection. Conclusion The prevalence of HIV among MSM in Harbin has been rapidly increasing in the past few years. Targeted, tailored, and comprehensive interventions are urgently needed to prevent the HIV infection from MSM. PMID:23516481

  9. Enhancing Motivation to Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection for Economically Disadvantaged Urban Women

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Michael P.; Maisto, Stephen A.; Kalichman, Seth C.; Forsyth, Andrew D.; Wright, Ednita M.; Johnson, Blair T.

    2008-01-01

    This research evaluated a motivation-based HIV-risk-reduction intervention for economically disadvantaged urban women. Participants completed a survey that assessed HIV-related knowledge, risk perceptions, behavioral intentions, sexual communication, substance use, and risk behavior. A total of 102 at-risk women (76% African-American) were randomly assigned to either the risk-reduction intervention or to a waiting list. Women were reassessed at three and twelve weeks. Results indicated that treated women increased their knowledge and risk awareness, strengthened their intentions to adopt safer sexual practices, communicated their intentions with partners, reduced substance use proximal to sexual activities, and engaged in fewer acts of unprotected vaginal intercourse. These effects were observed immediately and most were maintained at follow-up. PMID:9256553

  10. Risk Factors for Early and Late Transmission of HIV via Breast-Feeding among Infants Born to HIV-Infected Women in a Randomized Clinical Trial in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, Roger L.; Smeaton, Laura; Lockman, Shahin; Thior, lbou; Rossenkhan, Raabya; Wester, Carolyn; Stevens, Lisa; Moffat, Claire; Arimi, Peter; Ndase, Patrick; Asmelash, Aida; Leidner, Jean; Novitsky, Vladimir; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, Max

    2009-01-01

    Risk factors for mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) via breast-feeding were evaluated in a randomized trial. HIV-infected women and their infants received zidovudine as well as single-dose nevirapine or placebo. Infants were randomized to formula-feed (FF) or breast-feed (BF) in combination with zidovudine prophylaxis. Of 1116 at-risk infants, 6 (1.1%) in the FF group and 7 (1.3%) in the BF group were infected between birth and 1 month)P = .99). Maternal receipt of nevirapine did not predict early MTCT in the BF group (P = .45). Of 547 infants in the BF group at risk for late MTCT, 24 (4.4%) were infected. Maternal HIV-1 RNA levels in plasma (P<.001) and breast milk (P<.001) predicted late MTCT. These findings support the safety of 1 month of breast-feeding in combination with maternal and infant antiretroviral prophylaxis. PMID:19090775

  11. High Risk of Obesity and Weight Gain for HIV-Infected Uninsured Minorities

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Liang, Yuanyuan; Garduño, L. Sergio; Walter, Elizabeth A.; Gerardi, Margit; Anstead, Gregory M.; Bullock, Delia; Turner, Barbara J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Obesity and HIV disproportionately affect minorities and have significant health risks, but few studies have examined disparities in weight change in HIV-seropositive (HIV+) cohorts. Objective To determine racial and health insurance disparities in significant weight gain in a predominately Hispanic HIV+ cohort. Methods Our observational cohort study of 1,214 non-underweight HIV+ adults from 2007-2010 had significant weight gain (≥3% annual BMI increase) as primary outcome. The secondary outcome was continuous BMI over time. A four-level race-ethnicity/insurance predictor reflected the interaction between race-ethnicity and insurance: insured white (non-Hispanic), uninsured white, insured minority (Hispanic or black), or uninsured minority. Logistic and mixed effects models adjusted for: baseline BMI; age; gender; household income; HIV transmission category; antiretroviral therapy type; CD4+ count; plasma HIV-1 RNA; observation months; and visit frequency. Results The cohort was 63% Hispanic and 14% black; 13.3% were insured white, 10.0% uninsured white, 40.9% insured minority, and 35.7% uninsured minority. At baseline, 37.5% were overweight, 22.1% obese. Median observation was 3.25 years. 24.0% had significant weight gain, which was more likely for uninsured minority patients than insured whites (adjusted odds ratio=2.85 , 95%CI: 1.66, 4.90). The rate of BMI increase in mixed effects models was greatest for uninsured minorities. Of 455 overweight at baseline, 29% were projected to become obese in 4 years. Conclusions and Relevance In this majority Hispanic HIV+ cohort, 60% were overweight or obese at baseline, and uninsured minority patients gained weight more rapidly. These data should prompt greater attention by HIV providers to prevention of obesity. PMID:24121754

  12. [HIV infection and immigration].

    PubMed

    Monge, Susana; Pérez-Molina, José A

    2016-01-01

    Migrants represent around one third of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Spain and they constitute a population with higher vulnerability to its negative consequences due to the socio-cultural, economical, working, administrative and legal contexts. Migrants are diagnosed later, which worsens their individual prognosis and facilitates the maintenance of the HIV epidemic. In spite of the different barriers they experience to access healthcare in general, and HIV-related services in particular, access to antiretroviral treatment has been similar to that of the autochthonous population. However, benefits of treatment have been not, with women in general and men from Sub-Saharan Africa exhibiting the worse response to treatment. We need to proactively promote earlier diagnosis of HIV infection, the adoption of preventive measures to avoid new infections, and to deliver accessible, adapted and high-quality health-care. PMID:27016136

  13. Prevalence of HIV Infection and Risk Behaviors Among Younger and Older Injecting Drug Users in the United States, 2009

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Huong; Spiller, Michael; Wejnert, Cyprian; Le, Binh; Neaigus, Alan; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    This study compared HIV sero-prevalence and risk behaviors between younger and older injecting drug users (IDUs). IDUs aged ≥18 years were interviewed for the 2009 National HIV Behavioral Surveillance System. Using GEE regression, we assessed characteristics of younger (18–29 years) and older (≥30 years) IDUs, and factors associated with past 12-month receptive syringe sharing and unprotected sex (vaginal/anal). Of 10,090 participants, 10 % were younger. HIV sero-prevalence was lower among younger than older IDUs (4 vs. 10 %, p = 0.001). Younger IDUs were more likely (p ≤ 0.002) to be non-black race/ethnicity, report higher household income, homelessness, being arrested and to engage in receptive syringe sharing and unprotected sex. In multivariable models, age remained associated (p < 0.001) with receptive syringe sharing (aPR = 1.14, 95 % CI1.07–1.22) and unprotected sex (aPR = 1.10, 95 % CI1.06–1.14). Although younger IDUs had lower HIV prevalence, their behaviors place them at increased risk of HIV infection and could lead to a rapid spread in this susceptible population. PMID:24242754

  14. A nested case-control study of sexual practices and risk factors for prevalent HIV-1 infection among young men in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Mattson, Christine L.; Bailey, Robert C.; Agot, Kawango; Ndinya-Achola, J.O.; Moses, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    Objectives To investigate sexual practices and risk factors for prevalent HIV infection among young men in Kisumu, Kenya. Goal The goal of this study was to identify behaviors associated with HIV in Kisumu to maximize the effectiveness of future prevention programs. Study Design Lifetime sexual histories were collected from a nested sample of 1337 uncircumcised participants within the context of a randomized controlled trial of male circumcision to reduce HIV incidence. Results Sixty-five men (5%) tested positive for HIV. Multiple logistic regression revealed the following independent predictors of HIV: older age, less education being married, being Catholic, >4 lifetime sex partners, prior treatment for an STI, sex during partner’s menstruation, ever practicing bloodletting, and receipt of a medical injection in the last 6 months. Prior HIV testing and post coital cleansing were protective. Conclusions This analysis confirms the importance of established risk factors for HIV and identifies practices that warrant further investigation. PMID:17495591

  15. Prevalence and risk factors for oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jessica A; Rudy, Bret J; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Secord, Elizabeth; Gillison, Maura

    2016-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV) may promote oral cancers, especially among immunosuppressed individuals. The aims of this study were to examine whether demographic characteristics, medical history, sexual behaviors, substance use, CD4+ T-cell count, HIV viral load, and HPV vaccination were associated with HPV, EBV, and KSHV infection and viral load. Multivariable modeling using logistic or linear regression examined associations between independent variables and infection or viral load, respectively. Among 272 HIV-infected 12-24-year-old youth, 19.5% were positive for oral HPV, 88.2% for EBV, and 11.8% for KSHV. In multivariable models, recent marijuana use (OR 1.97, 95%CI 1.02-3.82) and lower CD4+ T-cell count (<350 vs. ≥350 cells/mm(3) : OR 1.92, 95%CI 1.003-3.69) were associated with HPV infection; lifetime tobacco use (estimated coefficient [EC] 1.55, standard error [SE] 0.53, P = 0.0052) with HPV viral load; recent tobacco use (OR 2.90, 95%CI 1.06-7.97), and higher HIV viral load (>400 vs. <400 copies/ml: OR 3.98, 95%CI 1.84-8.74) with EBV infection; Black versus White race (EC 1.18, SE 0.37, P = 0.0023), and lower CD4+ T-cell count (EC 0.70, SE 0.28, P = 0.017) with EBV viral load, male versus female gender (OR 10, 95%CI 1.32-100) with KSHV infection, and younger age at HIV diagnosis (1-14 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.33, SE 0.16, P = 0.049; 15-17 vs. 18-20 years: EC 0.35, SE 0.13, P = 0.0099) with KSHV viral load. In conclusion, substance use and immunosuppression are associated with oral DNA tumor viruses in HIV-infected youth. J. Med. Virol. 88:1944-1952, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27096166

  16. Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Lipoatrophy in Patients with HIV Infection in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Lesi, Olufunmilayo A.; Sabir, Anas A.; Olamoyegun, Michael Adeyemi; Okany, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although the association between lipoatrophy and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is well known, other nondrug factors may be associated with lipoatrophy in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). There are no reports of lipoatrophy from Nigeria, a country with the second largest number of PLWHA. We aimed to determine the prevalence, characteristics, and factors associated with lipoatrophy in a cohort of patients attending the HIV clinic in Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Methods. Two hundred and eighty-eight patients with HIV infection were recruited for the study. The study protocol involved administration of a questionnaire, targeted physical examination (including anthropometric indices and skin fold thickness), and bioelectrical impedance analysis measurements. Lipoatrophy was defined clinically. Results. Lipoatrophy was present in 75 (26.0%) persons. It was associated with lower body circumferences, skin fold thicknesses, and lower % body fat with preservation of skeletal muscle mass (all P < 0.05). Male gender and HAART use were the factors associated with lipoatrophy on multivariate analysis (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Lipoatrophy is frequently encountered in patients with HIV infection in Nigeria, with HAART use conferring an added factor in its development. There is need for more physician and patient awareness of this condition. PMID:25821597

  17. Are healthcare workers at higher risk of HIV infection than the general population in Burkina Faso?

    PubMed

    Kirakoya-Samadoulougou, F; Fao, P; Yaro, S; Defer, M-C; Meda, N; Robert, A; Nagot, N

    2014-03-01

    In order to assess the HIV prevalence in healthcare workers (HCWs) in Burkina Faso, we conducted a national survey in 97 health facilities from urban and rural areas. Of 1570 HCWs who agreed to participate, 1013 (64·5%) provided a urine sample for HIV testing. The crude prevalence of HIV in HCWs was 3·5% (95% CI 2·3-4·6). HIV prevalence was 0·7% in students and trainees, 3·8% in nurses and midwives, 4·5% in administrative workers, and 4·6% in laboratory workers. After age and area standardization, men from the Demographic Health Survey (DHS) had a similar HIV prevalence (2·3%, 95% CI 1·4-2·9) as male HCWs (2·5%, 95% CI 1·1-4·0), while female HCWs were more infected (4·5%, 95% CI 2·5-6·0) than women from the DHS (2·1%, 95% CI 1·3-2·4). A voluntary counselling and testing (VCT) programme should be specifically implemented and adapted for female HCWs. PMID:23759388

  18. Receipt of clinical and prevention services, clinical outcomes, and sexual risk behaviors among HIV-infected young adults in care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Beer, Linda; Mattson, Christine L; Shouse, R Luke; Prejean, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    We describe receipt of clinical and prevention services, clinical outcomes, and sexual risk behaviors among young adult HIV patients in the United States during 2009-2013, using a sample designed to produce nationally representative estimates. Compared with older HIV patients, proportionately more young adults received provider-delivered prevention services and reported sexual risk behaviors. Young adults had similar care patterns as older HIV patients, but were less likely to have or adhere to an antiretroviral therapy prescription and achieve viral suppression. These estimates establish a national baseline from which to monitor changes in clinical outcomes and transmission behaviors among young HIV-infected adults. PMID:27011102

  19. [Immunopathogenesis of HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Alcamí, José; Coiras, Mayte

    2011-03-01

    Killing of CD4 lymphocytes and systemic immune suppression are the hallmarks of HIV infection. These milestones are produced by different mechanisms that draw a complex picture of AIDS immunopathogenesis. The role of the GALT system as a preferential target for HIV, chronic activation of the immune system and viral escape mechanisms are recent challenges that have changed our current view on the mechanisms leading to immune destruction and development of AIDS. In this article, the mechanisms of immune suppression, the evolution of immune response throughout the infection and the mechanisms of viral escape are analysed. PMID:21388715

  20. [Metabolic abnormalities, lipodystrophy and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Pascale; Blanc, Myriam

    2006-05-15

    Life expectancy of HIV-infected patients has improved considerably with HAART. However long term use of HAART is linked with lipodystrophy syndrom (subcutaneous lipoatrophy and central fat accumulation) associated with dyslipemia (hypoHDL, hyperLDL and hypertriglyceridemia) and insulin resistance. It is also linked with mitochondrial toxicity clinically expressed by chronic fatigue syndrom and premature aging. The induced metabolic syndrom has cardiovascular consequences and myocardial infarction is the cause of 7% of the HIV-infected deaths in 2000. Assessment of these complications should be done at least every year. Treatment options concern antiretroviral therapy with the search for the least toxic drug (but with equal antiviral efficacy), symptomatic treatment (statin, fibrates, thiazolidinediones, metformin) and lifestyle modifications (first of all, stopping cigarette smoking!) PMID:16775979

  1. Socioeconomic Disconnection as a Risk Factor for Increased HIV Infection in Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Gayles, Travis A.; Kuhns, Lisa M.; Kwon, Soyang; Mustanski, Brian

    2016-01-01

    among YMSM, suggesting that the two factors are related. Socioeconomic factors present an important area for future research focusing on HIV infection in this high-risk group. PMID:27002852

  2. Long-term risk of mortality for acute kidney injury in HIV-infected patients: a cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients and is associated with hospital mortality. We aimed to evaluate the impact of AKI on long-term mortality of hospitalized HIV-infected patients. Methods Retrospective analysis of a cohort of 433 hospitalized HIV-infected patients who were discharged alive from the hospital. AKI was defined according to ‘Risk Injury Failure Loss of kidney function End-stage kidney disease’ creatinine criteria, as an increase of baseline serum creatinine (SCr) X 1.5 or in patients with baseline SCr > 4 mg/dL if there was an acute rise in SCr of at least 0.5 mg/dL. Cumulative mortality curves were determined by the Kaplan-Meier method, and log-rank test was employed to analyze statistically significant differences between curves. Cox regression method was used to determine independent predictors of mortality. Risk factors were assessed with univariate analysis, and variables that were statistically significant (P < 0.05) in the univariate analysis were included in the multivariate analysis. Results Sixty-four patients (14.8%) had AKI. Median follow-up was 37 months. At follow-up 81 patients (18.7%) died. At 1, 2 and 5 years of follow-up, the cumulative probability of death of patients with AKI was 21.2, 25 and 31.3%, respectively, as compared with 10, 13.3 and 16.5% in patients without AKI (log-rank, P = 0.011). In multivariate analysis AKI was associated with increased mortality (adjusted HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1-3; P = 0.049). Conclusions AKI was independently associated with long-term mortality of hospitalized HIV-infected patients. PMID:23394360

  3. Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of an HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk-Reduction Intervention for South African Men

    PubMed Central

    Jemmott, Loretta S.; O’Leary, Ann; Ngwane, Zolani; Icard, Larry D.; Heeren, G. Anita; Mtose, Xoliswa; Carty, Craig

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested the efficacy of a sexual risk-reduction intervention for men in South Africa, where heterosexual exposure is the main mode of HIV transmission. Methods. Matched-pairs of neighborhoods in Eastern Cape Province, South Africa, were randomly selected and within pairs randomized to 1 of 2 interventions based on social cognitive theory and qualitative research: HIV/sexually transmitted infection (STI) risk-reduction, targeting condom use, or attention-matched control, targeting health issues unrelated to sexual risks. Sexually active men aged 18 to 45 years were eligible. The primary outcome was consistent condom use in the past 3 months. Results. Of 1181 participants, 1106 (93.6%) completed the 12-month follow-up. HIV and STI risk-reduction participants had higher odds of reporting consistent condom use (odds ratio [OR] = 1.32; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.03, 1.71) and condom use at last vaginal intercourse (OR = 1.40; 95% CI = 1.08, 1.82) than did attention-control participants, adjusting for baseline prevalence. No differences were observed on unprotected intercourse or multiple partnerships. Findings did not differ for sex with steady as opposed to casual partners. Conclusions. Behavioral interventions specifically targeting men can contribute to efforts to reduce sexual risk behaviors in South Africa. PMID:24432923

  4. Being Unaware of Being HIV-Infected is Associated with Alcohol Use Disorders and High Risk Sexual Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Vagenas, Panagiotis; Ludford, Kaysia T.; Gonzales, Pedro; Peinado, Jesus; Cabezas, Cesar; Gonzales, Fernando; Lama, Javier R.; Sanchez, Jorge; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the correlates of HIV risk among men who have sex with men (MSM) with newly diagnosed versus previously known HIV infection among 5,148 MSM recruited using modified snowball sampling in 5 Peruvian cities. Participants, if age≥18 years and sex with a male in the previous 12 months, underwent standardized computer-assisted risk assessments and HIV and syphilis testing. Overall, 420 (8.2%) participants tested HIV seropositive, most of whom (89.8%) were unaware of their HIV status. Compared to those who knew themselves to be HIV-infected, multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that unprotected anal intercourse at last encounter [AOR=2.84 (95% CI 1.09–7.40)] and having an alcohol use disorder (AUD) [AOR=2.14 (95% CI 1.01–5.54)] were independently associated with a newly diagnosed HIV infection. Being unaware of being HIV-infected was associated with high-risk sexual behaviors and AUDs, both of which are amenable to behavioral and medication-assisted therapy interventions. PMID:23670711

  5. [Travel medicine for HIV-infected patients].

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Furrer, H

    2001-06-01

    Many HIV-infected persons travel from temperate zones to (sub)tropical destinations. HIV-specific immigration issues, medical resources abroad and problems regarding travelling with multiple medications have to be anticipated. When prescribing immunizations and specific chemoprophylaxis, the stage of immunodeficiency as well as drug interactions with antiretrovirals and medicaments against opportunistic infections have to be taken into account. Live vaccines may be contraindicated. Immunocompromised HIV-infected travellers have a higher risk for serious courses of diseases by enteropathogens. Therefore a good information about food hygiene is important and a prescription of an antibiotic to take in case of severe diarrhea may be indicated. A new antiretroviral combination therapy should not be started immediately before travelling to the tropics. The possibility to continue an established HIV treatment during travel has to be evaluated cautiously. With good pre-travel advice the risk of severe health problems is low for most HIV-infected travellers. PMID:11441700

  6. HIV Prevalence, Risks for HIV Infection, and Human Rights among Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Stefan; Trapence, Gift; Motimedi, Felistus; Umar, Eric; Iipinge, Scholastika; Dausab, Friedel; Beyrer, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Background In the generalized epidemics of HIV in southern Sub-Saharan Africa, men who have sex with men have been largely excluded from HIV surveillance and research. Epidemiologic data for MSM in southern Africa are among the sparsest globally, and HIV risk among these men has yet to be characterized in the majority of countries. Methodology A cross-sectional anonymous probe of 537 men recruited with non-probability sampling among men who reported ever having had sex with another man in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana using a structured survey instrument and HIV screening with the OraQuick© rapid test kit. Principal Findings The HIV prevalence among those between the ages of 18 and 23 was 8.3% (20/241); 20.0% (42/210) among those 24–29; and 35.7% (30/84) among those older than 30 for an overall prevalence of 17.4% (95% CI 14.4–20.8). In multivariate logistic regressions, being older than 25 (aOR 4.0, 95% CI 2.0–8.0), and not always wearing condoms during sex (aOR 2.6, 95% CI 1.3–4.9) were significantly associated with being HIV-positive. Sexual concurrency was common with 16.6% having ongoing concurrent stable relationships with a man and a woman and 53.7% had both male and female sexual partners in proceeding 6 months. Unprotected anal intercourse was common and the use of petroleum-based lubricants was also common when using condoms. Human rights abuses, including blackmail and denial of housing and health care was prevalent with 42.1% (222/527) reporting at least one abuse. Conclusions MSM are a high-risk group for HIV infection and human rights abuses in Malawi, Namibia, and Botswana. Concurrency of sexual partnerships with partners of both genders may play important roles in HIV spread in these populations. Further epidemiologic and evaluative research is needed to assess the contribution of MSM to southern Africa's HIV epidemics and how best to mitigate this. These countries should initiate and adequately fund evidence-based and targeted HIV

  7. HIV-Infected Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Identify Themselves as Belonging to Subcultures Are at Increased Risk for Hepatitis C Infection

    PubMed Central

    Matser, Amy; Vanhommerig, Joost; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.; Geskus, Ronald B.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Prins, Jan M.; Prins, Maria; Bruisten, Sylvia M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV) emerged as sexually transmitted infection among HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM). We studied whether HCV circulated in identifiable high-risk MSM subcultures and performed phylogenetic analysis. Methods HIV-infected MSM were recruited at the sexually transmitted infections (STI) outpatient clinic and a university HIV clinic in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, 2008–2009. Participants completed a detailed questionnaire and were tested for HCV antibodies and RNA, with NS5B regions sequenced for analysis of clusters. Results Among 786 participants, the median age was 43 (IQR 37–48) years, and 93 (11.8%) were HCV-positive. Seropositivity was associated with belonging to subcultures identified as leather (aOR 2.60; 95% CI 1.56–4.33), rubber/lycra (aOR 2.15; 95% CI 1.10–4.21), or jeans (aOR 2.23; 95% CI 1.41–3.54). The two largest HCV-RNA monophyletic clusters were compared; MSM in cluster I (genotype 1a, n = 13) reported more partners (P = 0.037) than MSM in cluster II (genotype 4d, n = 14), but demographics, subculture characteristics and other risk behaviors did not differ significantly between the two clusters. Discussion HCV infection is associated with identifiable groups of leather/rubber/lycra/jeans subcultures among HIV-infected MSM. Separate epidemiological HCV transmission networks were not revealed. Active HCV screening and treatment within specific subcultures may reduce HCV spread among all MSM. PMID:23469226

  8. Cervical human papillomavirus infection among young women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: prevalence, genotypes, risk factors and association with HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although cervical cancer is the leading cancer in Cambodia, most women receive no routine screening for cervical cancer and few treatment options exist. Moreover, nothing is known regarding the prevalence of cervical HPV or the genotypes present among women in the country. Young sexually active women, especially those with multiple sex partners are at highest risk of HPV infection. We examine the prevalence and genotypes of cervical HPV, as well as the associated risk factors among young women engaged in sex work in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study among 220 young women (15–29 years) engaged in sex work in different venues including brothels or entertainment establishments, and on a freelance basis in streets, parks and private apartments. Cervical specimens were collected using standard cytobrush technique. HPV DNA was tested for by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and genotyping using type-specific probes for 29 individual HPV types, as well as for a mixture of 10 less common HPV types. All participants were also screened for HIV status using blood samples. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to assess risk factors for any or multiple HPV infection. Results The prevalence of cervical HPV 41.1%. HPV 51 and 70 were the most common (5.0%), followed by 16 (4.6%), 71 (4.1%) and 81 (3.7%). Thirty-six women (16.4%) were infected with multiple genotypes and 23.3% were infected with at least one oncogenic HPV type. In multivariate analyses, having HIV infection and a higher number of sexual partners were associated with cervical HPV infection. Risk factors for infection with multiple genotypes included working as freelance female sex workers (FSW) or in brothels, recent binge use of drugs, high number of sexual partners, and HIV infection. Conclusions This is the first Cambodian study on cervical HPV prevalence and genotypes. We found that HPV infection was common among young FSW, especially among women

  9. Risks for HIV infection among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men in Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia.

    PubMed

    Baral, Stefan; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Peryskina, Alena; Mogilnii, Vladimir; Masenior, Nicole F; Sergeyev, Boris; Deobald, Irina; Wirtz, Andrea L; Beyrer, Chris

    2012-08-01

    The majority of early cases of HIV in Russia were among men who have sex with men (MSM). Despite this and the current resurgence of HIV among MSM globally, little systematic work has been done to assess current HIV risks. We conducted a rapid assessment of HIV and associated risk behaviors among MSM in Russia. An anonymous, cross-sectional study was performed among MSM in Moscow and St. Petersburg (January 2008). Participants were enrolled by local NGO partners via peer-recruitment, underwent a brief behavioral survey, and were offered rapid, oral HIV screening. Factors associated with HIV infection were assessed using logistic regression. A total of 401 participants were enrolled. HIV prevalence was comparable in the two cities (6.0% in Moscow, 5.5% in St. Petersburg). Approximately half (49.3%) were under age 25, 75.1% of all men reported unprotected anal intercourse (UAI), and 21.5% reported engaging in unprotected exchange sex in the prior 12 months. HIV infection was the highest (7.7%) among the youngest MSM, those aged 18-22 years. Never having tested for HIV (AOR=6.2; 95% CI: 1.8, 21.9) and ever injecting drugs (AOR=11.3; 95% CI: 2.6, 50.4) were independently associated with HIV infection. We found significant overall HIV prevalence among MSM in Moscow and St. Petersburg, particularly among the youngest men. The majority of men reported ongoing high-risk behaviors, indicating the potential for further spread. HIV prevention efforts need to specifically focus on urban MSM in Russia, encourage testing, and target injection risks to address this epidemic. PMID:21978380

  10. A study of the prevalence and risk factors leading to HIV infection among a sample of street children and youth of Kathmandu

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The true prevalence of HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases among street children in Nepal is virtually unknown while information on related behavioural risk factors in this population is non-existent. The risk of HIV infection among street children and adolescents may be especially high due to their marginalized social and economic conditions. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of HIV infection among a sample of street children and youth of Kathmandu and to identify risk factors associated with HIV infection in this group. A sample of street children and youth was recruited based on the purposive sampling of ten streets in Kathmandu, Nepal, known to have a high density of street children and youth. A total of 251 street children (aged 11–16 years) and youth (aged 17–24 years) were enrolled, with informed consent, from November, 2008 through June, 2009. Most of the participants (95%) were male. Case status was determined by serological assessment of HIV status; data on risk factors were obtained using structured survey interviews. HIV prevalence and rates of a number of behavioural risk factors suspected to play a role in HIV transmission among street children and youth were determined, including unprotected sex, intravenous drug use, and other risky sex and substance use behaviours. Results Among the 251 children and youth, we found an overall HIV prevalence of 7.6%. As the sample size of females was small (n = 13) and the behavioural risk factors are likely to be quite different for boys and girls, we conducted separate analyses by gender. As our small sample of females is unlikely to be representative and lacks power for statistical testing, our report focuses on the results for the males surveyed.The strongest behavioural risk factor to emerge from this study was intravenous drug use; 30% of the male subjects were injecting drug users and 20% of those were HIV positive. Furthermore, frequency of drug injection was

  11. Patterns and predictors of high-risk sexual behavior in female partners of HIV-infected men with hemophilia.

    PubMed

    Dublin, S; Rosenberg, P S; Goedert, J J

    1992-05-01

    This study sought to characterize and quantify the high-risk heterosexual activity in HIV-discordant couples. An analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal questionnaire data from 217 HIV-negative female sexual partners of HIV-infected hemophiliac men were included in this study. There was a comparison of prevalence rates of anal sex, oral sex, vaginal intercourse with or without condoms, and use of other contraceptives between 1985-91. Logistic regression analysis of demographic, sexual, and clinical variables was used to predict unprotected vaginal sex. Actuarial estimates of semiannual relapse rates to unsafe sex were used. The proportion of women at low risk increases from 7 to 69% between 1985-91, mainly because more women were using condoms during all acts of vaginal intercourse. Other contraceptive practices did not change during this time. The proportion who engaged in oral or anal sex decreased from 26 to 13% and from 13% to 4%, respectively. Unprotected vaginal sex was more common among women who enrolled earlier, had less education, engaged in oral or anal sex, and among those whose partners had not had AIDS. Unprotected vaginal sex before enrollment was the strongest predictor of this high-risk activity during followup. 2-year rates of relapse to high-risk behavior were significantly higher among women who enrolled at high risk compared with those who enrolled at low risk (39 vs 8%, p=0.005). Although high risk sexual behavior become much less prevalent in this population between 1985-91, many continued to have unprotected vaginal sex occasionally. Counseling efforts should target couples who have been the most sexually active or have less education, and should emphasize not only initial risk reduction but also maintenance of low-risk behavior. PMID:1616653

  12. Risk perception of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Nigerian commercial sex workers living in Barcelona: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Coma Auli, Núria; Mejía-Lancheros, Cília; Berenguera, Anna; Mayans, Martí Vall; Lasagabaster, Maider Arando; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV are a serious global public health issue. These diseases are largely preventable, as they are directly and indirectly associated with potentially modifiable factors, including socioeconomic conditions. Sexual transmission is responsible for over 75% of new HIV infections worldwide. Moreover, commercial sex workers and their clients are two of the groups at the highest risk of acquiring and transmitting these infectious diseases, due to an extensive number of sexual encounters and the various factors related to commercial sex situations. This qualitative study aims to deepen the understanding of the risk perception of STIs and HIV and their associated factors in Nigerian commercial sex workers in the city of Barcelona. Methods and analysis This is a qualitative, descriptive, interpretive study based on a social constructivist and phenomenological perspective conducted on a saturated sample of Nigerian commercial sex workers in the city of Barcelona. Data will be collected through semistructured individual and triangular group interviews. Information will be examined using a sociological discourse analysis, allowing us to understand the social and individual factors related to the risk perception of STIs and HIV in commercial sex workers. Discussion Qualitative studies are an important element in identifying individual, social and contextual factors directly or indirectly related to the health/disease process. This qualitative study will provide essential knowledge to improve health promotion, prevention strategies and effective management of STIs both for commercial sex workers and their clients. Ethics This study has been approved by the clinical research ethics committee (CEIC) of IDIAP Jordi Gol in Barcelona, 2012. PMID:23901029

  13. Programmatic Implications of Acute and Early HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Suthar, Amitabh B; Granich, Reuben M; Kato, Masaya; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Montaner, Julio S G; Williams, Brian G

    2015-11-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection includes acute, early, chronic, and late stages. Acute HIV infection lasts approximately 3 weeks and early HIV infection, which includes acute HIV infection, lasts approximately 7 weeks. Many testing and blood screening algorithms detect HIV antibodies about 3 weeks after HIV infection. Incidence estimates are based on results of modeling, cohort studies, surveillance, and/or assays. Viral load is the key modifiable risk factor for HIV transmission and peaks during acute and early HIV infection. Empirical evidence characterizing the impact of acute and early HIV infection on the spread of the HIV epidemic are limited. Time trends of HIV prevalence collected from concentrated and generalized epidemics suggest that acute and early HIV infection may have a limited role in population HIV transmission. Collectively, these data suggest that acute and early HIV infection is relatively short and does not currently require fundamentally different programmatic approaches to manage the HIV/AIDS epidemic in most settings. Research and surveillance will inform which epidemic contexts and phases may require tailored strategies for these stages of HIV infection. PMID:26310309

  14. Prevalence of HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and risk behaviours among female sex workers in Nairobi, Kenya: results of a respondent driven sampling study.

    PubMed

    Musyoki, Helgar; Kellogg, Timothy A; Geibel, Scott; Muraguri, Nicholas; Okal, Jerry; Tun, Waimar; Fisher Raymond, H; Dadabhai, Sufia; Sheehy, Meredith; Kim, Andrea A

    2015-02-01

    We conducted a respondent driven sampling survey to estimate HIV prevalence and risk behavior among female sex workers (FSWs) in Nairobi, Kenya. Women aged 18 years and older who reported selling sex to a man at least once in the past 3 months were eligible to participate. Consenting FSWs completed a behavioral questionnaire and were tested for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Adjusted population-based prevalence and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using RDS analysis tool. Factors significantly associated with HIV infection were assessed using log-binomial regression analysis. A total of 596 eligible participants were included in the analysis. Overall HIV prevalence was 29.5 % (95 % CI 24.7-34.9). Median age was 30 years (IQR 25-38 years); median duration of sex work was 12 years (IQR 8-17 years). The most frequent client-seeking venues were bars (76.6 %) and roadsides (29.3 %). The median number of clients per week was seven (IQR 4-18 clients). HIV testing was high with 86.6 % reported ever been tested for HIV and, of these, 63.1 % testing within the past 12 months. Of all women, 59.7 % perceived themselves at 'great risk' for HIV infection. Of HIV-positive women, 51.0 % were aware of their infection. In multivariable analysis, increasing age, inconsistent condom use with paying clients, and use of a male condom as a method of contraception were independently associated with unrecognized HIV infection. Prevalence among STIs was low, ranging from 0.9 % for syphilis, 1.1 % for gonorrhea, and 3.1 % for Chlamydia. The data suggest high prevalence of HIV among FSWs in Nairobi. Targeted and routine HIV and STI combination prevention strategies need to be scaled up or established to meet the needs of this population. PMID:25428282

  15. High Blood Pressure and Related Factors Among Individuals at High Risk for HIV/Sexually Transmitted Infections.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soohyun; Whittemore, Robin; Jeon, Sangchoon; Davey-Rothwell, Melissa A; Latkin, Carl

    2016-06-01

    Data from a social network-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention study with a total of 330 men and women at high risk for HIV/STIs were used to examine the relationships between substance use, depressive symptoms, general health, cardiovascular disease risk factors, sociodemographic characteristics, and systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP). Approximately 60% of the participants had prehypertension to stage 2 hypertension. In the base model, older patients (P<.0001), men (P=.003), and patients with poorer self-reported health (P=.029) were significantly associated with high SBP, whereas older age (P<.001) and higher body mass index (P<.001) were significantly associated with higher DBP. After adjusting for the base model, high frequency of alcohol drinking and high frequency of binge drinking remained significant for high SBP and DBP. These data suggest that future cardiovascular disease programs should target moderate alcohol consumption to improve blood pressure among individuals at high risk for HIV/STIs. PMID:26514661

  16. Children Who Acquire HIV Infection Perinatally Are at Higher Risk of Early Death than Those Acquiring Infection through Breastmilk: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Becquet, Renaud; Marston, Milly; Dabis, François; Moulton, Lawrence H.; Gray, Glenda; Coovadia, Hoosen M.; Essex, Max; Ekouevi, Didier K.; Jackson, Debra; Coutsoudis, Anna; Kilewo, Charles; Leroy, Valériane; Wiktor, Stefan Z.; Nduati, Ruth; Msellati, Philippe; Zaba, Basia; Ghys, Peter D.; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background Assumptions about survival of HIV-infected children in Africa without antiretroviral therapy need to be updated to inform ongoing UNAIDS modelling of paediatric HIV epidemics among children. Improved estimates of infant survival by timing of HIV-infection (perinatally or postnatally) are thus needed. Methodology/Principal Findings A pooled analysis was conducted of individual data of all available intervention cohorts and randomized trials on prevention of HIV mother-to-child transmission in Africa. Studies were right-censored at the time of infant antiretroviral initiation. Overall mortality rate per 1000 child-years of follow-up was calculated by selected maternal and infant characteristics. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to estimate survival curves by child's HIV infection status and timing of HIV infection. Individual data from 12 studies were pooled, with 12,112 children of HIV-infected women. Mortality rates per 1,000 child-years follow-up were 39.3 and 381.6 for HIV-uninfected and infected children respectively. One year after acquisition of HIV infection, an estimated 26% postnatally and 52% perinatally infected children would have died; and 4% uninfected children by age 1 year. Mortality was independently associated with maternal death (adjusted hazard ratio 2.2, 95%CI 1.6–3.0), maternal CD4<350 cells/ml (1.4, 1.1–1.7), postnatal (3.1, 2.1–4.1) or peri-partum HIV-infection (12.4, 10.1–15.3). Conclusions/Results These results update previous work and inform future UNAIDS modelling by providing survival estimates for HIV-infected untreated African children by timing of infection. We highlight the urgent need for the prevention of peri-partum and postnatal transmission and timely assessment of HIV infection in infants to initiate antiretroviral care and support for HIV-infected children. PMID:22383946

  17. Prevalence and risk factors associated with HIV infection, hepatitis and syphilis in a state prison of São Paulo.

    PubMed

    El Maerrawi, Ilham; Carvalho, Heráclito Barbosa

    2015-02-01

    Given the importance of the control of sexually transmitted infections in the general population and specifically in the prison system, we rolled out this cross-sectional study in 2007. Standard questionnaires and blood samples were accessed among 680 prisoners. The protocol was approved by the Ethics Committee. We determined the following seroprevalences: HIV, 1.8% (95%CI = 0.1-3.3); HBV, 21.0% (95%CI = 17.8-25.1); HBV, 5.3% (95%CI = 3.5-7.6) and syphilis 5.3% (95%CI = 3.5-7.6). Logistic regression identified significant associations with (p < 0.05): HIV: injectable drug use (OR = 15.4), age over 30 years (OR = 13.3), cocaine use (OR = 5.4) and crack-cocaine use (OR = 5.2); HBV: injectable drug use (OR = 3.4), history of previous sexually transmitted infection (OR = 2.3), age over 30 years (OR = 1.9) and more than 5 years in prison (OR = 2.2); HCV: injectable drug use (OR = 9.65), marijuana use in prison (OR = 2.9) and age over 30 years (OR = 8.4) and for syphilis: homosexual relationship (OR = 7.8) and previous syphilis reported (OR = 7.7). These prevalences remain high when compared to the general population, however, HIV infection had decreased compared with previous studies in prisoners while the other studied infections remained unchanged. Preventive actions to reduce sexual and parenteral risk have been advocated. However, measures capable of controlling these infections still have not made an impact. PMID:24733152

  18. Risk factors for anal human papillomavirus infection type 16 among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Alexandra L.; Efird, Jimmy T.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Berry, J. Michael; Jay, Naomi; Palefsky, Joel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) are at high risk of anal cancer compared with the general population. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly HPV 16, is causally associated with anal cancer. However, risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection are poorly understood. We determined the prevalence and risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection in a population of HIV-positive MSM, most of whom were being treated with antiretroviral therapy. Design Cross-sectional data from the baseline visit of a 4-year prospective cohort study. Methods 348 HIV-positive MSM were recruited in San Francisco and received a detailed sexual behavior risk-factor questionnaire. An anal swab was used to collect specimens for HPV type-specific DNA testing using L1 HPV DNA PCR. We used log-binomial multivariable models to determine risk factors for anal HPV 16 infection. Results 92% of HIV-positive MSM had at least one anal HPV type, 80% had at least one oncogenic HPV type and 42% had HPV 16. Non-Hispanic white race and higher level of education were associated with a decreased risk of HPV 16 infection. A higher number of total male partners was associated with HPV 16 (RR: 1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4, p=0.01) for 201–1000 partners compared with 1–200. Injection drug use (IDU) was independently associated with anal HPV 16 infection (RR: 1.5, 95%CI 1.2–1.9, p=0.003). Conclusions The prevalence of anal HPV infection, including HPV 16, is high in HIV-positive MSM. HIV-positive MSM should be counseled about the risk associated with increased partners and IDU. PMID:23614994

