Science.gov

Sample records for hiv type-1 drug

  1. Prevalence of Drug Resistance Mutations and HIV Type 1 Subtypes in an HIV Type 1-Infected Cohort in Rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Masimba, Pax; Kituma, Elimsaada; Klimkait, Thomas; Horvath, Edit; Stoeckle, Marcel; Hatz, Christoph; Mossdorf, Erick; Mwaigomole, Emmanuel; Khamis, Salim; Jullu, Boniphace; Abdulla, Salim; Tanner, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The development of resistance mutations in drug-targeted HIV-1 genes compromises the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs. Genotyping of these mutations enables adjusted therapeutic decisions both at the individual and population level. We investigated over time the prevalence of HIV-1 primary drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive patients and described the HIV-1 subtype distribution in a cohort in rural Tanzania at the beginning of the ART rollout in 2005–2007 and later in 2009. Viral RNA was analyzed in 387 baseline plasma samples from treatment-naive patients over a period of 5 years. The reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease genes were reversely transcribed, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified, and directly sequenced to identify HIV-1 subtypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with drug resistance (DR-SNPs). The prevalence of major DR-SNPs in 2005–2007 in the RT gene was determined: K103N (5.0%), Y181C (2.5%), M184V (2.5%), and G190A (1.7%), and M41L, K65KR, K70KR, and L74LV (0.8%). In samples from 2009 only K103N (3.3%), M184V, and T215FY (0.8%) were detected. Initial frequencies of subtypes C, A, D, and recombinants were 43%, 32%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. Later similar frequencies were found except for the recombinants, which were found twice as often (15%), highlighting the subtype diversity and a relatively stable subtype frequency in the area. DR-SNPs were found at initiation of the cohort despite very low previous ART use in the area. Statistically, frequencies of major mutations did not change significantly over the studied 5-year interval. These mutations could reflect primary resistances and may indicate a possible risk for treatment failure. PMID:23806135

  2. Prevalence of drug resistance mutations and HIV type 1 subtypes in an HIV type 1-infected cohort in rural Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Masimba, Pax; Kituma, Elimsaada; Klimkait, Thomas; Horvath, Edit; Stoeckle, Marcel; Hatz, Christoph; Mossdorf, Erick; Mwaigomole, Emmanuel; Khamis, Salim; Jullu, Boniphace; Abdulla, Salim; Tanner, Marcel; Felger, Ingrid

    2013-09-01

    The development of resistance mutations in drug-targeted HIV-1 genes compromises the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programs. Genotyping of these mutations enables adjusted therapeutic decisions both at the individual and population level. We investigated over time the prevalence of HIV-1 primary drug resistance mutations in treatment-naive patients and described the HIV-1 subtype distribution in a cohort in rural Tanzania at the beginning of the ART rollout in 2005-2007 and later in 2009. Viral RNA was analyzed in 387 baseline plasma samples from treatment-naive patients over a period of 5 years. The reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease genes were reversely transcribed, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplified, and directly sequenced to identify HIV-1 subtypes and single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with drug resistance (DR-SNPs). The prevalence of major DR-SNPs in 2005-2007 in the RT gene was determined: K103N (5.0%), Y181C (2.5%), M184V (2.5%), and G190A (1.7%), and M41L, K65KR, K70KR, and L74LV (0.8%). In samples from 2009 only K103N (3.3%), M184V, and T215FY (0.8%) were detected. Initial frequencies of subtypes C, A, D, and recombinants were 43%, 32%, 18%, and 7%, respectively. Later similar frequencies were found except for the recombinants, which were found twice as often (15%), highlighting the subtype diversity and a relatively stable subtype frequency in the area. DR-SNPs were found at initiation of the cohort despite very low previous ART use in the area. Statistically, frequencies of major mutations did not change significantly over the studied 5-year interval. These mutations could reflect primary resistances and may indicate a possible risk for treatment failure. PMID:23806135

  3. The evolving molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Tee, Kok Keng; Saw, Teik Leong; Pon, Chee Keong; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Ng, Kee Peng

    2005-12-01

    Earlier studies in the 1990s indicate that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B has been the predominant subtype among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Malaysia. More recent studies performed between 2003 and 2004, however, show a high prevalence of unique CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants among IDUs. To determine the subtype distribution among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur prior to the emergence of CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants, the gag-pol or the reverse transcriptase gene was sequenced from IDUs who were diagnosed as HIV positive between 1993 and 2002. Subtype B was present at 50.0% followed by CRF01_AE/B recombinant at 41.7%, with more CRF01_AE/B recombinants detected between 2000 and 2002. All CRF01_AE/B recombinants shared similar recombination patterns. Interestingly, we found that this potential new candidate of circulating recombinant form (CRF) could have emerged as early as the mid-1990s. The results showed evidence of changing HIV-1 molecular epidemiology toward the predominance of CRF01_AE/B intersubtype recombinants among IDUs in Kuala Lumpur. PMID:16379608

  4. Polymeric Nanoparticles Containing Combination Antiretroviral Drugs for HIV Type 1 Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Annemarie; McMullen, Emily; Pham, Alex; Belshan, Michael; Sanford, Bridget; Zhou, You; Goede, Michael; Date, Abjijit A.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The use of combination antiretroviral nanoparticles (cART NPs) was investigated as a novel treatment approach for the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. We developed nanoparticles of biodegradable polymer, poly-(dl-lactide-co-glycolic acid; PLGA) containing efavirenz (EFV) and boosted lopinavir (lopinavir/ritonavir; LPV/r) by a high-pressure homogenization method. The method resulted in >79% drug entrapment efficiency for each of the three drugs. The average size of cART NPs was 138.3±55.4 nm as measured by dynamic light scanning, confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with an average surface charge of −13.7±4.5. Lissamine-rhodamine-labeled fluorescent PLGA NPs exhibited efficient uptake in nonimmune (HeLa cells) and immune (H9 T cells) cells as measured by confocal microscopy. Cells treated with cART NPs resulted in minimal loss of cell viability over 28 days. Subcellular fractionation studies demonstrated that HIV-1-infected H9 monocytic cells treated with cART NPs contained significantly (p<0.05) higher nuclear, cytoskeleton, and membrane antiretroviral drug levels compared to cells treated with drug solutions alone. Finally, cART NPs efficiently inhibited HIV-1 infection and transduction. The IC50 for each of the three drugs in the cART NPs was <31 nM. These experiments demonstrate the efficacy of a novel PLGA NPs formulation for the delivery of cART to inhibit HIV-1 replication. PMID:23289671

  5. Genotypic Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    There are 16 approved human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drugs belonging to three mechanistic classes: protease inhibitors, nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors, and nonnucleoside RT inhibitors. HIV-1 resistance to these drugs is caused by mutations in the protease and RT enzymes, the molecular targets of these drugs. Drug resistance mutations arise most often in treated individuals, resulting from selective drug pressure in the presence of incompletely suppressed virus replication. HIV-1 isolates with drug resistance mutations, however, may also be transmitted to newly infected individuals. Three expert panels have recommended that HIV-1 protease and RT susceptibility testing should be used to help select HIV drug therapy. Although genotypic testing is more complex than typical antimicrobial susceptibility tests, there is a rich literature supporting the prognostic value of HIV-1 protease and RT mutations. This review describes the genetic mechanisms of HIV-1 drug resistance and summarizes published data linking individual RT and protease mutations to in vitro and in vivo resistance to the currently available HIV drugs. PMID:11932232

  6. Treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected cells with combinations of HIV-1-specific inhibitors results in a different resistance pattern than does treatment with single-drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Camarasa, M J; Tarpley, W G; De Clercq, E

    1993-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected CEM cells were treated by the HIV-1-specific inhibitors bis-heteroarylpiperazine (BHAP), 4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-5-methylimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1 H)-on e (TIBO) R82913, nevirapine, and the N3-methylthymine derivative of [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3'-spiro- 5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide) (TSAO-m3T), as single agents or in combination, at escalating concentrations. When used individually, the compounds led to the emergence of drug-resistant virus strains within two to five subcultivations. The resulting strains were designated HIV-1/BHAP, HIV-1/TIBO, HIV-1/Nev, and HIV-1/TSAO-m3T, respectively. The mutant viruses showed the following amino acid substitutions in their reverse transcriptase (RT): Leu-100-->Ile for HIV-1/BHAP; Lys-103-->Asn for HIV-1/TIBO; Val-106-->Ala for HIV-1/Nev; and Glu-138-->Lys for HIV-1/TSAO-m3T. Both the Tyr-181-->Cys and Val-106-->Ala mutations were found in another mutant emerging following treatment with nevirapine at escalating concentrations. The BHAP-resistant virus remained fully sensitive to the inhibitory effects of nevirapine and TSAO-m3T, whereas the TSAO-m3T-resistant virus remained fully sensitive to the inhibitory effects of nevirapine and BHAP. When different pairs of nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (i.e., BHAP plus TSAO-m3T, nevirapine plus TSAO-m3T, TIBO plus TSAO-m3T, nevirapine plus TIBO, and BHAP plus nevirapine) were used, resistant virus emerged as fast as with single-drug therapy. In all cases the Tyr-181-->Cys mutation appeared; the virus showed markedly reduced sensitivity to all HIV-1-specific inhibitors but retained sensitivity to 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside analogs such as zidovudine, ddC, and ddI. Our findings argue against simultaneous combination of two different nonnucleoside RT inhibitors that are unable to inhibit HIV-1 mutant strains containing the Tyr-181-->Cys mutation when administered as single

  7. Short communication: molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 infection in northern Greece (2009-2010): evidence of a transmission cluster of HIV type 1 subtype A1 drug-resistant strains among men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2014-03-01

    A prospective molecular epidemiology study of HIV-1 infection was conducted in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy. Phylogenetic trees of the pol sequences obtained in this study with reference sequences indicated that subtypes B and A1 were the most common subtypes present and accounted for 44.9% and 42.9%, respectively, followed by subtype C (3.1%), CRF02_AG (4.1%), CRF04_cpx (2.0%), and subtypes CRF01_01, F1, and G (1.0%). A high rate of clustered transmission of subtype A1-resistant strains to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors was observed among men having sex with men. Indeed, 15 out of 17 study subjects (88.2%) infected with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) strains were implicated in transmission clusters, 10 of whom (66.7%) were men who have sex with men (MSM), and were also infected with subsubtype A1 strains. The main cluster within subtype A1 (I) included eight men reporting having sex with men from Thessaloniki infected with dual-class RT-resistant strains carrying both T215C and Y181C mutations. PMID:24059291

  8. Short Communication: Molecular Epidemiology of HIV Type 1 Infection in Northern Greece (2009–2010): Evidence of a Transmission Cluster of HIV Type 1 Subtype A1 Drug-Resistant Strains Among Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Antoniadou, Zoi-Anna; Kousiappa, Ioanna; Skoura, Lemonia; Pilalas, Dimitris; Metallidis, Simeon; Nicolaidis, Pavlos; Malisiovas, Nicolaos

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A prospective molecular epidemiology study of HIV-1 infection was conducted in newly diagnosed and antiretroviral-naive patients in Northern Greece between 2009 and 2010 using a predefined enrolling strategy. Phylogenetic trees of the pol sequences obtained in this study with reference sequences indicated that subtypes B and A1 were the most common subtypes present and accounted for 44.9% and 42.9%, respectively, followed by subtype C (3.1%), CRF02_AG (4.1%), CRF04_cpx (2.0%), and subtypes CRF01_01, F1, and G (1.0%). A high rate of clustered transmission of subtype A1-resistant strains to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors was observed among men having sex with men. Indeed, 15 out of 17 study subjects (88.2%) infected with transmitted drug resistance (TDR) strains were implicated in transmission clusters, 10 of whom (66.7%) were men who have sex with men (MSM), and were also infected with subsubtype A1 strains. The main cluster within subtype A1 (I) included eight men reporting having sex with men from Thessaloniki infected with dual-class RT-resistant strains carrying both T215C and Y181C mutations. PMID:24059291

  9. Genetic similarity of HIV type 1 subtype E in a recent outbreak among injecting drug users in northern Vietnam to strains in Guangxi Province of southern China.

    PubMed

    Kato, K; Shiino, T; Kusagawa, S; Sato, H; Nohtomi, K; Shibamura, K; Nguyen, T H; Pham, K C; Truong, X L; Mai, H A; Hoang, T L; Bunyaraksyotin, G; Fukushima, Y; Honda, M; Wasi, C; Yamazaki, S; Nagai, Y; Takebe, Y

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the molecular epidemiology of a recent HIV-1 outbreak in northern Vietnam and its relation to the epidemic in surrounding areas, we analyzed 17 HIV-positive blood specimens from 3 heterosexuals, 2 sexually transmitted disease patients, and 12 injecting drug users (IDUs), collected in 4 provinces near Hanoi in 1998. These were compared with the specimens from Ho Chi Minh City (n = 10) and An Giang Province (n = 10) in southern Vietnam and with published sequences from neighboring countries. Genetic subtyping based on the env C2/V3 sequences revealed that HIV-1 subtype E predominated throughout Vietnam in all risk populations; the exception was one typical United States-European-type HIV-1 subtype B detected in a patient in Ho Chi Minh City, the first case of HIV infection identified in Vietnam in 1990. The HIV-1 subtype E sequences identified in 9 of the 12 IDUs from northern provinces were closely related phylogenetically to those in IDUs in nearby Guangxi Province of China, and also shared a common amino acid signature downstream of the env V3 loop region. The low interperson nucleotide diversity among IDUs in northern Vietnam supports the view that HIV-1 subtype E was introduced recently among IDUs in northern Vietnam. These data indicate a linkage between HIV-1 circulating among IDUs in northern Vietnam and southern China, and suggest recent transborder introductions as the likely source of HIV-1 subtype E in northern Vietnam. PMID:10480629

  10. Genetic characterization and transmitted drug resistance of the HIV type 1 epidemic in men who have sex with men in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Lin; Han, Na; Lu, Junfeng; Li, Tianyi; Zhong, Xiangfu; Wu, Hao; Rayner, Simon; Chen, Lili; Liu, Yongjian; Wang, Xiaolin; Li, Hanping; Li, Jingyun

    2013-03-01

    A rapid increase in the number of HIV cases in the men who have sex with men (MSM) population has been observed in China; however, little information is available on the genetic characterization of HIV prevalent in this population. In this study, 95 HIV-1-seropositive drug-naive patients from the Beijing MSM population were enrolled. The genetic characterization and transmission of drug resistance of HIV-1 were examined based on full-length gag, pol, and partial env gene sequences. Three subtypes, including CRF01_AE (56.0%), B (30.8%), and CRF07_BC (12.6%), were identified. Close phylogenetic relationships were found among these strains with isolates from other populations in Beijing and MSM isolates from Hebei province, which suggested that the Beijing MSM population might act as a bridge for HIV transmission between MSM and other high-risk populations. Drug-resistant mutations were identified in 5.3% of sampled individuals. Our results provided detailed genetic data and would be helpful for understanding the transmitting pattern of HIV strains between MSM and other populations. PMID:23121221

  11. Distinct HIV Type 1 Strains in Different Risk Groups and the Absence of New Infections by Drug-Resistant Strains in Lithuania

    PubMed Central

    Caplinskas, Saulius; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; Gasich, Elena L.; Gilyazova, Alla V.; Caplinskiene, Irma

    2013-01-01

    Abstract To analyze HIV-1 genotypes in Lithuania and the transmission of drug-resistant viruses, HIV-1 sequences were obtained from 138 individuals, who were diagnosed as HIV-1 infected in 1990–2008 and represented all major risk groups. Subtype A strains, dominating in the former Soviet Union (90% of cases), were found in 60% of individuals, followed by subtype B (22%) and CRF03_AB (12%) strains. The remaining 7% of the strains included variants belonging to subtype C, CRF01_AE, CRF02_AG, more complex recombinant forms, and strains that could not be reliably genotyped. Analysis of virus genotypes per risk group revealed the circulation of distinct HIV-1 strains in different risk groups: subtype A viruses were present in 82% of injecting drug users (IDUs), but less than a half of heterosexually infected individuals and cases with unknown transmission route, and none of men having sex with men (MSM). We observed no mutations causing drug resistance among 27 newly diagnosed HIV-1 cases. PMID:23186249

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of env, gag, and tat genes of HIV type 1 detected among the injecting drug users in West Bengal, India.

    PubMed

    Mullick, Ranajoy; Sengupta, Satarupa; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Saha, M K; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2006-12-01

    A recent occurrence of HIV-1 seropositivity among a group of injecting drug users (IDUs) in Darjeeling, a hilly district in northern West Bengal, revealed overall 11.8% HIV seroprevalence. Our study based on env (C2-V3), gag (p24-p7), and tat (exon-1) genomic regions of HIV-1 detected among this population showed that Darjeeling IDU sequences belonged to subtype C. Interestingly, the IDU sequences from Darjeeling were again found to be closer to the C strains from Manipur, a northeastern state in India, which is linked to the Golden Triangle via the Manipur-Myanmar border, rather than the IDU C sequences from Nepal, a neighboring country of India. The outgroup reference strains from different sites of IDU-driven epidemics in the world like Russia, Vietnam, Thailand, and Spain belonged to the nonsubtype C group and formed separate clusters from the subtype C cluster in our analysis. These results indicate a rapid spread of HIV-1 by possible drug trafficking along international boundaries, which might also help in the invasion of HIV-1 among IDUs of Darjeeling through the Manipur-Myanmar border of India. PMID:17209773

  13. Evaluation of two commercial kits for the detection of genotypic drug resistance on a panel of HIV type 1 subtypes A through J.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, E; Riva, C; Peeters, M; Schmit, J C; Delaporte, E; Van Laethem, K; Van Vaerenbergh, K; Snoeck, J; Van Wijngaerden, E; De Clercq, E; Van Ranst, M; Vandamme, A M

    2001-11-01

    We compared the two commercially available sequencing kits for HIV-1 drug resistance testing, the ViroSeq Genotyping System (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, U.S.A.) and the TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit (Visible Genetics, Inc., Toronto, Ontario, Canada), with our in-house genotyping system. Fifteen viral isolates from African patients (6 treated and 9 untreated) covering a panel of HIV-1 subtypes A through J and 7 plasma samples from Belgian and African patients (2 treated and 5 untreated) were tested. All the samples could be amplified and sequenced by the three systems; however, for all systems, alternative amplification/sequencing primers had to be used for some samples belonging to subtype B as well as to other subtypes. The consensus sequence was partially derived from only one strand for the in-house system and for the ViroSeq Genotyping System. The TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotyping Kit scored the highest number of ambiguities, followed by the ViroSeq Genotyping System and the in-house system. For 11 samples, these differences in reporting mixtures affected 14 resistance-related positions, which altered the interpretation toward protease inhibitors for 2 samples when using version 1.2 RetroGram software (Virology Networks, Utrecht, The Netherlands). All three systems were able to sequence diluted samples with a viral load down to 10 3 or 10 4 RNA copies/ml. Our data therefore suggest that the performance of amplification and sequencing primers must be improved to allow fast and reliable resistance testing for all HIV-1 subtypes. PMID:11694832

  14. Transmitted Drug Resistance Among Antiretroviral-Naive Patients with Established HIV Type 1 Infection in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic and Review of the Latin American and Caribbean Literature

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Barbara S.; Rojas Fermín, Rita A.; Reyes, Emily Virginia; Vaughan, Catherine; José, Lina; Javier, Carmen; Franco Estévez, Ramona; Donastorg Cabral, Yeycy; Batista, Arelis; Lie, Yolanda; Coakley, Eoin; Hammer, Scott M.; Brudney, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Emergence of HIV resistance is a concerning consequence of global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). To date, there is no published information about HIV resistance from the Dominican Republic. The study's aim was to determine the prevalence of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) to reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors in a sample of chronically HIV-1-infected patients in one clinic in Santo Domingo. The data are presented in the context of a review of the TDR literature from Latin America and the Caribbean. Genotype testing was successfully performed on 103 treatment-naive adults planning to initiate antiretroviral therapy; the World Health Organization (WHO) list of surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRM) was used to determine the presence of TDR mutations. WHO SDRM were identified in eight patients (7.8%); none had received sdNVP. There were no significant differences in epidemiologic or clinical variables between those with or without WHO SDRM. The prevalence of WHO SDRM was 1.0% and 6.8% for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, respectively. No WHO SDRMs for protease inhibitors were identified. Among 12 studies of TDR in the region with a sample size of at least 100 subjects, the reported prevalence of SDRM ranged from 2.8% to 8.1%. The most commonly identified SDRM was K103N. This information adds to our understanding of the epidemiology of TDR in the region and the possible role such mutations could play in undermining first-line treatment. Ongoing surveillance is clearly needed to better understand the TDR phenomenon in the Caribbean. PMID:21851324

  15. (Alkylamino) piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizine analogs are potent, broad-spectrum nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of drug-resistant isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and select for drug-resistant variants of HIV-1IIIB with reduced replication phenotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Olmsted, R A; Slade, D E; Kopta, L A; Poppe, S M; Poel, T J; Newport, S W; Rank, K B; Biles, C; Morge, R A; Dueweke, T J; Yagi, Y; Romero, D L; Thomas, R C; Sharma, S K; Tarpley, W G

    1996-01-01

    The (alkylamino)piperidine bis(heteroaryl)piperizines (AAP-BHAPs) are a new class of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific inhibitors which were identified by targeted screening of recombinant reverse transcriptase (RT) enzymes carrying key nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI) resistance-conferring mutations and NNRTI-resistant variants of HIV-1. Phenotypic profiling of the two most potent AAP-BHAPs, U-95133 and U-104489, against in vitro-selected drug-resistant HIV-1 variants carrying the NNRTI resistance-conferring mutation (Tyr->Cys) at position 181 of the HIV-1 RT revealed submicromolar 90% inhibitory concentration estimates for these compounds. Moreover, U-104489 demonstrated potent activity against BHA-P-resistant HIV-1MF harboring the Pro-236->Leu RT substitution and significantly suppressed the replication of clinical isolates of HIV-1 resistant to both delavirdine (BHAP U-90152T) and zidovudine. Biochemical and phenotypic characterization of AAP-BHAPresistant HIV-1IIIB variants revealed that high-level resistance to the AAP-BHAPs was mediated by a Gly-190->Glu substitution in RT, which had a deleterious effect on the integrity and enzymatic activity of virion-associated RT heterodimers, as well as the replication capacity of these resistant viruses. PMID:8648704

  16. Sex-Based Differences in HIV Type 1 Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Addo, Marylyn M.; Altfeld, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global infectious diseases threat that disproportionally affects women. Beyond social and political factors, biological and genetic differences have been identified that lead to differential disease courses and outcomes in men and women. Following HIV type 1 (HIV-1) seroconversion, women have up to 40% lower HIV loads and higher CD4+ T-cell counts than men. However, at the same level of viremia, progression to AIDS is faster in women. After adjustment for viral load, HIV-positive women also display increased levels of generalized immune activation and experience the consequences of elevated inflammatory activity more frequently than men. Part of these observations are linked to sex-based differences in innate immunity, in which the differential ability of plasmacytoid dendritic cells to produce interferon α following stimulation of Toll-like receptor 7 and upregulation of interferon-stimulated genes play a central role. Here, we review the current knowledge and remaining gaps therein regarding sex-based differences in HIV-1 pathogenesis. PMID:24966195

  17. Analysis of nonnucleoside drug-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, P L; Currens, M J; McMahon, J B; Boyd, M R; Hughes, S H

    1993-01-01

    A number of chemically distinct nonnucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) have been reported. Several lines of evidence, including the isolation of RT mutants that show cross resistance, suggest that, despite their structural diversity, many of these inhibitors bind to a common site on HIV-1 RT. We have recently reported that, on the basis of analyses of HIV-1/HIV-2 chimeras, the natural product calanolide A may interact with a different site or sites in HIV-1 RT. We have used BspMI cassette mutagenesis to prepare a collection of HIV-1 RT mutants that show resistance to the known members of the general class of nonnucleoside inhibitors. This collection of mutants can be used to determine whether a new drug will show cross resistance with known inhibitors and to define amino acid positions critical for the action of the drugs. The mutants were used to analyze calanolide A, 1H,3H-thiazolo[3,4-a]benzimidazole(4i), and the acyclic nucleoside analog 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine. These analyses suggest that all three drugs interact with HIV-1 RT within the previously defined common binding site for nonnucleoside inhibitors. However, the drugs respond differently to the panel of drug-resistant HIV-1 RTs, indicating that while the binding sites of the drugs overlap they are not identical. PMID:7680393

  18. Comparative Fitness of Multi-Dideoxynucleoside-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) in an In Vitro Competitive HIV-1 Replication Assay

    PubMed Central

    Kosalaraksa, Pope; Kavlick, Mark F.; Maroun, Victor; Le, Richard; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    1999-01-01

    We examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) fitness was altered upon the acquisition of a set or subset of five mutations (A62V, V75I, F77L, F116Y, and Q151M) in the pol gene, which confers resistance to multiple dideoxynucleosides (MDR), as well as the zidovudine resistance-associated mutation T215Y, using a competitive HIV-1 replication assay in a setting of an HXB2D genetic background. Target H9 cells were exposed to a 50:50 mixture of paired infectious molecular clones, and HIV-1 in the culture supernatant was transmitted to new cultures every 7 to 10 days. The polymerase-encoding region of the virus was sequenced at various time points, and the relative proportion of the two viral populations was determined. In the absence of drugs, the comparative order for replicative fitness was HIV-162/75/77/116/151 > HIV-177/116/151 > HIV-1151 > wild-type HIV-1 (HIV-1wt) > HIV-175/77/116/151 > HIV-1151/215 > HIV-1215. In the presence of zidovudine or didanosine, the order was HIV-162/75/77/116/151 > HIV-177/116/151 > HIV-175/77/116/151 > HIV-1151 > HIV-1215. HIV-1215S(TCC), a putative intermediate infectious clone for HIV-1215, replicated comparably to HIV-1wt, while two putative intermediates for HIV-1151 [HIV-1151L(CTG) and HIV-1151K(AAG)] replicated much less efficiently than HIV-1wt and HIV-1151, suggesting that for HIV-1151 to develop, two base substitutions are likely to occur concurrently or within a short interval. These data may illustrate the molecular basis by which HIV-1151 emerges much less frequently than HIV-1215. The present data also demonstrate that several MDR HIV-1 variants are more fit than HIV-1wt in the absence of drugs and that resistance-associated mutations and drug pressure are critical variates for HIV-1 fitness. PMID:10364282

  19. Performance of the Affymetrix GeneChip HIV PRT 440 Platform for Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Genotyping of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Clades and Viral Isolates with Length Polymorphisms

    PubMed Central

    Vahey, Maryanne; Nau, Martin E.; Barrick, Sandra; Cooley, John D.; Sawyer, Robert; Sleeker, Alex A.; Vickerman, Peter; Bloor, Stuart; Larder, Brendan; Michael, Nelson L.; Wegner, Scott A.

    1999-01-01

    The performance of a silica chip-based resequencing method, the Affymetrix HIV PRT 440 assay (hereafter referred to as the Affymetrix assay), was evaluated on a panel of well-characterized nonclade B viral isolates and on isolates exhibiting length polymorphisms. Sequencing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pol cDNAs from clades A, C, D, E, and F resulted in clade-specific regions of base-calling ambiguities in regions not known to be associated with resistance polymorphisms, as well as a small number of spurious resistance polymorphisms. The Affymetrix assay failed to detect the presence of additional serine codons distal to reverse transcriptase (RT) codon 68 that are associated with multinucleoside RT inhibitor resistance. The increasing prevalence of non-clade B HIV-1 strains in the United States and Europe and the identification of clinically relevant pol gene length polymorphisms will impact the generalizability of the Affymetrix assay, emphasizing the need to accommodate this expanding pool of pol genotypes in future assay versions. PMID:10405396

  20. Women, drugs and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Azim, Tasnim; Bontell, Irene; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2014-01-01

    Women who inject drugs are among the most vulnerable to HIV through both unsafe injections and unprotected sex. They are also among the most hidden affected populations, as they are more stigmatized than their male counterparts. Many sell sex to finance their own and their partner’s drug habit and often their partner exerts a significant amount of control over their sex work, condom use and injection practices. Women who use drugs all over the world face many different barriers to HIV service access including police harassment, judgmental health personnel and a fear of losing their children. In order to enable these women to access life-saving services including needle-syringe and condom programs, opioid substitution therapy and HIV testing and treatment, it is essential to create a conducive environment and provide tailor-made services that are adapted to their specific needs. In this commentary, we explore the risks and vulnerabilities of women who use drugs as well as the interventions that have been shown to reduce their susceptibility to HIV infection. PMID:25277726

  1. Differentiation between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 isolates by nonradioisotopic reverse transcriptase-typing assay.

    PubMed Central

    Urabe, T; Sano, K; Nakano, T; Odawara, F; Lee, M H; Otake, T; Okubo, S; Hayami, M; Misaki, H; Baba, M

    1994-01-01

    We tested whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) could be differentiated from HIV-2 by a reverse transcriptase (RT)-typing assay that measured the reduction of enzyme activity owing to specific antibody. RT-inhibiting antibody was examined for HIV type specificity by a new nonradioisotopic RT assay. Antibodies from four rabbits immunized with recombinant HIV-1 RT and from 23 HIV-1-seropositive individuals all specifically inhibited the enzyme activities of two HIV-1 strains (LAV-1 and GH-3), three zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 mutants, and a recombinant HIV-1 RT. However, none of these antisera affected the activities of six HIV-2 strains (GH-1, GH-2, GH-4, GH-5, GH-6, LAV-2ROD), Rous-associated virus type 2, and DNA polymerase I from Escherichia coli. In contrast, HIV-2 antibody from a rabbit immunized with disrupted GH-1 virions blocked the enzyme activities of the six HIV-2 strains but not those of the three HIV-1 strains, Rous-associated virus type 2, or DNA polymerase I. These results indicate that the antigenic domains of HIV-1 and HIV-2 RTs recognized by their inhibiting antibodies are distinct from each other and are highly conserved. Clinical HIV isolates from 18 HIV-1-seropositive individuals and 3 HIV-2-seropositive Ghanaian individuals were identified as HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively, by the nonradioisotopic RT-typing assay. Images PMID:7527425

  2. HIV Type 1 Gag as a Target for Antiviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The Gag proteins of HIV-1 are central players in virus particle assembly, release, and maturation, and also function in the establishment of a productive infection. Despite their importance throughout the replication cycle, there are currently no approved antiretroviral therapies that target the Gag precursor protein or any of the mature Gag proteins. Recent progress in understanding the structural and cell biology of HIV-1 Gag function has revealed a number of potential Gag-related targets for possible therapeutic intervention. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of HIV-1 Gag and suggest some approaches for the development of novel antiretroviral agents that target Gag. PMID:21848364

  3. Neisseria gonorrhoeae enhances infection of dendritic cells by HIV type 1.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jizhong; Li, Geling; Bafica, Andre; Pantelic, Milica; Zhang, Pei; Broxmeyer, Hal; Liu, Ying; Wetzler, Lee; He, Johnny J; Chen, Tie

    2005-06-15

    Clinical studies indicate that Neisseria gonorrhoeae (gonococci (GC)) has the capacity to enhance HIV type 1 (HIV-1) infection. We studied whether GC enhances HIV infection of activated dendritic cells (DCs). The results show that GC can dramatically enhance HIV replication in human DCs during coinfection. The GC component responsible for HIV infection enhancement may be peptidoglycan, which activates TLR2. TLR2 involvement is suggested by bacterial lipoprotein, a TLR2-specific inducer, which stimulates a strong enhancement of HIV infection by human DCs. Moreover, participation of TLR2 is further implicated because GC is unable to stimulate expression of HIV in DCs of TLR2-deficient HIV-1-transgenic mice. These results provide one potential mechanism through which GC infection increases HIV replication in patients infected with both GC and HIV. PMID:15944306

  4. In vitro Isolation and Identification of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Variants with Reduced Sensitivity to C-2 Symmetrical Inhibitors of HIV Type 1 Protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, M. J.; Garber, S.; Winslow, D. L.; Reid, C. D.; Aldrich, P.; Jadhav, P. K.; Patterson, C. E.; Hodge, C. N.; Cheng, Y.-S. E.

    1993-08-01

    Protease inhibitors are another class of compounds for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused disease. The emergence of resistance to the current anti-HIV drugs makes the determination of potential resistance to protease inhibitors imperative. Here we describe the isolation of an HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistant to an HIV-protease inhibitor. Serial passage of HIV-1 (strain RF) in the presence of the inhibitor, [2-pyridylacetylisoleucylphenylalanyl-psi(CHOH)]_2 (P9941), failed to yield a stock of virus with a resistance phenotype. However, variants of the virus with 6- to 8-fold reduced sensitivity to P9941 were selected by using a combination of plaque assay and endpoint titration. Genetic analysis and computer modeling of the variant proteases revealed a single change in the codon for amino acid 82 (Val -> Ala), which resulted in a protease with lower affinity and reduced sensitivity to this inhibitor and certain, but not all, related inhibitors.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 subtypes in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Kemal, Kimdar S; Anastos, Kathryn; Weiser, Barbara; Ramirez, Christina M; Shi, Qiuhu; Burger, Harold

    2013-06-01

    HIV-1 infection is characterized by genetic diversity, with multiple subtypes and recombinant variants circulating, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. During the Rwandan genocide, many women experienced multiple rapes and some became HIV-1 infected. We studied plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 30 infected women comprising two exposure groups: those with numerous contacts, raped multiple times, and women with one lifetime sexual partner and no history of rape. Population-based sequences from gag, pol, and env genes were analyzed to determine HIV-1 subtypes and intersubtype recombination. Individual plasma-derived variants from 12 women were also analyzed. Subtype A was found in 24/30 (80%), intersubtype recombination (AC and AD) in 4/30 (13%), and subtypes C and D in 1/30 each. In two subjects, the pattern of HIV-1 recombination differed between plasma and PBMC-derived sequences. Intersubtype recombination was common, although there were no significant differences in subtype or recombination rates between exposure groups. PMID:23458210

  6. Etiologic Agents and Antifungal Susceptibility of Oral Candidosis from Romanian patients with HIV-infection or type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Minea, Bogdan; Nastasa, Valentin; Kolecka, Anna; Mares, Magdalena; Marangoci, Narcisa; Rosca, Irina; Pinteala, Mariana; Hancianu, Monica; Mares, Mihai

    2016-01-01

    This is the first Romanian investigation of oral candidosis in patients suffering of HIV-infection or type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Candida albicans was the dominant species in both types of isolates: n = 14 (46.7%) in T1DM, n = 60 (69.8%) in HIV. The most frequent non-albicans Candida spp. were Candida kefyr (n = 6; 20%) in T1DM and Candida dubliniensis (n = 8; 9.3%) in HIV. Resistance to fluconazole was detected only in the HIV non-albicans Candida group (n = 8; 9.3%). All isolates were susceptible to VOR. The experimental drug MXP had MIC values equal or close to the ones of VOR. Echinocandin resistance was more frequent than azole resistance. PMID:27282005

  7. Pin1 liberates the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1): Must we stop it?

    PubMed

    Hou, Hai; Wang, Jing-Zhang; Liu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Ting

    2015-07-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is mainly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). To our knowledge, this is the first review focusing on the vital role of Pin1 in the infection of HIV-1 and the development of AIDS. We and others have demonstrated that Pin1, the only known cis-to-trans isomerase recognizing the pThr/pSer-Pro motifs in proteins, plays striking roles in several human diseases. Interestingly, recent evidence gradually indicates that Pin1 regulates several key steps of the life cycle of HIV-1, including the uncoating of the HIV-1 core, the reverse transcription of the RNA genome of HIV-1, and the integration of the HIV-1 cDNA into human chromosomes. Whereas inhibiting Pin1 suppresses all of these key steps and attenuates the replication of HIV-1, at the same time different PIN1 gene variants are correlated with the susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, Pin1 potentially promotes HIV-1 infection by activating multiple oncogenes and inactivating multiple tumor suppressors, extending the life span of HIV-infected cells. These descriptions suggest Pin1 as a promising therapeutic target for the prevention of HIV-1 and highlight the possibility of blocking the development of AIDS by Pin1 inhibitors. PMID:25913034

  8. Molecular characterization of HIV type 1 strains from newly diagnosed patients in Cyprus (2007-2009) recovers multiple clades including unique recombinant strains and lack of transmitted drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Kousiappa, Ioanna; Achilleos, Charis; Hezka, Johana; Lazarou, Yiota; Othonos, Katerina; Demetriades, Ioannis; Kostrikis, Leondios G

    2011-11-01

    HIV-1 evolution generates substantial genetic diversity among isolates, the majority of which are represented in areas where multiple strains cocirculate. A heterogeneous genetic HIV-1 pool has been found in Cyprus, directing us to determine the dynamics of the local HIV-1 infection by characterizing strains isolated from 74 subjects during 2007-2009, representing 88% of the known-living HIV-1-infected population, of whom 53 are newly diagnosed therapy-naive patients and 21 are chronic patients, according to the European HIV Resistance guidelines. Near full-length genome sequences were amplified by RT-nested PCR using diluted RNA from all HIV-1 seropositives and sequenced using a newly designed assay. Resistant mutations were not found among the population of the newly diagnosed therapy-naive patients either to protease, reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Phylogenetic analyses indicated subtype B as the main subtype (48.6%), followed by subtype A (18.9%), subtype C (10.8%), CRF02_AG (8.1%), CRF11_cpx (2.7%), and (sub)subtype F1 and CRF37_cpx (1.4% each). Six HIV-1 isolates (8.1%) were not classified in any pure (sub)subtype or circulating recombinant form (CRF). Complete phylogenetic and bootscanning analyses revealed that each isolate had a new, unique recombinant pattern and is distinct from all other CRFs or unique recombinant forms (URFs) reported so far. Two of the six isolates have the same mosaic pattern. Analogous to results of the earlier epidemiological studies, this study expands on the HIV-1 sequence database and reveals the high degree of diversity of HIV-1 infection in Cyprus. PMID:21453134

  9. A Mathematical Model of Antiretroviral Therapy Evaluation for HIV Type 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio; Mo Yang, Hyun

    2009-09-01

    Treating HIV-infected patients with a combination of several antiretroviral drugs can lead to emergence of the drug-resistant strain. This work proposes a mathematical model to evaluate the emergence of HIV-1 drug resistant during antiretroviral therapy. The model assumes that all susceptible individuals who can be infected by the wildtype strain (sensible to the treatment) or by drug-resistant virus receive antiretroviral therapy. Patients on treatment regimen can evolve to a state of success or failure and for the individuals in therapeutic fail the therapeutic schema is changed. The analysis of system is performed. The existence and stability of the steady states are considered. We address an analytical expression for the reproductive number in a community where antiretroviral therapy are widely used to treat HIV and where both drug sensitive and drug resistant strains are co-circulating.

