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Sample records for hiv therapeutic possibilities

  1. Conotoxins that confer therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Essack, Magbubah; Bajic, Vladimir B; Archer, John A C

    2012-06-01

    Cone snails produce a distinctive repertoire of venom peptides that are used both as a defense mechanism and also to facilitate the immobilization and digestion of prey. These peptides target a wide variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, which make them an invaluable resource for studying the properties of these ion channels in normal and diseased states, as well as being a collection of compounds of potential pharmacological use in their own right. Examples include the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pharmaceutical drug, Ziconotide (Prialt(®); Elan Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) that is the synthetic equivalent of the naturally occurring ω-conotoxin MVIIA, whilst several other conotoxins are currently being used as standard research tools and screened as potential therapeutic drugs in pre-clinical or clinical trials. These developments highlight the importance of driving conotoxin-related research. A PubMed query from 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2011 combined with hand-curation of the retrieved articles allowed for the collation of 98 recently identified conotoxins with therapeutic potential which are selectively discussed in this review. Protein sequence similarity analysis tentatively assigned uncharacterized conotoxins to predicted functional classes. Furthermore, conotoxin therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) was also inferred. PMID:22822370

  2. Pharmacokinetic enhancers in HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Larson, Kajal B; Wang, Kun; Delille, Cecile; Otofokun, Igho; Acosta, Edward P

    2014-10-01

    Maximal and durable viral load suppression is one of the most important goals of HIV therapy and is directly related to adequate drug exposure. Protease inhibitors (PIs), an important component of the antiretroviral armada, were historically associated with poor oral bioavailability and high pill burden. However, because the PIs are metabolized by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A enzymes, intentional inhibition of these enzymes leads to higher drug exposure, lower pill burden, and therefore simplified dosing schedules with this class of drug. This is the basis of pharmacokinetic enhancement. In HIV therapy, two pharmacokinetic enhancers or boosting agents are used: ritonavir and cobicistat. Both agents inhibit CYP3A4, with cobicistat being a more specific CYP inhibitor than ritonavir. Unlike ritonavir, cobicistat does not have antiretroviral activity. Cobicistat has been evaluated in clinical trials and was recently approved in the USA as a fixed-dose combination with the integrase inhibitor, elvitegravir and two nucleos(t)ide analogs. Additional studies are examining cobicistat in fixed-dose combinations with various PIs. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of these agents and clinically relevant drug regimens and ongoing trials. Studies with elvitegravir and the novel PI TMC319011 are also discussed. PMID:25164142

  3. [Splenic abscess: etiology, diagnosis and possible therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Burnier, C; Ribordy-Baudat, V; Lamy, O

    2007-10-31

    We report the case of a 28-year-old intravenous drug abuser under quadritherapy for stage C3 AIDS and with past history of infectious endocarditis. He was admitted with a diminished general condition, weight loss, progressive unbearable abdominal pain and vomiting, without fever. An inflammatory syndrome is noted and imaging reveals a voluminous splenic abscess. Conservative treatment is initiated with repetitive drainages and intravenous antibiotics. Aetiologies, diagnosis and possible therapeutics of splenic abscesses are discussed. PMID:18018950

  4. Fighting HIV/AIDS: is success possible?

    PubMed Central

    Okware, S.; Opio, A.; Musinguzi, J.; Waibale, P.

    2001-01-01

    The fight against HIV/AIDS poses enormous challenges worldwide, generating fears that success may be too difficult or even impossible to attain. Uganda has demonstrated that an early, consistent and multisectoral control strategy can reduce both the prevalence and the incidence of HIV infection. From only two AIDS cases in 1982, the epidemic in Uganda grew to a cumulative 2 million HIV infections by the end of 2000. The AIDS Control Programme established in 1987 in the Ministry of Health mounted a national response that expanded over time to reach other relevant sectors under the coordinating role of the Uganda AIDS Commission. The national response was to bring in new policies, expanded partnerships, increased institutional capacity for care and research, public health education for behaviour change, strengthened sexually transmitted disease (STD) management, improved blood transfusion services, care and support services for persons with HIV/AIDS, and a surveillance system to monitor the epidemic. After a decade of fighting on these fronts, Uganda became, in October 1996, the first African nation to report declining trends in HIV infection. Further decline in prevalence has since been noted. The Medical Research Council (UK) and the Uganda Virus Research Institute have demonstrated declining HIV incidence rates in the general population in the Kyamulibwa in Masaka Districts. Repeat knowledge, attitudes, behaviour and practice studies have shown positive changes in the priority prevention indicators. The data suggest that a comprehensive national response supported by strong political commitment may be responsible for the observed decline. Other countries in sub-Saharan Africa can achieve similar results by these means. Since success is possible, anything less is unacceptable. PMID:11799443

  5. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far. PMID:26365737

  6. Nanotechnology as a New Therapeutic Approach to Prevent the HIV-Infection of Treg Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo-Ruiz, Didiana; De La Mata, Francisco Javier; Gómez, Rafael; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Muñoz-Fernández, Mª Ángeles

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 has proved to infect regulatory T cells (Treg) modifying their phenotype and impairing their suppressive capacity. As Treg cells are a crucial component in the preservation of the immune homeostasis, we researched that the antiviral capacity of carboxilan dendrimers prevents the HIV-1 infection of Treg and their effects. The phenotype and suppressive capacity of Treg treated or non-treated with carbosilane dendrimers were studied by flow cytometry. Treated and non-treated Treg from healthy donors were infected with HIV-1NL4.3. The infection of Treg cells by HIV-1, and protective effect of two dendrimers were determined by measuring antigen p24gag in the supernatant of the culture and intracellular. Results The Treg cells were treated with cationic and anionic carbosilane dendrimers. The results showed that both dendrimers did not modify the phenotype and functionality of Treg cells compared with non- treated Treg cells. Anionic dendrimers showed high biocompatibility with normal activity of the Treg cells and in antiviral assays. These dendrimers were highly active against HIV-1 preventing the infection of Treg, and were able to protect the Treg from the Foxp3 downregulation induced by the HIV-1 infection. Conclusions This is the first work showing that the in vitro use of anionic dendrimers prevent the HIV-1 replication and the infection of expanded Treg cells in culture, which raises the possibility to use Treg cells therapeutically in HIV-1-infected subjects. PMID:26785250

  7. Pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as HIV-1 antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cynthia; Maddukuri, Anil; Kehn, Kylene; Baylor, Shanese Y; Deng, Longwen; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2003-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect quiescent cells; however, viral production is restricted to actively proliferating cells. Recent evidence has indicated that HIV-1 viral proteins, Vpr and Tat, perturb the cell cycle to optimize HIV-1 replication. Vpr arrests the cell cycle at G2 by inactivating the cyclin B/cdk1 complex. Tat regulates the cell cycle by altering factors involved in proliferation and differentiation (i.e. the cdk inhibitor p21/waf1) and associating with cyclin/cdk complexes (i.e. cyclin E/cdk2, cyclin H/cdk7, and cyclin T/cdk9). These studies indicate the importance of host cellular factors, such as cyclin/cdk complexes, in regulating HIV-1 replication and therefore represent novel targets for antiviral therapeutics. Recently, the efficacy of pharmalogical cdk inhibitors (PCIs) in abrogating viral replication has been under development. To date there are 25-30 PCIs that have been synthesized against known cdks, several of which have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 and other AIDS-associated viruses in vitro and in vivo. Targeting these critical cyclin/cdk complexes needed for viral propagation may solve the problems inherent in current HAART therapy, including the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. Thus, PCIs have the potential to become novel therapeutic antiviral drugs that can inhibit HIV-1 transcription and opens the possibility of new avenues of treatment. PMID:15043199

  8. The structural biology of HIV-1: mechanistic and therapeutic insights

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Cherepanov, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional molecular structures can provide detailed information on biological mechanisms and, in cases where molecular function impacts on human health, significantly aid in the development of therapeutic interventions. Over the past 23 years, key components of the lentivirus HIV-1, including its envelope glycoproteins and capsid, and the replication enzymes reverse transcriptase, integrase and protease, have accordingly been scrutinized to near atomic scale resolution. Structural analyses of the interactions between viral and host cell components have moreover yielded key insights into the mechanisms of virus entry, chromosomal integration, transcription and egress from cells. Here, we review recent advances in HIV-1 structural biology, focusing on the impact these results have had on our understanding of virus replication and the development of new therapeutics. PMID:22421880

  9. Immune Activation and HIV Persistence: Considerations for Novel Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hatano, Hiroyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review One of the potential barriers to current HIV cure strategies is the persistence of elevated levels of immune activation despite otherwise effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). The purpose of this review is to examine the relationship between immune activation and HIV persistence, and to review novel therapeutic interventions that are currently being pursued to target immune activation in treated HIV disease. Recent findings Multiple groups have consistently observed that elevated levels of inflammation, immune activation, and immune dysfunction persist in ART-treated individuals, despite successful suppression of plasma viremia. Increased immune activation may lead to viral persistence through multiple mechanisms. Several novel interventions aimed at decreasing persistent immune activation are being pursued and include studies aimed at decreasing low-level viral replication, approaches aimed at decreasing microbial translocation, interventions to treat co-infections, and therapies that directly target immune activation. Summary There appears to be a clear and consistent relationship between immune activation and viral persistence in treated HIV disease. Whether this relationship is causal or mediated through other mechanisms is still unknown. Small-scale, pathogenesis-oriented interventional studies are necessary to further evaluate this relationship and the effect of potential interventions. PMID:23454864

  10. Potential use of pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as anti-HIV therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Pumfery, Anne; de la Fuente, Cynthia; Berro, Reem; Nekhai, Sergei; Kashanchi, Fatah; Chao, Sheng-Hao

    2006-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are key regulators of the cell cycle and RNA polymerase II transcription. Several pharmacological CDK inhibitors (PCIs) are currently in clinical trials as potential cancer therapeutics since CDK hyperactivation is detected in the majority of neoplasias. Within the last few years, the anti-viral effects of PCIs have also been observed against various viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus, and murine leukemia virus. Through the inhibition of CDK2 and 9, the cellular co-factors for HIV-1 Tat transactivation, HIV-1 replication is blocked by two specific PCIs, CYC202 and flavopiridol, respectively. In this article, we will review the inhibitory mechanisms of flavopiridol and CYC202 and discuss their possible usage in AIDS treatment. PMID:16787240

  11. Virus Maturation as a Novel HIV-1 Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Catherine S.; Salzwedel, Karl; Freed, Eric O.

    2009-01-01

    Development of novel therapeutic targets against HIV-1 is a high research priority due to the serious clinical consequences associated with acquisition of resistance to current antiretroviral drugs. The HIV-1 structural protein Gag represents a potential novel therapeutic target as it plays a central role in virus particle production, yet is not targeted by any of the currently approved antiretroviral drugs. The Gag polyprotein precursor multimerizes to form immature particles that bud from the infected cell. Concomitant with virus release, the Gag precursor undergoes proteolytic processing by the viral protease to generate the mature Gag proteins, which include capsid (CA). Once liberated from the Gag polyprotein precursor, CA molecules interact to reassemble into a condensed conical core, which organizes the viral RNA genome and several viral proteins to facilitate virus replication in the next round of infection. Correct Gag proteolytic processing and core assembly are therefore essential for virus infectivity. In this review, we discuss novel strategies to inhibit maturation by targeting proteolytic cleavage sites in Gag or CA-CA interactions required for core formation. The identification and development of lead maturation inhibitors are highlighted. PMID:19534569

  12. HIV Testing Among Teens Attending Therapeutic Schools: Having a Personal Source of Information About HIV/AIDS Matters!

    PubMed

    Swenson, Rebecca R; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K

    2015-06-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13-19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two US cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  13. HIV testing among teens attending therapeutic schools: Having a personal source of information about HIV/AIDS matters!

    PubMed Central

    Swenson, Rebecca R.; Houck, Christopher; Sarfati, David; Emerson, Erin; Donenberg, Geri; Brown, Larry K.

    2015-01-01

    Being informed and using positive coping strategies are associated with engaging in health-promoting behaviors. We assessed whether the type of information source about HIV (personal or impersonal) and coping strategies (optimism, avoidance, or emotion-focused) are associated with HIV testing among adolescents attending therapeutic schools. Participants were 417 adolescents, ages 13 to 19, who attended one of 20 therapeutic day schools for emotionally/behaviorally disordered youth in two U.S. cities (Providence, RI and Chicago, IL) and completed a baseline assessment for an HIV prevention study. Among adolescents in the study, 29% reported having been tested for HIV. Adolescents were more likely to have been tested if they were older, female, Hispanic, identified as non-heterosexual, came from lower SES households, and had recently had unprotected sex. Additionally, youth who endorsed greater use of optimistic thinking and emotion-focused coping, and who reported having been informed about HIV by more personal sources, were also more likely to have been tested for HIV. In a multivariate analysis, having had recent unprotected sex and having more personal sources of information about HIV/AIDS were independently associated with HIV testing. Study findings suggest that, controlling for sociodemographic background, sexual risk behavior, and coping strategy, HIV testing among adolescents with emotional and behavioral problems may be increased when adolescents learn about HIV/AIDS from personal sources such as their healthcare providers, family, and friends. PMID:25656380

  14. HIV-1 gp120 as a therapeutic target: Navigating a moving labyrinth

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Priyamvada; Lusvarghi, Sabrina; Bewley, Carole A.; Kwong, Peter D.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The HIV-1 gp120 envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates attachment of virus to human target cells that display requisite receptors, CD4 and co-receptor, generally CCR5. Despite high affinity interactions with host receptors and proof-of-principle by the drug maraviroc that interference with CCR5 provides therapeutic benefit, no licensed drug currently targets gp120. Areas covered An overview of the role of gp120 in HIV-1 entry and of sites of potential gp120 vulnerability to therapeutic inhibition is presented. Viral defenses that protect these sites and turn gp120 into a moving labyrinth are discussed together with strategies for circumventing these defenses to allow therapeutic targeting of gp120 sites of vulnerability. Expert opinion The gp120 envelope glycoprotein interacts with host proteins through multiple interfaces and has conserved structural features at these interaction sites. In spite of this, targeting gp120 for therapeutic purposes is challenging. Env mechanisms evolved to evade the humoral immune response also shield it from potential therapeutics. Nevertheless, substantial progress has been made in understanding HIV-1 gp120 structure and its interactions with host receptors, and in developing therapeutic leads that potently neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains. Synergies between advances in understanding, needs for therapeutics against novel viral targets, and characteristics of breadth and potency for a number of gp120-targetting lead molecules bodes well for gp120 as a HIV-1 therapeutic target. PMID:25724219

  15. Leveraging Cancer Therapeutics for the HIV Cure Agenda: Current Status and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Polizzotto, Mark N; Chen, Grace; Tressler, Randall L; Godfrey, Catherine

    2015-09-01

    Despite effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) and undetectable HIV RNA in the plasma, latent replication-competent HIV persists indefinitely in long-lived cells. Cessation of ART results in rebound of HIV from these persistent reservoirs. While this was thought to be an insurmountable obstacle to viral eradication, recent cases suggest otherwise. To date one patient has been "cured" of HIV and several others have been able to interrupt ART without viral rebound for prolonged periods. These events have sparked renewed interest in developing strategies that will allow eradication of HIV in infected individuals. We review the current knowledge of HIV latency and the viral reservoir, describe the potential utility of emerging cancer therapeutics in HIV cure research with an emphasis on pathways implicated in reservoir persistence, and outline opportunities and challenges in the context of the current clinical trial and regulatory environment. PMID:26224205

  16. High-Throughput Humanized Mouse Models for Evaluation of HIV-1 Therapeutics and Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tynisha; Seay, Kieran; Zheng, Jian Hua; Zhang, Cong; Ochsenbauer, Christina; Kappes, John C; Goldstein, Harris

    2016-01-01

    Mice cannot be used as a model to evaluate HIV-1 therapeutics because they do not become infected by HIV-1 due to structural differences between several human and mouse proteins required for HIV-1 replication. This has limited their use for in vivo assessment of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics and the mechanism by which cofactors, such as illicit drug use accelerate HIV-1 replication and disease course in substance abusers. Here, we describe the development and application of two in vivo humanized mouse models that are highly sensitive and useful models for the in vivo evaluation of candidate anti-HIV therapeutics. The first model, hu-spl-PBMC-NSG mice, uses NOD-SCID IL2rγ(-/-) (NSG) mice intrasplenically injected with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) which develop productive splenic HIV-1 infection after intrasplenic inoculation with a replication-competent HIV-1 expressing Renilla reniformis luciferase (HIV-LucR) and enables investigators to use bioluminescence to visualize and quantitate the temporal effects of therapeutics on HIV-1 infection. The second model, hCD4/R5/cT1 mice, consists of transgenic mice carrying human CD4, CCR5 and cyclin T1 genes, which enables murine CD4-expressing cells to support HIV-1 entry, Tat-mediated LTR transcription and consequently develop productive infection. The hCD4/R5/cT1 mice develop disseminated infection of tissues including the spleen, small intestine, lymph nodes and lungs after intravenous injection with HIV-1-LucR. Because these mice can be infected with HIV-LucR expressing transmitted/founder and clade A/E and C Envs, these mouse models can also be used to evaluate the in vivo efficacy of broadly neutralizing antibodies and antibodies induced by candidate HIV-1 vaccines. Furthermore, because hCD4/R5/cT1 mice can be infected by vaginal inoculation with replication-competent HIV-1 expressing NanoLuc (HIV-nLucR)-, this mouse model can be used to evaluate the mechanisms by which substance abuse and other factors

  17. Possible Mechanisms Underlying the Therapeutic Effects of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chervyakov, Alexander V.; Chernyavsky, Andrey Yu.; Sinitsyn, Dmitry O.; Piradov, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is an effective method used to diagnose and treat many neurological disorders. Although repetitive TMS (rTMS) has been used to treat a variety of serious pathological conditions including stroke, depression, Parkinson’s disease, epilepsy, pain, and migraines, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the effects of long-term TMS remain unclear. In the present review, the effects of rTMS on neurotransmitters and synaptic plasticity are described, including the classic interpretations of TMS effects on synaptic plasticity via long-term potentiation and long-term depression. We also discuss the effects of rTMS on the genetic apparatus of neurons, glial cells, and the prevention of neuronal death. The neurotrophic effects of rTMS on dendritic growth and sprouting and neurotrophic factors are described, including change in brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentration under the influence of rTMS. Also, non-classical effects of TMS related to biophysical effects of magnetic fields are described, including the quantum effects, the magnetic spin effects, genetic magnetoreception, the macromolecular effects of TMS, and the electromagnetic theory of consciousness. Finally, we discuss possible interpretations of TMS effects according to dynamical systems theory. Evidence suggests that a rTMS-induced magnetic field should be considered a separate physical factor that can be impactful at the subatomic level and that rTMS is capable of significantly altering the reactivity of molecules (radicals). It is thought that these factors underlie the therapeutic benefits of therapy with TMS. Future research on these mechanisms will be instrumental to the development of more powerful and reliable TMS treatment protocols. PMID:26136672

  18. Therapeutic Immunization In HIV Infected Ugandans Receiving Stable Antiretroviral Treatment: A Phase I Safety Study4

    PubMed Central

    Kityo, Cissy; Bousheri, Stephanie; Akao, Juliette; Ssali, Francis; Byaruhanga, Rose; Ssewanyana, Isaac; Muloma, Prossy; Myalo, Sula; Magala, Rose; Lu, Yichen; Mugyenyi, Peter; Cao, Huyen

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic immunizations in HIV infection may boost immunity during antiretroviral treatment. We report on the first therapeutic vaccine trial in Uganda, Africa. This open label Phase I trial was designed to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine candidate. Thirty HIV positive volunteers receiving a stable regimen of antiretroviral therapy with CD4 counts > 400 were recruited for the safety evaluation of LFn-p24C, a detoxified anthrax-derived polypeptide fused to the subtype C HIV gag protein p24. The vaccine was well tolerated and HIV RNA levels remained undetectable following three immunizations. CD4 counts in vaccine recipients were significantly higher compared to the control individuals after 12 months. HIV-specific responses were associated with higher gain in CD4 counts following LFn-p24C immunizations. Volunteers were subsequently asked to undergo a 30-day period of observed treatment interruption. 8/24 (30%) individuals showed no evidence of viral rebound during treatment interruption. All demonstrated prompt suppression of viral load following resumption of ART. Our data demonstrates the safety of LFn-p24C and suggests that adjunct therapeutic immunization may benefit select individuals in further boosting an immune response. PMID:21211581

  19. Evaluating the potential of IL-27 as a novel therapeutic agent in HIV-1 infection

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Sanjay; Dai, Lue; Lane, H. Clifford; Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin 27 (IL-27) is an immunomodulatory cytokine with important roles in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In the last five years, the addition of exogenous IL-27 to primary cell cultures has been demonstrated to decrease HIV-1 replication in a number of cell types including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), CD4+ T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. These in-vitro findings suggest that IL-27 may have therapeutic value in the setting of HIV-1 infection. In this review, we describe the current knowledge of the biology of IL-27, its effects primarily on HIV-1 replication but also in other viral infections and explore its potential role as a therapeutic cytokine for the treatment of patients with HIV-1 infection. PMID:23962745

  20. Advancements in nano-enabled therapeutics for neuroHIV management.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    This viewpoint is a global call to promote fundamental and applied research aiming toward designing smart nanocarriers of desired properties, novel noninvasive strategies to open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), delivery/release of single/multiple therapeutic agents across the BBB to eradicate neurohuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV), strategies for on-demand site-specific release of antiretroviral therapy, developing novel nanoformulations capable to recognize and eradicate latently infected HIV reservoirs, and developing novel smart analytical diagnostic tools to detect and monitor HIV infection. Thus, investigation of novel nanoformulations, methodologies for site-specific delivery/release, analytical methods, and diagnostic tools would be of high significance to eradicate and monitor neuroacquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Overall, these developments will certainly help to develop personalized nanomedicines to cure HIV and to develop smart HIV-monitoring analytical systems for disease management. PMID:27621624

  1. Soluble mediators of inflammation in HIV and their implications for therapeutics and vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Keating, Sheila M.; Jacobs, Evan S.; Norris, Philip J.

    2012-01-01

    From early in the HIV epidemic it was appreciated that many inflammatory markers such as neopterin and TNF-α were elevated in patients with AIDS. With the advent of modern technology able to measure a broad array of cytokines, we now know that from the earliest points of infection HIV induces a cytokine storm. This review will focus on how cytokines are disturbed in HIV infection and will explore potential therapeutic uses of cytokines. These factors can be used directly as therapy during HIV infection, either to suppress viral replication or prevent deleterious immune effects of infection, such as CD4+ T cell depletion. Cytokines also show great promise as adjuvants in the development of HIV vaccines, which would be critical for the eventual control of the epidemic. PMID:22743035

  2. Advancements in nano-enabled therapeutics for neuroHIV management

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Nair, Madhavan

    2016-01-01

    This viewpoint is a global call to promote fundamental and applied research aiming toward designing smart nanocarriers of desired properties, novel noninvasive strategies to open the blood–brain barrier (BBB), delivery/release of single/multiple therapeutic agents across the BBB to eradicate neurohuman immunodeficiency virus (HIV), strategies for on-demand site-specific release of antiretroviral therapy, developing novel nanoformulations capable to recognize and eradicate latently infected HIV reservoirs, and developing novel smart analytical diagnostic tools to detect and monitor HIV infection. Thus, investigation of novel nanoformulations, methodologies for site-specific delivery/release, analytical methods, and diagnostic tools would be of high significance to eradicate and monitor neuroacquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Overall, these developments will certainly help to develop personalized nanomedicines to cure HIV and to develop smart HIV-monitoring analytical systems for disease management. PMID:27621624

  3. Conjugation of a nonspecific antiviral sapogenin with a specific HIV fusion inhibitor: a promising strategy for discovering new antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Lu, Lu; Na, Heya; Li, Xiangpeng; Wang, Qian; Jiang, Xifeng; Xu, Xiaoyu; Yu, Fei; Zhang, Tianhong; Li, Jinglai; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zheng, Baohua; Liang, Guodong; Cai, Lifeng; Jiang, Shibo; Liu, Keliang

    2014-09-11

    Triterpene saponins are a major group of active components in natural products with nonspecific antiviral activities, while T20 peptide (enfuvirtide), which contains a helix zone-binding domain (HBD), is a gp41-specific HIV-1 fusion inhibitor. In this paper, we report the design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship (SAR) of a group of hybrid molecules in which bioactive triterpene sapogenins were covalently attached to the HBD-containing peptides via click chemistry. We found that either the triterpenes or peptide part alone showed weak activity against HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion, while the hybrids generated a strong cooperative effect. Among them, P26-BApc exhibited anti-HIV-1 activity against both T20-sensitive and -resistant HIV-1 strains and improved pharmacokinetic properties. These results suggest that this scaffold design is a promising strategy for developing new HIV-1 fusion inhibitors and possibly novel antiviral therapeutics against other viruses with class I fusion proteins. PMID:25156906

  4. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  5. Decelerating gastric emptying: therapeutic possibilities in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Phillips, W T; Schwartz, J G

    1996-09-01

    There is clear evidence of a positive correlation between carbohydrate absorption, plasma concentration of glucose, and the rate of gastric emptying. This suggests that clinical manipulation of gastric emptying rates may have therapeutic potential in glycaemic control. Cholecystokinin (CCK-8) has been shown to delay gastric emptying in individuals with Type 2 diabetes, but its potential as a therapy is limited by the need to administer it intravenously. The preferred routes of administration would be intramuscular injections, an intranasal spray or the use of orally ingested CCK analogues. Alternatively, the oral administration of an agent that enhances endogenous release of CCK could represent an important approach to the treatment of Type 2 diabetes. Agents such as POT II may have a therapeutic indication in patients with recently diagnosed Type 2 diabetes. PMID:8894471

  6. Identification of Vimentin as a Potential Therapeutic Target against HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ortega, Celia; Ramírez, Anna; Casillas, Dionne; Paneque, Taimi; Ubieta, Raimundo; Dubed, Marta; Navea, Leonor; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Duarte, Carlos; Falcon, Viviana; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda; Silva, Eladio; Noa, Enrique; Ramos, Yassel; Besada, Vladimir; Betancourt, Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    A combination of antiviral drugs known as antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown effectiveness against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ART has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected patients, having even reduced HIV transmission. However, an important current disadvantage, resistance development, remains to be solved. Hope is focused on developing drugs against cellular targets. This strategy is expected to prevent the emergence of viral resistance. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach in MT4 cells treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract, we identified vimentin, a molecule forming intermediate filaments in the cell, as a possible target against HIV infection. We demonstrated a strong reduction of an HIV-1 based lentivirus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in vimentin knockdown cells, and a noteworthy decrease of HIV-1 capsid protein antigen (CAp24) in those cells using a multiround infectivity assay. Electron micrographs showed changes in the structure of intermediate filaments when MT4 cells were treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract. Changes in the structure of intermediate filaments were also observed in vimentin knockdown MT4 cells. A synthetic peptide derived from a cytoskeleton protein showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 infection, and low cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that vimentin can be a suitable target to inhibit HIV-1. PMID:27314381

  7. Identification of Vimentin as a Potential Therapeutic Target against HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ortega, Celia; Ramírez, Anna; Casillas, Dionne; Paneque, Taimi; Ubieta, Raimundo; Dubed, Marta; Navea, Leonor; Castellanos-Serra, Lila; Duarte, Carlos; Falcon, Viviana; Reyes, Osvaldo; Garay, Hilda; Silva, Eladio; Noa, Enrique; Ramos, Yassel; Besada, Vladimir; Betancourt, Lázaro

    2016-01-01

    A combination of antiviral drugs known as antiretroviral therapy (ART) has shown effectiveness against the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). ART has markedly decreased mortality and morbidity among HIV-infected patients, having even reduced HIV transmission. However, an important current disadvantage, resistance development, remains to be solved. Hope is focused on developing drugs against cellular targets. This strategy is expected to prevent the emergence of viral resistance. In this study, using a comparative proteomic approach in MT4 cells treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract, we identified vimentin, a molecule forming intermediate filaments in the cell, as a possible target against HIV infection. We demonstrated a strong reduction of an HIV-1 based lentivirus expressing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in vimentin knockdown cells, and a noteworthy decrease of HIV-1 capsid protein antigen (CAp24) in those cells using a multiround infectivity assay. Electron micrographs showed changes in the structure of intermediate filaments when MT4 cells were treated with an anti-HIV leukocyte extract. Changes in the structure of intermediate filaments were also observed in vimentin knockdown MT4 cells. A synthetic peptide derived from a cytoskeleton protein showed potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 infection, and low cytotoxicity. Our data suggest that vimentin can be a suitable target to inhibit HIV-1. PMID:27314381

  8. HIV capsid is a tractable target for small molecule therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Blair, Wade S; Pickford, Chris; Irving, Stephen L; Brown, David G; Anderson, Marie; Bazin, Richard; Cao, Joan; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Isaacson, Jason; Jackson, Lynn; Hunt, Rachael; Kjerrstrom, Anne; Nieman, James A; Patick, Amy K; Perros, Manos; Scott, Andrew D; Whitby, Kevin; Wu, Hua; Butler, Scott L

    2010-01-01

    Despite a high current standard of care in antiretroviral therapy for HIV, multidrug-resistant strains continue to emerge, underscoring the need for additional novel mechanism inhibitors that will offer expanded therapeutic options in the clinic. We report a new class of small molecule antiretroviral compounds that directly target HIV-1 capsid (CA) via a novel mechanism of action. The compounds exhibit potent antiviral activity against HIV-1 laboratory strains, clinical isolates, and HIV-2, and inhibit both early and late events in the viral replication cycle. We present mechanistic studies indicating that these early and late activities result from the compound affecting viral uncoating and assembly, respectively. We show that amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal domain of HIV-1 CA are sufficient to confer resistance to this class of compounds, identifying CA as the target in infected cells. A high-resolution co-crystal structure of the compound bound to HIV-1 CA reveals a novel binding pocket in the N-terminal domain of the protein. Our data demonstrate that broad-spectrum antiviral activity can be achieved by targeting this new binding site and reveal HIV CA as a tractable drug target for HIV therapy. PMID:21170360

  9. [GnRH analogs in gynecology. Possibilities for therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Niesert, S

    1990-09-10

    Gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists are synthetic peptide analogues of the natural gonadotropin releasing hormone with a stronger and more prolonged effect than the natural GnRH. Repeated administration of GnRH agonists induces pituitary desensitization followed by a decrease in gonadotropin secretion and estradiol synthesis. Thus reversible hypogonadotropic hypogonadism is produced. Consequently, estrogen-dependent diseases can be treated successfully with GnRH analogues. The therapeutic results obtained in patients with endometriosis, leiomyoma, pubertas praecox, and metastatic breast cancer are discussed. Furthermore the contraceptive properties of GnRH analogues, and combination treatment with HMG to induce ovulation is reviewed. PMID:2262188

  10. Evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic HIV vaccines through analytical treatment interruptions

    PubMed Central

    Graziani, Gina M; Angel, Jonathan B

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The development of an effective therapeutic HIV vaccine that induces immunologic control of viral replication, thereby eliminating or reducing the need for antiretroviral therapy (ART), would be of great value. Besides the obvious challenges of developing a therapeutic vaccine that would generate effective, sustained anti-HIV immunity in infected individuals is the issue of how to best assess the efficacy of vaccine candidates. Discussion This review discusses the various outcome measures assessed in therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials involving individuals receiving suppressive ART, with a particular focus on the role of analytical treatment interruption (ATI) as a way to assess the virologic control induced by an immunotherapy. This strategy is critical given that there are otherwise no readily available measures to determine the ability of a vaccine-induced immune response to effectively control HIV replication. The various outcome measures that have been used to assess vaccine efficacy in published therapeutic HIV vaccine clinical trials will also be discussed. Outcome measures have included the kinetics of viral rebound, the new viral set point and changes in the size of the viral reservoir. Clinically relevant outcomes such as the CD4 decline, the time to resume therapy or the time to meet the criterion to resume therapy, the proportion of participants who resume therapy and/or the development of clinical symptoms such as acute retroviral syndrome are also measures of vaccine efficacy. Conclusions Given the lack of consistency between therapeutic HIV vaccine trials in how efficacy is assessed, comparing vaccines has been difficult. It would, therefore, be beneficial to determine the most clinically relevant measure for use in future studies. Other recommendations for future clinical trials also include studying compartments in addition to blood and replacing ATIs with single-copy assays in situations in which the use of an ATI is not ideal

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae. PMID:14693483

  12. [Novel possibilities of development and therapeutical application of liposomes].