  19. Risk perception of sexually transmitted infections and HIV in Nigerian commercial sex workers in Barcelona: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Coma Auli, Núria; Mejía-Lancheros, Cília; Berenguera, Anna; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to determine in detail the risk perception of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV, and the contextual circumstances, in Nigerian commercial sex workers (CSWs) in Barcelona. Design A qualitative study with a phenomenological approach. Setting Raval area in Barcelona. Participants 8 CSWs working in Barcelona. Methods A phenomenological study was carried out with Nigerian CSWs in Barcelona. Sampling was theoretical, taking into account: different age ranges; women with and without a partner; women with and without children; and women participating or not in STI/HIV-prevention workshops. Information was obtained by means of eight semistructured individual interviews. An interpretative content analysis was conducted by four analysts. Results Illegal immigrant status, educational level, financial situation and work, and cultural context had mixed effects on CSW knowledge of, exposure to, and prevention and treatment of STI and HIV. CSWs were aware of the higher risk of STI associated with their occupation. They identified condoms as the best preventive method and used them during intercourse with clients. They also implemented other preventive behaviours such as personal hygiene after intercourse. Control of sexual services provided, health education and healthcare services had a positive effect on decreasing exposure and better management of STI/HIV. Conclusions Nigerian CSWs are a vulnerable group because of their poor socioeconomic status. The perception of risk in this group and their preventive behaviours are based on personal determinants, beliefs and experiences from their home country and influences from the host country. Interventions aimed at CSWs must address knowledge gaps, risk behaviours and structural elements. PMID:26078307

  20. Risk of Active Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Patients in Taiwan with Free Access to HIV Care and a Positive T-Spot.TB Test

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hsin-Yun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Liu, Wen-Chun; Su, Yi-Ching; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been used to identify individuals at risk for developing active tuberculosis (TB). However, data regarding the risk of TB development in HIV-infected patients testing positive for IGRAs remain sparse in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods Between 2011 and 2013, 608 HIV-infected patients without active TB undergoing T-Spot.TB testing were enrolled in this prospective observational study at a university hospital designated for HIV care in Taiwan with a declining TB incidence from 72 per 100,000 population in 2005 to 53 per 100,000 population in 2012. All of the subjects were followed until September 30, 2014. The national TB registry was accessed to identify any TB cases among those lost to follow-up. Results T-Spot.TB tested negative in 534 patients (87.8%), positive in 64 patients (10.5%), and indeterminate in 10 patients (1.6%). In multivariate analysis, positive T-Spot.TB was significantly associated with older age (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.172 per 10-year increase; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.022-1.344, P=0.023), past history of TB (AOR, 13.412; 95% CI, 6.106-29.460, P<0.001), and higher CD4 counts at enrollment (AOR, per 50-cell/μl increase, 1.062; 95% CI, 1.017-1.109, P=0.007). Of the 64 patients testing positive for T-Spot.TB, none received isoniazid preventive therapy and all but 5 received combination antiretroviral therapy at the end of follow-up with the latest CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load being 592.8 cells/μL and 1.85 log10 copies/mL, respectively. One patient (1.6%) developed active TB after 167 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), resulting in an incidence rate of 0.599 per 100 PFYU. None of the 534 patients testing negative for T-Spot.TB developed TB after 1380 PYFU, nor did the 24 patients with old TB and positive T-Spot.TB tests develop TB after 62.33 PYFU. Conclusions The risk of developing active TB in HIV-infected patients with positive T-Spot.TB receiving

  1. Clinically Significant Depressive Symptoms as a Risk Factor for HIV Infection Among Black MSM in Massachusetts

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Skeer, Margie; Bright, Donna; Cranston, Kevin; Isenberg, Deborah; Bland, Sean; Barker, Thomas A.; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    High rates of depression have been observed among men who have sex with men (MSM) relative to the general adult male population; however, a dearth of research has explored depression among Black MSM. Black MSM (n = 197) recruited via modified respondent-driven sampling between January and July 2008 completed an interviewer-administered quantitative assessment and voluntary HIV counseling and testing. Bivariate and multivariable logistic regression procedures examined the associations of demographics, behavioral HIV risk factors, and psychosocial variables with depressive symptoms by severity, using the 20-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D). Adjusting for demographic and behavioral variables, significant factors associated with (1) clinically significant depressive symptoms (33%; CES-D score ≥ 16): being publicly insured by Medicaid, having serodiscordant anal sex with a casual male partner, and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (2) moderate depressive symptoms (19%; CES-D score 16–26): having serodiscordant unprotected anal sex with a casual male partner and being diagnosed with an STD in the prior 12 months; (3) severe depressive symptoms (14%; CES-D score 27+): being publicly insured by Medicaid and reporting difficulty accessing healthcare in the past 12 months. Moderately depressed Black MSM may be more likely to engage in behaviors that place them at increased risk for HIV and other STDs. HIV prevention interventions for Black MSM may benefit from incorporating screening and/or treatment for depression, allowing MSM who are depressed to respond more effectively to behavioral change approaches. PMID:19462228

  2. Prevalence of HIV, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Risk Behaviours Among Female Sex Workers in Nairobi, Kenya: Results of a Respondent Driven Sampling Study

    PubMed Central

    Kellogg, Timothy A.; Geibel, Scott; Muraguri, Nicholas; Okal, Jerry; Tun, Waimar; Raymond, H. Fisher; Dadabhai, Sufia; Sheehy, Meredith; Kim, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    We conducted a respondent driven sampling survey to estimate HIV prevalence and risk behavior among female sex workers (FSWs) in Nairobi, Kenya. Women aged 18 years and older who reported selling sex to a man at least once in the past 3 months were eligible to participate. Consenting FSWs completed a behavioral questionnaire and were tested for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Adjusted population-based prevalence and 95 % confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using RDS analysis tool. Factors significantly associated with HIV infection were assessed using log-binomial regression analysis. A total of 596 eligible participants were included in the analysis. Overall HIV prevalence was 29.5 % (95 % CI 24.7–34.9). Median age was 30 years (IQR 25–38 years); median duration of sex work was 12 years (IQR 8–17 years). The most frequent client-seeking venues were bars (76.6 %) and roadsides (29.3 %). The median number of clients per week was seven (IQR 4–18 clients). HIV testing was high with 86.6 % reported ever been tested for HIV and, of these, 63.1 % testing within the past 12 months. Of all women, 59.7 % perceived themselves at ‘great risk’ for HIV infection. Of HIV-positive women, 51.0 % were aware of their infection. In multivariable analysis, increasing age, inconsistent condom use with paying clients, and use of a male condom as a method of contraception were independently associated with unrecognized HIV infection. Prevalence among STIs was low, ranging from 0.9 % for syphilis, 1.1 % for gonorrhea, and 3.1 % for Chlamydia. The data suggest high prevalence of HIV among FSWs in Nairobi. Targeted and routine HIV and STI combination prevention strategies need to be scaled up or established to meet the needs of this population. PMID:25428282

  3. Immune-Correlates Analysis of an HIV-1 Vaccine Efficacy Trial Reveals an Association of Nonspecific Interferon-γ Secretion with Increased HIV-1 Infection Risk: A Cohort-Based Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunda; Duerr, Ann; Frahm, Nicole; Zhang, Lily; Moodie, Zoe; De Rosa, Steve; McElrath, M. Juliana; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Elevated risk of HIV-1 infection among recipients of an adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5)-vectored HIV-1 vaccine was previously reported in the Step HIV-1 vaccine efficacy trial. We assessed pre-infection cellular immune responses measured at 4 weeks after the second vaccination to determine their roles in HIV-1 infection susceptibility among Step study male participants. Methods We examined ex vivo interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) using an ELISpot assay in 112 HIV-infected and 962 uninfected participants. In addition, we performed flow cytometric assays to examine T-cell activation, and ex vivo IFN-γ and interleukin-2 secretion from CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We accounted for the sub-sampling design in Cox proportional hazards models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) of HIV-1 infection per 1-loge increase of the immune responses. Findings We found that HIV-specific immune responses were not associated with risk of HIV-1 infection. However, each 1-loge increase of mock responses measured by the ELISpot assay (i.e., IFN-γ secretion in the absence of antigen-specific stimulation) was associated with a 62% increase of HIV-1 infection risk among vaccine recipients (HR = 1.62, 95% CI: (1.28, 2.04), p<0.001). This association remains after accounting for CD4+ or CD8+ T-cell activation. We observed a moderate correlation between ELISpot mock responses and CD4+ T-cells secreting IFN-γ (ρ = 0.33, p = 0.007). In addition, the effect of the Step vaccine on infection risk appeared to vary with ELISpot mock response levels, especially among participants who had pre-existing anti-Ad5 antibodies (interaction p = 0.04). Conclusions The proportion of cells, likely CD4+ T-cells, producing IFN-γ without stimulation by exogenous antigen appears to carry information beyond T-cell activation and baseline characteristics that predict risk of HIV-1 infection. These results motivate additional investigation to understand

  4. Prevalence of HCV Infections and Co-Infection With HBV and HIV and Associated Risk Factors Among Addicts in Drug Treatment Centers, Lorestan Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Norouzian, Hossein; Gholami, Mohammadreza; Shakib, Pegah; Goudarzi, Gholamreza; Ghobadian Diali, Hamze; Rezvani, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis C is an infectious disease caused by blood-borne pathogen, hepatitis C virus (HCV). Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of HCV infection and associated risk factors among addicts in drug treatment centers in Lorestan Province, Iran. Patients and Methods: A cross-sectional sero-behavioral survey was given to drug addicts in the drug treatment centers of Khorramabad, Lorestan Province, Iran during June 2012 - March 2013. Drug addicts were interviewed using a standard questionnaire including demographic, imprisonment history, and HCV-related risk behavior items. Thereafter, the sera drawn from the participants were tested for anti-HCV antibody (Ab), anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Ab, and hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Results: The mean age of the cohorts was 31.7. Up to 60.2% of drug users had educational levels less than high school, 67.5% were self-employed, and 32.5% were office workers. The mean duration of drug injection was 6.8 years. Statistical analyses indicated that the prevalence of HCV among drug addicts was positively associated with age, past incarceration, drug injection history, the duration of drug use, and tattooing. In addition, 16.23% of volunteers were HCV-positive. Of those infected with HCV, 1.10% was co-infected with HBV, 2.95% were positive for HIV, and 0.36% of HCV-positive cases were infected with all three viruses. Conclusions: The high prevalence of HCV infection among this group implies a high rate of transmission and exposure to the risk of serious diseases. It is important that the high prevalence of HCV infection be taken into consideration to control further transmission of this infection. PMID:27162762

  5. The Effect of HIV Infection on the Risk, Frequency, and Intensity of Plasmodium falciparum Parasitemia in Primigravid and Multigravid Women in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Nkhoma, Ella T.; Bowman, Natalie M.; Kalilani-Phiri, Linda; Mwapasa, Victor; Rogerson, Stephen J.; Meshnick, Steven R.

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is common in pregnant women in many malaria-endemic regions and may increase risk of placental parasitemia. Placental malaria is more common in primigravidae than multigravidae, but the relationship between HIV and malaria across gravidities is not well characterized. We recruited pregnant Malawian women during the second trimester and followed them until delivery. Parasitemia was assessed at enrollment, follow-up visits, and delivery, when placental blood was sampled. There was no difference in risk of parasitemia between HIV-positive and HIV-negative primigravidae. Among multigravidae, HIV-infected women had greater than twice the risk of parasitemia as HIV-uninfected women throughout follow-up. Human immunodeficiency virus was also associated with more frequent peripheral parasitemia in multigravidae but not primigravidae. Both HIV and primigravid status were independently associated with higher peripheral and placental parasite densities. Although risk of parasitemia is lower in multigravidae than primigravidae, the HIV effect on risk of malaria is more pronounced in multigravidae. PMID:23045249

  6. Immunology of Pediatric HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Nicole H.; Aldrovandi, Grace M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Most infants born to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women escape HIV infection. Infants evade infection despite an immature immune system and, in the case of breastfeeding, prolonged repetitive, exposure. If infants become infected, the course of their infection and response to treatment differs dramatically depending upon the timing (in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding) and potentially the route of their infection. Perinatally acquired HIV infection occurs during a critical window of immune development. HIV’s perturbation of this dynamic process may account for the striking age-dependent differences in HIV disease progression. HIV infection also profoundly disrupts the maternal immune system upon which infants rely for protection and immune instruction. Therefore, it is not surprising that infants who escape HIV infection still suffer adverse effects. In this review, we highlight the unique aspects of pediatric HIV transmission and pathogenesis with a focus on mechanisms by which HIV infection during immune ontogeny may allow discovery of key elements for protection and control from HIV. PMID:23772619

  7. HIV infection and maternal and child health.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, P

    1988-01-01

    Collaborative studies to determine the consequences of pregnancy in HIV infected women have been begun in the last 2 years. Both HIV and HIV antibodies pass through the placenta, and 30-50% of infants born to HIV infected mothers are infected in utero. In developed countries it is feasible to screen pregnant women in high risk groups for HIV positivity. In developing countries, where heterosexual transmission is the main route of infection, there are no high risk groups, and it is not feasible to screen all pregnant women. Some data have shown that HIV infection in pregnancy is associated with intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, and high infant mortality. There is no evidence that cesarean section reduces infection in neonates, and it should not be performed on HIV infected women. By 1987 almost 1.5% of AIDS cases in the US were in vertically infected infants. In Africa also the main factor in HIV in infancy is vertical transmission. AIDS in infancy follows 1 of 2 distinct patterns: failure to thrive and death from Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia within the 1st year or else apparent health during infancy but death from opportunistic infections by age 3. HIV infection in childhood is uncommon and can usually be traced to blood transfusions or unsterilized needles used for vaccinations. Neurological symptoms often develop early in children. Breast feeding probably does not infect any infants who have not already been infected in utero, and in developing counties breast feeding is still the best assurance of total nutrition. Pooled, unpasteurized milk banks, on the other hand, represent an unnecessary danger, and milk donors should be screened. Since there is no evidence that routine immunization accelerates the course of HIV infection, and since mass screening is not feasible in developing countries, the World Health Organization recommends that routine immunizations be continued. Since the best protection from in utero HIV infection is the use of

  8. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Infection in HIV Coinfected Individuals in Eastern India with Risk Factor Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Soumyabrata; Sarkar, Soma; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy; Biswas, Rahul; SenGupta, Manideepa

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is the cause of most genital herpes while HSV-1 is responsible for orolabial and facial lesions. In immunocompromised individuals, like HIV patients, impaired immunity leads to more frequent symptomatic and asymptomatic HSV infection. Fifty-two blood samples from HIV patients with clinically diagnosed HSV infection were taken as cases, while 45 blood samples each from HIV-infected (HIV control) and noninfected patients without any herpetic lesion (non-HIV control) were taken as control. Serum was tested for IgM and IgG antibodies of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 by ELISA. The seroprevalence was compared among the three groups of study population, considering the demographic and socioeconomic parameters. The HSV-2 IgM was significantly higher (p < 0.005) in the HIV patient group (34.6%) than the HIV control (2.2%) and non-HIV control (2.2%) groups, whereas HSV-2 IgG seroprevalence was higher in both HIV patient (61.5%) and HIV control (57.8%) groups than the non-HIV control group (17.8%). The prevalence of HSV-2 was significantly higher in persons with multiple partners and in the reproductive age group. The overall seroprevalence of HSV-1 IgM was too low (<5%), whereas it was too high (about 90%) with HSV-1 IgG in all three study groups. PMID:26557849

  9. Sexual Risk Behaviors Among HIV-Infected South African Men and Women with Their Partners in a Primary Care Program: Implications for Couples-Based Prevention

    PubMed Central

    de Bruyn, Guy; Lurie, Mark N.; Modisenyane, Tebogo; Triche, Elizabeth W.; Gray, Glenda E.; Welte, Alex; Martinson, Neil A.

    2011-01-01

    We studied 1163 sexually-active HIV-infected South African men and women in an urban primary care program to understand patterns of sexual behaviors and whether these behaviors differed by partner HIV status. Overall, 40% reported a HIV-positive partner and 60% a HIV-negative or status unknown partner; and 17.5% reported >2 sex acts in the last 2 weeks, 16.4% unprotected sex in the last 6 months, and 3.7% >1 sex partner in the last 6 months. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) was consistently associated with decreased sexual risk behaviors, as well as with reporting a HIV-negative or status unknown partner. The odds of sexual risk behaviors differed by sex; and were generally higher among participants reporting a HIV-positive partner, but continued among those with a HIV-negative or status unknown partner. These data support ART as a means of HIV prevention. Engaging in sexual risk behaviors primarily with HIV-positive partners was not widely practiced in this setting, emphasizing the need for couples-based prevention. PMID:21476005

  10. The Presence of Psychiatric Disorders in HIV-Infected Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Elizabeth R.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Many women of low socioeconomic status who have contracted HIV qualify for individual, dual, and multiple psychiatric diagnoses that predate their knowledge of their HIV infection. Earlier intervention addressing these problems might have prevented the onset of psychiatric disorders as well as high-risk behaviors that lead to HIV infection. (FC)

  11. Risk behaviors of homeless men in India: a potential bridge population for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Arunansu; Roy, Krishnendu; Saha, Indrajit; Mitra, Jayashree; Detels, Roger

    2008-07-01

    This study investigated whether homeless men are a bridge group for transmission of HIV to the general population in India. A cross-sectional study design was used to measure subjects' past and current sexual activities. We surveyed 493 of 606 homeless men aged 18-49 years who live in public places in Kolkata, India, who were invited to take part in a structured interview, using a CD player and earphones. Almost two-thirds of respondents had never attended school. Sex with commercial sex worker (CSWs), multiple sex partners, and inconsistent condom use were common. About 90% of married homeless men visited CSWs, but only 3.3% consistently used condoms. AIDS awareness and risk perception were very low. Less education and being married but not currently living with wife were associated with high-risk sexual behaviors. Homeless men should be considered a potential bridge for HIV transmission from CSWs to the general population. Appropriate non-written communication strategies targeted to homeless people are urgently needed. Community intervention programs targeting the homeless, such as the 'Popular Opinion Leader' model, should be designed and evaluated. PMID:18080739

  12. [Pneumocystosis during HIV infection].

    PubMed

    El Fane, M; Sodqi, M; Oulad Lahsen, A; Chakib, A; Marih, L; Marhoum El Filali, K

    2016-08-01

    Pneumocystosis is an opportunistic disease caused by invasion of unicellular fungus Pneumocystic jirovecii which is responsible for febrile pneumonia among patients with cellular immunodeficiency especially those HIV infected. Despite the decreasing of its incidence due to the introduction of antiretroviral therapy, as well as anti-Pneumocystis prophylaxis among these patients, Pneumocystis pneumonia remains the first AIDS-defining event and a leading cause of mortality among HIV-infected patients. The usual radiological presentation is that of diffuse interstitial pneumonia. The diagnosis is confirmed by the detection of trophozoides and/or cysts P. jirovecii in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples using several staining techniques. The use of polymerase chain reaction in the BAL samples in conjunction with standard immunofluorescent or colorimetric tests have allowed for more has allowed for more rapid and accurate diagnosis. The standard regimen of treatment is the association of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole which has been utilized as an effective treatment with a favourable recovery. Early HIV diagnosis and antiretroviral therapy should reduce the incidence of this dreaded disease. PMID:27349824

  13. Risk factors for HIV and syphilis infection among male sex workers who have sex with men: a cross-sectional study in Hangzhou, China, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yan; Zhu, Chunyan; Chen, Shuchang; Geng, Qingshan; Fu, Rong; Li, Xiting; Xu, Ke; Cheng, Jie; Ding, Jianming

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HIV and syphilis infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) in male sex workers (MSW). Design Cross-sectional survey. Setting Hangzhou, China. Participants 259 MSW in MSM were recruited by respondent-driven sampling from May 2011 to December 2011.The inclusion criteria were: (1) age ≥18 years; (2) engaging in sex with men in the previous year and (3) willing to cooperate in the implementation of the study. Outcome measures HIV-related knowledge, high-risk behaviour and condom use. Results Among these MSW in MSM, 23.2% were infected with HIV and/or syphilis, 8.9% were infected only with HIV, 12.7% only with syphilis and 1.5% with HIV/syphilis co-infection; 96.6% sold sex to males, 8.9% bought sex from males and 15.4% sold sex to females; 49.0% had non-commercial sex behaviours with males and 24.3% with females. The rate of condom use while having commercial sex with clients was 86.9% and 53.3% (selling anal and oral sex to males, respectively), 95.5% (buying sex from males) and 77.5% (selling sex to females), respectively. Regarding their non-commercial sex behaviour, the rate of condom use was 77.2% (with males) and 49.2% (with females), respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that age >30 years (OR 1.055; 95% CIs 1.015 to 1.095) and having ≥10 non-commercial male sex partners (OR, 1.573; 95% CI 1.018 to 2.452) were significantly associated with HIV/syphilis infection, while heterosexuality (OR, 0.238; 95% CI 0.066 to 0.855) was significantly associated with a low HIV/syphilis infection rate. Conclusions The MSW in MSM population in Hangzhou has a high prevalence of HIV/syphilis infection, poor perceived risks of HIV and more engagement in unsafe sex with its clients and partners, in addition to a low rate of condom use. These risk factors may account for their relatively high infection rate of HIV/syphilis. PMID:25922096

  14. Incident Infection and Resistance Mutation Analysis of Dried Blood Spots Collected in a Field Study of HIV Risk Groups, 2007-2010

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xierong; Smith, Amanda J.; Forrest, David W.; Cardenas, Gabriel A.; Beck, Dano W.; LaLota, Marlene; Metsch, Lisa R.; Sionean, Catlainn; Owen, S. Michele; Johnson, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the utility of cost-effective dried blood spot (DBS) field sampling for incidence and drug resistance surveillance of persons at high risk for HIV infection. Methods We evaluated DBS collected in 2007–2010 in non-clinical settings by finger-stick from HIV-positive heterosexuals at increased risk of HIV infection (n = 124), men who have sex with men (MSM, n = 110), and persons who inject drugs (PWID, n = 58). Relative proportions of recent-infection findings among risk groups were assessed at avidity index (AI) cutoffs of ≤25%, ≤30%, and ≤35%, corresponding to an infection mean duration of recency (MDR) of 220.6, 250.4, and 278.3 days, respectively. Drug resistance mutation prevalence was compared among the risk groups and avidity indices. Results HIV antibody avidity testing of all self-reported ARV-naïve persons (n = 186) resulted in 9.7%, 11.3% and 14.0% with findings within the 221, 250, and 278-day MDRs, respectively. The proportion of ARV-naïve MSM, heterosexuals, and PWID reporting only one risk category who had findings below the suggested 30% AI was 23.1%, 6.9% and 3.6% (p<0.001), respectively. MSM had the highest prevalence of drug resistance and the only cases of transmitted multi-class resistance. Among the ARV-experienced, MSM had disproportionately more recent-infection results than did heterosexuals and PWID. Conclusions The disproportionately higher recent-infection findings for MSM as compared to PWID and heterosexuals increased as the MDR window increased. Unreported ARV use might explain greater recent-infection findings and drug resistance in this MSM population. DBS demonstrated utility in expanded HIV testing; however, optimal field handling is key to accurate recent-infection estimates. PMID:27415433

  15. The Prevalence and Risk Factors of Hepatitis Delta Virus in HIV/HBV Co-Infected Patients in Shiraz, Iran, 2012.

    PubMed

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Taheri, Mohammad; Lankarani, Kamran Bagheri; Gholami, Mina; Lari, Mahmood Amini; Faramarzi, Hossein; Sarvari, Jamal

    2015-09-01

    Evidence has shown that liver disease caused by hepatitis viruses can be more aggressive and severe in HIV infected subjects. Therefore, the present cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the seroprevalence of HDV infection among HIV/HBV co-infected clients in Shiraz, southwest Iran. In this study, 178 patients co-infected with HBV and HIV individuals were enrolled. The diagnosis of HIV infection was documented based on serological assays. The demographic and complementary data were collected by a questionnaire. HBsAg and HDV Ab were detected by commercial quantitative enzyme linked immunosorbent assay kits according to the manufacturer's instructions. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) were also measured. The mean age of the participants was 37.4±7.4 years (range 22-63). 175 (98.4 %) patients were male and 3 (1.6 %) were female. Among 178 patients co-infected with HIV/HBV, 35 cases (19.7%, 95% CI: 14%-25%) were anti-HDV‏ positive and 143 (80.3%) were negative for anti-HDV. HDV exposure in HIV/HBV co-infected patients was associated with blood transfusion (P=0.002, OR: 14.3) and prison history (P=0.01, OR: 2.31) but not with age, marital status, unsafe sex contact, and injection drug abuse. Our data showed a relatively high prevalence of HDV infection in HIV infected population in Shiraz, Iran. The high frequency of HDV Ab in patients with blood transfusion and prison history reveals that HDV transmission occurs more frequently in the parental route than sexual contacts; therefore, blood screening for HDV diagnosis in the high-risk group is recommended. PMID:26379352

  16. Inability to access addiction treatment and risk of HIV infection among injection drug users recruited from a supervised injection facility†

    PubMed Central

    Milloy, M.-J.S.; Kerr, Thomas; Zhang, Ruth; Tyndall, Mark; Montaner, Julio; Wood, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Background Treatment for drug addiction is effective in reducing the harms of injection drug use, including infection with HIV and/or hepatitis C. We sought to examine the prevalence and correlates of being unable to access addiction treatment in a representative sample of injection drug users randomly recruited from a supervised injection facility. Methods Using generalized estimating equations, we determined the prevalence and factors associated with being unable to access addiction treatment. Results Between 1 July 2004 and 30 June 2006, 889 individuals completed at least one interview and were included in this analysis. At each interview, ∼20% of respondents reported trying but being unable to access any type of drug or alcohol treatment in the previous 6 months. Being unable to access treatment was independently associated with recent incarceration, daily use of heroin and borrowing used syringes. In a secondary question, the majority of individuals reported waiting lists were the reason for being unable to access treatment. Conclusion Given the independent association between inability to access addiction treatment and elevated HIV risk behavior, these results suggest expanding addiction treatment may contribute significantly to HIV prevention efforts in this population. PMID:19776079

  17. Communication About HIV and Risk Behaviors Among Mothers Living With HIV and Their Early Adolescent Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Traeger, Lara; Mellins, Claude A.

    2005-01-01

    Little is known about how mothers living with HIV communicate to their children about HIV risk. The current study explored communication between mothers and children about prevention and risk behaviors, the impact of maternal HIV infection and child knowledge of HIV, and concordance in reports from mothers and their children. The sample comprised…

  18. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... incidence could be reduced if people changed their sexual behaviors. Our research has demonstrated remarkable success in reducing HIV risk-associated sexual behaviors among African American adolescents and adults." Spring 2008 ...

  19. Depression in patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Penzak, S R; Reddy, Y S; Grimsley, S R

    2000-02-15

    The epidemiology, clinical features, and drug treatment of depression in HIV-infected patients are discussed. The lifetime prevalence of depression in patients infected with HIV has been estimated at 22-45%. The signs and symptoms of depression are similar in HIV-infected and noninfected patients, but patients with HIV infection may more frequently have sleep and appetite disturbances. Diagnosis should focus on affective or cognitive depression symptoms that reflect mood state alone. Patients with a history of depression, homosexual men, women, and i.v. drug abusers are among HIV-infected individuals who may be at increased risk for depression. Depression may alter the course of HIV infection by impairing immune function or influencing behavior. Depression my contribute to nonadherence to therapy. Antidepressant therapy is effective in most HIV-positive patients with major depression. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) have produced response rates as high as 89%, but their usefulness has been limited by adverse effects. Selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors and other non-TCAs have also demonstrated efficacy and are generally better tolerated. Psychostimulants have improved mood, cognition, and energy level, and androgens have been used for their anabolic effects. The systemic concentrations of antidepressants may be altered by coadministered drugs that affect their cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme-mediated metabolism; in turn, the metabolism and toxicity of certain antiretrovirals may be affected by antidepressants. Guidelines on the treatment of depression in the general population may be applied to patients with HIV infection. Depressive disorders are prevalent among patients with HIV infection but often respond to a variety of treatments. PMID:10714976

  20. High Risks of HIV Transmission for Men Who Have Sex with Men — A Comparison of Risk Factors of HIV Infection among MSM Associated with Recruitment Channels in 15 Cities of China

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Jinlei; Zhang, Dapeng; Fu, Xiaojing; Li, Chengmei; Meng, Sining; Dai, Min; Liu, Hui; Sun, Jiangping

    2015-01-01

    Objective While the HIV epidemic varies greatly by region and population group throughout China, the HIV incidence among men who have sex with men (MSM) continues to rise at an alarmingly fast pace. We seek to analyze the risk factors associated with HIV infection among MSM recruited from different channels in large urban centers across China, in an attempt to shed light on the design of future targeted intervention strategies. Methods A total of 33,684 MSM from 14 cities and one province were recruited from July to December 2011. Demographic (e.g. age, marital status, education) and behavioral (e.g. condom use, HIV testing history) data were collected using information collection cards. Blood samples were also collected to test for HIV and Syphilis. Results Participants were recruited from five different channels, and all demonstrated distinct characteristics. The overall rate of positive HIV screening was 6.27% and the rate of syphilis infection was 6.50%. Participants recruited from bathhouses had the highest HIV (11.80%) and syphilis infection rates (11.20%). Participants who were infected with syphilis had the highest HIV-positive screening rate (13.75%; 95% CI OR, 2.33-3.06). living in the southwest region of the country (11.64%; OR=2.76, 95%CI OR 2.19-3.47), Being >20 years of age (P<0.001), living in the southwest region of the country (OR=2.76, 95%CI 2.19-3.47), not having sex with female over the previous 3 months (OR=1.27, 95%CI 1.09-1.48), no condom use during the last anal intercourse (OR=1.54, 95%CI 1.39-1.70) and other factors were all associated with a higher probability of having an HIV-positive test result. Conclusion Depending on the way they are recruited, more targeted interventions are required to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among MSM with different characteristics and behaviors. Results from this study could provide evidence for researchers to conduct further studies and policy-makers to establish more effective and strategic interventions

  1. Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Patients with Well-Controlled HIV Infection: Clinical Features, Treatment, and Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Bradley T.; Leitch, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In advanced HIV prior to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), dysplastic marrow changes occurred and resolved with ART. Few reports of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in well-controlled HIV exist and management is undefined. Methods. Patients with well-controlled HIV and higher risk MDS were identified; characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were reviewed. Results. Of 292 MDS patients since 1996, 1 (0.3%) was HIV-positive. A 56-year-old woman presented with cytopenias. CD4 was 1310 cells/mL and HIV viral load <40 copies/mL. Bone marrow biopsy showed RCMD and karyotype included del(5q) and del(7q); IPSS was intermediate-2 risk. She received azacitidine at 75% dose. Cycle 2, at full dose, was complicated by marrow aplasia and possible AML; she elected palliation. Three additional HIV patients with higher risk MDS, aged 56–64, were identified from the literature. All had deletions involving chromosomes 5 and 7. MDS treatment of 2 was not reported and one received palliation; all died of AML. Conclusion. Four higher risk MDS in well-controlled HIV were below the median age of diagnosis for HIV-negative patients; all had adverse karyotype. This is the first report of an HIV patient receiving MDS treatment with azacitidine. Cytopenias were profound and dosing in HIV patients should be considered with caution. PMID:26904323

  2. Higher Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes in Patients with Well-Controlled HIV Infection: Clinical Features, Treatment, and Outcome.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Bradley T; Leitch, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In advanced HIV prior to combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), dysplastic marrow changes occurred and resolved with ART. Few reports of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) in well-controlled HIV exist and management is undefined. Methods. Patients with well-controlled HIV and higher risk MDS were identified; characteristics, treatment, and outcomes were reviewed. Results. Of 292 MDS patients since 1996, 1 (0.3%) was HIV-positive. A 56-year-old woman presented with cytopenias. CD4 was 1310 cells/mL and HIV viral load <40 copies/mL. Bone marrow biopsy showed RCMD and karyotype included del(5q) and del(7q); IPSS was intermediate-2 risk. She received azacitidine at 75% dose. Cycle 2, at full dose, was complicated by marrow aplasia and possible AML; she elected palliation. Three additional HIV patients with higher risk MDS, aged 56-64, were identified from the literature. All had deletions involving chromosomes 5 and 7. MDS treatment of 2 was not reported and one received palliation; all died of AML. Conclusion. Four higher risk MDS in well-controlled HIV were below the median age of diagnosis for HIV-negative patients; all had adverse karyotype. This is the first report of an HIV patient receiving MDS treatment with azacitidine. Cytopenias were profound and dosing in HIV patients should be considered with caution. PMID:26904323

  3. Preventing HIV Infection in Women

    PubMed Central

    Adimora, Adaora A.; Ramirez, Catalina; Auerbach, Judith D.; Aral, Sevgi O.; Hodder, Sally; Wingood, Gina; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Bukusi, Elizabeth Anne

    2014-01-01

    Although the number of new infections has declined recently, women still constitute almost half of the world's 34 million people with HIV infection, and HIV remains the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age. Prevention research has made considerable progress during the past few years in addressing the biological, behavioral and social factors that influence women's vulnerability to HIV infection. Nevertheless, substantial work still must be done in order to implement scientific advancements and to resolve the many questions that remain. This article highlights some of the recent advances and persistent gaps in HIV prevention research for women and outlines key research and policy priorities. PMID:23764631

  4. HIV infection and domestic smoke exposure, but not human papillomavirus, are risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Zambia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Kayamba, Violet; Bateman, Allen C; Asombang, Akwi W; Shibemba, Aaron; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Banda, Themba; Soko, Rose; Kelly, Paul

    2015-01-01

    There is emerging evidence that esophageal cancer occurs in younger adults in sub-Saharan Africa than in Europe or North America. The burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is also high in this region. We postulated that HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections might contribute to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) risk. This was a case–control study based at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Cases were patients with confirmed OSCC and controls had completely normal upper endoscopic evaluations. A total of 222 patients were included to analyze the influence of HIV infection; of these, 100 patients were used to analyze the influence of HPV infection, alcohol, smoking, and exposure to wood smoke. The presence of HIV infection was determined using antibody kits, and HPV infection was detected by polymerase chain reaction. HIV infection on its own conferred increased risk of developing OSCC (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0–5.1; P = 0.03). The OR was stronger when only people under 60 years were included (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.5–13.2; P = 0.003). Cooking with charcoal or firewood, and cigarette smoking, both increased the odds of developing OSCC ([OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.4–9.3; P = 0.004] and [OR 9.1; 95% CI 3.0–30.4; P < 0.001], respectively). There was no significant difference in HPV detection or alcohol intake between cases and controls. We conclude that HIV infection and exposure to domestic and cigarette smoke are risk factors for OSCC, and HPV immunization unlikely to reduce OSCC incidence in Zambia. PMID:25641622

  5. HIV infection and domestic smoke exposure, but not human papillomavirus, are risk factors for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Zambia: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Kayamba, Violet; Bateman, Allen C; Asombang, Akwi W; Shibemba, Aaron; Zyambo, Kanekwa; Banda, Themba; Soko, Rose; Kelly, Paul

    2015-04-01

    There is emerging evidence that esophageal cancer occurs in younger adults in sub-Saharan Africa than in Europe or North America. The burden of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is also high in this region. We postulated that HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections might contribute to esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) risk. This was a case-control study based at the University Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, Zambia. Cases were patients with confirmed OSCC and controls had completely normal upper endoscopic evaluations. A total of 222 patients were included to analyze the influence of HIV infection; of these, 100 patients were used to analyze the influence of HPV infection, alcohol, smoking, and exposure to wood smoke. The presence of HIV infection was determined using antibody kits, and HPV infection was detected by polymerase chain reaction. HIV infection on its own conferred increased risk of developing OSCC (odds ratio [OR] 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-5.1; P = 0.03). The OR was stronger when only people under 60 years were included (OR 4.3; 95% CI 1.5-13.2; P = 0.003). Cooking with charcoal or firewood, and cigarette smoking, both increased the odds of developing OSCC ([OR 3.5; 95% CI 1.4-9.3; P = 0.004] and [OR 9.1; 95% CI 3.0-30.4; P < 0.001], respectively). There was no significant difference in HPV detection or alcohol intake between cases and controls. We conclude that HIV infection and exposure to domestic and cigarette smoke are risk factors for OSCC, and HPV immunization unlikely to reduce OSCC incidence in Zambia. PMID:25641622

  6. An Alternative Model of the Reproductive Rate of HIV Infection: Formulation, Evaluation, and Implications for Risk Reduction Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Abramson, Paul R.

    1994-01-01

    Estimates of the reproductive rate of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), obtained through a Bernoulli process model, indicate that decreasing the infectivity of the virus, through the use of condoms, for example, is more effective at reducing the infection rate than is limiting the number of sexual partners. (SLD)

  7. ONGOING SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASE ACQUISTION AND RISK TAKING BEHAVIOR AMONG U.S. HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS IN PRIMARY CARE: IMPLICATIONS FOR PREVENTION INTERVENTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H; Bush, Timothy; Henry, Keith; Overton, Turner; Hammer, John; Richardson, Jean; Wood, Kathy; Conley, Lois; Papp, John; Caliendo, Angela M.; Patel, Pragna; Brooks, John T

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY A study of HIV-infected persons in primary care in four U.S. found that 13% had a prevalent STD at enrollment and 7% an incident STD six months later. Background To better understand the factors associated with HIV and STD transmitting behavior among HIV-infected persons, we estimated STD prevalence and incidence and associated risk factors among a diverse sample of HIV-infected patients in primary care. Methods We analyzed data from 557 participants in the SUN study, a prospective observational cohort of HIV-infected persons in primary care in four U.S. cities. At enrollment and six months thereafter, participants completed an audio computer-assisted self interview about their sexual behavior, and were screened for genitourinary, rectal and pharyngeal N. gonorrhoeae and C. trachomatis infections by nucleic acid amplification testing, and for serologic evidence of syphilis. Women provided cervicovaginal samples and men provided urine to screen for T. vaginalis by polymerase chain reaction. Results Thirteen percent of participants had a prevalent STD at enrollment and 7% an incident STD six months later. The most commonly diagnosed infections were rectal chlamydia, oropharyngeal gonorrhea, and chlamydial urethritis among the men, and trichomoniasis among the women. Other than trichomoniasis, 94% of incident STDs were identified in MSM. Polysubstance abuse other than marijuana, and having ≥ 4 sex partners in the six months prior to testing were associated with diagnosis of an incident STD. Conclusions STDs were commonly diagnosed among contemporary HIV-infected patients receiving routine outpatient care, particularly among sexually active MSM who used recreational drugs. These findings underscore the need for frequent STD screening, prevention counseling, and substance abuse treatment for HIV-infected persons in care. PMID:22183836

  8. Risks for HIV infection among users and sellers of crack, powder cocaine and heroin in central Harlem: Implications for interventions

    PubMed Central

    DAVIS, W. REES; JOHNSON, B. D.; RANDOLPH, D.; LIBERTY, H. J.

