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Sample records for hiv-1 protease inhibitor

  1. A symmetric inhibitor binds HIV-1 protease asymmetrically.

    PubMed

    Dreyer, G B; Boehm, J C; Chenera, B; DesJarlais, R L; Hassell, A M; Meek, T D; Tomaszek, T A; Lewis, M

    1993-01-26

    Potential advantages of C2-symmetric inhibitors designed for the symmetric HIV-1 protease include high selectivity, potency, stability, and bioavailability. Pseudo-C2-symmetric monools and C2-symmetric diols, containing central hydroxymethylene and (R,R)-dihydroxyethylene moieties flanked by a variety of hydrophobic P1/P1' side chains, were studied as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The monools and diols were synthesized in 8-10 steps from D-(+)-arabitol and D-(+)-mannitol, respectively. Monools with ethyl or isobutyl P1/P1' side chains were weak inhibitors of recombinant HIV-1 protease (Ki > 10 microM), while benzyl P1/P1' side chains afforded a moderately potent inhibitor (apparent Ki = 230 nM). Diols were 100-10,000x more potent than analogous monools, and a wider range of P1/P1' side chains led to potent inhibition. Both classes of compounds exhibited lower apparent Ki values under high-salt conditions. Surprisingly, monool and diol HIV-1 protease inhibitors were potent inhibitors of porcine pepsin, a prototypical asymmetric monomeric aspartic protease. These results were evaluated in the context of the pseudosymmetric structure of monomeric aspartic proteases and their evolutionary kinship with the retroviral proteases. The X-ray crystal structure of HIV-1 protease complexed with a symmetric diol was determined at 2.6 A. Contrary to expectations, the diol binds the protease asymmetrically and exhibits 2-fold disorder in the electron density map. Molecular dynamics simulations were conducted beginning with asymmetric and symmetric HIV-1 protease/inhibitor model complexes. A more stable trajectory resulted from the asymmetric complex, in agreement with the observed asymmetric binding mode. A simple four-point model was used to argue more generally that van der Waals and electrostatic force fields can commonly lead to an asymmetric association between symmetric molecules. PMID:8422397

  2. HIV-1 protease mutations and protease inhibitor cross-resistance.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W

    2010-10-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  3. Antimalarial activity of HIV-1 protease inhibitor in chromone series.

    PubMed

    Lerdsirisuk, Pradith; Maicheen, Chirattikan; Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn

    2014-12-01

    Increasing parasite resistance to nearly all available antimalarial drugs becomes a serious problem to human health and necessitates the need to continue the search for new effective drugs. Recent studies have shown that clinically utilized HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) inhibitors can inhibit the in vitro and in vivo growth of Plasmodium falciparum. In this study, a series of chromone derivatives possessing HIV-1 PR inhibitory activity has been tested for antimalarial activity against P. falciparum (K1 multi-drug resistant strain). Chromone 15, the potent HIV-1 PR inhibitor (IC50=0.65μM), was found to be the most potent antimalarial compound with IC50=0.95μM while primaquine and tafenoquine showed IC50=2.41 and 1.95μM, respectively. Molecular docking study of chromone compounds against plasmepsin II, an aspartic protease enzyme important in hemoglobin degradation, revealed that chromone 15 exhibited the higher binding affinity (binding energy=-13.24kcal/mol) than the known PM II inhibitors. Thus, HIV-1 PR inhibitor in chromone series has the potential to be a new class of antimalarial agent. PMID:25462990

  4. The triple threat of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Potempa, Marc; Lee, Sook-Kyung; Wolfenden, Richard; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Newly released human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles obligatorily undergo a maturation process to become infectious. The HIV-1 protease (PR) initiates this step, catalyzing the cleavage of the Gag and Gag-Pro-Pol structural polyproteins. Proper organization of the mature virus core requires that cleavage of these polyprotein substrates proceeds in a highly regulated, specific series of events. The vital role the HIV-1 PR plays in the viral life cycle has made it an extremely attractive target for inhibition and has accordingly fostered the development of a number of highly potent substrate-analog inhibitors. Though the PR inhibitors (PIs) inhibit only the HIV-1 PR, their effects manifest at multiple different stages in the life cycle due to the critical importance of the PR in preparing the virus for these subsequent events. Effectively, PIs masquerade as entry inhibitors, reverse transcription inhibitors, and potentially even inhibitors of post-reverse transcription steps. In this chapter, we review the triple threat of PIs: the intermolecular cooperativity in the form of a cooperative dose-response for inhibition in which the apparent potency increases with increasing inhibition; the pleiotropic effects of HIV-1 PR inhibition on entry, reverse transcription, and post-reverse transcription steps; and their potency as transition state analogs that have the potential for further improvement that could lead to an inability of the virus to evolve resistance in the context of single drug therapy. PMID:25778681