    PubMed

    Bozó, Tamás; Pál, Szilárd; Dévay, Attila

    2008-01-01

    Properties and possibilities of application of liposomal drug delivery systems are summarized in this review. Technological and biopharmeceutical criteria that have to be taken into consideration in the course of development of biocompatible liposomes are discussed. The manner and possibilities of active and passive targeting are shown according to the literary data and special liposome-based drug delivery systems responsible for pathologic or arteficial stimuli are introduced. PMID:18986087

  13. Understanding HIV-1 protease autoprocessing for novel therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liangqun; Chen, Chaoping

    2013-01-01

    In the infected cell, HIV-1 protease (PR) is initially synthesized as part of the GagPol polyprotein. PR autoprocessing is a virus-specific process by which the PR domain embedded in the precursor catalyzes proteolytic reactions responsible for liberation of free mature PRs, which then recognize and cleave at least ten different peptide sequences in the Gag and GagPol polyproteins. Despite extensive structure and function studies of the mature PRs as well as the successful development of ten US FDA-approved catalytic-site inhibitors, the precursor autoprocessing mechanism remains an intriguing yet-to-be-solved puzzle. This article discusses current understanding of the autoprocessing mechanism, in an effort to prompt the development of novel anti-HIV drugs that selectively target precursor autoprocessing. PMID:23859204

  14. Engaging therapeutic citizenship and clientship: Untangling the reasons for therapeutic pacifism among people living with HIV in urban Zambia.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Amy S

    2016-10-01

    This article explores the reasons for therapeutic pacifism among people living with HIV (PLHIVs) in urban Zambia. It contributes to a growing ethnography on global health, biosociality, and patient-provider dynamics. Therapeutic citizenship is a biopolitical citizenship that includes claims and ethical projects that emerge from techniques to control and manage bodies. In some contexts, therapeutic citizenship has included activism and claims-making against local, national, and international power brokers. This article investigates therapeutic citizenship in the specific context of impoverished urban Zambian compounds, sites of food insecurity, unemployment, and political exclusion, as well as targets for donor, NGO, and faith-based organisation projects and PLHIV support group proliferation. The article utilises data from participant observations at two Lusaka AIDS clinics, interviews, and focused discussions with support groups of PLHIVs. It argues that PLHIVs continuously negotiate subjectivities related to kinship, clientship, religious belief, and political citizenship in processes that complicate therapeutic citizenship. Rather than fostering participation in PLHIV support groups or challenging 'politics as usual' through activist claims-making to institutions of biopower, these processes lead to therapeutic pacifism. PMID:26256509

  15. HBV and HIV co-infection: Impact on liver pathobiology and therapeutic approaches

    PubMed Central

    Parvez, Mohammad Khalid

    2015-01-01

    The consequences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection on progression of severe liver diseases is a serious public health issue, worldwide. In the co-infection cases, about 90% of HIV-infected population is seropositive for HBV where approximately 5%-40% individuals are chronically infected. In HIV co-infected individuals, liver-related mortality is estimated over 17 times higher than those with HBV mono-infection. The spectrum of HIV-induced liver diseases includes hepatitis, steatohepatitis, endothelialitis, necrosis, granulomatosis, cirrhosis and carcinoma. Moreover, HIV co-infection significantly alters the natural history of hepatitis B, and therefore complicates the disease management. Though several studies have demonstrated impact of HIV proteins on hepatocyte biology, only a few data is available on interactions between HBV and HIV proteins. Thus, the clinical spectrum as well as the complexity of the co-infection offers challenging fronts to study the underlying molecular mechanisms, and to design effective therapeutic strategies. PMID:25625003

  16. Targeting nicotine addiction: the possibility of a therapeutic vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Escobar-Chávez, José Juan; Domínguez-Delgado, Clara Luisa; Rodríguez-Cruz, Isabel Marlen

    2011-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive disorders, and delayed wound healing all over the world. The goals of smoking cessation are both to reduce health risks and to improve quality of life. The development of novel and more effective medications for smoking cessation is crucial in the treatment of nicotine dependence. Currently, first-line smoking cessation therapies include nicotine replacement products and bupropion. The partial nicotinic receptor agonist, varenicline, has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for smoking cessation. Clonidine and nortriptyline have demonstrated some efficacy, but side effects may limit their use to second-line treatment products. Other therapeutic drugs that are under development include rimonabant, mecamylamine, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and dopamine D3 receptor antagonists. Nicotine vaccines are among newer products seeking approval from the FDA. Antidrug vaccines are irreversible, provide protection over years and need booster injections far beyond the critical phase of acute withdrawal symptoms. Interacting with the drug in the blood rather than with a receptor in the brain, the vaccines are free of side effects due to central interaction. For drugs like nicotine, which interacts with different types of receptors in many organs, this is a further advantage. Three anti-nicotine vaccines are today in an advanced stage of clinical evaluation. Results show that the efficiency of the vaccines is directly related to the antibody levels, a fact which will help to optimize the vaccine effect. The vaccines are expected to appear on the market between 2011 and 2012. PMID:21607018

  17. Possible pubertal effect on therapeutic gains in an autistic girl.

    PubMed

    Ayres, A J; Mailloux, Z K

    1983-08-01

    A deaf, partially sighted, severely retarded autistic girl, 11 years, 6 months of age, received approximately 2 years of occupational therapy, where sensory integration procedures were employed to reduce self-stimulation. Videotaped time samples of the amount of stereotypies showed a consistent reduction from the time of starting therapy to an interruption for vacation and surgery for scoliosis 46 weeks later. On returning to therapy after a 9-week break, self-stimulation had greatly increased and did not return to the presurgery level during an additional 55 weeks of therapy, 30 of which followed the removal of a cast. Menarche occurred 1 week after removing the cast. Increased self-stimulation is linked to reduced inclination toward environmental interaction as well as to an interruption of intervention and possible pubertal effect. Brief reports on four other autistic adolescents who received similar therapy are consistent with the conjecture of frequent pubertal regression. PMID:6624850

  18. Past experiences, current realities and future possibilities for HIV nursing education and care in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Mill, Judy; Caine, Vera; Arneson, Cheryl; Maina, Geoffrey; De Padua, Anthony; Dykeman, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Nurses may have inadequate basic education and opportunities for continuing education in relation to HIV care. As well nurses may perpetuate and impose stigma. We developed, implemented and evaluated an educational intervention to reduce stigma and discrimination among nurses providing HIV care. The intervention used a mentorship model that brought experienced nurses in HIV care and people living with HIV together with nurses who wanted to learn more about HIV nursing care. We examined our findings in relation to past experiences, current realities and future possibilities for HIV nursing education and care in Canada. Our findings demonstrated that many nurses were interested in improving their HIV care, yet few opportunities existed for them to do so. We found that HIV nursing education and expertise were significantly different among participants and across clinical sites. This difference was visible in basic education, services offered for HIV and AIDS care, the collaborative and inter-professional nature of care, and opportunities for continuing education. Mentorship education is an effective strategy to not only address a critical void in knowledge, but also to promote a fundamental shift in attitudes. With the recent call by the World Health Organization to place nurses in key positions to provide HIV care, treatment and prevention, it is imperative to prepare nurses at both the undergraduate and graduate level, as well as those in practice, to fulfill this call. PMID:27152130

  19. HIV-infected People in Sudan Moving Toward Chronic Poverty: Possible Interventions.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Salwa Muddthir; Eisa, Ammar Abobakre; Ibrahim, Faisal

    2016-01-01

    We sought to identify the socioeconomic impact on people living with HIV (PLWH) in Sudan. Focus group discussions were used to collect data and identify the most outstanding domains of HIV impact on PLWH and the survival mechanisms that may be common to a group of diverse HIV-infected persons (n = 30). The findings indicated that the most striking financial and social impacts were due to stigma associated with HIV in the conservative Sudanese society, which led to loss of work with all its consequences (e.g., children's education and health care expenses were affected). The socioeconomic impacts of HIV on infected populations are discussed, and suggestions for possible interventions to mitigate harmful impacts and stigma within the society, the workplace, and health care settings are highlighted. We concluded that HIV has intensified the existing problems of infected people, contributing to their vulnerability to poverty. PMID:26190419

  20. [Digestive complications of radiotherapy of gynecologic cancers: therapeutic possibilities].

    PubMed

    Caligaris, P; Ducassou, M J; Maurin, B; Bricot, R

    1983-01-01

    It appears that there are a certain number of complications in the digestive tract that still occur in spite of improvements in techniques of irradiation therapy. They may only appear a few months or even a few years after the treatment, and sometimes they only appear when the initial growth is considered to have been cured. The clinical picture is dominated by the appearance of fistulae, of adhesions and of stenoses which give rise to sub-acute or sometimes acute obstructions. From the anatomical point of view all elements of the digestive tube are affected with a predominance of the fibro-hyaline elements of the muscles and the arteries. The possibilities for surgical treatment are limited. Excision with anastomosis would seem to be more risky than diversion. We have had to operate on ten of our eleven patients, of whom six died and only one of these directly because of recurrence of the initial growth. Only prevention can lessen the mortality of these severe complications. PMID:6853979

  1. Retroviral restriction factors TRIM5α: therapeutic strategy to inhibit HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Ge, Weiying; Zhan, Peng; De Clercq, Erik; Liu, Xinyong

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite motif protein 5-alpha (TRIM5α) is a cytoplasmic protein that efficiently recognizes the incoming capsid (CA) protein of retroviruses and potently inhibits virus infection in a species-specific manner. Through directly recognizing and interacting with HIV CA, TRIM5α is capable of disrupting the ordered process of viral uncoating, eventually interfering with HIV-1 reverse transcription and virus replication. TRIM5α protein contains four domains: RING domain, B-box 2 domain, coiled-coil domain, and B30.2 domain (SPRY) domain. All of the domains are necessary for efficient retrovirus restriction and the B30.2 domain has been shown to be the determinant of the specificity of restriction. Species-specific innate resistance against viral infections offers novel avenues for antiviral therapeutics. Various mutants of TRIM5α have been described which differently affect the HIV-1 reverse transcription process. This makes the establishment of new and improved models for HIV replication and AIDS pathogenesis by monitoring endogenous TRIM5α an attractive approach. TRIM5α-mediated restriction is modulated by the host protein Cyclophilin A (Cyp A) which could effectively interact with the CA of HIV-1. Here we will review the structure and roles of TRIM5α protein, the interaction between Cyp A and TRIM5α, as well as gene therapy strategies associated with TRIM5α to inhibit HIV-1 infection. PMID:21568899

  2. Exploring the Potential of Monoclonal Antibody Therapeutics for HIV-1 Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Euler, Zelda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The HIV field has seen an increased interest in novel cure strategies. In particular, new latency reversal agents are in development to reverse latency to flush the virus out of its hiding place. Combining these efforts with immunotherapeutic approaches may not only drive the virus out of latency, but allow for the rapid elimination of these infected cells in a “shock and kill” approach. Beyond cell-based approaches, growing interest lies in the potential use of functionally enhanced “killer” monoclonal therapeutics to purge the reservoir. Here we discuss prospects for a monoclonal therapeutic-based “shock and kill” strategy that may lead to the permanent elimination of replication-competent virus, making a functional cure a reality for all patients afflicted with HIV worldwide. PMID:25385703

  3. HIV-1 Latency: An Update of Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Battistini, Angela; Sgarbanti, Marco

    2014-01-01

    The major obstacle towards HIV-1 eradication is the life-long persistence of the virus in reservoirs of latently infected cells. In these cells the proviral DNA is integrated in the host’s genome but it does not actively replicate, becoming invisible to the host immune system and unaffected by existing antiviral drugs. Rebound of viremia and recovery of systemic infection that follows interruption of therapy, necessitates life-long treatments with problems of compliance, toxicity, and untenable costs, especially in developing countries where the infection hits worst. Extensive research efforts have led to the proposal and preliminary testing of several anti-latency compounds, however, overall, eradication strategies have had, so far, limited clinical success while posing several risks for patients. This review will briefly summarize the more recent advances in the elucidation of mechanisms that regulates the establishment/maintenance of latency and therapeutic strategies currently under evaluation in order to eradicate HIV persistence. PMID:24736215

  4. Inhibition of the HIV Rev transactivator : a new target for therapeutic intervention.

    PubMed

    Heguy, A

    1997-01-01

    The viral transactivator Rev is essential for HIV replication, since it allows the nuclear export of unspliced and partially spliced viral mRNAs that encode the structural proteins. Rev is an RNA binding protein that interacts with a highly structured RNA element, the RRE, found within the envelope sequences. This viral protein also interacts with cellular proteins, termed nucleoporins, and acts as an adaptor between the viral mRNAs and the cellular nuclear export machinery. Both interactions are specific, and required for Rev function. Because of its crucial role in the HIV replication cycle, and its novel mechanism of action, Rev represents an ideal target for therapeutic intervention. This review describes the efforts towards Rev inhibition. Gene therapy approaches, including the expression of trans-dominant mutants and RNA decoys, as well as antisense therapies and small molecule inhibitors of Rev-RRE binding or Rev interaction with the cellular machinery will be discussed PMID:9206979

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies as candidate therapeutics against emerging viruses and HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhongyu; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Chen, Weizao; Broder, Christopher C; Gong, Rui; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2013-04-01

    More than 40 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for a number of disease indications with only one of these (Synagis) - for a viral disease, and not for therapy but for prevention. However, in the last decade novel potent mAbs have been discovered and characterized with potential as therapeutics against viruses of major importance for public health and biosecurity including Hendra virus (HeV), Nipah virus (NiV), severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), Ebola virus (EBOV), West Nile virus (WNV), influenza virus (IFV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Here, we review such mAbs with an emphasis on antibodies of human origin, and highlight recent results as well as technologies and mechanisms related to their potential as therapeutics. PMID:23575729

  6. Dose-response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies.

    PubMed

    Webb, Nicholas E; Montefiori, David C; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose-response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120-gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  7. Dose–response curve slope helps predict therapeutic potency and breadth of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Nicholas E.; Montefiori, David C.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of HIV broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) with remarkable potency, breadth and epitope diversity has rejuvenated interest in immunotherapeutic strategies. Potencies defined by in vitro IC50 and IC80 values (50 and 80% inhibitory concentrations) figure prominently into the selection of clinical candidates; however, much higher therapeutic levels will be required to reduce multiple logs of virus and impede escape. Here we predict bnAb potency at therapeutic levels by analysing dose–response curve slopes, and show that slope is independent of IC50/IC80 and specifically relates to bnAb epitope class. With few exceptions, CD4-binding site and V3-glycan bnAbs exhibit slopes >1, indicative of higher expected therapeutic effectiveness, whereas V2-glycan, gp41 membrane-proximal external region (MPER) and gp120–gp41 bnAbs exhibit less favourable slopes <1. Our results indicate that slope is one major predictor of both potency and breadth for bnAbs at clinically relevant concentrations, and may better coordinate the relationship between bnAb epitope structure and therapeutic expectations. PMID:26416571

  8. The highly specific carbohydrate-binding protein cyanovirin-N: structure, anti-HIV/Ebola activity and possibilities for therapy.

    PubMed

    Barrientos, Laura G; Gronenborn, Angela M

    2005-01-01

    Cyanovirin-N (CV-N), a cyanobacterial lectin, is a potent viral entry inhibitor currently under development as a microbicide against a broad spectrum of enveloped viruses. CV-N was originally identified as a highly active anti-HIV agent and later, as a virucidal agent against other unrelated enveloped viruses such as Ebola, and possibly other viruses. CV-N's antiviral activity appears to involve unique recognition of N-linked high-mannose oligosaccharides, Man-8 and Man-9, on the viral surface glycoproteins. Due to its distinct mode of action and opportunities for harnessing the associated interaction for therapeutic intervention, a substantial body of research on CV-N has accumulated since its discovery in 1997. In this review we focus in particular on structural studies on CV-N and their relationship to biological activity. PMID:15638789

  9. Leptin and Adiponectin in the HIV Associated Metabolic Syndrome: Physiologic and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Tsiodras, Sotirios; Mantzoros, Christos

    2006-01-01

    Leptin and adiponectin represent two newly discovered adipose tissue derived hormones with important roles in energy homeostasis and insulin resistance. Their interrelations with the manifestations of the HIV associated metabolic syndrome and specific somatomorphic changes i.e. fat redistribution is reviewed. A synopsis of published studies is presented and the potential role of leptin and adiponectin is discussed. We have described an association of the HIV metabolic syndrome with a state of reduced insulin sensitivity due to adiponectin deficiency. The metabolic syndrome is also accompanied by leptin deficiency in lipoatrophic subjects and possibly by a leptin resistance state in lipohypertrophic patients. Adiponectin and / or leptin therapy in a manner similar to other leptin deficiency states may assist in the future management of such patients. PMID:17183414

  10. Role of fever in infection: has induced fever any therapeutic potential in HIV infection?

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R S; Rashid, S

    1997-01-01

    Ancient societies had no rational understanding of fever. The Greeks were the first to recognise that it may be part of nature's method of effecting cure in some diseases. How best to assist nature went through many trials and errors. Appreciation of the prognostic value of fever and how it may be controlled was slow to appear. That there was a place in the therapeutic arsenal for induced fever came only with the 20th century. Finding a suitable, safe, and satisfactory means came slowly. The curative power of well controlled and reproducible levels of fever was proved by the arrest of one deadly and incurable complication of a sexually transmitted disease in the first half of this century. The purpose of this review is to promote discussion and, hopefully, well ordered laboratory and clinical trials aimed at learning whether or not induced fevers have a place in the care of patients with HIV/AIDS. Images PMID:9306904

  11. A therapeutic community for HIV-infected persons: an approach for prevention and control of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Warnnissorn, T

    1995-10-01

    The Therapeutic Community (TC) for HIV-infected persons is neither a hospital nor a confinement for people with HIV. Actually it is a family of friends who are in the same boat and a place of education to teach them about AIDS and relevant subjects necessary for their life in the future, and to help establish new values and life styles for them using TC tools which are adapted from the DAYTOP TC in U.S.A. The purpose was not only to build the residents, but also to encourage them to do their part in contributing to build up a better and safer society that will help to save the lives of others from AIDS. Correct knowledge in AIDS, together with the quality of honesty, responsibility and other basic attitudes that the residents acquire through the program will enable them to become a creative force in the prevention and control of AIDS. The author would say that words alone will not describe the whole TC. It requires self experience through the program in order to learn TC and understand it. PMID:8576664

  12. Safety and immunogenicity of an adjuvanted protein therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine in subjects with HIV-1 infection: a randomised placebo-controlled study.

    PubMed

    Harrer, Thomas; Plettenberg, Andreas; Arastéh, Keikawus; Van Lunzen, Jan; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Jaeger, Hans; Janssens, Michel; Burny, Wivine; Collard, Alix; Roman, François; Loeliger, Alfred; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Bourguignon, Patricia; Lavreys, Ludo; Voss, Gerald

    2014-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) vaccine candidate F4/AS01 has previously been shown to induce potent and persistent polyfunctional CD4(+) T-cell responses in HIV-1-seronegative volunteers. This placebo-controlled study evaluated two doses of F4/AS01 1-month apart in antiretroviral treatment (ART)-experienced and ART-naïve HIV-1-infected subjects (1:1 randomisation in each cohort). Safety, HIV-1-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses, absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts and HIV-1 viral load were monitored for 12 months post-vaccination. Reactogenicity was clinically acceptable and no vaccine-related serious adverse events were reported. The frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells 2 weeks post-dose 2 was significantly higher in the vaccine group than in the placebo group in both cohorts (p<0.05). Vaccine-induced HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells exhibited a polyfunctional phenotype, expressing at least CD40L and IL-2. No increase in HIV-1-specific CD8(+) T-cells or change in CD8(+) T-cell activation marker expression profile was detected. Absolute CD4(+) T-cell counts were variable over time in both cohorts. Viral load remained suppressed in ART-experienced subjects. In ART-naïve subjects, a transient reduction in viral load from baseline was observed 2 weeks after the second F4/AS01 dose, which was concurrent with a higher frequency of HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cells expressing at least IL-2 in this cohort. In conclusion, F4/AS01 showed a clinically acceptable reactogenicity and safety profile, and induced polyfunctional HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses in ART-experienced and ART-naïve subjects. These findings support further clinical investigation of F4/AS01 as a potential HIV-1 vaccine for therapeutic use in individuals with HIV-1 infection. PMID:24144472

  13. Therapeutic possibilities in the autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Straub, Volker; Bushby, Kate

    2008-10-01

    Fourteen years ago, the first disease-causing mutation in a form of autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy was reported. Since then the number of genes has been extended to at least 14 and the phenotypic spectrum has been broadened. The generation of mouse models helped to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and also served to study therapeutic possibilities. All autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophies are rare diseases, which is one reason why there have been so very few controlled clinical trials. Other reasons are insufficient natural history data and the lack of standardized assessment criteria and validated outcome measures. Currently, therapeutic possibilities are mainly restricted to symptomatic treatment and the treatment of disease complications. On the other hand, new efforts in translational research and the development of molecular therapeutic approaches suggest that more promising clinical trials will be carried out in autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy in the next several years. PMID:19019315

  14. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Carolina G D O; Matassoli, Flavio L; Peçanha, Ligia M T; Santillo, Bruna Tereso; Oliveira, Luanda Mara da Silva; Oshiro, Telma Miyuki; Marques, Ernesto T D A; Oxenius, Annette; de Arruda, Luciana B

    2016-08-01

    The decline in number and function of T cells is a hallmark of HIV infection, and preservation or restoration of HIV-specific cellular immune response is a major goal of AIDS treatment. Dendritic cells (DCs) play a key role in the initiation and maintenance of the immune response, and their use as a vaccine vehicle is a promising strategy for enhancing vaccine efficacy. We evaluated the potential of DC-mediated immunization with a DNA vaccine consisting of HIV-1-p55gag (gag, group-specific antigen) associated to lysosomal associated protein (LAMP) sequence (LAMP/gag vaccine). Immunization of mice with mouse DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-mDCs) stimulated more potent B- and T-cell responses than naked DNA or DCs pulsed with inactivated HIV. Anti-Gag antibody levels were sustained for at least 3 mo after immunization, and recall T-cell responses were also strongly detected at this time point. Human DCs transfected with LAMP/gag (Lg-hDCs) were also activated and able to stimulate greater T-cell response than native gag-transfected DCs. Coculture between Lg-hDCs and T lymphocytes obtained from patients with HIV resulted in upregulation of CD38, CD69, HLA-DR, and granzyme B by CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, and increased IFN-γ and TNF-α production. These results indicate that the use of LAMP/gag-DC may be an efficient strategy for enhancing immune function in patients with HIV.-Lucas, C. G. D. O., Matassoli, F. L., Peçanha, L. M. T., Santillo, B. T., Oliveira, L. M. D. S., Oshiro, T. M., Marques, E. T. D. A., Jr., Oxenius, A., de Arruda, L. B. Dendritic cells primed with a chimeric plasmid containing HIV-1-gag associated with lysosomal-associated protein-1 (LAMP/gag) is a potential therapeutic vaccine against HIV. PMID:27199296

  15. The Role of Chemokines in Breast Cancer Pathology and Its Possible Use as Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Palacios-Arreola, M. Isabel; Nava-Castro, Karen E.; Castro, Julieta I.; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Carrero, Julio C.; Morales-Montor, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines are small proteins that primarily regulate the traffic of leukocytes under homeostatic conditions and during specific immune responses. The chemokine-chemokine receptor system comprises almost 50 chemokines and approximately 20 chemokine receptors; thus, there is no unique ligand for each receptor and the binding of different chemokines to the same receptor might have disparate effects. Complicating the system further, these effects depend on the cellular milieu. In cancer, although chemokines are associated primarily with the generation of a protumoral microenvironment and organ-directed metastasis, they also mediate other phenomena related to disease progression, such as angiogenesis and even chemoresistance. Therefore, the chemokine system is becoming a target in cancer therapeutics. We review the emerging data and correlations between chemokines/chemokine receptors and breast cancer, their implications in cancer progression, and possible therapeutic strategies that exploit the chemokine system. PMID:25165728

  16. Cross-Learning: The Possibilities of a Learning Dialogue between the HIV and AIDS and Disability Movements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rule, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa is the region of the world most affected by HIV & AIDS, accounting for two-thirds of the global burden of the pandemic. People with disabilities are regarded as a high-risk group for HIV but have been largely neglected in programmes of education, treatment and support. This paper examines the possibilities for a learning…

  17. The Therapeutic Potentials of Ayahuasca: Possible Effects against Various Diseases of Civilization.

    PubMed

    Frecska, Ede; Bokor, Petra; Winkelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychoactive brew of two main components. Its active agents are β-carboline and tryptamine derivatives. As a sacrament, ayahuasca is still a central element of many healing ceremonies in the Amazon Basin and its ritual consumption has become common among the mestizo populations of South America. Ayahuasca use amongst the indigenous people of the Amazon is a form of traditional medicine and cultural psychiatry. During the last two decades, the substance has become increasingly known among both scientists and laymen, and currently its use is spreading all over in the Western world. In the present paper we describe the chief characteristics of ayahuasca, discuss important questions raised about its use, and provide an overview of the scientific research supporting its potential therapeutic benefits. A growing number of studies indicate that the psychotherapeutic potential of ayahuasca is based mostly on the strong serotonergic effects, whereas the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist effect of its active ingredient dimethyltryptamine raises the possibility that the ethnomedical observations on the diversity of treated conditions can be scientifically verified. Moreover, in the right therapeutic or ritual setting with proper preparation and mindset of the user, followed by subsequent integration of the experience, ayahuasca has proven effective in the treatment of substance dependence. This article has two important take-home messages: (1) the therapeutic effects of ayahuasca are best understood from a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model, and (2) on the biological level ayahuasca may act against chronic low grade inflammation and oxidative stress via the Sig-1R which can explain its widespread therapeutic indications. PMID:26973523

  18. The Therapeutic Potentials of Ayahuasca: Possible Effects against Various Diseases of Civilization

    PubMed Central

    Frecska, Ede; Bokor, Petra; Winkelman, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychoactive brew of two main components. Its active agents are β-carboline and tryptamine derivatives. As a sacrament, ayahuasca is still a central element of many healing ceremonies in the Amazon Basin and its ritual consumption has become common among the mestizo populations of South America. Ayahuasca use amongst the indigenous people of the Amazon is a form of traditional medicine and cultural psychiatry. During the last two decades, the substance has become increasingly known among both scientists and laymen, and currently its use is spreading all over in the Western world. In the present paper we describe the chief characteristics of ayahuasca, discuss important questions raised about its use, and provide an overview of the scientific research supporting its potential therapeutic benefits. A growing number of studies indicate that the psychotherapeutic potential of ayahuasca is based mostly on the strong serotonergic effects, whereas the sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) agonist effect of its active ingredient dimethyltryptamine raises the possibility that the ethnomedical observations on the diversity of treated conditions can be scientifically verified. Moreover, in the right therapeutic or ritual setting with proper preparation and mindset of the user, followed by subsequent integration of the experience, ayahuasca has proven effective in the treatment of substance dependence. This article has two important take-home messages: (1) the therapeutic effects of ayahuasca are best understood from a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual model, and (2) on the biological level ayahuasca may act against chronic low grade inflammation and oxidative stress via the Sig-1R which can explain its widespread therapeutic indications. PMID:26973523

  19. Chaperone proteins and brain tumors: Potential targets and possible therapeutics1

    PubMed Central

    Graner, Michael W.; Bigner, Darell D.

    2005-01-01

    Chaperone proteins are most notable for the proteo- and cyotoprotective capacities they afford during cellular stress. Under conditions of cellular normalcy, chaperones still play integral roles in the folding of nascent polypeptides into functional entities, in assisting in intracellular/intraorganellar transport, in assembly and maintenance of multi-subunit protein complexes, and in aiding and abetting the degradation of senescent proteins. Tumors frequently have relatively enhanced needs for chaperone number and activity because of the stresses of rapid proliferation, increased metabolism, and overall genetic instability. Thus, it may be possible to take advantage of this reliance that tumor cells have on chaperones by pharmacologic and biologic means. Certain chaperones are abundant in the brain, which implies important roles for them. While it is presumed that the requirements of brain tumors for chaperone proteins are similar to those of any other cell type, tumor or otherwise, very little inquiry has been directed at the possibility of using chaperone proteins as therapeutic targets or even as therapeutic agents against central nervous system malignancies. This review highlights some of the research on the functions of chaperone proteins, on what can be done to modify those functions, and on the physiological responses that tumors and organisms can have to chaperone-targeted or chaperone-based therapies. In particular, this review will also underscore areas of research where brain tumors have been part of the field, although in general those instances are few and far between. This relative dearth of research devoted to chaperone protein targets and therapeutics in brain tumors reveals much untrodden turf to explore for potential treatments of these dreadfully refractive diseases. PMID:16053701

  20. Cytotoxic and Cytolytic Cnidarian Venoms. A Review on Health Implications and Possible Therapeutic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Mariottini, Gian Luigi; Pane, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    The toxicity of Cnidaria is a subject of concern for its influence on human activities and public health. During the last decades, the mechanisms of cell injury caused by cnidarian venoms have been studied utilizing extracts from several Cnidaria that have been tested in order to evaluate some fundamental parameters, such as the activity on cell survival, functioning and metabolism, and to improve the knowledge about the mechanisms of action of these compounds. In agreement with the modern tendency aimed to avoid the utilization of living animals in the experiments and to substitute them with in vitro systems, established cell lines or primary cultures have been employed to test cnidarian extracts or derivatives. Several cnidarian venoms have been found to have cytotoxic properties and have been also shown to cause hemolytic effects. Some studied substances have been shown to affect tumour cells and microorganisms, so making cnidarian extracts particularly interesting for their possible therapeutic employment. The review aims to emphasize the up-to-date knowledge about this subject taking in consideration the importance of such venoms in human pathology, the health implications and the possible therapeutic application of these natural compounds. PMID:24379089

  1. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells.

    PubMed

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-11-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4(+) T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4(+) T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4(+) T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the "Shock and Kill" strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. PMID:26184775

  2. Implication of Green Tea as a Possible Therapeutic Approach for Parkinson Disease.

    PubMed

    Jurado-Coronel, Juan C; Ávila-Rodriguez, Marco; Echeverria, Valentina; Hidalgo, Oscar Alejandro; Gonzalez, Janneth; Aliev, Gjumrakch; Barreto, George E

    2016-01-01

    Green tea is a beverage consumed around the world that is believed to have substantial health benefits such as reducing the risk of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and neurodegeneration. This beverage is prepared from the leaves (steamed and dried) of the Camellia sinesis plant and contains strong antioxidant and neuroprotective phenolic compounds from which the most important is (-)-Epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second more common neurodegenerative disorders, after Alzheimer's disease and is characterized by degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compact of the substantia nigra of the basal ganglia. It has been shown in pre-clinical and clinical studies that green tea may be able to prevent PD, but its optimal dose or a possible mechanism explaining its health benefit in PD has not been properly established. In this review, we discuss the potential role of green tea's phenolic compounds and their therapeutic effectin modulating key signaling pathways in the PD brain. PMID:26831259

  3. Endothelial dysfunction in metabolic diseases: role of oxidation and possible therapeutic employment of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Masha, A; Martina, V

    2014-01-01

    Several metabolic diseases present a high cardiovascular mortality due to endothelial dysfunction consequences. In the last years of the past century, it has come to light that the endothelial cells, previously considered as inert in what regards an eventual secretion activity, play a pivotal role in regulating different aspects of the vascular function (endothelial function). It was clearly demonstrated that the endothelium acts as a real active organ, owning endocrine, paracrine and autocrine modulation activities by means of which it is able to regulate the vascular homeostasis. The present review will investigate the relationship between some metabolic diseases and the endothelial dysfunction and in particular the mechanisms underlying the effects of metabolic pathologies on the endothelium. Furthermore, it will consider the possible therapeutic employment of the N-acetilcysteine in such conditions. PMID:25005185

  4. [Non-epileptic sleep disorders (somnambulism) in epilepsy. Diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities].