    2007-01-01

    This article investigates behaviours that may be associated HIV infection among users and sellers of crack, powder cocaine and heroin in central Harlem. Chain referral sampling and other strategies were combined to acquire a sample of 637 (Users = 546; Sellers = 91) who provided urine specimens that were tested for the presence of drugs and HIV. Nearly a quarter (23.9%) of all respondents were HIV positive. Drug injectors were more than 2.5 times more likely to have HIV infections than other respondents (OR = 2.66; 95% CI 1.66–4.26). Those involved in frauds/cons were almost as likely to be HIV positive (OR = 2.58; 95% CI 1.64–4.06). Those with a marital status of being separated, divorced or widowed were twice as likely to be HIV infected (OR 2.16; 95% CI 1.43–3.25). Respondents currently having multiple partner sex (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.1–2.51) or who were female (OR = 1.66; 95% CI 1.12–2.45) were more than 1.5 times more likely to be HIV positive. Thus, controlling for lifetime drug injection and current multiple partner sex, other factors, such as participating in frauds/cons, as well as relationship status and being female, were also associated with HIV infection. PMID:16338774

  9. Risk factors for HIV infection in male sexual contacts of men with AIDS or an AIDS-related condition.

    PubMed

    Coates, R A; Calzavara, L M; Read, S E; Fanning, M M; Shepherd, F A; Klein, M H; Johnson, J K; Soskolne, C L

    1988-10-01

    A total of 246 healthy male sexual contacts of men with either acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) or an AIDS-related condition were recruited into a prospective study in Toronto, Canada between July 1984 and July 1985. At induction, data were collected on the sexual relationship between the contact and his primary case, sexual activities with other men, history of sexually transmitted diseases and other diseases, and use of recreational drugs. At recruitment, 144 sexual contacts had antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV); 102 of the contacts were seronegative at induction and at three months following recruitment. No association between HIV seropositivity and total number of sexual partners could be demonstrated. In univariate and multivariate analyses, receptive and insertive anal intercourse with the primary cases, and activities which either indicated or potentially caused anorectal mucosal injury (rectal douching, perianal bleeding, receipt of objects in ano, and receptive fisting) were strongly associated with HIV seropositivity. In the final multiple logistic regression model, two significant interaction effects were observed: the interaction between receptive anal intercourse and insertive anal intercourse and that between receptive anal intercourse and the anorectal mucosal injury index. These two interaction terms had negative regression coefficients which suggested that change in one sexual activity would not decrementally reduce risk of HIV infection without a comparable modification in the other activity. No association could be demonstrated between oral-genital and oral-anal sexual contact and odds ratios for these sexual activities declined to levels below 1.0 when adjusted for frequency of receptive anal intercourse. PMID:3421239

  10. The role of statins in the setting of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Eckard, Allison Ross; McComsey, Grace A

    2015-09-01

    HIV-infected individuals are at an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and other HIV-related co-morbidities. This is due in part to dyslipidemia associated with antiretroviral therapy and increased inflammation and immune activation from chronic HIV infection. Statins not only have potent lipid-lowering properties but are also anti-inflammatory and immunomodulators. Studies suggest that statin therapy in the HIV-infected population may decrease the risk of CVD and other non-AIDS-defining co-morbidities. This review summarizes the recent literature on statin use in the HIV setting. PMID:26126687

  11. Test and treat: the early experiences in a clinic serving women at high risk of HIV infection in Kampala.

    PubMed

    Mbonye, Martin; Seeley, Janet; Nalugya, Ruth; Kiwanuka, Thadeus; Bagiire, Daniel; Mugyenyi, Michelle; Namale, Gertrude; Mayanja, Yunia; Kamali, Anatoli

    2016-01-01

    At the end of 2013, the Government of Uganda issued guidance recommending provision of Anti-Retroviral Treatment (ART) to HIV-positive people in key populations, including female sex workers, regardless of CD4 cell count. We describe the implementation of this new guidance in a clinic serving women at high risk of HIV infection in Kampala. Between July and December 2015, we conducted repeat in-depth interviews with 15 women attending the clinic after the change in guidelines, to explore their perceptions regarding prompt ART initiation. The sample included some women who were HIV-negative and women who had both started and deferred ART. We conducted a data-led thematic analysis of the material from the interviews. A total of 257 of 445 eligible women had started ART; others were undecided or had not returned to the clinic after receiving the new information. Participants recounted varying experiences with the provision of prompt treatment. At an individual level, a history of treatment for opportunistic infections and other illnesses, coupled with relatively poor health, encouraged some to initiate ART promptly. However, knowledge of friends/relatives already on ART who had experienced side effects caused others to delay starting, fearing the same experience for themselves. A number of women questioned why they should start treatment when they were not sick. Situational factors such as work and residence (with many sharing single rooms) caused discomfort among newly diagnosed women who feared disclosure and stigma that would result from taking ART when they were not ill. Alcohol consumption and irregular working hours affected perceptions of future adherence, making prompt ART harder to embrace for some. Our findings show the challenges that influence the delay of treatment initiation, and/or the decision to defer receiving information on ART, with implications for the success of the test and treat programmes and guidelines. PMID:27421050

  12. Efficacy of Tenofovir 1% Vaginal Gel in Reducing the Risk of HIV-1 and HSV-2 Infection

    PubMed Central

    McConville, Christopher; Boyd, Peter; Major, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that can result in rare opportunistic infections occurring in humans. The onset of these infections is known as Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Sexual transmission is responsible for the majority of infections 1, resulting in transmission of HIV due to infected semen or vaginal and cervical secretions containing infected lymphocytes. HIV microbicides are formulations of chemical or biological agents that can be applied to the vagina or rectum with the intention of reducing the acquisition of HIV. Tenofovir is an NRTI that is phosphorylated by adenylate kinase to tenofovir diphosphate, which in turn competes with deoxyadeosine 5’-triphosphate for incorporation into newly synthesized HIV DNA. Once incorporated, tenofovir diphosphate results in chain termination, thus inhibiting viral replication. Tenofovir has been formulated into a range of vaginal formulations, such as rings, tablets gels and films. It has been shown to safe and effective in numerous animal models, while demonstrating safety and acceptability in numerous human trials. The most encouraging results came from the CAPRISA 004 clinical trial which demonstrated that a 1% Tenofovir vaginal gel reduced HIV infection by approximately 39%. PMID:24741339

  13. Grappling with HIV Transmission Risks: Narratives of Rural Women in Eastern Kenya Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Kako, Peninnah M.; Stevens, Patricia E.; Karani, Anna K; Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Banda, Anne

    2011-01-01

    As people live longer and more productively with HIV infection, issues of agency in reducing HIV risk are particularly important for HIV-infected women living in high prevalence, under-resourced countries such as Kenya. Because of their gendered lives, in that being masculine is associated with dominance, while being feminine is associated with passiveness, women in rural Kenya must cope with continued HIV transmission risk even after knowing they are infected with HIV. In this narrative interview study, informed by theories of gender and post-colonial feminism, we examined personal accounts of HIV risk and risk reduction of 20 rural women in eastern Kenya who were living with HIV. From our analysis of the women's narratives, two major themes emerged: gender-based obstacles even in the context of a known HIV diagnosis, and struggles with economic pressures amid HIV risks. Implications for policy, programs, and research are discussed. PMID:22137546

  14. Grappling with HIV transmission risks: narratives of rural women in eastern Kenya living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Kako, Peninnah M; Stevens, Patricia E; Karani, Anna K; Mkandawire-Valhmu, Lucy; Banda, Anne

    2012-01-01

    As people live longer and more productively with HIV infection, issues of agency in reducing HIV risk are particularly important for HIV-infected women living in high prevalence, underresourced countries such as Kenya. Because of their gendered lives, in that being masculine is associated with dominance and being feminine is associated with passiveness, women in rural Kenya must cope with continued HIV transmission risk even after knowing they are infected with HIV. In this narrative interview study, informed by theories of gender and postcolonial feminism, we examined personal accounts of HIV risk and risk reduction of 20 rural women in eastern Kenya who were living with HIV. From our analysis of the women's narratives, two major themes emerged: gender-based obstacles even in the context of a known HIV diagnosis, and struggles with economic pressures amid HIV risks. Implications for policy, programs, and research are discussed. PMID:22137546

  15. Risk Factor or Social Vaccine? The Historical Progression of the Role of Education in HIV and AIDS Infection in Sub-Saharan Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, David P.; Collins, John M.; Leon, Juan

    2008-01-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies from the early years of the tragic HIV and AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa identified formal education as a risk factor increasing the chance of infection. Instead of playing its usual role as a preventative factor, as has been noted in many other public health cases, until the mid-1990s educated African men…

  16. Steroids are a risk factor for Kaposi's sarcoma-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and mortality in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Mónica; Iglesias, María C.; Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Alvarado-de la Barrera, Claudia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the association between Kaposi's sarcoma-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (KS-IRIS) and mortality, with the use of glucocorticoids in HIV-infected individuals. Design: Case–control study. Methods: We reviewed the medical records of 145 individuals with HIV-associated Kaposi's sarcoma receiving antiretroviral therapy. The association of different variables with KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality was explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. The main exposure of interest was the use of glucocorticoids. We also compared the time to KS-IRIS and the time to death of individuals treated with glucocorticoids vs. those nontreated with glucocorticoids, and the time to death of individuals with KS-IRIS vs. those without KS-IRIS by hazards regression. Results: Sixty of 145 individuals received glucocorticoids (41.4%) for the management or suspicion of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia. Fifty individuals had KS-IRIS (37%). The use of glucocorticoids was more frequent in individuals with KS-IRIS than in those without KS-IRIS (54.9 vs. 36.47%, P = 0.047). Kaposi's sarcoma-related mortality occurred in 17 cases (11.7%), and glucocorticoid use was more frequent in this group (76.47 vs. 36.7%, P = 0.003). Glucocorticoid use was a risk factor for mortality (adjusted odds ratio = 4.719, 95% confidence interval = 1.383–16.103, P = 0.0132), and was associated with shorter periods to KS-IRIS (P = 0.03) and death (P = 0.0073). KS-IRIS was a risk factor for mortality (P = 0.049). Conclusion: In HIV-infected individuals, the use of glucocorticoids is a risk factor for KS-IRIS and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated mortality. In addition, KS-IRIS is a risk factor for mortality. Therefore, glucocorticoid administration in this population requires careful consideration based on individualized risk–benefit analysis. PMID:26636923

  17. Family-Based HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk Reduction for Drug-Involved Young Offenders: 42-Month Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Cynthia L; Alberga, Linda; Dakof, Gayle A; Henderson, Craig E; Ungaro, Rocio; Liddle, Howard A

    2016-06-01

    This study tested a family-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention approach integrated within an empirically supported treatment for drug-involved young offenders, Multidimensional Family Therapy (MDFT). A randomized, controlled, two-site community-based trial was conducted with 154 youth and their parents. Drug-involved adolescents were recruited in detention, randomly assigned to either MDFT or Enhanced Services as Usual (ESAU), and assessed at intake, 3, 6, 9, 18, 24, 36, and 42-month follow-ups. Youth in both conditions received structured HIV/STI prevention in detention and those in MDFT also received family-based HIV/STI prevention as part of ongoing treatment following detention release. Youth in both conditions and sites significantly reduced rates of unprotected sex acts and STI incidence from intake to 9 months. They remained below baseline levels of STI incidence (10%) over the 42-month follow-up period. At Site A, adolescents who were sexually active at intake and received MDFT showed greater reduction in overall frequency of sexual acts and number of unprotected sexual acts than youth in ESAU between intake and 9-month follow-ups. These intervention differences were evident through the 42-month follow-up. Intervention effects were not found for STI incidence or unprotected sex acts at Site B. Intensive group-based and family intervention in detention and following release may reduce sexual risk among substance-involved young offenders, and a family-based approach may enhance effects among those at highest risk. Site differences in intervention effects, study limitations, clinical implications, and future research directions are discussed. PMID:26879671

  18. How Many HIV infections may be averted by targeting primary infection in men who have sex with men? Quantification of changes in transmission-risk behavior, using an individual-based model.

    PubMed

    White, Peter J; Fox, Julie; Weber, Jonathan; Fidler, Sarah; Ward, Helen

    2014-12-01

    In the United Kingdom, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) is not under control, despite readily available treatment, highlighting the need to design a cost-effective combination prevention package. MSM report significantly reduced transmission risk behavior following HIV diagnosis. To assess the effectiveness of HIV diagnosis in averting transmission during highly infectious primary HIV infection (PHI), we developed a stochastic individual-based model to calculate the number of HIV-transmission events expected to occur from a cohort of recently infected MSM with and those without the behavior changes reported after diagnosis. The model incorporates different types of sex acts, incorporates condom use, and distinguishes between regular and casual sex partners. The impact on transmission in the 3 months after infection depends on PHI duration and testing frequency. If PHI lasts for 3 months and testing is performed monthly, then behavior changes after diagnosis would have reduced estimated transmission events by 49%-52%, from 31-45 to 15-23 events; a shorter duration of PHI and/or a lower testing frequency reduces the number of infections averted. Diagnosing HIV during PHI can markedly reduce transmission by changing transmission-risk behavior. Because of the high infectivity but short duration of PHI, even short-term behavior change can significantly reduce transmission. Our quantification of the number of infections averted is an essential component of assessment of the cost-effectiveness of strategies to increase detection and diagnoses of PHI. PMID:25381380

  19. Prevalence and Predictors of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder and Depression in HIV-Infected and At-Risk Rwandan Women

    PubMed Central

    Fabri, Mary; Cai, Xiaotao; Shi, Qiuhu; Hoover, Donald R.; Binagwaho, Agnes; Culhane, Melissa A.; Mukanyonga, Henriette; Karegeya, Davis Ksahaka; Anastos, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective During the 1994 Rwandan genocide, rape was used as a weapon of war to transmit HIV. This study measures trauma experiences of Rwandan women and identifies predictors associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depressive symptoms. Methods The Rwandan Women's Interassociation Study and Assessment (RWISA) is a prospective observational cohort study designed to assess effectiveness and toxicity of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected Rwandan women. In 2005, a Rwandan-adapted Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ) and the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) were used to assess genocide trauma events and prevalence of PTSD (HTQ mean >2) and depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 16) for 850 women (658 HIV-positive and 192 HIV-negative). Results PTSD was common in HIV-positive (58%) and HIV-negative women (66%) (p = 0.05). Women with HIV had a higher prevalence of depressive symptoms than HIV-negative women (81% vs. 65%, p < 0.0001). Independent predictors for increased PTSD were experiencing more genocide-related trauma events and having more depressive symptoms. Independent predictors for increased depressive symptoms were making <$18 a month, HIV infection (and, among HIV-positive women, having lower CD4 cell counts), a history of genocidal rape, and having more PTSD symptoms. Conclusions The prevalence of PTSD and depressive symptoms is high in women in the RWISA cohort. Four of five HIV-infected women had depressive symptoms, with highest rates among women with CD4 cell counts <200. In addition to treatment with antiretroviral therapy, economic empowerment and identification and treatment of depression and PTSD may reduce morbidity and mortality among women in postconflict countries. PMID:19951212

  20. Rethinking the risk-benefit ratio of efavirenz in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Van de Wijer, Lisa; Schellekens, Arnt F A; Burger, David M; Homberg, Judith R; de Mast, Quirijn; van der Ven, Andre J A M

    2016-05-01

    The non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor efavirenz is part of the WHO guidelines for preferred first-line treatment of HIV-1-infected adults, pregnant and lactating women, and children. Efavirenz is well known to cause CNS toxicity. Although good data for CNS toxicity are available for adults, the opposite is true for children. Paediatric studies on this topic frequently suffer from small sample sizes or absence of thorough neuropsychiatric assessments. In this Personal View, we focus on two knowledge gaps of CNS toxicity of efavirenz in children. First, plasma concentrations of efavirenz are difficult to predict in children because of immaturity of and genetic variation in metabolic enzymes. Second, efavirenz exerts a lysergide (LSD)-like effect on brain serotonergic pathways and affects CNS metabolic pathways, including mitochondrial function. Whether these effects interfere with normal brain development is unknown. These uncertainties underline the imminent need for better monitoring of mental health and neurocognitive development in children given and exposed to efavirenz. PMID:27599655

  1. Mother to child transmission of hepatitis C virus: prospective study of risk factors and timing of infection in children born to women seronegative for HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara; Mannelli, Francesco; Moriondo, Maria; Novembre, Elio; de Martino, Maurizio; Vierucci, Alberto

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the risk factors for and timing of vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus in women who are not infected with HIV-1. Design: Follow up for a median of 28 (range 24-38) months of babies born to women with antibodies to hepatitis C virus but not HIV-1. Subjects: 442 mothers and babies, of whom 403 completed the study. Main outcome measures: Presence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus and viral RNA and alanine aminotransferase activity in babies. Presence of viral RNA, method of infection with hepatitis C, method of delivery, and type of infant feeding in mothers. Results: 13 of the 403 children had acquired hepatitis C virus infection at the end of follow up. All these children were born to women positive for hepatitis C virus RNA; none of the 128 RNA negative mothers passed on the infection (difference 5%, 95% confidence interval 2% to 7%). 6 children had viral RNA immediately after birth. 111 women had used intravenous drugs and 20 had received blood transfusions. 11 of the infected children were born to these women compared with 2 to the 144 with no known risk factor (difference 7%, 2% to 12%). Conclusions: This study suggests that in women not infected with HIV only those with hepatitis C virus RNA are at risk of infecting their babies. Transmission does seem to occur in utero, and the rate of transmission is higher in women who have had blood transfusions or used intravenous drugs than in women with no known risk factor for infection. Key messages Little information exists on vertical transmission of hepatitis C virus in women not infected with HIV This study in a large unselected population of infants born to HIV-1 negative mothers suggests that intravenous drug use itself is an important risk factor for transmission of hepatitis C virus Maternal post-transfusional hepatitis is also an important risk factor for infection of infants Viral genotype, maternal viraemia, type of delivery (vaginal delivery or caesarean section) and breast

  2. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chang, Charlotte A; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J

    2015-12-01

    Background.  Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods.  This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results.  Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7-27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4(+) cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions.  The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  3. Tuberculosis Incidence and Risk Factors Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Infected Adults Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in a Large HIV Program in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Charlotte A.; Meloni, Seema Thakore; Eisen, Geoffrey; Chaplin, Beth; Akande, Patrick; Okonkwo, Prosper; Rawizza, Holly E.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric; Kanki, Phyllis J.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons in Africa. Nigeria bears the highest TB burden in Africa and second highest HIV burden globally. This long-term multicenter study aimed to determine the incidence rate and predictors of TB in adults in the Harvard/AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) and President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) Nigeria ART program. Methods. This retrospective evaluation used data collected from 2004 to 2012 through the Harvard/APIN PEPFAR program. Risk factors for incident TB were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression with time-dependent covariates. Results. Of 50 320 adults enrolled from 2005 to 2010, 11 092 (22%) had laboratory-confirmed active TB disease at ART initiation, and 2021 (4%) developed active TB after commencing ART. During 78 228 total person-years (PY) of follow-up, the TB incidence rate was 25.8 cases per 1000 PY (95% confidence interval [CI], 24.7–27.0) overall, and it decreased significantly both with duration on ART and calendar year. Risk factors at ART initiation for incident TB included the following: earlier ART enrollment year, tenofovir-containing initial ART regimen, and World Health Organization clinical stage above 1. Time-updated risk factors included the following: low body mass index, low CD4+ cell count, unsuppressed viral load, anemia, and ART adherence below 80%. Conclusions. The rate of incident TB decreased with longer duration on ART and over the program years. The strongest TB risk factors were time-updated clinical markers, reinforcing the importance of consistent clinical and laboratory monitoring of ART patients in prompt diagnosis and treatment of TB and other coinfections. PMID:26613097

  4. Identifying Risk Factors for Recent HIV Infection in Kenya Using a Recent Infection Testing Algorithm: Results from a Nationally Representative Population-Based Survey

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Andrea A.; Parekh, Bharat S.; Umuro, Mamo; Galgalo, Tura; Bunnell, Rebecca; Makokha, Ernest; Dobbs, Trudy; Murithi, Patrick; Muraguri, Nicholas; De Cock, Kevin M.; Mermin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A recent infection testing algorithm (RITA) that can distinguish recent from long-standing HIV infection can be applied to nationally representative population-based surveys to characterize and identify risk factors for recent infection in a country. Materials and Methods We applied a RITA using the Limiting Antigen Avidity Enzyme Immunoassay (LAg) on stored HIV-positive samples from the 2007 Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey. The case definition for recent infection included testing recent on LAg and having no evidence of antiretroviral therapy use. Multivariate analysis was conducted to determine factors associated with recent and long-standing infection compared to HIV-uninfected persons. All estimates were weighted to adjust for sampling probability and nonresponse. Results Of 1,025 HIV-antibody-positive specimens, 64 (6.2%) met the case definition for recent infection and 961 (93.8%) met the case definition for long-standing infection. Compared to HIV-uninfected individuals, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of recent infection were living in Nairobi (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 11.37; confidence interval [CI] 2.64–48.87) and Nyanza (AOR 4.55; CI 1.39–14.89) provinces compared to Western province; being widowed (AOR 8.04; CI 1.42–45.50) or currently married (AOR 6.42; CI 1.55–26.58) compared to being never married; having had ≥ 2 sexual partners in the last year (AOR 2.86; CI 1.51–5.41); not using a condom at last sex in the past year (AOR 1.61; CI 1.34–1.93); reporting a sexually transmitted infection (STI) diagnosis or symptoms of STI in the past year (AOR 1.97; CI 1.05–8.37); and being aged <30 years with: 1) HSV-2 infection (AOR 8.84; CI 2.62–29.85), 2) male genital ulcer disease (AOR 8.70; CI 2.36–32.08), or 3) lack of male circumcision (AOR 17.83; CI 2.19–144.90). Compared to HIV-uninfected persons, factors associated with higher adjusted odds of long-standing infection included living in Coast (AOR 1.55; CI 1.04–2

  5. Risk factors for anal cancer in persons infected with HIV: a nested case-control study in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Bertisch, Barbara; Franceschi, Silvia; Lise, Mauro; Vernazza, Pietro; Keiser, Olivia; Schöni-Affolter, Franziska; Bouchardy, Christine; Dehler, Silvia; Levi, Fabio; Jundt, Gernot; Ess, Silvia; Pawlita, Michael; Kovari, Helen; Wandeler, Gilles; Calmy, Alexandra; Cavassini, Matthias; Stöckle, Marcel; Clifford, Gary

    2013-09-15

    Although persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), particularly men who have sex with men, are at excess risk for anal cancer, it has been difficult to disentangle the influences of anal exposure to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, immunodeficiency, and combined antiretroviral therapy. A case-control study that included 59 anal cancer cases and 295 individually matched controls was nested in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (1988-2011). In a subset of 41 cases and 114 controls, HPV antibodies were tested. A majority of anal cancer cases (73%) were men who have sex with men. Current smoking was significantly associated with anal cancer (odds ratio (OR) = 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.25, 5.34), as were antibodies against L1 (OR = 4.52, 95% CI: 2.00, 10.20) and E6 (OR = ∞, 95% CI: 4.64, ∞) of HPV16, as well as low CD4+ cell counts, whether measured at nadir (OR per 100-cell/μL decrease = 1.53, 95% CI: 1.18, 2.00) or at cancer diagnosis (OR per 100-cell/μL decrease = 1.24, 95% CI: 1.08, 1.42). However, the influence of CD4+ cell counts appeared to be strongest 6-7 years prior to anal cancer diagnosis (OR for <200 vs. ≥500 cells/μL = 14.0, 95% CI: 3.85, 50.9). Smoking cessation and avoidance of even moderate levels of immunosuppression appear to be important in reducing long-term anal cancer risks. PMID:23900553

  6. High-risk oncogenic HPV genotype infection associates with increased immune activation and T cell exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV-1-infected women.

    PubMed

    Papasavvas, Emmanouil; Surrey, Lea F; Glencross, Deborah K; Azzoni, Livio; Joseph, Jocelin; Omar, Tanvier; Feldman, Michael D; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Siminya, Maureen; Swarts, Avril; Yin, Xiangfan; Liu, Qin; Firnhaber, Cynthia; Montaner, Luis J

    2016-05-01

    Persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical disease in the context of HIV co-infection can be influenced by introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and sustained immune activation despite ART. We conducted a cross-sectional study in order to evaluate immune activation/exhaustion in ART-suppressed HIV(+) women with or without high-risk (HR) HPV-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). 55 South African women were recruited in three groups: HR (-) (n = 16) and HR (+) (n = 15) HPV with negative cervical histopathology, and HR (+) HPV with CIN grade 1/2/3 (n = 24). Sampling included endocervical brushing (HPV DNA genotyping), Pap smear (cytology), colposcopic punch biopsy (histopathology, histochemical evaluation of immune cells), and peripheral blood (clinical assessment, flow cytometry-based immune subset characterization). Statistics were done using R2.5.1. Irrespective of the presence of CIN, HR (+) HPV women had higher circulating levels of T cells expressing markers of activation/exhaustion (CD38, PD1, CTLA-4, BTLA, CD160), Tregs, and myeloid subsets expressing corresponding ligands (PDL1, PDL2, CD86, CD40, HVEM) than HR (-) HPV women. A decrease in circulating NK cells was associated with CIN grade. CD4(+) T cell count associated negatively with T cell exhaustion and expression of negative regulators on myeloid cells. Women with CIN when compared to HR (-) HPV women, had higher cervical cell density in stroma and epithelium for CD4(+), CD68(+), and CD11c(+) cells, and only in stroma for CD8(+) cells. We conclude that in ART-suppressed HIV-infected women with HPV co-infection the levels of T and myeloid cell activation/exhaustion are associated with the presence of HR HPV genotypes. PMID:27467943

  7. Ethanol stimulation of HIV infection of oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jun; Yang, Otto O; Xie, Yiming; Campbell, Richard; Chen, Irvin S Y; Pang, Shen

    2004-12-01

    Oral mucosal cells can be infected by exogenous HIV during receptive oral sex or breast-feeding. The risk of oral mucosal infection depends on the infection efficiency of the HIV strains present in the oral cavity, the viral titers, and the defense mechanisms in the oral cavity environment. It is expected that alcohol can weaken the host defense mechanism against HIV infection in the oral cavity. We modified an HIV strain, NL4-3, by inserting the enhanced green fluorescent protein gene and used this virus to infect oral epithelial cells obtained from patients. Various concentrations of ethanol (0%-4%) were added to the infected cells. HIV-infected cells were detected by fluorescent microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting. We found that ethanol significantly increases HIV infection of primary oral epithelial cells (POEs). POEs pretreated with 4% ethanol for less than 10 minutes demonstrated 3- to 6-fold higher susceptibility to infection by the CXCR-4 HIV strain NL4-3. Our studies also demonstrated that HIV infects POEs through a gp120-independent mechanism. We tested an HIV CCR5 strain, JRCSF, and also found its infection efficiency to be stimulated by alcohol. Our results indicate that in cell culture conditions, the ranges of concentrations of alcohol that are commercially available are able to stimulate the infection efficiency of HIV in POEs. PMID:15602121

  8. Elevated Risk for HIV-1 Infection in Adolescents and Young Adults in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Bassichetto, Katia Cristina; Bergamaschi, Denise Pimentel; Oliveira, Solange Maria; Verri Deienno, Marylei Casteldelli; Bortolato, Reginaldo; de Rezende, Heloíza Vilma; Arthur, Thaís; Tomiyama, Helena; Watkins, Colyn; Mesquita, Fabio; Abbate, Maria Cristina; Kallas, Esper Georges

    2008-01-01

    Background Recent studies have sought to describe HIV infection and transmission characteristics around the world. Identification of early HIV-1 infection is essential to proper surveillance and description of regional transmission trends. In this study we compare people recently infected (RI) with HIV-1, as defined by Serologic Testing Algorithm for Recent HIV Seroconversion (STARHS), to those with chronic infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Subjects were identified from 2002–2004 at four testing sites in São Paulo. Of 485 HIV-1-positive subjects, 57 (12%) were defined as RI. Of the participants, 165 (34.0%) were aware of their serostatus at the time of HIV-1 testing. This proportion was statistically larger (p<0.001) among the individuals without recent infection (n = 158, 95.8%) compared to 7 individuals (4.2%) with recently acquired HIV-1 infection. In the univariate analysis, RI was more frequent in <25 and >59 years-old age strata (p<0.001). The majority of study participants were male (78.4%), 25 to 45 years-old (65.8%), white (63.2%), single (61.7%), with family income of four or more times the minimum wage (41.0%), but with an equally distributed educational level. Of those individuals infected with HIV-1, the predominant route of infection was sexual contact (89.4%), with both hetero (47.5%) and homosexual (34.5%) exposure. Regarding sexual activity in these individuals, 43.9% reported possible HIV-1 exposure through a seropositive partner, and 49.4% reported multiple partners, with 47% having 2 to 10 partners and 37.4% 11 or more; 53.4% of infected individuals reported condom use sometimes; 34.2% reported non-injecting, recreational drug use and 23.6% were reactive for syphilis by VDRL. Subjects younger than 25 years of age were most vulnerable according to the multivariate analysis. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we evaluated RI individuals and discovered that HIV-1 has been spreading among younger individuals in São Paulo and

  9. Insulin resistance and diabetes in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Das, Satyajit

    2011-09-01

    Insulin resistance is an important and under recognized consequence of HIV treatment. Different studies have yielded widely varying estimates of the prevalence of impaired glucose metabolism in people on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The risk increases further with hepatitis C co infection. Although Protease inhibitors (PIs) are the main drug class implicated in insulin resistance, some studies have shown an association of increased risk of diabetes with cumulative exposure of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs). The effect of switching to other antiretrovirals has not been fully determined and the long-term consequences of insulin resistance in this population are not known. Treatment of established diabetes mellitus should generally follow existing guidelines. It is therefore reasonable to recommend general measures to increase insulin sensitivity in all patients infected with HIV, such as regular aerobic exercise and weight reduction for overweight persons. The present review article has the information of some recent patents regarding the insulin resistance in HIV infection. PMID:21824074

  10. Metabolic disorders and cardiovascular risk in treatment-naive HIV-infected patients of sub-saharan origin starting antiretrovirals: impact of westernized lifestyle.

    PubMed

    Eholié, Serge Paul; Lacombe, Karine; Krain, Alysa; Diallo, Zelica; Ouiminga, Mariama; Campa, Pauline; Bouchaud, Olivier; Bissagnene, Emmanuel; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-04-01

    In a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin we describe the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy after 3 years of combined antiretroviral therapy, and model the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases, while taking into account environmental factors. This is a multinational, prospective cohort study conducted in HIV outpatient clinics from four tertiary care centers set in France and Côte d'Ivoire. The participants were HIV-infected, treatment-naive patients eligible to start antiretroviral treatment and were of sub-Saharan African origin. The main outcome measures were the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy, and the assessment of the 10-year risk of cardiovascular diseases using Framingham risk prediction, D.A.D. Cardiovascular Disease Risk, and WHO/ISH prediction charts. Of 245 patients followed for up to 3 years, the incidence of metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, and lipodystrophy was 5.5, 8.5, and 6.8 per 100 person-years of follow-up (cumulative incidence: 14.4%, 19.2%, and 18.1%, respectively). Living in France as well as female gender and being overweight were risk factors for metabolic disorders as whole and only first generation protease inhibitors were marginally associated with metabolic syndrome. Cardiovascular risk as modeled through the three equations was high in all patients with the synergistic and deleterious effect of living in France compared to Côte d'Ivoire. This cohort study shows how the synergy between HIV, antiretroviral (ARV) exposure, and westernization of life style in a cohort of HIV-infected patients of sub-Saharan origin leads to a progressive increase in the risk of lipodystrophy, as well as metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance, all associated with increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:25707418

  11. Community-Based Management of Child Malnutrition in Zambia: HIV/AIDS Infection and Other Risk Factors on Child Survival

    PubMed Central

    Moramarco, Stefania; Amerio, Giulia; Ciarlantini, Clarice; Chipoma, Jean Kasengele; Simpungwe, Matilda Kakungu; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Palombi, Leonardo; Buonomo, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    (1) Background: Supplementary feeding programs (SFPs) are effective in the community-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and prevention of severe acute malnutrition (SAM); (2) Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on a sample of 1266 Zambian malnourished children assisted from 2012 to 2014 in the Rainbow Project SFPs. Nutritional status was evaluated according to WHO/Unicef methodology. We performed univariate and multivariate Cox proportional risk regression to identify the main predictors of mortality. In addition, a time-to event analysis was performed to identify predictors of failure and time to cure events; (3) Results: The analysis included 858 malnourished children (19 months ± 9.4; 49.9% males). Program outcomes met international standards with a better performance for MAM compared to SAM. Cox regression identified SAM (3.8; 2.1–6.8), HIV infection (3.1; 1.7–5.5), and WAZ <−3 (3.1; 1.6–5.7) as predictors of death. Time to event showed 80% of children recovered by SAM/MAM at 24 weeks. (4) Conclusions: Preventing deterioration of malnutrition, coupled to early detection of HIV/AIDS with adequate antiretroviral treatment, and extending the duration of feeding supplementation, could be crucial elements for ensuring full recovery and improve child survival in malnourished Zambian children. PMID:27376317

  12. Community-Based Management of Child Malnutrition in Zambia: HIV/AIDS Infection and Other Risk Factors on Child Survival.

    PubMed

    Moramarco, Stefania; Amerio, Giulia; Ciarlantini, Clarice; Chipoma, Jean Kasengele; Simpungwe, Matilda Kakungu; Nielsen-Saines, Karin; Palombi, Leonardo; Buonomo, Ersilia

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Supplementary feeding programs (SFPs) are effective in the community-based treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and prevention of severe acute malnutrition (SAM); (2) METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted on a sample of 1266 Zambian malnourished children assisted from 2012 to 2014 in the Rainbow Project SFPs. Nutritional status was evaluated according to WHO/Unicef methodology. We performed univariate and multivariate Cox proportional risk regression to identify the main predictors of mortality. In addition, a time-to event analysis was performed to identify predictors of failure and time to cure events; (3) RESULTS: The analysis included 858 malnourished children (19 months ± 9.4; 49.9% males). Program outcomes met international standards with a better performance for MAM compared to SAM. Cox regression identified SAM (3.8; 2.1-6.8), HIV infection (3.1; 1.7-5.5), and WAZ <-3 (3.1; 1.6-5.7) as predictors of death. Time to event showed 80% of children recovered by SAM/MAM at 24 weeks. (4) CONCLUSIONS: Preventing deterioration of malnutrition, coupled to early detection of HIV/AIDS with adequate antiretroviral treatment, and extending the duration of feeding supplementation, could be crucial elements for ensuring full recovery and improve child survival in malnourished Zambian children. PMID:27376317

  13. Relative resistance to HIV-1 infection of CD4 lymphocytes from persons who remain uninfected despite multiple high-risk sexual exposure.

    PubMed

    Paxton, W A; Martin, S R; Tse, D; O'Brien, T R; Skurnick, J; VanDevanter, N L; Padian, N; Braun, J F; Kotler, D P; Wolinsky, S M; Koup, R A

    1996-04-01

    Some individuals remain uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) despite multiple high-risk sexual exposures. We studied a cohort of 25 subjects with histories of multiple high-risk sexual exposures to HIV-1 and found that their CD8+ lymphocytes had greater anti-HIV-1 activity than did CD8+ lymphocytes from nonexposed controls. Further studies indicated that their purified CD4+ lymphocytes were less susceptible to infection with multiple primary isolates of HIV-1 than were CD4+ lymphocytes from the nonexposed controls. This relative resistance to HIV-1 infection did not extend to T-cell line-adapted strains, was restricted by the envelope glycoprotein, was not explained by the cell surface density of CD4 molecules, but was associated with the activity of the C-C chemokines RANTES, MIP-1alpha, and MIP-1beta. This relative resistance of CD4+ lymphocytes may contribute to protection from HIV-1 in multiply exposed persons. PMID:8597950

  14. The Mental Health Risk of Mothers and Children: The Role of Maternal HIV Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Mellins, Claude Ann; Dolezal, Curtis; Spiegel, Dina

    2007-01-01

    Rates of mental health problems in mothers and children in families affected by maternal HIV as compared to those not affected by maternal HIV but living in similar inner-city, low-SES, primarily ethnic-minority neighborhoods were examined. In addition, correspondence between mother and child mental health was explored. Interviews were conducted…

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics of HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strain, Matthew Carl

    Mathematical models of the dynamics of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have contributed to tremendous advances over the past 20 years. This thesis extends this previous work by exploring the importance of spatial heterogeneity in HIV infection both in vitro and in vivo in patients treated with highly-active antiretroviral therapy. Viral infections propagate locally in space, yet HIV infection has been widely regarded as equilibrated over the entire body of an infected patient. This dissertation constructs and explores a cellular automata model of viral spread at the cellular level. Coupling the automata to a blood compartment represented by a differential equation leads to a whole-body model of HIV infection that explicitly includes spatial effects at both the cellular and tissue levels. These models are tested by comparison with experimental data. A central prediction of the spatial model is that, due to competition between Brownian motion and viral lability, HIV infectivity increases with target cell density. This production is verified in a series of in vitro experiments in cell culture. The predicted independence of inhibitory concentrations of antiretoviral agents is verified for nevirapine, but azidothymidine inhibits HIV replication less efficiently in more dense cultures. These in vitro results suggest that systems allowing cell concentrations closer to tissue densities would better reflect virus replication kinetics, although standard measures of relative drug susceptibility may accurately reflect in vivo conditions. The coupled spatial model of in vivo dynamics is compared with novel mathematical analysis of experiments in HIV-infected patients. These analyses indicate that HIV DNA provides a useful marker of the size of long-lived cellular reservoirs of HIV. Levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood are predictive of the average rate of residual virus production after years of treatment, regardless of whether patients initiate therapy

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of intestinal protozoan and helminth infections among pulmonary tuberculosis patients without HIV infection in a rural county in P. R. China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Xu; Chen, Jia-Xu; Wang, Li-Xia; Tian, Li-Guang; Zhang, Yu-Ping; Dong, Shuang-Pin; Hu, Xue-Guang; Liu, Jian; Wang, Feng-Feng; Wang, Yue; Yin, Xiao-Mei; He, Li-Jun; Yan, Qiu-Ye; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Xu, Bian-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Nong

    2015-09-01

    Although co-infection of tuberculosis (TB) and intestinal parasites, including protozoa and helminths, in humans has been widely studied globally, very little of this phenomenon is known in China. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was conducted in a rural county of China to investigate such co-infections. Patients with pulmonary TB (PTB) undergoing anti-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (anti-MTB) treatment were surveyed by questionnaires, and their feces and blood specimens were collected for detection of intestinal protozoa and helminths, routine blood examination and HIV detection. The χ(2) test and multivariate logistic regression model were used to identify risk factors. A total of 369 patients with PTB were included and all of them were HIV negative. Overall, only 7.3% of participants were infected with intestinal protozoa, among which prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Entamoeba spp. and Trichomonas hominis were 6.0%, 1.1% and 0.3%, respectively; 7.0% were infected with intestinal helminths, among which prevalence of hookworm, Trichuris trichiura, Ascaris lumbricoides and Clonorchis sinensis were 4.3%, 1.9%, 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively; and 0.5% were simultaneously infected with intestinal protozoa and helminths. Among patients with PTB, body mass index (BMI)≤18 (OR=3.30, 95% CI=1.44-7.54) and raised poultry or livestock (e.g., chicken, duck, pig) (OR=3.96, 95% CI=1.32-11.89) were significantly associated with harboring intestinal protozoan infection, while BMI≤18 (OR=3.32, 95% CI=1.39-7.91), anemia (OR=3.40, 95% CI=1.44-8.02) and laboring barefoot in farmlands (OR=4.54, 95% CI=1.88-10.92) were significantly associated with having intestinal helminth infection. Additionally, there was no significant relationship between duration of anti-MTB treatment and infection rates of intestinal parasites including protozoa and helminths. Therefore, preventing malnutrition, avoiding unprotected contact with reservoirs of protozoa, and improving health education for good

  17. Treatment of Acute HIV Infection and the Potential Role of Acutely HIV-Infected Persons in Cure Studies.

    PubMed

    Little, Susan J

    Diagnosis of acute HIV infection is important for accurate estimation of HIV incidence, identifying persons who are unaware of their HIV infection, and offering immediate treatment and risk-reduction strategies. The higher viral loads associated with acute HIV infection are associated with an increased risk of transmission. Current treatment recommendations are the same for acute and established infections. Studies of acute HIV infection indicate that initiation of antiretroviral therapy during this period may allow greater recovery of CD4+ T-cell count and function and may result in a smaller latent viral reservoir and a skewing of infection away from central memory CD4+ T cells toward shorter-lived transitional memory CD4+ T cells. This article summarizes a presentation by Susan J. Little, MD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program, Improving the Management of HIV Disease, held in Los Angeles, California, in April 2015. PMID:27398768

  18. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Medical Complications and Comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    Care of patients with HIV infection starts with diagnosis as soon as possible, preferably at or near the time of acute infection. Opportunistic infections, malignancies, and other conditions develop progressively over time, particularly in untreated patients. The AIDS-defining opportunistic infections most common in the United States include Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia, Candida esophagitis, toxoplasmic encephalitis, tuberculosis, disseminated Mycobacterium avium complex, cryptococcal meningitis, and cytomegalovirus retinitis. Specific prophylaxis regimens exist for several opportunistic infections, and effective antiretroviral therapy reduces the risk of most others. Other AIDS-defining conditions include wasting syndrome and HIV encephalopathy. AIDS-defining malignancies include Kaposi sarcoma, systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma, and invasive cervical cancer. Although not an AIDS-defining condition, anal cancer is common in patients with HIV infection. Other HIV-related conditions include thrombocytopenia, recurrent bacterial respiratory infections, HIV-associated nephropathy, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder. PMID:27092563

  19. Brief Report: APOL1 Renal Risk Variants Are Associated With Chronic Kidney Disease in Children and Youth With Perinatal HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Purswani, Murli U; Patel, Kunjal; Winkler, Cheryl A; Spector, Stephen A; Hazra, Rohan; Seage, George R; Mofenson, Lynne; Karalius, Brad; Scott, Gwendolyn B; Van Dyke, Russell B; Kopp, Jeffrey B

    2016-09-01

    APOL1 renal risk alleles are associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in adults, with the strongest effect being for HIV-associated nephropathy. Their role in youth with perinatal HIV-1 infection (PHIV) has not been studied. In a nested case-control study of 451 PHIV participants in the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study, we found a 3.5-fold increased odds of CKD in those carrying high-risk APOL1 genotypes using a recessive model [95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2 to 10.0]. We report an unadjusted incidence of 1.2 CKD cases/100 person-years (95% CI: 0.5 to 2.5) in PHIV youth carrying APOL1 high-risk genotypes, with important implications for sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27035887

  20. Sexual Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men Who Use the Internet in Beijing and Urumqi, China

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Huachun; Wu, Zunyou; Yu, Jianping; Li, Min; Ablimit, Muhtar; Li, Fan; Pang, Lin; Juniper, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To assess HIV and syphilis infections among men who have sex with men who use the Internet (MSMUI) and their risk behaviors. Methods In 2007, 429 MSMUI were recruited via the Internet in Beijing and Urumqi, China. A questionnaire was administered, and a blood specimen collected and tested for HIV and syphilis. Results Median age of participants was 25 years. Median number of lifetime sexual partners was 10. Ninety point seven percent ever had sex with a cyber-friend. Rates of condom use in the last oral, insertive and receptive anal sex were 9.1%, 66.3% and 60.4% respectively. Infection rates of HIV, syphilis and HIV/syphilis co-infection were 4.8%, 11.4%, and 1.7% respectively. Factors associated with HIV infection were being ≤24 years (OR=2.85, 95% CI: 1.05–7.75), syphilis positive (OR=4.78, 95% CI: 1.68–13.58), used non-water-based liquid as lubricant (OR=8.03, 95% CI: 1.03–62.52) and having bleeding gums or oral ulcers during condom-free oral sex (OR=3.17, 95% CI: 1.13–8.88). Conclusions MSMUI engage in high-risk sexual behaviors and have a high prevalence of HIV and syphilis infections. The internet is the predominant venue for the majority of MSMUI to find sexual partners. It is urgent to implement effective intervention programs targeting this group. PMID:20104115

  1. Minimizing the risk of non-vertical, non-sexual HIV infection in children--beyond mother to child transmission.

    PubMed

    Cotton, Mark F; Marais, Barend J; Andersson, Monique I; Eley, Brian; Rabie, Helena; Slogrove, Amy L; Dramowski, Angela; Schaaf, Hendrik Simon; Mehtar, Shaheen

    2012-01-01

    After witnessing an episode of poor injection safety in large numbers of children in a rural under-resourced hospital in Uganda, we briefly review our own experience and that of others in investigating HIV infection in children considered unlikely to be through commonly identified routes such as vertical transmission, sexual abuse or blood transfusion. In the majority of cases, parents are HIV uninfected. The cumulative experience suggests that the problem is real, but with relatively low frequency. Vertical transmission is the major route for HIV to children. However, factors such as poor injection safety, undocumented surrogate breast feeding, an HIV-infected adult feeding premasticated food to a weaning toddler, poor hygienic practice in the home and using unsterilised equipment for minor surgical or traditional procedures are of cumulative concern. PMID:23199798

  2. Distinct HIV Type 1 Strains in Different Risk Groups and the Absence of New Infections by Drug-Resistant Strains in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Caplinskas, Saulius; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Gasich, Elena L.; Gilyazova, Alla V.; Caplinskiene, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To analyze HIV-1 genotypes in Lithuania and the transmission of drug-resistant viruses, HIV-1 sequences were obtained from 138 individuals, who were diagnosed as HIV-1 infected in 1990–2008 and represented all major risk groups. Subtype A strains, dominating in the former Soviet Union (90% of cases), were found in 60% of individuals, followed by subtype B (22%) and CRF03_AB (12%) strains. The remaining 7% of the strains included variants belonging to subtype C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, more complex recombinant forms, and strains that could not be reliably genotyped. Analysis of virus genotypes per risk group revealed the circulation of distinct HIV-1 strains in different risk groups: subtype A viruses were present in 82% of injecting drug users (IDUs), but less than a half of heterosexually infected individuals and cases with unknown transmission route, and none of men having sex with men (MSM). We observed no mutations causing drug resistance among 27 newly diagnosed HIV-1 cases. PMID:23186249

  3. Maternal Substance Use and HIV Status: Adolescent Risk and Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Noelle R.; Gwadz, Marya Viorst; Cleland, Charles M.; Vekaria, Pooja C.; Ferns, Bill

    2008-01-01

    We examined the risk and protective factors and mental health problems of 105 low SES, urban adolescents whose mothers were coping with alcohol abuse and other drug problems. Approximately half of the mothers were also HIV-infected. As hypothesized, there were few differences between adolescents of HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected mothers in…

  4. HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources for Healthcare Professionals HIV Infection and Adult Vaccination Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccines are ... percentage is less than 15%. Learn about adult vaccination and other health conditions Asplenia Diabetes Type 1 ...