  5. De novo design and discovery of potent, nonpeptidal HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lam, P.Y.S.; Eyermann, C.J.; Hodge, C.N.; Jadhav, P.K.; Ru, Yu; Bacheler, L.T.; Meek, J.L.; Otto, M.J.; Rayner, M.M.; Wong, N.Y.; Chang, C.H.; Weber, P.C.; Jackson, D.A.; Sharpe, T.R.; Erickson-Viitanen, S.K.

    1993-12-31

    Intense worldwide research in HIV-1 protease inhibition has resulted in many inhibitors with nanomolar Ki. However, they are mostly pseudopeptides (containing amide bonds) and substrate-like. In this work the authors report that using 3-D database searching, computer modeling and x-ray structures of the HIV-1 protease/inhibitor complex, a completely novel class of potent nonpeptides has been designed and synthesized. The Ki is in the subnanomolar range and the IC90 for the cell assays in the submicromolar range. Confirmation of the mode of binding was achieved by a high resolution x-ray structure of a HIV-1 protease/inhibitor complex. Molecular recognition studies between HIV-1 protease and these inhibitors will also be discussed.

  6. Enantioselective Synthesis of Dioxatriquinane Structural Motifs for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Using a Cascade Radical Cyclization†

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Osswald, Heather L.

    2015-01-01

    Synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating dioxatriquinane-derived P2-ligands is described. The tricyclic ligand alcohol contains five contiguous chiral centers. The ligand alcohols were prepared in optically active form by an enzymatic asymmetrization of mesodiacetate, cascade radical cyclization, and Lewis acid catalyzed reduction as the key steps. Inhibitors with dioxatriquinane-derived P2-ligands exhibited low nanomolar HIV-1 protease activity. PMID:26185337

  7. Impact of protease inhibitors on intracellular concentration of tenofovir-diphosphate among HIV-1 infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Lahiri, Cecile D.; Tao, Sijia; Jiang, Yong; Sheth, Anandi N.; Acosta, Edward P.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Armstrong, Wendy S.; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Vunnava, Aswani; Sanford, Sara; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) concentrations are associated with plasma HIV-1 response. Coadministration of protease inhibitors with NRTIs can affect intra-cellular concentrations due to protease inhibitor inhibition of efflux transporters. Tenofovir-diphosphate (TFV-DP) concentrations within peripheral blood mononuclear cells were compared among individuals receiving either atazanavir or darunavir-based regimens. There was a trend towards higher TFV-DP concentrations among women and among participants receiving atazanavir. TFV-DP intracellular concentrations were positively associated with undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA. PMID:25870991

  8. Computational Prediction of HIV-1 Resistance to Protease Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Ali; Alibés, Andreu; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Gil, Victor; Paredes, Roger; Soliva, Robert; Orozco, Modesto; Guallar, Victor

    2016-05-23

    The development of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) hinders the activity of antiretroviral drugs, forcing changes in drug prescription. Most resistance assessments used to date rely on expert-based rules on predefined sets of stereotypical mutations; such an information-driven approach cannot capture new polymorphisms or be applied for new drugs. Computational modeling could provide a more general assessment of drug resistance and could be made available to clinicians through the Internet. We have created a protocol involving sequence comparison and all-atom protein-ligand induced fit simulations to predict resistance at the molecular level. We first compared our predictions with the experimentally determined IC50 values of darunavir, amprenavir, ritonavir, and indinavir from reference PR mutants displaying different resistance levels. We then performed analyses on a large set of variants harboring more than 10 mutations. Finally, several sequences from real patients were analyzed for amprenavir and darunavir. Our computational approach detected all of the genotype changes triggering high-level resistance, even those involving a large number of mutations. PMID:27082876