    PubMed

    Kaschnitz, W; Scheer, P J; Kratky-Dunitz, M; Broussalis, T

    1991-11-01

    The case history of a 15 1/2-year-old boy is presented who suffers from screaming fits during the night and epilepsia. The problem has existed since he was eight. He lives alone with his mother in a "partner-like" relationship. The previous diagnosis, namely epilepsy, has masked any possible psychodynamic element. Our diagnostic instruments were: 1. Standardized diagnostics with DSM III-R; 2. psychoanalytically oriented psychodiagnostics; 3. long term EEG-video-monitoring, which eventually succeeded in differentiating his multiple symptoms. Using these methods we were able to differentiate a sleep disorder (somnambulism) from his grandmal epilepsy. We changed his anticonvulsive pharmacological therapy and introduced an individual psychotherapy ("Katathymes Bilderleben"). This kind of psychotherapy is applied for the first time as a therapy for somnambulism. By using this therapeutic concept we cured our patient from his symptoms. PMID:1775145

  5. True User Involvement by People Living With HIV is Possible: Description of a User-driven HIV Clinic in Norway.

    PubMed

    Berg, Rigmor C; Gamst, Are; Said, Maryan; Aas, Kristin Bårdsen; Songe, Solveig Helene; Fangen, Kim; Rysstad, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The Greater Involvement of People Living with or Affected by HIV principle highlights the various contributions HIV-infected people can make in HIV program development and implementation. We present a unique example of how service users' involvement led to a complete organizational redesign of an outpatient HIV clinic in Southern Norway. We applied a user-driven, case study method, which showed that establishing a user board laid the foundation for the redesign process, as the board provided a clear infrastructure of user involvement and developed a set of user-defined targets for services. The main targets-optimal health, holistic care and treatment, and empowerment-were operationalized as a set of action points, such as establishing HIV nurse coordinators. While there is no single method for user involvement, we offer useful ideas that can help others develop an involvement project that is effective and sustainable. PMID:26255897

  6. Usefulness of Photodynamic Therapy as a Possible Therapeutic Alternative in the Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Savoia, Paola; Deboli, Tommaso; Previgliano, Alberto; Broganelli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common cancer in individuals with fair skin type (I–II) and steadily increasing in incidence (70% of skin malignancy). It is locally invasive but metastasis is usually very rare, with an estimated incidence of 0.0028%–0.55%. Conventional therapy is surgery, especially for the H region of the face and infiltrative lesions; in case of inoperable tumors, radiotherapy is a valid option. Recently, topical photodynamic therapy (PDT) has become an effective treatment in the management of superficial and small nodular BCC. PDT is a minimally invasive procedure that involves the administration of a photo-sensibilizing agent followed by irradiation at a pre-defined wavelength; this determines the creation of reactive oxygen species that specifically destroy target cells. The only major side effect is pain, reported by some patients during the irradiation. The high cure rate and excellent cosmetic outcome requires considering this possibility for the management of patients with both sporadic and hereditary BCC. In this article, an extensive review of the recent literature was made, in order to clarify the role of PDT as a possible alternative therapeutic option in the treatment of BCC. PMID:26426005

  7. siRNA Against KIR3DL1 as a Potential Gene Therapeutic Agent in Controlling HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Geng-Feng; Pan, Ji-Cheng; Lin, Nan; Hu, Hai-Yang; Tang, Wei-Ming; Xu, Jin-Shui; Wang, Xiao-Liang; Xu, Xiao-Qin; Qiu, Tao; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Guo-Hong; Mahapatra, Tanmay; Huan, Xi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop a small interfering RNA (siRNA) against the expression of KIR3DL1 receptor on natural killer (NK) cells, in order to promote the ability of NK cells to destroy human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected cells and thus prevent failure of siRNA therapy targeting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virus among HIV-1 infected patients in vitro. Methods: A siRNA targeting KIR3DL1 was synthesized and then modified with cholesterol, methylene, and sulfate. The inhibitory action of the siRNAs on primary cultured NK cells was detected. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in NK cells was measured. The intended functions of NK cells in vitro were analyzed by CFSE and PI methods. Results: There were no significant differences in inhibiting the expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells between the modified and unmodified siRNAs, while inhibition by each of them differed significantly from controls. The amount of IFN-γ and TNF-α secretions in the NK cells was abundant due to unsuccessful expression of KIR3DL1 on NK cells, which further promoted function of the NK cells. Conclusion: The siRNA against KIR3DL1 could enhance the ability of the NK cells to kill the HIV-1 infected cells in vitro and successfully prevented the failure of siRNA therapy targeting the HIV-1 virus. Therefore, it can act as a potential gene therapeutic agent among HIV-1 infected people. PMID:24834927

  8. Bone-derived mesenchymal stromal cells from HIV transgenic mice exhibit altered proliferation, differentiation capacity and paracrine functions along with impaired therapeutic potential in kidney injury

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Kang; Rai, Partab; Lan, Xiqian; Plagov, Andrei; Malhotra, Ashwani; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2013-08-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) secrete paracrine factors that could be cytoprotective and serve roles in immunoregulation during tissue injury. Although MSCs express HIV receptors, and co-receptors, and are susceptible to HIV infection, whether HIV-1 may affect biological properties of MSCs needs more study. We evaluated cellular proliferation, differentiation and paracrine functions of MSCs isolated from compact bones of healthy control mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice. The ability of MSCs to protect against cisplatin toxicity was studied in cultured renal tubular cells as well as in intact mice. We successfully isolated MSCs from healthy mice and Tg26 HIV-1 transgenic mice and found the latter expressed viral Nef, Vpu, NL4-3 and Vif genes. The proliferation and differentiation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs was inferior to MSCs from healthy mice. Moreover, transplantation of Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs less effectively improved outcomes compared with healthy MSCs in mice with acute kidney injury. Also, Tg26 HIV-1 MSCs secreted multiple cytokines, but at significantly lower levels than healthy MSCs, which resulted in failure of conditioned medium from these MSCs to protect cultured renal tubular cells from cisplatin toxicity. Therefore, HIV-1 had adverse biological effects on MSCs extending to their proliferation, differentiation, function, and therapeutic potential. These findings will help in advancing mechanistical insight in renal injury and repair in the setting of HIV-1 infection. -- Highlights: •MSCs isolated from HIV mice displayed HIV genes. •MSCs isolated from HIV mice exhibited attenuated growth and paracrine functions. •AKI mice with transplanted HIV-MSC displayed poor outcome. •HIV-1 MSC secreted multiple cytokines but at a lower level.

  9. Aging and HIV/AIDS: pathogenetic role of therapeutic side effects

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Rebecca A; Lewis, William

    2014-01-01

    The intersection of aging and HIV/AIDS is a looming ‘epidemic within an epidemic.’ This paper reviews how HIV/AIDS and its therapy cause premature aging or contribute mechanistically to HIV-associated non-AIDS illnesses (HANA). Survival with HIV/AIDS has markedly improved by therapy combinations containing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, and protease inhibitors (PIs) called HAART (highly active anti-retroviral therapy). Because NRTIs and PIs together prevent or attenuate HIV-1 replication, and prolong life, the population of aging patients with HIV/AIDS increases accordingly. However, illnesses frequently associated with aging in the absence of HIV/AIDS appear to occur prematurely in HIV/AIDS patients. Theories that help to explain biological aging include oxidative stress (where mitochondrial oxidative injury exceeds antioxidant defense), chromosome telomere shortening with associated cellular senescence, and accumulation of lamin A precursors (a nuclear envelop protein). Each of these has the potential to be enhanced or caused by HIV/AIDS, antiretroviral therapy, or both. Antiretroviral therapy has been shown to enhance events seen in biological aging. Specifically, antiretroviral NRTIs cause mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial DNA defects that resemble features of both HANA and aging. More recent clinical evidence points to telomere shortening caused by NRTI triphosphate-induced inhibition of telomerase, suggesting telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) inhibition as being a pathogenetic contributor to premature aging in HIV/AIDS. PIs may also have a role in premature aging in HIV/AIDS as they cause prelamin A accumulation. Overall, toxic side effects of HAART may both resemble and promote events of aging and are worthy of mechanistic studies. PMID:24336070

  10. Advances in biosensing strategies for HIV-1 detection, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lifson, Mark A; Ozen, Mehmet Ozgun; Inci, Fatih; Wang, ShuQi; Inan, Hakan; Baday, Murat; Henrich, Timothy J; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    HIV-1 is a major global epidemic that requires sophisticated clinical management. There have been remarkable efforts to develop new strategies for detecting and treating HIV-1, as it has been challenging to translate them into resource-limited settings. Significant research efforts have been recently devoted to developing point-of-care (POC) diagnostics that can monitor HIV-1 viral load with high sensitivity by leveraging micro- and nano-scale technologies. These POC devices can be applied to monitoring of antiretroviral therapy, during mother-to-child transmission, and identification of latent HIV-1 reservoirs. In this review, we discuss current challenges in HIV-1 diagnosis and therapy in resource-limited settings and present emerging technologies that aim to address these challenges using innovative solutions. PMID:27262924

  11. Developmental, Ethnic, and Social Influences on Participation in Sexual Possibility Situations for Youth with HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Linwood J.; Mellins, Claude A.; Brackis-Cott, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    This cross-sectional study examined the relationship among maternal HIV, pubertal development, gender, ethnicity, and spirituality and adolescent participation in sexual possibility situations (SPSs) and in sexual activity. SPSs are social encounters with cross-gender peers that afford the opportunity to engage in sexual activity. Heterosexual…

  12. Transglutaminase inhibition as a possible therapeutical approach to protect cells from death in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Iannaccone, Martina; Serretiello, Enrica; De Vivo, Giulia; Martin, Antonio; Stefanile, Alessandro; Titta, Federica; Gentile, Vittorio

    2013-08-01

    Transglutaminases are ubiquitous enzymes which catalyze post-translational modifications of proteins. The main activity of these enzymes is the cross-linking of glutaminyl residues of a protein/peptide substrate to lysyl residues of a protein/peptide co-substrate. In addition to lysyl residues, other second nucleophilic co-substrates may include monoamines or polyamines (to form mono- or bi-substituted /crosslinked adducts) or -OH groups (to form ester linkages). In absence of co-substrates, the nucleophile may be water, resulting in the net deamidation of the glutaminyl residue. Recently, "tissue" transglutaminase (transglutaminase 2), a member of the transglutaminase family of enzymes, has been shown to be involved in the molecular mechanisms responsible for some human pathologies, including celiac disease, a very widespread human pathology. Transglutaminase activity has also been hypothesized to be involved in the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for other several human diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases, often associated to celiac disease. Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease, supranuclear palsy, Huntington's Disease and other polyglutamine diseases, are characterized in part by aberrant cerebral transglutaminase activity and by increased cross-linked proteins in affected brains. This review focuses on the possible therapeutic effects of selective transglutaminase inhibitors for patients with diseases characterized by aberrant transglutaminase activity and on the strategies to design such transglutaminase inhibitors. In addition, the review also examines available patents that relates to cysteamine and derivatives. PMID:23688272

  13. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities.

    PubMed

    Pertwee, Roger G

    2012-12-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB(1) and CB(2) receptors that can be activated by endogenously released 'endocannabinoids' or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB(1)/CB(2) receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC)) and Sativex (Δ(9)-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB(2) receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive 'multi-targeting'. PMID:23108552

  14. Monocyte/macrophage inflammatory response pathways to combat Francisella infection: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed Central

    Gillette, Devyn D.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Butchar, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis can bypass and suppress host immune responses, even to the point of manipulating immune cell phenotypes and intercellular inflammatory networks. Strengthening these responses such that immune cells more readily identify and destroy the bacteria is likely to become a viable (and perhaps necessary) strategy for combating infections with Francisella, especially given the likelihood of antibiotic resistance in the foreseeable future. Monocytes and macrophages offer a niche wherein Francisella can invade and replicate, resulting in substantially higher bacterial load that can overcome the host. As such, understanding their responses to Francisella may uncover potential avenues of therapy that could promote a lowering of bacterial burden and clearance of infection. These response pathways include Toll-like Receptor 2 (TLR2), the caspase-1 inflammasome, Interferons, NADPH oxidase, Phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), and the Ras pathway. In this review we summarize the literature pertaining to the roles of these pathways during Francisella infection, with an emphasis on monocyte/macrophage responses. The therapeutic targeting of one or more such pathways may ultimately become a valuable tool for the treatment of tularemia, and several possibilities are discussed. PMID:24600590

  15. [Post-therapeutic lymphedema of the arm--possibilities and limits of diagnosis and therapy].

    PubMed

    Döller, W

    1999-01-01

    The post-therapeutical secondary arm lymphedema is the most frequent complication after a curatively treated cancer of mamma. For the diagnosis and therapy the knowledge of physiology and pathophysiology of lymphedema and of specific anatomy are necessary. The diagnosis facilities are essentially limited to a basic diagnosis (anamnesis, inspection, palpation, sonography, functional-diagnosis). Specific apparative diagnostics like lab, sonography, CT, MRI and PTE have to be applied especially at an early stage of the secondary arm lymphedema for the differential diagnosis between the secondary malign and secondary benign arm lymphedema. Specific apparative examinations like lymphscintigraphy and lymphography are limited and solely indicated for special questions. As a therapy possibility of the secondary arm-lymph edema, a conservative therapy, that is, the complex two-stage-decongestive physiotherapy (CDP) is recommended as first choice. Surgical therapies such as autologous lympho-lymphostatic anastomoses and lymphovenous anastomoses are only recommended in selected individual cases. The secondary malignant arm lymphedema must be primarily treated oncologically; lymphological therapy measures have to be postponed. Diagnosis and therapy are limited through lymphological incompetence and insufficient patient compliance. In this respect the provision of financial resources through National Health policy ist regarded as utterly important. PMID:10378339

  16. Targeting the endocannabinoid system with cannabinoid receptor agonists: pharmacological strategies and therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Pertwee, Roger G.

    2012-01-01

    Human tissues express cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptors that can be activated by endogenously released ‘endocannabinoids’ or exogenously administered compounds in a manner that reduces the symptoms or opposes the underlying causes of several disorders in need of effective therapy. Three medicines that activate cannabinoid CB1/CB2 receptors are now in the clinic: Cesamet (nabilone), Marinol (dronabinol; Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)) and Sativex (Δ9-THC with cannabidiol). These can be prescribed for the amelioration of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (Cesamet and Marinol), stimulation of appetite (Marinol) and symptomatic relief of cancer pain and/or management of neuropathic pain and spasticity in adults with multiple sclerosis (Sativex). This review mentions several possible additional therapeutic targets for cannabinoid receptor agonists. These include other kinds of pain, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, stroke, cancer, drug dependence, glaucoma, autoimmune uveitis, osteoporosis, sepsis, and hepatic, renal, intestinal and cardiovascular disorders. It also describes potential strategies for improving the efficacy and/or benefit-to-risk ratio of these agonists in the clinic. These are strategies that involve (i) targeting cannabinoid receptors located outside the blood-brain barrier, (ii) targeting cannabinoid receptors expressed by a particular tissue, (iii) targeting upregulated cannabinoid receptors, (iv) selectively targeting cannabinoid CB2 receptors, and/or (v) adjunctive ‘multi-targeting’. PMID:23108552

  17. Possible Therapeutic Effect of Stem Cell in Atherosclerosis in Albino Rats. A Histological and Immunohistochemical Study

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Kawi, Samraa H; Hashem, Khalid S

    2015-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of death worldwide. there are no effective approaches to regressing atherosclerosis due to not fully understood mechanisms. Recently, stem cell-based therapies have held promises to various diseases, including vascular diseases. Aim The present study aimed at investigating the possible effect of cord blood mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy on atherosclerosis. Material and Methods Eighty adult male albino rats were divided into control group (I), atherogenic group (II): subjected to high cholesterol fed diet (200~300 mg/kg body weight) for 12 weeks and 1.8 million units of vitamin D / kg of diet for 6 weeks. Stem cell therapy group (III): injected with stem cells in the tail vein following confirmation of atherosclerosis. Histological, Immunohistochemical and morphometric studies were performed were conducted. Results Atherogenic group (II) showed increased aortic thickness, intimal proliferation, smooth muscle proliferation and migration. Increased area % of collagen fibers, iNOS and vimentin immunoreactions were recorded and proved morphometrically. All findings regressed on stem cell therapy. Conclusion A definite therapeutic effect of mesenchymal stem cells was found on atherosclerosis. PMID:26634068

  18. Biological activity of glycolipids produced by microorganisms: new trends and possible therapeutic alternatives.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Sánchez, Alejandro de Jesús; Hernández-Sánchez, Humberto; Jaramillo-Flores, María Eugenia

    2013-01-15

    Several biological processes in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms require the presence of glycolipids (biosurfactants), compounds with both hydrophilic and hydrophobic groups in their structure. They constitute the backbone of different metabolic functions and biological structures such as cell membranes. Besides being structural components, glycolipids show surface activity in the interfaces and are mainly produced by microorganisms. Interest in biosurfactants has increased considerably in recent times due to their applications in the environmental, oil, food, and pharmaceutical industries, since they have unique properties such as low toxicity, high biodegradability, environmentally friendly, foaming capacity, high selectivity and specificity at extreme temperatures, pH and salinity, as well as biological activity. All of these properties are considered advantages over other chemical surfactants, and therefore glycolipids are considered a good alternative, given the current interest on sustainable development. The present work shows a general view of bio-surfactants of microbial origin, particularly of glycolipids, referring to several studies on their biological activity that have revealed their great potential in the medical-biological field, discovering interesting possibilities for their therapeutic application in the near future. PMID:22959834

  19. Possible HIV transmission modes among at-risk groups at an early epidemic stage in the Philippines.

    PubMed

    Telan, Elizabeth Freda O; Samonte, Genesis May J; Palaypayon, Noel; Abellanosa-Tac-An, Ilya P; Leaño, Prisca Susan A; Tsuneki, Akeno; Kageyama, Seiji

    2013-12-01

    A concentrated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic might have started in the Philippines. A subsequent characterization of viruses was carried out to estimate HIV transmission modes. Most HIV strains from injecting drug users belonged to subtype-B. CRF-01 was a major subtype harbored by three other at-risk populations: male visa applicants who had sex with men, "men who have sex with men," and visa applicants. An HIV phylogeny suggested that two strain groups of injecting drug users and others circulated separately. In contrast, there was substantial genetic overlap between two strain groups from "men who have sex with men" and visa applicants. Mean nucleotide distance within strains was shorter among subtype-B strains harbored by the injecting drug users (0.010) than among CRF-01 strains of the other three populations: male visa applicants who had sex with men (0.034), "men who have sex with men" (0.023), and visa applicants (0.032). Closely related strains of hepatitis C virus were derived from not only HIV-positive but also -negative individuals. These results suggest that there is potential for transmission from visa applicants to "men who have sex with men," and that once HIV occurs in injecting drug users, it spreads rapidly among them. Close contacts of hepatitis C virus carriers composed of HIV-negative and -positive individuals indicated ongoing HIV spread via blood and possible intervention points. Large-scale analysis is needed to provide more precise information on the transmission directions and to help curb the growth of this HIV epidemic in the Philippines. PMID:23959846

  20. Structure and possible function of a G-quadruplex in the long terminal repeat of the proviral HIV-1 genome.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, Beatrice; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Regmi, Sagar; Frasson, Ilaria; Perrone, Rosalba; Richter, Sara N; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-07-27

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the proviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genome is integral to virus transcription and host cell infection. The guanine-rich U3 region within the LTR promoter, previously shown to form G-quadruplex structures, represents an attractive target to inhibit HIV transcription and replication. In this work, we report the structure of a biologically relevant G-quadruplex within the LTR promoter region of HIV-1. The guanine-rich sequence designated LTR-IV forms a well-defined structure in physiological cationic solution. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of this sequence reveals a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex containing a single-nucleotide thymine bulge, which participates in a conserved stacking interaction with a neighboring single-nucleotide adenine loop. Transcription analysis in a HIV-1 replication competent cell indicates that the LTR-IV region may act as a modulator of G-quadruplex formation in the LTR promoter. Consequently, the LTR-IV G-quadruplex structure presented within this work could represent a valuable target for the design of HIV therapeutics. PMID:27298260

  1. An in silico approach for identification of novel inhibitors as a potential therapeutics targeting HIV-1 viral infectivity factor.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Chanda; Nischal, Anuradha; Bandaru, Srinivas; Kasera, Priyadarshani; Rajput, Ashish; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Khattri, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Currently available antiviral drugs target the pol-encoded retroviral enzymes or integrases, in addition, inhibitors that target HIV-1 envelope-receptor interactions have also been recently approved. Recent understanding of the interactions between HIV-1 and host restriction factors has provided fresh avenues for development of novel antiviral drugs. For example, viral infectivity factor (Vif) now surfaced as an important therapeutic target in treatment of HIV infection. Vif suppresses A3G antiviral activity by targeting these proteins for polyubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In the present study we analyzed the inhibitory potential of VEC5 and RN18 to inhibit the Vif-A3G interaction through protein- protein docking studies. Perusal of the study showed that, VEC5 and RN18 though inhibits the interaction however showed sub optimal potential. To overcome this set back, we identified 35 structural analogues of VEC5 and 18 analogues of RN18 through virtual screening approach. Analogue with PubCID 71624757 and 55358204 (AKOS006479723) -structurally akin to VEC5 and RN18 respectively showed much appreciable interaction than their respective parent compound. Evident from Vif-A3G; protein - protein docking studies, analogue PubCID 71624757 demonstrated 1.08 folds better inhibitory potential than its parent compound VEC5 while analogue PubCID 55358204 was 1.15 folds better than RN18. Further these analogues passed drug likeness filters and predicted to be non- toxic. We expect these analogues can be put to pharmacodynamic studies that can pave way the breakthrough in HIV therapeutics. PMID:25579575

  2. Characterization of Platelet-Monocyte Complexes in HIV-1 Infected Individuals: Possible Role in HIV-associated Neuroinflammation1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Meera V.; Davidson, Donna C.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Singh, Vir B.; Silva, Jharon; Ramirez, Servio H.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1-associated neuroinflammation persists even with effective combined anti-retroviral therapy (cART), and is associated with the presence of activated monocytes/macrophages within the CNS. In order to infiltrate the CNS, monocytes transmigrate across the selectively permeable blood brain barrier (BBB), which is compromised during HIV infection. Interestingly, platelet-derived excess soluble CD40L (sCD40L) found in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of HIV-1 infected individuals with cognitive impairment has previously been implicated in increased BBB permeability. Here we show that sCD40L also promotes the formation of complexes between inflammatory monocytes and activated platelets (PMCs), which are detected by flow cytometry as monocytes that express excess of CD61, a platelet marker and that these complexes are increased in individuals with HIV infection. PMCs exhibit an enhanced ability to adhere to human brain microvascular endothelial cells as compared to monocytes alone and migrate across transendothelial barrier. These complexes can be found marginalized in the lumen of post-capillary venules in post-mortem brain tissue derived from cases of HIV-1-associated encephalitis (HIV-E). The extravasation of monocytes across the brain endothelium may exacerbate neuroinflammation, indicating that enhancing this event via platelet interaction may be a contributing factor in the development of cognitive impairment. Thus, dampening platelet activation, and in turn PMC formation, with anti-platelet agents may prove beneficial in developing adjunctive therapies for use in combination with cART in an effort to reduce HIV-1-associated neurological deficit PMID:24729609

  3. Zinc as a possible preventive and therapeutic agent in pancreatic, prostate, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ba X; Han, Bo; Shaw, David Graeme; Nimni, Marcel

    2016-09-01

    Zinc is a vital nutrient for human health. Over 300 biological functions in the human body rely on zinc. Even though zinc is incredibly important for our physiology and pathology, our current understanding of zinc, as it relates to tumor cell biology, leaves much to be desired. As with other natural, nonpatentable, and inexpensive agents, zinc remains a subject of explorative research for scientific interest rather than being promoted for practical use. To date, more than 5000 studies with the keywords 'zinc' and 'cancer' have been indexed in the Web of Knowledge portal. Although the numbers of papers have increased 2.5-fold during the last decade, these vast research data have not generated a single recommendation for the incorporation of zinc use in cancer prevention and treatment. In this review, we intend to analyze the current available research data and epidemiological and clinical evidence on the role of zinc in human cancer prevention and treatment. We focus on the cancers - prostate, breast, and pancreatic - for which the most basic and epidemiological studies with zinc have been carried out. The pancreas, and prostate and mammary glands are secretory tissues that have unusual zinc requirements; they tightly regulate zinc metabolism through integration of zinc import, sequestration, and export mechanisms. This suggests to us that zinc could play an important role in the physiology and pathology of these organs. The objective of this review was to stimulate more interest in the research field, focusing on the role of zinc as a possible preventive and therapeutic agent and the accelerated application of this inexpensive and easily accessible nutrient in clinical oncology. PMID:26317381

  4. Therapeutic strategies underpinning the development of novel techniques for the treatment of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Jian J.; Cong, Xiao J.; Hu, Li M.; Wang, Cun X.; Jia, Lee; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2010-01-01

    The HIV replication cycle offers multiple targets for chemotherapeutic intervention, including the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120; viral co-receptors CXCR4 and CCR5; transmembrane glycoprotein, gp41; integrase; reverse transcriptase; protease and so on. Most currently used anti-HIV drugs are reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. The expanding application of simulation to drug design combined with experimental techniques have developed a large amount of novel inhibitors that interact specifically with targets besides transcriptase and protease. This review presents details of the anti-HIV inhibitors discovered with computer-aided approaches and provides an overview of the recent five-year achievements in the treatment of HIV infection and the application of computational methods to current drug design. PMID:20096804

  5. Two cases of possible transmitted drug-resistant HIV: likely HIV superinfection and unmasking of pre-existing resistance.

    PubMed

    Martin, Fabiola; Lee, John; Thomson, Emma; Tarrant, Nick; Hale, Antony; Lacey, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    In the UK, patients undergo HIV viral load and genotype testing before they are prescribed antiretroviral therapy. The genotype test guides clinicians in prescribing antiretroviral therapy with maximum efficacy against the patient's specific viral strain. HIV viral load escape under antiretroviral drug therapy, to which the virus was thought to be genotypically susceptible, is commonly observed in patients with poor adherence. We observed early viral escapes in two-newly diagnosed patients, during antiretroviral treatment, with different sequences compared to their original viral resistance test and who reported excellent adherence to and tolerance of their therapy. HIV superinfection with a new viral strain was identified in a patient with multiple risk factors and co-infections with sexually transmitted infections. The second patient was a case of the emergence of primary resistant virus under drug pressure. Both suppressed their virus promptly after treatment switch. PMID:25663247

  6. Two cases of possible transmitted drug-resistant HIV: likely HIV superinfection and unmasking of pre-existing resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John; Thomson, Emma; Tarrant, Nick; Hale, Antony; Lacey, Charles J

    2016-01-01

    In the UK, patients undergo HIV viral load and genotype testing before they are prescribed antiretroviral therapy. The genotype test guides clinicians in prescribing antiretroviral therapy with maximum efficacy against the patient’s specific viral strain. HIV viral load escape under antiretroviral drug therapy, to which the virus was thought to be genotypically susceptible, is commonly observed in patients with poor adherence. We observed early viral escapes in two-newly diagnosed patients, during antiretroviral treatment, with different sequences compared to their original viral resistance test and who reported excellent adherence to and tolerance of their therapy. HIV superinfection with a new viral strain was identified in a patient with multiple risk factors and co-infections with sexually transmitted infections. The second patient was a case of the emergence of primary resistant virus under drug pressure. Both suppressed their virus promptly after treatment switch. PMID:25663247

  7. Human T helper cells specific for HIV reverse transcriptase: possible role in intrastructural help for HIV envelope-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Manca, F; Fenoglio, D; Valle, M T; Li Pira, G; Kunkl, A; Balderas, R S; Baccala, R G; Kono, D H; Ferraris, A; Saverino, D

    1995-05-01

    Cooperation between B cells specific for an antigen exposed on a viral structure and T helper (Th) cells specific for an internal antigen, as demonstrated with influenza, hepatitis B and rabies viruses, has been termed intrastructural help. Th cells specific for internal proteins of HIV, which are much less mutated than its exposed antigens, may be valuable in vaccine design against this virus. We investigated the human Th repertoire specific for the core HIV antigen reverse transcriptase (p66), and determined whether these cells could be candidate intrastructural T helpers. CD4+ T lines and clones were generated from non-immune individuals by stimulation with p66-pulsed antigen-presenting cells (APC). Specific lines were obtained with p66 from 19 out of 21 (90%) of these individuals, vs. 7 out of 29 (24%) with gp120. Diverse epitopes were recognized by different individuals, and various V beta genes were used by these clones. Clones using the same V beta genes were of diverse origin, according to VDJ region sequence. Of these lines 45% responded to p66 in the context of HIV virions. Moreover, p66-specific clones could respond to APC that had internalized HIV complexed with envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that p66-specific Th cells may participate in intrastructural help. These studies indicate that p66-specific Th cells are detectable in vitro in most naive individuals and exhibit clonal heterogeneity, and that the majority recognize an HIV conserved antigen. They respond to p66 following processing of whole virions and are clearly candidates for intrastructural help. If confirmed in vivo, p66 should be included among vaccine candidates investigated to optimize the anti-HIV Th response. PMID:7539750

  8. Exploring the Possibilities and Limitations of Service-Learning: A Critical Analysis of College Student Narratives about HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan Robb; LePeau, Lucy A.; Robbins, Claire K.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports the results of a study that explored the possibilities and limitations of service-learning by deconstructing the narratives about HIV/AIDS that emerged from five college students who participated in an alternative spring break program. Employing a critical (Rhoads, 1997) and anti-foundational (Butin, 2010) approach to inquiry,…

  9. The Framing and Fashioning of Therapeutic Citizenship Among People Living With HIV Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steve; Namukwaya, Stella; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet

    2016-09-01

    In this article, we examine how people living with HIV (PLWH) were able to reconceptualize or "reframe" their understanding of HIV and enhance their capacity to self-manage the condition. Two in-depth interviews were held with 38 PLWH (20 women, 18 men) selected from three government and nongovernment antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery sites in Wakiso District, and the narratives analyzed. ART providers played an important role in shaping participants' HIV self-management processes. Health workers helped PLWH realize that they could control their condition, provided useful concepts and language for emotional coping, and gave advice about practical self-management tasks, although this could not always be put into practice. ART providers in this setting were spaces for the development of a collective identity and a particular form of therapeutic citizenship that encouraged self-management, including adherence to ART. Positive framing institutions are important for many PLWH in resource-limited settings and the success of ART programs. PMID:26246523

  10. The Framing and Fashioning of Therapeutic Citizenship Among People Living With HIV Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steve; Namukwaya, Stella; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we examine how people living with HIV (PLWH) were able to reconceptualize or “reframe” their understanding of HIV and enhance their capacity to self-manage the condition. Two in-depth interviews were held with 38 PLWH (20 women, 18 men) selected from three government and nongovernment antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery sites in Wakiso District, and the narratives analyzed. ART providers played an important role in shaping participants’ HIV self-management processes. Health workers helped PLWH realize that they could control their condition, provided useful concepts and language for emotional coping, and gave advice about practical self-management tasks, although this could not always be put into practice. ART providers in this setting were spaces for the development of a collective identity and a particular form of therapeutic citizenship that encouraged self-management, including adherence to ART. Positive framing institutions are important for many PLWH in resource-limited settings and the success of ART programs. PMID:26246523

  11. Fc Receptor-Mediated Phagocytosis in Tissues as a Potent Mechanism for Preventive and Therapeutic HIV Vaccine Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Sips, Magdalena; Krykbaeva, Marina; Diefenbach, Thomas J.; Ghebremichael, Musie; Bowman, Brittany A.; Dugast, Anne-Sophie; Boesch, Austin W.; Streeck, Hendrik; Kwon, Douglas S.; Ackerman, Margaret E.; Suscovich, Todd J.; Brouckaert, Peter; Schacker, Timothy W.; Alter, Galit

    2016-01-01

    While the development of a protective HIV vaccine is the ultimate goal of HIV research, to date only one HIV vaccine trial, the RV144, has successfully induced a protective response. The 31% protection from infection achieved in the RV144 trial was linked to the induction of non-neutralizing antibodies, able to mediate ADCC, suggestive of an important role of Fc-mediated functions in protection. Likewise, Fc-mediated antiviral activity was recently shown to play a critical role in actively suppressing the viral reservoir, however, the Fc-effector mechanisms within tissues that provide protection from or after infection are largely unknown. Here we aimed to define the landscape of effector cells and Fc-receptors present within vulnerable tissues. We found negligible Fc-receptor expressing NK cells in the female reproductive and gastrointestinal mucosa. Conversely, Fc-receptor expressing macrophages were highly enriched in most tissues, but neutrophils mediated superior antibody-mediated phagocytosis. Modifications in Fc domain of VRC01 antibody increased phagocytic responses in both phagocytes. These data suggest that non-ADCC mediated mechanisms, such as phagocytosis and neutrophil activation, are more likely to play a role in preventative vaccine or reservoir-eliminating therapeutic approaches. PMID:26883728

  12. Traditional healers and the "Fast-Track" HIV response: is success possible without them?

    PubMed

    Leclerc-Madlala, Suzanne; Green, Edward; Hallin, Mary

    2016-07-01

    The rapid scale-up of effective HIV prevention strategies is a central theme of the post-2015 health and development agenda. All major global HIV and AIDS funders have aligned their policies and plans to achieve sharp reductions in new HIV infections and reach epidemic control by 2030. In these "fast-track" plans, increased antiretroviral treatment coverage and the attainment of viral suppression are pivotal, and there is firm recognition of the need for countries to mobilise more domestic resources and build stronger community clinic systems. There is little in these bold plans, however, to suggest that the now 30-year-old call by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other organisations to establish systematic collaborations with the traditional health sector will finally be heeded. In the context of sub-Saharan Africa's HIV epidemic, a significant body of literature demonstrates the critical role that traditional healers can play in improving the success of health programmes, including those for HIV prevention. This paper provides a brief history of collaboration with traditional healers for HIV followed by a description of several successful collaborations and discussion of key elements for success. We argue that the traditional health sector is a major resource that has yet to be sufficiently mobilised against HIV. As we shift from a short-term HIV response to a longer-term and more sustainable response, there is an urgent need to accelerate efforts to leverage and partner with the hundreds of thousands of traditional health practitioners who are already providing health services in communities. Failure to better attune our work to the medical pluralism of communities affected by HIV will continue to hinder HIV programming success and help assure that ambitious post-2015 HIV prevention and control goals are not realised. PMID:27399048

  13. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 (HIV-1)-Mediated Apoptosis: New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Mbita, Zukile; Hull, Rodney; Dlamini, Zodwa