  5. AIDS Prevention Guide. The Facts about HIV Infection and AIDS. Putting the Facts to Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (DHHS/PHS), Atlanta, GA.

    Many teenagers engage in behaviors that increase their risk of becoming infected with HIV. This document is a compilation of information about AIDS and HIV Infection, and provides suggestions for parents and other adults in discussing AIDS/HIV with young people. Basic facts are outlined, including what AIDS is and how HIV infection causes AIDS;…

  6. Increases in sexually transmitted infections and sexual risk behaviour without a concurrent increase in HIV incidence among men who have sex with men in San Francisco: a suggestion of HIV serosorting?

    PubMed Central

    Truong, H M; Kellogg, T; Klausner, J D; Katz, M H; Dilley, J; Knapper, K; Chen, S; Prabhu, R; Grant, R M; Louie, B; McFarland, W

    2006-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections (STI) and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) have been increasing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in San Francisco. However, HIV incidence has stabilised. Objectives To describe recent trends in sexual risk behaviour, STI, and HIV incidence among MSM in San Francisco and to assess whether increases in HIV serosorting (that is, selective unprotected sex with partners of the same HIV status) may contribute to preventing further expansion of the epidemic. Methods The study applies an ecological approach and follows the principles of second generation HIV surveillance. Temporal trends in biological and behavioural measures among MSM were assessed using multiple pre‐existing data sources: STI case reporting, prevention outreach programmatic data, and voluntary HIV counselling and testing data. Results Reported STI cases among MSM rose from 1998 through 2004, although the rate of increase slowed between 2002 and 2004. Rectal gonorrhoea cases increased from 157 to 389 while early syphilis increased from nine to 492. UAI increased overall from 1998 to 2004 (p<0.001) in community based surveys; however, UAI with partners of unknown HIV serostatus decreased overall (p<0.001) among HIV negative MSM, and among HIV positive MSM it declined from 30.7% in 2001 to a low of 21.0% in 2004 (p<0.001). Any UAI, receptive UAI, and insertive UAI with a known HIV positive partner decreased overall from 1998 to 2004 (p<0.001) among MSM seeking anonymous HIV testing and at the STI clinic testing programme. HIV incidence using the serological testing algorithm for recent HIV seroconversion (STARHS) peaked in 1999 at 4.1% at the anonymous testing sites and 4.8% at the STI clinic voluntary testing programme, with rates levelling off through 2004. Conclusions HIV incidence among MSM appears to have stabilised at a plateau following several years of resurgence. Increases in the selection of sexual partners of concordant HIV serostatus may be

  7. Migration, Marital Change, and HIV Infection in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Anglewicz, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Research on the relationship between migration and HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa often suggests that migrants are at higher risk of HIV infection because they are more likely to engage in risk behavior than non-migrants, and tend to move to areas with a relatively higher HIV prevalence. While migration may be a risk factor for HIV infection, I instead focus on the possibility that the HIV positive are more likely to migrate. Using a longitudinal dataset of permanent rural residents and migrants from Malawi, I find that migrants originating from rural areas are indeed more likely than non-migrants to be HIV positive and to have engaged in HIV risk behavior. The increased HIV risk among migrants may be due to the selection of HIV positive individuals into migration; I find that HIV positive individuals are more likely migrate than those who are HIV negative. The explanation for this phenomenon appears to be marital instability, which occurs more frequently among HIV positive individuals and leads to migration after marital change. PMID:22109083

  8. Role of HIV Infection Duration and CD4 Cell Level at Initiation of Combination Anti-Retroviral Therapy on Risk of Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lodi, Sara; Phillips, Andrew; Fidler, Sarah; Hawkins, David; Gilson, Richard; McLean, Ken; Fisher, Martin; Post, Frank; Johnson, Anne M.; Walker-Nthenda, Louise; Dunn, David; Porter, Kholoud

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of HIV drug resistance and subsequent virological failure are often cited as potential disadvantages of early cART initiation. However, their long-term probability is not known, and neither is the role of duration of infection at the time of initiation. Methods Patients enrolled in the UK Register of HIV seroconverters were followed-up from cART initiation to last HIV-RNA measurement. Through survival analysis we examined predictors of virologic failure (2HIV-RNA ≥400 c/l while on cART) including CD4 count and HIV duration at initiation. We also estimated the cumulative probabilities of failure and drug resistance (from the available HIV nucleotide sequences) for early initiators (cART within 12 months of seroconversion). Results Of 1075 starting cART at a median (IQR) CD4 count 272 (190,370) cells/mm3 and HIV duration 3 (1,6) years, virological failure occurred in 163 (15%). Higher CD4 count at initiation, but not HIV infection duration at cART initiation, was independently associated with lower risk of failure (p=0.033 and 0.592 respectively). Among 230 patients initiating cART early, 97 (42%) discontinued it after a median of 7 months; cumulative probabilities of resistance and failure by 8 years were 7% (95% CI 4,11) and 19% (13,25), respectively. Conclusion Although the rate of discontinuation of early cART in our cohort was high, the long-term rate of virological failure was low. Our data do not support early cART initiation being associated with increased risk of failure and drug resistance. PMID:24086588

  9. Non-injection and Injection Drug Use and STI/HIV Risk in the United States: The Degree to which Sexual Risk Behaviors versus Sex with an STI-Infected Partner Account for Infection Transmission among Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Maria; Berger, Amanda; Hemberg, Jordana; O’Neill, Allison; Dyer, Typhanye Penniman; Smyrk, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    We used the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (N=14,322) to measure associations between non-injection crack-cocaine and injection drug use and sexually transmitted infection including HIV (STI/HIV) risk among young adults in the United States and to identify factors that mediate the relationship between drug use and infection. Respondents were categorized as injection drug users, non-injection crack-cocaine users, or non-users of crack-cocaine or injection drugs. Non-injection crack-cocaine use remained an independent correlate of STI (adjusted prevalence ratio (APR): 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.10–2.42) and sexual risk behaviors including multiple partnerships and inconsistent condom use. Injection drug use was strongly associated with STI (APR: 2.66, 95% CI: 1.18–5.99); this association appeared to be mediated by sex with STI-infected partners rather than by sexual risk behaviors. The results underscore the importance of sexual risk reduction among all drug users including IDUs, who face high sexual as well as parenteral transmission risk. PMID:22890684

  10. Prevalence and behavioural risks for HIV and HCV infections in a population of drug users of Dakar, Senegal: the ANRS 12243 UDSEN study

    PubMed Central

    Leprêtre, Annie; Ba, Idrissa; Lacombe, Karine; Maynart, Maryvonne; Toufik, Abdalla; Ndiaye, Ousseynou; Kane, Coumba Toure; Gozlan, Joël; Tine, Judicaël; Ndoye, Ibrahim; Raguin, Gilles; Girard, Pierre-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Data on the extent of drug use and associated HIV, hepatitis C and hepatitis B infection in West Africa are lacking. The objectives of ANRS12244 UDSEN study were to estimate the size of the heroin and/or cocaine drug user (DU) population living in the Dakar area (Senegal), and assess the prevalence and risk factors of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV), including behavioural determinants in this population, in order to set up an integrated prevention and treatment programme for DUs. Design and methods A capture-recapture method was applied for population size estimation, whereas the respondent-driven sampling (RDS) method was used to recruit a sample of DUs living in the Dakar area and determine HIV, HBV and HCV prevalence. Behavioural data were gathered during face-to-face interviews, and blood samples were collected on dried blood spots for analysis in a central laboratory. Data analysis was performed using the RDS analysis tool, and risk factors were determined by logistic regression. Access to laboratory results was organized for the participants. Results The size of the DU population in the Dakar area was estimated to reach 1324 (95% confidence interval (95% CI: 1281–1367)). Based on the 506 DUs included in the study, the HIV, HCV and HBV prevalence were 5.2% (95% CI: 3.8–6.3), 23.3% (95% CI: 21.2–25.2) and 7.9% (95% CI: 5.2–11.1), respectively. In people who inject drugs (PWID), prevalence levels increased to 9.4% for HIV and 38.9% for HCV (p=0.001 when compared to those who never injected). Women were more at risk of being HIV infected (prevalence: 13.04% versus 2.97% in males, p=0.001). Being PWID was a risk factor for HCV and HIV infection (odds ratio, OR: 2.7, 95% CI: 1.7–4.3, and OR: 4.3, 95% CI: 1.7–10.7, respectively), whereas older age and female sex were additional risk factors for HIV infection (10% increase per year of age, p=0.03 and OR: 4.9, 95% CI: 1.6–156, respectively). No specific determinant was

  11. Mucosal Immunology of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in the immunology, pathogenesis, and prevention of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection continue to reveal clues to the mechanisms involved in the progressive immunodeficiency attributed to infection but more importantly have shed light on the correlates of immunity to infection and disease progression. HIV selectively infects, eliminates, and/or dysregulates several key cells of the human immune system, thwarting multiple arms of the host immune response, and inflicting severe damage to mucosal barriers, resulting in tissue infiltration of ‘symbiotic’ intestinal bacteria and viruses that essentially become opportunistic infections promoting systemic immune activation. This leads to activation and recruitment or more target cells for perpetuating HIV infection, resulting in persistent, high level viral replication in lymphoid tissues, rapid evolution of resistant strains, and continued evasion of immune responses. However, vaccine studies and studies of spontaneous controllers are finally providing correlates of immunity from protection and disease progression, including virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, binding antibodies, innate immune responses, and generation of antibodies with potent antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity activity. Emerging correlates of immunity indicate that prevention of HIV infection may be possible through effective vaccine strategies that protect and stimulate key regulatory cells and immune responses in susceptible hosts. Further, immune therapies specifically directed towards boosting specific aspects of the immune system may eventually lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. PMID:23772612

  12. Thymic function in HIV-infection.

    PubMed

    Kolte, Lilian

    2013-04-01

    promise as a future means to complete CD4 restoration and renew the TCR repertoire in patients who respond insufficiently to HAART. Apart from naïve T cells, regulatory T cells (Tregs) are developed in the thymus. Tregs play a critical role in peripheral tolerance and suppress inappropriate immune activation such as induced by HIV. We studied levels of Tregs in adult HIV-infected patients with known thymic output. Our studies demonstrate increased levels of Tregs in HIV-infected patients despite long-term treatment with HAART, suppressed viral loads, and normalized CD4 counts and immune activation suggesting that Tregs expand irreversibly in HIV-infection independently of viral load, CD4 depletion or level of immune activation. Our data further suggest that elevated levels of Tregs in HIV-infected adults may in part be due to increased thymic production of naive Tregs. During pregnancy, establishing fetal-maternal tolerance is essential to pregnancy success. In a prospective study on HIV-positive and HIV-negative pregnant women we found alterations in thymic output and Treg levels in HIV-negative pregnant women compatible with such an establishment. HIV-infected women, however, displayed different immunological profiles from HIV-negative women, and this immune unbalance may interfere with the prevention of fetal rejection and may partly explain the increased risk of abortion in HIV-infected women. We finally examined thymic function in 20 HIV-EU children at 15 months of age. The thymus was reduced in size in HIV-EU children compared with children born to HIV-negative mothers, but no evidence of impaired thymic function, immune regulation, or antibody vaccination response was detected, suggesting that no qualitative immune deficits persist in HIV-EU children beyond infancy. In conclusion, the thymus is functional in adults, and it contributes to immunological recovery in HIV-infected patients primarily during the first two years of HAART. Treg levels are increased in HIV-infected

  13. Changes in sexual and drug-related risk behavior following antiretroviral therapy initiation among HIV-infected injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Tsung-chieh; Westergaard, Ryan P.; Lau, Bryan; Celentano, David D.; Vlahov, David; Mehta, Shruti H.; Kirk, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate whether HAART is associated with subsequent sexual and drug-related risk behavior compensation among injection drug users (IDUs). Design A community-based cohort study of 362 HIV-infected IDUs initiating HAART in Baltimore, Maryland. Methods HAART use and risk behavior was assessed at 8316 biannual study visits (median 23). Using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations (GEE), we examined the effect of HAART initiation on changes in risk behavior while adjusting for sociodemographics, alcohol use, CD4+ cell count, year of initiation and consistency of HAART use. Results At HAART initiation, participants were a median of 44.4 years old, 71.3% men and 95.3% African–American. In multivariable analysis, HAART initiation was associated with a 75% reduction in the likelihood of unprotected sex [adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0.25; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.19–0.32] despite no change in overall sexual activity (aOR 0.95; 0.80–1.12). Odds of any injecting decreased by 38% (aOR 0.62; 0.51–0.75) after HAART initiation. Among the subset of persistent injectors, needle-sharing increased nearly two-fold (aOR 1.99; 1.57–2.52). Behavioral changes were sustained for more than 5 years after HAART initiation and did not differ by consistency of HAART use. Reporting specific high-risk behaviors in the year prior to initiation was a robust predictor of engaging in those behaviors subsequent to HAART. Conclusion Overall, substantial declines in sexual risk-taking and active injecting argue against significant behavioral compensation among IDUs following HAART initiation. These data also provide evidence to support identifying persons with risky pre-HAART behavior for targeted behavioral intervention. PMID:23079804

  14. The risk of non-melanoma skin cancer in HIV-infected patients: new data and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Honglei; Shu, Guobin; Wang, Songting

    2016-06-01

    The role of HIV/AIDS in non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is not well defined. We sought to update the evidence of the association between HIV/AIDS and risk of NMSC by gender and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE on 29 February 2014. Standardised incidence ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals were extracted and combined using generic inverse variance methods assuming a random effects model. Six studies including 78,794 patients with HIV/AIDS fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Analysis of all studies showed that HIV/AIDS was associated with an increased risk of NMSC (standardised incidence ratio 2.76; 95% confidence interval 2.55-2.98). The standardised incidence ratios of NMSC were 3.63 (1.08-12.22) for men and 2.18 (1.24-3.83) for women with HIV/AIDS, respectively. In analysis stratified by ART, we found that individuals receiving ART had lower risk of developing NMSC than individuals who had not received ART (standardised incidence ratio, 95% confidence interval; 1.95 [1.10-3.47] versus 2.11 [1.44-3.12]). HIV/AIDS is associated with an increased risk of NMSC in both male and female patients. The use of ART appears to be beneficial in protecting against the development of NMSC. PMID:25999166

  15. Risk Factors for HIV Transmission and Barriers to HIV Disclosure: Metropolitan Atlanta Youth Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Gonzalez, Andres F; Wallins, Amy; Toledo, Lauren; Murray, Ashley; Gaul, Zaneta; Sutton, Madeline Y; Gillespie, Scott; Leong, Traci; Graves, Chanda; Chakraborty, Rana

    2016-01-01

    Youth carry the highest incidence of HIV infection in the United States. Understanding adolescent and young adult (AYA) perspectives on HIV transmission risk is important for targeted HIV prevention. We conducted a mixed methods study with HIV-infected and uninfected youth, ages 18-24 years, from Atlanta, GA. We provided self-administered surveys to HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected AYAs to identify risk factors for HIV acquisition. By means of computer-assisted thematic analyses, we examined transcribed focus group responses on HIV education, contributors to HIV transmission, and pre-sex HIV status disclosure. The 68 participants had the following characteristics: mean age 21.5 years (standard deviation: 1.8 years), 85% male, 90% black, 68% HIV-infected. HIV risk behaviors included the perception of condomless sex (Likert scale mean: 8.0) and transactional sex (88% of participants); no differences were noted by HIV status. Qualitative analyses revealed two main themes: (1) HIV risk factors among AYAs, and (2) barriers to discussing HIV status before sex. Participants felt the use of social media, need for immediate gratification, and lack of concern about HIV disease were risk factors for AYAs. Discussing HIV status with sex partners was uncommon. Key reasons included: fear of rejection, lack of confidentiality, discussion was unnecessary in temporary relationships, and disclosure negatively affecting the mood. HIV prevention strategies for AYAs should include improving condom use frequency and HIV disclosure skills, responsible utilization of social media, and education addressing HIV prevention including the risks of transactional sex. PMID:26588663

  16. Prevalence and risk factors of squamous intraepithelial lesions of the cervix among HIV-infected women - a long-term follow-up study in a low-prevalence population.

    PubMed

    Lehtovirta, Päivi; Finne, Patrik; Nieminen, Pekka; Skogberg, Kirsi; Savonius, Hannele; Paavonen, Jorma; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2006-12-01

    HIV-infected women have high risk for precancerous lesions of the uterine cervix. We studied the prevalence and risk factors of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) among systematically followed HIV-infected women enrolled from a population with low HIV prevalence. The study population consisted of 108 HIV-infected women enrolled between 1989 and 2003 with a mean follow-up 4.4 years. Risk factors of SIL were assessed based on samples collected during 2000-02. The overall rates of atypical glandular cells of uncertain significance (AGUS), atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance (ASCUS), low-grade SIL (LSIL) and high-grade SIL (HSIL) were 4, 24, 15 and 5%, respectively. Reduced CD4-lymphocyte count was associated with an increased prevalence of SIL, whereas duration of HIV infection (< or > or =5 years), use of antiretroviral medication, or HIV viral load (<50 or > or =50 copies/mL) was not. The cumulative risk of developing SIL after 1 and 5 years was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI] 7-27%) and 48% (95% CI 33-63%), respectively. The cumulative risk of SIL was increased among women younger than 31 years (P = 0.04) as well as in women displaying high initial HIV viral load (P = 0.01). Our results from a low HIV-incidence population re-emphasize the importance of guidelines for cytologic screening of HIV-seropositive women. PMID:17212861

  17. Group Motivational Interviewing to Promote Adherence to Antiretroviral Medications and Risk Reduction Behaviors in HIV Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; DiIorio, Colleen; Kelley, Mary E.; Resnicow, Kenneth; Sharma, Sanjay

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a clinical trial that tested the efficacy of using motivational interviewing (MI) in a group format to promote adherence to antiretroviral medications and risk reduction behaviors (RRB) in 203 predominately African American HIV infected women. It was compared to a group health promotion program. Participants were followed for 9 months. Adherence was measured by MEMS®; and RRB by self-report. Controlling for recruitment site and years on ART, no significant group by time effects were observed. Attendance (≥7/8 sessions) modified the effects. Higher MI attendees had better adherence at all follow-ups, a borderline significant group by time effect (p = 0.1) for % Doses Taken on Schedule, a significantly larger proportion who reported abstinence at 2 weeks, 6, and 9 months, and always used protection during sex at 6 and 9 months. Though not conclusive, the findings offer some support for using MI in a group format to promote adherence and some risk reduction behaviors when adequate attendance is maintained. PMID:21165692

  18. Why Are the Benefits of Increased Resources Not Impacting the Risk of HIV Infection for High SES Women in Cameroon?

    PubMed Central

    Mumah, Joyce N.; Jackson-Smith, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    s social and economic power may be insufficient to address other drivers of HIV infection among women in SSA. PMID:24968350

  19. Identification of primary HIV-1C infection in Botswana.

    PubMed

    Novitsky, V; Woldegabriel, E; Wester, C; McDonald, E; Rossenkhan, R; Ketunuti, M; Makhema, J; Seage, G R; Essex, M

    2008-08-01

    Methods for identification of primary HIV infections seem increasingly important to understand pathogenesis, and to prevent transmission, which is particularly efficient during acute infection. Most current algorithms for HIV testing are based on detection of HIV antibodies and are unable to identify early infections before seroconversion. The efficiency of prospective cohorts, which is a standard approach for identifying primary HIV-1 infection, depends on a variety of epidemiological and cultural factors including HIV incidence and stigma and, not surprisingly, varies significantly in different geographical areas. We report a voluntary counseling and testing (VCT)-based approach to identifying primary HIV-1C infection that was developed as part of a primary HIV-1 subtype C infection study in Botswana. The referral strategy was based on: (1) collaboration with VCT centers at city clinics operated by the Ministry of Health; (2) partnering with the busiest non-government VCT center; (3) educating healthcare workers and the community about primary HIV infection; and (4) pairing with diverse VCT providers, including NGOs and private-sector organizations. Acute HIV-1 infections were defined by a negative HIV-1 serology combined with a positive HIV-1 RT-PCR test. Recent HIV-1 infections were identified by detuned EIA testing according to the classic STARTH algorithm. The VCT-based referral strategy resulted in the successful identification of 57 cases of acute and early HIV infection. A referral strategy of expanded VCT with viral RNA (Ribonucleic acid) testing to a national program in Botswana may be a promising approach for identification of primary HIV infections on a countrywide level. The program should offer VCT with viral RNA testing to the general public, facilitate proper counseling and risk reduction, and allow initiation of early HAART, and may reduce new viral transmissions. PMID:18608056

  20. Randomized, Controlled Intervention Trial of Male Circumcision for Reduction of HIV Infection Risk: The ANRS 1265 Trial

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Background Observational studies suggest that male circumcision may provide protection against HIV-1 infection. A randomized, controlled intervention trial was conducted in a general population of South Africa to test this hypothesis. Methods and Findings A total of 3,274 uncircumcised men, aged 18–24 y, were randomized to a control or an intervention group with follow-up visits at months 3, 12, and 21. Male circumcision was offered to the intervention group immediately after randomization and to the control group at the end of the follow-up. The grouped censored data were analyzed in intention-to-treat, univariate and multivariate, analyses, using piecewise exponential, proportional hazards models. Rate ratios (RR) of HIV incidence were determined with 95% CI. Protection against HIV infection was calculated as 1 − RR. The trial was stopped at the interim analysis, and the mean (interquartile range) follow-up was 18.1 mo (13.0–21.0) when the data were analyzed. There were 20 HIV infections (incidence rate = 0.85 per 100 person-years) in the intervention group and 49 (2.1 per 100 person-years) in the control group, corresponding to an RR of 0.40 (95% CI: 0.24%–0.68%; p < 0.001). This RR corresponds to a protection of 60% (95% CI: 32%–76%). When controlling for behavioural factors, including sexual behaviour that increased slightly in the intervention group, condom use, and health-seeking behaviour, the protection was of 61% (95% CI: 34%–77%). Conclusion Male circumcision provides a degree of protection against acquiring HIV infection, equivalent to what a vaccine of high efficacy would have achieved. Male circumcision may provide an important way of reducing the spread of HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. (Preliminary and partial results were presented at the International AIDS Society 2005 Conference, on 26 July 2005, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.) PMID:16231970

  1. Suitability of HIV-Infected Subjects for Insurance.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gurmukh; Salkind, Alan R; Kneepkens, Robert F

    2015-01-01

    Objectives .- To ascertain the suitability of HIV-positive individuals for insurance coverage based on international data and practices. Background .- During the first decade of HIV epidemic, diagnosis of HIV-infection carried a poor prognosis. Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy (HAART or ART), HIV infection is more like other chronic diseases with infected individuals often living 20 or more years after the diagnosis of HIV infection Methods .- Review of peer-reviewed publications was undertaken to assess the risk of death in the HIV-infected population as a whole as well as subsets with favorable outcomes and those with additional comorbidities, such as co-infection with hepatitis viruses and drug use. Results .- Review of literature revealed that in well-educated, non-drug using individuals, negative for hepatitis B and C infection, who had CD 4 counts above 500/cmm, viral loads below 500 particles/mL, and were compliant with treatment, the mortality rate was similar to that of general population. Conclusions .- The risk of death, in at least a subset of HIV-positive subjects, is low enough that insurance providers should consider stratifying HIV-infected individuals according to mortality risk and offering insurance rates comparable to people with other diseases with similar mortality risks. PMID:27584807

  2. HIV and co-infections

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Christina C; Crane, Megan; Zhou, JingLing; Mina, Michael; Post, Jeffrey J; Cameron, Barbara A; Lloyd, Andrew R; Jaworowski, Anthony; French, Martyn A; Lewin, Sharon R

    2013-01-01

    Summary Despite significant reductions in morbidity and mortality secondary to availability of effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection still accounts for 1.5 million deaths annually. The majority of deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa where rates of opportunistic co-infections are disproportionately high. In this review, we discuss the immunopathogenesis of five common infections that cause significant morbidity in HIV-infected patients globally. These include co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and Plasmodium falciparum. Specifically, we review the natural history of each co-infection in the setting of HIV, the specific immune defects induced by HIV, the effects of cART on the immune response to the co-infection, the pathogenesis of immune restoration disease (IRD) associated with each infection, and advances in the areas of prevention of each co-infection via vaccination. Finally, we discuss the opportunities and gaps for future research. PMID:23772618

  3. [Heterosexual transmission of HIV infection

    PubMed

    Coulaud, J P

    1993-02-01

    The AIDS epidemic has spread rapidly in Africa among the urban impoverished where multiple sexual partners and sexually transmitted diseases are common. Over 80% of the 9 million Africans who will develop AIDS before the year 2000 will have been contaminated sexually. Poverty, multiple sexual partners in the framework of prostitution, and drug addiction are responsible for rapid spread of HIV infection in Southeast Asia, the West India, and Brazil. Drug addiction has played a major role in diffusion of HIV into the general population of Europe and the US. Prevalence rates are much higher in sexually transmitted disease centers in France and the US than among blood donors or pregnant women. Sexually transmitted diseases and heterosexual transmission have been studied in Africas since diagnostic tests became available. Several studies, the majority conducted among prostitutes in Nairobi or Kinshasa and their clients, allow establishment of a list of sexually transmitted diseases associated with increased risk of seroconversion. Genital ulcers within the past 6 months presented a relative risk of 2-4 depending on the series. Urethral or cervical gonorrhea has a lower relative risk of 1.2 in most studies. Absence of circumcision was also a risk factor. Studies were subsequently conducted in Europe on factors favoring sexual transmission. 513 heterosexual couples together for a minimum duration of 18 months and an average of 38 months were included in the Multicenter European Study conducted in 10 centers in 9 countries. The "index" subject was male in 400 cases and female in 113. At entry into the study, 73 of 400 males (18.2%) and 10 of 113 females (8.8%) had already infected their partners. Duration of union, frequency of intercourse, mode of transmission of the index subject, and oral contraceptive use had no effect on risk of transmission. Factors increasing risk of infection included the severity of immunosuppression of the index subject, whether judged by

  4. HIV-negative gay men at risk.

    PubMed

    1995-01-01

    According to a study conducted by the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association, HIV-negative gay and bisexual men are at great risk of becoming HIV-positive unless changes in prevention education are made. Investigators studied gay men in four cities and projected their chances of becoming infected with HIV. They found an infection rate of three percent per year for gay and bisexual men under thirty. Low self-esteem, peer pressure, and a need for intimacy were contributing factors to unsafe sexual behavior. PMID:11362379

  5. HIV testing practices among Latina women at risk of getting infected: A five-year follow-up of a community sample in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Rojas, Patria; Dillon, Frank; Varga, Leah; De La Rosa, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latinos are more likely to delay HIV testing, present to care with an AIDS defining illness, and die within one year of learning their HIV-positive status than non-Latino blacks and whites. For this paper, we explore the role of partner-relationship characteristics and health behaviors, in predicting HIV testing among Latina adult women who engaged in risky sexual behaviors (i.e., unprotected vaginal and/or anal sex). Data from a convenience sample of 168 Latina adult women who engaged in risky sexual behavior in the year prior to assessment were analyzed for this paper. Rates and predictors of HIV testing among this sample were assessed after a five year follow-up. Descriptive and analytical estimates include incidence rates and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) from multilevel models. At five-year follow-up, 63.7% (n=107) women reported having been tested for HIV, of whom 12.2% (n=13) were women who never tested before. Main reasons for not having been tested at follow-up included: low risk perception (62.1%) and trusting their partner(s)/being in a monogamous relationship/knowing their partner’s HIV status (17.2%). Predictors of HIV testing included: age (AOR: 0.96; 95%C.I.=0.92–0.99), provider endorsement of HIV testing (AOR: 4.59; 95%C.I.=1.77–11.95), poor quality of their romantic relationships (AOR: 1.12; 95%C.I.=1.03–1.26) and knowing the HIV sero-status of sexual partner (AOR: 4.35; 95%C.I.=1.79–10.54). This study characterizes a group of Latina women at high risk for HIV infection and their HIV testing behaviors. Our findings underscore the need of increasing access to quality health care services and HIV behavioral interventions, and to strengthen the adherence to HIV/STD testing recommendations and guidelines among local health care providers serving the Latino community in South Florida. PMID:26291133

  6. HIV testing practices among Latina women at risk of getting infected: a five-year follow-up of a community sample in South Florida.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Quintero, Catalina; Rojas, Patria; Dillon, Frank R; Varga, Leah M; De La Rosa, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Latinos are more likely to delay HIV testing, present to care with an AIDS defining illness, and die within one year of learning their HIV-positive status than non-Latino blacks and whites. For this paper, we explore the role of partner-relationship characteristics and health behaviors, in predicting HIV testing among Latina adult women who engaged in risky sexual behaviors (i.e., unprotected vaginal and/or anal sex). Data from a convenience sample of 168 Latina adult women who engaged in risky sexual behavior in the year prior to assessment were analyzed for this paper. Rates and predictors of HIV testing among this sample were assessed after a five-year follow-up. Descriptive and analytical estimates include incidence rates and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) from multilevel models. At five-year follow-up, 63.7% (n = 107) women reported having been tested for HIV, of whom 12.2% (n = 13) were women who never tested before. Main reasons for not having been tested at follow-up included: low risk perception (62.1%) and trusting their partner(s)/being in a monogamous relationship/knowing their partner's HIV status (17.2%). Predictors of HIV testing included: age (AOR: 0.96; 95% CI = 0.92-0.99), provider endorsement of HIV testing (AOR: 4.59; 95% CI = 1.77-11.95), poor quality of their romantic relationships (AOR: 1.12; 95% CI = 1.03-1.26), and knowing the HIV sero-status of sexual partner (AOR: 3.61; 95% CI = 1.46-8.95). This study characterizes a group of Latina women at high risk for HIV infection and their HIV testing behaviors. Our findings underscore the need of increasing access to quality health-care services and HIV behavioral interventions, and to strengthen the adherence to HIV/sexually transmitted disease testing recommendations and guidelines among local health-care providers serving the Latino community in South Florida. PMID:26291133

  7. Bacterial Pneumonia among HIV-Infected Patients: Decreased Risk After Tobacco Smoking Cessation. ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2000–2007

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Antoine; Mercié, Patrick; Alioum, Ahmadou; Bonnet, Fabrice; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Dupon, Michel; Neau, Didier; Dabis, François; Chêne, Geneviève

    2010-01-01

    Background Bacterial pneumonia is still a substantial cause of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected patients in the era of combination Antiretroviral Therapy. The benefit of tobacco withdrawal on the risk of bacterial pneumonia has not been quantified in such populations, exposed to other important risk factors such as HIV-related immunodeficiency. Our objective was to estimate the effect of tobacco smoking withdrawal on the risk of bacterial pneumonia among HIV-infected individuals. Methodology/Principal Findings Patients of the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort with ≥ two visits during 2000–2007 and without bacterial pneumonia at the first visit were included. Former smokers were patients who stopped smoking since ≥ one year. We used Cox proportional hazards models adjusted on CD4+ lymphocytes (CD4), gender, age, HIV transmission category, antiretroviral therapy, cotrimoxazole prophylaxis, statin treatment, viral load and previous AIDS diagnosis. 135 cases of bacterial pneumonia were reported in 3336 patients, yielding an incidence of 12 ‰ patient-years. The adjusted hazard of bacterial pneumonia was lower in former smokers (Hazard Ratio (HR): 0.48; P = 0.02) and never smokers (HR: 0.50; P = 0.01) compared to current smokers. It was higher in patients with <200 CD4 cells/µL and in those with 200 to 349 CD4 cells/µL (HR: 2.98 and 1.98, respectively; both P<0.01), but not in those with 350 to 499 CD4 cells/µL (HR: 0.93; P = 0.79), compared to those with ≥500 CD4 cells/µL. The interaction between CD4 cell count and tobacco smoking status was not statistically significant. Conclusions/Significance Smoking cessation dramatically reduces the risk of bacterial pneumonia, whatever the level of immunodeficiency. Smoking cessation interventions should become a key element of the clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. PMID:20126646

  8. Risk factors for HIV infection in German i.v. drug abusers. Clinical, serological and epidemiological features.

    PubMed

    Harms, G; Laukamm-Josten, U; Bienzle, U; Guggenmoos-Holzmann, I

    1987-04-15

    A series of 320 German i.v. drug abusers (32.2% female, 67.8% male) were tested in a cross-sectional study for antibodies against HIV. Seroprevalence increased from 0 in those who discontinued i.v. drug abuse before 1982 to 37.2% in those who stopped injecting drugs in 1985/1986 or who were still addicted. Antibodies to HIV were significantly associated with lymphadenopathy and clinical symptoms (fever, weight loss, diarrhea, fatigue, night sweat, dermal lesions) and with markers of hepatitis A and hepatitis B virus infection. Participants of the study admitted in 92.5% of cases to "needle sharing" and in 83.1% of cases to sexual contacts among drug abusers. Prostitution and drug abuse in prison were significantly correlated with seropositivity. No antibodies to HIV infection were detected in 131 subjects of a control group of household contacts. PMID:3495695

  9. A risk score to identify HIV-infected women most likely to become lost to follow-up in the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Bengtson, Angela M; Chibwesha, Carla J; Westreich, Daniel; Mubiana-Mbewe, Mwangelwa; Chi, Benjamin H; Miller, William C; Mapani, Muntanga; Pence, Brian W; Musonda, Patrick; Stringer, Jeffrey Sa; Pettifor, Audrey

    2016-08-01

    Access to lifelong combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is expanding among HIV-infected pregnant and breastfeeding women throughout sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). For this strategy to meaningfully improve maternal HIV outcomes, retention in HIV care is essential. We developed a risk score to identify women with high likelihood of loss to follow-up (LTFU) at 6 months postpartum from HIV care, using data from public health facilities in Lusaka, Zambia. LTFU was defined as not presenting for HIV care within 60 days of the last scheduled appointment. We used logistic regression to assess demographic, obstetric and HIV predictors of LTFU and to develop a simple risk score. Sensitivity and specificity were assessed at each risk score cut-point. Among 2029 pregnant women initiating cART between 2009 and 2011, 507 (25%) were LTFU by 6 months postpartum. Parity, education, employment status, WHO clinical stage, duration of cART during pregnancy and number of antenatal care visits were associated with LTFU (p-value < .10). A risk score cut-point of 11 (42nd percentile) had 85% sensitivity (95% CI 82%, 88%) and 22% specificity (95% CI 20%, 24%) to detect women LTFU and would exclude 20% of women from a retention intervention. A risk score cut-point of 18 (69th percentile) identified the 23% of women with the highest probability of LTFU and had sensitivity 32% (95% CI 28%, 36%) and specificity 80% (95% CI 78%, 82%). A risk score approach may be useful to triage a subset of women most likely to be LTFU for targeted retention interventions. PMID:26887526

  10. Understanding Women's Risk for HIV Infection Using Social Dominance Theory and the Four Bases of Gendered Power

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenthal, Lisa; Levy, Sheri R.