  10. Polyclonal B-cell activation reveals antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in HIV-1-seronegative individuals.

    PubMed Central

    Jehuda-Cohen, T; Slade, B A; Powell, J D; Villinger, F; De, B; Folks, T M; McClure, H M; Sell, K W; Ahmed-Ansari, A

    1990-01-01

    Identification of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals is of paramount importance for the control of the spread of AIDS worldwide. Currently, the vast majority of screening centers throughout the world rely on serological techniques. As such, clinically asymptomatic but HIV-infected, seronegative individuals are rarely identified. In this report we show that 18% (30/165) of seronegative individuals who were considered to be a unique cohort of patients at high risk for HIV infection had circulating B cells that, upon in vitro polyclonal activation with pokeweed mitogen, produced antibodies reactive with HIV. Furthermore, polymerase chain reaction analysis of DNA obtained from aliquots of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these seronegative but pokeweed mitogen assay-positive individuals tested revealed the presence of HIV-specific sequences in a significant number of samples. In addition, depletion of CD8+ T cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-1-seronegative individuals prior to in vitro culture with pokeweed mitogen resulted in increased sensitivity for detecting HIV-reactive antibodies. This assay has obvious epidemiological implications, especially in the case of high-risk groups, and also provides a simple technique to enhance detection of HIV-infected individuals. Of further interest is the determination of the mechanisms related to the lack of HIV-specific antibodies in the serum of these infected individuals. Images PMID:2111024

  11. Persistent HIV Type 1 Seronegative Status Is Associated With Lower CD8+ T-Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Kuebler, Peter J; Mehrotra, Megha L; Shaw, Brian I; Leadabrand, Kaitlyn S; Milush, Jeffrey M; York, Vanessa A; Defechereux, Patricia; Grant, Robert M; Kallás, Esper G; Nixon, Douglas F

    2016-02-15

    We leveraged data from the Preexposure Prophylaxis Initiative (iPrEx), a global trial of preexposure chemoprophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, to compare T-cell activation between those who remained negative for HIV-1 and those who became infected during the trial. The frequency of CD38(+)HLA-DR(+) CD8(+) T cells was greater in those who seroconverted, relative to the frequency in those who remained uninfected (1.30% vs 0.82%, respectively; P = .005). This translated to an odds ratio of 4.26 (95% confidence interval, 1.54-11.78) for the association between CD8(+) T-cell activation and infection with HIV-1. T-cell activation may be a biomarker for elevated HIV-1 infection risk. PMID:26310308

  12. Seroprevalence of HIV-type 1 in a northern California health plan population: an unlinked survey.

    PubMed Central

    Hiatt, R A; Capell, F J; Ascher, M S

    1992-01-01

    We conducted an unlinked seroprevalence survey for human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1) of 9821 persons who had a routine personal health appraisal examination in 1989 while members of the Kaiser Permanente Medical Care Program in northern California. An outside laboratory performed enzyme immunoassay (EIA) analyses, and the California Viral and Rickettsial Diseases Laboratory confirmed EIA-reactive samples by immunofluorescent assay and Western blot assay. Only 20 specimens (0.2%) were confirmed as positive, and 18 were from men. These data suggest that, at the time of this survey, HIV-1 infection was not widespread in the northern California population represented by this health plan membership. PMID:1546773

  13. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... (70 FR 43439), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same title. FDA received...: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV): Testing, Product Disposition, and Donor...

  14. HIV type 1 Thai subtype E is predominant in South Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Menu, E; Truong, T X; Lafon, M E; Nguyen, T H; Müller-Trutwin, M C; Nguyen, T T; Deslandres, A; Chaouat, G; Duong, Q T; Ha, B K; Fleury, H J; Barré-Sinoussi, F

    1996-05-01

    Samples of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 50 HIV-1-infected individuals in South Vietnam were analyzed to determine with which HIV-1 subtype the subjects were infected. Participants were from Ho Chi Minh city and five surrounding provinces; 16 samples from female prostitutes, 32 from IV drug users, and one each from a man and woman not in any HIV risk group. 32 individuals were therefore most likely infected by IV drug use and the rest through sexual contacts. PCR amplification and heteroduplex mobility assay found all but one case to be infected with HIV-1 subtype E. The only nonsubtype E infection was HIV-1 subtype B in a woman sexually infected by her seropositive partner who was most likely exposed to the virus in Europe. HIV-1 subtype E strongly predominates in South Vietnam. The homogeneous geographic distribution of subtype E suggests the recent introduction of the virus into the country. A Thai origin can be considered given the genetic relationship between the Thai and Vietnamese subtypes E. It may be assumed that subtype E infections of Vietnamese prostitutes are related to the progressive entry and spread of HIV-1 subtype E from Thailand to Cambodia and then to southern Vietnam. PMID:8743088

  15. In Vitro Characterization of a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Chimera Expressing HIV Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase To Study Antiviral Resistance in Pigtail Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ambrose, Zandrea; Boltz, Valerie; Palmer, Sarah; Coffin, John M.; Hughes, Stephen H.; KewalRamani, Vineet N.

    2004-01-01

    Antiviral resistance is a significant obstacle in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Because nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) specifically target HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and do not effectively inhibit simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) RT, the development of animal models to study the evolution of antiviral resistance has been problematic. To facilitate in vivo studies of NNRTI resistance, we examined whether a SIV that causes immunopathogenesis in pigtail macaques could be made sensitive to NNRTIs. Two simian-human immunodeficiency viruses (SHIVs) were derived from the genetic background of SIVmne: SIV-RT-YY contains RT substitutions intended to confer NNRTI susceptibility (V181Y and L188Y), and RT-SHIVmne contains the entire HIV-1 RT coding region. Both mutant viruses grew to high titers in vitro but had reduced fitness relative to wild-type SIVmne. Although the HIV-1 RT was properly processed into p66 and p51 subunits in RT-SHIVmne particles, the RT-SHIVmne virions had lower levels of RT per viral genomic RNA than HIV-1. Correspondingly, there was decreased RT activity in RT-SHIVmne and SIV-RT-YY particles. HIV-1 and RT-SHIVmne were similarly susceptible to the NNRTIs efavirenz, nevirapine, and UC781. However, SIV-RT-YY was less sensitive to NNRTIs than HIV-1 or RT-SHIVmne. Classical NNRTI resis tance mutations were selected in RT-SHIVmne after in vitro drug treatment and were monitored in a sensitive allele-specific real-time RT-PCR assay. Collectively, these results indicate that RT-SHIVmne may be a useful model in macaques for the preclinical evaluation of NNRTIs and for studies of the development of drug resistance in vivo. PMID:15564466

  16. Unique Thermodynamic Response of Tipranavir to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Drug Resistance Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Muzammil,S.; Armstrong, A.; Kang, L.; Jakalian, A.; Bonneau, P.; Schmelmer, V.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2007-01-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem affecting the clinical efficacy of antiretroviral agents, including protease inhibitors, in the treatment of infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)/AIDS. Consequently, the elucidation of the mechanisms by which HIV-1 protease inhibitors maintain antiviral activity in the presence of mutations is critical to the development of superior inhibitors. Tipranavir, a nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitor, has been recently approved for the treatment of HIV infection. Tipranavir inhibits wild-type protease with high potency (K{sub i} = 19 pM) and demonstrates durable efficacy in the treatment of patients infected with HIV-1 strains containing multiple common mutations associated with resistance. The high potency of tipranavir results from a very large favorable entropy change (-T{Delta}S = -14.6 kcal/mol) combined with a favorable, albeit small, enthalpy change ({Delta}H = -0.7 kcal/mol, 25{sup o}C). Characterization of tipranavir binding to wild-type protease, active site mutants I50V and V82F/I84V, the multidrug-resistant mutant L10I/L33I/M46I/I54V/L63I/V82A/I84V/L90M, and the tipranavir in vitro-selected mutant I13V/V32L/L33F/K45I/V82L/I84V was performed by isothermal titration calorimetry and crystallography. Thermodynamically, the good response of tipranavir arises from a unique behavior: it compensates for entropic losses by actual enthalpic gains or by sustaining minimal enthalpic losses when facing the mutants. The net result is a small loss in binding affinity. Structurally, tipranavir establishes a very strong hydrogen bond network with invariant regions of the protease, which is maintained with the mutants, including catalytic Asp25 and the backbone of Asp29, Asp30, Gly48 and Ile50. Moreover, tipranavir forms hydrogen bonds directly to Ile50, while all other inhibitors do so by being mediated by a water molecule.

  17. High Sequence Conservation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase under Drug Pressure despite the Continuous Appearance of Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; Gago, Federico; Santoro, Maria; Gori, Caterina; Svicher, Valentina; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; d'Arrigo, Roberta; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Bertoli, Ada; Monforte, Antonella d'Arminio; Balzarini, Jan; Antinori, Andrea; Perno, Carlo-Federico

    2005-01-01

    To define the extent of sequence conservation in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) in vivo, the first 320 amino acids of RT obtained from 2,236 plasma-derived samples from a well-defined cohort of 1,704 HIV-1-infected individuals (457 drug naïve and 1,247 drug treated) were analyzed and examined in structural terms. In naïve patients, 233 out of these 320 residues (73%) were conserved (<1% variability). The majority of invariant amino acids clustered into defined regions comprising between 5 and 29 consecutive residues. Of the nine longest invariant regions identified, some contained residues and domains critical for enzyme stability and function. In patients treated with RT inhibitors, despite profound drug pressure and the appearance of mutations primarily associated with resistance, 202 amino acids (63%) remained highly conserved and appeared mostly distributed in regions of variable length. This finding suggests that participation of consecutive residues in structural domains is strictly required for cooperative functions and sustainability of HIV-1 RT activity. Besides confirming the conservation of amino acids that are already known to be important for catalytic activity, stability of the heterodimer interface, and/or primer/template binding, the other 62 new invariable residues are now identified and mapped onto the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme. This new knowledge could be of help in the structure-based design of novel resistance-evading drugs. PMID:16051864

  18. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in alcoholics.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Om; Mason, Andrew; Luftig, Ronald B; Bautista, Abraham P

    2002-07-01

    Approximately 400,000 individuals in the United States are co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and it is likely that almost one in two of these subjects consumes alcohol. The majority of these patients suffer an accelerated course of liver disease as manifested by the onset of cirrhosis within 5 to 10 years of developing HCV infection, as well as an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). It is thought that chronic alcohol abuse mediates liver damage as a result of increased production of free radicals and proinflammatory cytokines. In the setting of chronic HCV infection, alcohol ingestion has an additional effect of diminishing immune clearance and increasing viral burden to hasten the onset of cirrhosis and HCC. Likewise, chronic HCV and HIV-1 co-infection results in a net increase in HCV burden; higher prevalence rates of HCV transmission to sexual partners and offspring, as well as an accelerated progression to end stage liver disease as compared to individuals with HCV infection alone. Thus, the synergistic effects of alcohol abuse and HIV-1 greatly impact on the morbidity and mortality for patients with HCV coinfection. Ultimately, this cumulative disease process will require far more aggressive management with abstinence and counseling for alcohol abuse; highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV infection and combination anti-viral therapy for HCV infection to stem the rapid progression to end stage liver disease. PMID:12086918

  19. Evaluation of the disinfectant effect of Solprogel against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1).

    PubMed

    Hernández, A; Belda, F J; Domínguez, J; Matas, L; Gimenez, M; Caraballo, M; Ramil, C; Ausina, V

    1996-11-01

    The antiviral activities of sodium dichloroisocyanurate (NaDCC) and a commercial product (Solprogel 2%) against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) were investigated using a quantitative suspension test method. Solprogel is a compound that contains NaDCC and a biodegradable polymer of acrylic acid. Viral suspensions were prepared containing 3.2 x 10(6) tissue culture infective dose 50 (TCID50) in culture media. Syncytium formation in the MT-2 line and HIV antigen p24 on the supernatant of the cultures were used to determine viral titre. Results indicate that satisfactory disinfection (1000-fold reduction in 5 min) can be achieved using NaDCC and Solprogel at concentrations of 100 and 120 ppm available chlorine, respectively. PMID:8923278

  20. HIV type 1 gag genetic diversity among antenatal clinic attendees in North Rift Valley, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Nyagaka, Benuel; Kiptoo, Michael K; Lihana, Raphael W; Khamadi, Samoel A; Makokha, Ernest P; Kinyua, Joyceline G; Mwangi, Joseph; Osman, Saida; Lagat, Nancy J; Muriuki, Joseph; Okoth, Vincent; Gicheru, Michael; Ng'ang'a, Zipporah; Songok, Elijah M

    2012-05-01

    HIV genetic recombination and high mutation rate increase diversity allowing it to escape from host immune response or antiretroviral drugs. This diversity has enabled specific viral subtypes to be predominant in specific regions. To determine HIV-1 subtypes among seropositive antenatal clinic attendees in Kenya's North Rift Valley, a cross-sectional study was carried out on 116 HIV-1-positive blood samples. Proviral DNA was extracted from peripheral blood mononuclear cells by DNAzol lysis and ethanol precipitation. Polymerase chain reactions using specific primers for HIV-1 gag and population sequencing on resulting amplicons were carried out. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 81 (70%) were subtype A1, 13 (11%) subtype D, 8 (7%) subtype C, 3 (3%) subtype A2, 1 (1%) subtype G, and 10 showed possible recombinants: 5 (4%) subtype A1D, 4 (3%) subtype A1C, and 1 (1%) subtype A2C. These data support the need to establish circulating subtypes for better evaluation of effective HIV diagnostic and treatment options in Kenya. PMID:21827277

  1. HIV type 1 integrase inhibitors: from basic research to clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Jegede, Oyebisi; Babu, John; Di Santo, Roberto; McColl, Damian J; Weber, Jan; Quiñones-Mateu, Miguel

    2008-01-01

    Similar to other retroviruses, productive infection with HIV-1 requires three key steps in the viral replication: (i) reverse transcription of viral genomic RNA into viral cDNA by the viral reverse transcriptase; (ii) integration of viral cDNA into host cell genome using the viral integrase; and (iii) cleavage of newly synthesized viral polypeptide by the viral protease into individual viral proteins during new virion assembly. Following their discovery, all three viral enzymes were considered as targets for antiretroviral drugs. However, while multiple reverse transcriptase and protease inhibitors have been used for more than 12 years to treat HIV-infected individuals, only recently has the viral integrase enzyme emerged as an alternative, clinically validated target to block HIV-1 replication. Here we review the biology of HIV-1 integration, the mechanisms of action and development of resistance to integrase inhibitors, and the latest data on the most recent clinical trials involving this promising, novel class of antiretroviral drugs. PMID:18820719

  2. Drugs, Alcohol and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ... follow these reminders: Never reuse or "share" syringes, water, or drug preparation equipment. Use only syringes obtained ...

  3. Crystal structures of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 and their use in drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Mark P; Potter, Barry VL

    2014-01-01

    Cortisol is synthesized by 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1, inhibitors of which may treat disease associated with excessive cortisol levels. The crystal structures of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 that have been released may aid drug discovery. The crystal structures have been analyzed in terms of the interactions between the protein and the ligands. Despite a variety of structurally different inhibitors the crystal structures of the proteins are quite similar. However, the differences are significant for drug discovery. The crystal structures can be of use in drug discovery, but care needs to be taken when selecting structures for use in virtual screening and ligand docking. PMID:21446847

  4. HIV infection in females dependent on drugs.

    PubMed

    Wai, B H; Singh, S; Varma, S L

    1996-03-01

    One hundred and seventy-one drug-dependent females in a drug rehabilitation centre were studied to estimate the prevalence of HIV infection among them. Twenty-four (14%) were positive on the Western Blot test. The presence of HIV infection was significantly correlated with syphilis (p < 0.03) and age (p < 0.001); 83% of those who were HIV positive were intravenous drug users. The need for harm reduction programmes to prevent spread of HIV infection among injecting drug users is stressed. PMID:8867206

  5. Demonstration of de novo HIV type 1 production by detection of multiply spliced and unspliced HIV type 1 RNA in paraffin-embedded tonsils.

    PubMed

    Brachtel, Elena F; Mascola, John R; Wear, Douglas J; Ehrenberg, Philip K; Dayhoff, Deborah E; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Michael, Nelson L; Frankel, Sarah Schlesinger

    2002-07-20

    HIV-1 infection of tonsils takes place when virus spreads systemically, and may occur when tonsillar tissue serves as the initial portal of HIV-1 entry. The HIV replication cycle includes the production of regulatory and accessory gene mRNAs, produced by splicing of genomic mRNA, that are hallmarks of de novo virus production. We sought to demonstrate, for the first time, the presence of multiply spliced viral RNA transcripts in archival tissue as a marker for active virus replication. Further, amplified cDNA sequences from unspliced pol gene mRNA were used to define the genetic subtype of HIV-1 within these tissues. RNA was extracted from surgical pathological, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens, and RT-PCR was performed with primers for unspliced and multiply spliced HIV-1 transcripts. Amplification products were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis and their specificity was confirmed by sequencing and Southern blot hybridization. Unspliced HIV-1 pol transcripts yielded cDNA amplicons of 184 base pairs (bp) that were cloned and sequenced. Phylogenetic analysis revealed these sequences to be of HIV-1 subtype B. Multiply spliced transcripts specific for the tat/rev (173 bp), tat (268 bp), and tat/rev/nef (146 bp) regulatory gene mRNAs could be demonstrated in all cases. These results support the demonstration of active replication of HIV-1 in archival tonsillar tissues previously shown by p24 antigen staining. They also show the feasibility of performing molecular epidemiologic studies on HIV-1 cDNA sequences from archived pathologic specimens. PMID:12167270

  6. Recombinant virus assay: a rapid, phenotypic assay for assessment of drug susceptibility of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Kellam, P; Larder, B A

    1994-01-01

    Antiviral drug susceptibility assays for clinical human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates are required to monitor the development of drug resistance during clinical trials and antiretroviral drug therapy. First-generation phenotypic assays possess a number of drawbacks, not least the selection of unrepresentative virus populations during cocultivation. Here we describe a rapid phenotypic assay for the assessment of the susceptibility of clinical isolates to reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors. This procedure, called the recombinant virus assay, allows the generation of viable virus by homologous recombination of a PCR-derived pool of RT coding sequences into an RT-deleted, noninfectious proviral clone, pHIV delta BstEII. A nested PCR procedure has been optimized to allow the amplification of an RT pool from both uncultured and cocultured infected patient peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) DNA for subsequent use in the creation of recombinant viruses. Analysis of two patients during the course of zidovudine therapy showed that this approach produced viruses which accurately exhibited the same genotype and phenotype as that of the original infected PBL DNA. The recombinant virus assay can be performed in approximately 3 weeks without the use of donor PBLs and therefore represents a rapid, nonselective procedure for the assay of clinical isolates. Images PMID:8141575

  7. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance Among Jamaican Men Who Have Sex with Men Should Be Prioritized for Reducing HIV Transmission.

    PubMed

    Collins-Fairclough, Aneisha M; Dennis, Ann M; Nelson, Julie A E; Weir, Sharon S; Figueroa, J Peter

    2015-08-01

    The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is highest among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jamaica but no genotypic data are available on the virus strains that are responsible for the epidemic among this key population. HIV-1 polymerase (pol) genes from 65 MSM were sequenced and used to predict drug resistance mutations. An HIV drug resistance prevalence of 28% (minimum 13%) was observed among this cohort, with the most frequent mutations conferring resistance to efavirenz, nevirapine, and lamivudine. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed 10 times the number of linked HIV infections among this cohort than respondent reporting. HIV treatment and prevention efforts in Jamaica could benefit significantly from Pol genotyping of the HIV strains infecting socially vulnerable MSM prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), as this would guide suppressive ART and unearth HIV transmission clusters to enable more effective delivery of treatment and prevention programs. PMID:26133540

  8. HIV Drug Resistance Surveillance Among Jamaican Men Who Have Sex with Men Should Be Prioritized for Reducing HIV Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Ann M.; Nelson, Julie A.E.; Weir, Sharon S.; Figueroa, J. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is highest among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jamaica but no genotypic data are available on the virus strains that are responsible for the epidemic among this key population. HIV-1 polymerase (pol) genes from 65 MSM were sequenced and used to predict drug resistance mutations. An HIV drug resistance prevalence of 28% (minimum 13%) was observed among this cohort, with the most frequent mutations conferring resistance to efavirenz, nevirapine, and lamivudine. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences revealed 10 times the number of linked HIV infections among this cohort than respondent reporting. HIV treatment and prevention efforts in Jamaica could benefit significantly from Pol genotyping of the HIV strains infecting socially vulnerable MSM prior to initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), as this would guide suppressive ART and unearth HIV transmission clusters to enable more effective delivery of treatment and prevention programs. PMID:26133540

  9. Recreational drug use in type 1 diabetes: an invisible accomplice to poor glycaemic control?

    PubMed

    Lee, P; Greenfield, J R; Gilbert, K; Campbell, L V

    2012-02-01

    Recreational drug use during 'rave' parties is increasingly popular, but the impact of recreational drug use in type 1 diabetes (T1D) is not known. We determined the self-reported pattern and effects of recreational/illicit drug use in Australians with T1D people by inviting people with T1D to participate in an anonymous online/paper survey of drug use, through national radio broadcast and online/hospital advertising. Of the people with T1D who responded to our survey, more than three quarters reported having used recreational/illicit drug, but few people had informed health professionals about drug use. Drug use was associated with worse glycaemic control and higher risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. Medical awareness of common, currently underreported, drug use in young people with T1D is essential. It offers the possibility of helping such patients improve related suboptimal metabolic control. PMID:22356493

  10. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Tat Induces Nitric-oxide Synthase in Human Astroglia*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Jana, Malabendu; Dasgupta, Subhajit; Koka, Sreenivas; He, Jun; Wood, Charles; Pahan, Kalipada

    2007-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is known to cause neuronal injury and dementia in a significant proportion of patients. However, the mechanism by which HIV-1 mediates its deleterious effects in the brain is poorly defined. The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the HIV-1 tat gene on the expression of inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS) in human U373MG astroglial cells and primary astroglia. Expression of the tat gene as RSV-tat but not that of the CAT gene as RSV-CAT in U373MG astroglial cells led to the induction of NO production and the expression of iNOS protein and mRNA. Induction of NO production by recombinant HIV-1 Tat protein and inhibition of RSV-tat-induced NO production by anti-Tat antibodies suggest that RSV-tat-induced production of NO is dependent on Tat and that Tat is secreted from RSV-tat-transfected astroglia. Similar to U373MG astroglial cells, RSV-tat also induced the production of NO in human primary astroglia. The induction of human iNOS promoter-derived luciferase activity by the expression of RSV-tat suggests that RSV-tat induces the transcription of iNOS. To understand the mechanism of induction of iNOS, we investigated the role of NF-κB and C/EBPβ, transcription factors responsible for the induction of iNOS. Activation of NF-κB as well as C/EBPβ by RSV-tat, stimulation of RSV-tat-induced production of NO by the wild type of p65 and C/EBPβ, and inhibition of RSV-tat-induced production of NO by Δp65, a dominant-negative mutant of p65, and ΔC/EBPβ, a dominant-negative mutant of C/EBPβ, suggest that RSV-tat induces iNOS through the activation of NF-κB and C/EBPβ. In addition, we show that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) but not that p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is involved in RSV-tat induced production of NO. Interestingly, PD98059, an inhibitor of the ERK pathway, and ΔERK2, a dominant-negative mutant of ERK2, inhibited RSV-tat-induced production of NO

  11. Induction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Specific T-Cell Responses in HIV Vaccine Trial Participants Who Subsequently Acquire HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Helen; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Lee, Deborah; Moore, Erin; Cao, Jianhong; McNevin, John; Andrus, Thomas; Zhu, Haiying; Rubin, Abbe; Zhu, Tuofu; Celum, Connie; McElrath, M. Juliana

    2006-01-01

    Candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines designed to elicit T-cell immunity in HIV-1-uninfected persons are under investigation in phase I to III clinical trials. Little is known about how these vaccines impact the immunologic response postinfection in persons who break through despite vaccination. Here, we describe the first comprehensive characterization of HIV-specific T-cell immunity in vaccine study participants following breakthrough HIV-1 infection in comparison to 16 nonvaccinated subjects with primary HIV-1 infection. Whereas none of the 16 breakthrough infections possessed vaccine-induced HIV-1-specific T-cell responses preinfection, 85% of vaccinees and 86% of nonvaccinees with primary HIV-1 infection developed HIV-specific T-cell responses postinfection. Breakthrough subjects' T cells recognized 43 unique HIV-1 T-cell epitopes, of which 8 are newly described, and 25% were present in the vaccine. The frequencies of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-secreting cells recognizing epitopes within gene products that were and were not encoded by the vaccine were not different (P = 0.64), which suggests that responses were not anamnestic. Epitopes within Nef and Gag proteins were the most commonly recognized in both vaccinated and nonvaccinated infected subjects. One individual controlled viral replication without antiretroviral therapy and, notably, mounted a novel HIV-specific HLA-C14-restricted Gag LYNTVATL-specific T-cell response. Longitudinally, HIV-specific T cells in this individual were able to secrete IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor alpha, as well as proliferate and degranulate in response to their cognate antigenic peptides up to 5 years postinfection. In conclusion, a vaccinee's ability to mount an HIV-specific T-cell response postinfection is not compromised by previous immunization, since the CD8+ T-cell responses postinfection are similar to those seen in vaccine-naïve individuals. Finding an individual who is controlling infection

  12. Alternate approaches for pediatric type 1 diabetes drug development and potential regulatory approval: a perspective.

    PubMed

    Turner, J Rick; Close, Kelly L; Fleming, G Alexander; Wherrett, Diane K; DiMeglio, Linda A

    2015-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of pediatric type 1 diabetes are increasing globally, including in the U.S. While the increasing number of cases of pediatric diabetes makes expeditious availability of new medical products and therapies for diabetes care essential, there have been many barriers encountered in bringing some drugs and devices to pediatric patients who may benefit. Newer insulins have been studied and approved for use in children. However, hurdles exist in the inclusion of children in studies of therapies aimed at preventing β-cell loss in those with new-onset diabetes and those at risk for type 1 diabetes. This Perspective focuses on potential solutions to the challenges experienced in bringing new drugs for pediatric type 1 diabetes to marketing approval. Given their central importance as the users of medical products, patient perspectives are included along with scientific and regulatory considerations. PMID:26404928

  13. [Research development of HIV drug resistance].

    PubMed

    Zou, Wen; Liu, Ying; Wang, Jian; Gao, Guo-Jian; Dong, Ji-Peng; Xian, Qing-Fei

    2013-08-01

    Highly active antiretroviral combination therapy significantly reduced the mortality, but in the high-speed copying, high genetic variation and drug selection pressure under the effect of the increasingly serious problem of drug resistance greatly weakened the role of HAART inhibit viral replication and reduce antiviral treatment. This paper reports the latest trends in HIV drug-resistance in order to develop anti-HIV drugs in clinical programs, research and development of new guidance anti-HIV-1 strategy to bring guidance. PMID:24228557

  14. Role and modulation of drug transporters in HIV-1 therapy.

    PubMed

    Alam, Camille; Whyte-Allman, Sana-Kay; Omeragic, Amila; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-08-01

    Current treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection involves a combination of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) that target different stages of the HIV-1 life cycle. This strategy is commonly referred to as highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) or combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Membrane-associated drug transporters expressed ubiquitously in mammalian systems play a crucial role in modulating ARV disposition during HIV-1 infection. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporter superfamilies have been shown to interact with ARVs, including those that are used as part of first-line treatment regimens. As a result, the functional expression of drug transporters can influence the distribution of ARVs at specific sites of infection. In addition, pathological factors related to HIV-1 infection and/or ARV therapy itself can alter transporter expression and activity, thus further contributing to changes in ARV disposition and the effectiveness of HAART. This review summarizes current knowledge on the role of drug transporters in regulating ARV transport in the context of HIV-1 infection. PMID:27181050

  15. Drug and Alcohol Use -- A Significant Risk Factor for HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Drug and Alcohol Use - A Significant Risk Factor for HIV Email ... with HIV currently use drugs or binge on alcohol. Many people are unaware that the increased risk ...

  16. Mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T.; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.; Letvin, Norman; Hahn; Beatrice H.

    2011-05-31

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  17. Susceptibility Testing by Polymerase Chain Reaction DNA Quantitation: A Method to Measure Drug Resistance of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Isolates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eron, Joseph J.; Gorczyca, Paul; Kaplan, Joan C.; D'Aquila, Richard T.

    1992-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) DNA quantitation (PDQ) susceptibility testing rapidly and directly measures nucleoside sensitivity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. PCR is used to quantitate the amount of HIV-1 DNA synthesized after in vitro infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The relative amounts of HIV-1 DNA in cell lysates from cultures maintained at different drug concentrations reflect drug inhibition of virus replication. The results of PDQ susceptibility testing of 2- or 3-day cultures are supported by assays measuring HIV-1 p24 antigen production in supernatants of 7- or 10-day cultures. DNA sequence analyses to identify mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene that cause resistance to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine also support the PDQ results. With the PDQ method, both infectivity titration and susceptibility testing can be performed on supernatants from primary cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PDQ susceptibility testing should facilitate epidemiologic studies of the clinical significance of drug-resistant HIV-1 isolates.

  18. Near full-length genomic characterization of a HIV type 1 BC recombinant strain from Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Roni; Sarkar, Kamalesh; Singh, N Brajachand; Singh, Y Manihar; Chakrabarti, Sekhar

    2012-10-01

    Genetic complexity of HIV-1 is brought about by recombination between HIV-1 subtypes which leads to the development of epidemiologically significant founder strains. In the present study, the near full-length genome sequence of an HIV-1 isolate from an injecting drug user of Manipur (India) was determined, which evidenced the presence of a novel HIV-1 BC recombinant strain. Near full-length genome was amplified by polymerase chain reaction using primer walking approach. The recombination break points were detected using bootscan and simplot analyses. This isolate exhibited a mosaic structure consisting of subtype C backbone with subtype B insertions at the upstream of pol gene (3026-3259) and the downstream of env gene which spanned till the nef gene (8183-8961). Phylogenetic relationships determined with neighbor-joining trees, revealed that the subtype C sequences clustered with sequences from Indian subtype C HIV-1 strains, and the subtype B sequences clustered with HIV-1 subtype B strains from Thailand. This finding may create a complex scenario of HIV-1 epidemic among the injecting drug users of Manipur in near future. PMID:22710995

  19. A Case of Primary HIV Type 1 and Cytomegalovirus Coinfection Presenting with Widespread Clinical Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Singer, Elyse J.; Bonelli, Laura; Klausner, Jeffrey D.