    2014-01-01

    HIV has posed a significant challenge due to the ability of the virus to both impair and evade the host’s immune system. One of the most important mechanisms it has employed to do so is the modulation of the host’s native apoptotic pathways and mechanisms. Viral proteins alter normal apoptotic signaling resulting in increased viral load and the formation of viral reservoirs which ultimately increase infectivity. Both the host’s pro- and anti-apoptotic responses are regulated by the interactions of viral proteins with cell surface receptors or apoptotic pathway components. This dynamic has led to the development of therapies aimed at altering the ability of the virus to modulate apoptotic pathways. These therapies are aimed at preventing or inhibiting viral infection, or treating viral associated pathologies. These drugs target both the viral proteins and the apoptotic pathways of the host. This review will examine the cell types targeted by HIV, the surface receptors exploited by the virus and the mechanisms whereby HIV encoded proteins influence the apoptotic pathways. The viral manipulation of the hosts’ cell type to evade the immune system, establish viral reservoirs and enhance viral proliferation will be reviewed. The pathologies associated with the ability of HIV to alter apoptotic signaling and the drugs and therapies currently under development that target the ability of apoptotic signaling within HIV infection will also be discussed. PMID:25196285

  14. Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) Analogs: Recent Advances, New Possibilities, and Therapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is an incretin that plays important physiological roles in glucose homeostasis. Produced from intestine upon food intake, it stimulates insulin secretion and keeps pancreatic β-cells healthy and proliferating. Because of these beneficial effects, it has attracted a great deal of attention in the past decade, and an entirely new line of diabetic therapeutics has emerged based on the peptide. In addition to the therapeutic applications, GLP-1 analogs have demonstrated a potential in molecular imaging of pancreatic β-cells; this may be useful in early detection of the disease and evaluation of therapeutic interventions, including islet transplantation. In this Perspective, we focus on GLP-1 analogs for their studies on improvement of biological activities, enhancement of metabolic stability, investigation of receptor interaction, and visualization of the pancreatic islets. PMID:25349901

  15. Evidence of clinically significant change: the therapeutic alliance and the possibilities of outcomes-informed care.

    PubMed

    Manning, Walter H

    2010-11-01

    This article addresses the issue of clinically significant (or meaningful) change resulting from treatment for stuttering. Research in both medical and behavioral fields indicates that clients often have their own unique perspective of meaningful clinical change and that this perspective is often different from that of the professional administering the treatment. Among the variables that the client brings to the treatment session are their progression through stages of therapeutic change and the ways in which they believe they are capable of coping with their problem. Research has shown that how an individual interprets the meaning his or her therapeutic experience is central to clinically significant change. Procedures for obtaining feedback from clients concerning clinically significant change and the quality of the therapeutic alliance are described. PMID:21080293

  16. THERAPEUTIC DRUG MONITORING OF PROTEASE INHIBITORS AND EFAVIRENZ IN HIV-INFECTED INDIVIDUALS WITH ACTIVE SUBSTANCE RELATED DISORDERS

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Zingman, Barry S.; Luque, Amneris; Fischl, Margaret A.; Gripshover, Barbara; Venuto, Charles; DiFrancesco, Robin; Forrest, Alan; Morse, Gene D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Achieving targeted antiretroviral (ART) plasma concentrations during long-term treatment in HIV-infected patients with substance related disorders (SRD) may be challenging due to a number of factors including medication adherence, co-infection with hepatitis B or C virus, medication intolerance and drug interactions. One approach to investigate these factors is to conduct therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) to measure ART exposure during treatment. The objective of this study was to utilize TDM to compare efavirenz and protease inhibitor pharmacokinetics in patients with and without SRDs. Methods This was a multi-center, cross-sectional open-label study in patients with HIV-1 infection receiving ART, with active (n=129) or without (n=146) SRD according to National Institute on Drug Abuse criteria. 275 subjects who were receiving either protease inhibitor- or efavirenz-based ART regimens for more than 6 months were enrolled at four HIV treatment centers with an equal distribution of SRD and non-SRD at each site. Patients were instructed during enrollment visits with regard to the importance of adherence prior to and after study visits. Demographics and routine clinical laboratory tests were recorded. Results Among the 275 patients, 47% had SRD with at least one substance. There were no significant differences between SRD and non-SRD groups for race, gender, age, or CD4 count at entry. A significantly higher proportion of patients with SRD had an entry HIV RNA plasma concentration > 75 copies/ml compared to patients without SRD (40% vs. 28%, p=0.044). Logistic regression modeling revealed an association between HIV RNA plasma concentration and African-American race (p=0.017). A significantly higher proportion of SRDs also had an efavirenz or protease inhibitor trough concentration below the desired range (23% vs. 9%, p=0.048). Significantly lower trough concentrations were noted in patients with SRDs receiving atazanavir (0.290 vs. 0.976 µg/mL) or lopinavir

  17. A Future of Possibilities: Educating Children Living in HIV Impacted Households

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagotho, Njeri

    2012-01-01

    Close to one and a half million Kenyans reportedly live with HIV/AIDS. Using qualitative in-depth interviews this study explores the ways in which parents living with HIV/AIDS navigate their social and economic environment to provide educational opportunities for their children. Barriers identified include the economic costs of a free primary…

  18. Is transmission of HIV-1 in non-viraemic serodiscordant couples possible?

    PubMed

    Stürmer, Martin; Doerr, Hans W; Berger, Annemarie; Gute, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Several studies have shown that HIV-1 transmission in serodiscordant couples is significantly reduced when the plasma viral load (pVL) in the infected partner is low or undetectable. However, residual infectivity in the seminal compartment despite undetectable pVL has also been shown. Here we report HIV-1 transmission in a serodiscordant couple despite successful antiretroviral therapy of the HIV-infected partner. The newly infected partner had a negative HIV-1 screening ELISA when his HIV-1-positive partner was already on antiretroviral treatment with undetectable pVL, which remained undetectable beyond the time of seroconversion in the initially negative partner. Frozen blood samples were analyzed phylogenetically from the HIV-1-positive patient and the newly infected partner before treatment and shortly after seroconversion, respectively; they showed a true relationship. On the basis of these data, the present report suggests that transmission of HIV-1 can occur despite undetectable pVL. This should be added to the discussion of prevention strategies, which should not advise the abandonment of safer-sex practices without referring to the relatively low but not impossible risk of HIV-1 transmission in this context. PMID:18771057

  19. Towards novel therapeutics for HIV through fragment-based screening and drug design.

    PubMed

    Tiefendbrunn, Theresa; Stout, C David

    2014-01-01

    Fragment-based drug discovery has been applied with varying levels of success to a number of proteins involved in the HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) life cycle. Fragment-based approaches have led to the discovery of novel binding sites within protease, reverse transcriptase, integrase, and gp41. Novel compounds that bind to known pockets within CCR5 have also been identified via fragment screening, and a fragment-based approach to target the TAR-Tat interaction was explored. In the context of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), fragment-based approaches have yielded fragment hits with mid-μM activity in an in vitro activity assay, as well as fragment hits that are active against drug-resistant variants of RT. Fragment-based drug discovery is a powerful method to elucidate novel binding sites within proteins, and the method has had significant success in the context of HIV proteins. PMID:25455312

  20. Demographical, Viro-Immunological, Clinical and Therapeutical Characteristics of HIV-Infected Patients in an “Epidemiologically Unexplored” Region of Italy (Calabria Region): the CalabrHIV Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Postorino, Maria Concetta; Luciani, Filippo; Mangano, Carmelo; Carpentieri, Maria Stella; Scerbo, Paolo; Priamo, Armando; Berardelli, Giuseppina; Marino, Roberto; Vallone, Alfredo; Serrao, Nicola; Pisani, Vincenzo; Costa, Chiara; Terremoto, Albano; Foti, Giuseppe; Cosco, Lucio; Calderazzo, Massimo; Corigliano, Domenico; Scordo, Preziosa; Strazzulla, Alessio; Torti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives HIV epidemics may differ among epidemiological contexts. We aimed at constructing an HIV clinical cohort whose main epidemiological, clinical and therapeutical characteristics are described (the CalabrHIV cohort, Calabria Region, Southern Italy). Methods The CalabrHIV Cohort includes all HIV patients on active follow-up in all infectious disease centers in the Calabria Region as at October 2014. All information was recorded in a common electronic database. Not-infectious co-morbidities (such as cardiovascular diseases, bone fractures, diabetes, renal failure and hypertension) were also studied. Results 548 patients (68% males; 59% aged <50 years) were included in the CalabrHIV cohort. Major risk factors were: sexual transmission (49%) and intravenous drug use (34%). 39% patients had HCV and/or HBV co-infection. Amongst 404 patients who had a complete clinical history, 34% were AIDS presenters and 49.3% had CD4 count ≤350/mm3 at HIV diagnosis. 83% patients on HAART had undetectable HIV-RNA. Hypertension was the most frequent co-morbidity (21.5%). Multimorbidity was more frequent in >50 years old patients than in <50 years old ones (30% vs. 6%; p<0.0001). Co-morbidity was more frequent in HCV and/or HBV co-infected than in HIV mono-infected patients (46.6% vs. 31.7%: p=0.0006). Conclusion This cohort presentation study sheds light, for the first time, on HIV patients’ characteristics in the Calabria Region. We showed that HIV-infected patients with chronic hepatitis were affected by concomitant not-infectious co-morbidities more than the HIV mono-infected individuals. New HCV treatments are therefore to be implemented in the co-infected population. PMID:26543523

  1. Modelling the long-term impacts on affected children of adult HIV: benefits, challenges and a possible approach.

    PubMed

    Desmond, Christopher; Bruce, Faikah; Tomlinson, M; Marlow, Marguerite B; Aber, J Lawrence; Ouifki, Rachid; Welte, Alex

    2014-07-01

    We outline the benefits, challenges and possible approaches to developing mathematical models that could be used to estimate the magnitude of negative consequences of adult HIV infection for children. Adult HIV infection can lead to numerous negative consequences for dependent children, including depression, anxiety, withdrawal from school and early sexual debut, among others. For advocacy and planning purposes, it is important to highlight and consider as many of these as possible. A focus solely on orphan numbers, which is the typical summary measure for children affected by HIV and AIDS, can be misleading. The complexity of child development that is characterized by the interaction of a multitude of proximal and distal factors, coupled with a significant lack of data on child development in the context of adult HIV infection make the development of models a challenging task. Although it may not be possible in the first attempt to develop a population-based model capable of examining family dynamics, the negative consequences together with the impact of interventions, steps in that direction can be taken. We propose approaches and assumptions that we believe will allow the development of a useful first set of models. We conclude with a brief discussion of the type of data that, if collected, would facilitate refinement and development of these models. PMID:24991900

  2. Activities of Venom Proteins and Peptides with Possible Therapeutic Applications from Bees and WASPS.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xiujuan; Guan, Suzhen; Liu, Jiwen; Ng, Charlene C W; Chan, Gabriel H H; Sze, Stephen C W; Zhang, Kalin Y; Naude, Ryno; Rolka, Krzysztof; Wong, Jack Ho; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2016-01-01

    The variety of proteins and peptides isolated from honey bee venom and wasp venom includes melittin, adiapin, apamine, bradykinin, cardiopep, mast cell degranulating peptide, mastoparan, phospholipase A2 and secapin. Some of the activities they demonstrate may find therapeutic applications. PMID:27323949

  3. The hippocampo-prefrontal pathway: a possible therapeutic target for negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Ghoshal, Ayan; Conn, P Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The hippocampo-prefrontal (H-PFC) pathway has been linked to cognitive and emotional disturbances in several psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia. Preclinical evidence from the NMDA receptor antagonism rodent model of schizophrenia shows severe pathology selective to the H-PFC pathway. It is speculated that there is an increased excitatory drive from the hippocampus to the prefrontal cortex due to dysfunctions in the H-PFC plasticity, which may serve as the basis for the behavioral consequences observed in this rodent model. Thus, the H-PFC pathway is currently emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the negative and cognitive symptom clusters of schizophrenia. Here, we have reviewed the physiological, pharmacological and functional characteristics of the H-PFC pathway and we propose that allosteric activation of glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmission can serve as a plausible therapeutic approach. PMID:25825588

  4. Ebola virus: new insights into disease aetiopathology and possible therapeutic interventions.

    PubMed

    Geisbert, Thomas W; Hensley, Lisa E

    2004-09-21

    Ebola virus (EBOV) gained public notoriety in the last decade largely as a consequence of the highly publicized isolation of a new EBOV species in a suburb of Washington, DC, in 1989, together with the dramatic clinical presentation of EBOV infection and high case-fatality rate in Africa (near 90% in some outbreaks), and the unusual and striking morphology of the virus. Furthermore, there are no vaccines or effective therapies currently available. Progress in understanding the origins of the pathophysiological changes that make EBOV infections of humans so devastating has been slow, primarily because these viruses require special containment for safe research. However, an increasing understanding of the mechanisms of EBOV pathogenesis, facilitated by the development of new tools to elucidate critical regulatory elements in the viral life cycle, is providing new targets that can be exploited for therapeutic interventions. Notably, identifying factors triggering the haemorrhagic complications that characterise EBOV infections led to the development of a strategy to modulate coagulopathy; this therapeutic modality successfully mitigated the effects of EBOV haemorrhagic fever in nonhuman primates. This review summarises our current understanding of EBOV pathogenesis and discusses various approaches to therapeutic intervention based on our current understanding of how EBOV produces a lethal infection. PMID:15383160

  5. How genetic errors in GPCRs affect their function: Possible therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Stoy, Henriette; Gurevich, Vsevolod V.

    2015-01-01

    Activating and inactivating mutations in numerous human G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are associated with a wide range of disease phenotypes. Here we use several class A GPCRs with a particularly large set of identified disease-associated mutations, many of which were biochemically characterized, along with known GPCR structures and current models of GPCR activation, to understand the molecular mechanisms yielding pathological phenotypes. Based on this mechanistic understanding we also propose different therapeutic approaches, both conventional, using small molecule ligands, and novel, involving gene therapy. PMID:26229975

  6. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils in periodontitis and their possible modulation as a therapeutic approach.

    PubMed

    Nicu, Elena A; Loos, Bruno G

    2016-06-01

    The main focus of this review is polymorphonuclear neutrophilic granulocytes. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils play a pivotal role in normal host resistance to subgingival dental-plaque biofilm. Both hyper- and hypo-responsiveness of the immune system toward the microbial challenge in periodontitis have been described. We review polymorphonuclear neutrophil physiology with emphasis on the role of neutrophil functions and dysfunctions in periodontitis. Text boxes are given at the end of each subsection, which present the current knowledge on neutrophil-modulating agents as a potential therapeutic approach in periodontitis. PMID:27045435

  7. A Randomized Trial of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Protease Inhibitors in Antiretroviral-Experienced, HIV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Lisa M.; Jiang, Hongyu; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Morse, Gene D.; DiFrancesco, Robin; Dykes, Carrie; Sista, Prakash; Bacheler, Lee; Klingman, Karin; Rinehart, Alex; Albrecht, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Objective Whether therapeutic drug monitoring of protease inhibitors (PIs) improves outcomes in HIV-infected patients is controversial. We evaluated this strategy in a randomized, open-label clinical trial, using a normalized inhibitory quotient (NIQ), which incorporates drug exposure and viral drug resistance. NIQs≤1 may predict poor outcome and identify patients who could benefit from dose escalation. Design/Methods Eligible patients had a viral load ≥1,000 copies/mL on a failing regimen, and began a new PI-containing regimen at entry. All FDA-approved PIs available during study recruitment (June 2002-May 2006) were allowed. One-hundred-eighty-three participants with NIQ≤1, based on their week 2 PI trough concentration and pre-entry drug resistance test, were randomized at week 4 to standard of care (SOC) or PI dose escalation (TDM). The primary endpoint was change in log10 plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration from randomization to 20 weeks later. Results Ninety-one subjects were randomized to SOC, 92 to TDM. NIQs increased more in the TDM arm compared to SOC (+69% versus +25%, p=0.01). Despite this, TDM and SOC arms showed no difference in outcome (+0.09 versus +0.02 log10, p=0.17). In retrospective subgroup analyses, patients with less HIV resistance to their PIs benefited from TDM (p=0.002), as did black and Hispanic patients (p=0.035 and 0.05, respectively). Differences between black and white patients persisted when accounting for PI susceptibility. Conclusions There was no overall benefit of TDM. In post-hoc, subgroup analyses, TDM appeared beneficial in black and Hispanic patients, and in patients whose virus retained some susceptibility to the PIs in their regimen. PMID:19114860

  8. Creatine supplementation as a possible new therapeutic approach for fatty liver disease: early findings.

    PubMed

    Deminice, Rafael; de Castro, Gabriela S; Brosnan, Margaret E; Brosnan, John T

    2016-08-01

    Over the last few years, consistent data have demonstrated that creatine (Cr) supplementation prevents the accumulation of fat in rat liver as well as the progression of fatty liver disease in different situations. Studies have demonstrated that Cr is effective and prevents fatty liver in high-fat and choline-deficient diets and in hepatoma cells in vitro. Because Cr synthesis is responsible for a considerable consumption of hepatic methyl groups, studies have tested the idea that Cr supplementation could modulate phospholipid formation and VLDL secretion. Studies have also demonstrated Cr is able to modulate the expression of key genes related to fatty acid oxidation in hepatocyte cell culture and in rat liver. However, to date, the mechanism by which Cr exerts protective effects against fatty liver is poorly understood. Therefore, the present review aims to summarize the studies involving the therapeutic use of Cr supplementation on fatty liver disease and to explore the mechanisms involved in one-carbon and fatty acid metabolism for the preventive effects of Cr supplementation on fat liver accumulation. Although a small number of studies have been conducted to date, we consider Cr as a new and promising therapeutic strategy to control fat accumulation in the liver as well as the progression of fatty liver disease. PMID:26832170

  9. The nitric oxide pathway and possible therapeutic options in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Johal, Tamanrit; Lees, Christoph C; Everett, Thomas R; Wilkinson, Ian B

    2014-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious multisystem disorder with diverse clinical manifestations. Although not causal, endothelial dysfunction and reduced nitric oxide bioavailability are likely to play an important role in the maternal and fetal pathophysiology of this condition. Lack of treatment modalities that can target the underlying pathophysiological changes and reverse the endothelial dysfunction frequently leads to iatrogenic preterm delivery of the fetus, causing neonatal morbidity and mortality, and the condition itself is associated with short- and longer term maternal morbidity and mortality. Drugs that target various components of the nitric oxide–soluble guanylyl cyclase pathway can help to increase NO bioavailability. The purpose of this review is to outline the current status of clinical research involving these therapeutic modalities in the context of pre-eclampsia, with the focus being on the following: nitric oxide donors, including organic nitrates and S-nitrosothiols; l-arginine, the endogenous precursor of NO; inhibitors of cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate breakdown, including sildenafil; and other novel inhibitors of NO donor metabolism. The advantages and limitations of each modality are outlined, and scope for development into established therapeutic options for pre-eclampsia is explored. PMID:24313856

  10. A Phase I Randomized Therapeutic MVA-B Vaccination Improves the Magnitude and Quality of the T Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1-Infected Subjects on HAART

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Carmen Elena; Perdiguero, Beatriz; García-Arriaza, Juan; Cepeda, Victoria; Sánchez-Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Mothe, Beatriz; Jiménez, José Luis; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Gatell, Jose M.; López Bernaldo de Quirós, Juan Carlos; Brander, Christian; García, Felipe; Esteban, Mariano

    2015-01-01

    Trial Design Previous studies suggested that poxvirus-based vaccines might be instrumental in the therapeutic HIV field. A phase I clinical trial was conducted in HIV-1-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), with CD4 T cell counts above 450 cells/mm3 and undetectable viremia. Thirty participants were randomized (2:1) to receive either 3 intramuscular injections of MVA-B vaccine (coding for clade B HIV-1 Env, Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) or placebo, followed by interruption of HAART. Methods The magnitude, breadth, quality and phenotype of the HIV-1-specific T cell response were assayed by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) in 22 volunteers pre- and post-vaccination. Results MVA-B vaccine induced newly detected HIV-1-specific CD4 T cell responses and expanded pre-existing responses (mostly against Gag, Pol and Nef antigens) that were high in magnitude, broadly directed and showed an enhanced polyfunctionality with a T effector memory (TEM) phenotype, while maintaining the magnitude and quality of the pre-existing HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses. In addition, vaccination also triggered preferential CD8+ T cell polyfunctional responses to the MVA vector antigens that increase in magnitude after two and three booster doses. Conclusion MVA-B vaccination represents a feasible strategy to improve T cell responses in individuals with pre-existing HIV-1-specific immunity. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01571466 PMID:26544853

  11. The Emerging Role of the Thrombin Receptor (PAR-1) in Melanoma Metastasis - a Possible Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Villares, Gabriel J.; Zigler, Maya; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma remains as the deadliest form of skin cancer with limited and inefficient treatment options available for patients with metastatic disease. Within the last decade, the thrombin receptor, Protease Activated Receptor-1, has been described as an essential gene involved in the progression of human melanoma. PAR-1 is known to activate adhesive, invasive and angiogenic factors to promote melanoma metastasis. It is overexpressed not only in metastatic melanoma cell lines but is also highly expressed in metastatic lesions as compared to primary nevi and normal skin. Recently, PAR-1 has been described to regulate the gap junction protein Connexin 43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin to promote the metastatic melanoma phenotype. Herein, we review the role of PAR-1 in the progression of melanoma as well as utilizing PAR-1-regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets for melanoma treatment. PMID:21378407

  12. mTORC1 signaling and IL-17 expression: Defining pathways and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Yang, Guan; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    IL-17 mediates immune responses against extracellular pathogens, and it is associated with the development and pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. The expression of IL-17 is regulated by various intracellular signaling cascades. Recently, it has been shown that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, comprised mainly of mTORC1 signaling, plays a critical role in IL-17 expression. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding mechanisms by which mTORC1 regulates IL-17 expression. mTORC1 positively modulates IL-17 expression through several pathways, i.e. STAT3, -HIF-1α, -S6K1, and -S6K2. Amino acids (AAs) also regulate IL-17 expression by being the energy source for Th17 cells, and by activating mTORC1 signaling. Altogether, the AA-mTORC1-IL-17 axis has broad therapeutic implications for IL-17-associated diseases, such as EAE, allergies, and colitis. PMID:26558536

  13. Bullous Lesions After Use of a Commercial Therapeutic Hypothermia Temperature Management System: A Possible Burn Injury?

    PubMed Central

    Wells, James M.; Rizk, Dana V.

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (TH) is a novel technique for improving the likelihood of survival with good neurologic outcome after cardiopulmonary arrest. While commercial temperature management systems (TMS) are intended to facilitate cooling of the body during TH, their operation also involves body exposure to heat. We describe the case of a 72-year-old female postarrest patient who underwent TH using a commercial water-circulating TMS and concurrent continuous renal replacement therapy. The patient developed bullous lesions on the thigh and torso suspected to constitute a scald burn injury from the TMS. Clinicians must be aware of this important adverse event when providing TH, especially in the setting of concurrent hemodialysis therapy. PMID:24066269

  14. The possible therapeutic benefits of utilizing motion gaming systems on pediatric patients presenting autism.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Stephen A; Merritte, Kristin

    2013-09-01

    Autism is a pervasive developmental disorder that affects a growing number of children in the United States each year. It is characterized by substantive differences in brain structure and function that lead to long-term cognitive and social deficits. These differences, combined with the increasing prevalence of autism in children, warrant the need for development of innovative, cost-effective and widely available alternative and complementary therapies. Motion gaming has the potential to be highly efficacious as a therapeutic technique to aid in developing memory, facial recognition, motor skills and social integration in the pediatric autistic population. This paper outlines the major deficits in the brains of individuals with autism and describes how the use of motion gaming could capitalize on the individual strengths of each patient, leading to improvements in a variety of deficits. PMID:24027887

  15. Nitric oxide synthase inhibition and oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases: possible therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Rochette, Luc; Lorin, Julie; Zeller, Marianne; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Lorgis, Luc; Cottin, Yves; Vergely, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is synthetized enzymatically from l-arginine (l-Arg) by three NO synthase isoforms, iNOS, eNOS and nNOS. The synthesis of NO is selectively inhibited by guanidino-substituted analogs of l-Arg or methylarginines such as asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), which results from protein degradation in cells. Many disease states, including cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, are associated with increased plasma levels of ADMA. The N-terminal catalytic domain of these NOS isoforms binds the heme prosthetic group as well as the redox cofactor, tetrahydrobiopterin (BH(4)) associated with a regulatory protein, calmodulin (CaM). The enzymatic activity of NOS depends on substrate and cofactor availability. The importance of BH(4) as a critical regulator of eNOS function suggests that BH(4) may be a rational therapeutic target in vascular disease states. BH(4) oxidation appears to be a major contributor to vascular dysfunction associated with hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion injury, diabetes and other cardiovascular diseases as it leads to the increased formation of oxygen-derived radicals due to NOS uncoupling rather than NO. Accordingly, abnormalities in vascular NO production and transport result in endothelial dysfunction leading to various cardiovascular disorders. However, some disorders including a wide range of functions in the neuronal, immune and cardiovascular system were associated with the over-production of NO. Inhibition of the enzyme should be a useful approach to treat these pathologies. Therefore, it appears that both a lack and excess of NO production in diseases can have various important pathological implications. In this context, NOS modulators (exogenous and endogenous) and their therapeutic effects are discussed. PMID:23859953

  16. Melatonin and Its Agonist Ramelteon in Alzheimer's Disease: Possible Therapeutic Value

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Kaur, Charanjit; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu; Brown, Gregory M.; Cardinali, Daniel P.

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-associated neurodegenerative disease characterized by the progressive loss of cognitive function, loss of memory and insomnia, and abnormal behavioral signs and symptoms. Among the various theories that have been put forth to explain the pathophysiology of AD, the oxidative stress induced by amyloid β-protein (Aβ) deposition has received great attention. Studies undertaken on postmortem brain samples of AD patients have consistently shown extensive lipid, protein, and DNA oxidation. Presence of abnormal tau protein, mitochondrial dysfunction, and protein hyperphosphorylation all have been demonstrated in neural tissues of AD patients. Moreover, AD patients exhibit severe sleep/wake disturbances and insomnia and these are associated with more rapid cognitive decline and memory impairment. On this basis, the successful management of AD patients requires an ideal drug that besides antagonizing Aβ-induced neurotoxicity could also correct the disturbed sleep-wake rhythm and improve sleep quality. Melatonin is an effective chronobiotic agent and has significant neuroprotective properties preventing Aβ-induced neurotoxic effects in a number of animal experimental models. Since melatonin levels in AD patients are greatly reduced, melatonin replacement has the potential value to be used as a therapeutic agent for treating AD, particularly at the early phases of the disease and especially in those in whom the relevant melatonin receptors are intact. As sleep deprivation has been shown to produce oxidative damage, impaired mitochondrial function, neurodegenerative inflammation, and altered proteosomal processing with abnormal activation of enzymes, treatment of sleep disturbances may be a priority for arresting the progression of AD. In this context the newly introduced melatonin agonist ramelteon can be of much therapeutic value because of its highly selective action on melatonin MT1/MT2 receptors in promoting sleep. PMID:21197086

  17. Natural products as anti-glycation agents: possible therapeutic potential for diabetic complications.

    PubMed

    Elosta, Abdulhakim; Ghous, Tahseen; Ahmed, Nessar

    2012-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus is characterised by hyperglycaemia, lipidaemia and oxidative stress and predisposes affected individuals to long-term complications afflicting the eyes, skin, kidneys, nerves and blood vessels. Increased protein glycation and the subsequent build-up of tissue advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) contribute towards the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Protein glycation is accompanied by generation of free radicals through autoxidation of glucose and glycated proteins and via interaction of AGEs with their cell surface receptors (referred to as RAGE). Glycationderived free radicals can damage proteins, lipids and nucleic acids and contribute towards oxidative stress in diabetes. There is interest in compounds with anti-glycation activity as they may offer therapeutic potential in delaying or preventing the onset of diabetic complications. Although many different compounds are under study, only a few have successfully entered clinical trials but none have yet been approved for clinical use. Whilst the search for new synthetic inhibitors of glycation continues, little attention has been paid to anti-glycation compounds from natural sources. In the last few decades the traditional system of medicine has become a topic of global interest. Various studies have indicated that dietary supplementation with combined anti-glycation and antioxidant nutrients may be a safe and simple complement to traditional therapies targeting diabetic complications. Data for forty two plants/constituents studied for anti-glycation activity is presented in this review and some commonly used medicinal plants that possess anti-glycation activity are discussed in detail including their active ingredients, mechanism of action and therapeutic potential. PMID:22268395

  18. Drosophila Aurora A regulates mitotic timing in cancer stem cells: Possible therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Caous, Renaud; Richard-Parpaillon, Laurent; Giet, Régis

    2016-05-01

    Loss of Aurora A in Drosophila neuroblasts promotes loss of cell fate, leading to brain tumors. We showed that these tumor stem cells are delayed during mitosis and efficiently segregate their chromosomes even without the spindle assembly checkpoint. Here, we discuss the possible relevance of our results to human cancers. PMID:27314090

  19. Serious Non-AIDS Events: Therapeutic Targets of Immune Activation and Chronic Inflammation in HIV Infection.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Denise C; Sereti, Irini

    2016-04-01

    In the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era, serious non-AIDS events (SNAEs) have become the major causes of morbidity and mortality in HIV-infected persons. Early ART initiation has the strongest evidence for reducing SNAEs and mortality. Biomarkers of immune activation, inflammation and coagulopathy do not fully normalize despite virologic suppression and persistent immune activation is an important contributor to SNAEs. A number of strategies aimed to reduce persistent immune activation including ART intensification to reduce residual viremia; treatment of co-infections to reduce chronic antigen stimulation; the use of anti-inflammatory agents, reducing microbial translocation as well as interventions to improve immune recovery through cytokine administration and reducing lymphoid tissue fibrosis, have been investigated. To date, there is little conclusive evidence on which strategies beyond treatment of hepatitis B and C co-infections and reducing cardiovascular risk factors will result in clinical benefits in patients already on ART with viral suppression. The use of statins seems to show early promise and larger clinical trials are underway to confirm their efficacy. At this stage, clinical care of HIV-infected patients should therefore focus on early diagnosis and prompt ART initiation, treatment of active co-infections and the aggressive management of co-morbidities until further data are available. PMID:26915027

  20. Pharmacodynamic effects and possible therapeutic uses of THIP, a specific GABA-agonist.

    PubMed

    Christensen, A V; Svendsen, O; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    1982-10-22

    THIP (4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol) is a potent and specific GABA receptor agonist which does not influence the GABA uptake system or GABA metabolizing enzymes. The specificity for the GABA receptor is also demonstrated by lack of action on monoaminergic, cholinergic, histaminergic or opiate receptors. Since in recent years GABA receptor stimulants-among others THIP--have become available many have speculated as to what clinical indication GABA-ergic stimulation might be an important element. The first suggestion was that GABA-ergic drugs by an inhibitory effect on the dopamine neurons would improve the antischizophrenic effect of neuroleptics and improve tardive dyskinesia. Furthermore, studies on brains of deceased Parkinson and Huntington's chorea patients have demonstrated a low level of GABA and its synthesizing enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) in the basal ganglia. Also in epilepsy and diseases with dementia a deficit in the GABA system has been proposed. Therefore a therapeutic strategy for these diseases may be supplementary treatment with drugs which increase GABA receptor activity. Furthermore, recent results in humans have shown that GABA agonists perhaps also could be of benefit in mania and depressions. When considering the neurophysiological elements of nociception and muscle tone it is also reasonable to suggest that GABA-ergic stimulation may reduce pain perception and muscle tone. PMID:6292818

  1. Compromised redox homeostasis, altered nitroso–redox balance, and therapeutic possibilities in atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Jillian N.; Ziberna, Klemen; Casadei, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Although the initiation, development, and maintenance of atrial fibrillation (AF) have been linked to alterations in myocyte redox state, the field lacks a complete understanding of the impact these changes may have on cellular signalling, atrial electrophysiology, and disease progression. Recent studies demonstrate spatiotemporal changes in reactive oxygen species production shortly after the induction of AF in animal models with an uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase activity ensuing in the presence of long-standing persistent AF, ultimately leading to a major shift in nitroso–redox balance. However, it remains unclear which radical or non-radical species are primarily involved in the underlying mechanisms of AF or which proteins are targeted for redox modification. In most instances, only free radical oxygen species have been assessed; yet evidence from the redox signalling field suggests that non-radical species are more likely to regulate cellular processes. A wider appreciation for the distinction of these species and how both species may be involved in the development and maintenance of AF could impact treatment strategies. In this review, we summarize how redox second-messenger systems are regulated and discuss the recent evidence for alterations in redox regulation in the atrial myocardium in the presence of AF, while identifying some critical missing links. We also examine studies looking at antioxidants for the prevention and treatment of AF and propose alternative redox targets that may serve as superior therapeutic options for the treatment of AF. PMID:26786158

  2. Association of Oxidative Stress to the Genesis of Anxiety: Implications for Possible Therapeutic Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Waseem; Silva, Carlos Eduardo Barroso; Mohammadzai, Imdad Ullah; da Rocha, Joao Batista Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, J.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by reactive species, including reactive oxygen species, reactive nitrogen species, and unbound, adventitious metal ions (e.g., iron [Fe] and copper [Cu]), is an underlying cause of various neurodegenerative diseases. These reactive species are an inevitable by-product of cellular respiration or other metabolic processes that may cause the oxidation of lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins. Oxidative stress has recently been implicated in depression and anxiety-related disorders. Furthermore, the manifestation of anxiety in numerous psychiatric disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder, depressive disorder, panic disorder, phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder, highlights the importance of studying the underlying biology of these disorders to gain a better understanding of the disease and to identify common biomarkers for these disorders. Most recently, the expression of glutathione reductase 1 and glyoxalase 1, which are genes involved in antioxidative metabolism, were reported to be correlated with anxiety-related phenotypes. This review focuses on direct and indirect evidence of the potential involvement of oxidative stress in the genesis of anxiety and discusses different opinions that exist in this field. Antioxidant therapeutic strategies are also discussed, highlighting the importance of oxidative stress in the etiology, incidence, progression, and prevention of psychiatric disorders. PMID:24669207

  3. [Extending therapeutic possibilities in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: dimethyl fumarate].