    2010-01-01

    Theoretical models to date have fallen short of accounting for the alarming worldwide rates of HIV infection in women through heterosexual contact. In this article, social dominance theory and the four bases of gendered power--force, resource control, social obligations, and consensual ideologies--are used to organize and explain international…

  11. HIV Infection Presenting with Dementia.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, K; Gupta, Avneet; Manoj, S; Seshadri, Kp

    2015-08-01

    We present a case of dementia in a young healthy individual. On evaluation he was detected to have HIV infection with low CD4 count and a high viral load. He had no opportunistic infections or any other AIDS defining illnesses. He recovered fully within 3 months of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27604445

  12. Alcohol abuse and HIV infection: role of DRD2.

    PubMed

    Agudelo, Marisela; Khatavkar, Pradnya; Yndart, Adriana; Yoo, Changwon; Rosenberg, Rhonda; Devieux, Jessy G; Malow, Robert M; Nair, Madhavan

    2014-01-01

    According to a survey from the HIV Cost and Services Utilization Study (HCSUS), approximately 53% of HIV-infected patients reported drinking alcohol and 8% were classified as heavy drinkers. The role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV infection has been widely studied and recent research has found a significant association between heavy alcohol consumption and lower levels of CD4 T cells among HIV-infected alcoholics. Although there is evidence on the role of alcohol as a risk factor for HIV transmission and disease progression, there is a need for population studies to determine the genetic mechanisms that affect alcohol's role in HIV disease progression. One of the mechanisms of interest is the dopaminergic system. To date, the effects of dopamine on HIV neuroimmune pathogenesis are not well understood; however, dopaminergic neural degeneration due to HIV is known to occur by viral invasion into the brain via immune cells, and modulation of dopamine in the CNS may be a common mechanism by which different types of substances of abuse impact HIV disease progression. Although previous studies have shown an association of D(2) dopamine receptor (DRD2) polymorphisms with severity of alcohol dependence, the expression of this allele risk on HIV patients with alcohol dependence has not been systematically explored. In the current study, DRD2 Taq1A and C957T SNP genotyping analyses were performed in 165 HIV-infected alcohol abusers and the results were examined with immune status and CD4 counts. PMID:25053368

  13. Protocol for an open-label, single-arm trial of HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) among people at high risk of HIV infection: the NSW Demonstration Project PRELUDE

    PubMed Central

    Vaccher, S; Grulich, A; McAllister, J; Templeton, D J; Bloch, M; McNulty, A; Holden, J; Poynten, I M; Prestage, G; Zablotska, I

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Despite a number of HIV prevention strategies, the number of new HIV infections remains high. In Australia, over three-quarters of new HIV diagnoses are in gay and bisexual men (GBM). Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) has been shown to be effective at preventing new HIV infections in several randomised trials. The PRELUDE study aims to evaluate the implementation of PrEP in healthcare settings in New South Wales (NSW), Australia, among a sample of high-risk adults. Methods and analysis PRELUDE is an ongoing open-label, single-arm demonstration project, conducted in public and private clinics across NSW, Australia. Enrolment began in November 2014. The study is designed for 300 high-risk participants—mainly GBM and heterosexual women. Participants receive daily oral PrEP, composed of emtricitabine (FTC) and tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF), for up to 2.5 years. Quarterly study visits include testing for HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), assessment of ongoing eligibility and side effects, and self-reported adherence. Following each study visit, online behavioural surveys are administered to collect information on medication adherence, risk behaviours and attitudes. Blood samples will be collected in a subset of patients 1, 6 and 12 months after PrEP initiation to measure FTC/TDF concentrations. Analyses using longitudinal regression models will focus on feasibility, adherence, safety, tolerability and effects of PrEP on behaviour. This study will inform PrEP policy and guide the implementation of PrEP in Australia in people at high risk of HIV. Ethics and dissemination The study will be conducted in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. All patients will provide written informed consent prior to participation in the study. Publications relating to each of the primary end points will be gradually released after 12 months of follow-up is complete. Trial registration number NCT02206555; Pre-results. PMID:27324719

  14. Estimating the Sizes of Populations At Risk of HIV Infection From Multiple Data Sources Using a Bayesian Hierarchical Model

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Le; Raftery, Adrian E.; Reddy, Amala

    2014-01-01

    In most countries in the world outside of sub-Saharan Africa, HIV is largely concentrated in sub-populations whose behavior puts them at higher risk of contracting and transmitting HIV, such as people who inject drugs, sex workers and men who have sex with men. Estimating the size of these sub-populations is important for assessing overall HIV prevalence and designing effective interventions. We present a Bayesian hierarchical model for estimating the sizes of local and national HIV key affected populations. The model incorporates multiple commonly used data sources including mapping data, surveys, interventions, capture-recapture data, estimates or guesstimates from organizations, and expert opinion. The proposed model is used to estimate the numbers of people who inject drugs in Bangladesh. PMID:26015851

  15. Decreased sexual risk behavior in the era of HAART among HIV-infected urban and rural South Africans attending primary care clinics

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesh, Kartik K; de Bruyn, Guy; Lurie, Mark N; Mohapi, Lerato; Pronyk, Paul; Moshabela, Mosa; Marinda, Edmore; Gray, Glenda E; Triche, Elizabeth W; Martinson, Neil A

    2011-01-01

    Objective In light of increasing access to highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) in sub-Saharan Africa, we conducted a longitudinal study to assess the impact of HAART on sexual risk behaviors among HIV-infected South Africans in urban and rural primary care clinics. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Methods We conducted a cohort study at rural and urban primary care HIV clinics in South Africa consisting of 1544 men and 4719 women enrolled from 2003–2010, representing 19703 clinic visits. The primary outcomes were being sexually active, unprotected sex, and >1 sex partner and were evaluated at six monthly intervals. Generalized estimated equations assessed the impact of HAART on sexual risk behaviors. Results Among 6263 HIV-infected men and women, over a third (37.2%) initiated HAART during study follow-up. In comparison to pre-HAART follow-up, visits while receiving HAART were associated with a decrease in those reporting being sexually active (AOR: 0.86 [95% CI: 0.78–0.95]). Unprotected sex and having >1 sex partner were reduced at visits following HAART initiation compared to pre-HAART visits (AOR: 0.40 [95% CI: 0.34–0.46] and AOR: 0.20 [95% CI: 0.14–0.29], respectively). Conclusions Sexual risk behavior significantly decreased following HAART initiation among HIV-infected South African men and women in primary care programs. The further expansion of antiretroviral treatment programs could enhance HIV prevention efforts in Africa. PMID:20808202

  16. Hepatitis E virus infection in the HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Debes, Jose D; Pisano, Maria Belen; Lotto, Martin; Re, Viviana

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a RNA virus that can cause hepatitis. In immunocompetent individuals, infection with HEV usually leads to asymptomatic seroconversion. However, in immunosuppressed patients, such as transplant recipients, HEV can develop into a chronic infection. Studies regarding the seroprevalence and clinical implications of HEV in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are conflicting. Levels of CD4 count in blood seem to be the most widely associated risk factor, while other factors such as meat consumption or proximity to animals are less clearly associated with HEV infection. Progression to chronicity, as well as extrahepatic manifestations of HEV seem rare in HIV, and the implications of HEV in liver disease progression are poorly understood in the HIV-infected. In this review we describe the epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical implications of HEV infection in individuals infected with HIV. PMID:27243210

  17. Research on HIV Co-Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page Get email updates Order publications Featured Research The Path to a Cure for Hepatitis C ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Research on HIV Co-Infections HIV-infected people are ...

  18. HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159344.html HIV Infection Seems to Affect Nervous System But symptoms tend to subside once antiretroviral drugs ... mild, it is clear that HIV affects the nervous system within days of infection," she said in a ...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... rashes clinical tools newsletter | contact Share | Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Primary Infection Information for adults A A ... weeks following exposure to HIV (the human immunodeficiency virus). Chronic infection with this virus can cause AIDS ( ...

  20. Risk factors for default from tuberculosis treatment in HIV-infected individuals in the state of Pernambuco, Brazil: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Concomitant treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and tuberculosis (TB) presents a series of challenges for treatment compliance for both providers and patients. We carried out this study to identify risk factors for default from TB treatment in people living with HIV. Methods We conducted a cohort study to monitor HIV/TB co-infected subjects in Pernambuco, Brazil, on a monthly basis, until completion or default of treatment for TB. Logistic regression was used to calculate crude and adjusted odds ratios, 95% confidence intervals and P-values. Results From a cohort of 2310 HIV subjects, 390 individuals (16.9%) who had started treatment after a diagnosis of TB were selected, and data on 273 individuals who completed or defaulted on treatment for TB were analyzed. The default rate was 21.7% and the following risk factors were identified: male gender, smoking and CD4 T-cell count less than 200 cells/mm3. Age over 29 years, complete or incomplete secondary or university education and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) were identified as protective factors for the outcome. Conclusion The results point to the need for more specific actions, aiming to reduce the default from TB treatment in males, younger adults with low education, smokers and people with CD4 T-cell counts < 200 cells/mm3. Default was less likely to occur in patients under HAART, reinforcing the strategy of early initiation of HAART in individuals with TB. PMID:22176628

  1. HIV Prevention Counseling Intervention Delivered During Routine Clinical Care Reduces HIV Risk Behavior in HIV-Infected South Africans Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy: The Izindlela Zokuphila/Options for Health Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Jeffrey D.; Cornman, Deborah H.; Shuper, Paul A.; Christie, Sarah; Pillay, Sandy; Macdonald, Susan; Ngcobo, Ntombenhle; Amico, K. Rivet; Lalloo, Umesh; Friedland, Gerald; Fisher, William A.

    2014-01-01

    Context Sustainable interventions are needed to minimize HIV risk behavior among people living with HIV (PLWH) in South Africa on antiretroviral therapy (ART), a significant proportion of whom do not achieve viral suppression. Objective To determine whether a brief lay counselor delivered intervention implemented during routine care can reduce risky sex among PLWH on ART. Design Cluster randomized 16 HIV clinical care sites in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa, to intervention or standard-of-care. Setting Publicly funded HIV clinical care sites. Patients 1891 PLWH on ART received the HIV prevention counseling intervention (n = 967) or standard-of-care counseling (n = 924). Intervention Lay counselors delivered a brief intervention using motivational interviewing strategies based on the Information—Motivation—Behavioral Skills (IMB) model during routine clinical care. Main Outcome Measures Number of sexual events without a condom in the past four weeks with partners of any HIV status, and with partners perceived to be HIV-negative or HIV-status unknown, assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 18 months. Results Intervention participants reported significantly greater reductions in HIV risk behavior on both primary outcomes, compared to standard-of-care participants. Differences in STI incidence between arms were not observed. Conclusion Effective behavioral interventions, delivered by lay counselors within the clinical care setting, are consistent with the strategy of linking HIV care and HIV prevention and integrating biomedical and behavioral approaches to stemming the HIV epidemic. PMID:25230288

  2. Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Stephen T; Singh, Anjali; Read, Sarah W; Sharma, Opendra K; Finzi, Diana; Lane, Clifford; Rice, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring latently infected cells. To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient's long-term sustained HIV remission, but researchers have been unable to replicate this cure, and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission remain to be established. In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in-depth discussion of whether HSCT could be exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures. Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV-infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure. PMID:25273081

  3. Continued risky behavior in HIV-infected youth.

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, C; Buskin, S

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to describe and compare risky behaviors in HIV-infected youths and adults. METHODS: Records of HIV-infected outpatients were reviewed for the period January 1990 to February 1998. Youths (younger than 22 years at HIV diagnosis and younger than 25 years at study entry, n = 139) were compared with adults (22 years or older at HIV diagnosis or 25 years or older at study entry, n = 2880). Risky behaviors occurring after HIV diagnosis included unsafe sex and needle sharing. RESULTS: Female and male youths were more than twice as likely as adults to engage in risky behavior (adjusted odds ratios of 2.6 and 2.3, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Both youths and adults continue to engage in risky behaviors after HIV diagnosis. Prospective studies are needed, along with targeted public health campaigns, for youths with HIV and for those at risk of infection. PMID:10630148

  4. Behavior changes after notification of HIV infection.

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, P D; Van Devanter, N; Rogers, T F; Singer, E; Shipton-Levy, R; Steilen, M; Stuart, A; Avorn, J; Pindyck, J

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND. To learn more about how people who did not volunteer for testing react to information about HIV infection, we assessed short-term behavior changes in HIV-positive blood donors. METHODS. Blood donors who were notified at the New York Blood Center that they were HIV positive were asked to participate in a study. A nurse elicited a medical history, performed a limited medical examination, and asked participants to complete a questionnaire that included questions about drug use, sexual behavior, and psychological characteristics. Participants were asked to return in 2 weeks to complete another questionnaire. RESULTS. Many fewer men and women reported engaging in unsafe sexual behaviors in the 2 weeks preceding the follow-up visit than had reported such behaviors prior to notification. These changes were greater than those other investigators have reported, but about 40% of the participants still reported unsafe sexual activity at the follow-up interview. CONCLUSIONS. To make nonvolunteer screening programs for HIV infection more effective in reducing the spread of HIV infection, we need to learn more about how to help people change their high-risk behaviors. PMID:1746654

  5. Tuberculosis, before and after Antiretroviral Therapy among HIV-Infected Children in Nigeria: What Are the Risk Factors?

    PubMed Central

    Adeoti, Adekunle O.; Nweke, Nnamdi O.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In Nigeria, there is a dearth of pediatric data on the risk factors associated with tuberculosis (TB), before and after antiretroviral therapy (ART). Methodology A retrospective observational cohort study, between October 2010 and December 2013, at the Federal Medical Centre, Makurdi, Nigeria. TB was noted among children less than 15 years of age at ART enrolment (prevalent TB-PrevTB), within 6 months (early incident tuberculosis-EITB) and after 6 months (late incident tuberculosis-LITB) of a 12-month follow-up on ART. Potential risk factors for PrevTB and incident TB were assessed using the multivariate logistic and Cox regression models respectively. Results Among 368 HIV-1 infected children, PrevTB was diagnosed in 73 children (19.8%). Twenty-eight EITB cases were diagnosed among 278 children over 132 person-years (py) with an EITB rate of 21.2/100 py. Twelve LITB cases were seen among 224 children over 221.9 py with a LITB rate of 5.4/100 py. A significant reduction in the incidence rates of TB was found over time (75%, p˂ 0.001). Young age of children (12–35 months, aOR; 24, 95% CI; 4.1–146.6, p ˂ 0.001; 36–59 months, aOR;21, 95%CI;4.0–114.3, p ˂ 0.001); history of TB in children (aOR; 29, 95% CI; 7.3–119.4, P˂ 0.001); severe immunosuppression (aOR;38, 95% CI;12–123.2,p ˂ 0.001); oropharyngeal candidiasis (aOR;3.3, 95% CI; 1.4–8.0, p = 0.009) and sepsis (aOR; 3.2, 95% CI;1.0–9.6, p = 0.043) increased the risk of PrevTB. Urban residency was protective against EITB (aHR; 0.1, 95% CI; 0.0–0.4, p = 0.001). Virological failure (aHR; 4.7, 95% CI; 1.3–16.5, p ˂ 0.001) and sepsis (aHR; 26, 95% CI; 5.3–131.9, p ˂ 0.001) increased the risk of LITB. Conclusions In our cohort of HIV-infected children, a significant reduction in cases of incident TB was seen following a 12-month use of ART. After ART initiation, TB screening should be optimized among children of rural residency, children with sepsis, and those with poor virological

  6. Travelers' Health: HIV Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... 448-4911 ( www.nccc.ucsf.edu ). HIV TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR US TRAVELERS ENTERING FOREIGN COUNTRIES International travelers ... extended stay should review that country’s policies and requirements. This information is usually available from the consular ...

  7. Solid organ transplantation and HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Polak, Wojciech G; Gładysz, Andrzej

    2003-01-01

    HIV infection has been traditionally considered to be an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Recent advances in HIV treatment, as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), significantly reduced HIV-related mortality and morbidity. At the same time the number of HIV-infected patients with end-stage organ diseases constantly increased. Current data describing solid organ transplantation in HIV-infected patients demonstrated comparable outcome to that in the HIV-negative population. In light of this, solid organ transplantation should be considered as a treatment option for selected HIV-positive patients with end-stage organ disease. PMID:15171000

  8. HIV Risk Behavior among Delinquent and Mentally Ill Teens: Case Manager Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michael D.; Seal, David Wyatt; Hartley, Shannon

    2006-01-01

    An HIV knowledge survey and qualitative interview were administered to 20 case managers in community-based programs for troubled youth to assess HIV knowledge and their perception of client HIV risk behaviors. Participants had good HIV knowledge. Case managers perceived client youth to be at high risk for HIV infection due to unsafe sexual…

  9. A Case of Seronegative HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Adam M.; Brennan, Tim; O'Connell, Karen; Sydnor, Emily; Williams, Thomas M.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Gallant, Joel E.; Blankson, Joel N.

    2009-01-01

    Patients infected with HIV-1 typically seroconvert within weeks of primary infection. In rare cases, patients do not develop antibodies against HIV-1 despite demonstrable infection. We describe an HLA-B*5802 positive individual who presented with AIDS despite repeatedly negative HIV-1 antibody screening tests. Phylogenetic analysis of env clones revealed little sequence diversity, and weak HIV-1 specific CD8+ T cell responses were present to Gag epitopes. The patient seroconverted after immune reconstitution on HAART. Lack of an antibody response to HIV-1 is rare and appears to be due to a defect in HIV-1-specific immunity rather than infection with attenuated virus. PMID:20039801

  10. Understanding motives for intravaginal practices amongst Tanzanian and Ugandan women at high risk of HIV infection: The embodiment of social and cultural norms and well-being☆

    PubMed Central

    Lees, Shelley; Zalwango, Flavia; Andrew, Bahati; Vandepitte, Judith; Seeley, Janet; Hayes, Richard J.; Francis, Suzanna C.

    2014-01-01

    Some types of intravaginal practices (IVP) may increase the risk for HIV acquisition. This is particularly worrisome for populations with dual high prevalence of HIV and IVP. Women involved in transactional sex are at increased risk for HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Social, cultural and economic influences are strong drivers of IVP in this population. To explore this, we carried out a qualitative research study to investigate the drivers and motivations for using IVP within a large observational study of women at high risk of HIV in Tanzania and Uganda from September 2008 to September 2009. Of the 201 women selected, 176 women took part in a semi-structured in-depth interview. Additionally, in Tanzania, eight focus group discussions among study participants and community members were carried out to obtain information on community norms and expectations. IVP were motivated by overlapping concerns with hygiene, morality, sexual pleasure, fertility, relationship security, and economic security. These motives were driven by the need to meet cultural and social expectations of womanhood, and at the same time attend to personal well-being. Among women involved in transactional sex in East Africa, interventions aimed at modifying or eliminating IVP should attend to local cultural and social norms as well as the individual as an agent of change. PMID:24565154

  11. Understanding motives for intravaginal practices amongst Tanzanian and Ugandan women at high risk of HIV infection: the embodiment of social and cultural norms and well-being.

    PubMed

    Lees, Shelley; Zalwango, Flavia; Andrew, Bahati; Vandepitte, Judith; Seeley, Janet; Hayes, Richard J; Francis, Suzanna C

    2014-02-01

    Some types of intravaginal practices (IVP) may increase the risk for HIV acquisition. This is particularly worrisome for populations with dual high prevalence of HIV and IVP. Women involved in transactional sex are at increased risk for HIV infection in sub-Saharan Africa. Social, cultural and economic influences are strong drivers of IVP in this population. To explore this, we carried out a qualitative research study to investigate the drivers and motivations for using IVP within a large observational study of women at high risk of HIV in Tanzania and Uganda from September 2008 to September 2009. Of the 201 women selected, 176 women took part in a semi-structured in-depth interview. Additionally, in Tanzania, eight focus group discussions among study participants and community members were carried out to obtain information on community norms and expectations. IVP were motivated by overlapping concerns with hygiene, morality, sexual pleasure, fertility, relationship security, and economic security. These motives were driven by the need to meet cultural and social expectations of womanhood, and at the same time attend to personal well-being. Among women involved in transactional sex in East Africa, interventions aimed at modifying or eliminating IVP should attend to local cultural and social norms as well as the individual as an agent of change. PMID:24565154

  12. Risk Factors Associated with HIV Infection among Male Homosexuals and Bisexuals Followed in an Open Cohort Study: Project Horizonte, Brazil (1994-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Ana Paula; Greco, Marília; Fausto, Maria Arlene; Greco, Dirceu B.; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2014-01-01

    Background There has recently been an increase in HIV infection rates among men who have sex with men (MSM). This study aimed at investigating risk factors associated with incident HIV infection in a MSM cohort–Project Horizonte, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Methodology This is a nested case-control study in an ongoing open cohort of homosexual and bisexual men, carried out in 1994–2010, during which 1,085 volunteers were enrolled. Each HIV seroconverted volunteer (case) was compared with three randomly selected HIV negative controls, matched by admission date and age (±3 years). During follow-up, 93 volunteers seroconverted and were compared with 279 controls. Principal Findings The risk factors associated with HIV seroconversion were: contact with partner’s blood during sexual relations (OR 3.7; 95% CI 1.2–11.6), attendance at gay saunas in search for sexual partners (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.3–5.4), occasional intake of alcohol when flirting and engaging in sexual activity (OR 2.5; 95% CI 1.3–5.1), inconsistent use of condoms in receptive anal sex (OR 2.4; 95% CI 1.1–5.4), little interest to look up information about AIDS (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.0–6.7) particularly in newspapers (OR 3.4; 95% CI 1.4–8.1). Conclusions This study shows that MSM are still engaging in risk behavior, such as unprotected anal intercourse, despite taking part in a cohort study on various preventive measures. New preventive strategies in touch with the epidemic’s development and the specificities of this particular population are needed. PMID:25279670

  13. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  14. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Suppression of HIV Infectivity and Replication

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Tami; Lynch, Kevin; Dubé, Benoit; Gettes, David R.; Tustin, Nancy B.; Lai, Jian Ping; Metzger, David S.; Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D.; Evans, Dwight L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) citalopram would down regulate HIV infectivity and that the greatest effects would be seen in people with depression. Depression is a risk factor for morbidity and mortality in HIV/AIDS. Serotonin (5-HT) neurotransmission has been implicated in the pathobiology of depression, and pharmacologic therapies for depression target this system. The 5-HT transporter and 5-HT receptors are widely distributed throughout the central nervous and immune systems. Depression has been associated with suppression of natural killer cells (NK) cells and CD8+ lymphocytes, key regulators of HIV infection. Methods Ex-vivo models for acute and chronic HIV infection were used to study the effects of citalopram on HIV viral infection and replication, in 48 depressed and non-depressed women. For both the acute and chronic infection models, HIV reverse transcriptase (RT) activity was measured in the citalopram treatment condition and the control condition. Results The SSRI significantly downregulated the RT response in both the acute and chronic infection models. Specifically, citalopram significantly decreased the acute HIV infectivity of macrophages. Citalopram also significantly decreased HIV viral replication in the latently infected T-cell line and in the latently infected macrophage cell line. There was no difference in down-regulation by depression status. Conclusions These studies suggest that an SSRI enhances NK/CD8 non-cytolytic HIV suppression in HIV/AIDS and decreases HIV viral infectivity of macrophages, ex vivo, suggesting the need for in vivo studies to determine a potential role for agents targeting serotonin in the host defense against HIV. PMID:20947783

  15. Neurologic complications of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Spudich, Serena S; Ances, Beau M

    2012-01-01

    The effects of HIV-1 in the nervous system are a topic of avid interest to investigators and clinicians focused on HIV, judging by the large and discriminating audience at the oral sessions and poster presentations relating to neuroscience at the 19th Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections. Major areas of investigation at this year's conference included the use of neuropsychological testing and neuroimaging to assess the state of the central nervous system (CNS) and effects of antiretroviral therapy during HIV infection as well as basic and clinical studies of neuropathogenesis of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND). Numerous important suggestions emerged during the meeting. Among them was the proposition that earlier initiation of therapy might benefit the CNS. Another was that the relationship between HIV and normal aging remains unclear and warrants further study. Still another was that ongoing abnormalities may persist despite treatment with antiretroviral therapy-including measurable brain microglial activation, detectable cerebrospinal fluid HIV, and progression of neurologic impairment. PMID:22710906

  16. HIV/STI Risk Behavior of Drug Court Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Angela A.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Drug abusing offenders have high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). To date, the HIV/STI prevention needs of offenders in drug court programs have been ignored. This multi-method study employed interviews to assess drug court professionals' perceptions of the need for an HIV risk reduction intervention to be integrated…

  17. Interventions to Prevent Sexually Transmitted Infections, Including HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Willard

    2011-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Sexually Transmitted Disease (STD) Treatment Guidelines were last updated in 2006. To update the “Clinical Guide to Prevention Services” section of the 2010 CDC STD Treatment Guidelines, we reviewed the recent science with reference to interventions designed to prevent acquisition of STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Major interval developments include (1) licensure and uptake of immunization against genital human papillomavirus, (2) validation of male circumcision as a potent prevention tool against acquisition of HIV and some other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), (3) failure of a promising HIV vaccine candidate to afford protection against HIV acquisition, (4) encouragement about the use of antiretroviral agents as preexposure prophylaxis to reduce risk of HIV and herpes simplex virus acquisition, (5) enhanced emphasis on expedited partner management and rescreening for persons infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, (6) recognition that behavioral interventions will be needed to address a new trend of sexually transmitted hepatitis C among men who have sex with men, and (7) the availability of a modified female condom. A range of preventive interventions is needed to reduce the risks of acquiring STI, including HIV infection, among sexually active people, and a flexible approach targeted to specific populations should integrate combinations of biomedical, behavioral, and structural interventions. These would ideally involve an array of prevention contexts, including (1) communications and practices among sexual partners, (2) transactions between individual clients and their healthcare providers, and (3) comprehensive population-level strategies for prioritizing prevention research, ensuring accurate outcome assessment, and formulating health policy. PMID:22080271

  18. A point mutation in CD45 may be associated with an increased risk of HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Tchilian, E Z; Wallace, D L; Dawes, R; Imami, N; Burton, C; Gotch, F; Beverley, P C

    2001-09-28

    The CD45 antigen is essential for normal antigen receptor-mediated signalling in lymphocytes, and different patterns of splicing of CD45 are associated with distinct functions in lymphocytes. Here we show that abnormal CD45 splicing caused by a C77G transversion in exon A of the gene encoding CD45 (PTPRC) is associated with increased susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. PMID:11579257

  19. Group Intervention to Reduce HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among Persons Living With HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalichman, Seth C.; Rompa, David; Cage, Marjorie

    2005-01-01

    Results of a randomized controlled trial show that a behavioral intervention grounded in social cognitive theory reduces unprotected sexual behaviors among men and women living with HIV infection, with the greatest reductions in HIV transmission risk behaviors occurring with non-HIV-positive sex partners. In this article, the authors describe the…

  20. Hyponatremia, hypochloremia, and hypoalbuminemia predict an increased risk of mortality during the first year of antiretroviral therapy among HIV-infected Zambian and Kenyan women.

    PubMed

    Dao, Christine N; Peters, Philip J; Kiarie, James N; Zulu, Isaac; Muiruri, Peter; Ong'ech, John; Mutsotso, Winfred; Potter, Dara; Njobvu, Lungowe; Stringer, Jeffrey S A; Borkowf, Craig B; Bolu, Omotayo; Weidle, Paul J

    2011-11-01

    Early mortality rates after initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) are high in sub-Saharan Africa. We examined whether serum chemistries at ART initiation predicted mortality among HIV-infected women. From May 2005 to January 2007, we enrolled women initiating ART in a prospective cohort study in Zambia and Kenya. We used Cox proportional hazards models to identify risk factors associated with mortality. Among 661 HIV-infected women, 53 (8%) died during the first year of ART, and tuberculosis was the most common cause of death (32%). Women were more likely to die if they were both hyponatremic (sodium <135 mmol/liter) and hypochloremic (chloride <95 mmol/liter) (37% vs. 6%) or hypoalbuminemic (albumin <34 g/liter, 13% vs. 4%) when initiating ART. A body mass index <18 kg/m(2) [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) 5.3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.6-10.6] and hyponatremia with hypochloremia (aHR 4.5, 95% CI 2.2-9.4) were associated with 1-year mortality after adjusting for country, CD4 cell count, WHO clinical stage, hemoglobin, and albumin. Among women with a CD4 cell count >50 cells/μl, hypoalbuminemia was also a significant predictor of mortality (aHR=3.7, 95% CI 1.4-9.8). Baseline hyponatremia with hypochloremia and hypoalbuminemia predicted mortality in the first year of initiating ART, and these abnormalities might reflect opportunistic infections (e.g., tuberculosis) or advanced HIV disease. Assessment of serum sodium, chloride, and albumin can identify HIV-infected patients at highest risk for mortality who may benefit from more intensive medical management during the first year of ART. PMID:21417949

  1. HIV risk, seropositivity and predictors of infection among homeless and non-homeless women sex workers in Miami, Florida, USA.

    PubMed

    Surratt, H L; Inciardi, J A

    2004-07-01

    Although homelessness has frequently been associated with substance abuse, and has been established as a predictor of HIV risk among substance abusers, little is known about the impact of homelessness on HIV risk among female sex workers. This analysis investigated the contribution of homelessness to sexual risk taking among a sample of 485 female sex workers recruited into an HIV prevention programme in Miami, Florida, 41.6% of whom considered themselves to be currently homeless. Findings indicated that in comparison to non-homeless sex workers, significantly more homeless sex workers were daily users of alcohol and crack, and their past month sex work reflected significantly more frequent vaginal and oral sex acts, higher levels of unprotected vaginal sex and more numerous sexual activities while 'high' on drugs. At the same time, a significantly greater proportion of homeless sex workers encountered customers that refused to use condoms than did the non-homeless sex workers. There were no significant differences in HIV seropositivity between the homeless and non-homeless women (22.5 and 24.9%, respectively), primarily because the majority of the women in the study cycled in and out of homelessness. PMID:15223529

  2. HIV risk behaviors, knowledge, and prevention education among offenders under community supervision: a hidden risk group.

    PubMed

    Belenko, Steven; Langley, Sandra; Crimmins, Susan; Chaple, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Numerous studies have established that incarcerated populations are at substantial risk for HIV infection. In response, many jails and prisons have increased HIV prevention and related services. However, although twice as many offenders are under community supervision as are incarcerated at any given time, HIV prevention needs have been largely ignored among probationers and parolees, and little is known about their HIV risk behaviors or HIV prevention needs. Compared with inmates, probationers and parolees have substantially greater opportunities to engage in HIV risk behaviors. In the present study, we describe HIV risk behaviors, knowledge, and prevention education experiences of probationers and parolees in New York City. We find that probationers and parolees have high rates of unprotected sex, and limited current exposure to effective HIV education and prevention interventions. Probation and parole departments need to improve HIV training for officers and make HIV risk reduction services more available. PMID:15342338

  3. Metabolic Syndrome, Diabetes, and Cardiovascular Risk in HIV

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Linda

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection and its treatment have been associated with adipose tissue changes and disorders of glucose and lipid metabolism. The proportion of HIV-infected adults over the age of 50 is also growing placing HIV-infected adults at particular risk for metabolic perturbations and cardiovascular disease. The metabolic syndrome in HIV-infected adults has been increasingly studied but whether HIV is associated with greater risk remains unclear, likely because of the interplay of host, viral and antiretroviral factors that are associated with the components of the metabolic syndrome. While the Framingham Risk Score is a well-accepted measure of 10-year cardiovascular risk in the general population, it may not accurately predict risk in the HIV setting due to HIV-related factors such as inflammation that are not accounted for. The relationship between HIV and diabetes mellitus (DM) risk has also been debated. We summarize the recent literature on metabolic syndrome, DM, and cardiovascular risk in HIV-infected adults. PMID:25027062

  4. The rationale for third trimester testing of vertical HIV transmission in neonates with CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Boos, Vinzenz; Feiterna-Sperling, Cornelia; Sarpong, Akosua; Garten, Lars; Cremer, Malte; von Weizsäcker, Katharina; Bührer, Christoph; Dame, Christof

    2016-08-01

    We report on a late-preterm neonate with severe congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, refractory to antiviral therapy with ganciclovir. Subsequent immune diagnostics led to the finding of HIV infection at day 69, even though the mother tested negative for HIV in early pregnancy. Thus, in congenital CMV infection, HIV testing should be performed to elucidate maternal HIV seroconversion during late pregnancy. Our case strongly supports third trimester screening of HIV infection acquired during pregnancy, yet recommended only for women with traditional risk factors for HIV or living in an area of high HIV prevalence. PMID:26830786

  5. Altered Functional Response to Risky Choice in HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Colm G.; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Jordan, Stephan J.; Woods, Steven Paul; Ellis, Ronald J.; Paulus, Martin P.; Grant, Igor

    2014-01-01

    Background Risky decision-making is commonly observed in persons at risk for and infected with HIV and is associated with executive dysfunction. Yet it is currently unknown whether HIV alters brain processing of risk-taking decision-making. Methods This study examined the neural substrate of a risky decision-making task in 21 HIV seropositive (HIV+) and 19 seronegative (HIV-) comparison participants. Functional magnetic resonance imaging was conducted while participants performed the risky-gains task, which involves choosing among safe (20 cents) and risky (40/80 cent win or loss) choices. Linear mixed effects analyses examining group and decision type were conducted. Robust regressions were performed to examine the relationship between nadir CD4 count and Kalichman sexual compulsivity and brain activation in the HIV+ group. The overlap between the task effects and robust regressions was explored. Results Although there were no serostatus effects in behavioral performance on the risky-gains task, HIV+ individuals exhibited greater activation for risky choices in the basal ganglia, i.e. the caudate nucleus, but also in the anterior cingulate, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, and insula relative to the HIV- group. The HIV+ group also demonstrated reduced functional responses to safe choices in the anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex relative to the HIV- group. HIV+ individuals with higher nadir CD4 count and greater sexual compulsivity displayed lower differential responses to safe versus risky choices in many of these regions. Conclusions This study demonstrated fronto-striatal loop dysfunction associated with HIV infection during risky decision-making. Combined with similar between-group task behavior, this suggests an adaptive functional response in regions critical to reward and behavioral control in the HIV+ group. HIV-infected individuals with higher CD4 nadirs demonstrated activation patterns more similar to seronegative individuals. This

  6. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  7. Women and HIV infection: the makings of a midlife crisis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Nanette; Fan, Maria; Maslow, BatSheva; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2009-11-20

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral agents, women with HIV infection can expect to live longer than ever before. This increased survival has led to concerns about the long-term implications of HIV disease and its treatment. Women with HIV infection appear to lose ovarian function earlier in life than women without HIV infection. They also have evidence of reduced bone mineral density and increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, many of these increases in risk factors are present even prior to the menopausal transition. All of these risks, present at midlife, augur poorly for future health and describe a substantially increased burden of disease likely to accrue to HIV-infected women as they enter older age groups. Further compounding the adversity faced by the HIV infected, the demographics of women most vulnerable to this disease include adverse social and economic influences, both of which worsen their long-term prognosis. For example, drug use and poverty are related to more severe menopausal symptoms and chronic stress is related to worse psychological and cardiovascular risk. An understanding of how menopause interacts with HIV infection is therefore most important to alert the clinician to perform surveillance for common health problems in postmenopausal women, and to address directly and appropriately symptomatology during the menopausal transition. PMID:19783389

  8. Women and HIV Infection: The Makings of a Midlife Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Santoro, Nanette; Fan, Maria; Maslow, BatSheva; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2009-01-01

    With the advent of highly active antiretroviral agents, women with HIV infection can expect to live longer than ever before. This increased survival has led to concerns about the long-term implications of HIV disease and its treatment. Women with HIV infection appear to lose ovarian function earlier in life than women without HIV infection. They also have evidence of reduced bone mineral density and increased cardiovascular risk. Moreover, many of these increases in risk factors are present even prior to the menopausal transition. All of these risks, present at mid-life, augur poorly for future health and describe a substantially increased burden of disease likely to accrue to HIV infected women as they enter older age groups. Further compounding the adversity faced by the HIV infected, the demographics of women most vulnerable to this disease include adverse social and economic influences, both of which worsen their long term prognosis. For example, drug use and poverty are related to more severe menopausal symptoms and chronic stress is related to worse psychological and cardiovascular risk. An understanding of how menopause interacts with HIV infection is therefore most important to alert the clinician to perform surveillance for common health problems in postmenopausal women, and to address directly and appropriately symptomatology during the menopausal transition. PMID:19783389

  9. Health Related Quality of Life in HIV-infected and at-risk Women: The Impact of Illicit Drug Use and Hepatitis C on a Community Preference Weighted Measure*

    PubMed Central

    Aden, Brandon; Nosyk, Bohdan; Wittenberg, Eve; Schackman, Bruce R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of illicit drug use and chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) on health related quality of life (HRQoL) in women with HIV or at-risk for HIV infection. Methods Cross-sectional analysis of data from the Women's Interagency Health Study (WIHS) of women with HIV (n=2508) and at high risk of HIV infection (n=889) in the US. A Short-Form-6D (SF-6D) HRQoL measure derived from the Medical Outcomes Study–HIV (MOS-HIV) questionnaire, HIV infection status, CD4 cell count (a measure of immune status), antiretroviral treatment, current illicit drug use (heroin and/or cocaine), and HCV status were assessed at a recent study visit. We developed multivariate linear regression models adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, education, and testing for interactions. Results HIV-infected women with ≤200 CD4 cells/uL had lower mean HRQoL scores (0.69) than either HIV-infected women with >200 CD4 cells/uL (0.78) or HIV-uninfected women (0.80) (p<0.01). In multivariate analysis, illicit drug use, chronic HCV, and low CD4 count were independently associated with lower HRQoL. There was a differential effect of HCV and illicit drug use for HIV-infected women depending on CD4 cell count: HIV-infected women with >200 CD4 cells/uL had a significantly greater reduction in HRQoL associated with illicit drug use (−0.063) and chronic HCV (−0.036) than women with ≤200 CD4 cells/uL (−0.017, −0.005 respectively). Conclusion Poorly-controlled HIV, illicit drug use, and chronic HCV are associated with lower HRQoL. Illicit drug use and chronic HCV have greater HRQoL impacts for HIV-infected women with well-controlled HIV versus those with poorly-controlled HIV, which may affect clinical and policy priorities. PMID:24106234

  10. HIV infection and stroke: current perspectives and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Laura A; Bryer, Alan; Emsley, Hedley CA; Khoo, Saye; Solomon, Tom; Connor, Myles D

    2012-01-01

    Summary HIV infection can result in stroke via several mechanisms, including opportunistic infection, vasculopathy, cardioembolism, and coagulopathy. However, the occurrence of stroke and HIV infection might often be coincidental. HIV-associated vasculopathy describes various cerebrovascular changes, including stenosis and aneurysm formation, vasculitis, and accelerated atherosclerosis, and might be caused directly or indirectly by HIV infection, although the mechanisms are controversial. HIV and associated infections contribute to chronic inflammation. Combination antiretroviral therapies (cART) are clearly beneficial, but can be atherogenic and could increase stroke risk. cART can prolong life, increasing the size of the ageing population at risk of stroke. Stroke management and prevention should include identification and treatment of the specific cause of stroke and stroke risk factors, and judicious adjustment of the cART regimen. Epidemiological, clinical, biological, and autopsy studies of risk, the pathogenesis of HIV-associated vasculopathy (particularly of arterial endothelial damage), the long-term effects of cART, and ideal stroke treatment in patients with HIV are needed, as are antiretrovirals that are without vascular risk. PMID:22995692