    2015-01-01

    Coinfection of HIV-1 and cytomegalovirus (CMV) may occur given the shared routes of transmission, and the clinical presentations of each process overlap. We present a case of acute HIV-1 and CMV coinfection presenting with an acute febrile illness complicated by meningitis, hepatitis, and retinopathy. This and other similar cases demonstrate the need to consider CMV coin-fection in acute HIV-1 disease, particularly in situations with significant end-organ damage. PMID:24476962

  20. Nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope immunogens

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T; Fischer, William; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Letvin, Norman; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2015-04-21

    The present invention relates to nucleic acids encoding mosaic clade M HIV-1 Env polypeptides and to compositions and vectors comprising same. The nucleic acids of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  1. Potent and selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by 5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil derivatives through their interaction with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Baba, M; De Clercq, E; Tanaka, H; Ubasawa, M; Takashima, H; Sekiya, K; Nitta, I; Umezu, K; Nakashima, H; Mori, S

    1991-01-01

    In the search for 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)-methyl]-6-(phenylthio)thymine (HEPT) derivatives, we have found several 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues to be highly potent and selective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1. 1-Benzyloxymethyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil, the most potent congener of the series, inhibits HIV-1 replication in a variety of cell systems, including peripheral blood lymphocytes, at a concentration of 1.5-7.0 nM, which is lower by a factor of 10(3) than the 50% antivirally effective concentration of the parent compound HEPT. The 5-ethyl-6-(phenylthio)uracil analogues, like HEPT itself, do not inhibit HIV-2 replication but do inhibit replication of 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant mutants of HIV-1. 1-Benzyloxy-methyl-5-ethyl-6-phenylthiouracil and its congeners are targeted at the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). They do not inhibit HIV-2 RT. They do not need to be metabolized to exert their inhibitory effect on HIV-1 RT. Yet this inhibitory effect is competitive with the natural substrate dTTP. The HEPT derivatives represent a group of RT inhibitors with a unique mode of interaction with HIV-1 RT. PMID:1706522

  2. A review of antiviral drugs and other compounds with activity against feline herpesvirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Thomasy, Sara M; Maggs, David J

    2016-07-01

    Feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) is a common and important cause of ocular surface disease, dermatitis, respiratory disease, and potentially intraocular disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs developed for the treatment of humans infected with herpesviruses have been used to treat cats infected with FHV-1. Translational use of drugs in this manner ideally requires methodical investigation of their in vitro efficacy against FHV-1 followed by pharmacokinetic and safety trials in normal cats. Subsequently, placebo-controlled efficacy studies in experimentally inoculated animals should be performed followed, finally, by carefully designed and monitored clinical trials in client-owned animals. This review is intended to provide a concise overview of the available literature regarding the efficacy of antiviral drugs and other compounds with proven or putative activity against FHV-1, as well as a discussion of their safety in cats. PMID:27091747

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) derived vectors: safety considerations and controversy over therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Romano, Gaetano; Claudio, Pier Paolo; Tonini, Tiziana; Giordano, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    The latest generation of lentiviral vectors based on HIV-1 is one of the most efficient tools for gene transduction of mammalian cells. However, the possible employment of HIV-based vectors in clinical trials is a very controversial issue, mainly due to safety and ethical concerns. HIV-1 is a lethal pathogenic agent, which induces AIDS. Genetic vectors must derive either from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans, or that eventually just cause mild illnesses. Patients exposed to HIV-based vectors will test seropositive to certain components of HIV-1. In addition, there might be other possible adverse effects in patients that cannot be predicted, as many aspects of the pathogenesis of AIDS have not been completely understood yet. On these grounds, it seems necessary to improve the design of other lentiviral vectors, which derive from viruses that are not pathogenic in humans and are distantly related to primate retroviridae. PMID:14693483

  4. Decreased HIV Type 1 Transcription in CCR5-Δ32 Heterozygotes During Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Charlene; Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Strain, Matthew C.; Lada, Steven M.; Yukl, Steven; Cockerham, Leslie R.; Pilcher, Christopher D.; Hecht, Frederick M.; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Liegler, Teri; Richman, Douglas D.; Deeks, Steven G.; Pillai, Satish K.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals who are heterozygous for the CCR5-Δ32 mutation provide a natural model to examine the effects of reduced CCR5 expression on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) persistence. We evaluated the HIV reservoir in 18 CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes and 54 CCR5 wild-type individuals during suppressive antiretroviral therapy. Cell-associated HIV RNA levels (P = .035), RNA to DNA transcriptional ratios (P = .013), and frequency of detectable HIV 2–long terminal repeat circular DNA (P = .013) were significantly lower in CD4+ T cells from CCR5-Δ32 heterozygotes. Cell-associated HIV RNA was significantly correlated with CCR5 surface expression on CD4+ T cells (r2 = 0.136; P = .002). Our findings suggest that curative strategies should further explore manipulation of CCR5. PMID:24935955

  5. HIV Type 1 Transmission Networks Among Men Having Sex with Men and Heterosexuals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Hassan, Amin; Hamers, Raph L.; Mutua, Gaudensia; Anzala, Omu; Mandaliya, Kishor; Cane, Patricia; Berkley, James A.; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F.; Wallis, Carole; Graham, Susan M.; Price, Matthew A.; Coutinho, Roel A.; Sanders, Eduard J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We performed a molecular phylogenetic study on HIV-1 polymerase sequences of men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual patient samples in Kenya to characterize any observed HIV-1 transmission networks. HIV-1 polymerase sequences were obtained from samples in Nairobi and coastal Kenya from 84 MSM, 226 other men, and 364 women from 2005 to 2010. Using Bayesian phylogenetics, we tested whether sequences clustered by sexual orientation and geographic location. In addition, we used trait diffusion analyses to identify significant epidemiological links and to quantify the number of transmissions between risk groups. Finally, we compared 84 MSM sequences with all HIV-1 sequences available online at GenBank. Significant clustering of sequences from MSM at both coastal Kenya and Nairobi was found, with evidence of HIV-1 transmission between both locations. Although a transmission pair between a coastal MSM and woman was confirmed, no significant HIV-1 transmission was evident between MSM and the comparison population for the predominant subtype A (60%). However, a weak but significant link was evident when studying all subtypes together. GenBank comparison did not reveal other important transmission links. Our data suggest infrequent intermingling of MSM and heterosexual HIV-1 epidemics in Kenya. PMID:23947948

  6. HIV Type 1 transmission networks among men having sex with men and heterosexuals in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Bezemer, Daniela; Faria, Nuno Rodrigues; Hassan, Amin; Hamers, Raph L; Mutua, Gaudensia; Anzala, Omu; Mandaliya, Kishor; Cane, Patricia; Berkley, James A; Rinke de Wit, Tobias F; Wallis, Carole; Graham, Susan M; Price, Matthew A; Coutinho, Roel A; Sanders, Eduard J

    2014-02-01

    We performed a molecular phylogenetic study on HIV-1 polymerase sequences of men who have sex with men (MSM) and heterosexual patient samples in Kenya to characterize any observed HIV-1 transmission networks. HIV-1 polymerase sequences were obtained from samples in Nairobi and coastal Kenya from 84 MSM, 226 other men, and 364 women from 2005 to 2010. Using Bayesian phylogenetics, we tested whether sequences clustered by sexual orientation and geographic location. In addition, we used trait diffusion analyses to identify significant epidemiological links and to quantify the number of transmissions between risk groups. Finally, we compared 84 MSM sequences with all HIV-1 sequences available online at GenBank. Significant clustering of sequences from MSM at both coastal Kenya and Nairobi was found, with evidence of HIV-1 transmission between both locations. Although a transmission pair between a coastal MSM and woman was confirmed, no significant HIV-1 transmission was evident between MSM and the comparison population for the predominant subtype A (60%). However, a weak but significant link was evident when studying all subtypes together. GenBank comparison did not reveal other important transmission links. Our data suggest infrequent intermingling of MSM and heterosexual HIV-1 epidemics in Kenya. PMID:23947948

  7. Non-insulin drugs to treat hyperglycaemia in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Christian Seerup; Dejgaard, Thomas Fremming; Madsbad, Sten

    2016-09-01

    Insulin treatment of individuals with type 1 diabetes has shortcomings and many patients do not achieve glycaemic and metabolic targets. Consequently, the focus is on novel non-insulin therapeutic approaches that reduce hyperglycaemia and improve metabolic variables without increasing the risk of hypoglycaemia or other adverse events. Several therapies given in conjunction with insulin have been investigated in clinical trials, including pramlintide, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, sodium-glucose co-transporter inhibitors, metformin, sulfonylureas, and thiazolidinediones. These drugs have pleiotropic effects on glucose metabolism and different actions complementary to those of insulin-this Review reports the effects of these drugs on glycaemic control, glucose variability, hypoglycaemia, insulin requirements, and bodyweight. Existing studies are of short duration with few participants; evidence for the efficacy of concomitant treatments is scarce and largely clinically insignificant. A subgroup of patients with type 1 diabetes for whom non-insulin antidiabetic drugs could significantly benefit glycaemic control cannot yet be defined, but we suggest that obese patients prone to hypoglycaemia and patients with residual β-cell function are populations of interest for future trials. PMID:26969516

  8. Demonstration of Sustained Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Lineages Circulating among Treatment-Naïve Individuals▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Hué, Stéphane; Gifford, Robert J.; Dunn, David; Fernhill, Esther; Pillay, Deenan

    2009-01-01

    Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance is well-recognized and compromises response to first-line therapy. However, the population dynamics of transmitted resistance remains unclear, although previous models have assumed that such transmission reflects direct infection from treated individuals. We investigated whether population-based phylogenetic analyses would uncover lineages of resistant viruses circulating in untreated individuals. Through the phylogenetic analysis of 14,061 HIV type 1 (HIV-1) pol gene sequences generated in the United Kingdom from both treatment-naïve and -experienced individuals, we identified five treatment-independent viral clusters containing mutations conferring cross-resistance to antiretroviral drugs prescribed today in the United Kingdom. These viral lineages represent sustainable reservoirs of resistance among new HIV infections, independent of treatment. Dated phylogenies reconstructed through Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo inference indicated that these reservoirs originated between 1997 and 2003 and have persisted in the HIV-infected population for up to 8 years. Since our cohort does not represent all infected individuals within the United Kingdom, our results are likely to underestimate the number and size of the resistant reservoirs circulating among drug-naïve patients. The existence of sustained reservoirs of resistance in the absence of treatment has the capacity to threaten the long-term efficacy of antiretroviral therapy and suggests there is a limit to the decline of transmitted drug resistance. Given the current decrease in resistance transmitted from treated individuals, a greater proportion of resistance is likely to come from drug-naïve lineages. These findings provide new insights for the planning and management of treatment programs in resource-rich and developing countries. PMID:19158238

  9. Male genital tract compartmentalization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV).

    PubMed

    Diem, Kurt; Nickle, David C; Motoshige, Alexis; Fox, Alan; Ross, Susan; Mullins, James I; Corey, Lawrence; Coombs, Robert W; Krieger, John N

    2008-04-01

    We present phylogenetic evidence supporting viral compartmentalization between the blood (peripheral blood mononuclear cells or plasma) and multiple genitourinary sites in HIV-infected men. Four of the five subjects evaluated demonstrated compartmentalization of viral sequences between urogenital tract specimens (tissue or fluid) and at least one blood category. HIV sequence migration from blood to urogenital tract was detected in four of five men, with migration from urogenital tract to blood in the fifth, and cross migration between both compartments noted in one man. These observations add 5 additional cases to the 27 total reported cases in which male urogenital tract compartmentalization has been studied, investigate surgical samples/specimens that have not been evaluated previously, and provide further evidence for restricted flow of HIV between the blood and the genital tract. As such, our study findings are important for understanding the long-term response to antiretroviral therapy, the design of vaccines, and the sexual transmission of HIV. PMID:18426336

  10. Performance of an In-House Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genotyping System for Assessment of Drug Resistance in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays. PMID

  11. Isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces by a simple method and difference between HIV-1 subpopulations in feces and serum.

    PubMed Central

    van der Hoek, L; Boom, R; Goudsmit, J; Snijders, F; Sol, C J

    1995-01-01

    A simple method for the isolation and subsequent detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA from feces is described. Viral RNA was isolated by the method developed by Boom et al. (R. Boom, C.J.A. Sol, M.M.M. Salimans, C.L. Jansen, P.M.E. Wertheim-van Dillen, and J. van der Noordaa, J. Clin. Microbiol. 28:495-503, 1990), which was adapted for feces. HIV-1 RNA was detected by reverse transcription (RT) followed by a nested PCR encompassing the V3 region. Reconstruction experiments revealed that the efficiencies of the extraction technique and the subsequent RT-PCR were not considerably affected by the varied composition of feces. The method was applied on fecal specimens from 18 HIV-1-infected individuals, among which were samples that had been stored for 9 years. It appeared that HIV-1 RNA was detectable in the feces of 12 persons (67%). Viral RNA was present in the feces of persons who fulfilled the criteria for CDC class II and CDC class III HIV infection as well as in patients who were diagnosed with AIDS (CDC class IV). Direct sequencing of amplimers obtained from paired fecal and serum specimens showed that differences in sequence heterogeneity existed. In one patient a remarkable difference in the HIV-1 sequences between isolates from feces and serum was observed. In conclusion, HIV-1 RNA is frequently present in the feces of HIV-1-infected individuals, and in some cases the HIV-1 subpopulation in feces differs from the HIV-1 subpopulation in serum. PMID:7751361

  12. Nucleic acids encoding modified human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) group M consensus envelope glycoproteins

    DOEpatents

    Haynes, Barton F.; Gao, Feng; Korber, Bette T.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Shaw, George M.; Kothe, Denise; Li, Ying Ying; Decker, Julie; Liao, Hua-Xin

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates, in general, to an immunogen and, in particular, to an immunogen for inducing antibodies that neutralizes a wide spectrum of HIV primary isolates and/or to an immunogen that induces a T cell immune response. The invention also relates to a method of inducing anti-HIV antibodies, and/or to a method of inducing a T cell immune response, using such an immunogen. The invention further relates to nucleic acid sequences encoding the present immunogens.

  13. Increased Frequency of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Type 1 Regulatory T Cells in HIV-Infected Individuals.

    PubMed

    Koch, Kristina; Koch, Nora; Sandaradura de Silva, Ute; Jung, Norma; Schulze zur Wiesch, Julian; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Hartmann, Pia; Romerio, Fabio; Lehmann, Clara

    2015-12-01

    In HIV-1 infection elevated serum levels of interferon-α (IFN-α) and interleukin-10 (IL-10) are associated with immune hyperactivation and disease progression. Recently, coexpression of CD49b and LAG-3 was shown to identify Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells, which secrete large amounts of the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. We analyzed the frequency of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells in the peripheral blood of HIV-infected individuals at different stages of the disease. We found increased levels of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells as well as IL-10 in HIV patients. With disease progression, Tr1 cells negatively correlate with frequency of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), the main producers of IFN-α. However, elevated IL-10 levels could not be ascribed to the CD49b/LAG-3(+)Tr1 cell population. Moreover, we showed in vitro that IFN-α leads to an upregulation of IL-10 as well as CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cell counts in healthy controls, recapitulating effects observed in vivo during HIV infection. Our results suggest that overexpression of IFN-α during HIV infection drives the generation of CD49b/LAG-3(+) Tr1 cells and the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10. Furthermore, it remains unclear whether elevated IL-10 levels are beneficial or detrimental in regard to disease progression. PMID:26192268

  14. HIV type 1 subtypes among bar and hotel workers in Moshi, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kiwelu, Ireen E; Renjifo, Boris; Chaplin, Beth; Sam, Noel; Nkya, Watoky M M M; Shao, John; Kapiga, Saidi; Essex, Max

    2003-01-01

    The HIV-1 prevalence among bar and hotel workers in Tanzania suggests they are a high-risk group for HIV-1 infection. We determined the HIV-1 subtype of 3'-p24/5'-p7 gag and C2-C5 env sequences from 40 individuals representing this population in Moshi. Genetic patterns composed of A(gag)-A(env), C(gag)-C(env), and D(gag)-D(env) were found in 19 (48.0%), 8 (20.0%), and 3 (8.0%) samples, respectively. The remaining 10 samples (25%) had different subtypes in gag and env, indicative of intersubtype recombinants. Among these recombinants, two contained sequences from HIV-1 subsubtype A2, a new genetic variant in Tanzania. Five bar and hotel workers may have been infected with viruses from a common source, based on phylogenetic analysis. The information obtained by surveillance of HIV-1 subtypes in a high-risk population should be useful in the design and evaluation of behavioral, therapeutic, and vaccine trial interventions aimed at reducing HIV-1 transmission. PMID:12596722

  15. Action of anti-HIV drugs and resistance: reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2004-01-01

    Currently, 20 drugs have been approved for Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) clinical therapy. These drugs inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, or virus entry. Introduction of a combination therapy with reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors has resulted in a drastic decrease in HIV-1 related mortality. Although the combination therapy can suppress viral replication below detection levels in current available assays, low levels of on-going viral replication still persist in some patients. Long-term administration of the combination therapy may increase selective pressure against viruses, and subsequently induce emergence of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Attempts have been made to design novel antiretroviral drugs that would be able to suppress replication of the resistant variants. At present, several investigational drugs are being tested in clinical trials. These drugs target not only the resistant variants, but also improvement in oral bioavilability or other viral proteins such as HIV-1 integrase, ribonuclease H, and HIV-1 entry (CD4 attachment inhibitors, chemokine receptors antagonists, and fusion inhibitors). Understanding mechanism(s) of action of the drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance is necessary for successful designs in the next generation of anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this review, the mechanisms of action of reverse transcriptase- and protease-inhibitors, and the mechanism of resistance to these inhibitors, are described. PMID:15579086

  16. Alternating versus continuous drug regimens in combination chemotherapy of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Mazzulli, T; Rusconi, S; Merrill, D P; D'Aquila, R T; Moonis, M; Chou, T C; Hirsch, M S

    1994-01-01

    We compared the in vitro efficacies of two-, three-, and four-drug combinations given continuously or in alternating regimens against a clinical isolate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. In H9 cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, at the drug concentrations used in this study, there was greater suppression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection as the number of drugs in the regimen was increased from one to four simultaneously administered agents. Although alternating drug regimens were effective, they were not better than continuous administration of either single drugs or combinations of agents and were less effective than giving all drugs of an alternating regimen simultaneously. PMID:8031028

  17. Drugs That Fight HIV-1

    MedlinePlus

    ... program of the National Institutes of Health Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NRTIs) NRTIs block reverse transcriptase, an enzyme HIV- ... these products are on last page.) Non-Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (NNRTIs) NNRTIs bind to and alter reverse transcriptase, ...

  18. Drugs + HIV, Learn the Link

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... with HIV is a key predictor of the development of AIDS. Because of their compromised immune system, ... Children, Youth and Families The American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) The United Negro College Fund, ...

  19. Phylogeographic reconstruction of HIV type 1B in Montenegro and the Balkan region.

    PubMed

    Ciccozzi, Massimo; Lai, Alessia; Ebranati, Erika; Gabanelli, Elena; Galli, Massimo; Mugosa, Boban; Vratnica, Zoran; Vujoševic, Danijela; Lauševic, Dragan; Ciotti, Marco; Cella, Eleonora; Lo Presti, Alessandra; Zehender, Gianguglielmo

    2012-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most genetically variable human viruses as it is characterized by high rates of mutation, viral replication, and recombination. Phylodynamics is a powerful means of describing the behavior of an infection as a combination of evolutionary and ecological processes. Only a few studies of HIV-1 molecular epidemiology have so far been carried out in the Balkans. In this study, we used Bayesian methods to reconstruct the phylogeography and phylodynamics of HIV-1B in Montenegro and some other Balkan countries on the basis of pol gene sequences retrieved from a public database. The phylogenetic analysis showed that 43% of the isolates grouped in accordance with their geographic area, whereas the majority were interspersed in the tree, thus confirming the multiple introductions of HIV-1B in the Balkans. The Bayesian phylogeographic analysis suggested that HIV-1B entered the Balkans in the early 1970s probably through Greece and other Mediterranean tourist/travel destinations (such as Slovenia). Other Balkan countries, such as Bulgaria and Serbia, may have played an important role in spreading the infection to the entire Eastern Mediterranean area, and possibly to Northeast Europe. This suggests that the Balkans may have played a role as a "gateway" between Western and Eastern Europe. PMID:22364163

  20. Potent and highly selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibition by a series of alpha-anilinophenylacetamide derivatives targeted at HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Van Daele, P; Schols, D; Stoffels, P; De Vreese, K; Woestenborghs, R; Vandamme, A M; Janssen, C G

    1993-01-01

    In vitro evaluation of a large chemical library of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds in a high-capacity, cellular-based screening system has led to the discovery of another family of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) inhibitors. Through optimization of a lead compound, several alpha-anilinophenylacetamide (alpha-APA) derivatives have been identified that inhibit the replication of several HIV-1 strains (IIIB/LAI, RF, NDK, MN, HE) in a variety of host cell types at concentrations that are 10,000- to 100,000-fold lower than their cytotoxic concentrations. The IC50 of the alpha-APA derivative R 89439 for HIV-1 cytopathicity in MT-4 cells was 13 nM. The median 90% inhibitory concentration (IC90) in a variety of host cells was 50-100 nM. Although these alpha-APA derivatives are active against a tetrahydroimidazo [4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-thione-(TIBO)-resistant HIV-1 strain, they do not inhibit replication of HIV-2 (strains ROD and EHO) or simian immunodeficiency virus (strains Mac251, mndGB1, and agm3). An HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr181-->Cys mutation in the reverse transcriptase region displayed reduced sensitivity. alpha-APA derivative R 89439 inhibited virion and recombinant reverse transcriptase of HIV-1 but did not inhibit that of HIV-2. Reverse transcriptase inhibition depended upon the template/primer used. The relatively uncomplicated synthesis of R 89439, its potent anti-HIV-1 activity, and its favorable pharmacokinetic profile make R 89439 a good candidate for clinical studies. PMID:7680476

  1. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities of halogenated gomisin J derivatives, new nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Fujihashi, T; Hara, H; Sakata, T; Mori, K; Higuchi, H; Tanaka, A; Kaji, H; Kaji, A

    1995-01-01

    Halogenated gomisin J (a derivative of lignan compound), represented by the bromine derivative 1506 [(6R, 7S, S-biar)-4,9-dibromo-3,10-dihydroxy-1,2,11,12-tetramethoxy-6, 7-dimethyl-5,6,7,8- tetrahydrodibenzo[a,c]cyclo-octene], was found to be a potent inhibitor of the cytopathic effects of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on MT-4 human T cells (50% effective dose, 0.1 to 0.5 microM). Gomisin J derivatives were active in preventing p24 production from acutely HIV-1-infected H9 cells. The selective indices (toxic dose/effective dose) of these compounds were as high as > 300 in some systems. 1506 was active against 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant HIV-1 and acted synergistically with AZT and 2',3'-ddC. 1506 inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in vitro but not HIV-1 protease. From the time-of-addition experiment, 1506 was found to inhibit the early phase of the HIV life cycle. A 1506-resistant HIV mutant was selected and shown to possess a mutation within the RT-coding region (at position 188 [Tyr to Leu]). The mutant RT expressed in Escherichia coli was resistant to 1506 in the in vitro RT assay. Some of the HIV strains resistant to other nonnucleoside HIV-1 RT inhibitors were also resistant to 1506. Comparison of various gomisin J derivatives with gomisin J showed that iodine, bromine, and chlorine in the fourth and ninth positions increased RT inhibitory activity as well as cytoprotective activity. PMID:8540706

  2. Breaking the Taboo: Illicit Drug Use among Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Hogendorf, Anna M.; Fendler, Wojciech; Sieroslawski, Janusz; Bobeff, Katarzyna; Wegrewicz, Krzysztof; Malewska, Kamila I.; Przudzik, Maciej W.; Szmigiero-Kawko, Malgorzata; Sztangierska, Beata; Mysliwiec, Malgorzata; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of the study was to explore the prevalence of illicit drug use in a group of Polish adolescents with type 1 diabetes (DM1) in comparison with a national cohort of their healthy peers. Methods. Two hundred and nine adolescents with DM1, aged 15–18 years, were studied in 2013 with an anonymous questionnaire prepared for the European School Survey Project on Alcohol and Other Drugs (ESPAD). The control group was a representative sample of 12114 students at the same age who took part in ESPAD in 2011. Metabolic control was regarded as good if self-reported HbA1c was <8% or poor if HbA1c was ≥8%. Results. Lifetime prevalence of illicit drug use was lower among adolescents with DM1 than in the control group [58 (28%) versus 5524 (46%), p = 10−5]. Cannabis preparations were the most frequently used substances [38 (18.3%) versus 3976 (33.1%), p = 10−5], followed by tranquilizers, sedatives, and amphetamine. Lifetime and last 12-month use of cannabis were associated with poorer glycemic control (HbA1c ≥ 8%), p < 0.01 and 0.02, respectively. Conclusions. Adolescents with DM1 report using illicit drugs to a lesser extent than their healthy peers. The use of cannabis is associated with a poorer metabolic control in teens with DM1. PMID:26858959

  3. Cell-Associated Transmission of HIV Type 1 and Other Lentiviruses in Small-Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Moench, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Small-animal models of lentivirus transmission have repeatedly demonstrated transmission by cell-associated virus via vaginal, rectal, and oral routes. The earliest experiments were in the cat/feline immunodeficiency virus model, followed a decade later by successful vaginal transmission of cell-associated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in mice bearing transplanted human immune cells. After early unsuccessful attempts at cell-associated transmission in nonhuman primates, renewed investigation in diverse primate models has now confirmed the findings from the cat and humanized mouse models. Improvements in humanized mouse models have made them the preferred small-animal models to study HIV mucosal transmission. They provide complementary systems to nonhuman primate models to aid in the elucidation of the many remaining questions on the mechanism of and means to prevent both cell-associated and cell-free HIV transmission across mucosal barriers. PMID:25414420

  4. Safety and Efficacy of Dolutegravir in Treatment-Experienced Subjects With Raltegravir-Resistant HIV Type 1 Infection: 24-Week Results of the VIKING Study

    PubMed Central

    Eron, Joseph J.; Clotet, Bonaventura; Durant, Jacques; Katlama, Christine; Kumar, Princy; Lazzarin, Adriano; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle; Richmond, Gary; Soriano, Vincent; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Fujiwara, Tamio; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Vavro, Cindy; Yeo, Jane; Walmsley, Sharon L.; Cox, Joseph; Reynes, Jacques; Morlat, Philippe; Vittecoq, Daniel; Livrozet, Jean-Michel; Fernández, Pompeyo Viciana; Gatell, Jose M.; DeJesus, Edwin; DeVente, Jerome; Lalezari, Jacob P.; McCurdy, Lewis H.; Sloan, Louis A.; Young, Benjamin; LaMarca, Anthony; Hawkins, Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Background. Dolutegravir (DTG; S/GSK1349572), a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integrase inhibitor, has limited cross-resistance to raltegravir (RAL) and elvitegravir in vitro. This phase IIb study assessed the activity of DTG in HIV-1–infected subjects with genotypic evidence of RAL resistance. Methods. Subjects received DTG 50 mg once daily (cohort I) or 50 mg twice daily (cohort II) while continuing a failing regimen (without RAL) through day 10, after which the background regimen was optimized, when feasible, for cohort I, and at least 1 fully active drug was mandated for cohort II. The primary efficacy end point was the proportion of subjects on day 11 in whom the plasma HIV-1 RNA load decreased by ≥0.7 log10 copies/mL from baseline or was <400 copies/mL. Results. A rapid antiviral response was observed. More subjects achieved the primary end point in cohort II (23 of 24 [96%]), compared with cohort I (21 of 27 [78%]) at day 11. At week 24, 41% and 75% of subjects had an HIV-1 RNA load of <50 copies/mL in cohorts I and II, respectively. Further integrase genotypic evolution was uncommon. Dolutegravir had a good, similar safety profile with each dosing regimen. Conclusion. Dolutegravir 50 mg twice daily with an optimized background provided greater and more durable benefit than the once-daily regimen. These data are the first clinical demonstration of the activity of any integrase inhibitor in subjects with HIV-1 resistant to RAL. PMID:23225901

  5. Sexual role and transmission of HIV Type 1 among men who have sex with men, in Peru.

    PubMed

    Goodreau, Steven M; Goicochea, L Pedro; Sanchez, Jorge

    2005-02-01

    In Latin America, men who have sex with men (MSM) have traditionally practiced role segregation--that is, the adoption of a fixed role (insertive or receptive) rather than a versatile role (both practices) during anal sex. Previous modeling has shown that role segregation may yield a lower incidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 infection, compared with role versatility; however, the modeling assumed no risk of acquiring HIV-1 during insertive sex, which is now recognized as unlikely. We reexamine the issue by use of a deterministic model incorporating bidirectional transmission and data from a cohort study of MSM in Lima, Peru, to demonstrate the potential effects of role segregation on the trajectory of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Lima, 67% of MSM reported segregated roles in their recent male partnerships. A population of MSM with identical contact rates but complete role versatility would have twice the prevalence of HIV-1 infection throughout the epidemic's first 3 decades. Preferential mixing among versatile MSM does not change overall prevalence but affects which individuals become infected. PMID:15627225

  6. Polymorphism, recombination, and mutations in HIV type 1 gag-infecting Peruvian male sex workers.

    PubMed

    Yabar, Carlos Augusto; Salvatierra, Javier; Quijano, Eberth

    2008-11-01

    HIV genetic diversity in female sex workers (FSW) has been previously described in Peru; however this information is not yet available for male sex workers (MSW). Therefore, purified peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA from 147 HIV-infected subjects identified as MSW and FSW was used to amplify a 460-bp fragment corresponding to the p24-p7 region of the gag gene. The PCR product was digested with restriction enzymes to identify genetic polymorphism. Later, a random group of samples (n = 19) was sequenced to perform phylogenetic analysis, intragenic recombination analysis, and deleterious mutations leading to a nonfunctional protein in conservative regions of the Gag protein. RFLP analysis revealed 11 genetic variants for AluI and five for MspI. A group of nonsex workers (NSW) used for comparison showed different RFLP genetic variant distributions. Of interest, nine cases of mixed genetic variants were observed for MSW, one case for FSW, and none for NSW. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all HIV-1 species were subtype B. Intragenic recombination analysis showed a B/C recombination case from an FSW (boostrap = 1000; p value < 0.05). Of interest, deleterious mutations were observed in three cases of conservative D2 zinc domains for Gag 3/19 and one case of the high homology region (1/19). This study shows that gag of HIV circulating from MSW has high genetic polymorphism involving deleterious mutations in conserved domains from the p24-p7 gag region. PMID:19000025

  7. A role for RNA helicase A in post-transcriptional regulation of HIV type 1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junzhou; Tang, Hengli; Mullen, Tina-Marie; Westberg, Christopher; Reddy, Thipparthi R.; Rose, David W.; Wong-Staal, Flossie

    1999-01-01

    Retroviruses must bypass the tight coupling of splicing and nuclear export of mRNA in their replication cycle because unspliced genomic RNA and incompletely spliced mRNA must be exported to the cytoplasm for packaging or translation. This process is mediated by a cis-acting constitutive transport element (CTE) for simple retroviruses and by the trans-acting viral protein Rev in concert with its response element (RRE) for complex retroviruses (e.g., HIV). Recently, we identified RNA helicase A (RHA) as a potential cellular cofactor for CTE. Here, we report that RHA also plays a role in Rev/RRE-mediated gene expression and HIV replication. RHA binds weakly to HIV-1 RRE independently of Rev. Overexpression of RHA, but not of an RHA mutant lacking helicase activity, increased both Rev/RRE- and CTE-dependent gene expression and the levels of unspliced HIV mRNA. Microinjection of antibodies to RHA into nuclei dramatically inhibited both CTE- and Rev-dependent gene expression in human cells. Exogenous RHA cDNA, but not the mutant RHA, rescued this inhibition. We propose that RHA is required to release both CTE- and RRE-containing mRNA from spliceosomes before completion of splicing, thus freeing them for nuclear export. PMID:9892698

  8. HIV/STI Risk Behavior of Drug Court Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Angela A.; St. Lawrence, Janet S.; McCluskey, D. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Drug abusing offenders have high rates of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STI). To date, the HIV/STI prevention needs of offenders in drug court programs have been ignored. This multi-method study employed interviews to assess drug court professionals' perceptions of the need for an HIV risk reduction intervention to be integrated…

  9. Expression profiling pre-diabetic mice to uncover drugs with clinical application to type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Pang, Dimeng; Irvine, Katharine M; Mehdi, Ahmed M; Thomas, Helen E; Harris, Mark; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2015-08-01

    In the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D), genetically identical mice in the same environment develop diabetes at different rates. Similar heterogeneity in the rate of progression to T1D exists in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we aimed to discover peripheral blood (PB) genes in NOD mice predicting insulitis severity and rate of progression to diabetes. We then wished to use these genes to mine existing databases to identify drugs effective in diabetes. In a longitudinal study, we analyzed gene expression in PB samples from NOD.CD45.2 mice at 10 weeks of age, then scored pancreatic insulitis at 14 weeks or determined age of diabetes onset. In a multilinear regression model, Tnf and Tgfb mRNA expression in PB predicted insulitis score (R (2)=0.56, P=0.01). Expression of these genes did not predict age of diabetes onset. However, by expression-profiling PB genes in 10-week-old NOD.CD45.2 mice, we found a signature of upregulated genes that predicted delayed or no diabetes. Major associated pathways included chromatin organization, cellular protein location and regulation of nitrogen compounds and RNA. In a clinical cohort, three of these genes were differentially expressed between first-degree relatives, T1D patients and controls. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed genes in NOD.CD45.2 PB identified drugs that are predicted to delay or prevent diabetes. Of these drugs, 11 overlapped with drugs predicted to induce a human 'non-progressor' expression profile. These data demonstrate that disease heterogeneity in diabetes-prone mice can be exploited to mine novel clinical T1D biomarkers and drug targets. PMID:26366287

  10. Expression profiling pre-diabetic mice to uncover drugs with clinical application to type 1 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Dimeng; Irvine, Katharine M; Mehdi, Ahmed M; Thomas, Helen E; Harris, Mark; Hamilton-Williams, Emma E; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2015-01-01

    In the NOD mouse model of type 1 diabetes (T1D), genetically identical mice in the same environment develop diabetes at different rates. Similar heterogeneity in the rate of progression to T1D exists in humans, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Here, we aimed to discover peripheral blood (PB) genes in NOD mice predicting insulitis severity and rate of progression to diabetes. We then wished to use these genes to mine existing databases to identify drugs effective in diabetes. In a longitudinal study, we analyzed gene expression in PB samples from NOD.CD45.2 mice at 10 weeks of age, then scored pancreatic insulitis at 14 weeks or determined age of diabetes onset. In a multilinear regression model, Tnf and Tgfb mRNA expression in PB predicted insulitis score (R2=0.56, P=0.01). Expression of these genes did not predict age of diabetes onset. However, by expression-profiling PB genes in 10-week-old NOD.CD45.2 mice, we found a signature of upregulated genes that predicted delayed or no diabetes. Major associated pathways included chromatin organization, cellular protein location and regulation of nitrogen compounds and RNA. In a clinical cohort, three of these genes were differentially expressed between first-degree relatives, T1D patients and controls. Bioinformatic analysis of differentially expressed genes in NOD.CD45.2 PB identified drugs that are predicted to delay or prevent diabetes. Of these drugs, 11 overlapped with drugs predicted to induce a human ‘non-progressor' expression profile. These data demonstrate that disease heterogeneity in diabetes-prone mice can be exploited to mine novel clinical T1D biomarkers and drug targets. PMID:26366287

  11. Altered Strand Transfer Activity of a Multi-drug-resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutant with a Dipeptide Fingers Domain Insertion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Laura A.; Daddacha, Waaqo; Rigby, Sean; Bambara, Robert A.; Kim, Baek

    2013-01-01

    Prolonged highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART) with multiple nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTI) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infected patients can induce the development of an HIV-1 RT harboring a dipeptide insertion at the RT fingers domain with a background thymidine analog mutation (TAM). This mutation renders viral resistance to multiple NRTIs. We investigated the effect of the dipeptide fingers domain insertion mutation on strand transfer activity using two clinical RT variants isolated during pre- and post-treatment of an infected patient, termed pre-drug RT without the dipeptide insertion and post-drug RT with the Ser-Gly insertion mutation, respectively. First, the post-drug RT displayed elevated strand transfer activity, compared to the pre-drug RT, with two different RNA templates. Second, the post-drug RT exhibited less RNA template degradation than the pre-drug RT, but higher polymerization-dependent RNase H activity. Third, the post-drug RT had a faster association rate for template binding (kon) and lower equilibrium binding constant KD to template, leading to the tighter template binding affinity than the pre-drug RT. The koff rates for pre-drug RT and post-drug RTs were similar. Finally, the removal of the dipeptide insertion from the post-drug RT abolished the elevated strand transfer activity and RNase H activity in addition to the loss of AZT resistance. These biochemical data suggests that the dipeptide insertion mutation elevates strand transfer activity by increasing the interaction of the RT with RNA donor template, promoting cleavage that generates more invasion site for the acceptor template during DNA synthesis. PMID:22100453

  12. The construction and evaluation of SIV/HIV chimeras that express the envelope of European HIV type 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, S; Jones, S; Stott, E J; Almond, N

    1997-06-10

    The molecular construction of SIV/HIV-1 chimeric viruses (or SHIVs), provides a means of infecting macaques with immunodeficiency viruses that express the envelope protein of HIV-1. However, to date, most SHIVs produced express the envelope of isolates of HIV-1 that have been passaged repeatedly in T cell lines. We have taken SHIV-4 and replaced an NheI-AvrII fragment that encompasses the gp120 region and the extracellular portion of gp41 with the equivalent region of two European isolates of HIV-1 (ACH320.3.1 and HIV-1Han-2). Neither of these viruses had been passaged in T cell lines for prolonged periods prior to molecular cloning. Virus stocks were prepared of both SHIV constructs. In vitro, the relative ability of each clone to replicate in four T cell lines mirrored closely the pattern observed with the parental virus donating the envelope sequences. In vivo, only one of the chimeric viruses was infectious in cynomolgus macaques and its recovery was transient. The factors that affect the replication of SHIVs in vitro and in vivo are discussed. PMID:9171224

  13. Clinical Management of HIV Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Karoll J.; Maldarelli, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy for HIV-1 infection has resulted in profound reductions in viremia and is associated with marked improvements in morbidity and mortality. Therapy is not curative, however, and prolonged therapy is complicated by drug toxicity and the emergence of drug resistance. Management of clinical drug resistance requires in depth evaluation, and includes extensive history, physical examination and laboratory studies. Appropriate use of resistance testing provides valuable information useful in constructing regimens for treatment-experienced individuals with viremia during therapy. This review outlines the emergence of drug resistance in vivo, and describes clinical evaluation and therapeutic options of the individual with rebound viremia during therapy. PMID:21994737

  14. Phylogenetic Analysis of Near Full-Length HIV Type 1 Genomic Sequences from 21 Korean Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-Eun; Foley, Brian T.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The Korean subclade of subtype B (KSB) is the most prevalent HIV-1 strain found in Korea. To date, only two near full-length HIV-1 sequences from Korean patients have been reported. Here, we analyzed a total of 24 near full-length genomes of HIV-1 strains that were isolated from 17 antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naive patients and four ART-exposed patients. Proviral DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were used to classify viruses from 19 patients as KSB, from one patient as subtype B, from one patient as subtype D, and three viruses from one patient as CRF02_AG. All KSB viruses demonstrated TAAAA instead of TATAA at the TATA box in the LTR. Of the 19 KSB patients, their sequence identities at the nucleotide level ranged from 89.8% to 97.1% from the lowest env gene to the highest pol gene. Other than the CRF02_AG viruses, no recombination events were noted in any of the 19 KSB patients, which is consistent with our previous studies on the pol, vif, and nef genes. Except for one strain, all of the strains were classified as non-syncytium-inducing strains. This is the first report to describe near full-length KSB. PMID:23199052

  15. Relationship of CD4+ T cell counts and HIV type 1 viral loads in untreated, infected adolescents. Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network.

    PubMed

    Holland, C A; Ellenberg, J H; Wilson, C M; Douglas, S D; Futterman, D C; Kingsley, L A; Moscicki, A B

    2000-07-01

    The REACH Project (Reaching for Excellence in Adolescent Care and Health) of the Adolescent Medicine HIV/AIDS Research Network was designed as a study of an adolescent cohort composed of HIV-1-infected and -uninfected subjects. The goal of the analysis presented was to examine the relationship of CD4+ T cell counts and HIV-1 plasma viral loads in adolescents. The CD4+ T cell counts of 84 HIV+ subjects who were 13 to 19 years of age were measured at the clinical sites, using ACTG standardized techniques. HIV-1 viral loads in frozen plasma were determined by the NASBA/NucliSens assay at a central laboratory. Past and current treatment with antiretroviral drugs was determined by medical record abstraction and interview data. The slope of the line generated by regressing log10 HIV-1 RNA (copies/ml) versus CD4+ T cell counts of REACH subjects who are antiretroviral drug naive was negative and significantly different than zero. A negative association has also been reported for antiretroviral drug-naive, adult males in the Pittsburgh Men's Study, a component of MACS (Pitt-MACS) (Mellors J, et al.: Science 1996;272:1167). These data show that in adolescents, as in adults, HIV-1 RNA concentrations are correlated with corresponding absolute CD4+ T cell count. The slopes of the lines generated with data from each cohort were different (p = 0.003). In addition to age, there are sex and racial differences in the makeup of the two cohorts. Any or all of these differences may affect the slopes of the lines. PMID:10890357

  16. [Anti-HIV drugs and drug delivery system].