    PubMed

    Matolcsi, Judit; Rózsa, Csilla

    2015-01-30

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a novel oral therapy that has recently been approved for the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Dimethyl fumarate shows anti-inflammatory and cytoprotective properties that are thought to be mediated primarily via activation of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2- Nrf2 transcriptional pathway, which up-regulates the genes involved in the cellular response to oxidative stress. The drug was evaluated in 2 large, randomized, double-blind, multicentric, multinational, 2-year, phase III clinical trials. The DEFINE and CONFIRM trials, conducted with over 2600 adult patients suffering from RRMS, unequivocally confirmed the efficacy of DMF (2 x 240 mg daily) in reducing the annualized relapse rate (ARR) and reducing the proportion of patients with MS relapse at 2 years. Significantly reduced sustained disability progression was observed with the drug versus placebo in DEFINE, while the same tendency was seen in CONFIRM. The MRI results of the studies were also convincing: DMF significantly reduced the number of new/enlarging T2-hyperintense lesions and the number of Gd-enhancing lesions compared to placebo. Dimethyl fumarate was generally well tolerated and no safety concern has been raised. Adverse events that occurred most frequently included flushing and gastrointestinal events. The long-term efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate is currently being investigated in the ENDORSE trial, with interim results demonstrating the same results as the two previous studies. In conclusion, although further, mostly comparative data are needed to fully establish the relative efficacy and tolerability of dimethyl fumarate compared with other therapies, dimethyl-fumarate is a valuable addition to the therapeutic options available for RRMS. PMID:25842911

  4. Epilepsy and innate immune system: A possible immunogenic predisposition and related therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Matin, Nassim; Tabatabaie, Omidreza; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Lubrano, Riccardo; Pavone, Piero; Mahmood, Fahad; Gullotta, Melissa; Serra, Agostino; Di Mauro, Paola; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental studies and pathological analyses of patient brain tissue samples with refractory epilepsy suggest that inflammatory processes and neuroinflammation plays a key-role in the etiopathology of epilepsy and convulsive disorders. These inflammatory processes lead to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for blood-brain-barrier disruption and involvement of resident immune cells in the inflammation pathway, occurring within the Central Nervous System (CNS). These elements are produced through activation of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) by exogenous and endogenous ligands thereby increasing expression of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules through the activation of TLRs 2, 3, 4, and 9 as reported in murine studies.It has been demonstrated that IL-1β intracellular signaling and cascade is able to alter the neuronal excitability without cell loss. The activation of the IL-1β/ IL-1β R axis is strictly linked to the secretion of the intracellular protein MyD88, which interacts with other cell surface receptors, such as TLR4 during pathogenic recognition. Furthermore, TLR-signaling pathways are able to recognize molecules released from damaged tissues, such as damage-associated molecular patterns/proteins (DAMPs). Among these molecules, High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a component of chromatin that is passively released from necrotic cells and actively released by cells that are subject to profound stress. Moreover, recent studies have described models of epilepsy induced by the administration of bicuculline and kainic acid that highlight the nature of HMGB1-TLR4 interactions, their intracellular signaling pathway as well as their role in ictiogenesis and epileptic recurrence.The aim of our review is to focus on different branches of innate immunity and their role in epilepsy, emphasizing the role of immune related molecules in epileptogenesis and highlighting the research implications for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26260962

  5. Epilepsy and innate immune system: A possible immunogenic predisposition and related therapeutic implications

    PubMed Central

    Matin, Nassim; Tabatabaie, Omidreza; Falsaperla, Raffaele; Lubrano, Riccardo; Pavone, Piero; Mahmood, Fahad; Gullotta, Melissa; Serra, Agostino; Mauro, Paola Di; Cocuzza, Salvatore; Vitaliti, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental studies and pathological analyses of patient brain tissue samples with refractory epilepsy suggest that inflammatory processes and neuroinflammation plays a key-role in the etiopathology of epilepsy and convulsive disorders. These inflammatory processes lead to the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines responsible for blood-brain-barrier disruption and involvement of resident immune cells in the inflammation pathway, occurring within the Central Nervous System (CNS). These elements are produced through activation of Toll-Like Receptors (TLRs) by exogenous and endogenous ligands thereby increasing expression of cytokines and co-stimulatory molecules through the activation of TLRs 2, 3, 4, and 9 as reported in murine studies.It has been demonstrated that IL-1β intracellular signaling and cascade is able to alter the neuronal excitability without cell loss. The activation of the IL-1β/ IL-1β R axis is strictly linked to the secretion of the intracellular protein MyD88, which interacts with other cell surface receptors, such as TLR4 during pathogenic recognition. Furthermore, TLR-signaling pathways are able to recognize molecules released from damaged tissues, such as damage-associated molecular patterns/proteins (DAMPs). Among these molecules, High-mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) is a component of chromatin that is passively released from necrotic cells and actively released by cells that are subject to profound stress. Moreover, recent studies have described models of epilepsy induced by the administration of bicuculline and kainic acid that highlight the nature of HMGB1-TLR4 interactions, their intracellular signaling pathway as well as their role in ictiogenesis and epileptic recurrence.The aim of our review is to focus on different branches of innate immunity and their role in epilepsy, emphasizing the role of immune related molecules in epileptogenesis and highlighting the research implications for novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26260962

  6. Heteromers of μ-δ opioid receptors: new pharmacology and novel therapeutic possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2015-01-01

    Several studies suggest that heteromerization between μ (MOP) and δ (DOP) opioid receptors modulates the signalling properties of the individual receptors. For example, whereas activation of MOP receptors by an agonist induces G protein-mediated signalling, the same agonist induces β-arrestin-mediated signalling in the context of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer. Moreover, heteromer-mediated signalling is allosterically modulated by a combination of MOP and DOP receptor ligands. This has implications in analgesia given that morphine-induced antinociception can be potentiated by DOP receptor ligands. Recently reagents selectively targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer such as bivalent ligands, antibodies or membrane permeable peptides have been generated; these reagents are enabling studies to elucidate the contribution of endogenously expressed heteromers to analgesia as well as to the development of side-effects associated with chronic opioid use. Recent advances in drug screening technology have led to the identification of a MOP-DOP receptor heteromer-biased agonist that activates both G protein-mediated and β-arrestin-mediated signalling. Moreover, this heteromer-biased agonist exhibits potent antinociceptive activity but with reduced side-effects, suggesting that ligands targeting the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer form a basis for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of pain. In this review, we summarize findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of the MOP-DOP receptor heteromer and the in vitro and in vivo properties of heteromer-selective ligands. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Opioids: New Pathways to Functional Selectivity. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2015.172.issue-2 PMID:24571499

  7. [Sense of humour in schizophrenia--ability of humour reception and possibilities of its application in therapeutic interventions].

    PubMed

    Parnowska, Dorota; Braniecka, Anna; Radomska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The existing research on sense of humour in schizophrenia is focused on two main areas, mainly, assessment of patients' abilities to understand and appreciate humour and denoting the possibilities of its application in therapeutic programs concentrating on the improvement of patients' functionality and preventing illness relapses. The vast majority of the conclusions from the above mentioned research corroborate the opinion on the usefulness of developing and reinforcing sense of humour in schizophrenia, emphasizing its beneficial effect on the patients' quality of life, above all, in terms of reducing aggression, anxiety and depression as well as improving general life satisfaction and social functioning. At the same time numerous research indicate low reception of humour in schizophrenia which can negatively influence its effective usage in therapeutic interventions. Further constraint with regard to the therapy can constitute an intensified fear for being laughed at, which has been confirmed in numerous empirical reports. Therefore, it seems that addressing humorous therapeutic interventions to the above mentioned group of patients requires especially careful planning taking into consideration its cognitive and affective limitations in the perception of humour and intensified fear for being laughed at. PMID:25011239

  8. HCN2 ion channels: basic science opens up possibilities for therapeutic intervention in neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Tsantoulas, Christoforos; Mooney, Elizabeth R; McNaughton, Peter A

    2016-09-15

    Nociception - the ability to detect painful stimuli - is an invaluable sense that warns against present or imminent damage. In patients with chronic pain, however, this warning signal persists in the absence of any genuine threat and affects all aspects of everyday life. Neuropathic pain, a form of chronic pain caused by damage to sensory nerves themselves, is dishearteningly refractory to drugs that may work in other types of pain and is a major unmet medical need begging for novel analgesics. Hyperpolarisation-activated cyclic nucleotide (HCN)-modulated ion channels are best known for their fundamental pacemaker role in the heart; here, we review data demonstrating that the HCN2 isoform acts in an analogous way as a 'pacemaker for pain', in that its activity in nociceptive neurons is critical for the maintenance of electrical activity and for the sensation of chronic pain in pathological pain states. Pharmacological block or genetic deletion of HCN2 in sensory neurons provides robust pain relief in a variety of animal models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain, without any effect on normal sensation of acute pain. We discuss the implications of these findings for our understanding of neuropathic pain pathogenesis, and we outline possible future opportunities for the development of efficacious and safe pharmacotherapies in a range of chronic pain syndromes. PMID:27621481

  9. A review on possible therapeutic targets to contain obesity: The role of phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Balaji, Meriga; Ganjayi, Muni Swamy; Hanuma Kumar, Gali E N; Parim, Brahma Naidu; Mopuri, Ramgopal; Dasari, Sreenivasulu

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of obesity has increased markedly in recent decades making it a global public health concern. Since obesity is a potential risk factor in the development of hypertension, type-2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, infertility, etc., it is no more viewed as a cosmetic issue. Currently, only a few FDA-approved anti-obesity drugs like Orlistat, Lorcaserin and Phentermine-topiramate are available in the market, but they have considerable side effects. On the other hand, bariatric surgery as an alternative is associated with high risk and expensive. In view of these there is a growing trend towards natural product-based drug intervention as one of the crucial strategies for management of obesity and related ailments. In Asian traditional medicine and Ayurvedic literature a good number of plant species have been used and quoted for possible lipid-lowering and anti-obesity effects; however, many of them have not been evaluated rigorously for a definite recommendation and also lack adequate scientific validation. This review explores and updates on various plant species, their used parts, bioactive components and focuses multiple targets/pathways to contain obesity which may pave the way to develop novel and effective drugs. We also summarised different drugs in use to treat obesity and their current status. Nature is future promise of our wellbeing. PMID:26740473

  10. [Mucosal immunity in children with HIV infection and the possibility of correcting this immunity].

    PubMed

    Kostinov, M P; Suloeva, S V; Tarasova, A A; Lukushkina, E F

    2006-01-01

    The influence of bacterial lysate [see text]PC-19 on the mucosal immunity of children with HIV infection was evaluated. The action of this topical immunomodulator was found to increase the synthesis of sIgA, which was indirectly reflected in a rise of the local immunity of the upper respiratory ways, preventing the aggravation of the chronic focal infection and the main disease. It should be pointed out that in a group of HIV-infected children and adolescents with an initially high level of salivary IgG the prescription of preparation [see text]PC-19 led to its considerable decrease. A decrease in the level of IgG and a rise in the content of sIgA in saliva under the action of the preparation correlated with a decrease in inflammatory changes in the nasopharyngeal mucosa. On the basis of results obtained in this study additions to the algorithm of the prophylactic medical observation of children and adolescents with HIV infection have been developed. PMID:16758905

  11. HIV

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sumit; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop; Jain, Rambilas; Khanna, Pardeep; Mehta, Bharti; Singh, Inderjeet

    2014-01-01

    Getting to zero: zero new HIV infections, zero deaths from AIDS-related illness, zero discrimination is the theme of World AIDS Day 2012. Given the spread of the epidemic today, getting to zero may sound difficult, but significant progress is underway. The total annual loss for the entire country due to HIV is 7% of GDP, which exceeds India’s annual health expenditure in 2004. The additional loss due to loss of labor income and increased medical expenditure as measured by the external transfers, account for 5% of the country’s health expenditure and 0.23% of GDP. Given that the HIV incidence rate is only 0.27% in India, these losses are quite staggering. Despite the remarkable achievements in development of anti-retroviral therapies against HIV and the recent advances in new prevention technologies, the rate of new HIV infections continue to outpace efforts on HIV prevention and control. Thus, the development of a safe and effective vaccine for prevention and control of AIDS remains a global public health priority and the greatest opportunity to eventually end the AIDS pandemic. PMID:24056755

  12. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome in association with HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis: Views over hidden possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Esaki Muthu; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Murugavel, Kailapuri G; Balakrishnan, Pachamuthu; Sekar, Ramalingam; Lloyd, Charmaine AC; Solomon, Suniti; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran

    2007-01-01

    Gut immune components are severely compromised among persons with AIDS, which allows increased translocation of bacterial lipopolysaccharides (LPS) into the systemic circulation. These microbial LPS are reportedly increased in chronically HIV-infected individuals and findings have correlated convincingly with measures of immune activation. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is an adverse consequence of the restoration of pathogen-specific immune responses in a subset of HIV-infected subjects with underlying latent infections during the initial months of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART). Whether IRIS is the result of a response to a high antigen burden, an excessive response by the recovering immune system, exacerbated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines or a lack of immune regulation due to inability to produce regulatory cytokines remains to be determined. We theorize that those who develop IRIS have a high burden of proinflammatory cytokines produced also in response to systemic bacterial LPS that nonspecifically act on latent mycobacterial antigens. We also hypothesize that subjects that do not develop IRIS could have developed either tolerance (anergy) to persistent LPS/tubercle antigens or could have normal FOXP3+ gene and that those with defective FOXP3+ gene or those with enormous plasma LPS could be vulnerable to IRIS. The measure of microbial LPS, anti-LPS antibodies and nonspecific plasma cytokines in subjects on HAART shall predict the role of these components in IRIS. PMID:18053126

  13. Influence of perfusion and ventilation scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome in cases of possible embolism.

    PubMed

    Mercandetti, A J; Kipper, M S; Moser, K M

    1985-02-01

    We examined the influence of perfusion (Q) and ventilation (V) scans on therapeutic decision making and outcome among 229 patients referred for lung scans because embolism was suggested and found that specific V/Q scan patterns strongly influenced postscan decisions regarding initiation, maintenance or cessation of heparin therapy. These therapeutic decisions bore a relationship to outcome (recurrences and death) and disclosed decision-making deficits that need remedy by future investigational and educational efforts. PMID:4013250

  14. " … it's almost therapeutic, right? Because it's almost like that session that I never had": gay men's accounts of being a participant in HIV research.

    PubMed

    Grace, Daniel; Steinberg, Malcolm; Chown, Sarah A; Jollimore, Jody; Parry, Robin; Gilbert, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Limited research has explored how gay, bisexual and other men who have sex with men describe the impact of their involvement in HIV and sexual health research. We enrolled 166 gay and bisexual men who tested HIV-negative at a community sexual health clinic in Vancouver, British Columbia, into a year-long mixed methods study. Thirty-three of these participants who reported recent condomless anal intercourse were purposively recruited into an embedded qualitative study. Analysis revealed rich accounts of the self-described, interrelated impacts of study participation: (1) pride in contribution and community involvement (e.g., as a rationale for enrolment and an outcome of participation); (2) how one thinks about sexual behaviours and partnerships (e.g., encouraging reflection on the types and amount of sex they have had; in some cases the methods of quantitative data collection were said to have produced feelings of guilt or shame); and (3) experiencing research as a form of counselling (e.g., qualitative interviews were experienced as having a major therapeutic component to them). Our analysis underscores the importance of researchers being reflexive regarding how study participation in HIV research may impact participants, including unintended emotional and behavioural impacts. PMID:27137510

  15. Recombination of HIV type 1C (C'/C") in Ethiopia: possible link of EthHIV-1C' to subtype C sequences from the high-prevalence epidemics in India and Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Pollakis, Georgios; Abebe, Almaz; Kliphuis, Aletta; De Wit, Tobias F Rinke; Fisseha, Bitew; Tegbaru, Belete; Tesfaye, Girma; Negassa, Hailu; Mengistu, Yohannes; Fontanet, Arnaud L; Cornelissen, Marion; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2003-11-01

    The magnitude and complexity of the HIV-1 genetic diversity are major challenges for vaccine development. Investigation of the genotypes circulating in areas of high incidence, as well as their interactions, will be a milestone in the development of an efficacious vaccine. Because HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) is responsible for most of the 36 million infections worldwide we investigated the HIV-1C strains circulating in Ethiopia in a retrospective, cross-sectional study. Serum samples from HIV-1-positive individuals were collected in seven Ethiopian cities and towns. Nucleotide sequences of the gag, pol, and env genes were analyzed. We performed phylogenetic analysis by the neighbor-joining and maximum-likelihood methods with sequences from 30 isolates, and we determined recombination by the bootscanning method as implemented in the SIMPLOT program. Sequence analyses of a 2600-nucleotide fragment (including the gag gene, the protease, and the 5' half of reverse transcriptase of the pol gene) and the corresponding V1V2/C2V3 envelope regions confirmed that two distinct HIV-1C genotypes (C' and C") are cocirculating in Ethiopia, as shown previously by the analysis of the C2V3 envelope region. We have identified intrasubtype recombination between the two HIV-1C genotypes, C' and C", with 6 of the 30 (20%) analyzed viruses being recombinants. The C' sequences were phylogenetically linked to the fast spreading viruses in India and southern Africa. Furthermore, all the recombinant viruses shared the C' V1V3 region of the envelope, suggesting that the prevalence of viruses with the C' envelope is increasing compared to the C" envelope. The possibility that viruses with a C' envelope have a biological advantage over the viruses with a C" envelope should be further investigated in biological and epidemiological studies. PMID:14678607

  16. Blocking Type I Interferon Production: A New Therapeutic Option to Reduce the HIV-1-Induced Immune Activation

    PubMed Central

    Ries, Moritz; Pritschet, Kathrin; Schmidt, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the morbidity and mortality of HIV-1-infected individuals. A total of 25 licensed drugs provide the basis for an optimized virus-suppressive treatment of nearly each subject. The promises of immune reconstitution and normal life expectancy, however, fall short for a number of patients, either through inadequate recovery of CD4+ T-cell counts or the occurrence of non-AIDS defining malignancies. In this respect, the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus-associated Hodgkin lymphoma and human papillomavirus-related anal neoplasia is rising in aging HIV-1-infected individuals despite antiretroviral therapy. An important cause appears to be the HIV-1-induced chronic immune activation, propagated by inappropriate release of proinflammatory cytokines and type I interferons. This immune dysregulation can be reduced in vitro by inhibitors blocking the endosomal acidification. Recent data suggest that this concept is also of relevance in vivo, which opens the door for adjuvant immunomodulatory therapies in HIV-1 infection. PMID:22203858

  17. SupT1 Cell Infusion as a Possible Cell-Based Therapy for HIV: Results from a Pilot Study in Hu-PBMC BRGS Mice.

    PubMed

    Fior, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In a previous in vitro study, the SupT1 cell line was explored as a decoy target for HIV-1, proposing SupT1 cell infusion as a possible cell-based therapy for HIV. In the present work, the previous in vitro model was translated into an in vivo setting. Specifically, Hu-PBMC BRGS mice were infected with a high input of HIV-1 LAI (100,000 TCID50), and 40 million 30 Gy-irradiated SupT1 cells were infused weekly for 4 weeks as a therapy. Blood samples were taken to monitor CD4+ T cell count and viral load, and mice were monitored daily for signs of illness. At the earliest time point analyzed (Week 1), there was a significantly lower plasma viral load (~10-fold) in all animals treated with SupT1 cell infusion, associated with a higher CD4+ T cell count. At later time points, infection proceeded with robust viral replication and evident CD4+ T cell depletion, except in one mouse that showed complete suppression of viral replication and preservation of CD4+ T cell count. No morbidity or mortality was associated with SupT1 cell infusion. The interesting tendencies observed in the generated data suggest that this approach should be further investigated as a possible cell-based HIV therapy. PMID:27128948

  18. Humanized Mouse Models of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denton, Paul W.; Garcia, J. Victor

    2013-01-01

    Because of the limited tropism of HIV, in vivo modeling of this virus has been almost exclusively limited to other lentiviruses such as SIV that reproduce many important characteristics of HIV infection. However, there are significant genetic and biological differences among lentiviruses and some HIV-specific interventions are not effective against other lentiviruses in non-human hosts. For these reasons much emphasis has recently been placed on developing alternative animal models that support HIV replication and recapitulate key aspects of HIV infection and pathogenesis in humans. Humanized mice, CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cell transplanted immunodeficient mice and in particular mice also implanted with human thymic/liver tissue (BLT mice) that develop a functional human immune system, have been the focus of a great deal of attention as possible models to study virtually all aspects of HIV biology and pathogenesis. Humanized mice are systemically reconstituted with human lymphoid cells offering rapid, reliable and reproducible experimental systems for HIV research. Peripheral blood of humanized mice can be readily sampled longitudinally to assess reconstitution with human cells and to monitor HIV replication permitting the evaluation of multiple parameters of HIV infection such as viral load levels, CD4+ T cell depletion, immune activation, as well as the effects of therapeutic interventions. Of high relevance to HIV transmission is the extensive characterization and validation of the reconstitution with human lymphoid cells of the female reproductive tract and of the gastrointestinal tract of humanized BLT mice that renders them susceptible to both vaginal and rectal HIV infection. Other important attributes of all types of humanized mice include: 1) their small size and cost that make them broadly accessible; 2) multiple cohorts of humanized mice can be made from multiple human donors and each cohort has identical human cells, permitting control of

  19. Possible therapeutic benefits of adenosine-potentiating drugs in reducing age-related degenerative disease in dogs and cats.

    PubMed

    Scaramuzzi, R J; Baker, D J

    2003-10-01

    Adenosine is a ubiquitous, biologically important molecule that is a precursor of other biologically active molecules. It also is a component of some co-factors and has distinct physiological actions in its own right. Levels are maintained by synthesis from dietary precursors and re-cycling. The daily turnover of adenosine is very high. Adenosine can act either as a hormone by binding to adenosine receptors, four adenosine receptor subtypes have been identified, and as an intracellular modulator, after transport into the cell by membrane transporter proteins. One of the principal intracellular actions of adenosine is inhibition of the enzyme phosphodiesterase. Extracellular adenosine also has specific neuromodulatory actions on dopamine and glutamate. Selective and nonselective agonists and antagonists of adenosine are available. The tasks of developing, evaluating and exploiting the therapeutic potential of these compounds is still in its infancy. Adenosine has actions in the central nervous system (CNS), heart and vascular system, skeletal muscle and the immune system and the presence of receptors suggests potential actions in the gonads and other organs. Adenosine agonists improve tissue perfusion through actions on vascular smooth muscle and erythrocyte fluidity and they can be used to improve the quality of life in aged dogs. This article reviews the therapeutic potential of adenosine-potentiating drugs in the treatment of age-related conditions in companion animals, some of which may be exacerbated by castration or spaying at an early age. PMID:14633184

  20. The emerging role of the thrombin receptor (PAR-1) in melanoma metastasis--a possible therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Villares, Gabriel J; Zigler, Maya; Bar-Eli, Menashe

    2011-01-01

    Melanoma remains as the deadliest form of skin cancer with limited and inefficient treatment options available for patients with metastatic disease. Within the last decade, the thrombin receptor, Protease Activated Receptor-1, has been described as an essential gene involved in the progression of human melanoma. PAR-1 is known to activate adhesive, invasive and angiogenic factors to promote melanoma metastasis. It is overexpressed not only in metastatic melanoma cell lines but is also highly expressed in metastatic lesions as compared to primary nevi and normal skin. Recently, PAR-1 has been described to regulate the gap junction protein Connexin 43 and the tumor suppressor gene Maspin to promote the metastatic melanoma phenotype. Herein, we review the role of PAR-1 in the progression of melanoma as well as utilizing PAR-1-regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets for melanoma treatment. PMID:21378407

  1. HIV and the gut microbiota, partners in crime: breaking the vicious cycle to unearth new therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Vyboh, Kishanda; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Mehraj, Vikram; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a key role in health and immune system education and surveillance. The delicate balance between microbial growth and containment is controlled by the immune system. However, this balance is disrupted in cases of chronic viral infections such as HIV. This virus is capable of drastically altering the immune system and gastrointestinal environment leading to significant changes to the gut microbiota and mucosal permeability resulting in microbial translocation from the gut into the peripheral blood. The changes made locally in the gut have far-reaching consequences on the other organs of the body starting in the liver, where microbes and their products are normally filtered out, and extending to the blood and even brain. Microbial translocation and their downstream effects such as increased indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme expression and activity create a self-sustaining feedback loop which enhances HIV disease progression and constitute a vicious cycle of inflammation and immune activation combining viral and bacterial factors. Understanding this self-perpetuating cycle could be a key element in developing new therapies aimed at the gut microbiota and its fallout after infection. PMID:25759844

  2. HIV and the Gut Microbiota, Partners in Crime: Breaking the Vicious Cycle to Unearth New Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali

    2015-01-01

    The gut microbiota plays a key role in health and immune system education and surveillance. The delicate balance between microbial growth and containment is controlled by the immune system. However, this balance is disrupted in cases of chronic viral infections such as HIV. This virus is capable of drastically altering the immune system and gastrointestinal environment leading to significant changes to the gut microbiota and mucosal permeability resulting in microbial translocation from the gut into the peripheral blood. The changes made locally in the gut have far-reaching consequences on the other organs of the body starting in the liver, where microbes and their products are normally filtered out, and extending to the blood and even brain. Microbial translocation and their downstream effects such as increased indolamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) enzyme expression and activity create a self-sustaining feedback loop which enhances HIV disease progression and constitute a vicious cycle of inflammation and immune activation combining viral and bacterial factors. Understanding this self-perpetuating cycle could be a key element in developing new therapies aimed at the gut microbiota and its fallout after infection. PMID:25759844

  3. An Essential Role for Coagulase in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Development Reveals New Therapeutic Possibilities for Device-Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Zapotoczna, Marta; McCarthy, Hannah; Rudkin, Justine K; O'Gara, James P; O'Neill, Eoghan

    2015-12-15

    High-level resistance to antimicrobial drugs is a major factor in the pathogenesis of chronic Staphylococcus aureus biofilm-associated, medical device-related infections. Antimicrobial susceptibility analysis revealed that biofilms grown for ≤ 24 hours on biomaterials conditioned with human plasma under venous shear in iron-free cell culture medium were significantly more susceptible to antistaphylococcal antibiotics. Biofilms formed under these physiologically relevant conditions were regulated by SaeRS and dependent on coagulase-catalyzed conversion of fibrinogen into fibrin. In contrast, SarA-regulated biofilms formed on uncoated polystyrene in nutrient-rich bacteriological medium were mediated by the previously characterized biofilm factors poly-N-acetyl glucosamine, fibronectin-binding proteins, or autolytic activity and were antibiotic resistant. Coagulase-mediated biofilms exhibited increased antimicrobial resistance over time (>48 hours) but were always susceptible to dispersal by the fibrinolytic enzymes plasmin or nattokinase. Biofilms recovered from infected central venous catheters in a rat model of device-related infection were dispersed by nattokinase, supporting the important role of the biofilm phenotype and identifying a potentially new therapeutic approach with antimicrobials and fibrinolytic drugs, particularly during the early stages of device-related infection. PMID:26044292

  4. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  5. Which Antibody Functions are Important for an HIV Vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    HIV antibody (Ab) functions capable of preventing mucosal cell-free or cell-to-cell HIV transmission are critical for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In addition to CD4+ T cells, other potential HIV-target cell types including antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (dendritic cells, macrophages) residing at mucosal sites are infected. Moreover, the interactions between APCs and HIV lead to HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are able to neutralize a broad spectrum of HIV strains, inhibit cell-to-cell transfer, and efficiently protect from infection in the experimentally challenged macaque model. However, the 31% protection observed in the RV144 vaccine trial in the absence of detectable NAbs in blood samples pointed to the possible role of additional Ab inhibitory functions. Increasing evidence suggests that IgG Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition of Abs present at the mucosal site may play a role in protection against HIV mucosal transmission. Moreover, mucosal IgA Abs may be determinant in protection against HIV sexual transmission. Therefore, defining Ab inhibitory functions that could lead to protection is critical for further HIV vaccine design. Here, we review different inhibitory properties of HIV-specific Abs and discuss their potential role in protection against HIV sexual transmission. PMID:24995008

  6. Is it possible to diagnose the therapeutic adherence of patients with COPD in clinical practice? A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Therapeutic adherence of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is poor. It is therefore necessary to determine the magnitude of non-adherence to develop strategies to correct this behaviour. The purpose of this study was to analyse the diagnostic validity of indirect adherence methods. Methods Sample: 195 COPD patients undergoing scheduled inhaled treatment attending 5 Primary Care Centres of Malaga, Spain. Variables: Sociodemographic profile, illness data, spirometry, quality of life (St. George Respiratory Questionnaire: SGRQ), and inhaled medication counting (count of dose/pill or electronic monitoring) were collected. The patient's knowledge of COPD (Batalla test:BT),their attitude towards treatment (Morisky-Green test: MGT) and their self-reported therapeutic adherence (Haynes-Sackett test: HST) were used as methods of evaluating adherence. The follow-up consisted four visits over one year (the recruitment visit: V0; and after 1 month:V1; 6 months:V2; and 1 year:V3). Results The mean age was 69.59 (95% CI, 68.29-70.89) years old and 93.8% were male. Other findings included: 85.4% had a low educational level, 23.6% were smokers, 71.5% mild-moderate COPD stage with a FEV1 = 56.86 (SD = 18.85); exacerbations per year = 1.41(95% CI, 1-1.8). The total SGRQ score was 44.96 (95% CI, 42.46-47.46), showing a mild self-perceived impairment in health. The prevalence of adherence (dose/pill count) was 68.1% (95% CI, 60.9-75.3) at V1, 80% (95% CI, 73-87) at V2 and 84% (95% CI, 77.9) at V3. The MGT showed a specificity of 67.34% at V1, 76.19% at V2 and 69.62% at V3. The sensitivity was 53.33% at V1, 66.66% at V2 and 33.33% at V3.The BT showed a specificity of 55.1% at V1, 70.23% at V2 and 67.09% at V3. The sensitivity was 68.88% at V1, 71.43% at V2 and 46.66% at V3. Considering both tests together, the specificity was 86.73% at V1, 94.04% at V2 and 92.49% at V3 and the sensitivity was 37.77% at V1, 47.62% at V2 and 13.3% at V3. Conclusions

  7. S100A12 and the S100/Calgranulins: Emerging Biomarkers for Atherosclerosis and Possibly Therapeutic Targets.

    PubMed

    Oesterle, Adam; Bowman, Marion A Hofmann

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerosis is mediated by local and systematic inflammation. The multiligand receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) has been studied in animals and humans and is an important mediator of inflammation and atherosclerosis. This review focuses on S100/calgranulin proteins (S100A8, S100A9, and S100A12) and their receptor RAGE in mediating vascular inflammation. Mice lack the gene for S100A12, which in humans is located on chromosome 3 between S100A8 and S100A9. Transgenic mice with smooth muscle cell-targeted expression of S100A12 demonstrate increased coronary and aortic calcification, as well as increased plaque vulnerability. Serum S100A12 has recently been shown to predict future cardiovascular events in a longitudinal population study, underscoring a role for S100A12 as a potential biomarker for coronary artery disease. Genetic ablation of S100A9 or RAGE in atherosclerosis-susceptible apolipoprotein E null mice results in reduced atherosclerosis. Importantly, S100A12 and the RAGE axis can be modified pharmacologically. For example, soluble RAGE reduces murine atherosclerosis and vascular inflammation. Additionally, a class of compounds currently in phase III clinical trials for multiple sclerosis and rheumatologic conditions, the quinoline-3-carboxamides, reduce atherosclerotic plaque burden and complexity in transgenic S100A12 apolipoprotein E null mice, but have not been tested with regards to human atherosclerosis. The RAGE axis is an important mediator for inflammation-induced atherosclerosis, and S100A12 has emerged as biomarker for human atherosclerosis. Decreasing inflammation by inhibiting S100/calgranulin-mediated activation of RAGE attenuates murine atherosclerosis, and future studies in patients with coronary artery disease are warranted to confirm S100/RAGE as therapeutic target for atherosclerosis. PMID:26515415

  8. Phosphodiesterase-4 modulation as a potential therapeutic for cognitive loss in pathological and non-pathological aging: possibilities and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Rolf T; Zhang, Han-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are a super family of 11 enzyme families responsible for the hydrolysis of the intracellular secondary messengers cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP). PDE4, in particular, is highly expressed in brain regions involved with regulation of memory, anxiety, and depression, including the hippocampus, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens. Senescence has been shown to result in extreme dysregulation of the cAMP pathway in various brain regions. Thus, as a critical controller of intracellular cAMP levels, PDE4 may be a potential target for the treatment of senescence-related cognitive disorders, which could be pathological and/or non-pathological in origin. While there is great potential in the development of novel PDE4 inhibitors for treatment of senescent-cognition impairment, there are also currently many pitfalls that need to be overcome. PDE4 has four subfamilies (PDE4A, B, C, and D) that are differentially expressed throughout the brain and body, as well as at least 25 splice variants derived from alternative splicing and multiple promoter sites. PDE4 subtypes have been shown to have differential effects on behavior, and cAMP itself has also been shown to play a contrasting role in behavior in different brain regions. This review will focus on what is currently understood about PDE4 in aging, the potential for PDE4 modulation as a cognitive therapy, and current pitfalls and limitations that need to be overcome in the PDE4 field. Overall, furthering our understanding of this incredibly complex pathway may one day assist with the development of novel therapeutics for both pathological and non-pathological cognitive disorders associated with senescence. PMID:25159075

  9. Changes in key constituents of clonally propagated Artemisia annua L. during preparation of compressed leaf tablets for possible therapeutic use

    PubMed Central

    Weathers, Pamela J.; Towler, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Artemisia annua L., long used as a tea infusion in traditional Chinese medicine, produces artemisinin. Although artemisinin is currently used as artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) against malaria, oral consumption of dried leaves from the plant showed efficacy and will be less costly than ACT. Many compounds in the plant have some antimalarial activity. Unknown, however, is how these plant components change as leaves are processed into tablets for oral consumption. Here we compared extracts from fresh and dried leaf biomass with compressed leaf tablets of A. annua. Using GC-MS, nineteen endogenous compounds, including artemisinin and several of its pathway metabolites, nine flavonoids, three monoterpenes, a coumarin, and two phenolic acids, were identified and quantified from solvent extracts to determine how levels of these compounds changed during processing. Results showed that compared to dried leaves, artemisinin, arteannuin B, artemisinic acid, chlorogenic acid, scopoletin, chrysoplenetin, and quercetin increased or remained stable with powdering and compression into tablets. Dihydroartemisinic acid, monoterpenes, and chrysoplenol-D decreased with tablet formation. Five target compounds were not detectable in any of the extracts of this cultivar. In contrast to the individually measured aglycone flavonoids, using the AlCl3 method, total flavonoids increased nearly fivefold during the tablet formation. To our knowledge this is the first study documenting changes that occurred in processing dried leaves of A. annua into tablets. These results will improve our understanding of the potential use of not only this medicinal herb, but also others to afford better quality control of intact plant material for therapeutic use. PMID:25228784

  10. Schizotypy and leadership: a contrasting model for deficit symptoms, and a possible therapeutic role for sex hormones.