  9. Fluorogenic Assay for Inhibitors of HIV-1 Protease with Sub-picomolar Affinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windsor, Ian W.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2015-08-01

    A fluorogenic substrate for HIV-1 protease was designed and used as the basis for a hypersensitive assay. The substrate exhibits a kcat of 7.4 s-1, KM of 15 μM, and an increase in fluorescence intensity of 104-fold upon cleavage, thus providing sensitivity that is unmatched in a continuous assay of HIV-1 protease. These properties enabled the enzyme concentration in an activity assay to be reduced to 25 pM, which is close to the Kd value of the protease dimer. By fitting inhibition data to Morrison’s equation, Ki values of amprenavir, darunavir, and tipranavir were determined to be 135, 10, and 82 pM, respectively. This assay, which is capable of measuring Ki values as low as 0.25 pM, is well-suited for characterizing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

  10. The Genetic Basis of HIV-1 Resistance to Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, Robert W.; Kantor, Rami; Gonzales, Matthew J.

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 drug resistance is caused by mutations in the reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease enzymes, the molecular targets of antiretroviral therapy. At the beginning of the year 2000, two expert panels recommended that HIV-1 RT and protease susceptibility testing be used to help select antiretroviral drugs for HIV-1-infected patients. Genotypic assays have been developed to detect HIV-1 mutations known to confer antiretroviral drug resistance. Genotypic assays using dideoxynucleoside sequencing provide extensive insight into the presence of drug-resistant variants in the population of viruses within an individual. However, the interpretation of these assays in clinical settings is formidable because of the large numbers of drug resistance mutations and because these mutations interact with one another and emerge in complex patterns. In addition, cross-resistance between antiretroviral drugs is greater than that anticipated from initial in vitro studies. This review summarises the published data linking HIV-1 RT and protease mutations to in vitro and clinical resistance to the currently available nucleoside RT inhibitors, non-nucleoside RT inhibitors, and protease inhibitors. PMID:19096725

  11. Probing Multidrug-Resistance and Protein-Ligand Interactions with Oxatricyclic Designed Ligands in HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Rao, Kalapala V.; Baldridge, Abigail; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Weber, Irene T.; Aoki, Manabu; Miguel, Salcedo Pedro; Amano, Masayuki; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2010-10-29

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and X-ray crystallographic analysis of a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Compound 4 proved to be an extremely potent inhibitor toward various multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants, representing a near 10-fold improvement over darunavir (DRV). Compound 4 also blocked protease dimerization with at least 10-fold greater potency than DRV.

  12. HIV-1 Protease Mutations and Protease Inhibitor Cross-Resistance▿ † ‡

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Soo-Yon; Taylor, Jonathan; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Kaufman, David; Towner, William; Troia, Paolo; Ruane, Peter; Hellinger, James; Shirvani, Vivian; Zolopa, Andrew; Shafer, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of many protease inhibitor (PI)-selected mutations on the susceptibility to individual PIs are unknown. We analyzed in vitro susceptibility test results on 2,725 HIV-1 protease isolates. More than 2,400 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to fosamprenavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, and saquinavir; 2,130 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to lopinavir; 1,644 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to atazanavir; 1,265 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to tipranavir; and 642 isolates had been tested for susceptibility to darunavir. We applied least-angle regression (LARS) to the 200 most common mutations in the data set and identified a set of 46 mutations associated with decreased PI susceptibility of which 40 were not polymorphic in the eight most common HIV-1 group M subtypes. We then used least-squares regression to ascertain the relative contribution of each of these 46 mutations. The median number of mutations associated with decreased susceptibility to each PI was 28 (range, 19 to 32), and the median number of mutations associated with increased susceptibility to each PI was 2.5 (range, 1 to 8). Of the mutations with the greatest effect on PI susceptibility, I84AV was associated with decreased susceptibility to eight PIs; V32I, G48V, I54ALMSTV, V82F, and L90M were associated with decreased susceptibility to six to seven PIs; I47A, G48M, I50V, L76V, V82ST, and N88S were associated with decreased susceptibility to four to five PIs; and D30N, I50L, and V82AL were associated with decreased susceptibility to fewer than four PIs. This study underscores the greater impact of nonpolymorphic mutations compared with polymorphic mutations on decreased PI susceptibility and provides a comprehensive quantitative assessment of the effects of individual mutations on susceptibility to the eight clinically available PIs. PMID:20660676