  11. Gut Microbiota Linked to Sexual Preference and HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Noguera-Julian, Marc; Rocafort, Muntsa; Guillén, Yolanda; Rivera, Javier; Casadellà, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Hildebrand, Falk; Zeller, Georg; Parera, Mariona; Bellido, Rocío; Rodríguez, Cristina; Carrillo, Jorge; Mothe, Beatriz; Coll, Josep; Bravo, Isabel; Estany, Carla; Herrero, Cristina; Saz, Jorge; Sirera, Guillem; Torrela, Ariadna; Navarro, Jordi; Crespo, Manel; Brander, Christian; Negredo, Eugènia; Blanco, Julià; Guarner, Francisco; Calle, Maria Luz; Bork, Peer; Sönnerborg, Anders; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2016-03-01

    The precise effects of HIV-1 on the gut microbiome are unclear. Initial cross-sectional studies provided contradictory associations between microbial richness and HIV serostatus and suggested shifts from Bacteroides to Prevotella predominance following HIV-1 infection, which have not been found in animal models or in studies matched for HIV-1 transmission groups. In two independent cohorts of HIV-1-infected subjects and HIV-1-negative controls in Barcelona (n = 156) and Stockholm (n = 84), men who have sex with men (MSM) predominantly belonged to the Prevotella-rich enterotype whereas most non-MSM subjects were enriched in Bacteroides, independently of HIV-1 status, and with only a limited contribution of diet effects. Moreover, MSM had a significantly richer and more diverse fecal microbiota than non-MSM individuals. After stratifying for sexual orientation, there was no solid evidence of an HIV-specific dysbiosis. However, HIV-1 infection remained consistently associated with reduced bacterial richness, the lowest bacterial richness being observed in subjects with a virological-immune discordant response to antiretroviral therapy. Our findings indicate that HIV gut microbiome studies must control for HIV risk factors and suggest interventions on gut bacterial richness as possible novel avenues to improve HIV-1-associated immune dysfunction. PMID:27077120

  12. Gut Microbiota Linked to Sexual Preference and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Noguera-Julian, Marc; Rocafort, Muntsa; Guillén, Yolanda; Rivera, Javier; Casadellà, Maria; Nowak, Piotr; Hildebrand, Falk; Zeller, Georg; Parera, Mariona; Bellido, Rocío; Rodríguez, Cristina; Carrillo, Jorge; Mothe, Beatriz; Coll, Josep; Bravo, Isabel; Estany, Carla; Herrero, Cristina; Saz, Jorge; Sirera, Guillem; Torrela, Ariadna; Navarro, Jordi; Crespo, Manel; Brander, Christian; Negredo, Eugènia; Blanco, Julià; Guarner, Francisco; Calle, Maria Luz; Bork, Peer; Sönnerborg, Anders; Clotet, Bonaventura; Paredes, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The precise effects of HIV-1 on the gut microbiome are unclear. Initial cross-sectional studies provided contradictory associations between microbial richness and HIV serostatus and suggested shifts from Bacteroides to Prevotella predominance following HIV-1 infection, which have not been found in animal models or in studies matched for HIV-1 transmission groups. In two independent cohorts of HIV-1-infected subjects and HIV-1-negative controls in Barcelona (n = 156) and Stockholm (n = 84), men who have sex with men (MSM) predominantly belonged to the Prevotella-rich enterotype whereas most non-MSM subjects were enriched in Bacteroides, independently of HIV-1 status, and with only a limited contribution of diet effects. Moreover, MSM had a significantly richer and more diverse fecal microbiota than non-MSM individuals. After stratifying for sexual orientation, there was no solid evidence of an HIV-specific dysbiosis. However, HIV-1 infection remained consistently associated with reduced bacterial richness, the lowest bacterial richness being observed in subjects with a virological-immune discordant response to antiretroviral therapy. Our findings indicate that HIV gut microbiome studies must control for HIV risk factors and suggest interventions on gut bacterial richness as possible novel avenues to improve HIV-1-associated immune dysfunction. PMID:27077120

  13. Populations at Increased Risk for HIV Infection in Kenya: Results From a National Population-Based Household Survey, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Githuka, George; Hladik, Wolfgang; Mwalili, Samuel; Cherutich, Peter; Muthui, Mercy; Gitonga, Joshua; Maina, William K.; Kim, Andrea A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Populations with higher risks for HIV exposure contribute to the HIV epidemic in Kenya. We present data from the second Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey to estimate the size and HIV prevalence of populations with high-risk characteristics. Methods The Kenya AIDS Indicator Survey 2012 was a national survey of Kenyans aged 18 months to 64 years which linked demographic and behavioral information with HIV results. Data were weighted to account for sampling probability. This analysis was restricted to adults aged 18 years and older. Results Of 5088 men and 6745 women, 0.1% [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.03 to 0.14] were persons who inject drugs (PWID). Among men, 0.6% (CI: 0.3 to 0.8) had ever had sex with other men, and 3.1% (CI: 2.4 to 3.7) were males who had ever engaged in transactional sex work (MTSW). Among women, 1.9% (CI: 1.3 to 2.5) had ever had anal sex, and 4.1% (CI: 3.5 to 4.8) were women who had ever engaged in transactional sex work (FTSW). Among men, 17.6% (CI: 15.7 to 19.6) had been male clients of transactional sex workers (TSW). HIV prevalence was 0% among men who have sex with men, 6.3% (CI: 0 to 18.1) among persons who injected drugs, 7.1% (CI: 4.8 to 9.4) among male clients of TSW, 7.6% (CI: 1.8 to 13.4) among MTSW, 12.1% (CI: 7.1 to 17.1) among FTSW, and 12.1% (CI: 5.0 to 19.2) among females who ever had engaged in anal sex. Conclusions Population-based data on high-risk populations can be used to set realistic targets for HIV prevention, care, and treatment for these groups. These data should inform priorities for high-risk populations in the upcoming Kenyan strategic plan on HIV/AIDS. PMID:24732821

  14. Examining the Relationship between Urogenital Schistosomiasis and HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mbabazi, Pamela Sabina; Andan, Olivia; Fitzgerald, Daniel W.; Chitsulo, Lester; Engels, Dirk; Downs, Jennifer A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Urogenital schistosomiasis, caused by infection with Schistosoma haematobium, is widespread and causes substantial morbidity on the African continent. The infection has been suggested as an unrecognized risk factor for incident HIV infection. Current guidelines recommend preventive chemotherapy, using praziquantel as a public health tool, to avert morbidity due to schistosomiasis. In individuals of reproductive age, urogenital schistosomiasis remains highly prevalent and, likely, underdiagnosed. This comprehensive literature review was undertaken to examine the evidence for a cause-effect relationship between urogenital schistosomiasis and HIV/AIDS. The review aims to support discussions of urogenital schistosomiasis as a neglected yet urgent public health challenge. Methodology/Principal Findings We conducted a systematic search of the literature including online databases, clinical guidelines, and current medical textbooks. We describe plausible local and systemic mechanisms by which Schistosoma haematobium infection could increase the risk of HIV acquisition in both women and men. We also detail the effects of S. haematobium infection on the progression and transmissibility of HIV in co-infected individuals. We briefly summarize available evidence on the immunomodulatory effects of chronic schistosomiasis and the implications this might have for populations at high risk of both schistosomiasis and HIV. Conclusions/Significance Studies support the hypothesis that urogenital schistosomiasis in women and men constitutes a significant risk factor for HIV acquisition due both to local genital tract and global immunological effects. In those who become HIV-infected, schistosomal co-infection may accelerate HIV disease progression and facilitate viral transmission to sexual partners. Establishing effective prevention strategies using praziquantel, including better definition of treatment age, duration, and frequency of treatment for urogenital

  15. Preventing secondary infections among HIV-positive persons.

    PubMed Central

    Filice, G A; Pomeroy, C

    1991-01-01

    Secondary infectious diseases contribute substantially to morbidity and mortality of people infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The authors developed comprehensive, practical recommendations for prevention of infectious complications in HIV-infected people. Recommendations are concerned with the pathogens that are more common or more severe in HIV-infected people. Several infectious complications can be prevented by avoiding ingestion of contaminated food or water. Zoonoses can be prevented by precautions to be taken in contacts with animals. The risk of several fungal diseases can be reduced if activities likely to lead to inhalation of spores are avoided. HIV-infected people should be advised how to lower adverse health effects of travel, especially international travel. The potential for infectious complications of sexual activity and illicit drug use should be stressed, and recommendations to reduce the risk are discussed. Recommendations for use of vaccines in HIV-infected people are reviewed. Blood CD4+ lymphocyte concentrations, tuberculin skin testing, Toxoplasma serology, and sexually transmitted disease screening should be performed in certain subsets of HIV-infected people. Guidelines for chemoprophylaxis against Pneumocystis carinii and tuberculosis are presented. Recent data suggest that intravenous immunoglobulin therapy may prevent bacterial infections in HIV-infected children. PMID:1910184

  16. Impact of Poverty, Homelessness, and Drugs on Hispanic Women at Risk for HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyamathi, Adeline; Vasquez, Rose

    1989-01-01

    The overwhelming focus of the lives of 43 poor, at-risk Hispanic women was coping with threats to their role as providers for their children. Threats included poverty, potential loss of health, drug addiction, lack of social support, low self-esteem, helplessness, and loss of control. Contains 27 references. (SV)

  17. The Experience of Children with Hemophilia and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Christopher S.

    1994-01-01

    Children with hemophilia and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are not a transmission risk to other children, and they can help enact best practices for school attendance by other such children. The article examines the National Hemophilia Foundation's work to promote appropriate inclusion of students with hemophilia and HIV in all…

  18. Elevated Risk for HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Low- and Middle-Income Countries 2000–2006: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Baral, Stefan; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Cleghorn, Farley; Beyrer, Chris

    2007-01-01

    4.3) for Africa; and 1.3 (95% CI 1.1–1.6) for the low- and middle-income countries of Europe. Conclusions MSM have a markedly greater risk of being infected with HIV compared with general population samples from low- and middle-income countries in the Americas, Asia, and Africa. ORs for HIV infection in MSM are elevated across prevalence levels by country and decrease as general population prevalence increases, but remain 9-fold higher in medium–high prevalence settings. MSM from low- and middle-income countries are in urgent need of prevention and care, and appear to be both understudied and underserved. PMID:18052602

  19. HIV infection surveillance in Mogadishu, Somalia.

    PubMed

    Burans, J P; Fox, E; Omar, M A; Farah, A H; Abbass, S; Yusef, S; Guled, A; Mansour, M; Abu-Elyazeed, R; Woody, J N

    1990-07-01

    A group of 89 prostitutes and 45 patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in Mogadishu, Somalia were examined for evidence of HIV infection. Both groups reported more than 1 sexual partner routinely and had sexual contacts with prostitutes. There was a significant amount of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in these two groups, with 11.2% and 6.7% respectively being culture positive for N. gonorrhoea. Among the prostitutes, 28.1% were positive for antibodies to T. pallidum while only 4.4% of the STD patients were positive. One isolate of N. gonorrhoea was resistant to penicillin. All study participants were negative for antibodies to HIV suggesting an extremely low prevalence of HIV in high risk behaviour groups in the capital city of Somalia. PMID:2226225

  20. Individual and Social Network Sexual Behavior Norms of Homeless Youth at High Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Kimberly A.; Melander, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Although previous research shows that homeless youth engage in numerous risky sexual behaviors, little is known about whether or not specific rules govern this conduct within their social networks and how group norms influence subsequent sexual actions. The current study utilizes 19 in-depth interviews with homeless youth to investigate different elements of their sexual behavior. Findings reveal that their decision to have sex generally depends on chemistry and physical appearance whereas a potential partner’s risky sexual history and heavy substance use discourages youth from engaging in sex. Both males and females discuss condom usage as it relates to unknown sexual history, availability, pregnancy, and the prevention of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Sixteen homeless youth indicate that they do not discuss safe sex practices with their partners or social network members. PMID:23162182

  1. [Risk of contracting HIV].

    PubMed

    Becerra, Valeria Peixoto; Gaspar, Maria Filomena M; Alves, Maria Do Socorro C F

    2009-04-01

    The authors identify social activities related to the risk of contracting HIV in nursing students, bearing in mind their influence while using bio-secure methods, by means of an exploratory and qualitative study; 168 Superior School of Nursing in Lisbon, Portugal students participated in this study. Data were gathered by means of a Free Association Word Test which includes social demographic variables related to the participants. 90% of the 168 students in this study were female and 10% male. The majority 79,2%, of the participants age fell between 21 and 25 years and 97,6% of these participants were Portuguese. In the free association word test when responding to the stimulus HIV/AIDS, participants expressed disease (which is contagious in a clinical setting), and death as the awaited outcome for it. For the test term "risk of contagion when dealing with an AIDS patient" the participants often mentioned the words protection against contagion, as well as fear to contact blood and gloves as the main prevention method. To the stimulus measures of bio-security the words most frequently cited were glove as a protective measure in the context of professional activity and preservative (condom) to avoid contagion in other social contexts experienced by the participants. PMID:19554898

  2. Neurologic Complications in Treated HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Nisha S; Chow, Felicia C

    2016-07-01

    Effective combination antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV infection into a chronic disease, with HIV-infected individuals living longer and reaching older age. Neurological disease remains common in treated HIV, however, due in part to ongoing inflammation and immune activation that persist in chronic infection. In this review, we highlight recent developments in our understanding of several clinically relevant neurologic complications that can occur in HIV infection despite treatment, including HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders, symptomatic CSF escape, cerebrovascular disease, and peripheral neuropathy. PMID:27170369

  3. Sexual Risk Behaviors and HIV Infection among Men Who Have Sex with Men and Women in China: Evidence from a Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Yi; Xu, Jun-Jie; Zou, Hua-Chun; Reilly, Kathleen Heather; Zhang, Christiana Meng; Yun, Ke; Li, Yong-Ze; Jiang, Yong-Jun; Geng, Wen-Qing; Shang, Hong; Wang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To understand the current risk of HIV infection and transmission and further elucidate the underlying risk factors among men who have sex with men and women (MSMW) in China. Methods. Following PRISMA guidelines, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of searching through Chinese and English available literature databases between January 2000 and June 2014 to identify articles. Results. Thirty-six articles (including 19,730 MSMW and 53,536 MSMO) met the selection criteria and the aggregated results found that MSMW have significantly higher HIV prevalence than MSMO (6.6% versus 5.4%, OR = 1.27, 95% CI = 1.01–1.58). A higher proportion of MSMW had commercial male partners in the past 6 months (18.3% versus 12.2%, OR = 1.56, 95% CI = 1.01–2.42). Additionally, substance use in the past 6 months was significantly more frequent among MSMW than MSMO (alcohol use: 27.1% versus 13.1%, OR = 2.53, 95% CI = 2.14–2.99; illicit drug use: 5.3% versus 2.5%, OR = 2.09, 95% CI = 1.48–2.95). Conclusion. A higher proportion of commercial sex and substance use among MSMW may be a potentially indicative factor for significantly higher HIV prevalence compared to MSMO. Targeted interventions should aim at increasing the frequency of HIV/STIs screening and preventing high risk commercial sex and substance use among MSMW to decrease their HIV transmission to the general population. PMID:26779538

  4. Potential Clinical and Economic Value of Long-Acting Preexposure Prophylaxis for South African Women at High-Risk for HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Walensky, Rochelle P.; Jacobsen, Margo M.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Parker, Robert A.; Wood, Robin; Resch, Stephen C.; Horstman, N. Kaye; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Paltiel, A. David

    2016-01-01

    Background. For young South African women at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is one of the few effective prevention options available. Long-acting injectable PrEP, which is in development, may be associated with greater adherence, compared with that for existing standard oral PrEP formulations, but its likely clinical benefits and additional costs are unknown. Methods. Using a computer simulation, we compared the following 3 PrEP strategies: no PrEP, standard PrEP (effectiveness, 62%; cost per patient, $150/year), and long-acting PrEP (effectiveness, 75%; cost per patient, $220/year) in South African women at high risk for HIV infection (incidence of HIV infection, 5%/year). We examined the sensitivity of the strategies to changes in key input parameters among several outcome measures, including deaths averted and program cost over a 5-year period; lifetime HIV infection risk, survival rate, and program cost and cost-effectiveness; and budget impact. Results. Compared with no PrEP, standard PrEP and long-acting PrEP cost $580 and $870 more per woman, respectively, and averted 15 and 16 deaths per 1000 women at high risk for infection, respectively, over 5 years. Measured on a lifetime basis, both standard PrEP and long-acting PrEP were cost saving, compared with no PrEP. Compared with standard PrEP, long-acting PrEP was very cost-effective ($150/life-year saved) except under the most pessimistic assumptions. Over 5 years, long-acting PrEP cost $1.6 billion when provided to 50% of eligible women. Conclusions. Currently available standard PrEP is a cost-saving intervention whose delivery should be expanded and optimized. Long-acting PrEP will likely be a very cost-effective improvement over standard PrEP but may require novel financing mechanisms that bring short-term fiscal planning efforts into closer alignment with longer-term societal objectives. PMID:26681778

  5. Risk group characteristics and viral transmission clusters in South-East Asian patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) circulating recombinant form (CRF) 01_AE and subtype B.

    PubMed

    Oyomopito, Rebecca A; Chen, Yen-Ju; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek; Kantor, Rami; Merati, Tuti; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Sirisanthana, Thira; Li, Patrick C K; Kantipong, Pacharee; Phanuphak, Praphan; Lee, Chris K C; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ditangco, Rossana; Huang, Szu-Wei; Sohn, Annette H; Law, Matthew; Chen, Yi Ming A

    2015-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 epidemics in Asian countries are driven by varying exposures. The epidemiology of the regional pandemic has been changing with the spread of HIV-1 to lower-risk populations through sexual transmission. Common HIV-1 genotypes include subtype B and circulating recombinant form (CRF) 01_AE. Our objective was to use HIV-1 genotypic data to better quantify local epidemics. TASER-M is a multicenter prospective cohort of HIV-infected patients. Associations between HIV exposure, patient sex, country of sample origin and HIV-1 genotype were evaluated by multivariate logistic regression. Phylogenetic methods were used on genotypic data to investigate transmission relationships. A total of 1086 patients from Thailand, Hong Kong, Malaysia and the Philippines were included in analyses. Proportions of male patients within countries varied (Thailand: 55.6%, Hong Kong: 86.1%, Malaysia: 81.4%, Philippines: 93.8%; p < 0.001) as did HIV exposures (heterosexual contact: Thailand: 85.7%, Hong Kong, 46.2%, Malaysia: 47.8%, Philippines: 25.0%; p < 0.001). After adjustment, we found increased subtype B infection among men who have sex with men, relative to heterosexual-reported exposures (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.001). We further describe four transmission clusters of eight to 15 treatment naïve, predominantly symptomatic patients (two each for subtype B and CRF01_AE). Risk-group subpopulations differed with respect to the infecting HIV-1 genotype. Homosexual exposure patients had higher odds of being infected with subtype B. Where HIV-1 genotypes circulate within countries or patient risk-groups, local monitoring of genotype-specific transmissions may play a role in focusing public health prevention strategies. Phylogenetic evaluations provide complementary information for surveillance and monitoring of viruses with high mutation rates such as HIV-1 and Ebola. PMID:26362956

  6. Efficacy of a Multi-level Intervention to Reduce Injecting and Sexual Risk Behaviors among HIV-Infected People Who Inject Drugs in Vietnam: A Four-Arm Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Go, Vivian F.; Frangakis, Constantine; Minh, Nguyen Le; Latkin, Carl; Ha, Tran Viet; Mo, Tran Thi; Sripaipan, Teerada; Davis, Wendy W.; Zelaya, Carla; Vu, Pham The; Celentano, David D.; Quan, Vu Minh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injecting drug use is a primary driver of HIV epidemics in many countries. People who inject drugs (PWID) and are HIV infected are often doubly stigmatized and many encounter difficulties reducing risk behaviors. Prevention interventions for HIV-infected PWID that provide enhanced support at the individual, family, and community level to facilitate risk-reduction are needed. Methods 455 HIV-infected PWID and 355 of their HIV negative injecting network members living in 32 sub-districts in Thai Nguyen Province were enrolled. We conducted a two-stage randomization: First, sub-districts were randomized to either a community video screening and house-to-house visits or standard of care educational pamphlets. Second, within each sub-district, participants were randomized to receive either enhanced individual level post-test counseling and group support sessions or standard of care HIV testing and counseling. This resulted in four arms: 1) standard of care; 2) community level intervention; 3) individual level intervention; and 4) community plus individual intervention. Follow-up was conducted at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Primary outcomes were self-reported HIV injecting and sexual risk behaviors. Secondary outcomes included HIV incidence among HIV negative network members. Results Fewer participants reported sharing injecting equipment and unprotected sex from baseline to 24 months in all arms (77% to 4% and 24% to 5% respectively). There were no significant differences at the 24-month visit among the 4 arms (Wald = 3.40 (3 df); p = 0.33; Wald = 6.73 (3 df); p = 0.08). There were a total of 4 HIV seroconversions over 24 months with no significant difference between intervention and control arms. Discussion Understanding the mechanisms through which all arms, particularly the control arm, demonstrated both low risk behaviors and low HIV incidence has important implications for policy and prevention programming. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  7. Evaluation of an innovative program to address the health and social service needs of drug-using women with or at risk for HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Thompson, A S; Blankenship, K M; Selwyn, P A; Khoshnood, K; Lopez, M; Balacos, K; Altice, F L

    1998-12-01

    Drug-using women with or at risk for HIV infection have many competing unmet needs, especially for social services, drug treatment, and medical care. High-risk drug-using women were recruited through street outreach, at needle exchange sites, a prison, and local community based organizations in New Haven, Connecticut for a study of the service needs of out-of-treatment drug users and the ability of an interactive case management intervention (ICM) to address those needs. These women were administered baseline and follow-up interviews to identify their health and social service needs and the degree to which these needs were resolved. The women who chose to enroll in the interactive case management intervention (n = 38) did not differ demographically nor in their HIV risk behaviors from those not receiving case management (n = 73). Provision of ICM was most successful in meeting needs for supportive mental health counseling, basic services, and long term housing. The impact of interactive case management was less evident for the acquisition of medical and dental services, which were accessed comparably by women not receiving the intervention. Overall, the women who enrolled in the ICM intervention showed a significant decrease in the number of unmet service needs as compared to those who did not enroll. Multiple contacts were required by the case manager to establish trust and to resolve the unmet service needs of these high-risk women. Women with or at risk for HIV infection can be effectively engaged in an ICM intervention in order to meet their multiple unmet service needs, although such interventions are time-and-labor intensive. PMID:9824792

  8. Epidemiology of HIV infection in central Brazil: data from voluntary counseling and testing centers.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Sandra Maria Brunini; Teles, Sheila Araújo; Rezza, Giovanni; Pezzotti, Patrizio; Gir, Elucir

    2013-01-01

    Voluntary counseling and testing (VCT) is recommended to facilitate early identification of HIV infection. Data from VCT centers in Goiás and Federal District, Central Brazil, evaluated HIV prevalence and identified risk factors for HIV among individuals ages 13 years and older. Results indicated a 1.5% overall prevalence of HIV. Factors independently associated with HIV infection were: getting tested in a large city, being illiterate, having had a previous HIV test, living with an HIV-infected sexual partner, and being a noninjection illicit drug user. Being referred by friends was strongly associated with HIV infection. For men, being a health care worker, sex worker, man who has sex with men, or injection drug user were significant. In Central Brazil, HIV remains concentrated in males and subpopulations with known risk behaviors. Higher prevalence among individuals referred to VCT by friends highlights the importance of social network-based HIV prevention interventions in Brazil. PMID:23465400

  9. Prevalence and risk factors for low bone mineral density in untreated HIV infection: a substudy of the INSIGHT Strategic Timing of AntiRetroviral Treatment trial

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Andrew; Grund, Birgit; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Schwartz, Ann; Bernardino, Jose I; White, David; Badel-Faesen, Sharlaa; Avihingsanon, Anchalee; Ensrud, Kristine; Hoy, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection is associated with a higher prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures than the general population. There are limited data in HIV-positive adults, naïve to antiretroviral therapy (ART), to estimate the relative contribution of untreated HIV to bone loss. Methods The START Bone Mineral Density substudy is a randomised comparison of the effect of immediate versus deferred initial ART on bone. We evaluated traditional, demographic, HIV-related, and immunological factors for their associations with baseline hip and lumbar spine BMD, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, using multiple regression. Results A total of 424 ART-naïve participants were enrolled at 33 sites in six continents; mean (SD) age was 34 (10.1) years, 79.0% were nonwhite, 26.0% were women, and 12.5% had a body mass index (BMI) <20 kg/m2. Mean (SD) Z-scores were -0.41 (0.94) at the spine and -0.36 (0.88) for total hip; 1.9% had osteoporosis and 35.1% had low BMD (hip or spine T-score <-1.0). Factors independently associated with lower BMD at the hip and spine were female sex, Latino/Hispanic ethnicity, lower BMI and higher estimated glomerular filtration rate. Longer time since HIV diagnosis was associated with lower hip BMD. Current or nadir CD4 cell counts, and HIV viral load were not associated with BMD. Conclusions In this geographically and racially diverse population of ART-naïve adults with normal CD4 cell counts, low BMD was common, but osteoporosis was rare. Lower BMD was significantly associated with traditional risk factors but not with CD4 cell count or viral load. PMID:25711332

  10. Polypharmacy in the HIV-infected older adult population

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Lauren J; Luque, Amneris E; Shah, Krupa

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among people older than 50 years is increasing. Older HIV-infected patients are particularly at risk for polypharmacy because they often have multiple comorbidities that require pharmacotherapy. Overall, there is not much known with respect to both the impact of aging on medication use in HIV-infected individuals, and the potential for interactions with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and coadministered medications and its clinical consequences. In this review, we aim to provide an overview of polypharmacy with a focus on its impact on the HIV-infected older adult population and to also provide some clinical considerations in this high-risk population. PMID:23818773

  11. An empiric risk scoring tool for identifying high-risk heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples for targeted HIV-1 prevention

    PubMed Central

    KAHLE, Erin M.; HUGHES, James P.; LINGAPPA, Jairam R.; JOHN-STEWART, Grace; CELUM, Connie; NAKKU-JOLOBA, Edith; NJUGUNA, Stella; MUGO, Nelly; BUKUSI, Elizabeth; MANONGI, Rachel; BAETEN, Jared M.

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Heterosexual HIV-1 serodiscordant couples are increasingly recognized as an important source of new HIV-1 infections in sub-Saharan Africa. A simple risk assessment tool could be useful for identifying couples at highest risk for HIV-1 transmission. Methods Using data from three prospective studies of HIV-1 serodiscordant couples from seven African countries and standard methods for development of clinical prediction rules, we derived and validated a risk scoring tool developed from multivariate modeling and composed of key predictors for HIV-1 risk that could be measured in standard research and clinical settings. Results The final risk score included age of the HIV-1 uninfected partner, married and/or cohabiting partnership, number of children, unprotected sex, uncircumcised male HIV-1 uninfected partner, and plasma HIV-1 RNA in the HIV-1 infected partner. The maximum risk score was 12, scores ≥5 were associated with an annual HIV-1 incidence of >3%, and couples with a score ≥6 accounted for only 28% of the population but 67% of HIV-1 transmissions. The area under the curve for predictive ability of the score was 0.74 (95% CI 0.70–0.78). Internal and external validation showed similar predictive ability of the risk score, even when plasma viral load was excluded from the risk score. Conclusions A discrete combination of clinical and behavioral characteristics defines highest-risk HIV-1 serodiscordant couples. Discriminating highest-risk couples for HIV-1 prevention programs and clinical trials using a validated risk score could improve research efficiency and maximize the impact of prevention strategies for reducing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:23187945

  12. HIV/HCV coinfection ameliorates the atherogenic lipoprotein abnormalities of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    WHEELER, Amber L.; SCHERZER, Rebecca; LEE, Daniel; DELANEY, Joseph A. C.; BACCHETTI, Peter; SHLIPAK, Michael G.; SIDNEY, Stephen; GRUNFELD, Carl; TIEN, Phyllis C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Higher levels of small low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The extent to which HIV infection and HIV/HCV coinfection are associated with abnormalities of lipoprotein subclasses is unknown. Methods Lipoprotein subclasses were measured by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy in plasma samples from 569 HIV-infected and 5948 control participants in the FRAM, CARDIA and MESA studies. Multivariable regression was used to estimate the association of HIV and HIV/HCV coinfection with lipoprotein measures with adjustment for demographics, lifestyle factors, and waist-to-hip ratio. Results Relative to controls, small LDL levels were higher in HIV-monoinfected persons (+381 nmol/L, p<.0001), with no increase seen in HIV/HCV coinfection (−16.6 nmol/L). Levels of large LDL levels were lower (−196 nmol/L, p<.0001) and small HDL were higher (+8.2 μmol/L, p<.0001) in HIV-monoinfection with intermediate values seen in HIV/HCV-coinfection. Large HDL levels were higher in HIV/HCV-coinfected persons relative to controls (+1.70 μmol/L, p<.0001), whereas little difference was seen in HIV-monoinfected persons (+0.33, p=0.075). Within HIV-infected participants, HCV was associated independently with lower levels of small LDL (−329 nmol/L, p<.0001) and small HDL (−4.6 μmol/L, p<.0001), even after adjusting for demographic and traditional cardiovascular risk factors. Conclusion HIV-monoinfected participants had worse levels of atherogenic LDL lipoprotein subclasses compared with controls. HIV/HCV coinfection attenuates these changes, perhaps by altering hepatic factors affecting lipoprotein production and/or metabolism. The effect of HIV/HCV coinfection on atherosclerosis and the clinical consequences of low small subclasses remain to be determined. PMID:24136113

  13. Visiting one's native country: the risks of nonadherence in HIV-infected sub-Saharan migrants--ANRS VIHVO study.

    PubMed

    Abgrall, Sophie; Fugon, Lionel; Lélé, Nathalie; Carde, Estelle; Bentata, Michelle; Patey, Olivier; Khuong, Marie-Aude; Spire, Bruno; Carrieri, Patrizia; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate to what extent travel-related factors may cause adherence failure to antiretroviral therapy (ART) in otherwise adherent migrants when traveling back to Africa. HIV-infected sub-Saharian migrants living in France with a plasma HIV viral load < 200 copies/mL, with no change in ART for ≥3 months and who were about to visit their native country for between 2 weeks and 6 months were enrolled for the study. Patients completed a self-administered adherence questionnaire both at enrollment and during the week following their return to France. Adherence failure occurred in 23 (11.5%) of 200 patients. Negative perception about ART effectiveness (adjusted odds ratio = 4.3; 95% confidence interval = 1.3-13.7), unexpected traumatic events during their stay in their native country (7.8; 2.3-26.1), and a prolongation of their stay (5.2; 1.4-20.4) were independently associated with a higher likelihood of adherence failure. Owning/renting one's house in France (0.30; 0.10-0.96), singlehood (0.23; 0.05-1.00), and HIV status disclosure (0.19; 0.05-0.76) were correlates of sustained adherence during traveling. PMID:23697775

  14. Evaluation of Olfactory and Gustatory Function of HIV Infected Women

    PubMed Central

    Kuti, Kehinde Mobolanle; Nwaorgu, Onyekwere George; Akinyinka, Olusina Olusegun

    2016-01-01

    Background. Compliance with medication requires good sense of smell and taste. Objective. To evaluate the olfactory and gustatory function of HIV infected women in Ibadan, Nigeria. Methods. A case control study of women comprising 83 HIV infected women and 79 HIV uninfected women. Subjective self-rating of taste and smell function was by visual analogue scale. Olfactory function was measured via olfactory threshold (OT), olfactory discrimination (OD), olfactory identification (OI), and TDI using “Sniffin' sticks” kits and taste function (Total Taste Strips (TTS) score) measurement was by taste strips. Results. The mean age of the HIV infected women was 43.67 years ± 10.72 and control was 41.48 years ± 10.99. There was no significant difference in the self-reported assessment of smell (p = 0.67) and taste (p = 0.84) of HIV infected and uninfected women. Although the mean OT, OD, OI, TDI, and TTS scores of HIV infected and uninfected women were within the normosmic and normogeusic values, the values were significantly higher in the controls (p < 0.05). Hyposmia was in 39.7% of subjects and 12.6% of controls while hypogeusia was in 15.7% of subjects and 1.3% of controls. Conclusions. Hyposmia and hypogeusia are commoner among the HIV infected women than the HIV uninfected women and the risk increases with an increased duration of highly active antiretroviral therapy. PMID:27047688

  15. Male circumcision, HIV and sexually transmitted infections: a review

    PubMed Central

    Larke, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    Three randomized controlled trials in sub-Saharan Africa have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men by approximately 60%. In this paper, we review the evidence that male circumcision protects against infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men and their female partners. Data from the clinical trials indicate that circumcision may be protective against genital ulcer disease, Herpes simplex type 2, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus infection in men. No evidence exists of a protective effect against Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhea. There is weak evidence that circumcision has a direct protective effect on HIV infection in women, although there is likely to be an indirect benefit, since HIV prevalence is likely to be lower in circumcised male partners. Although there is little evidence from the trials of serious adverse events from the procedure and of behavioural risk compensation among circumcised men, essential operational research is being conducted to evaluate these key issues outside the trial setting as circumcision services are expanded. Following the publication of the clinical trial results in early 2007, the World Health Organization/UNAIDS has advised that promotion of male circumcision should be included as an additional HIV strategy for the prevention of heterosexually acquired HIV infection in men in areas of high HIV prevalence. As circumcision services are expanded in settings where resources are limited, non-physician providers including nurses will play an important role in the provision of services. PMID:20622758

  16. Male circumcision, HIV and sexually transmitted infections: a review.

    PubMed

    Larke, Natasha

    Three randomized controlled trials in sub-Saharan Africa have shown that circumcision reduces the risk of acquiring HIV infection in men by approximately 60%. In this paper, we review the evidence that male circumcision protects against infection with HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in men and their female partners. Data from the clinical trials indicate that circumcision may be protective against genital ulcer disease, Herpes simplex type 2, Trichomonas vaginalis and human papillomavirus infection in men. No evidence exists of a protective effect against Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhea. There is weak evidence that circumcision has a direct protective effect on HIV infection in women, although there is likely to be an indirect benefit, since HIV prevalence is likely to be lower in circumcised male partners. Although there is little evidence from the trials of serious adverse events from the procedure and of behavioural risk compensation among circumcised men, essential operational research is being conducted to evaluate these key issues outside the trial setting as circumcision services are expanded. Following the publication of the clinical trial results in early 2007, the World Health Organization/UNAIDS has advised that promotion of male circumcision should be included as an additional HIV strategy for the prevention of heterosexually acquired HIV infection in men in areas of high HIV prevalence. As circumcision services are expanded in settings where resources are limited, non-physician providers including nurses will play an important role in the provision of services. PMID:20622758

  17. Risk factors for false-negative results of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay in non-HIV-infected patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Young; Park, Moo Suk; Kim, Young Sam; Kim, Se Kyu; Chang, Joon; Kang, Young Ae

    2011-07-01

    Limited information is available on the risk factors for false-negative results with the new generation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) tests in non-HIV-infected patients with tuberculosis (TB). We sought to identify risk factors for false-negative QFT-GIT results in culture-confirmed TB patients. We reviewed the microbiological, laboratory, radiographic, and clinical data of 362 patients with positive M. tuberculosis cultures who received QFT-GIT tests at a Korean tertiary hospital between September 2006 and March 2010. Of these, 311 (85.9%) had true-positive and 51 (14.1%) had false-negative results. The false-negative group was more likely to have immunosuppressant diseases and lower platelet, protein, and albumin levels than the true-positive group. An immunosuppressive condition was an independent risk factor for false-negative QFT-GIT results in non-HIV-infected patients with active TB (odds ratio, 2.98; 95% confidence interval, 1.38-6.47; P = .006). Careful interpretation of negative QFT-GIT results is thus necessary in immunocompromised patients suspected of having active TB. PMID:21546200

  18. Epidemiology, Risk Factors and Genotypes of HBV in HIV-Infected Patients in the Northeast Region of Colombia: High Prevalence of Occult Hepatitis B and F3 Subgenotype Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Bautista-Amorocho, Henry; Castellanos-Domínguez, Yeny Zulay; Rodríguez-Villamizar, Laura Andrea; Velandia-Cruz, Sindi Alejandra; Becerra-Peña, Jeysson Andrey; Farfán-García, Ana Elvira

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals. HIV-positive patients are commonly co-infected with HBV due to shared routes of transmission. Objectives Our aim was to determine the risk factors, prevalence, genotypes, and mutations of the Surface S gene of HBV, and occult hepatitis B infection (OBI) among patients infected with HIV in a northeastern Colombian city. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted with 275 HIV-positive patients attending an outpatient clinic in Bucaramanga, Colombia during 2009–2010. Blood samples were collected and screened for serological markers of HBV (anti-HBs, anti-HBc and HBsAg) through ELISA assay. Regardless of their serological profile, all samples were tested for the HBV S gene by nested-PCR and HBV genotypes were determined by phylogenetic inference. Clinical records were used to examine demographic, clinical, virological, immunological and antiretroviral therapy (ART) variables of HIV infection. Results Participants were on average 37±11 years old and 65.1% male. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was 12% (95%CI 8.4–16.4) of which 3.3% had active HBV infection and 8.7% OBI. The prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection was associated with AIDS stage and ART treatment. Sequence analysis identified genotype F, subgenotype F3 in 93.8% of patients and genotype A in 6.2% of patients. A C149R mutation, which may have resulted from failure in HBsAg detection, was found in one patient with OBI. Conclusions The present study found a high prevalence of HIV-HBV coinfection with an incidence of OBI 2.6-fold higher compared to active HBV infection. These findings suggest including HBV DNA testing to detect OBI in addition to screening for HBV serological markers in HIV patients. PMID:25462190

  19. Anal Human Papillomavirus Infection among HIV-Infected Men in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang Hun; Lee, Sun Hee; Lee, Shinwon; Cho, Heerim; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Jung Eun; Jung, Eun ju; Lee, Su jin; Kim, Eun Jung; Kim, Ki Hyung; Moon, Eunsoo; Cho, Hong Je

    2016-01-01

    Background Little is known about the epidemiology on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, genotype distribution and risk factors associated with anal HPV infection among HIV-infected men in Korea. Methods A single-center cross-sectional study was conducted with HIV-infected men in Korea. Participants completed a detailed sexual behavior risk factor questionnaire. Anal samples were collected for cytology and HPV genotyping. Factors associated with anal HPV infection were assessed using multivariable logistic regression, stratifying by sexual behaviour. Results A total of 201 HIV-infected men were included in the study: 133 were from men who have sex with men (MSM) and 68 from men who have sex with women (MSW). Any anal HPV infection was detected in 82.7% of HIV-infected MSM and in 51.5% of HIV- infected MSW (P < 0.001). High-risk HPV (HR-HPV) prevalence was higher among MSM (47.4%) than MSW (25.0%; P = 0.002). The HR-HPV types identified most frequently were HPV 16 (11%), HPV 18 (9.9%), and HPV 58 (5%) in MSM, and HPV 58(11%) and HPV 16 (8.9%) in MSW. Prevalence of any HPV types in 9-valent vaccine types was higher among MSM than MSW (47.4% vs 22.1%. P = 0.001). Abnormal anal cytology was more commonly detected in MSM than MSW (42.9% vs.19.1%, P < 0.001). In HIV-infected MSM, higher number of lifetime male sex partners was significantly associated with any anal HPV infection, but age was a significant risk factor associated with anal HR-HPV infection. Conclusion Anal HPV infection was highly prevalent in HIV-infected MSM in Korea, and also commonly found in HIV-infected MSW. In HIV-infected MSM, the significant risk factor for being infected with any HPV infection was lifetime number of male sexual partners, and with anal oncogenic HPV infection was age. PMID:27548632

  20. The physical and psychological effects of HIV infection and its treatment on perinatally HIV-infected children

    PubMed Central

    Vreeman, Rachel C; Scanlon, Michael L; McHenry, Megan S; Nyandiko, Winstone M

    2015-01-01

    Introduction As highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) transforms human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) into a manageable chronic disease, new challenges are emerging in treating children born with HIV, including a number of risks to their physical and psychological health due to HIV infection and its lifelong treatment. Methods We conducted a literature review to evaluate the evidence on the physical and psychological effects of perinatal HIV (PHIV+) infection and its treatment in the era of HAART, including major chronic comorbidities. Results and discussion Perinatally infected children face concerning levels of treatment failure and drug resistance, which may hamper their long-term treatment and result in more significant comorbidities. Physical complications from PHIV+ infection and treatment potentially affect all major organ systems. Although treatment with antiretroviral (ARV) therapy has reduced incidence of severe neurocognitive diseases like HIV encephalopathy, perinatally infected children may experience less severe neurocognitive complications related to HIV disease and ARV neurotoxicity. Major metabolic complications include dyslipidaemia and insulin resistance, complications that are associated with both HIV infection and several ARV agents and may significantly affect cardiovascular disease risk with age. Bone abnormalities, particularly amongst children treated with tenofovir, are a concern for perinatally infected children who may be at higher risk for bone fractures and osteoporosis. In many studies, rates of anaemia are significantly higher for HIV-infected children. Renal failure is a significant complication and cause of death amongst perinatally infected children, while new data on sexual and reproductive health suggest that sexually transmitted infections and birth complications may be additional concerns for perinatally infected children in adolescence. Finally, perinatally infected children may face psychological challenges, including

  1. Outcomes of pharmacist-assisted management of antiretroviral therapy in patients with HIV infection: A risk-adjusted analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nevo, Ofir Noah; Lesko, Catherine R.; Colwell, Bradford; Ballard, Craig; Cole, Stephen R.; Mathews, W. Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The impact of pharmacist-assisted management (PAM) of pharmacotherapy for patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection was investigated. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis was conducted to evaluate antiretroviral therapy (ART) outcomes in treatment-naive patients initiated on ART at an HIV clinic. Eligible patients enrolled in the clinic during the period 1999–2013 were classified into two groups: those referred to a clinic-based HIV pharmacist for initiation of ART (the PAM group) and those managed by a primary care provider (the control group). The primary study objective was the median time to viral suppression; secondary objectives included the durability of response to the first ART regimen. Relative hazards for the events of interest were estimated using a marginal structural Cox proportional hazards model and Kaplan–Meier curves, with inverse probability weights used to control for selection and confounding bias. Results Patients referred for PAM services (n = 819) typically had higher baseline viral loads and lower CD4+ cell counts than those in the control group (n = 436). The likelihood of viral suppression during the first two years after ART initiation was significantly higher in the PAM group versus the control group (hazard ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 1.18–1.59; p < 0.0001). The median durability of the first ART regimen was 100 months in the PAM group versus 44 months in the control group (p > 0.05). Conclusion In treatment-naive patients, suppression of HIV viral load occurred earlier when pharmacists assisted with initiating ART than when ART was initiated without that assistance. PMID:26294239

  2. [HIV infection and human genetics].