    PubMed

    Alias, A G

    2000-04-01

    .0162) between the self-rated ratings of voice depth (promoted by T) and of leadership, but none between those of body hair (DHT dependent) and of leadership in 47 male US National Academy of Sciences members. And 43 male US Senators had deeper voices than 36 male House members (P<0.01) who, in turn, had deeper voices than either of two groups (numbers 102 and 72) of male scientists (P<0.01). Therapeutically, before chlorpromazine, DHEA had been used in young schizophrenics with modest success in improving deficit symptoms. DHEA, or other sex hormones, or some of their natural and synthetic derivatives may prove to be valuable to treat deficit symptoms of schizophrenia in both sexes. PMID:10859637

  11. Prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, and HIV in Overseas Job Seekers of Bangladesh with the Possible Routes of Transmission.

    PubMed

    Jobayer, M; Chowdhury, S S; Shamsuzzaman, S M; Islam, M S

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis and AIDS are major public health problem globally. The aim of this study was to determine the sero-prevalence of hepatitis B, C virus and HIV infection among Bangladeshi overseas job seekers. This cross sectional study was carried out in the Department of Microbiology of Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka, Bangladesh from February 2013 to August 2013. A total of 2254 adult (18-45 years) male job seekers to Malaysia attending for health check up were enrolled. HBsAg, Anti-HCV, Anti-HIV were detected from venous blood by ELISA method using commercial kits. From the positive people, further history and information were collected by predesigned questionnaire. Prevalence of HBV was 2.35%, HCV was 0.13% and none was found positive for HIV. Prevalence of hepatitis was higher in the age group of 21-30 year and infection was more prevalent in married group. No significant relationship was found between hepatitis infection and religion, localities, profession. Only a few cases had history of possible major known route of transmission of virus. But most of them had history of taking injection or sharing blades in barber shop and history of circumcision. About 96% population had no history of hepatitis B vaccination. None was co-infected with HBV and HCV. Prevalence of hepatitis B virus infection in adult population appears to be on decline and hepatitis C and HIV infection is still low in Bangladesh. In majority of the positive person, routes of transmission of viruses were not well established. PMID:27612902

  12. Restricting HIV-1 pathways for escape using rationally designed anti–HIV-1 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Florian; Horwitz, Joshua A.; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Sather, D. Noah; Marcovecchio, Paola M.; Lee, Terri; West, Anthony P.; Gao, Han; Seaman, Michael S.; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Bjorkman, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently identified broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) that potently neutralize most HIV-1 strains are key to potential antibody-based therapeutic approaches to combat HIV/AIDS in the absence of an effective vaccine. Increasing bNAb potencies and resistance to common routes of HIV-1 escape through mutation would facilitate their use as therapeutics. We previously used structure-based design to create the bNAb NIH45-46G54W, which exhibits superior potency and/or breadth compared with other bNAbs. We report new, more effective NIH45-46G54W variants designed using analyses of the NIH45-46–gp120 complex structure and sequences of NIH45-46G54W–resistant HIV-1 strains. One variant, 45-46m2, neutralizes 96% of HIV-1 strains in a cross-clade panel and viruses isolated from an HIV-infected individual that are resistant to all other known bNAbs, making it the single most broad and potent anti–HIV-1 antibody to date. A description of its mechanism is presented based on a 45-46m2–gp120 crystal structure. A second variant, 45-46m7, designed to thwart HIV-1 resistance to NIH45-46G54W arising from mutations in a gp120 consensus sequence, targets a common route of HIV-1 escape. In combination, 45-46m2 and 45-46m7 reduce the possible routes for the evolution of fit viral escape mutants in HIV-1YU-2–infected humanized mice, with viremic control exhibited when a third antibody, 10–1074, was added to the combination. PMID:23712429

  13. HIV Type 1 Gag as a Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Gag proteins of HIV-1 are central players in virus particle assembly, release, and maturation, and also function in the establishment of a productive infection. Despite their importance throughout the replication cycle, there are currently no approved antiretroviral therapies that target the Gag precursor protein or any of the mature Gag proteins. Recent progress in understanding the structural and cell biology of HIV-1 Gag function has revealed a number of potential Gag-related targets for possible therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of HIV-1 Gag and suggest some approaches for the development of novel antiretroviral agents that target Gag. PMID:21848364

  14. A Regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee-led Intervention to Reduce the Hospital Costs of Expensive HIV Drugs.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, Camilla Munk; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2016-09-01

    In 2009, the regional Drug and Therapeutics Committee (DTC) began a series of meetings with lead specialists in infectious diseases. The role of the DTC was to engage clinicians and ensure commitment to prescribing the least expensive drugs among the clinically equivalent HAARTs (highly active antiretroviral therapy). DTC also led implementation of a national guideline. This study analyses the impact of this process on HAART consumption and expenditure. The HAART consumption and expenditure (2009-2013) was compared to forecasts produced by exponential smoothing (2004-2009). Abrupt switches between drug regimens coincided with the DTC-led meetings. Overall, HAART consumption rose 16%, while price per defined daily dose (DDD) fell 11% and the 2013 expenditure decreased 23%. The consumption of drugs addressed by the guideline rose 48%. Still, the 2013 expenditure was 41.5 million DKK (5.5 million €) (27%) lower than expected, reflecting a fall in price per DDD that coincided with the intervention. The consumption of drugs not addressed by the guideline rose 8.3%, while price per DDD fell 8.5% and the 2013 expenditure was 26.8 million DKK (3.6 million €) (19%) lower than expected. Despite a steadily increasing consumption, significant cost savings followed this DTC-led intervention. This multifaceted approach might be applicable to changing the prescribing of other expensive drug classes. PMID:27009401

  15. Essential proteins and possible therapeutic targets of Wolbachia endosymbiont and development of FiloBase--a comprehensive drug target database for Lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (Lf) is one of the oldest and most debilitating tropical diseases. Millions of people are suffering from this prevalent disease. It is estimated to infect over 120 million people in at least 80 nations of the world through the tropical and subtropical regions. More than one billion people are in danger of getting affected with this life-threatening disease. Several studies were suggested its emerging limitations and resistance towards the available drugs and therapeutic targets for Lf. Therefore, better medicine and drug targets are in demand. We took an initiative to identify the essential proteins of Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, which are indispensable for their survival and non-homologous to human host proteins. In this current study, we have used proteome subtractive approach to screen the possible therapeutic targets for wBm. In addition, numerous literatures were mined in the hunt for potential drug targets, drugs, epitopes, crystal structures, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences for filarial causing nematodes. Data obtained from our study were presented in a user friendly database named FiloBase. We hope that information stored in this database may be used for further research and drug development process against filariasis. URL: http://filobase.bicpu.edu.in. PMID:26806463

  16. Essential proteins and possible therapeutic targets of Wolbachia endosymbiont and development of FiloBase-a comprehensive drug target database for Lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis (Lf) is one of the oldest and most debilitating tropical diseases. Millions of people are suffering from this prevalent disease. It is estimated to infect over 120 million people in at least 80 nations of the world through the tropical and subtropical regions. More than one billion people are in danger of getting affected with this life-threatening disease. Several studies were suggested its emerging limitations and resistance towards the available drugs and therapeutic targets for Lf. Therefore, better medicine and drug targets are in demand. We took an initiative to identify the essential proteins of Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, which are indispensable for their survival and non-homologous to human host proteins. In this current study, we have used proteome subtractive approach to screen the possible therapeutic targets for wBm. In addition, numerous literatures were mined in the hunt for potential drug targets, drugs, epitopes, crystal structures, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences for filarial causing nematodes. Data obtained from our study were presented in a user friendly database named FiloBase. We hope that information stored in this database may be used for further research and drug development process against filariasis. URL: http://filobase.bicpu.edu.in. PMID:26806463

  17. Potentiation of cytotoxicity of paclitaxel in combination with Cl-IB-MECA in human C32 metastatic melanoma cells: A new possible therapeutic strategy for melanoma.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana S; Costa, Vera M; Diniz, Carmen; Fresco, Paula

    2013-10-01

    Metastatic melanoma monotherapies with drugs such as dacarbazine, cisplatin or paclitaxel (PXT) are associated with significant toxicity and low efficacy rates. These facts reinforce the need for development of novel agents or combinatory strategies. Cl-IB-MECA is a small molecule, orally bioavailable, well tolerated and currently under clinical trials as an anticancer agent. Our aim was to investigate a possible combinatory therapeutic strategy using PXT and Cl-IB-MECA on human C32 melanoma cells and its underlying mechanisms. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using MTT reduction, lactate dehydrogenase leakage and neutral red uptake assays, for different concentrations and combinations of both agents, at 24 and 48 h. Apoptosis was also assessed using fluorescence microscopy and through the evaluation of caspases 8, 9, and 3 activities. We demonstrated, for the first time, that combination of PXT and Cl-IB-MECA significantly increases cytotoxicity for clinically relevant concentrations. This combination seems to act synergistically in disrupting membrane integrity, but also causing lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunction. When using the lowest PTX concentration (10 ng/mL), co-incubation with CI-IB-MECA (micromolar concentrations) potentiated overall cytotoxic effects and morphological signs of apoptosis. All combinations studied enhanced caspase 8, 9, and 3 activities, suggesting the involvement of both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. The possibility that cytotoxicity elicited by Cl-IB-MECA, alone or in combination with PXT, involves adenosine receptor activation was discarded and results confirmed that oxidative stress is only involved in cytotoxicity after treatment with PXT, alone. Being melanoma a very apoptosis-resistance cancer, this combination seems to hold promise as a new therapeutic strategy for melanoma. PMID:24035253

  18. EBV and HIV-Related Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bibas, Michele; Antinori, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    HIV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders represent a heterogeneous group of diseases, arising in the presence of HIV-associated immunodeficiency. The overall prevalence of HIV-associated lymphoma is significantly higher compared to that of the general population and it continues to be relevant even after the wide availability of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) (1). Moreover, they still represent one of the most frequent cause of death in HIV-infected patients. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV), a γ-Herpesviruses, is involved in human lymphomagenesis, particularly in HIV immunocompromised patients. It has been largely implicated in the development of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders as Burkitt lymphoma (BL), Hodgkin disease (HD), systemic non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL), nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NC). Virus-associated lymphomas are becoming of significant concern for the mortality of long-lived HIV immunocompromised patients, and therefore, research of advanced strategies for AIDS-related lymphomas is an important field in cancer chemotherapy. Detailed understanding of the EBV lifecycle and related cancers at the molecular level is required for novel strategies of molecular-targeted cancer chemotherapy The linkage of HIV-related lymphoma with EBV infection of the tumor clone has several pathogenetic, prognostic and possibly therapeutic implications which are reviewed herein. PMID:21416008

  19. Pin1 liberates the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1): Must we stop it?

    PubMed

    Hou, Hai; Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mainly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the vital role of Pin1 in the infection of HIV-1 and the development of AIDS. We and others have demonstrated that Pin1, the only known cis-to-trans isomerase recognizing the pThr/pSer-Pro motifs in proteins, plays striking roles in several human diseases. Interestingly, recent evidence gradually indicates that Pin1 regulates several key steps of the life cycle of HIV-1, including the uncoating of the HIV-1 core, the reverse transcription of the RNA genome of HIV-1, and the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into human chromosomes. Whereas inhibiting Pin1 suppresses all of these key steps and attenuates the replication of HIV-1, at the same time different PIN1 gene variants are correlated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, Pin1 potentially promotes HIV-1 infection by activating multiple oncogenes and inactivating multiple tumor suppressors, extending the life span of HIV-infected cells. These descriptions suggest Pin1 as a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of HIV-1 and highlight the possibility of blocking the development of AIDS by Pin1 inhibitors. PMID:25913034

  20. Behaviour patterns which may predispose to HIV infection or further transmission and possible intervention strategy in the City of Harare. Part II.

    PubMed

    Moyo, I M; Ray, C S; Chisvo, D; Gumbo, N; Low, A; Katsumbe, T M; Mbengeranwa, O L

    1993-11-01

    The proportion of people with AIDS is increasing rapidly in Zimbabwe. Several strategies have been adopted to check the further spread of the disease. This paper discusses the behaviour patterns which may predispose to HIV infection and possible intervention strategies that may be taken in the City of Harare. Over a third (33.9 pc, n = 1,526) of the married respondents reported that they were living separately from their spouses. There was a high proportion (76.6 pc, n = 564) of single respondents who admitted to engaging in premarital sex. Fifteen pc of total respondents were engaging in casual sex. The proportion of single respondents (31.2 pc) engaging in casual sex was higher than among the married (11.1 pc). More single respondents (10.9 pc) had been paid for sex than the married (4.1 pc) whilst the proportion that had been paid for sex was similar for the single (21.2 pc) and the married (22.9 pc). The median age for starting sex was 17 years (range = three to 26) for the single and 18 years (range = four to 35) for the married respondents. Sixteen pc stated that they had an STD in 1989. Condom usage was low with only 9.2 pc always using a condom. Forty eight pc of the married respondents who have engaged in casual sexual relationships never use condoms. The main source of information on AIDS/HIV was the radio (74 pc). Most parents (66 pc) had not talked about AIDS to their children. PMID:8055550

  1. Clinical performance of the Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid test to correctly differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection in screening algorithms using third and fourth generation assays and to identify cross reactivity with the HIV-1 Western Blot

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Eric M.; Harb, Socorro; Dragavon, Joan; Coombs, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Background An accurate and rapid serologic method to differentiate HIV-2 from HIV-1 infection is required since the confirmatory HIV-1 Western Blot (WB) may demonstrate cross-reactivity with HIV-2 antibodies. Objectives To evaluate the performance of the Bio-Rad Multispot HIV-1/HIV-2 rapid assay as a supplemental test to correctly identify HIV-2 infection and identify HIV-1 WB cross-reactivity with HIV-2 in clinical samples tested at an academic medical center. Study design Between August 2008 and July 2012, clinical samples were screened for HIV using either 3rd-or 4th-generation HIV-1/2 antibody or combination antibody and HIV-1 p24 antigen assays, respectively. All repeatedly reactive samples were reflexed for Multispot rapid testing. Multispot HIV-2 and HIV-1 and HIV-2-reactive samples were further tested using an HIV-2 immunoblot assay and HIV-1 or HIV-2 RNA assays when possible. The HIV-1 WB was performed routinely for additional confirmation and to assess for HIV-2 antibody cross-reactivity. Results Of 46,061 samples screened, 890 (89.6%) of 993 repeatedly reactive samples were also Multispot-reactive: 882 for HIV-1; three for only HIV-2; and five for both HIV-1 and HIV-2. All three HIV-2-only Multispot-positives along with a single dually reactive HIV-1/2 Multispot-positive were also HIV-2 immunoblot-positive; the latter was HIV-1 RNA negative and HIV-2 RNA positive. Conclusions The Multispot rapid test performed well as a supplemental test for HIV-1/2 diagnostic testing. Four new HIV-2 infections (0.45%) were identified from among 890 Multispot-reactive tests. The use of HIV-1 WB alone to confirm HIV-1/2 screening assays may underestimate the true prevalence of HIV-2 infection in the United States. PMID:24342468

  2. Rebuilding Synaptic Architecture in HIV-1 Associated Neurocognitive Disease (HAND) – A Therapeutic Strategy Based on Modulation of Mixed Lineage Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gelbard, Harris A.; Dewhurst, Stephen; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.; Kiebala, Michelle; Polesskaya, Oksana; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2010-01-01

    Work from our laboratories has validated mixed lineage kinase type 3 (MLK3) as an enzyme pathologically activated in the central nervous system (CNS) by HIV-1 neurotoxins. In this review, we discuss MLK3 activation in the context of the neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 associated neurocognitive deficits (HAND). We use findings from the literature to substantiate the neuropathologic relevance of MLK3 to neurodegenerative disease, with an emphasis on Parkinson’s disease (PD) that shares a number of important phenotypic and neuropathologic characteristics with HAND. We discuss signal transduction pathways downstream from MLK3 activation, with an emphasis on their involvement in microglia and neurons in preclinical models of HAND. Finally, we make a case for pharmacologic intervention targeted at inhibition of MLK3 as a strategy to reverse HAND in light of the fact that combination antiretroviral therapy, despite successfully managing systemic infection of HIV-1, has been largely unsuccessful in eradicating HAND. PMID:20880503

  3. HIV/AIDS: a minority health issue.

    PubMed

    Cargill, Victoria A; Stone, Valerie E

    2005-07-01

    HIV infection among racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing health crisis. The disproportionate impact of HIV infection on racial and ethnic minorities has affected communities already struggling with many social and economic challenges, such as poverty, substance abuse, homelessness,unequal access to health care, and unequal treatment once in the health care system. Superimposed on these challenges is HIV infection, the transmission of which is facilitated by many of these factors. Although the epidemic is disproportionately affecting all racial and ethnic minorities, within these minority populations women are particularly affected. The care and management of racial and ethnic minorities who have HIV infection has been complicated by the unequal access to health care and the unequal treatment once enrolled in health care. Health insurance status, lack of concordance between the race of the patient and the provider, and satisfaction with the quality of their care all impact on treatment outcomes in this population. In addition, the provider must be aware of the many comorbid conditions that may affect the delivery of care to minority patients living with HIV infection: depression, substance and alcohol abuse, and posttraumatic stress disorders. The impact of these comorbid conditions on the therapeutic relationship, including treatment and adherence, warrants screening for these disorders and treating them when identified. Because the patient provider relationship has been repeatedly identified as a predictor of higher adherence, developing and maintaining a strong therapeutic alliance is critical. Participation of racial and ethnic minorities in HIV clinical trials, as in other disease states, has been very poor. Racial and ethnic minorities have been chronically underrepresented in HIV clinical trials, despite their overrepresentation in the HIV epidemiology. This underrepresentation seems to be the result of a combination of factors including (1) provider

  4. The same site on the integrase-binding domain of lens epithelium–derived growth factor is a therapeutic target for MLL leukemia and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Marcelo J.; Pollock, Jonathan; He, Shihan; Miao, Hongzhi; Purohit, Trupta; Yokom, Adam; Hess, Jay L.; Muntean, Andrew G.; Grembecka, Jolanta

    2014-01-01

    Lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) is a chromatin-associated protein implicated in leukemia and HIV type 1 infection. LEDGF associates with mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) fusion proteins and menin and is required for leukemic transformation. To better understand the molecular mechanism underlying the LEDGF integrase-binding domain (IBD) interaction with MLL fusion proteins in leukemia, we determined the solution structure of the MLL-IBD complex. We found a novel MLL motif, integrase domain binding motif 2 (IBM2), which binds to a well-defined site on IBD. Point mutations within IBM2 abolished leukemogenic transformation by MLL-AF9, validating that this newly identified motif is essential for the oncogenic activity of MLL fusion proteins. Interestingly, the IBM2 binding site on IBD overlaps with the binding site for the HIV integrase (IN), and IN was capable of efficiently sequestering IBD from the menin-MLL complex. A short IBM2 peptide binds to IBD directly and inhibits both the IBD-MLL/menin and IBD-IN interactions. Our findings show that the same site on IBD is involved in binding to MLL and HIV-IN, revealing an attractive approach to simultaneously target LEDGF in leukemia and HIV. PMID:25305204

  5. Therapeutic perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Fiore, Carmelo E.; Pennisi, Pietra; Tinè, Marianna

    2008-01-01

    Osteoporosis and atherosclerosis are linked by biological association. This encourages the search for therapeutic strategies having both cardiovascular and skeletal beneficial effects. Among drugs that may concordantly enhance bone density and reduce the progression of atherosclerosis we can include bisphosphonates (BP), statins, β -blockers, and possibly anti-RANKL antibodies. Available data come from experimental animals and human studies. All these treatments however lack controlled clinical studies designed to demonstrate dual-action effects. PMID:22460845

  6. Favorable therapeutic response with an antiretroviral salvage regimen in an HIV-1-positive subject infected with a CRF11-cpx virus.

    PubMed

    Tau, Pamela; Mancon, Alessandro; Mileto, Davide; Di Nardo Stuppino, Silvia; Bottani, Giulia; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Galli, Massimo; Micheli, Valeria; Rusconi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    HIV drug resistance still represents a crucial problem in antiretroviral therapy. We report a case of a naive patient, harboring a CRF11-cpx virus, which showed drug resistance mutations in the reverse transcriptase. A drug resistance genotyping test was performed for the pol (protease, reverse transcriptase, and integrase) and V3 regions. The initial clinical parameter results showed a 4 log level of HIV-RNA (12,090 cp/ml) and a very low CD4(+) cell count (35 cells/μl). We designed an initial highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) regimen including lamivudine (3TC)+abacavir (ABC)+booster ritonavir (DRV/r). The virus was highly resistant to all nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) except for ABC, tenofovir (TDF), and efavirenz (EFV) and was susceptible to all protease inhibitors (PIs) and integrase inhibitors (INIs). A salvage regimen including raltegravir (RAL)+DRV/r was started. Ten months later, the immunovirological status shows CD4(+) 142/μl and HIV-RNA <37 cp/ml. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of a treatment combination that includes RAL+DRV/r in a patient infected with a complex X4-tropic CRF11-cpx virus. PMID:24279648

  7. HIV-1 proteins, Tat and gp120, target the developing dopamine system.

    PubMed

    Fitting, Sylvia; Booze, Rosemarie M; Mactutus, Charles F

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 3.2 million children (< 15 years of age) were estimated to be living with HIV and AIDS worldwide, with the 240,000 newly infected children in the past year, i.e., another child infected approximately every two minutes [1]. The primary mode of HIV infection is through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), occurring either in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding. The effects of HIV-1 on the central nervous system (CNS) are putatively accepted to be mediated, in part, via viral proteins, such as Tat and gp120. The current review focuses on the targets of HIV-1 proteins during the development of the dopamine (DA) system, which appears to be specifically susceptible in HIV-1-infected children. Collectively, the data suggest that the DA system is a clinically relevant target in chronic HIV-1 infection, is one of the major targets in pediatric HIV-1 CNS infection, and may be specifically susceptible during development. The present review discusses the development of the DA system, follows the possible targets of the HIV-1 proteins during the development of the DA system, and suggests potential therapeutic approaches. By coupling our growing understanding of the development of the CNS with the pronounced age-related differences in disease progression, new light may be shed on the neurological and neurocognitive deficits that follow HIV-1 infection. PMID:25613135

  8. HIV-1 Proteins, Tat and gp120, Target the Developing Dopamine System

    PubMed Central

    Fitting, Sylvia; Booze, Rosemarie M.; Mactutus, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, 3.2 million children (< 15 years of age) were estimated to be living with HIV and AIDS worldwide, with the 240,000 newly infected children in the past year, i.e., another child infected approximately every two minutes [1]. The primary mode of HIV infection is through mother-to-child transmission (MTCT), occurring either in utero, intrapartum, or during breastfeeding. The effects of HIV-1 on the central nervous system (CNS) are putatively accepted to be mediated, in part, via viral proteins, such as Tat and gp120. The current review focuses on the targets of HIV-1 proteins during the development of the dopamine (DA) system, which appears to be specifically susceptible in HIV-1-infected children. Collectively, the data suggest that the DA system is a clinically relevant target in chronic HIV-1 infection, is one of the major targets in pediatric HIV-1 CNS infection, and may be specifically susceptible during development. The present review discusses the development of the DA system, follows the possible targets of the HIV-1 proteins during the development of the DA system, and suggests potential therapeutic approaches. By coupling our growing understanding of the development of the CNS with the pronounced age-related differences in disease progression, new light may be shed on the neurological and neurocognitive deficits that follow HIV-1 infection. PMID:25613135

  9. A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) for Protease Inhibitor–Based Regimens in Antiretroviral-Experienced HIV-Infected Individuals: Week 48 Results of the A5146 Study

    PubMed Central

    Albrecht, Mary; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Tierney, Camlin; Morse, Gene D.; Dykes, Carrie; Klingman, Karin L.; Demeter, Lisa M.

    2012-01-01

    Background We devised an open-label, randomized trial to evaluate whether therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of protease inhibitors (PIs) and dose escalation based upon a normalized inhibitory quotient (NIQ), which integrates PI trough concentration and drug resistance, could improve virologic outcome in PI-experienced patients with treatment failure. Secondary analyses through 48 weeks are presented. Methods Eligible HIV-infected subjects with a screening viral load of ≥1000 copies/mL initiated a new PI-based regimen at entry and had NIQ performed at week 2. Subjects with an NIQ ≤1 were randomized at week 4 to a standard-of-care (SOC) arm or TDM arm featuring PI dose escalation. Results One hundred and eighty-three subjects were randomized. There was no significant treatment difference in change from randomization to week 48 in HIV-1 RNA [P = .13, median (25th, 75th percentile log10 copies/mL change): −0.03 (−0.74, 0.62) with TDM and 0.11 (−2.3, 0.82) with SOC]. In subgroup analysis, patients with ≥0.69 active PIs benefited from TDM compared to those with <0.69 active PIs (P = .05). Conclusions While the TDM strategy of PI dose escalation did not improve virologic response at week 48 overall, in subgroup analysis, TDM favorably impacted virologic outcome in subjects taking PI-based regimens with moderate antiviral activity. PMID:22044856

  10. HIV control in vivo: Dynamical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gumel, A. B.; Moghadas, S. M.

    2004-10-01

    A deterministic model for the immunological and therapeutic control of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in vivo is studied qualitatively. In addition to analyzing the local stability of the equilibria, the global stability of the infection-free equilibrium is established. The optimal efficacy level of anti-retroviral therapy needed to eradicate HIV from the body of an HIV-infected individual is obtained.

  11. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura in the presence of connective tissue disease and HIV infection: A diagnostic and therapeutic challenge in a resource- constrained setting.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Rubeshan; Marais, Johannes Alexander; Brown, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is a catastrophic disease and may occur in the presence of other confounding diseases. We present a case of TTP in a patient with connective tissue disease and HIV infection, in whom the diagnosis and management of TTP was challenging. It is important to understand the various underlying mechanisms that drive TTP in the presence of these comorbid diseases, so that an appropriate treatment strategy can be initiated. Our patient failed an initial trial of plasma infusion alone, but responded well to plasma exchange. PMID:27245723

  12. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa. PMID:26770596

  13. The change in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture: a possible marker to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao-Tao; Hong, Qing-Xiong; Xiang, Hong-Bing

    2015-01-01

    Some reports have demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a promising treatment for patients who suffer from intractable anorexia nervosa. However, the nature of DBS may not be viewed as a standard clinical treatment option for anorexia nervosa because of the unpredictable outcome before DBS. Just like DBS in the brain, electroacupuncture at acupoints is also efficient in treating refractory anorexia nervosa. Some neuroimaging studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET) had revealed that both DBS and electroacupuncture at acupoints with electrical stimulation are related to the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism. Therefore, we hypothesize that the changes in cerebral glucose metabolism after electroacupuncture might be useful to predict the therapeutic effect of deep brain stimulation for refractory anorexia nervosa. PMID:26770596

  14. Importance of an Early HIV Antibody Differentiation Immunoassay for Detection of Dual Infection with HIV-1 and HIV-2

    PubMed Central

    Zbinden, Andrea; Dürig, Roland; Shah, Cyril; Böni, Jürg; Schüpbach, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-2 is primarily endemic in West Africa and India, however, in time of global migration, a possible HIV-2 infection or co-infection with HIV-1 should be recognized right at the time of HIV diagnosis, in order to enable optimized antiretroviral treatment. Laboratory HIV testing consists of a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test and subsequent confirmation and type differentiation by a serological test formatted as a multi-line or multi-spot assay. CDC has proposed a revised alternative HIV diagnostic strategy which, in case of a reactive result in a combined HIV1/2/O antibody + antigen screening test, comprises an HIV-1 nucleic acid test (NAT) for HIV confirmation instead of an antibody differentiation immunoassay (ADI). Only a negative NAT must be further investigated by an ADI, thus saving expenses for ADI in most instances. We have investigated this alternative strategy with respect to its recognition of dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infection. Methods and Results Anonymized data of HIV notifications of patients newly diagnosed with HIV in Switzerland between 2007 and 2014 were analysed retrospectively. In a total of 4'679 notifications, we found 35 HIV-2 infections, 9 (25.7%) of which were dually infected with HIV-1. In 7 of the 9 dual HIV-1 and HIV-2 infections, HIV-1 RNA testing at the time of HIV diagnosis was positive with concentrations from 102 to 94'300 copies/mL plasma. HIV-1 RNA data were not available for the other two cases. Conclusions The alternative CDC strategy would have missed the concomitant HIV-2 infection in at least 7, but probably even more, of the 9 dually infected patients, as the detectable HIV-1 RNA would have precluded a supplemental ADI. Early ADI is mandatory for diagnosis of dual HIV-1/HIV-2 infection and guidance of appropriate therapy. PMID:27310138

  15. Prison Therapeutic Community Treatment for Female Offenders: Profiles and Preliminary Findings for Mental Health and Other Variables (Crime, Substance Use and HIV Risk)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Joann Y.; Sacks, Stanley; Mckendrick, Karen; Banks, Steven; Schoeneberger, Marlies; Hamilton, Zachary; Stommel, Joseph; Shoemaker, Joanie

    2008-01-01

    This random assignment study compared women in a prison Therapeutic Community (TC) program with those in a cognitive-behavioral intervention. Over two thirds of study subjects received a lifetime diagnosis of severe mental disorder, nearly one-half received a diagnosis of PTSD, and virtually all reported exposure to trauma. Preliminary analysis (n…

  16. Cross-Reactivity, Epitope Spreading, and De Novo Immune Stimulation Are Possible Mechanisms of Cross-Protection of Nonvaccine Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Recipients of HPV Therapeutic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Greenfield, William; Moerman-Herzog, Andrea; Coleman, Hannah N.