  13. Protease inhibitors effectively block cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) spreads by cell-free diffusion and by direct cell-to-cell transfer, the latter being a significantly more efficient mode of transmission. Recently it has been suggested that cell-to-cell spread may permit ongoing virus replication in the presence of antiretroviral therapy (ART) based on studies performed using Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors (RTIs). Protease Inhibitors (PIs) constitute an important component of ART; however whether this class of inhibitors can suppress cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1 is unexplored. Here we have evaluated the inhibitory effect of PIs during cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1 between T lymphocytes. Results Using quantitative assays in cell line and primary cell systems that directly measure the early steps of HIV-1 infection we find that the PIs Lopinavir and Darunavir are equally potent against both cell-free and cell-to-cell spread of HIV-1. We further show that a protease resistant mutant maintains its resistant phenotype during cell-to-cell spread and is transmitted more efficiently than wild-type virus in the presence of drug. By contrast we find that T cell-T cell spread of HIV-1 is 4–20 fold more resistant to inhibition by the RTIs Nevirapine, Zidovudine and Tenofovir. Notably, varying the ratio of infected and uninfected cells in co-culture impacted on the degree of inhibition, indicating that the relative efficacy of ART is dependent on the multiplicity of infection. Conclusions We conclude that if the variable effects of antiviral drugs on cell-to-cell virus dissemination of HIV-1 do indeed impact on viral replication and maintenance of viral reservoirs this is likely to be influenced by the antiviral drug class, since PIs appear particularly effective against both modes of HIV-1 spread. PMID:24364896

  14. Virtual Screening of Indonesian Herbal Database as HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Yanuar, Arry; Suhartanto, Heru; Mun׳im, Abdul; Anugraha, Bram Hik; Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1)׳s infection is considered as one of most harmful disease known by human, the survivability rate of the host reduced significantly when it developed into AIDS. HIV drug resistance is one of the main problems of its treatment and several drug designs have been done to find new leads compound as the cure. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach was used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 protease inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database with AutoDock was performed on HIV-1 protease. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds obtained were 8-Hydroxyapigenin 8-(2",4"-disulfatoglucuronide), Isoscutellarein 4'-methyl ether, Amaranthin, Torvanol A, Ursonic acid, 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-(6"-O-malonyl-beta-glucopyranoside), Oleoside, Jacoumaric acid, Platanic acid and 5-Carboxypyranocyanidin 3-O-beta-glucopyranoside. PMID:24616554

  15. Pulsed EPR Characterization of HIV-1 Protease Conformational Sampling and Inhibitor-Induced Population Shifts

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhanglong; Casey, Thomas M.; Blackburn, Mandy E.; Huang, Xi; Pham, Linh; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Carter, Jeffrey D.; Kear-Scott, Jamie L.; Veloro, Angelo M.; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E.

    2015-01-01

    The conformational landscape of HIV-1 protease (PR) can be experimentally characterized by pulsed-EPR double electron-electron resonance (DEER). For this characterization, nitroxide spin labels are attached to an engineered cysteine residue in the flap region of HIV-1 PR. DEER distance measurements from spin-labels contained within each flap of the homodimer provide a detailed description of the conformational sampling of apo-enzyme as well as induced conformational shifts as a function inhibitor binding. The distance distribution profiles are further interpreted in terms of a conformational ensemble scheme that consists of four unique states termed “curled/tucked”, “closed”, “semi-open” and “wide-open” conformations. Reported here are the DEER results for a drug-resistant variant clinical isolate sequence, V6, in the presence of FDA approved protease inhibitors (PIs) as well as a non-hydrolyzable substrate mimic, CaP2. Results are interpreted in the context of the current understanding of the relationship between conformational sampling, drug resistance, and kinetic efficiency of HIV-1PR as derived from previous DEER and kinetic data for a series of HIV-1PR constructs that contain drug-pressure selected mutations or natural polymorphisms. Specifically, these collective results support the notion that inhibitor-induced closure of the flaps correlates with inhibitor efficiency and drug resistance. This body of work also suggests DEER as a tool for studying conformational sampling in flexible enzymes as it relates to function. PMID:26489725