    PubMed

    Obaru, K; Mitsuya, H

    1998-03-01

    A number of candidate drugs for therapy of HIV-1 infection which show significant activity against the virus in vitro were reported; however, many of them have been dropped from drug development due to (i) insufficient intracellular activation in certain human target cells (particularly in case of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors), (ii) poor pharmacokinetic profiles, or (iii) intolerable in vitro and/or in vivo toxicities. To circumvent some of these problems, certain drug delivery systems have been applied and several candidate drugs including two novel nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, abacavir and adefovir, have acquired favorable properties in the clinical setting. This paper reviews several avenues for developing prodrugs of anti-HIV-1 agents to overcome their inherent limitations. PMID:9549371

  17. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  18. [CYTOKINES DURING THE HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS INFECTION TYPE 1(HIV-1)].

    PubMed

    Selimova, L M; Kalnina, L B; Serebrovskaya, L V; Ivanova, L A; Gulyaeva, A N; Nosik, D N

    2016-01-01

    In this work the proinflammatory (IL-1β, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2) and anti-inflammatory (IL-4, IL-10) plasma cytokine levels were evaluated in HIV-infected patients with or without antiretroviral treatment (ART). IFN-γ was detected in 94% samples with and without ART, TNF-α in 88% and IL-2 in 38% samples without ART, as well as in 12% and 30% samples with ART, respectively. Positive correlation was detected between viral RNA and IFN-γ levels (rs = 0.13) and negative correlation (rs = -0.242) in the patients without or with ART. Cosecretion of three cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2) was detected in 31% samples and two cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α) in 35% samples of persons without ART. Cosecretion of three cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2) was detected in 20% samples with ART; cosecretion of IFN-γ and IL-2 was detected in 10% samples. The higher percentage of the proinflammatory cytokines with cosecretion was detected in plasma HIV-infected patients without ART in the course of 6 and more years, which suggests that their immune system is able to provide disease control. PMID:27145600

  19. Nautilus: a bioinformatics package for the analysis of HIV type 1 targeted deep sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Kijak, Gustavo H; Pham, Phuc; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Harbolick, Elizabeth A; Eller, Leigh Anne; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Tovanabutra, Sodsai

    2013-10-01

    The advent of next generation sequencing technologies is providing new insight into HIV-1 diversity and evolution, which has created the need for bioinformatics tools that could be applied to the characterization of viral quasispecies. Here we present Nautilus, a bioinformatics package for the analysis of HIV-1 targeted deep sequencing data. The DeepHaplo module determines the nucleotide base frequency and read depth at each position and computes the haplotype frequencies based on the linkage among polymorphisms in the same next generation sequence read. The Motifs module computes the frequency of the variants in the setting of their sequence context and mapping orientation, which allows for the validation of polymorphisms and haplotypes when strand bias is suspected. Both modules are accessed through a user-friendly GUI, which runs on Mac OS X (version 10.7.4 or later), and are based on Python, JAVA, and R scripts. Nautilus is available from www.hivresearch.org/research.php?ServiceID=5&SubServiceID=6 . PMID:23809062

  20. HIV, drugs and the legal environment

    PubMed Central

    Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Beletsky, Leo; Kerr, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A large body of scientific evidence indicates that policies based solely on law enforcement without taking into account public health and human rights considerations increase the health risks of people who inject drugs (PWIDs) and their communities. Although formal laws are an important component of the legal environment supporting harm reduction, it is the enforcement of the law that affects PWIDs' behavior and attitudes most acutely. This commentary focuses primarily on drug policies and policing practices that increase PWIDs' risk of acquiring HIV and viral hepatitis, and avenues for intervention. Policy and legal reforms that promote public health over the criminalization of drug use and PWID are urgently needed. This should include alternative regulatory frameworks for illicit drug possession and use. Changing legal norms and improving law enforcement responses to drug-related harms requires partnerships that are broader than the necessary bridges between criminal justice and public health sectors. HIV prevention efforts must partner with wider initiatives that seek to improve police professionalism, accountability, and transparency and boost the rule of law. Public health and criminal justice professionals can work synergistically to shift the legal environment away from one that exacerbates HIV risks to one that promotes safe and healthy communities. PMID:25265900

  1. Identifying representative drug resistant mutants of HIV

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Drug resistance is one of the most important causes for failure of anti-AIDS treatment. During therapy, multiple mutations accumulate in the HIV genome, eventually rendering the drugs ineffective in blocking replication of the mutant virus. The huge number of possible mutants precludes experimental analysis to explore the molecular mechanisms of resistance and develop improved antiviral drugs. Results In order to solve this problem, we have developed a new algorithm to reveal the most representative mutants from the whole drug resistant mutant database based on our newly proposed unified protein sequence and 3D structure encoding method. Mean shift clustering and multiple regression analysis were applied on genotype-resistance data for mutants of HIV protease and reverse transcriptase. This approach successfully chooses less than 100 mutants with the highest resistance to each drug out of about 10K in the whole database. When considering high level resistance to multiple drugs, the numbers reduce to one or two representative mutants. Conclusion This approach for predicting the most representative mutants for each drug has major importance for experimental verification since the results provide a small number of representative sequences, which will be amenable for in vitro testing and characterization of the expressed mutant proteins. PMID:26678327

  2. Types of HIV/AIDS Antiretroviral Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... reverse transcriptase (RT) from converting single-stranded HIV RNA into double-stranded HIV DNA―a process called ... RT, interfering with its ability to convert HIV RNA into HIV DNA Integrase Inhibitors block the HIV ...

  3. V3 sequences and paired HIV isolates from 52 non-subtype B HIV type 1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Monno, Laura; Brindicci, Gaetano; Saracino, Annalisa; Punzi, Grazia; Cibelli, Donatella; Lagioia, Antonella; Angarano, Gioacchino

    2010-03-01

    Viral isolation and V3 sequencing were performed for 52 patients with non-subtype B viruses. The HIV-1 isolation rate was 93%, and 98% of isolates were characterized as NSI. V3 sequences corresponding to NSI isolates were compared to non-subtype B sequences with corresponding SI isolates from the Los Alamos database. The two sequence groups significantly differed in number of sequences with 35 amino acids, net charge, Brigg's coefficient, loss of NGS at positions 6-8, and 11/25 genotype (p < 0.0001). Substantial discrepancies in V3 variability were also observed. Basic amino acids at positions 8, 21, 23, and 24 were more frequent in SI sequences as were uncharged amino acids at positions 5, 6, 7, 8, 12, 13, 25, and 34. When characterizing paired viral isolates and V3 sequences from patients with non-subtype B HIV-1, current V3 sequence-based criteria from subtype B appeared to discriminate well between NSI and SI sequences from non-subtype B patients. PMID:20334572

  4. Systematic identification of synergistic drug pairs targeting HIV.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xu; Hu, Long; Luquette, Lovelace J; Gao, Geng; Liu, Yifang; Qu, Hongjing; Xi, Ruibin; Lu, Zhi John; Park, Peter J; Elledge, Stephen J

    2012-11-01

    The systematic identification of effective drug combinations has been hindered by the unavailability of methods that can explore the large combinatorial search space of drug interactions. Here we present multiplex screening for interacting compounds (MuSIC), which expedites the comprehensive assessment of pairwise compound interactions. We examined ∼500,000 drug pairs from 1,000 US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved or clinically tested drugs and identified drugs that synergize to inhibit HIV replication. Our analysis reveals an enrichment of anti-inflammatory drugs in drug combinations that synergize against HIV. As inflammation accompanies HIV infection, these findings indicate that inhibiting inflammation could curb HIV propagation. Multiple drug pairs identified in this study, including various glucocorticoids and nitazoxanide (NTZ), synergize by targeting different steps in the HIV life cycle. MuSIC can be applied to a wide variety of disease-relevant screens to facilitate efficient identification of compound combinations. PMID:23064238

  5. HIV type 1 pol gene diversity and archived nevirapine resistance mutation in pregnant women in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Servais, Jean; Lambert, Christine; Karita, Etienne; Vanhove, Dirk; Fischer, Aurelie; Baurith, Therese; Schmit, Jean-Claude; Schneider, François; Hemmer, Robert; Arendt, Vic

    2004-03-01

    This study aimed to find out whether genetic polymorphisms were present in positions potentially affecting susceptibility to antiretrovirals in non-B subtypes from HIV-1-infected patients in Rwanda. Viral pol gene diversity was investigated by direct sequencing in 43 treatment-naive women. In addition, 10 DNA sequences from uncultured peripheral blood mononuclear cells were analyzed 6 weeks after a single dose of nevirapine (prevention of mother-to-child transmission program). Phylogenetic analyses have shown 34 subtype A1, 6 subtype C, and 2 subtype D strains. In addition, an A/C recombinant between the protease (PR) (subtype A1) and the reverse transcriptase (RT) (subtype C) was identified. In the PR coding region, high numbers of polymorphisms were found, including substitutions in secondary PR resistance sites. PR 35D, 36I, and 37N were always present within subtype A as were PR 93L in subtype C strains. PR 10I/V, 20R, 33F, and 77V were found in subtype A whereas PR 36I was highly prevalent in subtype C strains. The A/C recombinant displayed substitutions related to resistance (PR 10, 33, 36 and RT 118). One nevirapine resistance mutation (RT 181Y/C) was found in proviral DNA after 6 weeks. In conclusion, subtypes A and C are predominant in this cohort in Rwanda. Substitutions similar to secondary protease inhibitor resistance mutations are common before treatment whereas major resistance mutation may be archived after a single dose of nevirapine. Accordingly, the hypothesis of a genetic background effect in non-B strains has to be further addressed in programs of introduction of antivirals in Africa. PMID:15117451

  6. Establishment of new transmissible and drug-sensitive human immunodeficiency virus type 1 wild types due to transmission of nucleoside analogue-resistant virus.

    PubMed

    de Ronde, A; van Dooren, M; van Der Hoek, L; Bouwhuis, D; de Rooij, E; van Gemen, B; de Boer, R; Goudsmit, J

    2001-01-01

    Sequence analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) from 74 persons with acute infections identified eight strains with mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) gene at positions 41, 67, 68, 70, 215, and 219 associated with resistance to the nucleoside analogue zidovudine (AZT). Follow-up of the fate of these resistant HIV-1 strains in four newly infected individuals revealed that they were readily replaced by sensitive strains. The RT of the resistant viruses changed at amino acid 215 from tyrosine (Y) to aspartic acid (D) or serine (S), with asparagine (N) as a transient intermediate, indicating the establishment of new wild types. When we introduced these mutations and the original threonine (T)-containing wild type into infectious molecular clones and assessed their competitive advantage in vitro, the order of fitness was in accord with the in vivo observations: 215Y < 215D = 215S = 215T. As detected by real-time nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with two molecular beacons, the addition of AZT or stavudine (d4T) to the viral cultures favored the 215Y mutant in a dose-dependent manner. Our results illustrate that infection with nucleoside analogue-resistant HIV leads in newly infected individuals to mutants that are sensitive to nucleoside analogues, but only a single mutation removed from drug-resistant HIV. Such mutants were shown to be transmissible, stable, and prone to rapid selection for resistance to AZT or d4T as soon as antiretroviral therapy was administered. Monitoring of patients for the presence of new HIV-1 wild types with D, S, or N residues at position 215 may be warranted in order to estimate the threat to long-term efficacy of regimens including nucleoside analogues. PMID:11134272

  7. [Clinical efficacy and tolerance of enfuvirtide (Fuzeon), new antiretroviral inhibitors of intracellular penetration of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1].

    PubMed

    Raffi, François

    2004-09-01

    The TORO 1 and TORO 2 clinical trials compared the efficacy and safety of enfuvirtide in combination with an optimized background antiretroviral regimen and optimized background regimen alone in HIV-1 infected patients. The patients had had previous treatment with each of the three classes of antiretroviral drugs and had a plasma level of HIV-1 RNA above 5000 copies/ml at baseline. They were randomly assigned in a 2:1 ratio to receive either enfuvirtide (90 mg subcutaneously twice daily) plus a background regimen optimized with the aid of resistance testing, or an optimized antiretroviral regimen alone (control group). Six hundred and sixty-one patients were enrolled in the enfuvirtide arm and 334 in the control group. The median baseline plasma HIV-1 RNA level was 5.2 log10 copies/ml in the enfuvirtide group and 5.1 log10 copies/ml in the control group. Patients had a median of 7 years of previous antiretroviral treatment. The optimized background regimen comprised a mean of 4 antiretroviral drugs in both groups. At week 48, the mean reduction in viral load was -1.48 log10 copies/ml in the enfuvirtide group, and -0.63 log10 copies/ml in the control group (difference = 0.846 log10 copies/ml, IC95%: -1.066; -0.626. p < 0.0001). The mean increase in the CD4+ cell count was significantly greater in the enfuvirtide group (91 cells/mm3) than in the control group (45 cells/mm3). Injection site reactions were the main reported adverse event which occurred in 98% of the enfuvirtide patients. Most had mild to moderate pain or discomfort not requiring analgesic or limiting usual activities. PMID:15742550

  8. Drugs from the sea: a marine sponge-derived compound prevents Type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Van Kaer, L

    2001-11-01

    More than one million Americans have Type 1 diabetes. This disease--also known as autoimmune or juvenile diabetes--strikes children suddenly, makes them dependent on insulin injections for life, and carries the constant threat of devastating complications. While it can and does strike adults, nearly half of all new cases are diagnosed in children. A child is diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes every hour. Type 1 diabetes is caused by the inability of a person"s pancreas to produce sufficient amounts of insulin to control their blood sugar levels and sustain life. While insulin injections allow affected individuals to control their blood sugar and stay alive, it is not a cure nor does it prevent the devastating complications of this disease, which include kidney failure, blindness, amputations, heart attack, and stroke. In Type 1 diabetes, the body"s own immune system goes awry, attacking and destroying insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. PMID:12805764

  9. Current Perspectives on HIV-1 Antiretroviral Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Iyidogan, Pinar; Anderson, Karen S.

    2014-01-01

    Current advancements in antiretroviral therapy (ART) have turned HIV-1 infection into a chronic and manageable disease. However, treatment is only effective until HIV-1 develops resistance against the administered drugs. The most recent antiretroviral drugs have become superior at delaying the evolution of acquired drug resistance. In this review, the viral fitness and its correlation to HIV-1 mutation rates and drug resistance are discussed while emphasizing the concept of lethal mutagenesis as an alternative therapy. The development of resistance to the different classes of approved drugs and the importance of monitoring antiretroviral drug resistance are also summarized briefly. PMID:25341668

  10. Genetic variation in the CCL18-CCL3-CCL4 chemokine gene cluster influences HIV Type 1 transmission and AIDS disease progression.

    PubMed

    Modi, William S; Lautenberger, James; An, Ping; Scott, Kevin; Goedert, James J; Kirk, Gregory D; Buchbinder, Susan; Phair, John; Donfield, Sharyne; O'Brien, Stephen J; Winkler, Cheryl

    2006-07-01

    CCL3 (MIP-1 alpha), CCL4 (MIP-1 beta), and CCL18 (DC-CK1/PARC/AMAC-1) are potent chemoattractants produced by macrophages, natural killer cells, fibroblasts, mast cells, CD4(+) T cells, and CD8(+) T cells. CCL3 and CCL4 are natural ligands for the primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) coreceptor CCR5 and are also known to activate and enhance the cytotoxicity of natural killer cells. Genomic DNAs from >3,000 participants enrolled in five United States-based natural-history cohorts with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were genotyped for 21 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a 47-kb interval on chromosome 17q12 containing the genes CCL3, CCL4, and CCL18. All 21 SNPs were polymorphic in African Americans (AAs), whereas 7 of the 21 had minor-allele frequencies <0.01 in European Americans (EAs). Substantial linkage disequilibrium was observed in a 37-kb interval containing 17 SNPs where many pairwise D' values exceeded 0.70 in both racial groups, but particularly in EAs. Four and three haplotype blocks were observed in AAs and EAs, respectively. Blocks were strongly correlated with each other, and common haplotype diversity within blocks was limited. Two significant associations are reported that replicate an earlier study. First, among AA members of the AIDS Link to the Intravenous Experience cohort of injection drug users, frequencies of three correlated SNPs covering 2,231 bp in CCL3 were significantly elevated among highly exposed, persistently HIV-1-uninfected individuals compared with HIV-1-infected seroconvertors (P = .02-.03). Second, seven highly correlated SNPs spanning 36 kb and containing all three genes were significantly associated with more-rapid disease progression among EAs enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study cohort (P = .01-.02). These results reiterate the importance of chemokine gene variation in HIV-1/AIDS pathogenesis and emphasize that localized linkage disequilibrium makes the identification of causal

  11. HIV-1 Drug Resistance Mutations Among Antiretroviral-Naïve HIV-1–Infected Patients in Asia: Results From the TREAT Asia Studies to Evaluate Resistance-Monitoring Study

    PubMed Central

    Oyomopito, Rebecca; Sirivichayakul, Sunee; Sirisanthana, Thira; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher K. C.; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Messerschmidt, Liesl; Law, Matthew G.; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2011-01-01

    (See editorial commentary by Jordan on pages 1058–1060.) Of 682 antiretroviral-naïve patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in a prospective, multicenter human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance monitoring study involving 8 sites in Hong Kong, Malaysia, and Thailand, the prevalence of patients with ≥1 drug resistance mutation was 13.8%. Primary HIV drug resistance is emerging after rapid scaling-up of antiretroviral therapy use in Asia. PMID:21460324

  12. Defining the level of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease activity required for HIV-1 particle maturation and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, J R; Babé, L M; Craik, C S

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is the enzyme required for processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins to yield mature, infectious virions. Although the complete absence of proteolytic activity prevents maturation, the level of activity sufficient for maturation and subsequent infectivity has not been determined. Amino acid substitutions that reduce catalytic activity without affecting substrate recognition have been engineered into the active site of the HIV-1 protease. The catalytic efficiency (kcat) of the HIV-1 protease is decreased 4-fold when threonine 26 is replaced by serine (T26S) and approximately 50-fold when alanine 28 is replaced by serine (A28S). Genes containing these mutations were cloned into a proviral vector for analysis of their effects on virion maturation and infectivity. The results show that virions containing the T26S protease variant, in which only 25% of the protease is active, are very similar to wild-type virions, although slight reductions in infectivity are observed. Virions containing the A28S protease variant are not infectious, even though a limited amount of polyprotein processing does occur. There appears to be a linear correlation between the level of protease activity and particle infectivity. Our observations suggest that a threshold of protease activity exists between a 4-fold and 50-fold reduction, below which processing is insufficient to yield infectious particles. Our data also suggest that a reduction of protease activity by 50-fold or greater is sufficient to prevent the formation of infectious particles. PMID:7535864

  13. Care of Patients With HIV Infection: Antiretroviral Drug Regimens.

    PubMed

    Bolduc, Philip; Roder, Navid; Colgate, Emily; Cheeseman, Sarah H

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral drug regimens has transformed HIV infection from a fatal illness into a manageable chronic condition. All patients with HIV infection should be considered for antiretroviral therapy, regardless of CD4 count or HIV viral load, for individual benefit and to prevent HIV transmission. Antiretroviral drugs affect HIV in several ways: entry inhibitors block HIV entry into CD4 T cells; nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription from RNA to DNA via chain-terminating proteins; nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors prevent reverse transcription through enzymatic inhibition; integrase strand transfer inhibitors block integration of viral DNA into cellular DNA; protease inhibitors block maturation and production of the virus. Current guidelines recommend six combination regimens for initial therapy. Five are based on tenofovir and emtricitabine; the other uses abacavir and lamivudine. Five include integrase strand transfer inhibitors. HIV specialists should assist with treating patients with complicated HIV infection, including patients with treatment-resistant HIV infection, coinfection with hepatitis B or C virus, pregnancy, childhood infections, severe opportunistic infections, complex drug interactions, significant drug toxicity, or comorbidities. Family physicians can treat most patients with HIV infection effectively by choosing appropriate treatment regimens, monitoring patients closely, and retaining patients in care. PMID:27092564

  14. HIV-1 Drug Discovery: Targeting Folded RNA Structures With Branched Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Wynn, Jessica E.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an RNA virus that is prone to high rates of mutation. While the disease is managed with current antiretroviral therapies, drugs with a new mode of action are needed. A strategy towards this goal is aimed at targeting the native three-dimensional fold of conserved RNA structures. This perspective highlights medium-sized peptides and peptidomimetics used to target two conserved RNA structures of HIV-1. In particular, branched peptides have the capacity to bind in a multivalent fashion, utilizing a large surface area to achieve the necessary affinity and selectivity toward the target RNA. PMID:25958855

  15. HIV-1 drug discovery: targeting folded RNA structures with branched peptides.

    PubMed

    Wynn, Jessica E; Santos, Webster L

    2015-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is an RNA virus that is prone to high rates of mutation. While the disease is managed with current antiretroviral therapies, drugs with a new mode of action are needed. A strategy towards this goal is aimed at targeting the native three-dimensional fold of conserved RNA structures. This perspective highlights medium-sized peptides and peptidomimetics used to target two conserved RNA structures of HIV-1. In particular, branched peptides have the capacity to bind in a multivalent fashion, utilizing a large surface area to achieve the necessary affinity and selectivity toward the target RNA. PMID:25958855

  16. HLA Class I and KIR Genes Do Not Protect Against HIV Type 1 Infection in Highly Exposed Uninfected Individuals With Hemophilia A

    PubMed Central

    Vince, Nicolas; Bashirova, Arman A.; Lied, Alexandra; Gao, Xiaojiang; Dorrell, Lucy; McLaren, Paul J.; Fellay, Jacques; Carrington, Mary

    2014-01-01

    A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) involving patients with hemophilia A who were exposed to but uninfected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) did not reveal genetic variants associated with resistance to HIV-1 infection, beyond homozygosity for CCR5-Δ32. Since variation in HLA class I and KIR genes is not well interrogated by standard GWAS techniques, we tested whether these 2 loci were involved in protection from HIV-1 infection in the same hemophilia cohort, using controls from the general population. Our data indicate that HLA class I alleles, presence or absence of KIR genes, and functionally relevant combinations of the HLA/KIR genotypes are not involved in resistance to parenterally transmitted HIV-1 infection. PMID:24719475

  17. Association of cervical biopsy with HIV type 1 genital shedding among women on highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Woo, Victoria G; Liegler, Teri; Cohen, Craig R; Sawaya, George F; Smith-McCune, Karen; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Huchko, Megan J

    2013-07-01

    HIV-1 genital shedding is associated with increased HIV-1 transmission risk. Inflammation and ulceration are associated with increased shedding, while highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been shown to have a protective effect. We sought to examine the impact of cervical biopsies, a routine component of cervical cancer screening, on HIV-1 genital RNA levels in HIV-infected women on HAART. We enrolled HIV-1-infected women undergoing cervical biopsy for diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 in this prospective cohort study. All were stable on HAART for at least 3 months. Clinical and demographic information as well as plasma HIV-1 viral load were collected at the baseline visit. Specimens for cervical HIV-1 RNA were collected immediately prior to biopsy, and 2 and 7 days afterward. Quantitative PCR determined HIV-1 concentration in cervical specimens at each time point to a lower limit of detection of 40 copies/specimen. Among the 30 participants, five (16.6%) women had detectable cervical HIV-1 RNA at baseline, of whom four (80%) had detectable HIV-1 RNA after cervical biopsy, with no significant increase in viral load in the follow-up specimens. Only one woman (3.3%) with undetectable baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA had detection postbiopsy. Detectable plasma HIV-1 RNA was the only factor associated with baseline cervical HIV-1 RNA. In women on HAART, an increase in cervical HIV-1 RNA detection or concentration was not associated with cervical biopsy. These findings help provide safety data regarding cervical cancer screening and diagnosis in HIV-infected women and inform postprocedure counseling. PMID:23594240

  18. Clinical Care of the HIV-Infected Drug User

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, R. Douglas; Altice, Frederick L.

    2007-01-01

    HIV/AIDS and chemical dependency, both of which are complicated by and intertwined with mental illness, are complex, overlapping spheres that adversely influence each other and the overall clinical outcomes of the affected individual [1]. Each disorder individually impacts tens of millions of people, with explosive epidemics described worldwide. Drug users have increased age matched morbidity and mortality for a number of medical and psychiatric conditions. HIV/AIDS, with its immunosuppressed states and direct virologic effects, exacerbate morbidity and mortality further among HIV-infected drug users. This article addresses the adverse consequences of HIV/AIDS, drug injection, the secondary comorbidities of both, and the impact of immunosuppression on presentation of disease as well as approaches to managing the HIV-infected drug user. PMID:17502234

  19. Drug Abuse, HIV, and HCV in Asian Countries.

    PubMed

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Liang, Di; Lan, Yu-Ching; Vicknasingam, Balasingam Kasinather; Chakrabarti, Amit

    2016-09-01

    Drug abuse and co-occurring infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Asian countries are particularly vulnerable to the deleterious consequences of these risks/problems, as they have some of the highest rates of these diseases. This review describes drug abuse, HIV, and hepatitis C (HCV) in Asian countries. The most commonly used illicit drugs include opioids, amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS), cannabis, and ketamine. Among people who inject drugs, HIV rates range from 6.3 % in China to 19 % in Malaysia, and HCV ranges from 41 % in India and Taiwan to 74 % in Vietnam. In the face of the HIV epidemics, drug policies in these countries are slowly changing from the traditional punitive approach (e.g., incarcerating drug users or requiring registration as a drug user) to embrace public health approaches, including, for example, community-based treatment options as well as harm reduction approaches to reduce needle sharing and thus HIV transmission. HIV and HCV molecular epidemiology indicates limited geographic diffusion. While the HIV prevalence is declining in all five countries, use of new drugs (e.g., ATS, ketamine) continues to increase, as well as high-risk sexual behaviors associated with drug use-increasing the risk of sexual transmission of HIV, particularly among men who have sex with men. Screening, early intervention, and continued scaling up of therapeutic options (drug treatment and recovery support, ART, long-term HIV and HCV care for drug users) are critical for effective control or continued reduction of drug abuse and co-infections. PMID:27000123

  20. Analysis of HIV Type 1 gp41 and Enfuvirtide Susceptibility among Men in the United States Who Were HIV Infected Prior to Availability of HIV Entry Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Hudelson, Sarah E.; Marlowe, Natalia; Huang, Wei; Bruce, Robert; Church, Jessica D.; Husnik, Marla; Donnell, Deborah; Coates, Thomas; Jackson, J. Brooks; Chesney, Margaret; Koblin, Beryl

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We analyzed HIV gp41 from 195 men in the United States who were HIV-1 infected between 1999 and 2002, before enfuvirtide (ENF) was approved for clinical use in the United States. gp41 genotyping results were obtained for 175 samples. None of the samples had major ENF resistance mutations. Six (3.4%) samples had minor ENF resistance mutations in the HR1 region (V38G, N43K, L44M, L45M). Twenty-eight (16%) samples had the N42S polymorphism, which is associated with ENF hypersusceptibility. Accessory mutations in the HR2 region were identified in some samples (E137K, S138A). Five of the six samples with HR1 resistance mutations were analyzed with a phenotypic assay; one sample had reduced ENF susceptibility (a sample with N42S + L44M + E137K). Prior to the availability of ENF, some men in the United States were infected with HIV that contained mutations associated with ENF resistance or hypersusceptibility. However, most of the mutations were not associated with phenotypic ENF resistance. PMID:19552592

  1. International epidemiology of HIV and AIDS among injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, D C; Friedman, S R; Choopanya, K; Vanichseni, S; Ward, T P

    1992-10-01

    HIV/AIDS and iv drug use (IVDU) are of significant multinational scope and growing. Supporting increased IVDU in many countries are countries' geographical proximity to illicit drug trafficking distribution routes, law enforcement efforts which increase the demand for more efficient drug distribution and consumption, and countries' infrastructural and social modernization. Given the failures of intensified law enforcement efforts to thwart the use and proliferation of illegal drugs, countries with substantial IVDU should look away from preventing use to preventing HIV transmission within drug user populations. With HIV seroprevalence rates rapidly reaching 40-50% in some developing country IVDU groups, a variety of prevention programs is warranted. Such programs should be supported and implemented while prevention remains feasible. This paper examines the variation in HIV seroprevalence among IVD users, rapid HIV spread among users, HIV among IVDUs in Bangkok, emerging issues in HIV transmission among IVDUs, non-AIDS manifestations of HIV infection among IVDUs, prevention programs and effectiveness, and harm reduction. PMID:1466837

  2. Safety and Pharmacokinetics of Amprenavir (141W94), a Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Protease Inhibitor, following Oral Administration of Single Doses to HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Sadler, Brian M.; Hanson, Cynthia D.; Chittick, Gregory E.; Symonds, William T.; Roskell, Neil S.

    1999-01-01

    We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel, dose-escalation trial to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and safety of single, oral doses of amprenavir (141W94; formerly VX-478), a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 protease, administered as hard gelatin capsules in 12 HIV-infected subjects. The doses of amprenavir evaluated were 150, 300, 600, 900, and 1,200 mg. Amprenavir was rapidly absorbed, with the time to maximum concentration occurring within 1 to 2 h after dosing. On the basis of power model analysis, the increase in the maximum concentration of amprenavir in plasma (Cmax) was less than dose proportional, and the increase in the area under the concentration-time curve from time zero to infinity (AUC0–∞) was greater than dose proportional; mean slopes (with 90% confidence intervals) were 1.25 (1.16 to 1.35) and 0.78 (0.78 to 0.86) for AUC0–∞ and Cmax, respectively. Amprenavir was eliminated slowly, with a terminal-phase half-life of 8 h. A second study was conducted to determine the bioavailability of the hard gelatin capsule relative to that of a subsequently developed soft gelatin capsule. The capsules were bioequivalent in terms of AUC0–∞ but not in terms of Cmax; geometric-least-squares means ratios (with 90% confidence intervals) were 1.03 (0.92 to 1.14) and 1.25 (1.03 to 1.53) for AUC0–∞ and Cmax, respectively. Administration of soft gelatin capsules of amprenavir with a high-fat breakfast resulted in a 14% decrease in the mean AUC0–∞ (from 9.58 to 8.26 μg · h/ml), which is not likely to be clinically significant. The most common adverse events related to amprenavir were headache, nausea, and hypesthesia. Amprenavir appears to be safe and well tolerated over the dose range of 150 to 1200 mg. On the basis of the present single-dose studies, amprenavir is an HIV protease inhibitor with favorable absorption and clearance pharmacokinetics that are only minimally affected by administration with food

  3. Pseudotyping human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) by the glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus targets HIV-1 entry to an endocytic pathway and suppresses both the requirement for Nef and the sensitivity to cyclosporin A.

    PubMed Central

    Aiken, C

    1997-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) normally enters cells by direct fusion with the plasma membrane. In this report, HIV-1 particles capable of infecting cells through an endocytic pathway are described. Chimeric viruses composed of the HIV-1 core and the envelope glycoprotein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-G) were constructed and are herein termed HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes. HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes were 20- to 130-fold more infectious than nonpseudotyped HIV-1. Infection by HIV-1(VSV) pseudotypes was markedly diminished by ammonium chloride and concanamycin A, a selective inhibitor of vacuolar H+ ATPases, demonstrating that these viruses require endosomal acidification to achieve productive infection. HIV-1 is thus capable of performing all of the viral functions necessary for infection when entry is targeted to an endocytic route. Maximal HIV-1 infectivity requires the presence of the viral Nef protein and the cellular protein cyclophilin A (CyPA) during virus assembly. Pseudotyping by VSV-G markedly suppressed the requirement for Nef. HIV-1(VSV) particles were also resistant to inhibition by cyclosporin A; however, the deleterious effect of a gag mutation inhibiting CyPA incorporation was not relieved by VSV-G. These results suggest that Nef acts at a step of the HIV-1 life cycle that is either circumvented or facilitated by targeting virus entry to an endocytic pathway. The findings also support the hypothesis that Nef and CyPA enhance HIV-1 infectivity through independent processes and demonstrate a mechanistic difference between reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by cyclosporin A and gag mutations that decrease HIV-1 incorporation of CyPA. PMID:9223476

  4. [Experiences from two HIV prevention projects among drug abusers in Oslo. Is methadone maintenance treatment useful?].

    PubMed

    Skogstad, M

    1990-06-10

    Experience from two HIV-preventive projects among drug abusers in Oslo, Norway, shows that HIV-positive drug abusers carry on their drug abuse independent of visits to residential drug-free treatment or prison. HIV-positive former drug abusers show a tendency to relapse to drug abuse. In terms of HIV-prevention among drug abusers it is important to reduce injection of drugs among HIV-positive drug abusers. Thus, methadone maintenance programmes should be considered in HIV-prevention in Norway. PMID:2363170

  5. Toxins that are activated by HIV type-1 protease through removal of a signal for degradation by the N-end-rule pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Falnes, P O; Welker, R; Kräusslich, H G; Olsnes, S

    1999-01-01

    Diphtheria toxin enters the cytosol of mammalian cells where it inhibits cellular protein synthesis, leading to cell death. Recently we found that the addition of a signal for N-end-rule-mediated protein degradation to diphtheria toxin substantially reduced its intracellular stability and toxicity. These results prompted us to construct a toxin containing a degradation signal that is removable through the action of a viral protease. In principle, such a toxin would be preferentially stabilized, and thus activated, in cells expressing the viral protease in the cytosol, i.e. virus-infected cells, thereby providing a specific eradication of these cells. In the present work we describe the construction of toxins that contain a signal for N-end-rule-mediated degradation just upstream of a cleavage site for the protease from HIV type 1 (HIV-1 PR). We show that the toxins are cleaved by HIV-1 PR exclusively at the introduced sites, and thereby are converted from unstable to stable proteins. Furthermore, this cleavage substantially increased the ability of the toxins to inhibit cellular protein synthesis. However, the toxins were unable to selectively eradicate HIV-1-infected cells, apparently due to low cytosolic HIV-1 PR activity, since we could not detect cleavage of the toxins by HIV-1 PR in infected cells. Alternative strategies for the construction of toxins that can specifically be activated by viral proteases are discussed. PMID:10493930

  6. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Induces the Cytoplasmic Retention of Heterogeneous Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein A1 by Disrupting Nuclear Import

    PubMed Central

    Monette, Anne; Ajamian, Lara; López-Lastra, Marcelo; Mouland, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-opts host proteins and cellular machineries to its advantage at every step of the replication cycle. Here we show that HIV-1 enhances heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A1 expression and promotes the relocalization of hnRNP A1 to the cytoplasm. The latter was dependent on the nuclear export of the unspliced viral genomic RNA (vRNA) and to alterations in the abundance and localization of the FG-repeat nuclear pore glycoprotein p62. hnRNP A1 and vRNA remain colocalized in the cytoplasm supporting a post-nuclear function during the late stages of HIV-1 replication. Consistently, we show that hnRNP A1 acts as an internal ribosomal entry site trans-acting factor up-regulating internal ribosome entry site-mediated translation initiation of the HIV-1 vRNA. The up-regulation and cytoplasmic retention of hnRNP A1 by HIV-1 would ensure abundant expression of viral structural proteins in cells infected with HIV-1. PMID:19737937

  7. A novel corneal explant model system to evaluate antiviral drugs against feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1).