    2015-01-01

    Numerous versions of human papillomavirus (HPV) therapeutic vaccines designed to treat individuals with established HPV infection, including those with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), are in development because approved prophylactic vaccines are not effective once HPV infection is established. As human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) is the most commonly detected type worldwide, all versions of HPV therapeutic vaccines contain HPV-16, and some also contain HPV-18. While these two HPV types are responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases, there are other high-risk HPV types known to cause malignancy. Therefore, it would be of interest to assess whether these HPV therapeutic vaccines may confer cross-protection against other high-risk HPV types. Data available from a few clinical trials that enrolled subjects with CINs regardless of the HPV type(s) present demonstrated clinical responses, as measured by CIN regression, in subjects with both vaccine-matched and nonvaccine HPV types. The currently available evidence demonstrating cross-reactivity, epitope spreading, and de novo immune stimulation as possible mechanisms of cross-protection conferred by investigational HPV therapeutic vaccines is discussed. PMID:25947147

  17. Overview of HIV.

    PubMed

    Klimas, Nancy; Koneru, Anne O'Brien; Fletcher, Mary Ann

    2008-06-01

    This article provides an overview and reviews the HIV pandemic, the basic biology and immunology of the virus (e.g., genetic diversity of HIV and the viral life cycle), the phases of disease progression, modes of HIV transmission, HIV testing, immune response to the infection, and current therapeutic strategies. HIV is occurring in epidemic proportions, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the US, men who have sex with men account for over half of AIDS diagnoses; racial and ethnic minorities are disproportionally affected. Factors influencing the progression and severity of HIV infection include type of immune response, coinfection (e.g., another sexually transmitted infection, including hepatitis B or C), age and behavioral and psychosocial factors. Antiretroviral therapies can achieve reduction in blood levels of the HIV virus below the limits of detection by current technology. However, effective treatment requires adherence to therapy. Patient failure to adhere to treatment regimens results in detectible circulating virus and in HIV disease progression, and is the primary cause of drug resistance. In addition to research on the immunology and virology of the disease, other studies focus on behavioral and psychosocial factors that may affect medication adherence and risk behaviors. PMID:18541903

  18. Barriers to HIV Cure.

    PubMed

    Stein, J; Storcksdieck Genannt Bonsmann, M; Streeck, H

    2016-10-01

    Since the beginning of the epidemic, more than 70 million people have been infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and about 38 million have died from acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related illnesses. While the discovery of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in the mid 90's has saved millions of lives, a complete eradication of HIV is still not possible as HIV can persist for decades in a small reservoir of latently infected cells. Once reactivated, these latently infected cells can actively produce viral particles. Recent studies suggest that several sanctuaries exist within infected individuals where HIV can remain undetected by the immune system. These cellular, anatomical and microanatomical viral reservoirs represent a major obstacle for the eradication of HIV. Here we review recent findings on potential sanctuaries of HIV and address potential avenues to overcome these immunological barriers. PMID:27620852

  19. Allicin as a possible adjunctive therapeutic drug for stage II oral submucous fibrosis: a preliminary clinical trial in a Chinese cohort.

    PubMed

    Jiang, X; Zhang, Y; Li, F; Zhu, Y; Chen, Y; Yang, S; Sun, G

    2015-12-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of allicin in the treatment of stage II oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) in a Chinese patient cohort. A randomized clinical trial was performed. Triamcinolone acetonide (TA) or allicin was injected intralesionally weekly for 16 weeks. Improvements in mouth opening, burning sensation, and oral health-related quality of life were evaluated. Forty-eight subjects completed the study without obvious adverse reactions. At 40 weeks, the net gain in mouth opening was 2.27 ± 0.84 mm in the TA group and 5.16 ± 1.04 mm in the allicin group. Burning sensation improved by 2.79 ± 0.87 in the TA group and by 4.33 ± 1.04 in the allicin group. The OHIP-14 score improved by 4.67 ± 2.94 in the TA group and by 12.58 ± 9.82 in the allicin group. Allicin intralesional injections improved mouth opening, burning sensation, and oral health-related quality of life in these stage II OSF patients. Allicin appears to be a potential adjunctive therapeutic drug. PMID:26165773

  20. HIV Infection is associated with compositional and functional shifts in the rectal mucosal microbiota

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    species and enrichment of a few opportunistic pathogens. Many imputed metagenomic functions differed between samples from HIV-negative and HIV-positive subjects not receiving cART, possibly reflecting mucosal metabolic changes associated with HIV infection. Such functional pathways may represent novel interventional targets for HIV therapy if normalizing the microbial composition or functional activity of the microbiota proves therapeutically useful. PMID:24451087

  1. Hit-and-Run Stimulation: a Novel Concept To Reactivate Latent HIV-1 Infection without Cytokine Gene Induction▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H.; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H.; Saag, Michael S.; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-01-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4+ memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1 reactivation without the induction of cytokine expression. We present here a proof-of-principle study showing that this is a possibility. In a high-throughput screening effort, we identified an HIV-1-reactivating protein factor (HRF) secreted by the nonpathogenic bacterium Massilia timonae. In primary T cells and T-cell lines, HRF triggered a high but nonsustained peak of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activity. While this short NF-κB peak potently reactivated latent HIV-1 infection, it failed to induce gene expression of several proinflammatory NF-κB-dependent cellular genes, such as those for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Dissociation of cellular and viral gene induction was achievable, as minimum amounts of Tat protein, synthesized following application of a short NF-κB pulse, triggered HIV-1 transactivation and subsequent self-perpetuated HIV-1 expression. In the absence of such a positive feedback mechanism, cellular gene expression was not sustained, suggesting that strategies modulating the NF-κB activity profile could be used to selectively trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:20538859

  2. Hit-and-run stimulation: a novel concept to reactivate latent HIV-1 infection without cytokine gene induction.

    PubMed

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H; Saag, Michael S; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-09-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4(+) memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1 reactivation without the induction of cytokine expression. We present here a proof-of-principle study showing that this is a possibility. In a high-throughput screening effort, we identified an HIV-1-reactivating protein factor (HRF) secreted by the nonpathogenic bacterium Massilia timonae. In primary T cells and T-cell lines, HRF triggered a high but nonsustained peak of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity. While this short NF-kappaB peak potently reactivated latent HIV-1 infection, it failed to induce gene expression of several proinflammatory NF-kappaB-dependent cellular genes, such as those for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Dissociation of cellular and viral gene induction was achievable, as minimum amounts of Tat protein, synthesized following application of a short NF-kappaB pulse, triggered HIV-1 transactivation and subsequent self-perpetuated HIV-1 expression. In the absence of such a positive feedback mechanism, cellular gene expression was not sustained, suggesting that strategies modulating the NF-kappaB activity profile could be used to selectively trigger HIV-1 reactivation. PMID:20538859

  3. Involvement of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors in the pathogenesis of Dupuytren's contracture: a novel target for a possible future therapeutic strategy?

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Enrica; Taurone, Samanta; Bardella, Lia; Signore, Alberto; Pompili, Elena; Sessa, Vincenzo; Chiappetta, Caterina; Fumagalli, Lorenzo; Di Gioia, Cira; Pastore, Francesco S; Scarpa, Susanna; Artico, Marco

    2015-10-01

    Dupuytren's contracture (DC) is a benign fibro-proliferative disease of the hand causing fibrotic nodules and fascial cords which determine debilitating contracture and deformities of fingers and hands. The present study was designed to characterize pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors involved in the pathogenesis, progression and recurrence of this disease, in order to find novel targets for alternative therapies and strategies in controlling DC. The expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and of growth factors was detected by immunohistochemistry in fibrotic nodules and normal palmar fascia resected respectively from patients affected by DC and carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS; as negative controls). Reverse transcription (RT)-PCR analysis and immunofluorescence were performed to quantify the expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, interleukin (IL)-1β and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by primary cultures of myofibroblasts and fibroblasts isolated from Dupuytren's nodules. Histological analysis showed high cellularity and high proliferation rate in Dupuytren's tissue, together with the presence of myofibroblastic isotypes; immunohistochemical staining for macrophages was completely negative. In addition, a strong expression of TGF-β1, IL-1β and VEGF was evident in the extracellular matrix and in the cytoplasm of fibroblasts and myofibroblasts in Dupuytren's nodular tissues, as compared with control tissues. These results were confirmed by RT-PCR and by immunofluorescence in pathological and normal primary cell cultures. These preliminary observations suggest that TGF-β1, IL-1β and VEGF may be considered potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of Dupuytren's disease (DD). PMID:26201022

  4. H3.3 G34R mutations in pediatric primitive neuroectodermal tumors of central nervous system (CNS-PNET) and pediatric glioblastomas: possible diagnostic and therapeutic implications?

    PubMed

    Gessi, Marco; Gielen, Gerrit H; Hammes, Jennifer; Dörner, Evelyn; Mühlen, Anja Zur; Waha, Andreas; Pietsch, Torsten

    2013-03-01

    Pediatric glioblastomas recently have been exon sequenced with evidence that approximately 30 % of cases harbour mutations of the histone H3.3 gene. Although studies to determinate their role in risk stratification are on-going, it remains to be determined whether H3.3 mutations could be found in other tumors such as pediatric primitive neuroectodermal tumors of the central nervous system (CNS-PNETs) and whether the presence of H3.3 mutations in glioblastomas could be used as diagnostic tool in their differential diagnosis with CNS-PNETs. We performed a large mutational pyrosequencing-based screening on 123 pediatric glioblastomas and 33 CNS-PNET. The analysis revealed that 39/123 (31.7 %) glioblastomas carry H3.3 mutations. The K27M (AAG → ATG, lysine → methionine) mutation was found in 33 glioblastomas (26 %); the G34R (GGG → AGG, glycine → arginine) was observed in 6 glioblastomas (5.5 %). However, we also identified 4 of 33 cases (11 %) of CNS-PNETs harbouring a H3.3 G34R mutation. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification analysis revealed PDGFR-alpha amplification and EGFR gain in two cases and N-Myc amplification in one case of H3.3 G34R mutated CNS-PNET. None of H3.3 mutated tumors presented a CDKN2A loss. In conclusion, because pediatric patients with glioblastoma and CNS-PNET are treated according to different therapeutic protocols, these findings may raise further concerns about the reliability of the histological diagnosis in the case of an undifferentiated brain tumor harbouring G34R H3.3 mutation. In this view, additional studies are needed to determine whether H3.3 G34 mutated CNS-PNET/glioblastomas may represent a defined tumor subtype. PMID:23354654

  5. STAT1 signaling modulates HIV-1-induced inflammatory responses and leukocyte transmigration across the blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Anathbandhu; Yang, Bo; Gendelman, Howard E; Persidsky, Yuri; Kanmogne, Georgette D

    2008-02-15

    The relationship among neuroinflammation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction, and progressive HIV-1 infection as they affect the onset and development of neuroAIDS is incompletely understood. One possible link is signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) pathways. These respond to proinflammatory and regulatory factors and could affect neuroinflammatory responses induced from infected cells and disease-affected brain tissue. Our previous works demonstrated that HIV-1 activates pro-inflammatory and interferon-alpha-inducible genes in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and that these genes are linked to the Janus kinase (JAK)/STAT pathway. We now demonstrate that HIV-1 activates STAT1, induces IL-6 expression, and diminishes expression of claudin-5, ZO-1, and ZO-2 in HBMECs. The STAT1 inhibitor, fludarabine, blocked HIV-1-induced IL-6, diminished HIV-1-induced claudin-5 and ZO-1 down-regulation, and blocked HIV-1- and IL-6-induced monocyte migration across a BBB model. Enhanced expression and activation of STAT1 and decreased claudin-5 were observed in microvessels from autopsied brains of patients with HIV-1-associated dementia. These data support the notion that STAT1 plays an integral role in HIV-1-induced BBB damage and is relevant to viral neuropathogenesis. Inhibition of STAT1 activation could provide a unique therapeutic strategy to attenuate HIV-1-induced BBB compromise and as such improve clinical outcomes. PMID:18003888

  6. HIV Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Home > HIV/AIDS > What is HIV/AIDS? HIV/AIDS This information in Spanish ( en español ) HIV symptoms Photo courtesy of AIDS.gov More information ... and brain Return to top More information on HIV symptoms Explore other publications and websites Basic Information ...

  7. HIV Interaction With Human Host: HIV-2 As a Model of a Less Virulent Infection.

    PubMed

    Azevedo-Pereira, José Miguel; Santos-Costa, Quirina

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 are the causal agents of AIDS. While similar in many ways, a significant amount of data suggests that HIV-2 is less virulent than HIV-1. In fact, HIV-2 infection is characterized by a longer asymptomatic stage and lower transmission rate, and the majority of HIV-2-infected patients can be classified as long-term non-progressors or elite controllers. The mechanisms underlying the ability of human host to naturally control HIV-2 infection are far from being completely understood. The identification of the differences between HIV-1 and HIV-2 interactions with human host cells could provide important insights into several aspects of retroviral pathogenesis that remain elusive, with significant implications for HIV vaccine development and therapy. In this review, we delve into some of the differences that notably distinguish HIV-2 from HIV-1, highlighting possible consequences in the pathogenesis and natural history of both infections. PMID:26936760

  8. Potential Anti-HIV Agents from Marine Resources: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Thanh-Sang; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) and is a global public health issue. Anti-HIV therapy involving chemical drugs has improved the life quality of HIV/AIDS patients. However, emergence of HIV drug resistance, side effects and the necessity for long-term anti-HIV treatment are the main reasons for failure of anti-HIV therapy. Therefore, it is essential to isolate novel anti-HIV therapeutics from natural resources. Recently, a great deal of interest has been expressed regarding marine-derived anti-HIV agents such as phlorotannins, sulfated chitooligosaccharides, sulfated polysaccharides, lectins and bioactive peptides. This contribution presents an overview of anti-HIV therapeutics derived from marine resources and their potential application in HIV therapy. PMID:21339954

  9. HIV Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat HIV infection (called antiretroviral therapy, or ART) the right way, every day and his or ... way, every day, the medicine to treat HIV (ART) reduces the amount of HIV (called “viral ...

  10. Isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-positive patient, and possible development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, A; Savic, B; Salemovic, D; Ranin, J; Jevtovic, Dj

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are rare but important causes of infection in HIV-positive individuals. A 28-year-old HIV-positive male presented with a high fever, non-productive cough, right subcostal pain, splenomegaly, a very low CD4 count, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a normal white blood cell count. The suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) was very high, and sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Standard quadruple anti-TB therapy was initiated, but once culture of the sample revealed Mycobacterium kansasii, pyrazinamide was withdrawn. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was initiated soon after, consisting of abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz. The patient's general condition deteriorated 2 weeks after HAART initiation, which could have been due to the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). The patient recovered and was discharged in good condition. However, the results of resistance testing of the isolated organism arrived after discharge, and showed isoniazid and streptomycin resistance. This is the first case report of M. kansasii infection from Serbia and shows the difficulties encountered during the course of treatment. PMID:26603644

  11. Clinical evaluation of BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab, an automated screening method providing discrete detection of HIV-1 p24 antigen, HIV-1 antibody, and HIV-2 antibody.

    PubMed

    Salmona, Maud; Delarue, Severine; Delaugerre, Constance; Simon, François; Maylin, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Early and accurate diagnosis is essential for optimal therapeutic outcomes in patients infected with HIV. Currently, none of the commercially available fourth-generation assays differentiate HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies (Ab) or the HIV-1 p24 antigen (Ag). The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of a novel assay, the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab. This assay uses a multiplex flow immunoassay design allowing the simultaneous detection and identification of antibodies to HIV-1 (groups M and O), HIV-2, and the HIV-1 p24 antigen, in addition to providing a traditional composite result. A total of 1,505 routine serum samples were prospectively tested. Results were compared with those from the Architect HIV Combo assay. The sensitivity of the BioPlex 2200 was 100%. The specificity assessed on repeated false-positive samples was 99.5%. In addition, 524 frozen specimens from patients known to be infected with HIV-1 or HIV-2 were tested. Of these specimens, 420 were infected with HIV-1, including 156 of known genotypes, 86 were infected with HIV-2, 7 were infected with HIV-1 and HIV-2, and 11 were from patients with acute HIV infection. Sensitivity was 100% for the HIV genotypes tested. The differentiation capabilities of the BioPlex 2200 HIV Ag-Ab assay for HIV-1, HIV-2, dual HIV-1/HIV-2, and early infections were 100%, 90.7%, 100%, and 90.9%, respectively. The BioPlex 2200 is a sensitive and specific assay that offers advantages over conventional HIV combo assays, also referred to as fourth-generation assays, to accurately differentiate and report HIV-1 p24 antigen and HIV-1 and HIV-2 antibodies. PMID:24153130

  12. Apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) Variants (Vs) a possible link between Heroin-associated Nephropathy (HAN) and HIV-associated Nephropathy (HIVAN)

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Xiqian; Rao, T. K. S.; Chander, Praveen N.; Skorecki, Karl; Singhal, Pravin C.

    2015-01-01

    In 1970s, Heroin-associated Nephropathy (HAN), one form of focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), was a predominant cause of End-stage Kidney Disease (ESKD) in African-Americans (AAs). In 1980s, with the surge of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in AAs, HAN more or less disappeared, and the incidence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus associated Nephropathy (HIVAN) markedly increased. Recent studies in AAs have identified APOL1 variants (Vs) as a major risk factor for the development and progression of non-diabetic kidney diseases including idiopathic FSGS and hypertension-attributed nephrosclerosis. These observations have also offered partial insights into the mechanisms of development, and higher rate of occurrence of both HAN and HIVAN in AAs. AAs with APOL1Vs develop idiopathic FSGS at four-fold higher rate compared to European Americans (EAs). Similarly, HIV infected AAs with APOL1Vs (if not on antiviral therapy), risk a 50% (10-fold greater) chance of developing HIVAN. It has been suggested that APOL1Vs expression may render podocytes more vulnerable to various types of injury: bacterial, viral, and others. However, in addition to genetic variants, additional factors such as persistence of a second hit may determine the nature and severity of glomerular disease. In patients with HAN, heroin or contaminants may have been the offending second insult(s) which caused renal disease in susceptible AA patients. In the 80's, since heroin-induced second hit was neither consistent nor sustained (depending on drug availability in the street), the disease was masked or replaced HIV infected patients (especially in untreated subjects), by an overwhelming second hit by the virus which was both intense as well as persistent. It appears that APOL1Vs may be one of the links between the disappearance of HAN and emergence of HIVAN in AA patients. PMID:26106375

  13. [HIV and reproductive choices].

    PubMed

    Boer, K; de Vries, J W; de Beaufort, I E

    1995-05-13

    It is estimated that there are about 120-150 hemophilic men infected with HIV in the Netherlands as well as 1000 men infected via intravenous drug use. The majority of them are in reproductive age with relationships with seronegative women. In the event they want to have a child, artificial insemination with donor sperm (KID) is an option. In 1994 there were 147 instances of insemination of 66 women with the processed semen of HIV-positive men and no infection resulted. The annual risk of HIV infection was 7.2% of a woman engaging in unprotected intercourse, according to a prospective Italian study. The risk of HIV infection per contact was estimated at 0.1-5.6%. However, it is not yet proven that processed sperm of an HIV-seropositive man can produce a pregnancy without the risk of infecting the woman. The risk of transmission of HIV to the fetus is higher in artificial insemination of a seropositive woman with the sperm of her partner. In vitro fertilization is not a sure method either for the prevention of HIV infection of the mother because of the possibility of an egg cell being infected before fertilization. HIV-infected pregnant women face the problems of caring for HIV-infected offspring. For HIV discordant couples the advice is to use both condoms for the prevention of infection and oral contraceptives for the prevention of pregnancy. In the case of a lesbian relationship, if the partners want to have a child, HIV infection is still a factor because of previous heterosexual contacts. PMID:7753239

  14. Liposomes for HIV prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Malavia, Nikita; Zurakowski, David; Schroeder, Avi; Princiotto, Amy; Laury, Anna Ray; Epstein-Barash, Hila; Sodroski, Joseph; Langer, Robert; Madani, Navid; Kohane, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    There are approximately 33.4 million adults living with HIV worldwide of which an estimated 15.7 million are women. Although there has been enormous progress in the therapy of HIV/AIDS, treatment is not curative. Prevention is therefore of paramount importance, but vaccine-based and microbicidal approaches are still in their infancy. Since women acquire the virus largely through sexual intercourse, we developed liposomal systems potentially suitable for intravaginal use to prevent HIV-1 infection. We formulated liposomes from a range of naturally-occurring and synthetic lipids with varying physicochemical properties, and tested their ability to inhibit infection of transformed cells that express receptors specific to the virus. We identified formulations with the most favorable balance between decreasing HIV infection and causing cytotoxicity (i.e. therapeutic index). The therapeutic index improved with increasing cardiolipin content, and degree of unsaturation. Tissue reaction to these formulations was benign after intravaginal instillation in an in vivo female mouse model. These results support the potential use of cardiolipin-based liposomes enriched with synthetic lipids as microbicides for the prevention of HIV infection in women. PMID:21862123

  15. [Surgical therapeutic possibilities of cartilage damage].

    PubMed

    Burkart, A C; Schoettle, P B; Imhoff, A B

    2001-09-01

    Therapy of cartilage damage is a frequent problem, especially in the young and active patient. For the treatment of a cartilage damage we have to consider the size of the defect, age and weight of the patient, meniscal tears, ligament instabilities and varus-/valgus-malalignment. Lavage, shaving and debridement are only sufficient for a short time and have no long term effect. Abrasio and drilling could be useful in eldery people. Microfracturing seems to be an effective alternative for small defects. The restoration of the cartilage surface with the use of autologous chondrocyte transplantation, osteochondral autograft transplantation and posterior condyle transfer seems to be an adequate treatment for younger patients. PMID:11572120

  16. Plasmids encoding therapeutic agents

    DOEpatents

    Keener, William K.

    2007-08-07

    Plasmids encoding anti-HIV and anti-anthrax therapeutic agents are disclosed. Plasmid pWKK-500 encodes a fusion protein containing DP178 as a targeting moiety, the ricin A chain, an HIV protease cleavable linker, and a truncated ricin B chain. N-terminal extensions of the fusion protein include the maltose binding protein and a Factor Xa protease site. C-terminal extensions include a hydrophobic linker, an L domain motif peptide, a KDEL ER retention signal, another Factor Xa protease site, an out-of-frame buforin II coding sequence, the lacZ.alpha. peptide, and a polyhistidine tag. More than twenty derivatives of plasmid pWKK-500 are described. Plasmids pWKK-700 and pWKK-800 are similar to pWKK-500 wherein the DP178-encoding sequence is substituted by RANTES- and SDF-1-encoding sequences, respectively. Plasmid pWKK-900 is similar to pWKK-500 wherein the HIV protease cleavable linker is substituted by a lethal factor (LF) peptide-cleavable linker.

  17. Women and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumer Information by Audience For Women Women and HIV Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... HIV? What should pregnant women know about HIV? HIV Quick Facts What is HIV? HIV is the ...

  18. Cancellers - Exploring the Possibility of Receptor Decoy Traps As a Superior Anti-Retroviral Strategy.

    PubMed

    Jeremiah, Sundararaj Stanley; Ohba, Kenji; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The global Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) pandemic is still spreading due to the lack of ideal anti-retroviral measures and their availability. Till date, all attempts to produce an efficient vaccine have ended with unsatisfactory results. The highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) is the only effective weapon currently available and is widely being used for curtailing the HIV pandemic. However, the HAART is also expected to fail in the near future due to the emergence and dissemination of antiviral resistance. This review sheds light on the reasons for the failure of the conventional anti-viral measures against HIV and the novel anti-retroviral strategies currently being developed. The various principles to be considered for the success of a novel anti-retroviral strategy are elaborately emphasized and an innovative concept is proposed on these lines. The proposed concept intends to use receptor decoy traps (RDT) called cancellers which are erythrocytes expressing the HIV entry receptors on their surface. If successfully developed, the cancellers would be capable of active targeting of the free HIV particles leading to the trapping of the viruses within the canceller, resulting in the neutralization of infectivity of the trapped virus. The possible ways of translating this concept into reality and the probable hurdles that can be encountered in the process are subsequently discussed. Also, the scope of cancellers in therapeutic and/or preventive strategies against HIV infection is envisaged upon their successful development. PMID:25882216

  19. HIV-related oral disease.

    PubMed

    Greenspan, D; Greenspan, J S

    1996-09-14

    Few people with HIV infection fall to experience oral lesions during the course of their disease. Oral mucosal and salivary gland manifestations include several that were not seen before the AIDS epidemic, while others are more severe in this population. Oral lesions reflect HIV status and the stage of immunosuppression, are important elements in HIV staging and classification schemes, raise pertinent questions about mucosal aspect of immunosuppression, and provide therapeutic challenges. Their pervasive nature and biological significance emphasise the importance of a careful oral examination as part of the general clinical evaluation. PMID:8806295

  20. Reevaluation of possible outcomes of infections with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, C; Colson, P; Decroly, E; Dhiver, C; Ravaux, I; Stein, A; Raoult, D

    2016-04-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that HIV infection can result in several possible incomes, including a very small proportion of individuals whose HIV replication is controlled after treatment interruption (known as HIV posttreatment controllers) or spontaneously without any treatment (known as HIV elite controllers). Both types of individuals are HIV RNA negative but HIV DNA positive, with living virus which can be stimulated ex vivo. A review was conducted to assess the literature on yet rarer cases with detectable integrated HIV DNA without HIV infectious virus in HIV-seropositive or -negative individuals. Three categories of patients were identified: (a) HIV-seropositive individuals with apparent spontaneous cure from their HIV infection, (b) HIV-seronegative children born to HIV-infected mothers and (c) highly exposed seronegative adults. Validity criteria were proposed to assess the presence of integrated HIV DNA as possible or unquestionable in these three categories. Only three articles among the 22 ultimately selected fulfilled these criteria. Among the highly exposed seronegative subjects, some individuals were described as being without integrated HIV DNA, probably because these subjects were not investigated using relevant, highly sensitive methods. Finally, we propose a definition of spontaneous cure of HIV infection based on clinical, immunologic and virologic criteria. PMID:26794031

  1. Stem cell transplantation for lymphoma patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Michieli, Mariagrazia; Mazzucato, Mario; Tirelli, Umberto; De Paoli, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The advent of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has radically changed incidence characteristics and prognosis of HIV-positive patients affected by lymphomas. At this time there is consensus in the literature that, in first line, HIV-positive patients should always be treated with curative intent preferentially following the same approach used in the HIV-negative counterpart. On the contrary, an approach of salvage therapy in HIV-positive lymphomas is still a matter of debate given that for a wide range of relapsed or resistant HIV-negative Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients, autologous peripheral or allogeneic stem cell transplantation are among the established options. In the pre-HAART era, therapeutic options derived from pioneering experiences gave only anecdotal success, either when transplantation was used to cure lymphomas or to improve HIV infection itself. Concerns relating to the entity, quality, and kinetics of early and late immune reconstitutions and the possible worsening of underlying viroimmunological conditions were additional obstacles. Currently, around 100 relapsed or resistant HIV-positive lymphomas have been treated with an autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (APSCT) in the HAART era. Published data compared favorably with any previous salvage attempt showing a percentage of complete remission ranging from 48% to 90%, and overall survival ranging from 36% to 85% at median follow-up approaching 3 years. However, experiences are still limited and have given somewhat confounding indications, especially concerning timing and patients' selection for APSCT and feasibility and outcome for allogeneic stem cell transplant. Moreover, little data exist on the kinetics of immunological reconstitution after APSCT or relevant to the outcome of HIV infection. The aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge of the role of allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation as a modality in the cure of

  2. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health ...

  3. HIV/AIDS and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    If you have HIV/AIDS and find out you are pregnant or think you may be pregnant, you should let your health care provider know as soon as possible. Some HIV/AIDS medicines may harm your baby. Your health care ...

  4. HIV Molecular Immunology 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette Tina Marie; Barouch, Dan; Koup, Richard; de Boer, Rob; Moore, John P.; Brander, Christian; Haynes, Barton F.; Walker, Bruce D.

    2015-02-03

    HIV Molecular Immunology is a companion volume to HIV Sequence Compendium. This publication, the 2014 edition, is the PDF version of the web-based HIV Immunology Database (http://www.hiv.lanl.gov/content/immunology/). The web interface for this relational database has many search options, as well as interactive tools to help immunologists design reagents and interpret their results. In the HIV Immunology Database, HIV-specific B-cell and T-cell responses are summarized and annotated. Immunological responses are divided into three parts, CTL, T helper, and antibody. Within these parts, defined epitopes are organized by protein and binding sites within each protein, moving from left to right through the coding regions spanning the HIV genome. We include human responses to natural HIV infections, as well as vaccine studies in a range of animal models and human trials. Responses that are not specifically defined, such as responses to whole proteins or monoclonal antibody responses to discontinuous epitopes, are summarized at the end of each protein section. Studies describing general HIV responses to the virus, but not to any specific protein, are included at the end of each part. The annotation includes information such as crossreactivity, escape mutations, antibody sequence, TCR usage, functional domains that overlap with an epitope, immune response associations with rates of progression and therapy, and how specific epitopes were experimentally defined. Basic information such as HLA specificities for T-cell epitopes, isotypes of monoclonal antibodies, and epitope sequences are included whenever possible. All studies that we can find that incorporate the use of a specific monoclonal antibody are included in the entry for that antibody. A single T-cell epitope can have multiple entries, generally one entry per study. Finally, maps of all defined linear epitopes relative to the HXB2 reference proteins are provided.

  5. The Impact of Unprotected T Cells in RNAi-based Gene Therapy for HIV-AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is highly effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in stably transduced T-cell lines. For the development of a durable gene therapy that prevents viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The future in vivo application of such a gene therapy protocol will reach only a fraction of the T cells, such that HIV-1 replication will continue in the unmodified T cells, thereby possibly frustrating the therapy by generation of HIV-1 variants that escape from the inhibition imposed by the protected cells. We studied virus inhibition and evolution in pure cultures of shRNA-expressing cells versus mixed cell cultures of protected and unprotected T cells. The addition of the unprotected T cells indeed seems to accelerate HIV-1 evolution and escape from a single shRNA inhibitor. However, expression of three antiviral shRNAs from a single lentiviral vector prevents virus escape even in the presence of unprotected cells. These results support the idea to validate the therapeutic potential of this anti-HIV approach in appropriate in vivo models. PMID:24336172

  6. HIV-1 cellular and tissue replication patterns in infected humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Araínga, Mariluz; Su, Hang; Poluektova, Larisa Y.; Gorantla, Santhi; Gendelman, Howard E.

    2016-01-01

    Humanized mice have emerged as a testing platform for HIV-1 pathobiology by reflecting natural human disease processes. Their use to study HIV-1 biology, virology, immunology, pathogenesis and therapeutic development has served as a robust alternative to more-well developed animal models for HIV/AIDS. A critical component in reflecting such human pathobiology rests in defining the tissue and cellular sites for HIV-1 infection. To this end, we examined the tissue sites for viral infection in bone marrow, blood, spleens, liver, gut, brain, kidney and lungs of human CD34+ hematopoietic stem cell engrafted virus-infected NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid Il2rgtm1Wjl/SzJ mice. Cells were analyzed by flow cytometry and sorted from species mixtures defined as CD34+ lineage negative progenitor cells, CD14+CD16+ monocyte-macrophages and central, stem cell and effector memory T cells. The cell distribution and viral life cycle were found dependent on the tissue compartment and time of infection. Cell subsets contained HIV-1 total and integrated DNA as well as multi-spliced and unspliced RNA in divergent proportions. The data support the idea that humanized mice can provide a means to examine the multifaceted sites of HIV-1 replication including, but not limited to progenitor cells and monocyte-macrophages previously possible only in macaques and human. PMID:26996968

  7. HIV disclosure among adults living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Mayfield Arnold, E; Rice, E; Flannery, D; Rotheram-Borus, M J

    2008-01-01

    Research on disclosure among heterosexual adult person(s) living with HIV (PLH) was reviewed, omitting disclosure of parental HIV to children. Disclosure has been studied within five additional relational contexts: with partners, family members, friends, healthcare professionals and in work settings. Disclosure is higher among women than men, among Latino and white compared to African-American families, and among younger compared to older HIV-positive adults. Most PLH disclose to their sexual partners and family members, yet there is a significant minority who do not disclose. Similarly, rates of disclosure to employers range from 27-68%, suggesting broad variability in perceived consequences of employment disclosures. Of concern, 40% of PLH do not consistently disclose to their healthcare professionals. Rather than examine HIV disclosures in the context of relationships, it is possible to understand disclosures around personal identity. Disclosure decisions are often made to tell everyone (making HIV status a central attribute of one's identity), no one (requiring strategies for securing social support while remaining anonymous) or some people (requiring strategic decisions based on context). Given that disclosure decisions are central to personal identity, future data on disclosure and interventions designed to increase disclosure or comfort with disclosure must focus on communication strategies adopted by PLH to present a coherent identity. PMID:18278618

  8. HIV infection and the gastrointestinal immune system

    PubMed Central

    Brenchley, JM; Douek, DC

    2009-01-01

    There has recently been a resurgence of interest in the gastrointestinal pathology observed in patients infected with HIV. The gastrointestinal tract is a major site of HIV replication, which results in massive depletion of lamina propria CD4 T cells during acute infection. Highly active antiretroviral therapy leads to incomplete suppression of viral replication and substantially delayed and only partial restoration of gastrointestinal CD4 T cells. The gastrointestinal pathology associated with HIV infection comprises significant enteropathy with increased levels of inflammation and decreased levels of mucosal repair and regeneration. Assessment of gut mucosal immune system has provided novel directions for therapeutic interventions that modify the consequences of acute HIV infection. PMID:19079157

  9. Eliminating the latent HIV reservoir by reactivation strategies

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Tolstrup, Martin; Winckelmann, Anni; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) has transformed HIV from a deadly to a chronic disease, but HIV patients are still burdened with excess morbidity and mortality, long-term toxicities from cART, stigmatization, and insufficient access to cART worldwide. Thus, a cure for HIV would have enormous impact on society as well as the individual. As the complexity and mechanisms of HIV persistence during therapy are being unraveled, new therapeutic targets for HIV eradication are discovered. Substances that activate HIV production in the latently infected cells have recently received much attention. By turning on expression of latent HIV proviruses, reactivation strategies could contribute to the eradication HIV infection. Compounds that are currently being or soon to be tested in clinical trials are emphasized. The results from these trials will provide important clues as to whether or not reactivating strategies could become significant components of a cure for HIV. PMID:23563519

  10. Two-Drug Treatment Approaches in HIV: Finally Getting Somewhere?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean G; Nyaku, Amesika N; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly decreased AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, the benefits of ART are only realized through adherence to lifelong treatment. Though contemporary antiretroviral (ARV) drugs have fewer adverse effects in comparison to older ARV drugs, many agents are associated with negative or unknown long-term effects. There is increasing evidence that two-drug (dual-therapy) regimens may be an effective alternative to the currently recommended three-drug (triple-therapy) regimens. In this review, we provide a comprehensive and critical review of recently completed and ongoing trials of dual-therapy regimens in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. We also review current HIV/AIDS society recommendations regarding dual therapy as well as future therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26886135

  11. Get Tested for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for HIV Browse Sections The Basics Overview What Is HIV? ... 1 of 7 sections The Basics: What Is HIV? What is HIV? HIV stands for human immunodeficiency ...