  16. Pulsed EPR characterization of HIV-1 protease conformational sampling and inhibitor-induced population shifts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhanglong; Casey, Thomas M; Blackburn, Mandy E; Huang, Xi; Pham, Linh; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Carter, Jeffrey D; Kear-Scott, Jamie L; Veloro, Angelo M; Galiano, Luis; Fanucci, Gail E

    2016-02-17

    The conformational landscape of HIV-1 protease (PR) can be experimentally characterized by pulsed-EPR double electron-electron resonance (DEER). For this characterization, nitroxide spin labels are attached to an engineered cysteine residue in the flap region of HIV-1 PR. DEER distance measurements from spin-labels contained within each flap of the homodimer provide a detailed description of the conformational sampling of apo-enzyme as well as induced conformational shifts as a function of inhibitor binding. The distance distribution profiles are further interpreted in terms of a conformational ensemble scheme that consists of four unique states termed "curled/tucked", "closed", "semi-open" and "wide-open" conformations. Reported here are the DEER results for a drug-resistant variant clinical isolate sequence, V6, in the presence of FDA approved protease inhibitors (PIs) as well as a non-hydrolyzable substrate mimic, CaP2. Results are interpreted in the context of the current understanding of the relationship between conformational sampling, drug resistance, and kinetic efficiency of HIV-1PR as derived from previous DEER and kinetic data for a series of HIV-1PR constructs that contain drug-pressure selected mutations or natural polymorphisms. Specifically, these collective results support the notion that inhibitor-induced closure of the flaps correlates with inhibitor efficiency and drug resistance. This body of work also suggests DEER as a tool for studying conformational sampling in flexible enzymes as it relates to function. PMID:26489725

  17. Protonation state and free energy calculation of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex based on electrostatic polarisation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Maoyou; Jiang, Xiaonan; Jiang, Ning

    2014-06-01

    The protonation states of catalytic Asp25/25‧ residues remarkably affect the binding mechanism of the HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex. Here we report a molecular dynamics simulation study, which includes electrostatic polarisation effect, to investigate the influence of Asp25/25‧ protonation states upon the binding free energy of the HIV-1 protease and a C2-symmetric inhibitor. Good agreements are obtained on inhibitor structure, hydrogen bond network, and binding free energy between our theoretical calculations and the experimental data. The calculations show that the Asp25 residue is deprotonated, and the Asp25‧ residue is protonated. Our results reveal that the Asp25/25‧ residues can have different protonation states when binding to different inhibitors although the protease and the inhibitors have the same symmetry. This study offers some insights into understanding the protonation state of HIV-1 protease-inhibitor complex, which could be helpful in designing new inhibitor molecules.

  18. Structure-Based Design of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors to Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh,A.; Sridhar, P.; Leshchenko, S.; Hussain, A.; Li, J.; Kovalevsky, A.; Walters, D.; Wedelind, J.; Grum-Tokars, V.; et al.

    2006-01-01

    Structure-based design and synthesis of novel HIV protease inhibitors are described. The inhibitors are designed specifically to interact with the backbone of HIV protease active site to combat drug resistance. Inhibitor 3 has exhibited exceedingly potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potency. Furthermore, this inhibitor maintains impressive potency against a wide spectrum of HIV including a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. The inhibitors incorporated a stereochemically defined 5-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furanyl urethane as the P2-ligand into the (R)-(hydroxyethylamino)sulfonamide isostere. Optically active (3aS,5R,6aR)-5-hydroxy-hexahydrocyclopenta[b]furan was prepared by an enzymatic asymmetrization of meso-diacetate with acetyl cholinesterase, radical cyclization, and Lewis acid-catalyzed anomeric reduction as the key steps. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of inhibitor 3-bound HIV-1 protease (1.35 Angstroms resolution) revealed extensive interactions in the HIV protease active site including strong hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone. This design strategy may lead to novel inhibitors that can combat drug resistance.