    PubMed

    Pennington, Matthew R; Fort, Michael W; Ledbetter, Eric C; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R

    2016-06-01

    Feline herpesvirus type-1 (FHV-1) is the most common viral cause of ocular surface disease in cats. Many antiviral drugs are used to treat FHV-1, but require frequent topical application and most lack well-controlled in vivo studies to justify their clinical use. Therefore, better validation of current and novel treatment options are urgently needed. Here, we report on the development of a feline whole corneal explant model that supports FHV-1 replication and thus can be used as a novel model system to evaluate the efficacy of antiviral drugs. The anti-herpes nucleoside analogues cidofovir and acyclovir, which are used clinically to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats and have previously been evaluated in traditional two-dimensional feline cell cultures in vitro, were evaluated in this explant model. Both drugs suppressed FHV-1 replication when given every 12 h, with cidofovir showing greater efficacy. In addition, the potential efficacy of the retroviral integrase inhibitor raltegravir against FHV-1 was evaluated in cell culture as well as in the explant model. Raltegravir was not toxic to feline cells or corneas, and most significantly, inhibited FHV-1 replication at 500 µM in both systems. Importantly, this drug was effective when given only once every 24 h. Taken together, our data indicate that the feline whole corneal explant model is a useful tool for the evaluation of antiviral drugs and, furthermore, that raltegravir appears a promising novel antiviral drug to treat ocular herpesvirus infection in cats. PMID:26959283

  8. Undiagnosed HIV among people who inject drugs in Manipur, India.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Gregory; Medhi, Gajendra K; Mahanta, Jagadish; Paranjape, R S; Kermode, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Manipur is a geographically isolated state of India characterised by a high HIV prevalence among people who inject drugs (PWID). A low-to-moderate lifetime rate of HIV testing has been documented amongst PWID in Manipur. Little is known about the extent of undiagnosed HIV in this setting and whether uptake of HIV testing (and knowledge of a positive diagnosis) leads HIV-positive PWID to change their risk behaviours. The cross-sectional data (n = 821) analysed for this paper were collected in 2009 for the Integrated Behavioural and Biological Assessment (IBBA) using interviewer-administered questionnaires and the collection of de-linked blood and urine samples. Almost one-third (30.7%) of the participants tested HIV positive. The majority knew where to obtain a confidential HIV test (80.7%), however, half of the HIV-positive participants had either never had an HIV test (37.7%), or had undertaken a test without collecting the result (12.7%). Almost one-quarter (23.4%) of the HIV-positive participants and 17.4% of the HIV-negative participants had shared a needle/syringe with at least one other injector during the preceding month. Encouragingly, HIV-positive participants were significantly more likely than HIV-negative participants to use condoms with their regular sexual partners, however, there was still a high proportion of HIV-positive participants who did not use a condom at last sex with their regular (47.2%) or casual (48.0%) partners. Having taken an HIV test and collected the result was associated with a reduction in HIV-risk behaviours among HIV-positive participants, but not among HIV-negative participants. In conclusion, we found that a substantial proportion of the HIV-positive PWID in Manipur were not aware of their positive status, and risky injecting and sexual practices were commonplace. However, HIV-positive PWID appear to reduce their high-risk behaviours when they become aware of their HIV status highlighting the importance of taking HIV testing

  9. The Roles of HIV-1 Proteins and Antiretroviral Drug Therapy in HIV-1-Associated Endothelial Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Erik R.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1)-infected patients have demonstrated dramatic decreases in viral burden and opportunistic infections, and an overall increase in life expectancy. Despite these positive HAART-associated outcomes, it has become increasingly clear that HIV-1 patients have an enhanced risk of developing cardiovascular disease over time. Clinical studies are instrumental in our understanding of vascular dysfunction in the context of HIV-1 infection. However, most clinical studies often do not distinguish whether HIV-1 proteins, HAART, or a combination of these 2 factors cause cardiovascular complications. This review seeks to address the roles of both HIV-1 proteins and antiretroviral drugs in the development of endothelial dysfunction because endothelial dysfunction is the hallmark initial step of many cardiovascular diseases. We analyze recent in vitro and in vivo studies examining endothelial toxicity in response to HIV-1 proteins or in response to the various classes of antiretroviral drugs. Furthermore, we discuss the multiple mechanisms by which HIV-1 proteins and HAART injure the vascular endothelium in HIV-1 patients. By understanding the molecular mechanisms of HIV-1 protein- and antiretroviral-induced cardiovascular disease, we may ultimately improve the quality of life of HIV-1 patients through better drug design and the discovery of new pharmacological targets. PMID:18525451

  10. people who inject drugs, HIV risk, and HIV testing uptake in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Asher, Alice K; Hahn, Judith A; Couture, Marie-Claude; Maher, Kelsey; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    Dramatic rises in injection drug use (IDU) in sub-Saharan Africa account for increasingly more infections in a region already overwhelmed by the HIV epidemic. There is no known estimate of the number of people who inject drugs (PWID) in the region, or the associated HIV prevalence in PWID. We reviewed literature with the goal of describing high-risk practices and exposures in PWID in sub-Saharan Africa, as well as current HIV prevention activities aimed at drug use. The literature search looked for articles related to HIV risk, injection drug users, stigma, and HIV testing in sub-Saharan Africa. This review found evidence demonstrating high rates of HIV in IDU populations in sub-Saharan Africa, high-risk behaviors of the populations, lack of knowledge regarding HIV, and low HIV testing uptake. There is an urgent need for action to address IDU in order to maintain recent decreases in the spread of HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:23164598

  11. Prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV type 1: the role of neonatal and infant prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Stacey A; Appelgren, Kristie E; Kourtis, Athena P

    2015-02-01

    The prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV is one of the great public health successes of the past 20 years. Much concerted research efforts and dedicated work have led to the achievement of very low rates of PMTCT of HIV in settings that can implement optimal prophylaxis. Though several implementation challenges remain, global elimination of pediatric HIV infection seems now more than ever to be an attainable goal. Often overlooked, the role of prophylaxis of the newborn is nevertheless a very important component of PMTCT. In this paper, we focus on the role of neonatal and infant prophylaxis, discuss mechanisms of protection, and present the clinical trial-generated evidence that led to the current recommendations for preventing infections in breastfed and non-breastfed infants. PMTCT of HIV should not end at birth; a continuum of care extending postpartum and postnatally is required to minimize the risk of new pediatric HIV infections. PMID:25578882

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 Vpr induces differential regulation of T cell costimulatory molecules: Direct effect of Vpr on T cell activation and immune function

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Majumder, Biswanath; Ayyavoo, Velpandi . E-mail: velpandi@pitt.edu

    2007-02-20

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral proteins disrupt the normal host cellular immune pathways thus exploiting the cellular machinery for replication, survival and to escape host immune attack. Here we evaluated the direct effects of HIV-1 Vpr-mediated immune modulation of infected T cells. Vpr specifically downregulated the expression of CD28 and increased the expression of CTLA-4, whereas no significant difference in the expression of CD25 and HLA-DR was observed. Interferon gamma (IFN-{gamma}) production in T cells was evaluated as a measure of the downstream effector functions. Results indicate that Vpr significantly inhibited IFN-{gamma} production and this may, in part, due to Vpr's ability to inhibit the nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B, and its transcriptional regulation. Together these results support that HIV-1 Vpr selectively dysregulates the immune functions at multiple levels and exerts its inhibitory effects in the presence of other viral proteins.

  13. Antihuman Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Activity of Rare Earth Metal Complexes of 4-Hydroxycoumarins in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Manolov, Ilia; Raleva, Sevda; Genova, Petya; Savov, Alexey; Froloshka, Liliana; Dundarova, Daniela; Argirova, Radka

    2006-01-01

    The cerium Ce(III), lanthanum La(III), and neodymium Nd(III) complexes with 4-hydroxy-3-(3-oxo-1-phenylbutyl)-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one (warfarin) (W) and 3,3′-benzylidenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin] (1) were synthesized and studied for the first time for cytotoxicity (on MT-2 cells) and as anti-HIV agents under acute and chronic infection. The complexes were characterized by different physicochemical methods: mass spectrometry, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, and IR spectroscopy. The spectra of the complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectrum of the free ligands. Anti-HIV effect of the complexes/ligands was measured in MT-2 cells by microtiter infection assay. Detection of endogenous reverse transcriptase (RT) activity and RT processivity by PCR indicative for proviral DNA synthesis demonstrated that anti-HIV activity has not been linked to early stages of viral replication. No effect on late steps of viral replication has been found using cells chronically producing HIV-1LAI virus. La(W) demonstrated anti-HIV activity (IC50=21.4 μM) close to maximal nontoxic concentration. Nd(W), Ce(1), and Nd(1) demonstrated limited anti-HIV potency, so none of the complexes seems appropriate to be used in clinic. Further targeting of HIV-1 inhibition by La(W) is under progress. PMID:17497016

  14. HIV Type 1 Infection Up-Regulates TLR2 and TLR4 Expression and Function in Vivo and in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Juan C.; Stevenson, Mario; Latz, Eicke

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in innate immunity against pathogens. Their stimulation induces the activation of NF-κB, an important inducer of HIV-1 replication. In recent years, an increasing number of studies using several cells types from HIV-infected patients indicate that TLRs play a key role in regulating the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and viral pathogenesis. In the present study, the effect of HIV-1 stimulation of monocyte-derived macrophage (MDM) and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subpopulations from healthy donors on the expression and functions of TLR2 and TLR4 was examined. In addition, and to complete the in vitro study, the expression pattern of TLR2 and TLR4 in 49 HIV-1-infected patients, classified according to viral load and the use of HAART, was determined and compared with 25 healthy subjects. An increase of TLR expression and production of proinflammatory cytokines were observed in MDMs and PBMCs infected with HIV-1 in vitro and in response to TLR stimulation, compared to the mock. In addition, an association between TLR expression and up-regulation of CD80 in plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was observed. The ex vivo analysis indicated increased expression of TLR2 and TLR4 in myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs), but only of TLR2 in monocytes obtained from HIV-1-infected patients, compared to healthy subjects. Remarkably, the expression was higher in cells from patients who do not use HAART. In monocytes, there was a positive correlation between both TLRs and viral load, but not CD4+ T cell numbers. Together, our in vitro and ex vivo results suggest that TLR expression and function can be up-regulated in response to HIV-1 infection and could affect the inflammatory response. We propose that modulation of TLRs represents a mechanism to promote HIV-1 replication or AIDS progression in HIV-1-infected patients. PMID:22280204

  15. Impact of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Genetic Diversity on Performance of Four Commercial Viral Load Assays: LCx HIV RNA Quantitative, AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5, VERSANT HIV-1 RNA 3.0, and NucliSens HIV-1 QT

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Priscilla; de Mendoza, Carmen; Joshi, Yagnya; Golden, Alan; Hodinka, Richard L.; Soriano, Vincent; Devare, Sushil G.; Hackett, John

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution and changing strain distribution present a challenge to nucleic acid-based assays. Reliable patient monitoring of viral loads requires the detection and accurate quantification of genetically diverse HIV-1. A panel of 97 HIV-1-seropositive plasma samples collected from Cameroon, Brazil, and South Africa was used to compare the performance of four commercially available HIV RNA quantitative tests: Abbott LCx HIV RNA Quantitative assay (LCx), Bayer Versant HIV-1 RNA 3.0 (bDNA), Roche AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR v1.5 (Monitor v1.5), and bioMérieux NucliSens HIV-1 QT (NucliSens). The panel included group M, group O, and recombinant viruses based on sequence analysis of gag p24, pol integrase, and env gp41. The LCx HIV assay quantified viral RNA in 97 (100%) of the samples. In comparison, bDNA, Monitor v1.5, and NucliSens quantified viral RNA in 96.9%, 94.8%, and 88.6% of the samples, respectively. The two group O specimens were quantified only by the LCx HIV assay. Analysis of nucleotide mismatches at the primer/probe binding sites for Monitor v1.5, NucliSens, and LCx assays revealed that performance characteristics reflected differences in the level of genetic conservation within the target regions. PMID:16081923

  16. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  17. Identification of Personal Lubricants That Can Cause Rectal Epithelial Cell Damage and Enhance HIV Type 1 Replication in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Begay, Othell; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Abraham, Ciby J.; Chudolij, Anne; Seidor, Samantha; Rodriguez, Aixa; Ford, Brian E.; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Zydowsky, Thomas; Robbiani, Melissa

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Over-the-counter personal lubricants are used frequently during vaginal and anal intercourse, but they have not been extensively tested for biological effects that might influence HIV transmission. We evaluated the in vitro toxicity anti-HIV-1 activity and osmolality of popular lubricants. A total of 41 lubricants were examined and compared to Gynol II and Carraguard as positive and negative controls for toxicity, respectively. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the XTT assay. The MAGI assay with R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains was used to evaluate antiviral activity. The effect of the lubricants on differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers (transepithelial electrical resistance, TEER) was also measured. None of the lubricants tested showed significant activity against HIV-1. Surprisingly, four of them, Astroglide Liquid, Astroglide Warming Liquid, Astroglide Glycerin & Paraben-Free Liquid, and Astroglide Silken Secret, significantly enhanced HIV-1 replication (p<0.0001). A common ingredient in three of these preparations is polyquaternium-15. In vitro testing of a chemically related compound (MADQUAT) confirmed that this similarly augmented HIV-1 replication. Most of the lubricants were found to be hyperosmolar and the TEER value dropped approximately 60% 2 h after exposure to all lubricants tested. Cells treated with Carraguard, saline, and cell controls maintained about 100% initial TEER value after 2–6 h. We have identified four lubricants that significantly increase HIV-1 replication in vitro. In addition, the epithelial damage caused by these and many other lubricants may have implications for enhancing HIV transmission in vivo. These data emphasize the importance of performing more rigorous safety testing on these products. PMID:21309617

  18. Identification of personal lubricants that can cause rectal epithelial cell damage and enhance HIV type 1 replication in vitro.

    PubMed

    Begay, Othell; Jean-Pierre, Ninochka; Abraham, Ciby J; Chudolij, Anne; Seidor, Samantha; Rodriguez, Aixa; Ford, Brian E; Henderson, Marcus; Katz, David; Zydowsky, Thomas; Robbiani, Melissa; Fernández-Romero, José A

    2011-09-01

    Over-the-counter personal lubricants are used frequently during vaginal and anal intercourse, but they have not been extensively tested for biological effects that might influence HIV transmission. We evaluated the in vitro toxicity anti-HIV-1 activity and osmolality of popular lubricants. A total of 41 lubricants were examined and compared to Gynol II and Carraguard as positive and negative controls for toxicity, respectively. Cytotoxicity was assessed using the XTT assay. The MAGI assay with R5 and X4 HIV-1 laboratory strains was used to evaluate antiviral activity. The effect of the lubricants on differentiated Caco-2 cell monolayers (transepithelial electrical resistance, TEER) was also measured. None of the lubricants tested showed significant activity against HIV-1. Surprisingly, four of them, Astroglide Liquid, Astroglide Warming Liquid, Astroglide Glycerin & Paraben-Free Liquid, and Astroglide Silken Secret, significantly enhanced HIV-1 replication (p<0.0001). A common ingredient in three of these preparations is polyquaternium-15. In vitro testing of a chemically related compound (MADQUAT) confirmed that this similarly augmented HIV-1 replication. Most of the lubricants were found to be hyperosmolar and the TEER value dropped approximately 60% 2 h after exposure to all lubricants tested. Cells treated with Carraguard, saline, and cell controls maintained about 100% initial TEER value after 2-6 h. We have identified four lubricants that significantly increase HIV-1 replication in vitro. In addition, the epithelial damage caused by these and many other lubricants may have implications for enhancing HIV transmission in vivo. These data emphasize the importance of performing more rigorous safety testing on these products. PMID:21309617

  19. Evaluation of secular trends in CD4+ lymphocyte loss among human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected men with known dates of seroconversion.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T R; Hoover, D R; Rosenberg, P S; Chen, B; Detels, R; Kingsley, L A; Phair, J; Saah, A J

    1995-09-15

    The rate at which immunodeficiency develops in untreated human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1)-infected persons might be increasing or decreasing over time because of viral evolution or other factors. Beginning in 1984, Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study investigators recruited HIV-1-seronegative homosexual/bisexual men from four US metropolitan areas and examined them semiannually for HIV-1 seroconversion. To assess possible secular changes in the natural history of HIV-1 infection, the authors examined CD4+ lymphocyte data from 354 men who seroconverted between 1984 and 1991. To control for measurement differences among centers and over time, the authors adjusted CD4+ lymphocyte values to those of persistently seronegative participants. CD4+ lymphocyte percentage measurements at the first seropositive visit formed a U-shaped pattern, with the lowest values observed in 1988 and 1989. The authors observed no consistent secular pattern of CD4+ percentages at later visit dates, except that mean CD4+ percentages were consistently lowest in men who seroconverted in 1988. In a proportional hazards model, the time to the adjusted CD4+ lymphocyte count of < 500 cells/mm3 was not associated with the secular time of seroconversion (relative hazard = 1.05, 95% confidence interval 0.97-1.13). The authors' data do not suggest a major change in the natural history of HIV-1 infection of this population. PMID:7653474

  20. Current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianhua; Li, Xinyue

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review the current status of drug use and HIV/AIDS prevention for drug users in China and provide scientific evidence for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in drug users. Literature and articles related to drug abuse in China, as well as the results of prevention efforts and successful cases regarding HIV/AIDS prevention in drug users, are reviewed. Lessons learned are drawn out for the future improvement of work and the sustainable development of treatment programs. The number of drug users in China is increasing. Even though the number of opioid-type drug users is growing more slowly than in the past, the number of amphetamine-type stimulant users has increased sharply. It has been proven that methadone maintenance treatment and syringe exchange programs gradually and successfully control HIV/AIDS transmission in drug users. However, it is necessary to enhance these prevention methods and expand their coverage. In addition, the strengthening of antiretroviral therapy (ART) treatment for HIV-infected drug users is crucial for HIV/AIDS prevention and control. The rapidly growing number of amphetamine-type stimulant users, along with their high-risk behavior, poses a hidden danger of greater HIV/AIDS transmission through sexual intercourse in the near future. PMID:25284965

  1. Drug-Induced Reactivation of Apoptosis Abrogates HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hanauske-Abel, Hartmut M.; Saxena, Deepti; Palumbo, Paul E.; Hanauske, Axel-Rainer; Luchessi, Augusto D.; Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Hoque, Mainul; Spino, Michael; Gandolfi, Darlene D'Alliessi; Heller, Debra S.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Park, Myung Hee; Cracchiolo, Bernadette M.; Tricta, Fernando; Connelly, John; Popowicz, Anthony M.; Cone, Richard A.; Holland, Bart; Pe’ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 blocks apoptosis, programmed cell death, an innate defense of cells against viral invasion. However, apoptosis can be selectively reactivated in HIV-infected cells by chemical agents that interfere with HIV-1 gene expression. We studied two globally used medicines, the topical antifungal ciclopirox and the iron chelator deferiprone, for their effect on apoptosis in HIV-infected H9 cells and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with clinical HIV-1 isolates. Both medicines activated apoptosis preferentially in HIV-infected cells, suggesting that the drugs mediate escape from the viral suppression of defensive apoptosis. In infected H9 cells, ciclopirox and deferiprone enhanced mitochondrial membrane depolarization, initiating the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis to execution, as evidenced by caspase-3 activation, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase proteolysis, DNA degradation, and apoptotic cell morphology. In isolate-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ciclopirox collapsed HIV-1 production to the limit of viral protein and RNA detection. Despite prolonged monotherapy, ciclopirox did not elicit breakthrough. No viral re-emergence was observed even 12 weeks after drug cessation, suggesting elimination of the proviral reservoir. Tests in mice predictive for cytotoxicity to human epithelia did not detect tissue damage or activation of apoptosis at a ciclopirox concentration that exceeded by orders of magnitude the concentration causing death of infected cells. We infer that ciclopirox and deferiprone act via therapeutic reclamation of apoptotic proficiency (TRAP) in HIV-infected cells and trigger their preferential elimination. Perturbations in viral protein expression suggest that the antiretroviral activity of both drugs stems from their ability to inhibit hydroxylation of cellular proteins essential for apoptosis and for viral infection, exemplified by eIF5A. Our findings identify ciclopirox and deferiprone as prototypes of selectively cytocidal

  2. HIV-1 Alters Intestinal Expression of Drug Transporters and Metabolic Enzymes: Implications for Antiretroviral Drug Disposition.

    PubMed

    Kis, Olena; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Hoque, M Tozammel; Walmsley, Sharon L; Dandekar, Satya; Bendayan, Reina

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated the effects of HIV-1 infection and antiretroviral therapy (ART) on the expression of intestinal drug efflux transporters, i.e., P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs), and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome P450s (CYPs), in the human upper intestinal tract. Intestinal biopsy specimens were obtained from HIV-negative healthy volunteers, ART-naive HIV-positive (HIV(+)) subjects, and HIV(+) subjects receiving ART (10 in each group). Intestinal tissue expression of drug transporters and metabolic enzymes was examined by microarray, real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qPCR), and immunohistochemistry analyses. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly lower expression of CYP3A4 and ABCC2/MRP2 in the HIV(+) ART-naive group than in uninfected subjects. qPCR analysis confirmed significantly lower expression of ABCC2/MRP2 in ART-naive subjects than in the control group, while CYP3A4 and ABCG2/BCRP showed a trend toward decreased expression. Protein expression of MRP2 and BCRP was also significantly lower in the HIV(+) naive group than in the control group and was partially restored to baseline levels in HIV(+) subjects receiving ART. In contrast, gene and protein expression of ABCB1/Pgp was significantly increased in HIV(+) subjects on ART relative to HIV(+) ART-naive subjects. These data demonstrate that the expression of drug-metabolizing enzymes and efflux transporters is significantly altered in therapy-naive HIV(+) subjects and in those receiving ART. Since CYP3A4, Pgp, MRPs, and BCRP metabolize or transport many antiretroviral drugs, their altered expression with HIV infection may negatively impact drug pharmacokinetics in HIV(+) subjects. This has clinical implications when using data from healthy volunteers to guide ART. PMID:26902756

  3. Drug choice, spatial distribution, HIV risk, and HIV prevalence among injection drug users in St. Petersburg, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Gina Rae; Barbour, Russell; Heimer, Robert; Shaboltas, Alla V; Toussova, Olga V; Hoffman, Irving F; Kozlov, Andrei P

    2009-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Russia has been driven by the unsafe injection of drugs, predominantly heroin and the ephedrine derived psychostimulants. Understanding differences in HIV risk behaviors among injectors associated with different substances has important implications for prevention programs. Methods We examined behaviors associated with HIV risk among 900 IDUs who inject heroin, psychostimulants, or multiple substances in 2002. Study participants completed screening questionnaires that provided data on sociodemographics, drug use, place of residence and injection- and sex-related HIV risk behaviors. HIV testing was performed and prevalence was modeled using general estimating equation (GEE) analysis. Individuals were clustered by neighborhood and disaggregated into three drug use categories: Heroin Only Users, Stimulant Only Users, and Mixed Drug Users. Results Among Heroin Only Users, younger age, front/backloading of syringes, sharing cotton and cookers were all significant predictors of HIV infection. In contrast, sharing needles and rinse water were significant among the Stimulant Only Users. The Mixed Drug Use group was similar to the Heroin Only Users with age, front/back loading, and sharing cotton significantly associated with HIV infection. These differences became apparent only when neighborhood of residence was included in models run using GEE. Conclusion The type of drug injected was associated with distinct behavioral risks. Risks specific to Stimulant Only Users appeared related to direct syringe sharing. The risks specific to the other two groups are common to the process of sharing drugs in preparation to injecting. Across the board, IDUs could profit from prevention education that emphasizes both access to clean syringes and preparing and apportioning drug with these clean syringes. However, attention to neighborhood differences might improve the intervention impact for injectors who favor different drugs. PMID:19646255

  4. HIV type 1 genetic diversity in Moyale, Mandera, and Turkana based on env-C2-V3 sequences.

    PubMed

    Khamadi, Samoel A; Lihana, Raphael W; Mwaniki, D L; Kinyua, Joyceline; Lagat, Nancy; Carter, Jane Y; Ichimura, Hiroshi; Oishi, Isao; Okoth, Fredrick A; Ochieng, Washington

    2008-12-01

    The genetic diversity of HIV-1 subtypes circulating in three districts of northern Kenya, i.e., Turkana, Mandera, and Moyale, was studied. DNA sequences encoding a portion of the env-C2-V3 region of the virus were amplified by PCR and sequenced directly. One hundred and fifty-nine samples were successfully sequenced in the env-C2-V3 region and analyzed. From the analysis, 57% were subtype A1, 27% were subtype C, 9% were subtype D, and the remaining 7% were unclassified. This study showed that HIV-1 subtype A1 was the dominant subtype in circulation in this region, though there was a significant percentage of HIV-1 subtype C in circulation there. PMID:19102688

  5. Short communication: molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 infection in Kazakhstan: CRF02_AG prevalence is increasing in the southeastern provinces.

    PubMed

    Lapovok, Ilya; Kazennova, Elena; Laga, Vita; Vasilyev, Alexander; Utegenova, Aliya; Abishev, Asylkhan; Dzissyuk, Natalya; Tukeev, Marat; Bobkova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    To analyze HIV-1 genetic variants in Kazakhstan, HIV-1 sequences were obtained from 205 antiretroviral-treated (ART) and naive patients in 2009-2013. Samples were collected in the most populous cities and provinces of Kazakhstan. On the basis of phylogenetic analyses of partial pol sequences, subtype A variant intravenous drug user (IDU)-A (which is dominant in the former Soviet Union) was found in 60.0% of the individuals, followed by CRF02_AG (34.6%); the rest of the samples were subtype B, CRF03_AB, CRF63_02A1, and CRF07_BC. The proportion of CRF02_AG has increased significantly since 2001-2003, when it was less than 5%. The majority of the CRF02_AG cases were found in Almaty, the former capital and the most populous city in Kazakhstan. The IDU-A variant dominated in the industrial regions of northern and central Kazakhstan and some other regions. Both dominant HIV-1 genetic variants were almost equally represented in the two main transmission groups: IDUs and heterosexuals. The analysis of drug-resistant mutations found a low prevalence of drug resistance in 165 therapy-naive individuals (3.0%). Thus, in the beginning of the second decade of the 2000s, the HIV epidemic in Kazakhstan is driven by two main genetic variants: IDU-A and CRF02_AG. PMID:24873898

  6. Management of the metabolic effects of HIV and HIV drugs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Todd T; Glesby, Marshall J

    2012-01-01

    Morphologic and metabolic abnormalities, including subcutaneous adipose tissue wasting, central adipose tissue accumulation, dyslipidemia and disorders of glucose metabolism are common among HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and contribute to the risk of cardiovascular disease in this population. The pathogenesis of these disorders is due to complicated interactions between effects of chronic HIV infection, HAART medications and patient factors, including genetic susceptibility. HAART has transformed HIV into a chronic condition for many patients and as a result the majority of HIV-infected patients in many areas of the developed world will soon be aged ≥50 years. Given that metabolic and cardiovascular diseases increase with aging, knowledge of the optimal management of these conditions is essential for practitioners caring for HIV-infected patients, including endocrine subspecialists. This Review highlights the clinical management of these disorders, focusing on the latest evidence regarding the efficacy of treatment strategies, newly available medications and potential interactions between HAART medications and medications used to treat metabolic disorders. PMID:21931374

  7. Short Communication: Current Prevalence and Risk Factors Associated with Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 and Human T Lymphotropic Virus Type 2 Infections Among HIV/AIDS Patients in São Paulo, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Sacchi, Cláudio Tavares; Gonçalves, Maria Gisele; Campos, Karoline Rodrigues; Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Alencar, Wong Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the 1990s, high prevalences of HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and HIV/human T lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) coinfections were detected in São Paulo, Brazil in association with intravenous drug use (IDU). The current prevalences and risk factors for HIV/HTLV-1/-2 were evaluated in 1,608 patients attending the AIDS/STD Reference and Training Center in São Paulo. Blood samples were analyzed for HTLV-1/2-specific antibodies using enzyme immunoassays (EIA Murex HTLV-I+II, Diasorin, and Gold ELISA HTLV-I+II, REM) and immunoblotting (HTLV Blot 2.4, MP Biomedicals and INNO-LIA HTLV-I/II, Innogenetics) and for the pol proviral DNA segments of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 by “in-house” real-time PCR. These analyses revealed that 50 (3.11%) of the samples were HTLV positive, including 25 (1.55%) that were HTLV-1 positive, 21 (1.31%) that were HTLV-2 positive, and 4 (0.25%) that were HTLV positive (untypeable). The median age of the HIV/HTLV-coinfected individuals was 50 years versus 44 years in the overall population (p=0.000). The risk factors associated with HIV/HTLV-1/-2 coinfections were female gender (OR 3.26, 1.78–5.95), black/pardo color (OR 2.21, 1.21–4.03), infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) (OR 4.27, 2.32–7.87) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) (OR 24.40, 12.51–48.11), and intravenous drug use (IDU) (OR 30.01, 15.21–59.29). The current low prevalence of HTLV-1/2 in HIV-infected patients in São Paulo could be explained in part by programs providing IDUs with sterile needles and syringes and changes in the drug usage patterns of individuals from injecting cocaine to smoking crack cocaine. PMID:25464979

  8. A Mathematical Model for HIV Drug-Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Ivan; Raimundo, Silvia Martorano; Venturino, Ezio

    2010-09-01

    In this paper we present a mathematical model of the transmission of HIV infection here the individuals receive antiretroviral drugs but may not respond to treatment. In such case the latter can be changed to a different therapy, and individuals may or may not respond also to this second set of drugs.

  9. Drugs of abuse, dopamine, and HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders/HIV-associated dementia.

    PubMed

    Purohit, Vishnudutt; Rapaka, Rao; Shurtleff, David

    2011-08-01

    Although the incidence of HIV-associated dementia (HAD) has declined, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remain a significant health problem despite use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In addition, the incidence and/or severity of HAND/HAD are increased with concomitant use of drugs of abuse, such as cocaine, marijuana, and methamphetamine. Furthermore, exposure to most drugs of abuse increases brain levels of dopamine, which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of HIV. This review evaluates the potential role of dopamine in the potentiation of HAND/HAD by drugs of abuse. In the brain, multiplication of HIV in infected macrophages/microglia could result in the release of HIV proteins such as gp120 and Tat, which can bind to and impair dopamine transporter (DAT) functions, leading to elevated levels of dopamine in the dopaminergic synapses in the early asymptomatic stage of HIV infection. Exposure of HIV-infected patients to drugs of abuse, especially cocaine and methamphetamine, can further increase synaptic levels of dopamine via binding to and subsequently impairing the function of DAT. This accumulated synaptic dopamine can diffuse out and activate adjacent microglia through binding to dopamine receptors. The activation of microglia may result in increased HIV replication as well as increased production of inflammatory mediators such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and chemokines. Increased HIV replication can lead to increased brain viral load and increased shedding of HIV proteins, gp120 and Tat. These proteins, as well as TNF-alpha, can induce cell death of adjacent dopaminergic neurons via apoptosis. Autoxidation and metabolism of accumulated synaptic dopamine can lead to generation of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide), quinones, and semiquinones, which can also induce apoptosis of neurons. Increased cell death of dopaminergic neurons can eventually lead to dopamine deficit that may exacerbate the severity and

  10. [MANAGEMENT OF PSYCHOTROPIC DRUGS IN HIV-INFECTED PATIENTS].

    PubMed

    Zirulnik, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    Here we make a revision about the rational use of psychopharmacological drugs in HIV/AIDS patients. We revised the clinical use of psychotropic drugs in this setting. In the clinical spectrum, the most frequent clinical pictures are the depression, anxiety disorders, psychosis, delirium, and the cognitive and behavioral neuropsychiatric symptoms associated with the HIV/AIDS dementia and the substance abuse-dependence. Also, we analyzed the most important pharmacological interactions between psychotropic drugs and antiretrovirals. The medical education and the interdisciplinary work are the basic topics to an adequate clinical management of this kind of patients. PMID:26650559

  11. Drugs, Alcohol and HIV/AIDS: A Consumer Guide for African Americans

    MedlinePlus

    Drugs, Alcohol and HIV/AIDS A Consumer Guide Drugs & Alcohol What do drugs and alcohol have to do with HIV? Drug and alcohol use can ... behavior that can increase your exposure to HIV/AIDS. For example, using or sharing needles or other ...

  12. Sequence analysis of the dimerization initiation site of concordant and discordant viral variants superinfecting HIV type 1 patients.

    PubMed

    Mayr, Luzia; Powell, Rebecca; Kinge, Thompson; Nyambi, Phillipe N

    2011-11-01

    For HIV recombination to occur, the RNAs from two infecting strains within a cell must dimerize at the dimerization initiation site (DIS). We examined the sequence identity at the DIS (697-731 bp, Hxb2 numbering engine) in patients superinfected with concordant HIV-1 strains and compared them to those with discordant strains. Viral RNA in sequential plasma from four subjects superinfected with subtype-discordant and two subjects superinfected with subtype-concordant HIV-1 strains was extracted, amplified (5' LTR-early gag: 526-1200 bp, Hxb2 numbering engine), sequenced, and analyzed to determine their compatibility for dimerization in vivo. The concordant viruses infecting the two subjects exhibited identical sequences in the 35-bp-long DIS region while sequences from the discordant viruses revealed single nucleotide changes that were located in the DIS loop (715 bp), its flanking nucleotides (710 bp and 717 bp), and the DIS stem (719 bp). Evidence from in vitro experiments demonstrates that these in vivo changes identified can abolish dimerization and reduce recombination frequency. Therefore, these results revealing differences in the DIS of discordant strains versus the similarity noted for the concordant strains may contribute to the differences in the frequency of recombination in patients superinfected with such HIV-1 variants. PMID:21453132

  13. HIV post-exposure therapy for drug users in treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, P G

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of drug treatment program providers concerning human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) post-exposure therapy (PET) for drug users enrolled in drug treatment. This was a cross-sectional evaluation of drug treatment program providers in four methadone maintenance programs (MMPs) in New Haven, Connecticut. Thirty-five MMP providers including: 29 MMP treatment staff (physicians, nurses, counselors) and 6 primary care provider staff (physicians, nurse practitioners, and nurses) participated in the study. The providers were presented with four case vignettes of individuals exposed to HIV through a needle stick ("stick"): a phlebotomist with occupational exposure (Case A) and three drug users with nonoccupational exposure to HIV (Cases B, C, and D). Case B had the same estimated future risk as Case A (three sticks/4 years) and the other cases had increased risk: Case C (four to six sticks/year) and Case D (monthly "sticks"). For each vignette, providers were asked whether they would offer HIV PET ("yes" or "no"). In addition, focus groups were held within each group of providers who were asked: "What role should drug treatment programs play in the implementation of PET?" All MMP staff (29/29) and primary care providers (6/6) felt that the phlebotomist with occupational exposure should be offered PET. The percent of MMP and Primary care provider staff recommending PET for the other cases were: Case B (MMP staff: 86% [25/29], PCPs: 100% [6/6]), Case C (MMP staff: 69% [20/29], PCPs: 33% [2/6]), and Case D (MMP staff: 59% [17/29], PCPs: 17% [1/6]). The "common themes" that were identified in the focus groups included: concern that MMPs lack resources to provide PET, the ethics of withholding PET, the "limit" on the number of times PET should be offered, and the role of PET in the overall HIV prevention message. Both MMP staff and PCPs felt that MMPs should have an "indirect" role in providing HIV PET by providing education

  14. Injection drug use and HIV/AIDS transmission in China.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian Xin; Levy, Judith A

    2005-01-01

    After nearly three decades of being virtually drug free, use of heroin and other illicit drugs has re-emerged in China as a major public health problem. One result is that drug abuse, particularly heroin injection, has come to play a predominant role in fueling China's AIDS epidemic. The first outbreak of HIV among China's IDUs was reported in the border area of Yunnan province between China and Myanmar where drug trafficking is heavy. Since then drug-related HIV has spread to all 31 provinces, autonomous regions and municipalities. This paper provides an overview to HIV/AIDS transmission through injection drug use in China. It begins with a brief history of the illicit drug trade in China, followed by a discussion of the emergence of drug related AIDS, and a profile of drug users and their sexual partners who have contracted the virus or who are vulnerable to infection. It ends by summarizing three national strategies being used by China to address both drug use and AIDS as major health threats. PMID:16354561

  15. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  16. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×104 known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  17. HIV Rapid Testing in Drug Treatment: Comparison Across Treatment Modalities

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Robert P.; Stitzer, Maxine L.; Feaster, Daniel J.; Korthuis, P. Todd; Alvanzo, Anika A. H.; Winhusen, T. M.; Donnard, Lillian; Snead, Ned; Metsch, L. R.

    2012-01-01

    Despite high rates of risky behavior among patients, many drug abuse treatment programs do not provide on-site HIV testing. This secondary analysis examined differences in outcome by program modality from a multi-site trial in which 1,281 HIV-negative patients in 3 methadone programs, 7 non-methadone outpatient programs, and 3 residential programs were randomly assigned to: (1) off-site referral for HIV risk reduction counseling and testing; or on-site rapid testing (2) with or (3) without risk reduction counseling. The parent study using generalized estimating equations with site as a cluster variable found significantly higher rates of HIV testing and feedback of results by 1 month post-enrollment for the combined on-site conditions compared to the offsite condition (RR=4.52, 97.5% CI (3.57, 5.72). Utilizing the same statistical approach, we found neither significant treatment modality nor significant treatment modality by testing condition interaction effects either for receipt of HIV test results at 1 month or for sexual or drug use HIV-risk behaviors at 6-month follow-up. On-site HIV testing is effective across treatment modalities for achieving high rates of testing and results feedback. All programs should be encouraged to adopt or expand this service. PMID:23021496

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nuclear import via Vpr-Importin {alpha} interactions as a novel HIV-1 therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Tatsunori; Yamamoto, Norio; Nonaka, Mizuho; Hashimoto, Yoshie; Matsuda, Go; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Matsuyama, Megumi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Miura, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Kato, Shingo; Aida, Yoko

    2009-03-20

    The development of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. One such target is the interaction between Vpr, one of the accessory gene products of HIV-1 and Importin {alpha}, which is crucial, not only for the nuclear import of Vpr, but also for HIV-1 replication in macrophages. We have identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, thereby inhibiting HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner. Analysis by real-time PCR demonstrated that hematoxylin specifically inhibited nuclear import step of pre-integration complex. Thus, hematoxylin is a new anti-HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-Importin {alpha} interaction, suggesting that a specific inhibitor of the interaction between viral protein and the cellular factor may provide a new strategy for HIV-1 therapy.