    PubMed

    Bobkova, M R

    2009-01-01

    The review summarizes data of recent studies on the impact of human gene polymorphisms on the possibility of HIV infection, as well as the specific features of its pathogenesis, the efficiency of HIV infection treatment and the likelihood of its complication. Main information on the mechanisms responsible for viral penetration into the sensitive cells, for immune response development and involvement of HLA and KIR molecules in this process are briefly outlined. Idea on major cell proteins affecting drug metabolism and excretion and encoding for their genes are generalized. There are many examples that show how different human gene alleles and their combinations affect the nature of the pathogenetic process and the occurrence and degree of adverse reactions. The first example of successfully using the prognostic genetic analysis (HLA-B*5701) registered in 2008 to upgrade the quality of HIV infection treatment is described in detail. Basic requirements for further genetic tests to use the optimal antiretroviral therapy schemes and to reduce its hazardous effects are formulated. PMID:20481056

  3. Food Insufficiency is a Risk Factor for Suboptimal Antiretroviral Therapy Adherence among HIV-Infected Adults in Urban Peru

    PubMed Central

    Franke, Molly F.; Murray, Megan B.; Muñoz, Maribel; Hernández-Díaz, Sonia; Sebastián, José Luís; Atwood, Sidney; Caldas, Adolfo; Bayona, Jaime; Shin, Sonya S.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the relationship between food insufficiency and antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. A cohort of HIV-infected adults in urban Peru was followed for a two-year period after ART initiation. ART adherence was measured using a 30-day self-report tool and classified as suboptimal if <95% adherence was reported. We conducted a repeated measures cohort analysis to examine whether food insufficiency was more common during months of suboptimal adherence relative to months with optimal adherence. 1,264 adherence interviews were conducted for 134 individuals. Participants who reported food insufficiency in the month prior to interview were more likely to experience suboptimal adherence than those who did not (odds ratio [O.R.]:2.4; 95% confidence interval [C.I.]:1.4, 4.1), even after adjusting for baseline social support score (O.R. per 5 point increase:0.91; C.I.:[0.85, 0.98]) and good baseline adherence self-efficacy (O.R.:0.25; C.I.:[0.09, 0.69]). Interventions that ensure food security for HIV-infected individuals may help sustain high levels of adherence. PMID:20714923

  4. Young women most vulnerable to HIV infection.

    PubMed

    1993-12-01

    It is estimated that 70% of the 3000 women who are infected with HIV each day are 15-24 years old. This pattern of increased prevalence among young women has been noted since a 1986 report that AIDS cases in Zaire were equally divided among men and women, but that the women were an average of 10 years younger than the men, and cases in women peaked at age 20-29. Despite this information, the HIV research and program agenda has failed to address the gender issues that place young women at risk of infection. Societies that do not provide young women with information about reproductive anatomy and sex or with reproductive health services, that allow men to have multiple sex partners, and that condone condom use only for illicit intercourse, leave young girls and women at risk of forced and unprotected sexual intercourse. Studies have also shown that early marriage practices also increase the risk of women becoming infected (usually by their older and more "experienced" husbands). In some parts of Africa, older men seek out virgins in the belief that having sex with a virgin will cure them of sexually transmitted diseases. Poverty also drives women to barter sex for money or goods. In addition to these social and behavioral risk factors, young women appear to have a greater physiological susceptibility to infection than more mature women. Possible factors for this increased risk include the facts that, in younger women, the lining of the vagina is thinner, vaginal mucus may be less profuse, ovulation (which seems to have a protective effect against infection) is infrequent, and a transition zone of cells ringing the cervical opening is more exposed. Thus, biologic, social, and behavioral factors increase the vulnerability of young women. To protect young women, societies will have to change cultural and sexual norms, values, and practices. PMID:12288834

  5. HIV Infection--Guangdong Province, China, 1997-2007.

    PubMed

    2009-04-24

    In 2007, an estimated 700,000 persons in China were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. An estimated 50,000 new HIV infections and 20,000 deaths related to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) occurred in 2007, and an estimated 71% of persons with HIV infection were unaware of their HIV status. In 2007, 40.6% of those living with HIV had been infected through heterosexual transmission and 38.1% through injection-drug use. Guangdong Province in southeastern China is the country's most populous province, with an estimated 75.6 million permanent residents and 16.5 million migrants; the province has undergone rapid economic development. Since 1986, a case-based surveillance system (CBSS) in China has collected data on persons infected with HIV, including demographic characteristics and transmission categories. To assess recent trends in HIV infection in the province, the Guangdong Center for Disease Control, with technical assistance from CDC, analyzed CBSS data for the period 1997--2007. The results of that analysis indicated that the number of HIV cases increased from 102 in 1997 to 4,593 in 2007, although this increase resulted, in part, from expanded testing and surveillance. Among males classified by HIV transmission category, 82.1% of newly diagnosed infections were attributed to injection-drug use. Among females classified by HIV transmission category, 53.7% engaged in high-risk heterosexual conduct. Despite substantial methodologic limitations, these results can be useful to Guangdong public health agencies in targeting and evaluating HIV prevention, care, and treatment programs. PMID:19390507

  6. Reduce HIV Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... are increasing among younger people from 13 to 30 years of age. The key to defeating HIV lies ... Control and Prevention (CDC) has used them as models, and Dr. Jemmott was invited to South Africa to help decrease HIV/AIDS there. "For the past 15 years, I have observed how the HIV/AIDS epidemic ...

  7. Factors That Influence HIV Risk among Hispanic Female Immigrants and Their Implications for HIV Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Amy M.; Zule, William A.; Karg, Rhonda S.; Browne, Felicia A.; Wechsberg, Wendee M.

    2012-01-01

    Hispanics are the fastest growing minority group in North Carolina with increasing incidence of HIV infection. Gender roles, cultural expectations, and acculturation of women may explain some of Hispanic women's risks. The perspectives of Hispanic female immigrants and community-based providers were sought to identify services they offer, understand HIV risk factors, and support the adaptation of a best-evidence HIV behavioural intervention for Hispanic women. Two sets of focus groups were conducted to explicate risks and the opportunities to reach women or couples and the feasibility to conduct HIV prevention in an acceptable manner. Salient findings were that Hispanic female immigrants lacked accurate HIV/AIDS and STI knowledge and that traditional gender roles shaped issues surrounding sexual behaviour and HIV risks, as well as condom use, partner communication, and multiple sexual partnerships. Intervention implications are discussed such as developing and adapting culturally appropriate HIV prevention interventions for Hispanics that address gender roles and partner communication. PMID:22518308

  8. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Diagnosis and Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    Appropriate screening for HIV infection is the cornerstone of HIV-related care. There have been several recent changes in testing technology and screening recommendations. The US Preventive Services Task Force recommends universal HIV screening at least once for adolescents and adults ages 15 to 65 years, and additional screening for patients at higher risk, although evidence is insufficient to determine optimum rescreening intervals. All pregnant women should be screened for HIV infection in the first trimester, and pregnant women at high risk should be screened again in the third trimester. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends use of an algorithm using fourth-generation tests for screening; this decreases the window period between infection and detection to as few as 14 days, thereby reducing the number of false-negative results. Home HIV testing kits, which require follow-up confirmatory testing, also are available. Clinicians should be aware of HIV-specific laws in their states, including those criminalizing HIV exposure and transmission. Thorough medical and laboratory evaluations are essential at initiation of care for patients with HIV infection, along with appropriate follow-up monitoring, as recommended in various guidelines. PMID:27092562

  9. A survey of HIV infection and related high-risk factors among men who have sex with men in Suzhou, Jiangsu, China.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hongling; Huan, Xiping; Tang, Weiming; Chen, Xin; Yan, Hongjing; Liu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Haitao; Peng, Zhihang; Zhao, Xiuping; Yu, Rongbin; Yu, Hao; Chen, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A cross-sectional study using the snowball sampling method was conducted in May 2008 to investigate human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection status and related high risk factors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Suzhou city of Jiangsu province. The researchers carried out a face-to-face questionnaire interview among MSM, and collected their blood samples to test for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). Among the 280 respondents, 91.1% had homosexual acts in the past 6 months and 87.5% had multiple homosexual partners; 46.4% had heterosexual sex in the past 6 months and 33.1% had multiple heterosexual partners. The rate of continued condom use was 44.3% in homosexual sex in the past 6 months, while the rate in heterosexual sex was 33.9%. Laboratory test results showed that the prevalences of HIV and syphilis were 7.1% (20/280) and 15.0% (42/280), respectively, but no HCV-positive person was found. In the multivariate logistic regression model, subjects with a monthly income of more than RMB ¥ 1,000 (OR=4.83,95% CI=1.44-16.22), subjects who often went to bars for sexual partners (OR=2.25, 95%CI=1.21-4.20), and subjects who had more than one sexual partner in the past 6 months (OR=0.49, 95%CI=0.25-0.97) and had sex with fixed sexual partners in the past 6 months (OR=0.42, 95%CI=0.25-0.75) were significantly associated with the rate of continued condom use in homosexual sex in the past 6 months. Unprotected sex and multiple sexual partners were more common among MSM in Suzhou city; furthermore, the prevalences of HIV infection and syphilis were relatively high. HIV preventive measures should be designed to address these risk factors and control the spread of HIV among MSM. PMID:23554667

  10. Hypertension, Cardiovascular Risk Factors and Anti-Hypertensive Medication Utilization among HIV-infected Individuals in Rakai, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Laura D.; Newell, Kevin; Ssebbowa, Paschal; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gray, Ronald H.; Wawer, Maria J.; Mondo, George; Reynolds, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence of hypertension, elevated blood pressure and cardiovascular risk factors among HIV-positive individuals in rural Rakai District, Uganda. Methods We assessed 426 HIV-positive individuals in Rakai, Uganda from 2007 to 2010. Prevalence of hypertension and elevated blood pressure assessed by clinical measurement was compared to clinician-recorded hypertension in case report forms. Multiple logistic regression and z-tests were used to examine the association of hypertension and elevated blood pressure with age, sex, body mass index, CD4 cell count, and anti-retroviral treatment (ART) use. For individuals on anti-hypertensives, medication utilization was reviewed. Results The prevalence of hypertension (two elevated blood pressure readings at different time points) was 8.0% (95% CI: 5.4–10.6%), and that of elevated blood pressure (one elevated blood pressure reading) was 26.3% (95% CI: 22.1–30.5%). Age ≥50 years and higher body mass index were positively associated with elevated blood pressure. ART use, time on ART, and CD4 cell count were not associated with hypertension. 83% of subjects diagnosed with hypertension were on anti-hypertensive medications, most commonly beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers. Conclusions Hypertension is common among HIV-positive individuals in rural Uganda. PMID:25430847

  11. Early Life Circumstances as Contributors to HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Karolynn; Lekas, Helen-Maria; Ramjohn, Destiny; Schrimshaw, Eric W.; VanDevanter, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents may come from family settings that heighten their vulnerability to early sexual initiation, promiscuity and sexual exploitation. To illuminate how this may occur, we present a set of five representative cases of HIV-infected females from a sample of 26 adolescent and young adult HIV-infected females (ages 16–24) enrolled in a study about the adaptive challenges people their age faced living with the disease. Study participants were recruited from five New York City adolescent HIV clinics that provided comprehensive specialty medical and supportive ancillary social services to adolescents and young adults with HIV. Study participants completed a battery of standardizes measures, using ACASI, and participated in a semi-structured in-depth interview. Using the qualitative interview data, we illustrate how early life and family circumstances including neglectful or dysfunctional parenting (e.g., low parental supervision), sexual abuse, and unstable housing placed these young women on a risk trajectory for HIV infection. PMID:25397349

  12. A Multimodal Behavioral Intervention to Impact Adherence and Risk Behavior among Perinatally and Behaviorally HIV-Infected Youth: Description, Delivery, and Receptivity of Adolescent Impact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandwani, Sulachni; Abramowitz, Susan; Koenig, Linda J.; Barnes, William; D'Angelo, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    Secondary prevention programs are needed to help HIV-positive youth reduce risk behavior and improve adherence to HIV medications. This article provides an overview of Adolescent Impact, a secondary HIV prevention intervention, including its description, delivery, and receptivity among the two unique groups of participants. Adolescent Impact, a…

  13. HIV infection and the gastrointestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM; Douek, DC

    2009-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the gastrointestinal pathology observed in patients infected with HIV. The gastrointestinal tract is a major site of HIV replication, which results in massive depletion of lamina propria CD4 T cells during acute infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to incomplete suppression of viral replication and substantially delayed and only partial restoration of gastrointestinal CD4 T cells. The gastrointestinal pathology associated with HIV infection comprises significant enteropathy with increased levels of inflammation and decreased levels of mucosal repair and regeneration. Assessment of gut mucosal immune system has provided novel directions for therapeutic interventions that modify the consequences of acute HIV infection. PMID:19079157

  14. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  15. HIV-specific IgG in cervicovaginal secretions of exposed HIV-uninfected female sexual partners of HIV-infected men.

    PubMed

    Buchacz, K; Parekh, B S; Padian, N S; van der Straten, A; Phillips, S; Jonte, J; Holmberg, S D

    2001-12-10

    The presence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific antibodies was examined in plasma and cervicovaginal (mucosal) samples of 24 HIV-exposed uninfected (EU) female sexual partners of HIV-infected men, and compared with findings in 18 HIV-infected and 15 low-risk HIV-uninfected women. Only HIV-infected women had detectable HIV-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) (18 of 18) or HIV-IgA (6 of 18) in cervicovaginal samples by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). However, 3 of 24 EU women had positive Western blot (WB) for HIV-IgG in cervicovaginal secretions, while 2 of 24 EU women and 1 of 15 low-risk controls had indeterminate IgG-WB. EU women with positive or indeterminate IgG-WB in the cervicovaginal samples were similar in risk to the remaining EU women. None of the HIV-uninfected women had mucosal HIV-IgA. The findings suggest that some sexually or parenterally exposed HIV-uninfected women might develop low-level mucosal IgG responses. However, it appears unlikely that HIV-specific cervicovaginal antibodies play a major role in protection from HIV infection in this EU population. PMID:11788020

  16. Determinants of Smoking and Quitting in HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Susan; Meigs, James B.; Grinspoon, Steven K.; Triant, Virginia A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking is widespread among HIV-infected patients, who confront increased risk of smoking-related co-morbidities. The effects of HIV infection and HIV-related variables on smoking and smoking cessation are incompletely understood. We investigated the correlates of smoking and quitting in an HIV-infected cohort using a validated natural language processor to determine smoking status. Method We developed and validated an algorithm using natural language processing (NLP) to ascertain smoking status from electronic health record data. The algorithm was applied to records for a cohort of 3487 HIV-infected from a large health care system in Boston, USA, and 9446 uninfected control patients matched 3:1 on age, gender, race and clinical encounters. NLP was used to identify and classify smoking-related portions of free-text notes. These classifications were combined into patient-year smoking status and used to classify patients as ever versus never smokers and current smokers versus non-smokers. Generalized linear models were used to assess associations of HIV with 3 outcomes, ever smoking, current smoking, and current smoking in analyses limited to ever smokers (persistent smoking), while adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, and psychiatric illness. Analyses were repeated within the HIV cohort, with the addition of CD4 cell count and HIV viral load to assess associations of these HIV-related factors with the smoking outcomes. Results Using the natural language processing algorithm to assign annual smoking status yielded sensitivity of 92.4, specificity of 86.2, and AUC of 0.89 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88–0.91). Ever and current smoking were more common in HIV-infected patients than controls (54% vs. 44% and 42% vs. 30%, respectively, both P<0.001). In multivariate models HIV was independently associated with ever smoking (adjusted rate ratio [ARR] 1.18, 95% CI 1.13–1.24, P <0.001), current smoking (ARR 1.33, 95% CI 1.25

  17. Association of cervical SIL and HIV-1 infection among Zimbabwean women in an HIV/STI prevention study.

    PubMed

    Chirenje, Z M; Loeb, L; Mwale, M; Nyamapfeni, P; Kamba, M; Padian, N

    2002-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on women attending family planning clinics in Harare, Zimbabwe to determine the prevalence of cervical neoplasia among HIV-1 positive women relative to an HIV-1 negative control group. Five hundred and fifty four women were recruited and the prevalence of HIV-1 was 36.8%. Cervical cytology was abnormal in 25.6% of HIV-infected women compared to only 6.7% HIV-1 seronegative women. Cervical neoplasia was significantly associated with HIV infection (chi(2)=42.4, P<0.001). Cellular changes typical of HPV infection (koilocytocis) were recorded in 6.4% of HIV infected women compared with 1.7% of HIV-1-uninfected women (chi(2)=8.43, P=0.004). HIV-1-positive women had twice the risk of having abnormal cervical cells than HIV-negative women (relative risk 2.47, odds ratio 10.14, P<0.001). Therefore the introduction of national cervical screening programme in HIV-1 endemic countries like Zimbabwe where the highest burden of pre-malignant lesions is among HIV-1-infected women needs careful planning because these women have other competing health needs including high rates of opportunistic infections. PMID:12437897

  18. Circulating HIV DNA Correlates With Neurocognitive Impairment in Older HIV-infected Adults on Suppressive ART

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Michelli Faria de; Murrel, Ben; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Vargas, Milenka; Ellis, Ronald J.; Letendre, Scott; Grant, Igor; Smith, Davey M.; Woods, Steven Paul; Gianella, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Older HIV-infected adults have a higher risk of neurocognitive impairment, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we investigated the associations between levels of HIV DNA in peripheral blood, soluble markers of inflammation and cellular trafficking in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive functioning among 18 younger (22–40 years) and 26 older (50–71 years) HIV-infected subjects, who were administered a comprehensive neurocognitive battery. Older HIV-infected individuals presented higher levels of inflammation in CSF and blood compared to younger individuals, but no difference was observed in HIV DNA levels. Among older participants, higher HIV DNA levels were significantly associated with more severe neurocognitive impairment (p = 0.005), particularly in the Executive Functions domain (p = 0.004). No association was observed between HIV DNA and neurocognition among younger individuals. Despite significantly increased inflammation observed in the older group, none of the inflammatory markers were associated with neurocognitive impairment among older HIV+ individuals (p > 0.05). Our study supports the involvement of peripheral HIV DNA reservoir in the pathogenesis of neurocognitive disorder during suppressive ART. Correlates of neurocognitive impairment might differ between younger and older adults, suggesting that future treatment and prevention strategies for HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders likely need to be tailored based on age. PMID:26603568

  19. Cerebrovascular disease in children with HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Charles K; Eley, Brian; Wieselthaler, Nicky; Ndondo, Alvin; Wilmshurst, Jo M

    2016-05-01

    An estimated 3.2 million children worldwide have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has resulted in prolonged survival, leading to an increase in complications previously recognized in adults. Children with HIV infection have increased risk of cerebrovascular disease from multiple aetiologies including HIV-associated vasculopathy, opportunistic vasculitis, cardioembolism or coagulopathy, all of which may be secondary to the infection. Prevalence of cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children is underestimated because of limited neuroimaging in low and middle income countries, silent events without overt motor manifestations, and mislabeling as HIV encephalopathy for non-motor manifestations such as behavioural and cognitive difficulties. No management guidelines for cerebrovascular disease in HIV-infected children exist but common practices target risk factors for stroke in low and middle income countries. Where capacity permits, screening for opportunistic infections, vasculitis, coagulopathy and cardioembolism is important. Optimising virological suppression, correction of anaemia, control of seizures and aspirin prophylaxis are management priorities. Neurosurgical interventions may have a role. PMID:26890389

  20. Trends in HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among injecting drug users in Europe, 2005 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Wiessing, L; Likatavicius, G; Hedrich, D; Guarita, B; van de Laar, M J; Vicente, J

    2011-01-01

    Data on newly diagnosed HIV infections and HIV prevalence in 2005 to 2010 suggest falling infection rates in injecting drug users (IDUs) in the European Union (EU). However, recent increases in HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection rates in IDUs suggest increasing injecting risks in some countries. The coverage of effective prevention measures has increased, but is still low in several countries. Overall the data suggest a continued risk of new outbreaks of HIV infection among IDUs. PMID:22172300

  1. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    With the advent of antiretroviral therapy and improved access to care, the average life expectancy of patients with HIV infection receiving optimal treatment approaches that of patients in the general population. AIDS-related opportunistic infections and malignancies are no longer the primary issues; instead, traditional age- and lifestyle-related conditions are a growing concern. Patients with HIV infection are at higher risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, hypertension, and some non-AIDS-related cancers than patients in the general population. Family physicians need to be knowledgeable about screening for and managing chronic comorbid conditions as this population ages. Health maintenance, including appropriate vaccinations, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, and routine screening for sexually transmitted infections, remains an important part of care. As HIV infection becomes a chronic condition, emerging strategies in prevention, including preexposure prophylaxis, fall within the scope of practice of the family physician. PMID:27092565

  2. Incidence and Risk Factors for Severe Bacterial Infections in People Living with HIV. ANRS CO3 Aquitaine Cohort, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Collin, Amandine; Le Marec, Fabien; Vandenhende, Marie-Anne; Lazaro, Estibaliz; Duffau, Pierre; Cazanave, Charles; Gérard, Yann; Dabis, François; Bruyand, Mathias; Bonnet, Fabrice

    2016-01-01

    Severe non-AIDS bacterial infections (SBI) are the leading cause of hospital admissions among people living with HIV (PLHIV) in industrialized countries. We aimed to estimate the incidence of SBI and their risk factors in a large prospective cohort of PLHIV patients over a 13-year period in France. Patients followed up in the ANRS CO3 Aquitaine cohort between 2000 and 2012 were eligible; SBI was defined as a clinical diagnosis associated with hospitalization of ≥48 hours or death. Survival analysis was conducted to identify risk factors for SBI.Total follow-up duration was 39,256 person-years [PY] (31,370 PY on antiretroviral treatment [ART]). The incidence of SBI decreased from 26.7/1000 PY [95% CI: 22.9-30.5] over the period 2000-2002 to 11.9/1000 PY [10.1-13.8] in 2009-2012 (p <0.0001). Factors independently associated to increased risk of SBI were: plasma HIVRNA>50 copies/mL (Hazard Ratio [HR] = 5.1, 95% Confidence Interval: 4.2-6.2), CD4 count <500 cells/mm3 and CD4/CD8 ratio <0.8 (with a dose-response relationship for both markers), history of cancer (HR = 1.4 [1.0-1.9]), AIDS stage (HR = 1.7 [1.3-2.1]) and HCV coinfection (HR = 1.4, [1.1-1.6]). HIV-positive patients with diabetes were more prone to SBI (HR = 1.6 [0.9-2.6]). Incidence of SBI decreased over a 13-year period due to the improvement in the virological and immune status of PLHIV on ART. Risk factors for SBI include low CD4 count and detectable HIV RNA, but also CD4/CD8 ratio, HCV coinfection, history of cancer and diabetes, comorbid conditions that have been frequent among PLHIV in recent years. PMID:27050752

  3. Glomerular filtration rate estimated by creatinine, cystatin C, or both markers and the risk of clinical events in HIV-infected individuals

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Gregory M.; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Wyatt, Christina M.; Post, Frank A.; Bormann, Alison M.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Ross, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background The accuracy and precision of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) estimating equations based on plasma creatinine (GFRcr), cystatin C (GFRcys), and the combination of these markers (GFRcr-cys) has recently been assessed in HIV-infected individuals. Methods We compared the associations of baseline GFRcr, GFRcys, and GFRcr-cys (using the CKD-EPI equations) with mortality, cardiovascular events (CVE), and opportunistic diseases (OD) in the Strategies for the Management of Antiretroviral Therapy (SMART) study. We used Cox proportional hazards models to estimate unadjusted and adjusted hazard ratios per standard deviation (SD) change in GFR. Results 4,614 subjects from the SMART trial with available baseline creatinine and cystatin C data were included in this analysis. Of these, 99 died, 111 had a CVE and 121 had an OD. GFRcys was weakly to moderately correlated with HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, high sensitivity C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, and D-dimer, while GFRcr had little or no correlation with these factors. GFRcys had the strongest associations with the three clinical outcomes, followed closely by GFRcr-cys, with GFRcr having the weakest associations with clinical outcomes. In a model adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, HIV-related factors, and inflammation markers, a 1-SD lower GFRcys was associated with a 55% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27% -90%) increased risk of mortality, a 21% (95% CI, 0% -47%) increased risk of CVE, and a 22% (95% CI, 0% -48%) increased risk of OD. Conclusions Of the three CKD-EPI GFR equations, GFRcys had the strongest associations with mortality, CVE, and OD. PMID:24024499

  4. Ten-year incidence and risk factors of bone fractures in a cohort of treated HIV1-infected adults

    PubMed Central

    Collin, Fidéline; Duval, Xavier; Lemoing, Vincent; Piroth, Lionel; Al Kaied, Firas; Massip, Patrice; Villes, Virginie; Chêne, Geneviève; Raffi, François

    2009-01-01

    In the ANRS CO8 APROCO-COPILOTE cohort of patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy since 1997–1999, the incidence density of bone fractures was 3.3 for 1,000 patient-years (95% CI: 2.0–4.6). Rate was 2.9-fold (95% CI: 1.3–6.5) higher among patients with excessive alcohol consumption and 3.6-fold (95% CI: 1.6–8.1) higher in those with Hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infection. Specific monitoring of HCV/HIV-coinfected patients and active promotion of alcohol cessation should be recommended for the prevention of bone fractures. PMID:19300202

  5. The Inner Foreskin of Healthy Males at Risk of HIV Infection Harbors Epithelial CD4+ CCR5+ Cells and Has Features of an Inflamed Epidermal Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Maria P.; Lama, Javier R.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Fong, Youyi; Montano, Silvia M.; Ganoza, Carmela; Gottardo, Raphael; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Male circumcision provides partial protection against multiple sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. To examine potential vulnerabilities in foreskin epithelial structure, we used Wilcoxon paired tests adjusted using the false discovery rate method to compare inner and outer foreskin samples from 20 healthy, sexually active Peruvian males who have sex with males or transgender females, ages 21–29, at elevated risk of HIV infection. No evidence of epithelial microtrauma was identified, as assessed by keratinocyte activation, fibronectin deposition, or parakeratosis. However, multiple suprabasal tight junction differences were identified: 1) inner foreskin stratum corneum was thinner than outer (p = 0.035); 2) claudin 1 had extended membrane-bound localization throughout inner epidermis stratum spinosum (p = 0.035); 3) membrane-bound claudin 4 was absent from inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.035); and 4) occludin had increased membrane deposition in inner foreskin stratum granulosum (p = 0.042) versus outer. Together, this suggests subclinical inflammation and paracellular transport modifications to the inner foreskin. A setting of inflammation was further supported by inner foreskin epithelial explant cultures secreting higher levels of GM-CSF (p = 0.029), IP-10 (p = 0.035) and RANTES (p = 0.022) than outer foreskin, and also containing an increased density of CCR5+ and CD4+ CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). Inner foreskin dermis also secreted more RANTES than outer (p = 0.036), and had increased density of CCR5+ cells (p = 0.022). In conclusion, subclinical changes to the inner foreskin of sexually active males may support an inflammatory state, with availability of target cells for HIV infection and modifications to epidermal barriers, potentially explaining the benefits of circumcision for STI prevention. PMID:25268493

  6. Greater Drug Injecting Risk for HIV, HBV, and HCV Infection in a City Where Syringe Exchange and Pharmacy Syringe Distribution are Illegal

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingfang; Gyarmathy, V. Anna; Cisek, Linda; Friedman, Samuel R.; Baxter, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    Comparing drug-injecting risk between cities that differ in the legality of sterile syringe distribution for injection drug use provides a natural experiment to assess the efficacy of legalizing sterile syringe distribution as a structural intervention to prevent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other parenterally transmitted infections among injection drug users (IDUs). This study compares the parenteral risk for HIV and hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) infection among IDUs in Newark, NJ, USA, where syringe distribution programs were illegal during the period when data were collected, and New York City (NYC) where they were legal. IDUs were nontreatment recruited, 2004–2006, serotested, and interviewed about syringe sources and injecting risk behaviors (prior 30 days). In multivariate logistic regression, adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for city differences are estimated controlling for potential city confounders. IDUs in Newark (n = 214) vs. NYC (n = 312) were more likely to test seropositive for HIV (26% vs. 5%; AOR = 3.2; 95% CI = 1.6, 6.1), antibody to the HBV core antigen (70% vs. 27%; AOR = 4.4; 95% CI = 2.8, 6.9), and antibody to HCV (82% vs. 53%; AOR = 3.0; 95% CI = 1.8, 4.9), were less likely to obtain syringes from syringe exchange programs or pharmacies (AOR = 0.004; 95% CI = 0.001, 0.01), and were more likely to obtain syringes from street sellers (AOR = 74.0; 95% CI = 29.9, 183.2), to inject with another IDU’s used syringe (AOR = 2.3; 95% CI = 1.1, 5.0), to reuse syringes (AOR = 2.99; 95% CI = 1.63, 5.50), and to not always inject once only with a new, sterile syringe that had been sealed in a wrapper (AOR = 5.4; 95% CI = 2.9, 10.3). In localities where sterile syringe distribution is illegal, IDUs are more likely to obtain syringes from unsafe sources and to engage in injecting risk behaviors. Legalizing and rapidly implementing sterile

  7. High-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels and risk of cancer in HIV-infected subjects: Data from the ICONA Foundation Cohort.

    PubMed

    Squillace, Nicola; Galli, Laura; Bandera, Alessandra; Castagna, Antonella; Madeddu, Giordano; Caramello, Pietro; Antinori, Andrea; Cattelan, Annamaria; Maggiolo, Franco; Cingolani, Antonella; Gori, Andrea; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio

    2016-09-01

    Investigation of the relationship between high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) and the risk of developing cancer in a prospective cohort of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients.The Italian Cohort of Antiretroviral-naïve Patients Foundation Cohort is an Italian multicenter observational study recruiting HIV-positive patients while still antiretroviral treatment-naïve, regardless of the reason since 1997.Patients with at least 1 HDL-c value per year since enrollment and one such value before antiretroviral treatment initiation were included. HDL-c values were categorized as either low (<39 mg/dL in males or <49 mg/dL in females) or normal. Cancer diagnoses were classified as AIDS-defining malignancies (ADMs) or non-AIDS-defining malignancies (NADMs). Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox proportional-hazards regression models were used.Among 4897 patients (13,440 person-years of follow-up [PYFU]), 104 diagnoses of cancer were observed (56 ADMs, 48 NADMs) for an overall incidence rate of 7.7 (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.3-9.2) per 1000 PYFU.Low HDL-c values at enrollment were associated with higher risk both of cancer (crude hazard ratio [HR] 1.72, 95% CI 1.16-2.56, P = 0.007) and of NADM (crude HR 2.50, 95% CI 1.35-4.76, P = 0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the risk of cancer diagnosis was higher in patients with low HDL-c values (adjusted HR [AHR] 1.87, 95% CI 1.18-2.95, P = 0.007) in older patients, those patients more recently enrolled, and in those with low current cluster of differentiation 4+ levels, and/or high current HIV-ribonucleic acid.The multivariate model confirmed an association between HDL-c (AHR 2.61, 95% CI 1.40-4.89, P = 0.003) and risk of NADM.Low HDL-c is an independent predictor of cancer in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:27603338

  8. Integrating Cervical Cancer Screening with HIV Care in Cameroon: Comparative Risk Analysis of Cervical Disease in HIV-Infected Women Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy to Women in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Bekolo, Cavin Epie; O’Bryan, Gillian; Tchago, François Edmond; Nangue, Charlette; Bekoule, Patrick Sylvestre; Kollo, Basile

    2016-01-01

    Background While the effect of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on natural history of cervical lesions remains controversial, resource limited countries need to understand the relevance of their own data to their settings. We compared the risk of cervical disease in HAART-experienced women with that in women in the general population of Cameroon. Methods A retrospective cross sectional survey of women aged 35 years and above, attending a voluntary screening campaign for cervical cancer at the Nkongsamba Regional Hospital in Cameroon between February and May 2014. Squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) were determined by Pap smear. Multiple logistic regression was used to compare the odds of SIL in women on HAART to women from the community with unknown HIV status. Results Included were 302 women of whom 131(43.4%) were HIV-infected and receiving HAART on the site while 171 (56.6%) were women from the community. Cervical disease was observed in 51(16.9%) persons of whom 15 (11.5%) cases in the HAART group and 36 (21.1%) cases in the general group (p = 0.027). After controlling for age and other covariates, women in the HAART group had a 67% reduction in the odds of cervical lesions compared with the community group [adjusted odd ratio (aOR) = 0.33, 95%CI: 0.15–0.73, p = 0.006). Conclusion HIV-infected women receiving HAART have a lower risk of cancer than women in the general population. This finding may not be attributed to HAART alone but to all the health benefits derived from receiving a comprehensive HIV care. PMID:26866371

  9. Infective endocarditis in an HIV-infected intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Mėlinytė, Karolina; Savickaitė, Jurgita; Rekienė, Daiva Emilija; Naudžiūnas, Albinas; Burkauskienė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Laima

    2015-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common complication among injecting drug users. Disease risk among these patients is increased by the spread of HIV infection. In the following article, we discuss the exceptional clinical presentation of a 28-year-old patient who used intravenous drugs (heroin) for 10 years, had been infected with HIV for seven years and as a complication had developed Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis. The patient came to the hospital in serious condition, complaining of bodily pain, swelling of the legs and general weakness. During hospitalization, besides infective endocarditis, she was also diagnosed with anemia, toxic hepatitis, renal failure, ascites, sepsis, and pneumonia. A completely disrupted tricuspid valve, damaged aortic valve, and fibrosis of the mitral valve were detected. Echocardiographic and radiologic data showed that the patient's condition continued to deteriorate day by day, with significant progression of heart failure, ejection fraction decreasing from 45% to 10%, and development of myocarditis, hydrothorax and pericarditis. However, this progressive worsening of the patient's condition ceased when vancomycin was administered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case described in the literature in which significant improvement was observed despite the patient's complex condition with associated complications. PMID:26417654

  10. HIV infection in the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, V W; Radcliffe, K W

    1994-01-01

    The Caribbean is a multi-ethnic region with many different cultural differences. The majority of the population is of African descent, but there are also other ethnic groups present such as Indians, Chinese, Syrians and Europeans. The Caribbean region is influenced by countries such as the USA, Great Britain, France and Holland. The countries of the Caribbean have a serious problem with HIV infection and AIDS. The epidemiology of HIV infection in this region, is different from most other parts of the world in that the mode of spread does not easily fit into any of the three WHO patterns. This review shows that the infection initially started in the homosexual/bisexual community, but since then, it has moved to the heterosexual population and this form of contact is now the main mode of transmission of the virus. The Governments of the Caribbean countries have realized the extent of the problem and have taken measures to try to control the epidemic. PMID:8031923

  11. High-risk behaviors associated with injection drug use among recently HIV-infected men who have sex with men in San Diego, CA.