  19. Design and implementation of a particle concentration fluorescence method for the detection of HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Manetta, J V; Lai, M H; Osborne, H E; Dee, A; Margolin, N; Sportsman, J R; Vlahos, C J; Yan, S B; Heath, W F

    1992-04-01

    A critical step in the replicative cycle of the human immunodeficiency virus HIV-1 involves the proteolytic processing of the polyprotein products Prgag and Prgag-pol that are encoded by the gag and pol genes in the viral genome. Inhibitors of this processing step have the potential to be important therapeutic agents in the management of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Current assays for inhibitors of HIV-1 protease are slow, cumbersome, or susceptible to interference by test compounds. An approach to the generation of a rapid, sensitive assay for HIV-1 protease inhibitors that is devoid of interference problems is to use a capture system which allows for isolation of the products from the reaction mixture prior to signal quantitation. In this paper, we describe a novel method for the detection of HIV-1 protease inhibitors utilizing the concept of particle concentration fluorescence. Our approach involves the use of the HIV-1 protease peptide substrate Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Ile-Val which has been modified to contain a biotin moiety on one side and a fluorescein reporter molecule on the other side of the scissile Tyr-Pro bond. This substrate is efficiently cleaved by the HIV-1 protease and the reaction can be readily quantitated. Known inhibitors of the protease were readily detected using this new assay. In addition, this approach is compatible with existing instrumentation in use for broad screening and is highly sensitive, accurate, and reproducible. PMID:1621970

  20. Expedient screening for HIV-1 protease inhibitors using a simplified immunochromatographic assay.

    PubMed

    Kitidee, Kuntida; Khamaikawin, Wannisa; Thongkum, Weeraya; Tawon, Yardpiroon; Cressey, Tim R; Jevprasesphant, Rachaneekorn; Kasinrerk, Watchara; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai

    2016-05-15

    A colloidal gold-based immunochromatographic (IC) strip test was developed and validated for the detection of HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) activity and inhibitory effect of HIV-PR inhibitors (PIs). It is a unique 'two-step' process requiring the combination of proteolysis of HIV-PR and an immunochromatographic reaction. Monoclonal antibodies to the free C-terminus of HIV matrix protein (HIV-MA) conjugated to gold particles and a monoclonal antibody against intact and cleaved forms of the HIV-MA are immobilized on the 'Test'-line of the IC strip. Using lopinavir, a potent HIV protease inhibitor, the IC-strip was optimized to detect inhibitory activity against HIV-protease. At a lopinavir concentration of 1000ng/mL (its suggested minimum effective concentration), a HIV-PRH6 concentration of 6mg/mL and incubation period of 60min were the optimal conditions. A preliminary comparison between a validated high-performance liquid chromatography assay and the IC-strip to semi-quantify HIV protease inhibitor concentrations (lopinavir and atazanavir) demonstrated good agreement. This simplified method is suitable for the rapid screening of novel protease inhibitors for future therapeutic use. Moreover, the IC strip could also be optimized to semi-quantify PIs concentrations in plasma samples. PMID:26490422

  1. Design and synthesis of HIV-1 protease inhibitors for a long-acting injectable drug application.

    PubMed

    Kesteleyn, Bart; Amssoms, Katie; Schepens, Wim; Hache, Geerwin; Verschueren, Wim; Van De Vreken, Wim; Rombauts, Klara; Meurs, Greet; Sterkens, Patrick; Stoops, Bart; Baert, Lieven; Austin, Nigel; Wegner, Jörg; Masungi, Chantal; Dierynck, Inge; Lundgren, Stina; Jönsson, Daniel; Parkes, Kevin; Kalayanov, Genadiy; Wallberg, Hans; Rosenquist, Asa; Samuelsson, Bertil; Van Emelen, Kristof; Thuring, Jan Willem