  12. HIV Treatment: The Basics

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Treatment: The Basics (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Antiretroviral therapy (ART) ... reduces the risk of HIV transmission . How do HIV medicines work? HIV attacks and destroys the infection- ...

  13. Gut barrier structure, mucosal immunity and intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis and treatment of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Tincati, Camilla; Douek, Daniel C; Marchetti, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, extensive work has been carried out in the field of microbial translocation in HIV infection, ranging from studies on its clinical significance to investigations on its pathogenic features. In the present work, we review the most recent findings on this phenomenon, focusing on the predictive role of microbial translocation in HIV-related morbidity and mortality, the mechanisms by which it arises and potential therapeutic approaches. From a clinical perspective, current work has shown that markers of microbial translocation may be useful in predicting clinical events in untreated HIV infection, while conflicting data exist on their role in cART-experienced subjects, possibly due to the inclusion of extremely varied patient populations in cohort studies. Results from studies addressing the pathogenesis of microbial translocation have improved our knowledge of the damage of the gastrointestinal epithelial barrier occurring in HIV infection. However, the extent to which mucosal impairment translates directly to increased gastrointestinal permeability remains an open issue. In this respect, novel work has established a role for IL-17 and IL-22-secreting T cell populations in limiting microbial translocation and systemic T-cell activation/inflammation, thus representing a possible target of immune-therapeutic interventions shown to be promising in the animal model. Further, recent reports have not only confirmed the presence of a dysbiotic intestinal community in the course of HIV infection but have also shown that it may be linked to mucosal damage, microbial translocation and peripheral immune activation. Importantly, technical advances have also shed light on the metabolic activity of gut microbes, highlighting the need for novel therapeutic approaches to correct the function, as well as the composition, of the gastrointestinal microbiota. PMID:27073405

  14. MACROMOLECULAR THERAPEUTICS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-01-01

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines – (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. PMID:24747162

  15. Human Microbiome and HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yihong; Yang, Liying; Pei, Zhiheng; Poles, Michael; Abrams, William R.; Malamud, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Understanding of the human microbiome continues to grow rapidly; however, reports on changes in the microbiome after HIV infection are still limited. This review surveys the progress made in methodology associated with microbiome studies and highlights the remaining challenges to this field. Studies have shown that commensal oral, gut, vaginal, and penile bacteria are vital to the health of the human immune system. Our studies on crosstalk among oral and gastrointestinal soluble innate factors, HIV, and microbes indicated that the oral and gut microbiome was altered in the HIV-positive samples compared to the negative controls. The importance of understanding the bacterial component of HIV/AIDS, and likelihood of “crosstalk” between viral and bacterial pathogens, will help in understanding the role of the microbiome in HIV-infected individuals and facilitate identification of novel antiretroviral factors for use as novel diagnostics, microbicides, or therapeutics against HIV infection. PMID:22193889

  16. Revisiting HIV-1 uncoating.

    PubMed

    Arhel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    HIV uncoating is defined as the loss of viral capsid that occurs within the cytoplasm of infected cells before entry of the viral genome into the nucleus. It is an obligatory step of HIV-1 early infection and accompanies the transition between reverse transcription complexes (RTCs), in which reverse transcription occurs, and pre-integration complexes (PICs), which are competent to integrate into the host genome. The study of the nature and timing of HIV-1 uncoating has been paved with difficulties, particularly as a result of the vulnerability of the capsid assembly to experimental manipulation. Nevertheless, recent studies of capsid structure, retroviral restriction and mechanisms of nuclear import, as well as the recent expansion of technical advances in genome-wide studies and cell imagery approaches, have substantially changed our understanding of HIV uncoating. Although early work suggested that uncoating occurs immediately following viral entry in the cell, thus attributing a trivial role for the capsid in infected cells, recent data suggest that uncoating occurs several hours later and that capsid has an all-important role in the cell that it infects: for transport towards the nucleus, reverse transcription and nuclear import. Knowing that uncoating occurs at a later stage suggests that the viral capsid interacts extensively with the cytoskeleton and other cytoplasmic components during its transport to the nucleus, which leads to a considerable reassessment of our efforts to identify potential therapeutic targets for HIV therapy. This review discusses our current understanding of HIV uncoating, the functional interplay between infectivity and timely uncoating, as well as exposing the appropriate methods to study uncoating and addressing the many questions that remain unanswered. PMID:21083892

  17. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Saag, Michael S.; Benson, Constance A.; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J.; Gallant, Joel E.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Mugavero, Michael J.; Sax, Paul E.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Landovitz, Raphael J.; Smith, Davey M.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. OBJECTIVE To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. EVIDENCE REVIEW A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. FINDINGS Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory

  18. Pigeon therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Harlin, R W

    2000-01-01

    This article examines therapeutics for pigeons, discussing their physiology and reproduction, housing, and nutrition. The author also looks at ways to prevent infection, while discussing treatments for various viral diseases, such as paramyxovirus and pigeon herpesvirus, bacterial infections, such as paratyphoid, and parasitic diseases. Drug dosages are listed for antibiotics, antifungals, antiparasitics, and vaccines. PMID:11228828

  19. Feedlot therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Apley, M D; Fajt, V R

    1998-07-01

    This article discusses therapeutic approaches to conditions commonly encountered in feedlots. Challenges discussed include bovine respiratory complex, tracheal edema, atypical interstitial pneumonia, footrot, toe abscesses, mycoplasma arthritis, cardiovascular disease, lactic acidosis, bloat, coccidiosis, central nervous system diseases, abscesses and cellulitis, pregnancy management and abortion, and ocular disease. PMID:9704416

  20. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  1. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Stephen C.; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip D.; Smith, Bryan R.; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'etre of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multi-step work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  2. Emerging strategies to deplete the HIV reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Archin, Nancie M.; Margolis, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review This review highlights recent studies undertaken to further advance the search for successful approaches to eradicate HIV infection. Recent findings Small pharmacological compounds such as histone deacetylase inhibitors, inhibitors of bromodomain and extraterminal proteins such as JQ1, and protein kinase C activators such as bryostatin and prostratin are proposed as putative candidates for inducing the expression of latent HIV in a so-called ‘shock and kill’ or ‘kick and kill’ strategy for HIV eradication. However, in order to achieve viral clearance, it is thought likely these compounds will have to be administered in concert with strategies that augment clearance of virus-infected cells in patients that have long been aviremic on successful antiretroviral therapy (ART). Several candidate therapies for this purpose are at hand, such as therapeutic HIV vaccines – recently shown to promote robust cytotoxic T cell responses and blunt viral rebound after ART interruption in clinical studies. HIV-infected patients treated during early infection may be ideal candidates for early studies to test these strategies, as early ART has been shown to limit the establishment of an HIV reservoir. Summary HIV latency is multifactorial and thus the eradication of HIV infection may require multiple approaches. Translational efforts employing pharmacological methods to target HIV latency should evaluate in parallel the additional potential benefits of invigorating the immune response of HIV-infected individuals, and limiting the size of the reservoir via early ART. PMID:24296585

  3. Cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing activity of serum IgG from a rabbit immunized with gp41 fused to IgG1 Fc: Possible role of the prolonged half-life of the immunogen

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei-Yun; Wang, Yanping; Mankowski, Marie K.; Ptak, Roger G.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    The elicitation of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies in humans remains a major challenge in developing a viable AIDS vaccine. We hypothesized that prolonged exposure to candidate vaccine immunogens could enhance the elicitation of such antibodies. In an attempt to develop HIV-1 vaccine immunogens with prolonged half-lives and increased stability, we constructed a fusion protein, gp41Fc, in which a truncated HIV-1 gp4189.6 was fused to a human IgG1 Fc. Gp41Fc is stable in solution, retains its antigenic structure and is highly immunogenic in rabbits. The serum titers reached 1:102,400 for the gp41Fc and 1:5,120 for gp14089.6. Rabbit IgG neutralized diverse HIV-1 isolates and HIV-2, and the neutralization activity was attributed to gp41-specific IgG. The concentration of the gp41Fc in the serum correlated with the neutralization activity of rabbit IgG which recognized mostly conformation-independent epitopes on gp41 and predominantly bound to peptides derived from the gp41 immunodominant loop region. These results suggest that the prolonged half-life of gp41Fc in the serum may enhance the generation of cross-reactive neutralizing antibodies. Further research is needed to confirm and extend these results which may have implications for the development of vaccine immunogens with enhanced capability to elicit cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:19084043

  4. HIV-2 Genetic Evolution in Patients with Advanced Disease Is Faster than That in Matched HIV-1 Patients▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Skar, Helena; Borrego, Pedro; Wallstrom, Timothy C.; Mild, Mattias; Marcelino, José Maria; Barroso, Helena; Taveira, Nuno; Leitner, Thomas; Albert, Jan

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate and compare the evolutionary rates of HIV-2 and HIV-1. Two HIV-2 data sets from patients with advanced disease were compared to matched HIV-1 data sets. The estimated mean evolutionary rate of HIV-2 was significantly higher than the estimated rate of HIV-1, both in the gp125 and in the V3 region of the env gene. In addition, the rate of synonymous substitutions in gp125 was significantly higher for HIV-2 than for HIV-1, possibly indicating a shorter generation time or higher mutation rate of HIV-2. Thus, the lower virulence of HIV-2 does not appear to translate into a lower rate of evolution. PMID:20463072

  5. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N

    2016-04-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  6. The G-quadruplex-forming aptamer AS1411 potently inhibits HIV-1 attachment to the host cell

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Rosalba; Butovskaya, Elena; Lago, Sara; Garzino-Demo, Alfredo; Pannecouque, Christophe; Palù, Giorgio; Richter, Sara N.

    2016-01-01

    AS1411 is a G-rich aptamer that forms a stable G-quadruplex structure and displays antineoplastic properties both in vitro and in vivo. This oligonucleotide has undergone phase 2 clinical trials. The major molecular target of AS1411 is nucleolin (NCL), a multifunctional nucleolar protein also present in the cell membrane where it selectively mediates the binding and uptake of AS1411. Cell-surface NCL has been recognised as a low-affinity co-receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) anchorage on target cells. Here we assessed the anti-HIV-1 properties and underlying mechanism of action of AS1411. The antiviral activity of AS1411 was determined towards different HIV-1 strains, host cells and at various times post-infection. Acutely, persistently and latently infected cells were tested, including HIV-1-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a healthy donor. Mechanistic studies to exclude modes of action other than virus binding via NCL were performed. AS1411 efficiently inhibited HIV-1 attachment/entry into the host cell. The aptamer displayed antiviral activity in the absence of cytotoxicity at the tested doses, therefore displaying a wide therapeutic window and favourable selectivity indexes. These findings, besides validating cell-surface-expressed NCL as an antiviral target, open the way for the possible use of AS1411 as a new potent and promisingly safe anti-HIV-1 agent. PMID:27032748

  7. HIV Transmission

    MedlinePlus

    ... pre-chewed by an HIV-infected person. The contamination occurs when infected blood from a caregiver’s mouth ... pre-chewed by an HIV-infected person. The contamination occurs when infected blood from a caregiver’s mouth ...

  8. HIV Entry Inhibitors and Their Potential in HIV Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Keduo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2013-01-01

    This review discusses recent progress in the development of anti-HIV agents targeting the viral entry process. The three main classes (attachment inhibitors, co-receptor binding inhibitors, and fusion inhibitors) are further broken down by specific mechanism of action and structure. Many of these inhibitors are in advanced clinical trials, including the HIV maturation inhibitor bevirimat, from the authors’ laboratories. In addition, the CCR5 inhibitor maraviroc has recently been FDA-approved. Possible roles for these agents in anti-HIV therapy, including treatment of virus resistant to current drugs, are also discussed. PMID:18720513

  9. Therapeutic imprinting of the immune system: towards a remission of AIDS in primates?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Our inability to cure HIV/AIDS is related to the ability of the virus to establish reservoirs during treatment. In order to develop new strategies, it is certainly essential that a suitable animal model be implemented. In the recent work of Shytaj et al., it has been possible to inhibit viral replication to levels below the assay detection limit in the macaque AIDS model. Moreover, different therapeutic regimens applied to the rhesus macaque AIDS model (herein reviewed), including ours, are starting to show the potential to induce, following therapy suspension, conditions reminiscent of a drug-free control of the infection. PMID:22978787

  10. Therapeutic alliance.

    PubMed

    Fox, Valerie

    2002-01-01

    I have been very fortunate in my journey of mental illness. I respond well to medication, but I don't think that is the complete answer to living successfully with serious, persistent mental illness. I believe a person's environment is also of utmost importance, enabling the person suffering with mental illness to continually grow in life. I found early in my struggle with mental illness a psychiatrist with whom I have always had a very good rapport. Until recently I didn't know that what I have with this psychiatrist is professionally known as a therapeutic alliance. Over the years, when I need someone to talk over anything that is troubling to me, I seek my psychiatrist. A therapeutic alliance is non-judgmental; it is nourishing; and finally it is a relationship of complete trust. Perhaps persons reading this article who have never experienced this alliance will seek it. I believe it can make an insecure person secure; a frightened person less frightened; and allow a person to continue the journey of mental health with a sense of belief in oneself. PMID:12433224

  11. Strategies for universalistic and targeted HIV prevention.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Padian, N

    1997-10-01

    The controversy over "targeted" versus "universalistic" programs for HIV prevention has persisted throughout the history of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the United States and in some European countries. Building on previous analyses, we outline methods for integrating universalistic and targeted HIV prevention programming. The outline considers possible synergy between targeted and universalistic programs, rather than a forced choice between the two. Components within this framework include a continuum of the intensity of targeted programs, specification of local risk behavior populations, categories of risk behavior, and HIV seroprevalence within local risk-behavior populations. Given the scarce resources currently available, preventing all new HIV infections is not a realistic public health goal, but with better use of current scientific knowledge, it should be possible to greatly reduce the rate of new HIV infections. PMID:9358108

  12. HIV and malaria interactions: where do we stand?

    PubMed

    González, Raquel; Ataíde, Ricardo; Naniche, Denise; Menéndez, Clara; Mayor, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    Reversing the spread of HIV infection and the incidence of malaria constitute two of the Millenium Development Goals. However, despite recent achievements, both diseases still entail global heath problems. Furthermore, their overlapping geographical distribution raises concerns and challenges for potential immunological, clinical and therapeutic interactions. It has been reported that HIV infection increases malaria susceptibility and reduces the efficacy of antimalarial drugs. On the other hand, the effect of malaria on HIV-infected individuals has also been explored, with the parasitic infection increasing the risk of HIV disease progression and mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The spread of malaria and parasite resistance to antimalarials could also be accelerated by HIV-associated immunosuppresion. Current knowledge of the epidemiological, clinical, immunological and therapeutic interactions of the two diseases is reviewed in this article. We focus on the latest available data, pointing out key future research areas and challenges of the field. PMID:22339190

  13. HIV Medication Adherence

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Treatment HIV Medication Adherence (Last updated 3/1/2016; last reviewed 3/1/2016) Key Points Medication adherence means sticking ... exactly as prescribed. Why is adherence to an HIV regimen important? Adherence to an HIV regimen gives ...

  14. HIV among Transgender People

    MedlinePlus

    ... of transgender Virginians . Richmond, VA: Virginia HIV Community Planning Committee and Virginia Department of Health; 2007. Accessed April 14, 2016. Additional ... HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ...

  15. Infection with human retroviruses other than HIV-1: HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4.

    PubMed

    Nicolás, David; Ambrosioni, Juan; Paredes, Roger; Marcos, M Ángeles; Manzardo, Christian; Moreno, Asunción; Miró, José M

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 is the most prevalent retrovirus, with over 30 million people infected worldwide. Nevertheless, infection caused by other human retroviruses like HIV-2, HTLV-1, HTLV-2, HTLV-3 and HTLV-4 is gaining importance. Initially confined to specific geographical areas, HIV-2, HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are becoming a major concern in non-endemic countries due to international migration flows. Clinical manifestations of retroviruses range from asymptomatic carriers to life-threatening conditions, such as AIDS in HIV-2 infection or adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis in HTLV-1 infection. HIV-2 is naturally resistant to some antiretrovirals frequently used to treat HIV-1 infection, but it does have effective antiretroviral therapy options. Unfortunately, HTLV still has limited therapeutic options. In this article, we will review the epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, pathogenic and therapeutic aspects of infections caused by these human retroviruses. PMID:26112187

  16. Screening and diagnosis for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    HIV testing; HIV screening; HIV screening test; HIV confirmatory test ... A positive result on a screening test does not confirm that the person has HIV infection. More tests are needed to confirm HIV infection. A negative test ...

  17. Human genetic variability and HIV treatment response.

    PubMed

    Haas, David W

    2006-07-01

    Access to potent antiretroviral medications greatly reduces morbidity and mortality due to HIV/AIDS, but drug toxicity limits treatment success in many individuals. The field of pharmacogenomics strives to understand the influence of human genetic variants in response to medications. Investigators have begun to identify associations among human genetic variants, predisposition to HIV drug toxicities, and likelihood of virologic response. These include associations among abacavir hypersensitivity reactions, HLA type, and hsp70-hom genotypes, and among CYP2B6 polymorphisms, efavirenz pharmacokinetics, and central nervous system symptoms. Pharmacogenomics also holds great promise to suggest novel targets for drug development. The discovery that a naturally occurring, nonfunctional variant of the HIV receptor gene CCR5 protected against HIV infection encouraged the development of CCR5 antagonists. Through continued translational and applied research, pharmacogenomics will ultimately benefit persons living with HIV worldwide by identifying new therapeutic targets and through individualized drug prescribing that is informed by human genetic testing. PMID:16608660

  18. T-cell therapies for HIV: Preclinical successes and current clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Jones, R Brad; Nixon, Douglas F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been successful in controlling HIV infection, it does not provide a permanent cure, requires lifelong treatment, and HIV-positive individuals are left with social concerns such as stigma. The recent application of T cells to treat cancer and viral reactivations post-transplant offers a potential strategy to control HIV infection. It is known that naturally occurring HIV-specific T cells can inhibit HIV initially, but this response is not sustained in the majority of people living with HIV. Genetically modifying T cells to target HIV, resist infection, and persist in the immunosuppressive environment found in chronically infected HIV-positive individuals might provide a therapeutic solution for HIV. This review focuses on successful preclinical studies and current clinical strategies using T-cell therapy to control HIV infection and mediate a functional cure solution. PMID:27265874

  19. Reward, attention, and HIV-related risk in HIV+ individuals.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian A; Kronemer, Sharif I; Rilee, Jessica J; Sacktor, Ned; Marvel, Cherie L

    2016-08-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is often contracted through engaging in risky reward-motivated behaviors such as needle sharing and unprotected sex. Understanding the factors that make an individual more vulnerable to succumbing to the temptation to engage in these risky behaviors is important to limiting the spread of HIV. One potential source of this vulnerability concerns the degree to which an individual is able to resist paying attention to irrelevant reward information. In the present study, we examine this possible link by characterizing individual differences in value-based attentional bias in a sample of HIV+ individuals with varying histories of risk-taking behavior. Participants learned associations between experimental stimuli and monetary reward outcome. The degree of attentional bias for these reward-associated stimuli, reflected in their ability to capture attention when presented as task-irrelevant distractors, was then assessed both immediately and six months following reward learning. Value-driven attentional capture was related to substance abuse history and non-planning impulsiveness during the time leading up to contraction of HIV as measured via self-report. These findings suggest a link between the ability to ignore reward-associated information and prior HIV-related risk-taking behavior. Additionally, particular aspects of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders were related to attentional bias, including motor deficits commonly associated with HIV-induced damage to the basal ganglia. PMID:26484383

  20. HIV among Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS ... HIV infection—National HIV Behavioral Surveillance, 20 U.S. cities, 2013 . HIV Surveillance Special Report 13 . Accessed January ...

  1. The cytokine network in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Alfano, M; Poli, G

    2002-12-01

    Cytokines are major controller of HIV replication and represent, at the same time, a target for viral-induced immune dysregulation. This mutual relationship has profound implications for both active HIV replication and immune-mediated governance of latency; in addition, cytokines have therapeutic value in the perspective of immune reconstitution. In the current article we will review the most relevant aspects emerged in almost 20 years of research in this area with particular reference to the distinct, but interconnected contribution of the most simple (cell lines) to the most complex (animal) models of HIV infection. PMID:12462389

  2. Drug interactions associated with methadone, buprenorphine, cocaine, and HIV medications: implications for pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    McCance-Katz, Elinore F.

    2010-01-01

    Pregnancy in substance-abusing women with HIV/AIDS presents a complex clinical challenge. Opioid-dependent women need treatment with opioid therapy during pregnancy to protect the health of mother and developing fetus. However, opioid therapies, methadone and buprenorphine, may have drug interactions with some HIV medications that can have adverse effects leading to suboptimal clinical outcomes. Further, many opioid-dependent individuals have problems with other forms of substance abuse, for example, cocaine abuse, that could also contribute to poor clinical outcomes in a pregnant woman. Physiological changes, including increased plasma volume and increased hepatic and renal blood flow, occur in the pregnant woman as the pregnancy progresses and may alter medication needs with the potential to exacerbate drug interactions, although there is sparse literature on this issue. Knowledge of possible drug interactions between opioids, other abused substances such as cocaine, HIV therapeutics, and other frequently required medications such as antibiotics and anticonvulsants is important to assuring the best possible outcomes in the pregnant woman with opioid dependence and HIV/AIDS. PMID:20965297

  3. The Pharmacology of TUG-891, a Potent and Selective Agonist of the Free Fatty Acid Receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120), Demonstrates Both Potential Opportunity and Possible Challenges to Therapeutic Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Brian D.; Shimpukade, Bharat; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Butcher, Adrian J.; Pediani, John D.; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Heathcote, Helen; Tobin, Andrew B.; Ulven, Trond

    2013-01-01

    TUG-891 [3-(4-((4-fluoro-4′-methyl-[1,1′-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy)phenyl)propanoic acid] was recently described as a potent and selective agonist for the long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) receptor 4 (FFA4; previously G protein–coupled receptor 120, or GPR120). Herein, we have used TUG-891 to further define the function of FFA4 and used this compound in proof of principle studies to indicate the therapeutic potential of this receptor. TUG-891 displayed similar signaling properties to the LCFA α-linolenic acid at human FFA4 across various assay end points, including stimulation of Ca2+ mobilization, β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 recruitment, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Activation of human FFA4 by TUG-891 also resulted in rapid phosphorylation and internalization of the receptor. While these latter events were associated with desensitization of the FFA4 signaling response, removal of TUG-891 allowed both rapid recycling of FFA4 back to the cell surface and resensitization of the FFA4 Ca2+ signaling response. TUG-891 was also a potent agonist of mouse FFA4, but it showed only limited selectivity over mouse FFA1, complicating its use in vivo in this species. Pharmacologic dissection of responses to TUG-891 in model murine cell systems indicated that activation of FFA4 was able to mimic many potentially beneficial therapeutic properties previously reported for LCFAs, including stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells, enhancing glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and inhibiting release of proinflammatory mediators from RAW264.7 macrophages, which suggests promise for FFA4 as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Together, these results demonstrate both potential but also significant challenges that still need to be overcome to therapeutically target FFA4. PMID:23979972

  4. The pharmacology of TUG-891, a potent and selective agonist of the free fatty acid receptor 4 (FFA4/GPR120), demonstrates both potential opportunity and possible challenges to therapeutic agonism.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Brian D; Shimpukade, Bharat; Mackenzie, Amanda E; Butcher, Adrian J; Pediani, John D; Christiansen, Elisabeth; Heathcote, Helen; Tobin, Andrew B; Ulven, Trond; Milligan, Graeme

    2013-11-01

    TUG-891 [3-(4-((4-fluoro-4'-methyl-[1,1'-biphenyl]-2-yl)methoxy)phenyl)propanoic acid] was recently described as a potent and selective agonist for the long chain free fatty acid (LCFA) receptor 4 (FFA4; previously G protein-coupled receptor 120, or GPR120). Herein, we have used TUG-891 to further define the function of FFA4 and used this compound in proof of principle studies to indicate the therapeutic potential of this receptor. TUG-891 displayed similar signaling properties to the LCFA α-linolenic acid at human FFA4 across various assay end points, including stimulation of Ca²⁺ mobilization, β-arrestin-1 and β-arrestin-2 recruitment, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Activation of human FFA4 by TUG-891 also resulted in rapid phosphorylation and internalization of the receptor. While these latter events were associated with desensitization of the FFA4 signaling response, removal of TUG-891 allowed both rapid recycling of FFA4 back to the cell surface and resensitization of the FFA4 Ca²⁺ signaling response. TUG-891 was also a potent agonist of mouse FFA4, but it showed only limited selectivity over mouse FFA1, complicating its use in vivo in this species. Pharmacologic dissection of responses to TUG-891 in model murine cell systems indicated that activation of FFA4 was able to mimic many potentially beneficial therapeutic properties previously reported for LCFAs, including stimulating glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from enteroendocrine cells, enhancing glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and inhibiting release of proinflammatory mediators from RAW264.7 macrophages, which suggests promise for FFA4 as a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes and obesity. Together, these results demonstrate both potential but also significant challenges that still need to be overcome to therapeutically target FFA4. PMID:23979972

  5. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Understanding HIV/AIDS AIDS was first reported in the United States in ... and has since become a major worldwide epidemic. AIDS is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus, or ...

  6. Newer Gene Editing Technologies toward HIV Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Manjunath, N.; Yi, Guohua; Dang, Ying; Shankar, Premlata

    2013-01-01

    Despite the great success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in ameliorating the course of HIV infection, alternative therapeutic approaches are being pursued because of practical problems associated with life-long therapy. The eradication of HIV in the so-called “Berlin patient” who received a bone marrow transplant from a CCR5-negative donor has rekindled interest in genome engineering strategies to achieve the same effect. Precise gene editing within the cells is now a realistic possibility with recent advances in understanding the DNA repair mechanisms, DNA interaction with transcription factors and bacterial defense mechanisms. Within the past few years, four novel technologies have emerged that can be engineered for recognition of specific DNA target sequences to enable site-specific gene editing: Homing Endonuclease, ZFN, TALEN, and CRISPR/Cas9 system. The most recent CRISPR/Cas9 system uses a short stretch of complementary RNA bound to Cas9 nuclease to recognize and cleave target DNA, as opposed to the previous technologies that use DNA binding motifs of either zinc finger proteins or transcription activator-like effector molecules fused to an endonuclease to mediate sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Unlike RNA interference, which requires the continued presence of effector moieties to maintain gene silencing, the newer technologies allow permanent disruption of the targeted gene after a single treatment. Here, we review the applications, limitations and future prospects of novel gene-editing strategies for use as HIV therapy. PMID:24284874

  7. Stem cell-based therapies for HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Olivier; Yadav, Swati Seth; An, Dong Sung

    2016-08-01

    One of the current focuses in HIV/AIDS research is to develop a novel therapeutic strategy that can provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS without daily drug treatment and, ultimately, a cure for HIV/AIDS. Hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy aims to reconstitute the patient immune system by transplantation of genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells with anti-HIV genes. Hematopoietic stem cells can self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into mature immune cells. In theory, anti-HIV gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells can continuously provide HIV-resistant immune cells throughout the life of a patient. Therefore, hematopoietic stem cell-based anti-HIV gene therapy has a great potential to provide a life-long remission of HIV/AIDS by a single treatment. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the recent progress of developing anti-HIV genes, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem progenitor cells, engraftment and reconstitution of anti-HIV gene-modified immune cells, HIV inhibition in in vitro and in vivo animal models, and in human clinical trials. PMID:27151309

  8. Polymorphisms of CUL5 are associated with CD4+ T cell loss in HIV-1 infected individuals.

    PubMed

    An, Ping; Duggal, Priya; Wang, Li Hua; O'Brien, Stephen J; Donfield, Sharyne; Goedert, James J; Phair, John; Buchbinder, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D; Winkler, Cheryl A

    2007-01-26

    Human apolipoprotein B mRNA editing enzyme, catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (Apobec3) antiretroviral factors cause hypermutation of proviral DNA leading to degradation or replication-incompetent HIV-1. However, HIV-1 viral infectivity factor (Vif) suppresses Apobec3 activity through the Cullin 5-Elongin B-Elongin C E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. We examined the effect of genetic polymorphisms in the CUL5 gene (encoding Cullin 5 protein) on AIDS disease progression in five HIV-1 longitudinal cohorts. A total of 12 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning 93 kb in the CUL5 locus were genotyped and their haplotypes inferred. A phylogenetic network analysis revealed that CUL5 haplotypes were grouped into two clusters of evolutionarily related haplotypes. Cox survival analysis and mixed effects models were used to assess time to AIDS outcomes and CD4(+) T cell trajectories, respectively. Relative to cluster I haplotypes, the collective cluster II haplotypes were associated with more rapid CD4(+) T cell loss (relative hazards [RH] = 1.47 and p = 0.009), in a dose-dependent fashion. This effect was mainly attributable to a single cluster II haplotype (Hap10) (RH = 2.49 and p = 0.00001), possibly due to differential nuclear protein-binding efficiencies of a Hap10-specifying SNP as indicated by a gel shift assay. Consistent effects were observed for CD4(+) T cell counts and HIV-1 viral load trajectories over time. The findings of both functional and genetic epidemiologic consequences of CUL5 polymorphism on CD4(+) T cell and HIV-1 levels point to a role for Cullin 5 in HIV-1 pathogenesis and suggest interference with the Vif-Cullin 5 pathway as a possible anti-HIV-1 therapeutic strategy. PMID:17257057

  9. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  10. "When in the body, it makes you look fat and HIV negative": the constitution of antiretroviral therapy in local discourse among youth in Kahe, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Ezekiel, Mangi Job; Talle, Aud; Juma, James M; Klepp, Knut-Inge

    2009-03-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is becoming increasingly more accessible within the health care system in Tanzania. However, the impact of the increased availability of ART on local conceptions about medicines, health and physical wellbeing has not been fully explored. In this article we examine how ART is constituted within local discourses about treatment and healing. Based on 21 focus group discussions with young people aged 14-24 years in a rural area (Kahe), we examine how local terms and descriptions of antiretroviral therapy relate to wider definitions about the body, health, illness and drug efficacy. Findings illustrate how local understandings of ART draw on a wider discourse about the therapeutic functions of medicines and clinical dimensions of HIV/AIDS. Therapeutic efficacy of antiretroviral medication appeared to overlap and sometimes contradict locally shared understandings of the clinical functions of medicines in the body. Implications of ART on bodily appearance and HIV signs may influence conceptions about sick role, perpetuate stigma and affect local strategies for HIV prevention. Structural inequities in access, limited information on therapeutic efficacy of ART and perceived difficulties with status disclosure appear to inform local conceptions and possible implications of ART. Policy and programme interventions to foster public understanding and acceptability of ART should emphasize treatment education about the benefits and limitations of therapy and increased access to ART in rural areas, and should integrate voluntary status disclosure and HIV prevention. PMID:19136190