    PubMed

    Ghanem, Angie; Little, Susan J; Drumright, Lydia; Liu, Lin; Morris, Sheldon; Garfein, Richard S

    2011-10-01

    The contribution of injection drug use to HIV risk among men who have sex with men (MSM) is understudied. MSM infected with HIV within the prior 12 months completed a questionnaire assessing sociodemographic, sexual, drug use, and social factors. Analyses were performed to identify factors associated with lifetime history of injection drug use. Among 212 participants, the mean age was 33.8 years, 72% were White, 89% had attended college, and 9.4% reported ever injecting drugs. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, ever trading sex and using methamphetamine during sex with at least one of their last three partners were associated with injection drug use. Adjusting for these variables, in separate models, ever perpetrating violence against others (Adjusted Odds Ratio [AOR] = 3.16), having physically abusive sexual partners (AOR = 3.08), or physically abusing sexual partners (AOR = 10.17) were significantly (P < 0.05) associated with injection drug use. These findings suggest that violence is more common among MSM who inject drugs, which should be considered in HIV prevention efforts. PMID:21607643

  12. Social factors related to risk for violence and sexually transmitted infections/HIV among Asian massage parlor workers in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Tooru; Iwamoto, Mariko; Wong, Serena; Le, Mai Nhung; Operario, Don

    2004-12-01

    Asian women who work at massage parlors in San Francisco have high levels of risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HIV, and being victims of violence, which jeopardizes their health and wellbeing. On the basis of mapping, the targeted districts in San Francisco where massage parlors were located, 23 massage parlors were identified where commercial sex activity took place. Using snowball-sampling methods, 43 Asian female massage parlor workers were recruited for focus groups; 21 participants were Vietnamese and 22 were Thai. Qualitative analyses revealed frequent exposure to violence including verbal or physical abuse from customers and gang members, as well as persistent HIV risk behaviors associated with multiple daily sex partners, inconsistent condom use with customers, and forced sex. Social factors related to gender, immigration status, and socioeconomic status appeared to be closely tied to the health and wellbeing of Asian masseuses. Study findings suggest that individualized as well as community-level interventions are necessary to improve these women's health and decrease their prolonged exposure to risks for STIs and violence. PMID:15690120

  13. HIV, HCV & Leprosy co-infection.

    PubMed

    George, A; Kanish, B

    2014-01-01

    In the era where Hansen's disease has achieved elimination status in India, co-infection with HIV can possibly cause a resurgence of this disease. A young intravenous drug abuser was found to have triple affliction, where HIV and HCV infection were discovered on testing after the patient was clinically diagnosed to have Hansen's disease. To our knowledge, there has been no case reported where leprosy was seen with HIV and HCV infection. We are reporting a patient with lepromatous Hansen's disease in type 2 reaction in whom HIV and HCV was incidentally diagnosed. PMID:26118224

  14. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  15. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed. PMID:8867206

  16. HIV-, HCV-, and Co-Infections and Associated Risk Factors among Drug Users in Southwestern China: A Township-Level Ecological Study Incorporating Spatial Regression

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yi-Biao; Wang, Qi-Xing; Liang, Song; Gong, Yu-Han; Yang, Mei-xia; Nie, Shi-Jiao; Nan, Lei; Yang, Ai-Hui; Liao, Qiang; Yang, Yang; Song, Xiu-Xia; Jiang, Qing-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Background The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are major public health problems. Many studies have been performed to investigate the association between demographic and behavioral factors and HIV or HCV infection. However, some of the results of these studies have been in conflict. Methodology/Principal Findings The data of all entrants in the 11 national methadone clinics in the Yi Autonomous Prefecture from March 2004 to December 2012 were collected from the national database. Several spatial regression models were used to analyze specific community characteristics associated with the prevalence of HIV and HCV infection at the township level. The study enrolled 6,417 adult patients. The prevalence of HIV infection, HCV infection and co-infection was 25.4%, 30.9%, and 11.0%, respectively. Prevalence exhibited stark geographical variations in the area studied. The four regression models showed Yi ethnicity to be associated with both the prevalence of HIV and of HIV/HCV co-infection. The male drug users in some northwestern counties had greater odds of being infected with HIV than female drug users, but the opposite was observed in some eastern counties. The ‘being in drug rehabilitation variable was found to be positively associated with prevalence of HCV infection in some southern townships, however, it was found to be negatively associated with it in some northern townships. Conclusions/Significance The spatial modeling creates better representations of data such that public health interventions must focus on areas with high frequency of HIV/HCV to prevent further transmission of both HIV and HCV. PMID:24687006

  17. Ocular Syphilis among HIV-Infected Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jonathan Z.; Tucker, Joseph D.; Lobo, Ann-Marie; Marra, Christina M.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Papaliodis, George N.; Felsenstein, Donna; Durand, Marlene L.; Yawetz, Sigal; Robbins, Gregory K.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected individual with ocular manifestations of secondary syphilis. Twelve other cases of HIV-associated ocular syphilis are also presented. Six of 12 individuals had normal cerebrospinal fluid study results, and 3 patients required retreatment within 1.5 years. In patients with HIV infection, clinicians should be vigilant for ocular syphilis despite normal cerebrospinal fluid measures and for syphilis reinfection. PMID:20604717

  18. Public Opinion, Public Policy, and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Jane

    1989-01-01

    A four-stage framework for considering the development of public policy in regard to the issue of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection is offered. The phases are denial, irrationality, acceptance, and the development of a rational response. Federal antidiscrimination policies which include persons with HIV infections as disabled are…

  19. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of Brief and Expanded Evidence-Based Risk Reduction Interventions for HIV-Infected People Who Inject Drugs in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Song, Dahye L.; Altice, Frederick L.; Copenhaver, Michael M.; Long, Elisa F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Two behavioral HIV prevention interventions for people who inject drugs (PWID) infected with HIV include the Holistic Health Recovery Program for HIV+ (HHRP+), a comprehensive evidence-based CDC-supported program, and an abbreviated Holistic Health for HIV (3H+) Program, an adapted HHRP+ version in treatment settings. We compared the projected health benefits and cost-effectiveness of both programs, in addition to opioid substitution therapy (OST), to the status quo in the U.S. Methods A dynamic HIV transmission model calibrated to epidemic data of current US populations was created. Projected outcomes include future HIV incidence, HIV prevalence, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) gained under alternative strategies. Total medical costs were estimated to compare the cost-effectiveness of each strategy. Results Over 10 years, expanding HHRP+ access to 80% of PWID could avert up to 29,000 HIV infections, or 6% of the projected total, at a cost of $7,777/QALY gained. Alternatively, 3H+ could avert 19,000 infections, but is slightly more cost-effective ($7,707/QALY), and remains so under widely varying effectiveness and cost assumptions. Nearly two-thirds of infections averted with either program are among non-PWIDs, due to reduced sexual transmission from PWID to their partners. Expanding these programs with broader OST coverage could avert up to 74,000 HIV infections over 10 years and reduce HIV prevalence from 16.5% to 14.1%, but is substantially more expensive than HHRP+ or 3H+ alone. Conclusions Both behavioral interventions were effective and cost-effective at reducing HIV incidence among both PWID and the general adult population; however, 3H+, the economical HHRP+ version, was slightly more cost-effective than HHRP+. PMID:25658949

  20. Unresolved antiretroviral treatment management issues in HIV-infected children.

    PubMed

    Heidari, Shirin; Mofenson, Lynne M; Hobbs, Charlotte V; Cotton, Mark F; Marlink, Richard; Katabira, Elly

    2012-02-01

    Antiretroviral therapy in children has expanded dramatically in low-income and middle-income countries. The World Health Organization revised its pediatric HIV guidelines to recommend initiation of antiretroviral therapy in all HIV-infected children younger than 2 years, regardless of CD4 count or clinical stage. The number of children starting life-long antiretroviral therapy should therefore expand dramatically over time. The early initiation of antiretroviral therapy has indisputable benefits for children, but there is a paucity of definitive information on the potential adverse effects. In this review, a comprehensive literature search was conducted to provide an overview of our knowledge about the complications of treating pediatric HIV. Antiretroviral therapy in children, as in adults, is associated with enhanced survival, reduction in opportunistic infections, improved growth and neurocognitive function, and better quality of life. Despite antiretroviral therapy, HIV-infected children may continue to lag behind their uninfected peers in growth and development. In addition, epidemic concurrent conditions, such as tuberculosis, malaria, and malnutrition, can combine with HIV to yield more rapid disease progression and poor treatment outcomes. Additional studies are required to evaluate the long-term effects of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected infants, children, and adolescents, particularly in resource-limited countries where concomitant infections and conditions may enhance the risk of adverse effects. There is an urgent need to evaluate drug-drug interactions in children to determine optimal treatment regimens for both HIV and coinfections. PMID:22138766

  1. Predicting the Onset of Sexual and Drug Risk Behaviors in HIV-Negative Youths with HIV-Positive Mothers: The Role of Contextual, Self-Regulation, and Social-Interaction Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellins, Claude A.; Dolezal, Curtis; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth; Nicholson, Ouzama; Warne, Patricia; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV-negative, inner-city adolescents with HIV-infected parents are considered to be at high risk for acquiring HIV themselves. Using a modified theory of health behavior, this study examined the effects of maternal HIV infection and psychosocial variables on the onset of sexual and drug risk behavior in 144 HIV-negative adolescents with and…

  2. HIV testing, risk perception, and behaviour in the British population

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Soazig; Nardone, Anthony; Field, Nigel; Mercer, Catherine H.; Tanton, Clare; Macdowall, Wendy; Johnson, Anne M.; Sonnenberg, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between HIV risk behaviour, risk perception and testing in Britain. Design: A probability sample survey of the British population. Methods: We analyzed data on sexual behaviour, self-perceived HIV risk and HIV testing (excluding testing because of blood donation) from 13 751 sexually experienced men and women aged 16–74, interviewed between 2010 and 2012 using computer-assisted face-to-face and self-interviewing. Results: Altogether, 3.5% of men and 5.4% of women reported having an HIV test in the past year. Higher perceived risk of HIV was associated with sexual risk behaviours and with HIV testing. However, the majority of those rating themselves as ‘greatly’ or ‘quite a lot’ at risk of HIV (3.4% of men, 2.5% of women) had not tested in the past year. This was also found among the groups most affected by HIV: MSM and black Africans. Within these groups, the majority reporting sexual risk behaviours did not perceive themselves as at risk and had not tested for HIV. Overall, 29.6% of men and 39.9% of women who tested for HIV in the past year could be classified as low risk across a range of measures. Conclusion: Most people who perceive themselves as at risk of HIV have not recently tested, including among MSM and black Africans. Many people tested in Britain are at low risk, reflecting current policy that aims to normalize testing. Strategies to further improve uptake of testing are needed, particularly in those at greatest risk, to further reduce undiagnosed HIV infection at late diagnoses. PMID:26963528

  3. Sexual Risk Behavior: HIV, STD, & Teen Pregnancy Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... behaviors place individuals at greatest risk for infection. HIV awareness and education should be universally integrated into all educational environments. * CDC recommends all adolescents and adults 13-64 get tested for HIV at least once as part of routine medical ...

  4. Lay Counsellor-Based Risk Reduction Intervention with HIV Positive Diagnosed Patients at Public HIV Counselling and Testing Sites in Mpumalanga, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltzer, Karl; Tabane, Cily; Matseke, Gladys; Simbayi, Leickness

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, fidelity, and effect of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction intervention delivered to HIV-infected patients by lay counsellors during routine HIV counselling and testing (HCT) public service in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Methods: A total of 488 HIV-infected patients, aged 18 years and older,…

  5. HIV risk behavior and access to services: what predicts HIV testing among heterosexually active homeless men?

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Suzanne L; Rhoades, Harmony; Tucker, Joan S; Golinelli, Daniela; Kennedy, David P; Zhou, Annie; Ewing, Brett

    2012-06-01

    HIV is a serious epidemic among homeless persons, where rates of infection are estimated to be three times higher than in the general population. HIV testing is an effective tool for reducing HIV transmission and for combating poor HIV/AIDS health outcomes that disproportionately affect homeless persons, however, little is known about the HIV testing behavior of homeless men. This study examined the association between individual (HIV risk) and structural (service access) factors and past year HIV testing. Participants were a representative sample of 305 heterosexually active homeless men interviewed from meal programs in the Skid Row region of Los Angeles. Logistic regression examined the association between past year HIV testing and demographic characteristics, HIV risk behavior, and access to other services in the Skid Row area in the past 30 days. Despite high rates of past year HIV testing, study participants also reported high rates of HIV risk behavior, suggesting there is still significant unmet need for HIV prevention among homeless men. Having recently used medical/dental services in the Skid Row area (OR: 1.91; CI: 1.09, 3.35), and being a military veteran (OR: 2.10; CI: 1.01-4.37) were significantly associated with HIV testing service utilization. HIV testing was not associated with HIV risk behavior, but rather with access to services and veteran status, the latter of which prior research has linked to increased service access. We suggest that programs encouraging general medical service access may be important for disseminating HIV testing services to this high-risk, vulnerable population. PMID:22676465

  6. Sexual Behavior and Risk Practices of HIV Positive and HIV Negative Rwandan Women.

    PubMed

    Adedimeji, Adebola A; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Gard, Tracy; Mutimura, Eugene; Sinayobye, Jean d'Amour; Cohen, Mardge H; Anastos, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    It is not well understood how infection with HIV and prior experience of sexual violence affects sexual behavior in African women. We describe factors influencing current sexual practices of Rwandan women living with or without HIV/AIDS. By design, 75 % of participants were HIV positive and ~50 % reported having experienced genocidal rape. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to describe demographic and clinical characteristics that influenced sexual behavior in the previous 6 months, condom use, history of transactional sex, and prior infection with a non-HIV sexually transmitted disease. Respondents' age, where they lived, whether or not they lived with a husband or partner, experience of sexual trauma, CD4 count, CES-D and PTSD scores were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior and infection with non-HIV STI. HIV positive women with a history of sexual violence in the contexts of war and conflict may be susceptible to some high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:25488169

  7. In men at risk of HIV infection, IgM, IgG1, IgG3, and IgA reach the human foreskin epidermis.

    PubMed

    Lemos, M P; Karuna, S T; Mize, G J; Fong, Y; Montano, S M; Ganoza, C; Lama, J R; Sanchez, J; McElrath, M J

    2016-05-01

    We profiled the humoral response in the penis, an area that has been minimally explored but may be relevant for protecting insertive men against HIV and other sexually acquired infections. Comparing paired tissue samples from 20 men at risk of HIV infection, foreskin contains less immunoglobulin A (IgA) and more IgG2 than colon. Using foreskin dermal and epidermal explants and paired plasma from 17 men, we examined Ig accumulation by normalizing Ig to human serum albumin (HSA) transudation. Dermal IgM, IgG2, IgA, and IgE ratios were greater than that in plasma, suggesting there is local antibody secretion at the dermis. Local Ig transcription was concentrated at the inner rather than the outer foreskin, and inner foreskin Ig ratios did not correlate with blood, indicating that localized production can contribute to the foreskin response. IgM, IgG1, IgG3, and IgA have preferential access to the foreskin epidermis, whereas IgG2, IgG4, and IgE are restricted to the dermis. Lastly, Ad5-specific IgA was selectively present in the colon, whereas foreskin Ad5 IgG was mainly derived from blood, and reached the inner epidermis at higher ratios than the outer (P<0.002). In summary, the foreskin antibody response combines local and systemic sources, and there is selective isotype accumulation in the epidermis. PMID:26509877

  8. In Men at Risk of HIV Infection, IgM, IgG1, IgG3 and IgA Reach the Human Foreskin Epidermis

    PubMed Central

    Lemos, Maria P.; Karuna, Shelly T.; Mize, Gregory J.; Fong, Youyi; Montano, Silvia M.; Ganoza, Carmela; Lama, Javier R.; Sanchez, Jorge; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2015-01-01

    We profiled the humoral response in the penis, an area that has been minimally explored but may be relevant for protecting insertive men against HIV and other sexually-acquired infections. Comparing paired tissue samples from 20 men at risk of HIV infection, foreskin contains less IgA and more IgG2 than colon. Using foreskin dermal and epidermal explants and paired plasma from 17 men, we examined Ig accumulation by normalizing Ig to human serum albumin (HSA) transudation. Dermal IgM, IgG2, IgA, and IgE ratios were greater than in plasma, suggesting there is local antibody secretion at the dermis. Local Ig transcription was concentrated at the inner rather than the outer foreskin, and inner foreskin Ig ratios did not correlate with blood, indicating that localized production can contribute to the foreskin response. IgM, IgG1, IgG3, and IgA have preferential access to the foreskin epidermis, whereas IgG2, IgG4, and IgE are restricted to the dermis. Lastly, Ad5-specific IgA was selectively in the colon; whereas foreskin Ad5 IgG was mainly derived from blood, and reached the inner epidermis at higher ratios than the outer (p<0.002). In summary, the foreskin antibody response combines local and systemic sources and there is selective isotype accumulation in the epidermis. PMID:26509877

  9. Frequency of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) in Trichomonas vaginalis Infected Women in Badagry, Lagos, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Salawu, Oyetunde Timothy; Esume, Chelsea Ndidi

    2016-01-01

    Background: The interaction between HIV and Trichomonas vaginalis infection has been widely studied in most developed countries but with scanty information in sub-Saharan Africa. While many of these studies have examined the prevalence of T. vaginalis infection in HIV positive individuals, no study in Nigeria has shown the effect of T. vaginalis on HIV transmission. Therefore, the study aimed to determine the occurrence of HIV in T. vaginalis infected women. Methods: A descriptive study was conducted among women attending STI clinic at the General Hospital, Badagry, Lagos, Nigeria. A total number of 201 (T. vaginalis infected) women were screened for HIV using rapid diagnostic test kits. Results: The frequency of HIV in T. vaginalis infected women was 35.8%. Conclusion: The study showed that T. vaginalis infection in women may be a high risk factor of HIV infection. PMID:26962485

  10. High prevalence of multiple syndemic conditions associated with sexual risk behavior and HIV infection among a large sample of Spanish- and Portuguese-speaking men who have sex with men in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Mimiaga, Matthew J; Biello, Katie B; Robertson, Angela M; Oldenburg, Catherine E; Rosenberger, Joshua G; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Novak, David S; Mayer, Kenneth H; Safren, Steven A

    2015-10-01

    The HIV epidemic in Latin America is highly concentrated in men who have sex with men (MSM). In the United States, multiple co-occurring psychosocial conditions have been shown to act as intertwined epidemics to potentiate HIV transmission among MSM. To date, no study has examined the role of syndemics and condomless sex among MSM in Latin America. In 2012, an online survey was conducted among members of the largest social/sexual networking website for MSM in Latin America. Participants were asked about demographics, sexual behaviors, HIV/STI diagnoses, and psychosocial well-being, including depression, suicidal ideation, hazardous alcohol use, hard drug use during sex, history of childhood/adolescent sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and sexual compulsivity. Multivariable logistic generalized estimation equations were used to assess the relationship of syndemic factors and (1) engagement in higher risk condomless anal sex and (2) self-report of prior HIV diagnosis. Among 24,274 survey respondents, 74.6 % of the sample had at least one syndemic factor. In an additive model, syndemics were associated with increased odds of higher risk condomless anal sex, ranging from adjusted odds ratio of 1.31 (95 % CI 1.20, 1.43) for one syndemic factor to 4.06 (95 % CI 3.25, 5.09) for 6/7 syndemic factors. Similarly, syndemics were associated with increased odds of HIV infection (p < .0001). This study provides initial evidence that intertwined syndemics increase HIV risk behavior and HIV infection among MSM in Latin America. In the Latin American context, comprehensive HIV prevention interventions for MSM should be developed and tested that simultaneously address co-occurring psychosocial conditions and HIV risk. PMID:26159862

  11. A Clinical Scoring Algorithm for Determination of the Risk of Tuberculosis in HIV-Infected Adults: A Cohort Study Performed at Ethiopian Health Centers

    PubMed Central

    Balcha, T. T.; Skogmar, S.; Sturegård, E.; Schön, T.; Winqvist, N.; Reepalu, A.; Jemal, Z. H.; Tibesso, G.; Björk, J.; Björkman, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background  The World Health Organization (WHO) tuberculosis (TB) symptom screening instrument (WHO-TB) can identify human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals at low risk of tuberculosis (TB); however, many patients report WHO-TB symptoms and require further TB investigations. We hypothesized that further clinical scoring could classify subjects with a positive WHO-TB screening result (WHO-TB+) for the likelihood of TB. Methods  HIV-infected adults eligible to initiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) were recruited and prospectively followed at 5 Ethiopian health centers. Irrespective of symptoms, all participants underwent sputum bacteriological testing for TB. Symptoms, physical findings, hemoglobin, and CD4 cell count results were compared between subjects with and those without bacteriologically confirmed TB. Variables associated with TB in WHO-TB+ individuals were used to construct a scoring algorithm with multiple logistic regression analysis. Results  Among 812 participants, 137 (16.9%) had TB. One hundred fifty-nine persons (20%) had a negative WHO-TB screen, 10 of whom had TB (negative predictive value [NPV], 94% [95% confidence interval {CI}, 90%–97.5%]). For WHO-TB+ subjects, the following variables were independently associated with TB, and were assigned 1 point each in the clinical scoring algorithm: cough, Karnofsky score ≤80, mid-upper arm circumference <20 cm, lymphadenopathy, and hemoglobin <10 g/dL. Among subjects with 0–1 points, 20 of 255 had TB (NPV, 92% [95% CI, 89%–95%]), vs 19 of 34 participants with ≥4 points (positive predictive value, 56% [95% CI, 39%–73%]). The use of WHO-TB alone identified 159 of 784 (20%) with a low risk of TB, vs 414 of 784 (53%) using WHO-TB followed by clinical scoring (P< .001). The difference in proportions of confirmed TB in these subsets was nonsignificant (6.3% vs 7.2%; P= .69). Conclusions  Clinical scoring can further classify HIV-infected adults with positive WHO-TB screen to

  12. Community Mobilization and Empowerment of Female Sex Workers in Karnataka State, South India: Associations With HIV and Sexually Transmitted Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Harnalli L.; Bhattacharjee, Parinita; Chandrashekar, Sudha; Isac, Shajy; Wheeler, Tisha; Prakash, Ravi; Ramesh, Banadakoppa M.; Blanchard, James F.; Heise, Lori; Vickerman, Peter; Moses, Stephen; Watts, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the impact of community mobilization (CM) on the empowerment, risk behaviors, and prevalence of HIV and sexually transmitted infection in female sex workers (FSWs) in Karnataka, India. Methods. We conducted behavioral–biological surveys in 2008 and 2011 in 4 districts of Karnataka, India. We defined exposure to CM as low, medium (attended nongovernmental organization meeting or drop-in centre), or high (member of collective or peer group). We used regression analyses to explore whether exposure to CM was associated with the preceding outcomes. Pathway analyses explored the degree to which effects could be attributable to CM. Results. By the final survey, FSWs with high CM exposure were more likely to have been tested for HIV (adjusted odd ratio [AOR] = 25.13; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 13.07, 48.34) and to have used a condom at last sex with occasional clients (AOR = 4.74; 95% CI =  2.17, 10.37), repeat clients (AOR = 4.29; 95% CI = 2.24, 8.20), and regular partners (AOR = 2.80; 95% CI = 1.43, 5.45) than FSWs with low CM exposure. They were also less likely to be infected with gonorrhea or chlamydia (AOR = 0.53; 95% CI = 0.31, 0.87). Pathway analyses suggested CM acted above and beyond peer education; reduction in gonorrhea or chlamydia was attributable to CM. Conclusions. CM is a central part of HIV prevention programming among FSWs, empowering them to better negotiate condom use and access services, as well as address other concerns in their lives. PMID:24922143

  13. The association between cervical HPV infection and HIV acquisition among women in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Averbach, Sarah H.; Gravitt, Patti E.; Nowak, Rebecca G.; Celentano, David D.; Dunbar, Megan S.; Morrison, Charles S.; Grimes, Barbara; Padian, Nancy S.

    2012-01-01

    Background The prevalence of HPV is higher among HIV+ women, but the prevalence of HPV prior to HIV acquisition has not been carefully evaluated. Objective This study evaluated whether HPV infection is independently associated with heterosexual HIV acquisition in a cohort of Zimbabwean women. Design Case-control study nested within a large multi-center cohort study (HC-HIV). Methods Cases consisted of Zimbabwean women with incident HIV infection observed during follow-up (n=145). HIV-uninfected controls were selected and matched to cases (n=446). The prevalence of cervical HPV infections was compared at the visit prior to HIV infection in the cases and at the same follow-up visit in the matched controls. Results The odds of acquiring HIV were 2.4 times higher in women with prior cervical HPV infection after adjustment for behavioral and biologic risk factors. There was no statistically significant difference in the risk of HIV acquisition between women infected with high versus low risk HPV types. Loss of detection of at least one HPV DNA type was significantly associated with HIV acquisition (OR =5.4 [95%CI, 2.9–9.9] (p<.0001). Conclusion Cervical HPV infection is associated with HIV acquisition among women residing in a region with a high prevalence of both infections. Further studies are required to evaluate whether the observed association is causal. PMID:20397287

  14. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jasper F W; Lau, Susanna K P; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick C Y

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  15. Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper FW; Lau, Susanna KP; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick CY

    2016-01-01

    Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei is an important pathogenic thermally dimorphic fungus causing systemic mycosis in Southeast Asia. The clinical significance of T. marneffei became evident when the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome epidemic arrived in Southeast Asia in 1988. Subsequently, a decline in the incidence of T. marneffei infection among HIV-infected patients was seen in regions with access to highly active antiretroviral therapy and other control measures for HIV. Since the 1990s, an increasing number of T. marneffei infections have been reported among non-HIV-infected patients with impaired cell-mediated immunity. Their comorbidities included primary adult-onset immunodeficiency due to anti-interferon-gamma autoantibodies and secondary immunosuppressive conditions including other autoimmune diseases, solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, T-lymphocyte-depleting immunsuppressive drugs and novel anti-cancer targeted therapies such as anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors. Moreover, improved immunological diagnostics identified more primary immunodeficiency syndromes associated with T. marneffei infection in children. The higher case-fatality rate of T. marneffei infection in non-HIV-infected than HIV-infected patients might be related to delayed diagnosis due to the lack of clinical suspicion. Correction of the underlying immune defects and early use of antifungals are important treatment strategies. Clinicians should be familiar with the changing epidemiology and clinical management of T. marneffei infection among non-HIV-infected patients. PMID:26956447

  16. Shifting the Paradigm: Using HIV Surveillance Data as a Foundation for Improving HIV Care and Preventing HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Patricia; Gardner, Lytt I; Buchacz, Kate; Garland, Pamela Morse; Mugavero, Michael J; Bosshart, Jeffrey T; Shouse, R Luke; Bertolli, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    Context Reducing HIV incidence in the United States and improving health outcomes for people living with HIV hinge on improving access to highly effective treatment and overcoming barriers to continuous treatment. Using laboratory tests routinely reported for HIV surveillance to monitor individuals’ receipt of HIV care and contacting them to facilitate optimal care could help achieve these objectives. Historically, surveillance-based public health intervention with individuals for HIV control has been controversial because of concerns that risks to privacy and autonomy could outweigh benefits. But with the availability of lifesaving, transmission-interrupting treatment for HIV infection, some health departments have begun surveillance-based outreach to facilitate HIV medical care. Methods Guided by ethics frameworks, we explored the ethical arguments for changing the uses of HIV surveillance data. To identify ethical, procedural, and strategic considerations, we reviewed the activities of health departments that are using HIV surveillance data to contact persons identified as needing assistance with initiating or returning to care. Findings Although privacy concerns surrounding the uses of HIV surveillance data still exist, there are ethical concerns associated with not using HIV surveillance to maximize the benefits from HIV medical care and treatment. Early efforts to use surveillance data to facilitate optimal HIV medical care illustrate how the ethical burdens may vary depending on the local context and the specifics of implementation. Health departments laid the foundation for these activities by engaging stakeholders to gain their trust in sharing sensitive information; establishing or strengthening legal, policy and governance infrastructure; and developing communication and follow-up protocols that protect privacy. Conclusions We describe a shift toward using HIV surveillance to facilitate optimal HIV care. Health departments should review the

  17. HIV-Risk Reduction with Juvenile Offenders on Probation

    PubMed Central

    Donenberg, Geri R.; Emerson, Erin; Mackesy-Amiti, Mary Ellen; Udell, Wadiya

    2014-01-01

    Youth involved in the juvenile justice system are at elevated risk for HIV as a result of high rates of sexual risk taking, substance use, mental health problems and sexually transmitted infections. Yet few HIV prevention programs exist for young offenders. This pilot study examined change in juvenile offenders’ sexual activity, drug/alcohol use, HIV testing and counseling, and theoretical mediators of risk taking following participation in PHAT Life, an HIV-prevention program for teens on probation. Participants (N=54) were 13–17 year-old arrested males and females remanded to a detention alternative setting. Youth participated in a uniquely tailored HIV prevention intervention and completed a baseline and 3-month follow up assessment of their HIV and substance use knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors. At 3-month follow up, teens reported less alcohol use, more positive attitudes toward peers with HIV, greater ability to resist temptation to use substances, and for males, improved HIV prevention self-efficacy and peer norms supporting prevention. Teens were also more likely to seek HIV counseling and males were more likely to get tested for HIV. Effect sizes revealed moderate change in sexual behavior. Findings support PHAT Life as a promising intervention to reduce HIV-risk among youth in juvenile justice. PMID:26097376

  18. Hepatic Fibrosis Progression in HIV-Hepatitis C Virus Co-Infection – The Effect of Sex on Risk of Significant Fibrosis Measured by Aspartate-to-Platelet Ratio Index

    PubMed Central

    Rollet-Kurhajec, Kathleen C.; Moodie, Erica E. M.; Walmsley, Sharon; Cooper, Curtis; Pick, Neora; Klein, Marina B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In Hepatitis C virus (HCV) mono-infection, male sex is associated with faster liver fibrosis progression but the effects of sex have not been well studied in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. We examined the influence of sex on progression to significant liver fibrosis in HIV-HCV co-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) using the aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) as a surrogate biomarker of liver fibrosis. Methods We evaluated 308 HIV infected, HCV RNA positive participants of a Canadian multicentre prospective cohort receiving antiretrovirals and without significant liver fibrosis or end-stage liver disease at baseline. We used multivariate discrete-time proportional hazards models to assess the effect of sex on time to significant fibrosis (APRI≥1.5) adjusting for baseline age, alcohol use, cigarette smoking, HCV duration, and APRI and time-updated CD4 count and HIV RNA. Results Overall, 55 (18%) participants developed an APRI ≥ 1.5 over 544 person-years of at-risk follow-up time; 18 (21%) women (incidence rate (IR)=14.0/100 PY; 7.5-20.4) and 37 (17%) men (IR=8.9/100 PY; 6.0-11.8). Women had more favourable profiles with respect to traditional risk factors for liver disease progression (younger, shorter duration of HCV infection and less alcohol use). Despite this, female sex was associated with a greater than two-fold increased risk of fibrosis progression (adjusted hazard rate (HR) =2.23; 1.22-4.08). Conclusions HIV-HCV co-infected women receiving antiretroviral therapy were at significantly greater risk of progressing to liver fibrosis as measured by APRI compared with men. Enhanced efforts to engage and treat co-infected women for HCV are needed. PMID:26090666

  19. HIV transmission risk at a gay bathhouse.

    PubMed

    Binson, Diane; Pollack, Lance M; Blair, Johnny; Woods, William J

    2010-11-01

    Previous research found up to 14% of men who go to bathhouses engage in unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) and tend to have multiple sexual partners during their bathhouse visit, thus appearing to support concerns that such venues could foster acute outbreaks of new HIV infections. We conducted a two-stage probability sample of men exiting a gay bathhouse, and focused our analysis on whether the partnering patterns of the men who engaged in UAI present such a risk. Among patrons who had oral or anal sex during their visit (n = 758), 16.7% were HIV+, and 13.9% engaged in UAI. Although men had multiple sex partners during a visit, they had UAI with only one of those partners, on average, and withdrawal prior to ejaculation occurred in the vast majority of UAI incidences. Thus, the risk of sexual transmission of HIV during the bathhouse visit was typically within isolated dyads rather than patterns of multiple sexual encounters that might put many men at risk during a single visit, and men who did engage in UAI tended to withdraw prior to ejaculation, potentially mitigating the risk of HIV transmission. PMID:19753499

  20. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center.

    PubMed

    Reisner, Sari L; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M; Cohen, Elijah L; LeClerc, M; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12-29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD=2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p=0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p=0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p=0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p=0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p<0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to understanding

  1. Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infection seropositivity and risk behavior among sexually active transgender patients at an adolescent and young adult urban community health center

    PubMed Central

    Reisner, Sari L.; Vetters, Ralph; White, Jaclyn M.; Cohen, Elijah L.; LeClerc, M.; Zaslow, Shayne; Wolfrum, Sarah; Mimiaga, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    The sexual health of transgender adolescents and young adults who present for health care in urban community health centers is understudied. A retrospective review of electronic health record (EHR) data was conducted from 180 transgender patients aged 12–29 years seen for one or more health-care visits between 2001 and 2010 at an urban community health center serving youth in Boston, MA. Analyses were restricted to 145 sexually active transgender youth (87.3% of the sample). Laboratory-confirmed HIV and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) seroprevalence, demographics, sexual risk behavior, and structural and psychosocial risk indicators were extracted from the EHR. Analyses were descriptively focused for HIV and STIs. Stratified multivariable logistic regression models were fit for male-to-female (MTF) and female-to-male (FTM) patients separately to examine factors associated with any unprotected anal and/or vaginal sex (UAVS). The mean age was 20.0 (SD = 2.9); 21.7% people of color, 46.9% white (non-Hispanic), 21.4% race/ethnicity unknown; 43.4% MTF, and 56.6% FTM; and 68.3% were on cross-sex hormones. Prevalence of STIs: 4.8% HIV, 2.8% herpes simplex virus, 2.8% syphilis, 2.1% chlamydia, 2.1% gonorrhea, 2.8% hepatitis C, 1.4% human papilloma virus. Only gonorrhea prevalence significantly differed by gender identity (MTF 2.1% vs. 0.0% FTM; p = 0.046). Nearly half (47.6%) of the sample engaged in UAVS (52.4% MTF, 43.9% FTM, p = 0.311). FTM more frequently had a primary sex partner compared to MTF (48.8% vs. 25.4%; p = 0.004); MTF more frequently had a casual sex partner than FTM (69.8% vs. 42.7% p = 0.001). In multivariable models, MTF youth who were younger in age, white non-Hispanic, and reported a primary sex partner had increased odds of UAVS; whereas, FTM youth reporting a casual sex partner and current alcohol use had increased odds of UAVS (all p < 0.05). Factors associated with sexual risk differ for MTF and FTM youth. Partner type appears pivotal to

  2. Prevalence and Correlates of Helminth Co-infection in Kenyan HIV-1 Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Walson, Judd L.; Stewart, Barclay T.; Sangaré, Laura; Mbogo, Loice W.; Otieno, Phelgona A.; Piper, Benjamin K. S.; Richardson, Barbra A.; John-Stewart, Grace

    2010-01-01

    Background Deworming HIV-1 infected individuals may delay HIV-1 disease progression. It is important to determine the prevalence and correlates of HIV-1/helminth co-infection in helminth-endemic areas. Methods HIV-1 infected individuals (CD4>250 cells/ul) were screened for helminth infection at ten sites in Kenya. Prevalence and correlates of helminth infection were determined. A subset of individuals with soil-transmitted helminth infection was re-evaluated 12 weeks following albendazole therapy. Results Of 1,541 HIV-1 seropositive individuals screened, 298 (19.3%) had detectable helminth infections. Among individuals with helminth infection, hookworm species were the most prevalent (56.3%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (17.1%), Trichuris trichiura (8.7%), Schistosoma mansoni (7.1%), and Stongyloides stercoralis (1.3%). Infection with multiple species occurred in 9.4% of infections. After CD4 count was controlled for, rural residence (RR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.08–1.81), having no education (RR 1.57, 95% CI: 1.07–2.30), and higher CD4 count (RR 1.36, 95% CI: 1.07–1.73) remained independently associated with risk of helminth infection. Twelve weeks following treatment with albendazole, 32% of helminth-infected individuals had detectable helminths on examination. Residence, education, and CD4 count were not associated with persistent helminth infection. Conclusions Among HIV-1 seropositive adults with CD4 counts above 250 cells/mm3 in Kenya, traditional risk factors for helminth infection, including rural residence and lack of education, were associated with co-infection, while lower CD4 counts were not. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00130910 PMID:20361031

  3. Partner Violence and Health among HIV-Infected Jail Detainees

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Jaimie P.; Wickersham, Jeffrey A.; Fu, Jeannia J.; Brown, Shan-Estelle; Sullivan, Tami P.; Springer, Sandra A.; Altice, Frederick L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Little is known about the association of intimate partner violence (IPV) with specific HIV treatment outcomes, especially among criminal justice (CJ) populations who are disproportionately affected by IPV, HIV, mental and substance use disorders (SUDs) and are at high risk of poor post-release continuity of care. Design/Methodology/Approach Mixed methods were used to describe the prevalence, severity, and correlates of lifetime IPV exposure among HIV-infected jail detainees enrolled in a novel jail-release demonstration project in Connecticut. Additionally, the effect of IPV on HIV treatment outcomes and longitudinal healthcare utilization was examined. Findings Structured baseline surveys defined 49% of 84 participants as having significant IPV-exposure, which was associated with female gender, longer duration since HIV diagnosis, suicidal ideation, having higher alcohol use severity, having experienced other forms of childhood and adulthood abuse, and homo/bisexual orientation. IPV was not directly correlated with HIV healthcare utilization or treatment outcomes. In-depth qualitative interviews with 20 surveyed participants, however, confirmed that IPV was associated with disengagement from HIV care especially in the context of overlapping vulnerabilities, including transitioning from CJ to community settings, having untreated mental disorders, and actively using drugs or alcohol at the time of incarceration. Value Post-release interventions for HIV-infected CJ populations should minimally integrate HIV secondary prevention with violence reduction and treatment for SUDs. PMID:24376468

  4. Differences in antigen-specific CD4+ responses to opportunistic infections in HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Katrina M; Montamat-Sicotte, Damien J; Cooke, Graham S; Kapembwa, Moses S; Kon, Onn M; Grass, Lisa; Sampson, Robert D; Taylor, Graham P; Lalvani, Ajit

    2015-01-01

    HIV-infected individuals with severe immunodeficiency are at risk of opportunistic infection (OI). Tuberculosis (TB) may occur without substantial immune suppression suggesting an early and sustained adverse impact of HIV on Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB)-specific cell mediated immunity (CMI). This prospective observational cohort study aimed to observe differences in OI-specific and MTB-specific CMI that might underlie this. Using polychromatic flow cytometry, we compared CD4+ responses to MTB, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Candida albicans in individuals with and without HIV infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells were more polyfunctional than virus specific (CMV/EBV) CD4+ T-cells which predominantly secreted IFN-gamma (IFN-γ) only. There was a reduced frequency of IFN-γ and IL-2 (IL-2)-dual-MTB-specific cells in HIV-infected individuals, which was not apparent for the other pathogens. MTB-specific cells were less differentiated especially compared with CMV-specific cells. CD127 expression was relatively less frequent on MTB-specific cells in HIV co-infection. MTB-specific CD4+ T-cells PD-1 expression was infrequent in contrast to EBV-specific CD4+ T-cells. The variation in the inherent quality of these CD4+ T-cell responses and impact of HIV co-infection may contribute to the timing of co-infectious diseases in HIV infection. PMID:26417433

  5. Geriatric Syndromes in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Covinsky, Kenneth E.; Valcour, Victor; Miao, Yinghui; Madamba, Joy; Lampiris, Harry; Cenzer, Irena Stijacic; Martin, Jeffrey; Deeks, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Geriatric syndromes such as falls, frailty, and functional impairment are multifactorial conditions used to identify vulnerable older adults. Limited data exists on these conditions in older HIV-infected adults and no studies have comprehensively examined these conditions. Methods Geriatric syndromes including falls, urinary incontinence, functional impairment, frailty, sensory impairment, depression and cognitive impairment were measured in a cross-sectional study of HIV-infected adults age 50 and older who had an undetectable viral load on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We examined both HIV and non-HIV related predictors of geriatric syndromes including sociodemographics, number of co-morbidities and non-antiretroviral medications, and HIV specific variables in multivariate analyses. Results We studied 155 participants with a median age of 57 (IQR 54-62); (94%) were men. Pre-frailty (56%), difficulty with instrumental activities of daily living (46%), and cognitive impairment (47%) were the most frequent geriatric syndromes. Lower CD4 nadir (IRR 1.16, 95% CI 1.06-1.26), non-white race (IRR 1.38, 95% CI 1.10-1.74), and increasing number of comorbidities (IRR 1.09, 95%CI 1.03-1.15) were associated with increased risk of having more geriatric syndromes. Conclusions Geriatric syndromes are common in older HIV infected adults. Treatment of comorbidities and early initiation of ART may help to prevent development of these age related complications. Clinical care of older HIV-infected adults should consider incorporation of geriatric principles. PMID:26009828

  6. HIV Risk Behaviors Among Latina Women Tested for HIV in Florida by Country of Birth, 2012.

    PubMed

    Taveras, Janelle; Trepka, Mary Jo; Khan, Hafiz; Madhivanan, Purnima; Gollub, Erica L; Devieux, Jessy

    2016-10-01

    Latina women in the United States (US) are disproportionately affected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Data are limited on the risk differences in HIV among Latinas by country of birth. This paper describes the risk behaviors among Latina women tested for HIV at public sites in Florida. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the demographic characteristics associated with the report of specific risk behavio