  19. HIV epidemic among drug users in China: 1995 to 2011

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Guo, Wei; Li, Dongmin; Ding, Zhengwei; McGoogan, Jennifer M.; Wang, Ning; Wu, Zunyou; Wang, Lu

    2014-01-01

    Aim To describe trends in the HIV epidemic among drug users (DUs) in China from 1995 to 2011. Design, setting and participants Datasets from China's national HIV/AIDS case reporting and sentinel surveillance systems as of December 2011 were used separately for descriptive analysis. Measures Changes in the geographic distribution of the number of HIV cases and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users (IDUs) and non-IDUs were examined. We also analyzed changes in HIV prevalence among the broader DU population, and drug use-related behaviors including types of drugs used, recent injecting, and recent needle sharing in the context of the rapid scale-up of DU sentinel sites and national harm reduction programs. Findings The HIV epidemic among China's DUs is still highly concentrated in five provinces. Here, HIV prevalence peaked at 30.3% (95% CI [28.6, 32.1]) among IDUs in 1999, and then gradually decreased to 10.9% (95% CI [10.6, 11.2]) by 2011. We observed a rapid increase in the use of “nightclub drugs” among DUs from 1.3% in 2004 to 24.4% in 2011. A decline in recent needle sharing among current IDU from 19.5% (95% CI [19.4, 19.6]) in 2006 to 11.3% (95% CI [11.2, 11.4]) in 2011 was found to be correlated with the rapid scale-up of methadone maintenance treatment (MMT; r(4) = - .94, p = 0.003) harm reduction efforts. Conclusions While needle sharing among current injecting drug users in China has declined dramatically and is correlated with the scale-up of national harm reduction efforts, the recent, rapid increased use of “nightclub drugs” presents a new challenge. PMID:25533861

  20. The Challenges in Managing HIV in People Who Use Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Altice, Frederick L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review HIV management in PWUD is typically complex and challenging due to the presence of multiple medical and psychiatric comorbidities as well as social, physical, economic and legal factors that often disrupt the HIV continuum of care. In this review we describe the individual, health systems and societal barriers to HIV treatment access and care retention for people who use drugs. Additionally the clinical management of HIV infected PWUD is often complicated by the presence of multiple infectious and non-infectious comorbidities. Recent findings Improved ART adherence can be achieved through the provision of opiate substitution therapy (OST), directly administered antiretroviral therapy (DAART) and integration of ART with OST services. Recent advances with direct-acting antivirals (DAA) for HCV have shown superior outcomes compared to interferon based regimes in HIV-HCV co-infected patients. Newer diagnostic technologies for tuberculosis hold promise for earlier diagnosis for PWUD co-infected with TB Summary HIV-infected PWUDs are a key population who frequently experience suboptimal outcomes along the HIV continuum of care. A comprehensive strategy that encompasses evidence-based prevention and treatment interventions that target the individual, family, healthcare system, legal and societal structure is required to ensure greater participation and success in HIV treatment and care. PMID:25490106

  1. How Can HIV-Type-1-Env Immunogenicity Be Improved to Facilitate Antibody-Based Vaccine Development?

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rogier W.; Cerutti, Andrea; Moore, John P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract No vaccine candidate has induced antibodies (Abs) that efficiently neutralize multiple primary isolates of HIV-1. Preexisting high titers of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are essential, because the virus establishes infection before anamnestic responses could take effect. HIV-1 infection elicits Abs against Env, Gag, and other viral proteins, but of these only a subset of the anti-Env Abs can neutralize the virus. Whereas the corresponding proteins from other viruses form the basis of successful vaccines, multiple large doses of HIV-1 Env elicit low, transient titers of Abs that are not protective in humans. The inaccessibility of neutralization epitopes hinders NAb induction, but Env may also subvert the immune response by interacting with receptors on T cells, B cells, monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Here, we discuss evidence from immunizations of different species with various modified Env constructs. We also suggest how the divergent Ab responses to Gag and Env during infection may reflect differences in B cell regulation. Drawing on these analyses, we outline strategies for improving Env as a component of a vaccine aimed at inducing strong and sustained NAb responses. PMID:21495876

  2. Molecular epidemiology of HIV type 1 in Chile: differential geographic and transmission route distribution of B and F subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rios, M; Fernandez, J; Jaramillo, P; Paredes, V; Sanchez, J L; Laguna-Torres, V A; Carr, J K; Ramirez, E

    2005-10-01

    We examined the genetic makeup of 221 HIV-1 strains from Chilean persons living with HIV/AIDS by HMA and DNA sequencing of the env gene: 143 cases were infected by sexual contact with an already-infected partner, 76 were infected by mother-to-child transmission, and 2 were transfusion related. We found env HIV-1 subtype B in 202 cases (91.4%) and subtype F in 19 cases (8.6%). Subtype B strains were found throughout the country whereas subtype F viruses were predominantly found in cases from the metropolitan/central to the northern regions of Chile (p < 0.01). Chilean F subtypes clustered in two different groups: viruses from the central region clustered with F subtypes from Argentina, Uruguay, and Brazil, and viruses from the northern region, which independently segregated from other South American and European F strains. All of the 59 men having sex with men (MSM) were infected with B subtype strains whereas 7 (9.2%) and 12 (15.8%), respectively, of heterosexually infected females and children were infected with F subtype strains (p < 0.01). It appears that F subtype strains have been introduced into Chile by separate heterosexual transmission events from other nearby countries in the Southern Cone whereas B subtype strains have continued to persist predominantly among MSM. PMID:16225409

  3. Illicit drug use and HIV risk in the Dominican Republic: tourism areas create drug use opportunities.

    PubMed

    Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Lee, Jane J; Ruiz, Yumary; Hagan, Holly; Delva, Marlyn; Quiñones, Zahira; Kamler, Alexandra; Robles, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    While the Caribbean has the second highest global human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevalence, insufficient attention has been paid to contributing factors of the region's elevated risk. Largely neglected is the potential role of drugs in shaping the Caribbean HIV/acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic. Caribbean studies have almost exclusively focused on drug transportation and seldom acknowledged local user economies and drug-related health and social welfare consequences. While tourism is consistently implicated within the Caribbean HIV epidemic, less is known about the intersection of drugs and tourism. Tourism areas represent distinct ecologies of risk often characterised by sex work, alcohol consumption and population mixing between lower and higher risk groups. Limited understanding of availability and usage of drugs in countries such as the Dominican Republic (DR), the Caribbean country with the greatest tourist rates, presents barriers to HIV prevention. This study addresses this gap by conducting in-depth interviews with 30 drug users in Sosúa, a major sex tourism destination of the DR. A two-step qualitative data analysis process was utilised and interview transcripts were systematically coded using a well-defined thematic codebook. Results suggest three themes: (1) local demand shifts drug routes to tourism areas, (2) drugs shape local economies and (3) drug use facilitates HIV risk behaviours in tourism areas. PMID:25330110

  4. Public health implications of antiretroviral therapy and HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wainberg, M A; Friedland, G

    1998-06-24

    Widespread use of antiretroviral agents and increasing occurrence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) strains resistant to these drugs have given rise to a number of important issues. Some of these concerns are distinct from the obvious question of the relationship between drug resistance and treatment failure and have potentially widespread public health implications. The relevant issues include but are not limited to the following: (1) frequency with which drug-resistant virus may be transmitted via sexual, intravenous, or mother-to-child routes; (2) ability of drug-resistant variants to be transmitted, a question that relates, in part, to the relative fitness of such strains; (3) effectiveness of antiviral therapy in diminishing viral burden in both blood and genital secretions, and whether this may be compromised in persons harboring resistant virus; and (4) importance of patient adherence to antiviral therapy and its relationship to sustained reduction in viral load to minimize the appearance in and transmission of drug-resistant virus from both blood and genital secretions. Thus, prevention of both development of HIV drug resistance as well as transmission of drug-resistant variants is a central issue of public health importance. Unless this topic is appropriately addressed, the likelihood is that drug-resistant variants of HIV, if able to successfully replicate, will sustain the epidemic and limit the effectiveness of antiviral therapy. PMID:9643862

  5. T-Tropic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Derived V3 Loop Peptides Directly Bind to CXCR-4 and Inhibit T-Tropic HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sakaida, Hitoshi; Hori, Toshiyuki; Yonezawa, Akihito; Sato, Akihiko; Isaka, Yoshitaka; Yoshie, Osamu; Hattori, Toshio; Uchiyama, Takashi

    1998-01-01

    Certain types of chemokine receptors have been identified as coreceptors for HIV-1 infection. The process of viral entry is initiated by the interaction between an envelope protein gp120 of HIV-1, CD4, and one of the relevant coreceptors. To understand the precise mechanism of the Env-mediated fusion and entry of HIV-1, we examined whether the V3 region of gp120 of T-cell line tropic (T-tropic) virus directly interacts with the coreceptor, CXCR-4, by using five synthetic V3 peptides: two cyclized V3 peptides (V3-BH10 and V3-ELI) which correspond to the V3 regions of the T-tropic HIV-1 IIIB and HIV-1 ELI strains, respectively, a linear V3 peptide (CTR36) corresponding to that of HIV-1 IIIB strain; and cyclized V3 peptides corresponding to that of the macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) HIV-1 ADA strain (V3-ADA) or the dualtropic HIV-1 89.6 strain (V3-89.6). FACScan analysis with a CXCR-4+ human B-cell line, JY, showed that V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6 but not CTR36 or V3-ADA blocked the binding of IVR7, an anti-CXCR-4 monoclonal antibody (MAb), to CXCR-4 with different magnitudes in a dose-dependent manner, while none of the V3 peptides influenced binding of an anti-CD19 MAb at all. Next, the effects of the V3 peptides on SDF-1β-induced transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ were investigated. Three V3 peptides (V3-BH10, V3-ELI, and V3-89.6) prevented Ca2+ mobilization. Furthermore, the three peptides inhibited infection by T-tropic HIV-1 in a dose-dependent manner as revealed by an MTT assay and a reverse transcriptase assay, while the other peptides had no effects. These results present direct evidence that the V3 loop of gp120 of T-tropic HIV-1 can interact with its coreceptor CXCR-4 independently of the V1/V2 regions of gp120 or cellular CD4. PMID:9811711

  6. Female genital tract shedding of CXCR4-tropic HIV Type 1 is associated with a majority population of CXCR4-tropic HIV Type 1 in blood and declining CD4(+) cell counts.

    PubMed

    Haaland, Richard E; Sullivan, Sharon T; Evans-Strickfaden, Tammy; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Hart, Clyde E

    2012-11-01

    This study compared HIV-1 genotypes shed over time (≤3.5 years) in the vaginal secretions (VS) and blood plasma (BP) of 15 chronically infected women. Analysis of predicted coreceptor tropism (CCR5=R5, CXCR4=X4) for quasispecies shedding revealed three patterns: (1) viral quasispecies shed in both VS and BP were restricted to R5-tropism at all time points, (2) quasispecies shed in VS were restricted to R5-tropism at all time points but X4 quasispecies were identified in the BP at one or more time points, and (3) quasispecies shed in matched VS and BP both contained X4-tropic viruses. Overall, the frequency of X4 quasispecies circulation in VS was 2-fold less than in BP and detection of X4 virus in VS was more likely to occur when X4 quasispecies comprised more than 50% of BP viruses (p=0.01) and when declines in blood CD4(+) lymphocyte levels were the greatest (p=0.038). Additionally, the mean number of predicted N-glycosylation sites between matched VS and BP samples was strongly correlated (r=0.86, p<0.0001) with glycosylation densities in the following order (VS R5=BP R5 > BP X4 > VS X4). The X4 glycosylation densities may result from compartmentalization pressures in the female genital tract or the delayed appearance of these viruses in VS. Our results suggest that the presence of X4 virus in VS is associated with a threshold population of X4 quasispecies in BP, which are increasing during the HIV-induced failure of the human immune system. PMID:22369497

  7. Antiretroviral drug use and HIV drug resistance among HIV-infected Black men who have sex with men: HIV Prevention Trials Network 061

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Connor, Matthew B.; Clarke, William; Marzinke, Mark A.; Cummings, Vanessa; Breaud, Autumn; Fogel, Jessica M.; Laeyendecker, Oliver; Fields, Sheldon D.; Donnell, Deborah; Griffith, Sam; Scott, Hyman M.; Shoptaw, Steven; del Rio, Carlos; Magnus, Manya; Mannheimer, Sharon; Wheeler, Darrell P.; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Koblin, Beryl A.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND HPTN 061 enrolled Black men who have sex with men in the United States. Some men with low/undetectable HIV RNA had unusual patterns of antiretroviral (ARV) drug use or had drugs detected in the absence of viral suppression. This report includes a comprehensive analysis of ARV drug use and drug resistance among men in HPTN 061 who were not virally suppressed. METHODS The analysis included 169 men who had viral loads >400 copies/mL at enrollment, including three with acute infection and 13 with recent infection. By self-report, 88 were previously diagnosed, including 31 in care; 137 men reported no ARV drug use. Samples from these 169 men and 23 seroconverters were analyzed with HIV genotyping and ARV drug assays. RESULTS Forty-eight (28%) of the 169 men had ≥1 drug resistance mutation (DRM); 19 (11%) had multi-class resistance. Sixty men (36%) had ≥1 ARV drug detected, 42 (70%) of whom reported no ARV drug use. Nine (23%) of 39 newly-infected men had ≥1 DRM; 10 had ≥1 ARV drug detected. Unusual patterns of ARV drugs were detected more frequently in newly-diagnosed men than previously-diagnosed men. The rate of transmitted drug resistance (TDR) was 23% based on HIV genotyping and self-reported ARV drug use, but was 12% after adjusting for ARV drug detection. CONCLUSIONS Many men in HPTN 061 had drug-resistant HIV and many were at risk of acquiring additional DRMs. ARV drug testing revealed unusual patterns of ARV drug use and provided a more accurate estimate of TDR. PMID:25861015

  8. HIV type 1 subtype C remains the predominant subtype in men having sex with men in Senegal.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Halimatou Diop; Tchiakpe, Edmond; Vidal, Nicole; Ndiaye, Ousseynou; Diop, Abdou Khoudia; Peeters, Martine; Mboup, Souleymane; Toure-Kane, Coumba

    2013-09-01

    HIV-1 epidemics are expanding among men who have sex with men in low- and middle-income countries. To confirm and further explore preliminary data in Senegal, we aimed to determine 3 years after a first study the HIV-1 genetic diversity in three different viral regions. From 109 samples available in 2007, 93 were sequenced in gag, 77 in env, and 60 in pol. Phylogenetic analysis showed that subtype C predominated (38-52%), followed by CRF02_AG (30-40%), subtype B (13-17%), and CRF09_cpx (2.6-5%). Subsubtype A3 and strains tightly linked to CRF43_02G were identified in env and gag, respectively, and 12% of the samples were unique recombinants. Six transmission chains involving two to seven individuals were identified. Some strains carried resistance mutations inside transmission chains. This study confirmed the existence of a dual epidemic in Senegal and emphasized the need to strengthen prevention programs to avoid strains intermixing between low-risk women and high-risk men. PMID:23742654

  9. A Rev-independent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-based vector that exploits a codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene.

    PubMed

    Kotsopoulou, E; Kim, V N; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M; Mitrophanous, K A

    2000-05-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  10. A Rev-Independent Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1)-Based Vector That Exploits a Codon-Optimized HIV-1 gag-pol Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotsopoulou, Ekaterini; Kim, V. Narry; Kingsman, Alan J.; Kingsman, Susan M.; Mitrophanous, Kyriacos A.

    2000-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) genome is AU rich, and this imparts a codon bias that is quite different from the one used by human genes. The codon usage is particularly marked for the gag, pol, and env genes. Interestingly, the expression of these genes is dependent on the presence of the Rev/Rev-responsive element (RRE) regulatory system, even in contexts other than the HIV genome. The Rev dependency has been explained in part by the presence of RNA instability sequences residing in these coding regions. The requirement for Rev also places a limitation on the development of HIV-based vectors, because of the requirement to provide an accessory factor. We have now synthesized a complete codon-optimized HIV-1 gag-pol gene. We show that expression levels are high and that expression is Rev independent. This effect is due to an increase in the amount of gag-pol mRNA. Provision of the RRE in cis did not lower protein or RNA levels or stimulate a Rev response. Furthermore we have used this synthetic gag-pol gene to produce HIV vectors that now lack all of the accessory proteins. These vectors should now be safer than murine leukemia virus-based vectors. PMID:10775623

  11. Long-Range HIV Genotyping Using Viral RNA and Proviral DNA for Analysis of HIV Drug Resistance and HIV Clustering.

    PubMed

    Novitsky, Vlad; Zahralban-Steele, Melissa; McLane, Mary Fran; Moyo, Sikhulile; van Widenfelt, Erik; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Makhema, Joseph; Essex, M

    2015-08-01

    The goal of the study was to improve the methodology of HIV genotyping for analysis of HIV drug resistance and HIV clustering. Using the protocol of Gall et al. (A. Gall, B. Ferns, C. Morris, S. Watson, M. Cotten, M. Robinson, N. Berry, D. Pillay, and P. Kellam, J Clin Microbiol 50:3838-3844, 2012, doi:10.1128/JCM.01516-12), we developed a robust methodology for amplification of two large fragments of viral genome covering about 80% of the unique HIV-1 genome sequence. Importantly, this method can be applied to both viral RNA and proviral DNA amplification templates, allowing genotyping in HIV-infected subjects with suppressed viral loads (e.g., subjects on antiretroviral therapy [ART]). The two amplicons cover critical regions across the HIV-1 genome (including pol and env), allowing analysis of mutations associated with resistance to protease inhibitors, reverse transcriptase inhibitors (nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NRTIs] and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors [NNRTIs]), integrase strand transfer inhibitors, and virus entry inhibitors. The two amplicons generated span 7,124 bp, providing substantial sequence length and numbers of informative sites for comprehensive phylogenic analysis and greater refinement of viral linkage analyses in HIV prevention studies. The long-range HIV genotyping from proviral DNA was successful in about 90% of 212 targeted blood specimens collected in a cohort where the majority of patients had suppressed viral loads, including 65% of patients with undetectable levels of HIV-1 RNA loads. The generated amplicons could be sequenced by different methods, such as population Sanger sequencing, single-genome sequencing, or next-generation ultradeep sequencing. The developed method is cost-effective-the cost of the long-range HIV genotyping is under $140 per subject (by Sanger sequencing)-and has the potential to enable the scale up of public health HIV prevention interventions. PMID:26041893

  12. Drug–drug interactions between anti-retroviral therapies and drugs of abuse in HIV systems

    PubMed Central

    Rao, PSS; Earla, Ravindra; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Substance abuse is a common problem among HIV-infected individuals. Importantly, addictions as well as moderate use of alcohol, smoking, or other illicit drugs have been identified as major reasons for non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV patients. The literature also suggests a decrease in the response to ART among HIV patients who use these substances, leading to failure to achieve optimal virological response and increased disease progression. Areas covered This review discusses the challenges with adherence to ART as well as observed drug interactions and known toxicities with major drugs of abuse, such as alcohol, smoking, methamphetamine, cocaine, marijuana, and opioids. The lack of adherence and drug interactions potentially lead to decreased efficacy of ART drugs and increased ART, and drugs of abuse-mediated toxicity. As CYP is the common pathway in metabolizing both ART and drugs of abuse, we discuss the possible involvement of CYP pathways in such drug interactions. Expert opinion We acknowledge that further studies focusing on common metabolic pathways involving CYP and advance research in this area would help to potentially develop novel/alternate interventions and drug dose/regimen adjustments to improve medication outcomes in HIV patients who consume drugs of abuse. PMID:25539046

  13. Performance Characteristics of the QUANTIPLEX HIV-1 RNA 3.0 Assay for Detection and Quantitation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 RNA in Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Erice, Alejo; Brambilla, Donald; Bremer, James; Jackson, J. Brooks; Kokka, Robert; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Coombs, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The QUANTIPLEX HIV-1 RNA assay, version 3.0 (a branched DNA, version 3.0, assay [bDNA 3.0 assay]), was evaluated by analyzing spiked and clinical plasma samples and was compared with the AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR Ultrasensitive (ultrasensitive reverse transcription-PCR [US-RT-PCR]) method. A panel of spiked plasma samples that contained 0 to 750,000 copies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA per ml was tested four times in each of four laboratories (1,344 assays). Negative results (<50 copies/ml) were obtained in 30 of 32 (94%) assays with seronegative samples, 66 of 128 (52%) assays with HIV-1 RNA at 50 copies/ml, and 5 of 128 (4%) assays with HIV-1 RNA at 100 copies/ml. The assay was linear from 100 to 500,000 copies/ml. The within-run standard deviation (SD) of the log10 estimated HIV-1 RNA concentration was 0.08 at 1,000 to 500,000 copies/ml, increased below 1,000 copies/ml, and was 0.17 at 100 copies/ml. Between-run reproducibility at 100 to 500 copies/ml was <0.10 log10 in most comparisons. Interlaboratory differences across runs were ≤0.10 log10 at all concentrations examined. A subset of the panel (25 to 500 copies/ml) was also analyzed by the US-RT-PCR assay. The within-run SD varied inversely with the log10 HIV-1 RNA concentration but was higher than the SD for the bDNA 3.0 assay at all concentrations. Log-log regression analysis indicated that the two methods produced very similar estimates at 100 to 500 copies/ml. In parallel testing of clinical specimens with low HIV-1 RNA levels, 80 plasma samples with <50 copies/ml by the US-RT-PCR assay had <50 copies/ml when they were retested by the bDNA 3.0 assay. In contrast, 11 of 78 (14%) plasma samples with <50 copies/ml by the bDNA 3.0 assay had ≥50 copies/ml when they were retested by the US-RT-PCR assay (median, 86 copies/ml; range, 50 to 217 copies/ml). Estimation of bDNA 3.0 values of <50 copies/ml by extending the standard curve of the assay showed that these samples with discrepant

  14. Two-Drug Treatment Approaches in HIV: Finally Getting Somewhere?

    PubMed

    Kelly, Sean G; Nyaku, Amesika N; Taiwo, Babafemi O

    2016-04-01

    The advent of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) has significantly decreased AIDS-related morbidity and mortality. Nevertheless, the benefits of ART are only realized through adherence to lifelong treatment. Though contemporary antiretroviral (ARV) drugs have fewer adverse effects in comparison to older ARV drugs, many agents are associated with negative or unknown long-term effects. There is increasing evidence that two-drug (dual-therapy) regimens may be an effective alternative to the currently recommended three-drug (triple-therapy) regimens. In this review, we provide a comprehensive and critical review of recently completed and ongoing trials of dual-therapy regimens in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced HIV-1-infected patients. We also review current HIV/AIDS society recommendations regarding dual therapy as well as future therapeutic possibilities. PMID:26886135

  15. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  16. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  17. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  18. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  19. 21 CFR 866.3950 - In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay. 866.3950 Section 866.3950 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Serological Reagents § 866.3950 In vitro human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) drug resistance genotype assay....

  20. Genetic diversity on the integrase region of the pol gene among HIV type 1-infected patients naive for integrase inhibitors in São Paulo City, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Liã Bárbara; Fonseca, Luiz Augusto M; Duarte, Alberto J S; Casseb, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    The presence of mutations associated with integrase inhibitor (INI) resistance among INI-naive patients may play an important clinical role in the use of those drugs Samples from 76 HIV-1-infected subjects naive to INIs were submitted to direct sequencing. No differences were found between naive (25%) subjects and subjects on HAART (75%). No primary mutation associated with raltegravir or elvitegravir resistance was found. However, 78% of sequences showed at least one accessory mutation associated with resistance. The analysis of the 76 IN sequences showed a high polymorphic level on this region among Brazilian HIV-1-infected subjects, including a high prevalence of aa substitutions related to INI resistance. The impact of these findings remains unclear and further studies are necessary to address these questions. PMID:20055590

  1. New Subtypes and Genetic Recombination in HIV Type 1-Infecting Patients with Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Peru (2008–2010)

    PubMed Central

    Acuña, Maribel; Gazzo, Cecilia; Salinas, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Fanny; Valverde, Ada; Romero, Soledad

    2012-01-01

    Abstract HIV-1 subtype B is the most frequent strain in Peru. However, there is no available data about the genetic diversity of HIV-infected patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) here. A group of 267 patients in the Peruvian National Treatment Program with virologic failure were tested for genotypic evidence of HIV drug resistance at the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) of Peru between March 2008 and December 2010. Viral RNA was extracted from plasma and the segments of the protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes were amplified by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), purified, and fully sequenced. Consensus sequences were submitted to the HIVdb Genotypic Resistance Interpretation Algorithm Database from Stanford University, and then aligned using Clustal X v.2.0 to generate a phylogenetic tree using the maximum likelihood method. Intrasubtype and intersubtype recombination analyses were performed using the SCUEAL program (Subtype Classification by Evolutionary ALgo-rithms). A total of 245 samples (91%) were successfully genotyped. The analysis obtained from the HIVdb program showed 81.5% resistance cases (n=198). The phylogenetic analysis revealed that subtype B was predominant in the population (98.8%), except for new cases of A, C, and H subtypes (n=4). Of these cases, only subtype C was imported. Likewise, recombination analysis revealed nine intersubtype and 20 intrasubtype recombinant cases. This is the first report of the presence of HIV-1 subtypes C and H in Peru. The introduction of new subtypes and circulating recombinants forms can make it difficult to distinguish resistance profiles in patients and consequently affect future treatment strategies against HIV in this country. PMID:22559065

  2. High Potency of Indolyl Aryl Sulfone Nonnucleoside Inhibitors towards Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase Mutants Is Due to Selective Targeting of Different Mechanistic Forms of the Enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Cancio, Reynel; Silvestri, Romano; Ragno, Rino; Artico, Marino; De Martino, Gabriella; La Regina, Giuseppe; Crespan, Emmanuele; Zanoli, Samantha; Hübscher, Ulrich; Spadari, Silvio; Maga, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    Indolyl aryl sulfone (IAS) nonnucleoside inhibitors have been shown to potently inhibit the growth of wild-type and drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), but their exact mechanism of action has not been elucidated yet. Here, we describe the mechanism of inhibition of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) by selected IAS derivatives. Our results showed that, depending on the substitutions introduced in the IAS common pharmacophore, these compounds can be made selective for different enzyme-substrate complexes. Moreover, we showed that the molecular basis for this selectivity was a different association rate of the drug to a particular enzymatic form along the reaction pathway. By comparing the activities of the different compounds against wild-type RT and the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-resistant mutant Lys103Asn, it was possible to hypothesize, on the basis of their mechanism of action, a rationale for the design of drugs which could overcome the steric barrier imposed by the Lys103Asn mutation. PMID:16251294

  3. Polymorphisms in HLA Class I Genes Associated with both Favorable Prognosis of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 Infection and Positive Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses to ALVAC-HIV Recombinant Canarypox Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kaslow, Richard A.; Rivers, Charles; Tang, Jianming; Bender, Thomas J.; Goepfert, Paul A.; El Habib, Raphaelle; Weinhold, Kent; Mulligan, Mark J.

    2001-01-01

    Carriers of certain human leukocyte antigen class I alleles show favorable prognosis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, presumably due to effective CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses, but close relationships between class I variants mediating such responses to natural and to vaccine HIV-1 antigen have not been established. During 6 to 30 months of administration and follow-up in trials of ALVAC-HIV recombinant canarypox vaccines, cells from 42% of 291 HIV-1-negative vaccinated subjects typed at class I loci responded to an HIV-1 protein in a lytic bulk CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte assay. By 2 weeks after the second dose, higher proportions of vaccinees carrying one of two alleles consistently associated with slower progression of natural HIV-1 infection reacted at least once: B∗27 carriers reacted to Gag (64%; odds ratio [OR] = 10.3, P = 0.001) and Env (36%; OR = 4.6, P = 0.04), and B∗57 carriers reacted to Env (44%; OR = 6.6, P < 0.05). By 2 weeks after the third or fourth dose, B∗27 carriers had responded (two or more reactions) to Gag (33%; OR = 4.4, P < 0.05) and B∗57 carriers had responded to both Gag (39%; OR = 5.3, P = 0.013) and Env (39%; OR = 9.5, P = 0.002). Homozygosity at class I loci, although conferring an unfavorable prognosis following natural infection, showed no such disadvantage for vaccine response. Individual class I alleles have not previously demonstrated such clear and consistent relationship with both the clinical course of an infection and cellular immunity to a vaccine against the infectious agent. This proof of principle that class I an alleles modulate both processes has implications for development of HIV-1 and presumably other vaccines. PMID:11507213

  4. Increased density of neurons containing NADPH diaphorase and nitric oxide synthase in the cerebral cortex of patients with HIV-1 infection and drug abuse.

    PubMed

    Kuljis, Rodrigo O; Shapshak, Paul; Alcabes, Philip; Rodríguez de la Vega, Pura; Fujimura, Robert; Petito, Carol K

    2002-01-01

    To determine whether nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide; NO) synthase (NOS) and NADPH diaphorase (NDP) co-containing cerebrocortical neurons (NOSN) neurons are affected in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) with and without associated intake of drugs of abuse, we examined the temporal neocortex of 24 individuals: 12 HIV-1 positive (including 3 drug users, 9 non-drug users) and 12 HIV-1 negative (including 6 drug users, and 6 non-drug users). Histochemical labeling for NDP-an enzymatic domain co-expressed in the NOS enzyme-was employed to visualize NOSN. Drug abuse and HIV-1 infection cause independently an increase in NOSN density, but combined they result in up to a 38-fold increase in NOSN density, suggesting that the combination of these factors induces NOS expression powerfully in neurons that normally do not synthesize NDP/NOS. This is associated with an increase in the proportion of NOSN displaying dystrophic changes, indicating that NOSN undergo massive degeneration in association with NOS synthesis induction. The increase in density of NOSN in HIV-1 infected drug abusers may be among the important sources of NO mediating cerebrocortical dysfunction, and the degeneration of NOS-containing local circuit neurons in patients with HIV-1 infection or drug abuse may underlie in part their neuropsychiatric manifestations. PMID:16873197

  5. Multiple routes of drug administration and HIV risk among injecting drug users

    PubMed Central

    Vorobjov, Sigrid; Uusküla, Anneli; Des Jarlais, Don C.; Abel-Ollo, Katri; Talu, Ave; Rüütel, Kristi

    2011-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between drug administration routes and HIV serostatus, drug-use and sexual behaviors among current injecting drug users (IDUs) in Tallinn, Estonia. We recruited 350 IDUs for a cross-sectional risk behavior survey. Adjusted odds ratios (AORs) were calculated to explore injection risk behavior, sexual behavior and HIV serostatus associated with multiple route use. Focus groups explored reasons why injectors might use non-injecting routes of administration. Those reporting multiple drug administration routes were less likely to be HIV seropositive (AOR 0.49; 95%CI 0.25-0.97), had almost twice the odds of having more than one sexual partner (AOR 1.90; 95%CI 1.01-3.60) and of reporting having sexually transmitted diseases (AOR 2.38; 95%CI 1.02-5.59). IDUs who engage in non-injecting drug use may be reducing their risk of acquiring HIV though sharing injection equipment, but if infected may be a critical group for sexual transmission of HIV to people who do not inject drugs. PMID:22116012

  6. Drug-induced mild therapeutic hypothermia obtained by administration of a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 agonist

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The use of mechanical/physical devices for applying mild therapeutic hypothermia is the only proven neuroprotective treatment for survivors of out of hospital cardiac arrest. However, this type of therapy is cumbersome and associated with several side-effects. We investigated the feasibility of using a transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) agonist for obtaining drug-induced sustainable mild hypothermia. Methods First, we screened a heterogeneous group of TRPV1 agonists and secondly we tested the hypothermic properties of a selected candidate by dose-response studies. Finally we tested the hypothermic properties in a large animal. The screening was in conscious rats, the dose-response experiments in conscious rats and in cynomologus monkeys, and the finally we tested the hypothermic properties in conscious young cattle (calves with a body weight as an adult human). The investigated TRPV1 agonists were administered by continuous intravenous infusion. Results Screening: Dihydrocapsaicin (DHC), a component of chili pepper, displayed a desirable hypothermic profile with regards to the duration, depth and control in conscious rats. Dose-response experiments: In both rats and cynomologus monkeys DHC caused a dose-dependent and immediate decrease in body temperature. Thus in rats, infusion of DHC at doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75 mg/kg/h caused a maximal ΔT (°C) as compared to vehicle control of -0.9, -1.5, -2.0, and -4.2 within approximately 1 hour until the 6 hour infusion was stopped. Finally, in calves the intravenous infusion of DHC was able to maintain mild hypothermia with ΔT > -3°C for more than 12 hours. Conclusions Our data support the hypothesis that infusion of dihydrocapsaicin is a candidate for testing as a primary or adjunct method of inducing and maintaining therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:20932337

  7. HIV-associated risk behaviour among drug users at drug rehabilitation centres.

    PubMed

    Fauziah, M N; Anita, S; Sha'ari, B N; Rosli, B I

    2003-06-01

    A cross-sectional study to determine the prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and HIV-associated risk behavior was conducted in February 1998 among 6,324 drug users in 26 drug rehabilitation centres in Malaysia. The majority of respondents were males (97.3%) and Malays (77.8%), administered drugs intravenously (64.6%) and of these 65.4% shared needles. About 78.1% had sexual exposure, of which 55.1% had sex with girl friends, 31.3% with prostitutes and 4.6% with male partners. The HIV prevalence rate in the group was 12.1% and significantly high among injecting drug users (IDU); those sharing needles; those who started addiction at a young age (10-15 years); those who had sexual exposures and had sex with prostitutes. PMID:14569748

  8. Drug-Eluting Fibers for HIV-1 Inhibition and Contraception

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A.

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract. PMID:23209601

  9. Drug-eluting fibers for HIV-1 inhibition and contraception.

    PubMed

    Ball, Cameron; Krogstad, Emily; Chaowanachan, Thanyanan; Woodrow, Kim A

    2012-01-01

    Multipurpose prevention technologies (MPTs) that simultaneously prevent sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and unintended pregnancy are a global health priority. Combining chemical and physical barriers offers the greatest potential to design effective MPTs, but integrating both functional modalities into a single device has been challenging. Here we show that drug-eluting fiber meshes designed for topical drug delivery can function as a combination chemical and physical barrier MPT. Using FDA-approved polymers, we fabricated nanofiber meshes with tunable fiber size and controlled degradation kinetics that facilitate simultaneous release of multiple agents against HIV-1, HSV-2, and sperm. We observed that drug-loaded meshes inhibited HIV-1 infection in vitro and physically obstructed sperm penetration. Furthermore, we report on a previously unknown activity of glycerol monolaurate (GML) to potently inhibit sperm motility and viability. The application of drug-eluting nanofibers for HIV-1 prevention and sperm inhibition may serve as an innovative platform technology for drug delivery to the lower female reproductive tract. PMID:23209601

  10. Effectiveness of HIV prevention social marketing with injecting drug users.

    PubMed

    Gibson, David R; Zhang, Guili; Cassady, Diana; Pappas, Les; Mitchell, Joyce; Kegeles, Susan M

    2010-10-01

    Social marketing involves applying marketing principles to promote social goods. In the context of health behavior, it has been used successfully to reduce alcohol-related car crashes, smoking among youths, and malaria transmission, among other goals. Features of social marketing, such as audience segmentation and repeated exposure to prevention messages, distinguish it from traditional health promotion programs. A recent review found 8 of 10 rigorously evaluated social marketing interventions responsible for changes in HIV-related behavior or behavioral intentions. We studied 479 injection drug users to evaluate a community-based social marketing campaign to reduce injection risk behavior among drug users in Sacramento, California. Injecting drugs is associated with HIV infection in more than 130 countries worldwide. PMID:20724686

  11. HIV Drug-Resistant Patient Information Management, Analysis, and Interpretation

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Maurice

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The science of information systems, management, and interpretation plays an important part in the continuity of care of patients. This is becoming more evident in the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), the leading cause of death in sub-Saharan Africa. The high replication rates, selective pressure, and initial infection by resistant strains of HIV infer that drug resistance will inevitably become an important health care concern. This paper describes proposed research with the aim of developing a physician-administered, artificial intelligence-based decision support system tool to facilitate the management of patients on antiretroviral therapy. Methods This tool will consist of (1) an artificial intelligence computer program that will determine HIV drug resistance information from genomic analysis; (2) a machine-learning algorithm that can predict future CD4 count information given a genomic sequence; and (3) the integration of these tools into an electronic medical record for storage and management. Conclusion The aim of the project is to create an electronic tool that assists clinicians in managing and interpreting patient information in order to determine the optimal therapy for drug-resistant HIV patients. PMID:23611761

  12. Polypharmacy, Drug-Drug Interactions, and Potentially Inappropriate Medications in Older HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Meredith; Steinman, Michael A.; McNicholl, Ian R.; Valcour, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To describe the frequency of medication-related problems in older HIV-infected adults Design Retrospective chart review Setting And Participants Community dwelling HIV-infected adults age 60 and older and age and sex-matched HIV-uninfected adults Measurements Total number of medications, potentially inappropriate medications as defined by the modified Beers criteria, anticholinergic drug burden as defined by the Anticholinergic Risk Scale, and drug-drug interactions using Lexi-Interact online drug interactions database. Results Of 89 HIV-infected participants, most were Caucasian (91%) and male (94%) with a median age of 64 (range 60-82). Common comorbidities included hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and depression. Participants were taking a median of 13 medications (range 2-38), of which only a median of 4 were antiretrovirals. At least one potentially inappropriate medication was prescribed in 46 participants (52%). Sixty-two (70%) participants had at least one Category D (consider therapy modification) drug-drug interaction and 10 (11%) had a Category X (avoid combination) interaction. One-third of these interactions were between two non-antiretroviral medications. We identified 15 participants (17%) with an anticholinergic risk scale score ≥3. In contrast, HIV-uninfected participants were taking a median of 6 medications, 29% had at least one potentially inappropriate medication, and 4% had an anticholinergic risk scale score ≥ 3 (p-value <0.05 for each comparison except p=0.07 for anticholinergic burden). Conclusion HIV-infected older adults have a high frequency of medication-related problems, of which a large portion is due to medications used to treat comorbid diseases. These medication issues were substantially higher than HIV-uninfected participants. Attention to the principles of geriatric prescribing is needed as this population ages in order to minimize complications from multiple medication use. PMID:24576251

  13. Drug resistance pattern of mycobacterial isolates in HIV and non-HIV population in South India

    PubMed Central

    Shivaswamy, Umamaheshwari; Neelambike, Sumana M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emergence of drug resistance has complicated the treatment of tuberculosis (TB). WHO reports India to be one among 27 “high burden” multidrug-resistant (MDR) TB countries. Objective: To diagnose TB and detect drug resistance of mycobacterial isolates in acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear negative HIV reactive patients (Group A) and compare them with HIV seropositive AFB smear positive (Group B) and HIV-seronegative AFB positive cases (Group C). Materials and Methods: Clinical specimens collected in all groups were processed as per the standard protocol except blood, which was processed by lysis centrifugation technique. They were then inoculated with Lowenstein-Jensen media and the isolates obtained were subjected to drug susceptibility test (DST) by proportion method and genotype MTBDR plus assay. Results: In Group A, 162 patients were included. Of the 443 clinical samples collected, 76 mycobacterial strains were obtained from 67 (41%) patients. Of these, 50 (65.8%) were sensitive to all drugs and 26 (34.2%) resistant to one or more anti-tubercular drugs. Antibiogram of Group A when compared with Group B and C showed that the MDR rate 6.6%, 6.7% and 8% respectively) did not differ much; but resistance to at least single drug was (26 [34.2%], 3 [10%], and 8 [16%]), respectively. Conclusion: Our study suggests that HIV has no influence on the anti-tubercular resistance pattern, but increased MDR rate along with HIV in high TB burden setting stresses the need for early diagnosis and DST in providing proper regimens and improve prognosis. PMID:26933303

  14. Virtual-screening targeting Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 integrase-lens epithelium-derived growth factor/p75 interaction for drug development.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wan-Gang; Liu, Bai-Nan; Yuan, Jun-Fa

    2015-02-01

    Three integrase (IN) inhibitors have been approved by FDA for clinical treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. This stimulates more researchers to focus their studies on this target for anti-HIV drug development. Three steps regarding of IN activity have been validated for inhibitor discovery: strand transfer, 3'-terminal processing, and IN-lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF)/p75 interaction. Among them, IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction is a new target validated in recent years. Emergence of drug-resistant virus strains makes this target appealing to pharmacologists. Compared with the traditional screening methods such as AlphaScreen and cell-based screening developed for IN inhibitor discovery, virtual screening is a powerful technique in modern drug discovery. Here we summarized the recent advances of virtual-screening targeting IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction. The combined application of virtual screening and experiments in drug discovery against IN-LEDFG/p75 interaction sheds light on anti-HIV research and drug discovery. PMID:25230778

  15. Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 2a Strains Among HIV Type 1-Coinfected Patients from Brazil Have Originated Mostly from Brazilian Amerindians

    PubMed Central

    Magri, Mariana Cavalheiro; Brigido, Luis Fernando de Macedo; Morimoto, Helena Kaminami

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The human T cell lymphotropic virus type 2 (HTLV-2) is found mainly in Amerindians and in intravenous drug users (IDUs) from urban areas of the United States, Europe, and Latin America. Worldwide, HTLV-2a and HTLV-2b subtypes are the most prevalent. Phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-2 isolates from Brazil showed the HTLV-2a subtype, variant -2c, which spread from Indians to the general population and IDUs. The present study searched for the types of HTLV-2 that predominate among HIV-1-coinfected patients from southern and southeastern Brazil. Molecular characterization of the LTR, env, and tax regions of 38 isolates confirmed the HTLV-2c variant in 37 patients, and one HTLV-2b in a patient from Paraguay. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences showed different clades of HTLV-2 associated with risk factors and geographic region. These clades could represent different routes of virus transmission and/or little diverse evolutionary rates of virus. Taking into account the results obtained in the present study and the lack of the prototypic North American HTLV-2a strain and HTLV-2b subtypes commonly detected among HIV-coinfected individuals worldwide, we could speculate on the introduction of Brazilian HTLV-2 strains in such populations before the introduction of HIV. PMID:23484539

  16. Subtype B was the dominant strain among HIV type 1 infections except for the population of men who have sex with men in Harbin City, China.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bing; Li, Wen-Jing; Liu, Ting; Li, Qing-Hai; Li, Hang; Chang, Man-Li; Huang, Chao-Qun; Wang, Fu-Xiang; Wang, Bin-You

    2013-09-01

    We sought to identify the prevalent subtypes and study the genetic variation of HIV-1 circulating in HIV infections in Harbin City, China. Forty-seven samples from the env V3-V4 region were successfully sequenced and analyzed, which involved thirty-one men who have sex with men (MSM), eight heterosexuals, seven former plasma donors (FPD)/blood transfusion recipients (BT), and one injection drug user (IDU). In all, 46.8% of CRF01_AE, 40.4% of subtype B, and 12.8% of CRF07_BC were identified. CRF01_AE (64.5%) was the dominant strain in MSM, and subtype B (81.2%) was the chief strain in other infected subjects except for the MSM population. Among all the genotypes, the B subtype possesses greater diversity of the tetramer on the tip of V3 loop than CRF07_BC and CRF01_AE, in which the peculiar GWGR was commonly found. Because nationwide there is a trend toward the increasing presence of CRF01_AE, a consecutive surveillance campaign was necessary among all HIV vulnerable populations in this locality. PMID:23734595

  17. Comparison of HIV type 1 sequences from plasma, cell-free breast milk, and cell-associated breast milk viral populations in treated and untreated women in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Mauro; Galluzzo, Clementina M; Guidotti, Giovanni; Germano, Paola; Altan, Annamaria Doro; Pirillo, Maria Franca; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Vella, Stefano; Palombi, Leonardo; Giuliano, Marina

    2009-07-01

    We analyzed the sequences of the HIV viral populations obtained from plasma, cell-free breast milk, and breast milk cells of HAART-treated (23) and untreated (30) HIV-infected women to obtain information about the origin of the breast milk virus. Sequence analyses of viruses were performed using the TruGene HIV-1 assay. Direct sequences of the reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (PR) genes were analyzed using the Phylip 3.68 suite of sequence analysis program and pairwise evolutionary distances were calculated with the Kimura two parameter model for estimation of distances. We found that the genetic distances between the plasma and the cell-free breast milk viruses and between the cell-free and cell-associated breast milk viruses for RT were higher in HAART-receiving women than in untreated women, suggesting viral evolution under selective drug pressure in breast milk. Our data support the hypothesis of the presence of an actively replicating viral population in the breast milk compartment, distinct from that present in plasma. PMID:19552594

  18. HIV and drug users in Ukraine: building confidence to reduce HIV risk.

    PubMed

    Hyde, L

    1999-09-01

    This article discusses the programs of nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) towards the drug practices and sexual behaviors of HIV infected individuals and drug users in Mykolaiv, Ukraine. Blagodiynist (Charity Foundation), one of the NGOs operating in Ukraine, has been helping drug users and sex workers. This group has collaborated with other group projects to produce better and effective interventions. As such, the needle-exchange project was organized, where drug users could not only exchange needles for clean ones, but also obtain information, advice, and even condoms. Role model stories approach was also another effective method that Blagodiynist utilized to make drug users and sex workers aware not only of the risk and reality of HIV, but to encourage behavior change as well, and to generate the self-confidence needed to alter their erroneous practices. The fact that sex workers and drug users have begun to take the risks of HIV infection seriously and have taken measures to protect themselves, reflect the success of these programs. PMID:12322332

  19. Drug abuse and weight loss in HIV-infected Hispanic men

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Weight loss is an independent risk factor for mortality in HIV, but the role of drug use in HIV-related weight loss is not well described. We conducted this study to determine the role of drug abuse in HIV-related weight loss. Men (n=304), all of whom were Hispanic, were recruited into one of three ...

  20. Assessing dietary intake of drug abusing Hispanic adults with and without HIV infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Drug abuse is an important risk factor for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) among Hispanics in the Northeastern United States and both drug abuse and HIV are associated with nutritional deficiencies. The selection of a dietary assessment method most appropriate for Hispanic adults with/without HIV...

  1. In vitro antiviral activity of the novel, tyrosyl-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 protease inhibitor brecanavir (GW640385) in combination with other antiretrovirals and against a panel of protease inhibitor-resistant HIV.

    PubMed

    Hazen, Richard; Harvey, Robert; Ferris, Robert; Craig, Charles; Yates, Phillip; Griffin, Philip; Miller, John; Kaldor, Istvan; Ray, John; Samano, Vincente; Furfine, Eric; Spaltenstein, Andrew; Hale, Michael; Tung, Roger; St Clair, Marty; Hanlon, Mary; Boone, Lawrence

    2007-09-01

    Brecanavir, a novel tyrosyl-based arylsulfonamide, high-affinity, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (PI), has been evaluated for anti-HIV activity in several in vitro assays. Preclinical assessment of brecanavir indicated that this compound potently inhibited HIV-1 in cell culture assays with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) of 0.2 to 0.53 nM and was equally active against HIV strains utilizing either the CXCR4 or CCR5 coreceptor, as was found with other PIs. The presence of up to 40% human serum decreased the anti-HIV-1 activity of brecanavir by 5.2-fold, but under these conditions the compound retained single-digit nanomolar EC(50)s. When brecanavir was tested in combination with nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, the antiviral activity of brecanavir was synergistic with the effects of stavudine and additive to the effects of zidovudine, tenofovir, dideoxycytidine, didanosine, adefovir, abacavir, lamivudine, and emtricitabine. Brecanavir was synergistic with the nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor nevirapine or delavirdine and was additive to the effects of efavirenz. In combination with other PIs, brecanavir was additive to the activities of indinavir, lopinavir, nelfinavir, ritonavir, amprenavir, saquinavir, and atazanavir. Clinical HIV isolates from PI-experienced patients were evaluated for sensitivity to brecanavir and other PIs in a recombinant virus assay. Brecanavir had a <5-fold increase in EC(50)s against 80% of patient isolates tested and had a greater mean in vitro potency than amprenavir, indinavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, tipranavir, and darunavir. Brecanavir is by a substantial margin the most potent and broadly active antiviral agent among the PIs tested in vitro. PMID:17620375

  2. Management of HIV/AIDS in older patients–drug/drug interactions and adherence to antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Mary J; Zeuli, John D; Kasten, Mary J

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are living longer with their disease, as HIV has become a chronic illness managed with combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). This has led to an increasing number of patients greater than 50 years old living successfully with HIV. As the number of older adults with HIV has increased, there are special considerations for the management of HIV. Older adults with HIV must be monitored for drug side effects and toxicities. Their other non-HIV comorbidities should also be considered when choosing a cART regimen. Older adults with HIV have unique issues related to medication compliance. They are more likely than the younger HIV patients to have vision loss, cognitive impairment, and polypharmacy. They may have lower expectations of their overall health status. Depression and financial concerns, especially if they are on a fixed income, may also contribute to noncompliance in the aging HIV population. PMID:26604826

  3. Agents of change: peer mentorship as HIV prevention among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Sonja; Pearson, Charles; Frye, Victoria; Gómez, Cynthia A; Latka, Mary H; Purcell, David W; Knowlton, Amy R; Metsch, Lisa R; Tobin, Karin E; Valverde, Eduardo E; Knight, Kelly R

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a qualitative investigation of peer mentoring among HIV seropositive injection drug users in a randomized controlled trial, the INSPIRE study. Qualitative analyses of 68 in-depth open-ended interviews conducted in 2005 in Baltimore, New York, Miami, and San Francisco revealed that these individuals conceptualized themselves as change agents through the identity of peer mentor at the three related domains of individual, interpersonal, and community-level change. Implications for program development and future research of peer mentoring as a mechanism for HIV prevention are discussed. This study was funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). PMID:22428820

  4. Co-infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1): does immune activation lead to a faster progression to AIDS?

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that HTLV-1 is prevalent among HIV positive patients in Mozambique, although the impact of HTLV-1 infection on HIV disease progression remains controversial. Our aim was to determine the phenotypic profile of T lymphocytes subsets among Mozambican patients co-infected by HIV and HTLV-1. Methods We enrolled 29 patients co-infected by HTLV-1 and HIV (co-infected), 59 patients mono-infected by HIV (HIV) and 16 healthy controls (HC), respectively. For phenotypic analysis, cells were stained with the following fluorochrome-labeled anti-human monoclonal antibodies CD4-APC, CD8-PerCP, CD25-PE, CD62L-FITC, CD45RA-FITC. CD45RO-PE, CD38-PE; being analysed by four-colour flow cytometry. Results We initially found that CD4+ T cell counts were significantly higher in co-infected, as compared to HIV groups. Moreover, CD4+ T Lymphocytes from co-infected patients presented significantly higher levels of CD45RO and CD25, but lower levels of CD45RA and CD62L, strongly indicating that CD4+ T cells are more activated under HTLV-1 plus HIV co-infection. Conclusion Our data indicate that HTLV-1/HIV co-infected patients progress with higher CD4+ T cell counts and higher levels of activation markers. In this context, it is conceivable that in co-infected individuals, these higher levels of activation may account for a faster progression to AIDS. PMID:20028500

  5. MULTIPLE WAYS OF TARGETING APOBEC3/VIF INTERACTIONS FOR ANTI-HIV-1 DRUG DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Jessica L.; Bu, Wei; Burdick, Ryan C.; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections and the resulting acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) pandemic remain a global challenge in the absence of a protective vaccine and because of rapid selection of drug-resistant viral variants in response to all currently available antiviral therapies. Development of new and highly active antiviral agents would greatly facilitate effective clinical management of HIV-1 infections and delay the onset of AIDS. Recent advances in our understanding of intracellular immunity conferred by host cytidine deaminases APOBEC3G (A3G) and APOBEC3F (A3F), and the mechanism by which the virally encoded Virion Infectivity Factor (Vif) protein induces their proteasomal degradation, provide fresh opportunities for the development of novel antiviral treatments. Interestingly, the interactions between Vif-A3G and Vif-A3F that overcome this host defense mechanism are structurally distinct, and provide two potential targets for antiviral drug development. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge of APOBEC3/Vif interactions and recent efforts to target these interactions for antiviral drug development. PMID:19837465

  6. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064.

    PubMed

    Chen, Iris; Clarke, William; Ou, San-San; Marzinke, Mark A; Breaud, Autumn; Emel, Lynda M; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James P; Richardson, Paul; Haley, Danielle F; Lucas, Jonathan; Rompalo, Anne; Justman, Jessica E; Hodder, Sally L; Eshleman, Susan H

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009-2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2%) of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15%) in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7%) in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1-4 drugs/sample). These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals. PMID:26445283

  7. Antiretroviral Drug Use in a Cohort of HIV-Uninfected Women in the United States: HIV Prevention Trials Network 064

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Iris; Clarke, William; Ou, San-San; Marzinke, Mark A.; Breaud, Autumn; Emel, Lynda M.; Wang, Jing; Hughes, James P.; Richardson, Paul; Haley, Danielle F.; Lucas, Jonathan; Rompalo, Anne; Justman, Jessica E.; Hodder, Sally L.; Eshleman, Susan H.

    2015-01-01

    Antiretroviral (ARV) drug use was analyzed in HIV-uninfected women in an observational cohort study conducted in 10 urban and periurban communities in the United States with high rates of poverty and HIV infection. Plasma samples collected in 2009–2010 were tested for the presence of 16 ARV drugs. ARV drugs were detected in samples from 39 (2%) of 1,806 participants: 27/181 (15%) in Baltimore, MD and 12/179 (7%) in Bronx, NY. The ARV drugs detected included different combinations of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors (1–4 drugs/sample). These data were analyzed in the context of self-reported data on ARV drug use. None of the 39 women who had ARV drugs detected reported ARV drug use at any study visit. Further research is needed to evaluate ARV drug use by HIV-uninfected individuals. PMID:26445283

  8. Unprecedented Degree of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Group M Genetic Diversity in the Democratic Republic of Congo Suggests that the HIV-1 Pandemic Originated in Central Africa

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, Nicole; Peeters, Martine; Mulanga-Kabeya, Claire; Nzilambi, Nzila; Robertson, David; Ilunga, Wantabala; Sema, Hurogo; Tshimanga, Kazadi; Bongo, Beni; Delaporte, Eric

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to document the genetic diversity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC; formerly Zaire). A total of 247 HIV-1-positive samples, collected during an epidemiologic survey conducted in 1997 in three regions (Kinshasa [the capital], Bwamanda [in the north], and Mbuyi-Maya [in the south]), were genetically characterized in the env V3-V5 region. All known subtypes were found to cocirculate, and for 6% of the samples the subtype could not be identified. Subtype A is predominant, with prevalences decreasing from north to south (69% in the north, 53% in the capital city, and 46% in the south). Subtype C, D, G, and H prevalences range from 7 to 9%, whereas subtype F, J, K, and CRF01-AE strains represent 2 to 4% of the samples; only one subtype B strain was identified. The highest prevalence (25%) of subtype C was in the south, and CRF01-AE was seen mainly in the north. The high intersubtype variability among the V3-V5 sequences is the most probable reason for the low (45%) efficiency of subtype A-specific PCR and HMA (heteroduplex mobility assay). Eighteen (29%) of 62 samples had discordant subtype designations between env and gag. Sequence analysis of the entire envelope from 13 samples confirmed the high degree of diversity and complexity of HIV-1 strains in the DRC; 9 had a complex recombinant structure in gp160, involving fragments of known and unknown subtypes. Interestingly, the unknown fragments from the different strains did not cluster together. Overall, the high number of HIV-1 subtypes cocirculating, the high intrasubtype diversity, and the high numbers of possible recombinant viruses as well as different unclassified strains are all in agreement with an old and mature epidemic in the DRC, suggesting that this region is the epicenter of HIV-1 group M. PMID:11044094

  9. Generic antiretroviral drugs and HIV care: An economic review.

    PubMed

    Yazdanpanah, Y; Schwarzinger, M

    2016-03-01

    The cost of HIV care in European countries is high. Direct medical costs, in France, have been estimated at 500,000 Euros per patient's lifetime (20,000 Euros/year/patient). Overall, 73% of these costs are related to antiretroviral treatments. In the current financial crisis context, some European countries are beginning to make economic decisions on the drugs to be used. These approaches are likely to become more frequent. It is obviously essential to prescribe the most effective, appropriate, best tolerated, and easy-to-use antiretroviral treatments to patients. However, while taking the above into consideration, and if various treatment options or combinations are available, cost should also be considered in the treatment choice. One may thus reflect on the use of generic antiretroviral agents as they have just been launched in France. We aimed to review the cost and cost-effectiveness of generic antiretroviral drugs and to review treatment strategies other than generic drugs that could help reduce HIV-related costs. HIV clinicians should consider treatment costs to avoid any future coercive measures. PMID:26905394

  10. Anti-HIV drug development: structural features and limitations of present day drugs and future challenges in the successful HIV/AIDS treatment.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Garima; Singh, Ramendra K

    2013-01-01

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), an immuno-compromized condition, a sequel to untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, inviting several life-threatening diseases, has become one of the most fatal disorders in the recent past because of HIV strain variance due to mutations, passive latency and reservoirs helping in replenishing and reviving the HIV-1 proviral DNA. Scientific efforts have led to the discovery of several effective drugs against HIV and lowered the morbidity and mortality all over the world. However, despite availability of a good number of anti-HIV drugs, the problem, for the foreseeable reasons, stands out as the most chronic disease due to the less tolerability and low accessibility of drugs, life-long expensive treatment, and above all, the emergence of drug resistant viral strains. This review dwells upon HIV infection and its proliferation inside the host system, drug targets, different types of drugs, their structural features and mode of interaction with viral targets and drug regimens. It further focuses on topics of latest interest regarding drug development, fixed dose combinations (FDCs), the limitations of present day drugs with their structural features along with their pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenomics and the challenges in finding a permanent cure for HIV/AIDS. PMID:23092282

  11. [Structural changes in the brain in HIV infection complicated by drug addiction].

    PubMed

    Nasibullin, B A; Tkachev, O V; Voĭno-Iasenetskaia, O V; Pykhteev, D M

    2000-01-01

    Comparative analysis of brain alterations in drug addicts who were HIV-seropositive and died of sepsis and HIV-seronegative addicts showed similarity of these changes which manifested with ganglion cell rarefaction and losses, changed neuron content of main structural-functional types; massive satellitosis and neuronophagia, massive glycosis and leucodystrophy. These changes were diffuse in seropositive patients and rather focal in seronegative patients. The authors, on the basis of these findings, suggest a wider spread of HIV infection in drug addicts; they express doubts in the secondary nature of HIV-encephalopathy and believe that drug addiction should be considered as factor promoting HIV-infection development. PMID:11198117

  12. Differential Risk Factors for HIV Drug and Sex Risk-Taking Among Non-treatment-seeking Hospitalized Injection Drug Users

    PubMed Central

    Crooks, Denise; Tsui, Judith; Anderson, Bradley; Dossabhoy, Shernaz; Herman, Debra; Liebschutz, Jane M.; Stein, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Injection drug users (IDUs) are at increased risk of contracting HIV. From a clinical trial assessing an intervention to enhance the linkage of hospitalized patients to opioid treatment after discharge, we conducted multivariate analysis of baseline data from hospitalized IDUs with a history of opioid dependence (n = 104) to identify differences in factors predicting HIV drug and sex risk behaviors. Factors significantly associated with HIV drug risk were being non-Hispanic Caucasian and recent cocaine use. Being female, binge drinking, and poorer mental health were significantly associated with higher sex risk. Because factors predicting HIV sex risk behaviors differ from those predicting HIV drug risk, interventions aimed at specific HIV risks should have different behavioral and substance use targets. PMID:25063229

  13. Co-infections and transmission networks of HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV among people who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Tien Ng, Kim; Takebe, Yutaka; Bee Chook, Jack; Zhen Chow, Wei; Gan Chan, Kok; Abed Al-Darraji, Haider Abdulrazzaq; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Keng Tee, Kok

    2015-01-01

    Co-infections with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and human pegivirus (HPgV) are common in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected individuals. However, analysis on the evolutionary dynamics and transmission network profiles of these viruses among individuals with multiple infections remains limited. A total of 228 injecting drug users (IDUs), either HCV- and/or HIV-1-infected, were recruited in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genes were sequenced, with epidemic growth rates assessed by the Bayesian coalescent method. Based on the sequence data, mono-, dual- and triple-infection were detected in 38.8%, 40.6% and 20.6% of the subjects, respectively. Fifteen transmission networks involving HCV (subtype 1a, 1b, 3a and 3b), HIV-1 (CRF33_01B) and HPgV (genotype 2) were identified and characterized. Genealogical estimates indicated that the predominant HCV, HIV-1 and HPgV genotypes were introduced into the IDUs population through multiple sub-epidemics that emerged as early as 1950s (HCV), 1980s (HIV-1) and 1990s (HPgV). By determining the difference in divergence times between viral lineages (ΔtMRCA), we also showed that the frequency of viral co-transmission is low among these IDUs. Despite increased access to therapy and other harm reduction interventions, the continuous emergence and coexistence of new transmission networks suggest persistent multiple viral transmissions among IDUs. PMID:26459957

  14. Identification of a Subset of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1), HIV-2, and Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Strains Able To Exploit an Alternative Coreceptor on Untransformed Human Brain and Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willey, Samantha J.; Reeves, Jacqueline D.; Hudson, Richard; Miyake, Koichi; Dejucq, Nathalie; Schols, Dominique; Clercq, Erik De; Bell, Jeanne; McKnight, Áine; Clapham, Paul R.

    2003-01-01

    The chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 are the major coreceptors for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). At least 12 other chemokine receptors or close relatives support infection by particular HIV and SIV strains on CD4+ transformed indicator cell lines in vitro. However, the role of these alternative coreceptors in vivo is presently thought to be insignificant. Infection of cell lines expressing high levels of recombinant CD4 and coreceptors thus does not provide a true indication of coreceptor use in vivo. We therefore tested primary untransformed cell cultures that lack CCR5 and CXCR4, including astrocytes and brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVECs), for naturally expressed alternative coreceptors functional for HIV and SIV infection. An adenovirus vector (Ad-CD4) was used to express CD4 in CD4− astrocytes and thus confer efficient infection if a functional coreceptor is present. Using a large panel of viruses with well-defined coreceptor usage, we identified a subset of HIV and SIV strains able to infect two astrocyte cultures derived from adult brain tissue. Astrocyte infection was partially inhibited by several chemokines, indicating a role for the chemokine receptor family in the observed infection. BMVECs were weakly positive for CD4 but negative for CCR5 and CXCR4 and were susceptible to infection by the same subset of isolates that infected astrocytes. BMVEC infection was efficiently inhibited by the chemokine vMIP-I, implicating one of its receptors as an alternative coreceptor for HIV and SIV infection. Furthermore, we tested whether the HIV type 1 and type 2 strains identified were able to infect peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) via an alternative coreceptor. Several strains replicated in Δ32/Δ32 CCR5 PBMCs with CXCR4 blocked by AMD3100. This AMD3100-resistant replication was also sensitive to vMIP-I inhibition. The nature and potential role of this alternative coreceptor(s) in HIV infection

  15. Recreational Drug Use and T Lymphocyte Subpopulations in HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected Men

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun; Jacobson, Lisa P; Tashkin, Donald; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Roth, Michael D; Margolick, Joseph B; Chmiel, Joan S; Rinaldo, Charles; Zhang, Zuo-Feng; Detels, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The effects of recreational drugs on CD4 and CD8 T cells in humans are not well understood. We conducted a longitudinal analysis of men who have sex with men (MSM) enrolled in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study to define associations between self-reported use of marijuana, cocaine, poppers and amphetamines, and CD4 and CD8 T cell parameters in both HIV-uninfected and HIV-infected MSM. For the HIV-infected MSM, we used clinical and laboratory data collected semiannually before 1996 to avoid potential effects of antiretroviral treatment. A regression model that allowed random intercepts and slopes as well as autoregressive covariance structure for within subject errors was used. Potential confounders adjusted for included length of follow-up, demographics, tobacco smoking, alcohol use, risky sexual behaviors, history of sexually transmitted infections, and antiviral therapy. We found no clinically meaningful associations between use of marijuana, cocaine, poppers, or amphetamines and CD4 and CD8 T cell counts, percentages, or rates of change in either HIV-uninfected or -infected men. The regression coefficients were of minimum magnitude despite some reaching statistical significance. No threshold effect was detected for frequent (at least weekly) or continuous substance use in the previous year. These results indicate that use of these substances does not adversely affect the numbers and percentages of circulating CD4 or CD8 T cells in either HIV-uninfected or -infected MSM. PMID:18180115

  16. A monoclonal antibody to CD4 domain 2 blocks soluble CD4-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-1 infection of CD4+ cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, J P; Sattentau, Q J; Klasse, P J; Burkly, L C

    1992-01-01

    The murine monoclonal antibody (MAb) 5A8, which is reactive with domain 2 of CD4, blocks human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and syncytium formation of CD4+ cells (L. C. Burkly, D. Olson, R. Shapiro, G. Winkler, J. J. Rosa, D. W. Thomas, C. Williams, and P. Chisholm, J. Immunol., in press). Here we show that, in contrast to the CD4 domain 1 MAb 6H10, 5A8 and its Fab fragment do not block soluble CD4 (sCD4) binding to virions, whereas they do inhibit sCD4-induced exposure of cryptic epitopes on gp41 and dissociation of gp120 from virions. Two other MAbs, OKT4 and L120, which are reactive with domains 3 and 4 of CD4, have little or no effect on HIV-1 infection, syncytium formation, or sCD4-induced conformational changes in the envelope glycoproteins. The mechanisms of action of 5A8 and 6H10 can be further distinguished in syncytium inhibition assays: 6H10 blocks competitively, while 5A8 does not. We opine that 5A8 blocks HIV-1 infection and fusion by interfering with conformational changes in gp120/gp41 and/or CD4 that are necessary for virus-cell fusion. Images PMID:1378510

  17. HIV-1 Genetic Diversity and Drug Resistance among Senegalese Patients in the Public Health System

    PubMed Central

    Thiam, Moussa; Diop-Ndiaye, Halimatou; Diouf, Aminata Diaw; Vidal, Nicole; Ndiaye, Ousseynou; Ndiaye, Ibrahima; Ngom-Gueye, Ndeye Fatou; Diallo, Sada; Diongue, Oumy Diop; Camara, Makhtar; Seck, Abdoulaye; Mboup, Souleymane

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) drug resistance mutations and genetic variability among Senegalese patients undergoing highly active antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the public health system. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 72 patients with suspected therapeutic failure. HIV-1 genotyping was performed with Viroseq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 or the procedure developed by the ANRS AC11 resistance study group, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. The median follow-up visit was at 40 (range, 12 to 123) months, and the median viral load was 4.67 (range, 3.13 to 6.94) log10 copies/ml. The first-line therapeutic regimen was nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus efavirenz (EFV) or NRTIs plus nevirapine (NVP) (54/72 patients; 75%), and the second-line therapy was NRTIs plus a protease inhibitor (PI/r) (18/72; 25%). Fifty-five patients (55/72; 76.39%) had at least one drug resistance mutation. The drug resistance rates were 72.22 and 88.89% for the first-line and second-line ARTs, respectively. In NRTI mutations, thymidine analog mutations (TAMs) were found in 50.79% and the M184V mutation was found in 34.92% of the samples. For non-NRTI resistance, we noted a predominance of the K103N mutation (46.27%). For PI/r, several cases of mutations were found with a predominance of M46I and L76V/F at 24% each. The phylogenetic analysis revealed CRF02_AG as the predominant circulating recombinant form (43/72; 59.72%). We found a high prevalence of resistance mutations and a high rate of TAMs among Senegalese patients in the public health system. These findings emphasize the need to improve virological monitoring in resource-limited settings. PMID:23241378

  18. Knowledge of AIDS and HIV transmission among drug users in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Proper knowledge of HIV transmission is not enough for people to adopt protective behaviors, but deficits in this information may increase HIV/AIDS vulnerability. Objective To assess drug users' knowledge of HIV/AIDS and the possible association between knowledge and HIV testing. Methods A Cross-sectional study conducted in 2006/7 with a convenience sample of 295 illicit drug users in Rio de Janeiro, assessing knowledge on AIDS/HIV transmission and its relationship with HIV testing. Information from 108 randomly selected drug users who received an educational intervention using cards illustrating situations potentially associated with HIV transmission were assessed using Multidimensional Scaling (MDS). Results Almost 40% of drug users reported having never used condoms and more than 60% reported not using condoms under the influence of substances. Most drug users (80.6%) correctly answered that condoms make sex safer, but incorrect beliefs are still common (e.g. nearly 44% believed HIV can be transmitted through saliva and 55% reported that HIV infection can be transmitted by sharing toothbrushes), with significant differences between drug users who had and who had not been tested for HIV. MDS showed queries on vaginal/anal sex and sharing syringes/needles were classified in the same set as effective modes of HIV transmission. The event that was further away from this core of properly perceived risks referred to blood donation, perceived as risky. Other items were found to be dispersed, suggesting inchoate beliefs on transmission modes. Conclusions Drug users have an increased HIV infection vulnerability compared to the general population, this specific population expressed relevant doubts about HIV transmission, as well as high levels of risky behavior. Moreover, the findings suggest that possessing inaccurate HIV/AIDS knowledge may be a barrier to timely HIV testing. Interventions should be tailored to such specific characteristics. PMID:21324119

  19. Induction of a major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to a highly conserved region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp120 in seronegative humans immunized with a candidate HIV-1 vaccine.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R P; Hammond, S A; Trocha, A; Siliciano, R F; Walker, B D

    1994-01-01

    Efforts to induce broadly reactive immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) have been impaired by the extent of sequence variation exhibited by this lentivirus. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) specific for other viruses such as influenza virus have been shown to mediate immunity against divergent viral strains, a property that is related to the ability of CTL to recognize processed antigen derived from conserved viral proteins. A recent candidate HIV-1 vaccine regimen has been described in which subjects receive a primary immunization with a recombinant vaccinia virus expressing gp160 and then a booster immunization with recombinant gp160. Volunteers immunized with this regimen have exhibited augmented humoral responses and have also developed CD4+ and CD8+ CTL specific for gp160. In this report, we have identified the epitopes recognized by CD4+ and CD8+ CTL obtained from two vaccines. An immunodominant CD8+ CTL response was HLA-A3.1 restricted and recognized a 10-amino-acid epitope (gp120/38-47) in a highly conserved region of gp120. CTL specific for the epitope gp120/38-47 were able to lyse targets sensitized with peptides corresponding to all known natural sequence variants in this region. In addition, other HLA class I-restricted CTL epitopes were identified in relatively conserved regions of gp120 and gp41, and CD4+ CTL were shown to recognize two different regions of gp120. Thus, in these two volunteers, immunization with a single strain of HIV-1 induced CD4+ and CD8+ CTL that are specific for multiple conserved regions of HIV-1 and would be expected to recognize a broad range of viral isolates. PMID:7908700

  20. Assessing transmissibility of HIV-1 drug resistance mutations from treated and from drug-naive individuals

    PubMed Central

    Winand, Raf; Theys, Kristof; Eusébio, Mónica; Aerts, Jan; Camacho, Ricardo J.; Gomes, Perpetua; Suchard, Marc A.; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Abecasis, Ana B.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Surveillance drug resistance mutations (SDRMs) in drug-naive patients are typically used to survey HIV-1-transmitted drug resistance (TDR). We test here how SDRMs in patients failing treatment, the original source of TDR, contribute to assessing TDR, transmissibility and transmission source of SDRMs. Design: This is a retrospective observational study analyzing a Portuguese cohort of HIV-1-infected patients. Methods: The prevalence of SDRMs to protease inhibitors, nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients was measured for 3554 HIV-1 subtype B patients. Transmission ratio (prevalence in drug-naive/prevalence in treatment-failing patients), average viral load and robust linear regression with outlier detection (prevalence in drug-naive versus in treatment-failing patients) were analyzed and used to interpret transmissibility. Results: Prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and treatment-failing patients were linearly correlated, but some SDRMs were classified as outliers – above (PRO: D30N, N88D/S, L90 M, RT: G190A/S/E) or below (RT: M184I/V) expectations. The normalized regression slope was 0.073 for protease inhibitors, 0.084 for NRTIs and 0.116 for NNRTIs. Differences between SDRMs transmission ratios were not associated with differences in viral loads. Conclusion: The significant linear correlation between prevalence of SDRMs in drug-naive and in treatment-failing patients indicates that the prevalence in treatment-failing patients can be useful to predict levels of TDR. The slope is a cohort-dependent estimate of rate of TDR per drug class and outlier detection reveals comparative persistence of SDRMs. Outlier SDRMs with higher transmissibility are more persistent and more likely to have been acquired from drug-naive patients. Those with lower transmissibility have faster reversion dynamics after transmission and are associated with

  1. Effects of the tat and nef gene products of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) on transcription controlled by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat and on cell growth in macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, K M; Sweet, M J; Ross, I L; Hume, D A

    1993-01-01

    The RAW264 murine macrophage cell line was used as a model to examine the role of the tat and nef gene products in the transcription regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) in macrophages. Contrary to claims that the activity of the HIV-1 LTR responds poorly in rodent cells to trans activation by the viral tat gene product, cotransfection of RAW264 cells with a tat expression plasmid in transient transfection assays caused a > 20-fold increase in reporter gene expression that was inhibited by mutations in the TAR region. RAW264 cells stably transfected with the tat plasmid displayed similarly elevated HIV-1 LTR-driven reporter gene activity. By contrast to previous reports indicating a negative role for nef in HIV transcription, cotransfection of RAW264 cells with a nef expression plasmid trans activated the HIV-1 LTR driving either a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase or a luciferase reporter gene. The action of nef was specific to the LTR, as expression of nef had no effect on the activity of the simian virus 40, c-fms, urokinase plasminogen activator, or type 5 acid phosphatase promoter. trans-activating activity was also manifested by a frameshift mutant expressing only the first 35 amino acids of the protein. The effects of nef were multiplicative with those of tat gene product and occurred even in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide, which itself activated LTR-directed transcription. Examination of the effects of selected mutations in the LTR revealed that neither the kappa B sites in the direct repeat enhancer nor the TAR region was required as a cis-acting element in nef action. The action of nef was not species restricted; it was able to trans activate in the human monocyte-like cell line Mono Mac 6. The presence of a nef expression cassette in a neomycin phosphotransferase gene expression plasmid greatly reduced the number of G418-resistant colonies generated in stable transfection of RAW264 cells

  2. Alcohol and HIV sexual risk behaviors among injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Arasteh, Kamyar; Des Jarlais, Don C; Perlis, Theresa E

    2008-05-01

    We analyzed data from 6341 injection drug users (IDUs) entering detoxification or methadone maintenance treatment in New York City between 1990 and 2004 to test the hypothesis that alcohol use and intoxication is associated with increased HIV sexual risk behaviors. Two types of associations were assessed: (1) a global association (i.e., the relationship between HIV sexual risk behaviors during the 6 months prior to the interview and at-risk drinking in that period, defined as more than 14 drinks per week for males or 7 drinks per week for females), and (2) an event-specific association (i.e., the relationship between HIV sexual risk behaviors during the most recent sex episode and alcohol intoxication during that episode). Sexual risk behaviors included multiple sex partners and engaging in unprotected sex. After adjusting for the effects of other variables, at-risk-drinkers were more likely to report multiple sex partners and engaging in unprotected sex with casual sex partners (both global associations). IDUs who reported both they and their casual partners were intoxicated during the most recent sex episode were more likely to engage in unprotected sex (an event-specific association). We also observed two significant interactions. Among IDUs who did not inject cocaine, moderate-drinkers were more likely to report multiple partners. Among self-reported HIV seropositive IDUs, when both primary partners were intoxicated during the most recent sex episode they were more likely to engage in unprotected sex. These observations indicate both global and event-specific associations of alcohol and HIV sexual-risk behaviors. PMID:18242009

  3. Differences between the course of the drug addict's HIV infection and that of other HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Gölz, J

    1993-11-01

    Drug addicts have, in general, a less complicated course of HIV infection than homosexual HIV patients. They show fewer opportunistic infections and tumors. But this advantage is lost by unnecessary complications due to their psychic disorders. Their non-compliance and concealment of signs of disease lead to worse outcomes of infections, which could be well-treated or prevented. PMID:8300042

  4. Why Do We Need New Drug Classes for HIV Treatment and Prevention?

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul A; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    The biomedical intervention that has had a major impact on the natural history of HIV and on the global HIV epidemic is antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, the emergence of drug-resistant HIV, an inevitable consequence of increasing use of antiretroviral drugs, poses a major threat to ART success. At the turn of this century, access to life-saving ART was accelerated in low and middle-income countries with the Millennium Development Goal of 15 million individuals receiving ART by 2015 expected to be achieved. However, ART access needs to continue to expand to help bring HIV under control by 2030. The standard of care for people living with HIV in resource- limited settings differs dramatically compared to high-income countries, and not unexpectedly, ART rollout in these settings has resulted in an increase in acquired and transmitted drug resistance. Also of concern, the same drug classes used for ART have been approved or are being progressed for HIV prevention and drug resistance could mitigate their effectiveness for treatment and prevention. In the absence of an effective HIV vaccine and cure, it is imperative that the antiretroviral drug pipeline contains new classes of HIV inhibitors that are active against circulating drug-resistant strains. Studies to advance our fundamental understanding of HIV replication needs to continue, including the interplay between virus and host cell factors, to identify and characterize new drug targets for chemotherapeutic intervention. PMID:26459806

  5. Profile of the HIV epidemic in Cape Verde: molecular epidemiology and drug resistance mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 infected patients from distinct islands of the archipelago.

    PubMed

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M; Guimarães, Monick L; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P; Morgado, Mariza G

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010-2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1-75) and 47 (IQR = 12-84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be implemented

  6. Profile of the HIV Epidemic in Cape Verde: Molecular Epidemiology and Drug Resistance Mutations among HIV-1 and HIV-2 Infected Patients from Distinct Islands of the Archipelago

    PubMed Central

    de Pina-Araujo, Isabel Inês M.; Guimarães, Monick L.; Bello, Gonzalo; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Morgado, Mariza G.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 and HIV-2 have been detected in Cape Verde since 1987, but little is known regarding the genetic diversity of these viruses in this archipelago, located near the West African coast. In this study, we characterized the molecular epidemiology of HIV-1 and HIV-2 and described the occurrence of drug resistance mutations (DRM) among antiretroviral therapy naïve (ARTn) patients and patients under treatment (ARTexp) from different Cape Verde islands. Blood samples, socio-demographic and clinical-laboratory data were obtained from 221 HIV-positive individuals during 2010–2011. Phylogenetic and bootscan analyses of the pol region (1300 bp) were performed for viral subtyping. HIV-1 and HIV-2 DRM were evaluated for ARTn and ARTexp patients using the Stanford HIV Database and HIV-GRADE e.V. Algorithm Homepage, respectively. Among the 221 patients (169 [76.5%] HIV-1, 43 [19.5%] HIV-2 and 9 [4.1%] HIV-1/HIV-2 co-infections), 67% were female. The median ages were 34 (IQR = 1–75) and 47 (IQR = 12–84) for HIV-1 and HIV-2, respectively. HIV-1 infections were due to subtypes G (36.6%), CRF02_AG (30.6%), F1 (9.7%), URFs (10.4%), B (5.2%), CRF05_DF (3.0%), C (2.2%), CRF06_cpx (0.7%), CRF25_cpx (0.7%) and CRF49_cpx (0.7%), whereas all HIV-2 infections belonged to group A. Transmitted DRM (TDRM) was observed in 3.4% (2/58) of ARTn HIV-1-infected patients (1.7% NRTI, 1.7% NNRTI), but not among those with HIV-2. Among ARTexp patients, DRM was observed in 47.8% (33/69) of HIV-1 (37.7% NRTI, 37.7% NNRTI, 7.4% PI, 33.3% for two classes) and 17.6% (3/17) of HIV-2-infections (17.6% NRTI, 11.8% PI, 11.8% both). This study indicates that Cape Verde has a complex and unique HIV-1 molecular epidemiological scenario dominated by HIV-1 subtypes G, CRF02_AG and F1 and HIV-2 subtype A. The occurrence of TDRM and the relatively high level of DRM among treated patients are of concern. Continuous monitoring of patients on ART, including genotyping, are public policies to be

  7. The ethics of HIV research with people who inject drugs in Africa: a desk review.

    PubMed

    Mamotte, Nicole

    2012-03-01

    Injecting drug use is a growing problem in Africa and a growing risk factor for contracting HIV in the region. It is imperative that HIV research includes injecting drug users so that they too are able to benefit from safe and effective behavioural interventions and biomedical HIV prevention and treatment products. This article relates a critical review of the findings of a desk review of previously published literature. The article examines injecting drug use in relation to HIV-related risk and research in Kenya, Mauritius, Nigeria, South Africa and Tanzania. The ethical challenges of including people who inject drugs in HIV research in Africa are also presented. The review found injecting drug use to be on the increase in all the countries reviewed. HIV-risk behaviour among people who inject drugs, such as needle-sharing and higher-risk sexual behaviour, was also found to be widespread. Furthermore, criminalisation of drug use and strict anti-drug laws are common in the countries reviewed, while harm-reduction programmes for people who inject drugs were found to be limited. The review identified a number of ethical challenges to the involvement of people who inject drugs in HIV research in Africa. This includes the illegal status and stigma surrounding injecting drug use, which may complicate participant recruitment, enrolment and retention. In addition, a lack of funding for supportive programmes to help injecting drug users may hinder the provision of appropriate standards of prevention and care and treatment for those who seroconvert. PMID:25870892

  8. HIV drug resistance interpreted by cumulative versus last genotypes in HIV-infected patients with multiple treatment failures.

    PubMed

    Punyacam, Punthiya; Iemwimangsa, Nareenart; Chantratita, Wasun; Sukasem, Chonlaphat; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2012-04-01

    Genotypic resistance test has been recommended to evaluate HIV drug resistance and guide the effective regimens of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-infected patients with treatment failure. In patients with multiple treatment failures, drug resistance-associated mutations may disappear due to the loss of selective drug pressure after switching regimens. A cohort study was conducted among HIV-infected patients who had ≥2 genotypic resistance tests during 2003-2011. HIV-1 pol nucleotide sequencing of reverse transcriptase and protease region was carried out using TRUGENE HIV-1 Genotypic Assay. Sequencing data was analyzed using Stanford rule-based interpretation algorithms. Of 54 patients with mean age of 30.1 years, 46.3% were males. HIV-1 subtype A/E was observed in 88.9% of patients. At the latest failure, 55.3% were receiving protease inhibitor-based regimens. Median CD4 and HIV RNA were 167 cells/mm(3) and 22,359 copies/mL. During a median duration of ART of 38.6 months, 72.2%, 22.2%, and 5.6% had 5, 3, and 2 genotype tests, respectively. When compared between using cumulative (CG) and last genotypes (LG), CG interpreted resistance to any drug 59.3% higher than LG did. For NRTI, NNRTI, and PI drug classes, CG interpreted as resistance 42.6%, 27.8%, and 7.4% higher than LG, respectively. The most common drugs that CG interpreted resistance with the higher rate than LG were lamivudine/emtricitabine, nevirapine, efavirenz, etravirine and abacavir. In conclusion, CG interprets HIV drug resistance at a higher rate than LG and may be more accurate to use for selecting the next effective regimen of ART among HIV-infected patients with multiple treatment failures. PMID:22497699

  9. [Companion Diagnostics for Selecting Antiretroviral Drugs against HIV-1].

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Katsuyuki

    2015-11-01

    Currently, the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus involves combination therapy, as antiretroviral therapy(ART). The treatment has improved steadily since the advent of potent combination therapy in 1996. New drugs that offer new mechanisms of action, improvements in potency and activity even against multidrug-resistant viruses, dosing convenience, and tolerability have been approved. Among ART with useful drugs, there are two important examinations before starting the treatment using the two kinds of drug. CCR5 co-receptor antagonists, maraviroc, prevent HIV entry into target cells by binding to CCR5 receptors. Genotypic assays have been developed that can determine or predict the co-receptor tropism(i.e., CCR5, CXCR4, or both) of the patient's dominant virus population. The assay for HIV-1 co-receptor usage should be performed whenever the use of a CCR5 antagonist is being considered. One of the nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), abacavir, is an important agent to develop recommended regimens for antiretroviral therapy. Serious and sometimes fatal hypersensitivity reactions have been associated with abacavir-containing products, ZIAGEN, Epzicom, and Triumeq. Patients who carry the HLA-B*5701 allele are at high-risk of a hypersensitivity reaction to abacavir. Prior to initiating therapy with abacavir, performing a screening test for the HLA-B*5701 allele is recommended. [Review]. PMID:26995879

  10. Identification of novel thiocarboxanilide derivatives that suppress a variety of drug-resistant mutant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strains at a potency similar to that for wild-type virus.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Brouwer, W G; Dao, D C; Osika, E M; De Clercq, E

    1996-01-01

    A large variety of carboxanilide and thiocarboxanilide derivatives in which the original oxathiin or aliphatic moieties present in the prototype compounds UC84 and UC38 were replaced by an (un) substituted furanyl, thienyl, phenyl, or pyrrole entity have been evaluated for activity against wild-type human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain IIIB [HIV-1 (IIIB)] and a series of mutant virus strains derived thereof. The mutant viruses contained either the Leu-100-->Ile, Lys-103-->Asn, Val-106-->Ala, Glu-138-->Lys, Tyr-181-->Cys, or Tyr-188-->Leu mutation in their reverse transcriptase. Several 3-(2-methylfuranyl)- and 3-(2-methylthienyl)-thiocarboxanilide ester, (thio)ether, and oxime ether derivatives showed exquisitely potent antiviral activity against wild-type HIV-1 (50% effective concentration, 0.009 to 0.021 microM). The pentenylethers of the 2-methylfuranyl and 2-methylthienyl derivatives (i.e., 313, N-[4-chloro-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)phenyl]- 2-methyl-3-furancarbothioamide or UC-781, and 314, N-[4-chloro-3-(3-methyl-2-butenyloxy)phenyl] -2-methyl-3-thiophenecarbothioamide or UC-82) proved virtually equally inhibitory for wild-type and the Ile-100, Ala-106, and Lys-138 mutant virus strains (50% effective concentration, 0.015 to 0.021 microM). Their inhibitory effect against the Asn-103 and Cys-181 reverse transcriptase mutant virus strains was decreased only four- to sevenfold compared with wildtype virus. UC-781 and UC-82 should be considered potential candidate drugs for the treatment of HIV-1-infected individuals. PMID:8726019

  11. HIV infection among persons who inject drugs: ending old epidemics and addressing new outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Des Jarlais, Don C; Kerr, Thomas; Carrieri, Patrizia; Feelemyer, Jonathan; Arasteh, Kamyar

    2016-03-27

    AIDS among persons who inject drugs, first identified in December 1981, has become a global epidemic. Injecting drug use has been reported in 148 countries and HIV infection has been seen among persons who inject drugs in 61 countries. Many locations have experienced outbreaks of HIV infection among persons who inject drugs, under specific conditions that promote very rapid spread of the virus. In response to these HIV outbreaks, specific interventions for persons who inject drugs include needle/syringe exchange programs, medicated-assisted treatment (with methadone or buprenorphine) and antiretroviral therapy. Through a 'combined prevention' approach, these interventions significantly reduced new HIV infections among persons who inject drugs in several locations including New York City, Vancouver and France. The efforts effectively ended the HIV epidemic among persons who inject drugs in those locations. This review examines possible processes through which combined prevention programs may lead to ending HIV epidemics. However, notable outbreaks of HIV among persons who inject drugs have recently occurred in several countries, including in Athens, Greece; Tel-Aviv, Israel; Dublin, Ireland; as well as in Scott County, Indiana, USA. This review also considers different factors that may have led to these outbreaks. We conclude with addressing the remaining challenges for reducing HIV infection among persons who inject drugs. PMID:26836787

  12. Mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, a nonimmunosuppressive cyclosporin A analog with activity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1): interference with early and late events in HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Steinkasserer, A; Harrison, R; Billich, A; Hammerschmid, F; Werner, G; Wolff, B; Peichl, P; Palfi, G; Schnitzel, W; Mlynar, E

    1995-02-01

    SDZ NIM 811 is a cyclosporin A analog that is completely devoid of immunosuppressive capacity but exhibits potent and selective anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity. The mechanism of action of SDZ NIM 811 is clearly different from those of all other anti-HIV agents described so far. In cell-free assays, it is not an inhibitor of reverse transcriptase, protease, integrase, and it does not interfere with Rev or Tat function. SDZ NIM 811 does not down-regulate CD4 or inhibit fusion between infected and uninfected, CD4-expressing cells. p24 production from chronically HIV-infected cells is not impaired either. To elucidate the mode of action of SDZ NIM 811, we performed DNA PCR analysis in HIV-1 IIIB-infected MT4 cells in one cycle of virus replication. The effects of SDZ NIM 811 on the kinetics of viral DNA synthesis, appearance of two-long terminal repeat circles (2-LTR circles), and integration of DNA were studied. SDZ NIM 811 inhibited 2-LTR circle formation in a concentration-dependent manner, which is indicative of nuclear localization of preintegration complexes. Half-maximal inhibition was achieved at 0.17 microgram/ml; this concentration is close to the 50% inhibitory concentrations (0.01 to 0.2 microgram/ml) for viral growth inhibition. As expected, integration of proviral DNA into cellular DNA was also inhibited by SDZ NIM 811. Analysis of the viral particles produced by SDZ NIM 811-treated, chronically infected cells revealed amounts of capsid proteins, reverse transcriptase activity, and viral RNA comparable to those of the untreated control. However, these particles showed a dose-dependent reduction in infectivity (50% inhibitory concentration of 0.028 microgram/ml) which indicates that the assembly process is also impaired by SDZ NIM 811. Gag proteins are postulated to play a role not only in assembly but also in early steps of viral replication, e.g., nuclear localization of the preintegration complex. Recently, it was reported that

  13. Prevention of HIV Infection among Injection Drug Users in Resource-Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, David; Robertson, Angela M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.

    2011-01-01

    Injection drug use contributes to considerable global morbidity and mortality associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and AIDS and other infections due to blood-borne pathogens through the direct sharing of needles, syringes, and other injection equipment. Of ~16 million injection drug users (IDUs) worldwide, an estimated 3 million are HIV infected. The prevalence of HIV infection among IDUs is high in many countries in Asia and eastern Europe and could exacerbate the HIV epidemic in sub- Saharan Africa. This review summarizes important components of a comprehensive program for prevention of HIV infection in IDUs, including unrestricted legal access to sterile syringes through needle exchange programs and enhanced pharmacy services, treatment for opioid dependence (i.e., methadone and buprenorphine treatment), behavioral interventions, and identification and treatment of noninjection drug and alcohol use, which accounts for increased sexual transmission of HIV. Evidence supports the effectiveness of harm-reduction programs over punitive drug-control policies. PMID:20397939

  14. Anti-HIV drugs: 25 compounds approved within 25 years after the discovery of HIV.

    PubMed

    De Clercq, Erik

    2009-04-01

    In 2008, 25 years after the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was discovered as the then tentative aetiological agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), exactly 25 anti-HIV compounds have been formally approved for clinical use in the treatment of AIDS. These compounds fall into six categories: nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs: zidovudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, stavudine, lamivudine, abacavir and emtricitabine); nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NtRTIs: tenofovir); non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs: nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz and etravirine); protease inhibitors (PIs: saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, lopinavir, atazanavir, fosamprenavir, tipranavir and darunavir); cell entry inhibitors [fusion inhibitors (FIs: enfuvirtide) and co-receptor inhibitors (CRIs: maraviroc)]; and integrase inhibitors (INIs: raltegravir). These compounds should be used in drug combination regimens to achieve the highest possible benefit, tolerability and compliance and to diminish the risk of resistance development. PMID:19108994

  15. Syndemic vulnerability, sexual and injection risk behaviors, and HIV continuum of care outcomes in HIV-positive injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Purcell, David W.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Wilkinson, James D.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Knight, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Limited investigations have been conducted on syndemics and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Using baseline data from a multi-site, randomized controlled study of HIV-positive injection drug users (n=1052), we examined whether psychosocial factors co-occurred, and whether these factors were additively associated with behavioral and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Experiencing one type of psychosocial problem was significantly (p<0.05) associated with an increased odds of experiencing another type of problem. Persons with 3 or more psychosocial problems were significantly more likely to report sexual and injection risk behaviors and were less likely to be adherent to HIV medications. Persons with 4 or more problems were less likely to be virally suppressed. Reporting any problems was associated with not currently taking HIV medications. Our findings highlight the association of syndemics not only with risk behaviors, but also with outcomes related to the continuum of care for HIV-positive persons. PMID:25249392

  16. Helping the urban poor stay with antiretroviral HIV drug therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, J D; Unick, J; Klein, P; Fraser, M; Chesney, M; Katz, M H

    2000-01-01

    Recent studies have documented dramatic decreases in opportunistic infections, hospitalizations, and mortality among HIV-infected persons, owing primarily to the advent of highly active antiretroviral medications. Unfortunately, not all segments of the population living with HIV benefit equally from treatment. In San Francisco, only about 30% of the HIV-infected urban poor take combination highly active antiretroviral medications, as compared with 88% of HIV-infected gay men. Practitioners who care for the urban poor are reluctant to prescribe these medications, fearing inadequate or inconsistent adherence to the complicated medical regimen. Persons typically must take 2 to 15 pills at a time, 2 to 3 times a day. Some of the medications require refrigeration, which may not be available to the homeless poor. Most homeless persons do not have food available to them on a consistent schedule. Therefore, they may have difficulty adhering to instructions to take medications only on an empty stomach or with food. Lack of a safe place to store medications may be an issue for some. In addition, many urban poor live with drug, alcohol, or mental health problems, which can interfere with taking medications as prescribed. Inconsistent adherence to medication regimens has serious consequences. Patients do not benefit fully from treatments, and they will become resistant to the medications in their regimen as well as to other medications in the same classes as those in their regimen. Development of resistance has implications for the broader public health, because inadvertent transmission of multidrug-resistant strains of HIV has been demonstrated. Concern that the urban poor will not adhere to highly active antiretroviral medication regimens has led to debate on the role of clinicians and public health officials in determining who can comply with these regimens. Rather than define the characteristics that would predict adherence to these regimens, the San Francisco Department

  17. Simian-tropic HIV as a model to study drug resistance against integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wares, Melissa; Hassounah, Said; Mesplède, Thibault; Sandstrom, Paul A; Wainberg, Mark A

    2015-04-01

    Drug resistance represents a key aspect of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) treatment failure. It is important to develop nonhuman primate models for studying issues of drug resistance and the persistence and transmission of drug-resistant viruses. However, relatively little work has been conducted using either simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) or SIV/HIV recombinant viruses for studying resistance against integrase strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs). Here, we used a T-cell-tropic SIV/HIV recombinant virus in which the capsid and vif regions of HIV-1 were replaced with their SIV counterparts (simian-tropic HIV-1 [stHIV-1](SCA,SVIF)) to study the impact of a number of drug resistance substitutions in the integrase coding region at positions E92Q, G118R, E138K, Y143R, S153Y, N155H, and R263K on drug resistance, viral infectivity, and viral replication capacity. Our results show that each of these substitutions exerted effects that were similar to their effects in HIV-1. Substitutions associated with primary resistance against dolutegravir were more detrimental to stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) infectiousness than were resistance substitutions associated with raltegravir and elvitegravir, consistent with data that have been reported for HIV-1. These findings support the role of stHIV-1(SCA,SVIF) as a useful model with which to evaluate the role of INSTI resistance substitutions on viral persistence, transmissibility, and pathogenesis in a nonhuman primate model. PMID:25583721

  18. HIV/AIDS, Drug Abuse Treatment, and the Correctional System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipton, Douglas S.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses in-prison prevalence and transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Focuses on epidemiology in prison settings, the role of ethnicity and gender in transmission, screening for HIV, segregating the HIV-positive inmate, condom distribution, medical treatment for HIV-positive inmates, HIV education and prevention, and tuberculosis…

  19. Sexual Risk Taking among HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users: Contexts, Characteristics, and Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kelly R.; Purcell, David; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Halkitis, Perry N.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 161) were recruited to complete a qualitative interview and a quantitative survey about sexual behavior and transmission risk. We identified two contexts in which exposure encounters occurred most commonly for HIV-positive IDUs: in intimate serodiscordant relationships and in the drug/sex economy.…

  20. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  1. The HIV antiretroviral drug efavirenz has LSD-like properties.

    PubMed

    Gatch, Michael B; Kozlenkov, Alexey; Huang, Ren-Qi; Yang, Wenjuan; Nguyen, Jacques D; González-Maeso, Javier; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P; Dillon, Glenn H; Forster, Michael J; Schetz, John A

    2013-11-01

    Anecdotal reports have surfaced concerning misuse of the HIV antiretroviral medication efavirenz ((4S)-6-chloro-4-(2-cyclopropylethynyl)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,4-dihydro-1H-3,1-benzoxazin-2-one) by HIV patients and non-infected teens who crush the pills and smoke the powder for its psychoactive effects. Molecular profiling of the receptor pharmacology of efavirenz pinpointed interactions with multiple established sites of action for other known drugs of abuse including catecholamine and indolamine transporters, and GABAA and 5-HT(2A) receptors. In rodents, interaction with the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a primary site of action of lysergic acid diethylamine (LSD), appears to dominate efavirenz's behavioral profile. Both LSD and efavirenz reduce ambulation in a novel open-field environment. Efavirenz occasions drug-lever responding in rats discriminating LSD from saline, and this effect is abolished by selective blockade of the 5-HT(2A) receptor. Similar to LSD, efavirenz induces head-twitch responses in wild-type, but not in 5-HT(2A)-knockout, mice. Despite having GABAA-potentiating effects (like benzodiazepines and barbiturates), and interactions with dopamine transporter, serotonin transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (like cocaine and methamphetamine), efavirenz fails to maintain responding in rats that self-administer cocaine, and it fails to produce a conditioned place preference. Although its molecular pharmacology is multifarious, efavirenz's prevailing behavioral effect in rodents is consistent with LSD-like activity mediated via the 5-HT(2A) receptor. This finding correlates, in part, with the subjective experiences in humans who abuse efavirenz and with specific dose-dependent adverse neuropsychiatric events, such as hallucinations and night terrors, reported by HIV patients taking it as a medication. PMID:23702798

  2. Infective endocarditis in an HIV-infected intravenous drug user.

    PubMed

    Mėlinytė, Karolina; Savickaitė, Jurgita; Rekienė, Daiva Emilija; Naudžiūnas, Albinas; Burkauskienė, Aušra; Jankauskienė, Laima

    2015-10-01

    Infective endocarditis is a common complication among injecting drug users. Disease risk among these patients is increased by the spread of HIV infection. In the following article, we discuss the exceptional clinical presentation of a 28-year-old patient who used intravenous drugs (heroin) for 10 years, had been infected with HIV for seven years and as a complication had developed Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis. The patient came to the hospital in serious condition, complaining of bodily pain, swelling of the legs and general weakness. During hospitalization, besides infective endocarditis, she was also diagnosed with anemia, toxic hepatitis, renal failure, ascites, sepsis, and pneumonia. A completely disrupted tricuspid valve, damaged aortic valve, and fibrosis of the mitral valve were detected. Echocardiographic and radiologic data showed that the patient's condition continued to deteriorate day by day, with significant progression of heart failure, ejection fraction decreasing from 45% to 10%, and development of myocarditis, hydrothorax and pericarditis. However, this progressive worsening of the patient's condition ceased when vancomycin was administered. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first such case described in the literature in which significant improvement was observed despite the patient's complex condition with associated complications. PMID:26417654

  3. From addiction to infection: managing drug abuse in the context of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

    PubMed

    Akindipe, Taiwo; Abiodun, Lolade; Adebajo, Sylvia; Lawal, Rahman; Rataemane, Solomon

    2014-09-01

    People who use drugs are at higher risk of HIV: directly through the sharing of injecting equipment, indirectly through associated risk behavior, and physiologically through the substances' impact on the immune system. Drug users, especially people who inject drugs (PWID) are a bridge to the general population. The treatment of drug addiction and provision of harm reduction interventions have impact on HIV transmission and incidence. Addiction treatment reduces the frequency of drug-related risky behaviors and enhances access and adherence to HIV treatment, resulting in fewer new infections. However, the drug policies of many African countries are punitive and hostile to harm reduction programs. These fuel criminalization of drug use and discrimination against the drug user thereby preventing individuals with drug addiction from accessing treatment programs. There is need to formulate policies aimed at protecting the rights of people with drug addiction and address the ethical aspects of treatment. PMID:26050376

  4. HIV Infection Among People Who Inject Drugs: The Challenge of Racial/Ethnic Disparities

    PubMed Central

    Des Jarlais, Don C.; McCarty, Dennis; Vega, William A.; Bramson, Heidi

    2013-01-01

    Racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection, with minority groups typically having higher rates of infection, are a formidable public health challenge. In the United States, among both men and women who inject drugs, HIV infection rates are elevated among non-Hispanic Blacks and Hispanics. A meta-analysis of international research concluded that among persons who inject drugs, racial and ethnic minorities were twice as likely to acquire an HIV infection, though there was great variation across the individual studies. To examine strategies to reduce racial/ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs, we reviewed studies on injection drug use and its role in HIV transmission. We identified four sets of evidence-based interventions that may reduce racial ethnic disparities among persons who inject drugs: HIV counseling and testing, risk reduction services, access to anti-retroviral therapy, and drug abuse treatment. Implementation of these services, however, is insufficient in many countries, including the US. Persons who inject drugs appear to be changing drug use norms and rituals to reduce risks. The challenges are to 1) develop a validated model of how racial/ethnic disparities in HIV infection arise, persist, and are reduced or eliminated over time, and 2) implement evidence-based services on a sufficient scale to eliminate HIV transmission among all persons who inject drugs. PMID:23688094

  5. Epidemic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among intravenous drug users (IVDU).

    PubMed Central

    D'Aquila, R. T.; Williams, A. B.

    1987-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is epidemic among intravenous drug users (IVDU), particularly in the northeastern United States. IVDU are playing a critical role in the spread of HIV by infecting their heterosexual partners and children, as well as their needle-sharing partners. The epidemiology of HIV infection among IVDU is reviewed here, including a compilation of seroprevalence data. Relevant determinants of the future spread of HIV among IVDU are discussed, including the major risk factors for HIV seropositivity, the modes of HIV transmission, and aspects of the natural history of HIV infection in IVDU. The public health policy implications of these issues include the need for education of adolescents and the general public about the risks of drug injection and heterosexual intercourse with IVDU, as well as motivation of IVDU to stop injecting, never share injection paraphernalia, or, at least, clean needles effectively. PMID:3324506

  6. HIV and Recent Illicit Drug Use Interact to Affect Verbal Memory in Women

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Vanessa J.; Rubin, Leah H.; Martin, Eileen; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge H.; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Valcour, Victor; Young, Mary A.; Crystal, Howard; Anastos, Kathryn; Aouizerat, Bradley E.; Milam, Joel; Maki, Pauline M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective HIV infection and illicit drug use are each associated with diminished cognitive performance. This study examined the separate and interactive effects of HIV and recent illicit drug use on verbal memory, processing speed and executive function in the multicenter Women's Interagency HIV Study (WIHS). Methods Participants included 952 HIV-infected and 443 HIV-uninfected women (mean age=42.8, 64% African-American). Outcome measures included the Hopkins Verbal Learning Test - Revised (HVLT-R) and the Stroop test. Three drug use groups were compared: recent illicit drug users (cocaine or heroin use in past 6 months, n=140), former users (lifetime cocaine or heroin use but not in past 6 months, n=651), and non-users (no lifetime use of cocaine or heroin, n=604). Results The typical pattern of recent drug use was daily or weekly smoking of crack cocaine. HIV infection and recent illicit drug use were each associated with worse verbal learning and memory (p's<.05). Importantly, there was an interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use such that recent illicit drug use (compared to non-use) negatively impacted verbal learning and memory only in HIV-infected women (p's <0.01). There was no interaction between HIV serostatus and illicit drug use on processing speed or executive function on the Stroop test. Conclusion The interaction between HIV serostatus and recent illicit drug use on verbal learning and memory suggests a potential synergistic neurotoxicity that may affect the neural circuitry underlying performance on these tasks. PMID:23392462

  7. In vitro model of mycobacteria and HIV-1 co-infection for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Finney John, Sarah; Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Ferguson, Monique R; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Olaleye, Omonike; Endsley, Janice J

    2013-12-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has become a global health threat in the wake of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) pandemic and is the leading cause of death in people with HIV/AIDS. Treatment of patients with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)/HIV co-infection is complicated by drug interactions and toxicity that present huge challenges for clinical intervention. Discovery efforts to identify novel compounds with increased effectiveness and decreased drug-drug interactions against Mtb, HIV-1, or both, would be greatly aided by the use of a co-infection model for screening drug libraries. Currently, inhibitors of Mtb are screened independently in mycobacterial cell cultures or target based biochemical screens and less often in macrophages or peripheral blood leukocytes. Similarly, HIV-1 drugs are screened in vitro independently from anti-mycobacterial compounds. Here, we describe an in vitro model where primary human peripheral blood mononuclear cells or monocyte-derived macrophages are infected with Mycobacterium bovis BCG and HIV-1, and used to evaluate drug toxicity and activity in a co-infection setting. Our results with standard compounds (e.g. Azidothymidine, Rifampicin) demonstrate the utility of this in vitro model to evaluate drug effectiveness relevant to cellular toxicity, HIV-1 replication, and intracellular mycobacterial growth, through the use of ELISA, bacterial enumeration, and multi-variate flow cytometry. This model and associated assays have great value in accelerating the discovery of compounds for use in Mtb/HIV-1 co-infected patients. PMID:24388652

  8. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  9. Short Communication Phylogenetic Characterization of HIV Type 1 CRF01_AE V3 Envelope Sequences in Pregnant Women in Northern Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Caridha, Rozina; Ha, Tran Thi Thanh; Gaseitsiwe, Simani; Hung, Pham Viet; Anh, Nguyen Mai; Bao, Nguyen Huy; Khang, Dinh Duy; Hien, Nguyen Tran; Cam, Phung Dac; Chiodi, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Characterization of HIV-1 strains is important for surveillance of the HIV-1 epidemic. In Vietnam HIV-1-infected pregnant women often fail to receive the care they are entitled to. Here, we analyzed phylogenetically HIV-1 env sequences from 37 HIV-1-infected pregnant women from Ha Noi (n=22) and Hai Phong (n=15), where they delivered in 2005–2007. All carried CRF01_AE in the gp120 V3 region. In 21 women CRF01_AE was also found in the reverse transcriptase gene. We compared their env gp120 V3 sequences phylogenetically in a maximum likelihood tree to those of 198 other CRF01_AE sequences in Vietnam and 229 from neighboring countries, predominantly Thailand, from the HIV-1 database. Altogether 464 sequences were analyzed. All but one of the maternal sequences colocalized with sequences from northern Vietnam. The maternal sequences had evolved the least when compared to sequences collected in Ha Noi in 2002, as shown by analysis of synonymous and nonsynonymous changes, than to other Vietnamese sequences collected earlier and/or elsewhere. Since the HIV-1 epidemic in women in Vietnam may still be underestimated, characterization of HIV-1 in pregnant women is important to observe how HIV-1 has evolved and follow its molecular epidemiology. PMID:21936713

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains selected for resistance against the HIV-1-specific [2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-3'-spiro- 5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)]-beta-D-pentofurano syl (TSAO) nucleoside analogues retain sensitivity to HIV-1-specific nonnucleoside inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Balzarini, J; Karlsson, A; Vandamme, A M; Pérez-Pérez, M J; Zhang, H; Vrang, L; Oberg, B; Bäckbro, K; Unge, T; San-Félix, A

    1993-01-01

    We recently reported that a newly discovered class of nucleoside analogues--[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)- 3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)]-beta-D - pentofuranosyl derivatives of pyrimidines and purines (designated TSAO)--are highly specific inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and targeted at the nonsubstrate binding site of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). We now find that HIV-1 strains selected for resistance against three different TSAO nucleoside derivatives retain sensitivity to the other HIV-1-specific nonnucleoside derivatives (tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO), 1-[(2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl]-6-phenylthiothymine, nevirapine, and pyridinone L697,661, as well as to the nucleoside analogues 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, ddI, ddC, and 9-(2-phosphonylmethoxyethyl)adenine. Pol gene nucleotide sequence analysis of the TSAO-resistant and -sensitive HIV-1 strains revealed a single amino acid substitution at position 138 (Glu-->Lys) in the RT of all TSAO-resistant HIV-1 strains. HIV-1 RT in which the Glu-138-->Lys substitution was introduced by site-directed mutagenesis and expressed in Escherichia coli could not be purified because of rapid degradation. However, HIV-1 RT containing the Glu-138-->Arg substitution was stable. It lost its sensitivity to the TSAO nucleosides but not to the other HIV-1-specific RT inhibitors (i.e., TIBO and pyridinone). Our findings point to a specific interaction of the 4''-amino group on the 3'-spiro-substituted ribose moiety of the TSAO nucleosides with the carboxylic acid group of glutamic acid at position 138 of HIV-1 RT. PMID:7688467