    2013-01-01

    The design and synthesis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) (1-22), which display high potency against HIV-1 wild-type and multi-PI-resistant HIV-mutant clinical isolates, is described. Lead optimization was initiated from compound 1, a Phe-Phe hydroxyethylene peptidomimetic PI, and was directed towards the discovery of new PIs suitable for a long-acting (LA) injectable drug application. Introducing a heterocyclic 6-methoxy-3-pyridinyl or a 6-(dimethylamino)-3-pyridinyl moiety (R(3)) at the para-position of the P1' benzyl fragment generated compounds with antiviral potency in the low single digit nanomolar range. Halogenation or alkylation of the metabolic hot spots on the various aromatic rings resulted in PIs with high stability against degradation in human liver microsomes and low plasma clearance in rats. Replacing the chromanolamine moiety (R(1)) in the P2 protease binding site by a cyclopentanolamine or a cyclohexanolamine derivative provided a series of high clearance PIs (16-22) with EC(50)s on wild-type HIV-1 in the range of 0.8-1.8 nM. PIs 18 and 22, formulated as nanosuspensions, showed gradual but sustained and complete release from the injection site over two months in rats, and were therefore identified as interesting candidates for a LA injectable drug application for treating HIV/AIDS. PMID:23177258

  2. Comparative molecular field analysis of a series of inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Leitão, Andrei; Montanari, Carlos A; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2011-03-01

    Several protease inhibitors have reached the world market in the last fifteen years, dramatically improving the quality of life and life expectancy of millions of HIV-infected patients. In spite of the tremendous research efforts in this area, resistant HIV-1 variants are constantly decreasing the ability of the drugs to efficiently inhibit the enzyme. As a consequence, inhibitors with novel frameworks are necessary to circumvent resistance to chemotherapy. In the present work, we have created 3D QSAR models for a series of 82 HIV-1 protease inhibitors employing the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) method. Significant correlation coefficients were obtained (q(2) = 0.82 and r(2) = 0.97), indicating the internal consistency of the best model, which was then used to evaluate an external test set containing 17 compounds. The predicted values were in good agreement with the experimental results, showing the robustness of the model and its substantial predictive power for untested compounds. The final QSAR model and the information gathered from the CoMFA contour maps should be useful for the design of novel anti-HIV agents with improved potency. PMID:21222610

  3. Prevalence, mutation patterns, and effects on protease inhibitor susceptibility of the L76V mutation in HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Young, Thomas P; Parkin, Neil T; Stawiski, Eric; Pilot-Matias, Tami; Trinh, Roger; Kempf, Dale J; Norton, Michael

    2010-11-01

    Patterns of HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI) resistance-associated mutations (RAMs) and effects on PI susceptibility associated with the L76V mutation were studied in a large database. Of 20,501 sequences with ≥1 PI RAM, 3.2% contained L76V; L76V was alone in 0.04%. Common partner mutations included M46I, I54V, V82A, I84V, and L90M. L76V was associated with a 2- to 6-fold decrease in susceptibility to lopinavir, darunavir, amprenavir, and indinavir and a 7- to 8-fold increase in susceptibility to atazanavir and saquinavir. PMID:20805393

  4. Origin of decrease in potency of darunavir and two related antiviral inhibitors against HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Knecht, Volker

    2012-03-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2). HIV-1 is observed worldwide while HIV-2 though prevalent in West Africa is persistently spreading to other parts of the world. An important target for AIDS treatment is the use of HIV protease (PR) inhibitors preventing the replication of the virus. In this work, the popular molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method has been used to investigate the effectiveness of the HIV-1 PR inhibitors darunavir, GRL-06579A, and GRL-98065 against HIV-2 and HIV-1 protease. The affinity of the inhibitors for both HIV-1 and HIV-2 PR decreases in the order GRL-06579A > darunavir > GRL-98065, in accordance with experimental data. On the other hand, our results show that all these inhibitors bind less strongly to HIV-2 than to HIV-1 protease, again in agreement with experimental findings. The decrease in binding affinity for HIV-2 relative to HIV-1 PR is found to arise from an increase in the energetic penalty from the desolvation of polar groups (DRV) or a decrease in the size of the electrostatic interactions between the inhibitor and the PR (GRL-06579A and GRL-98065). For GRL-98065, also a decrease in the magnitude of the van der Waals interactions contributes to the reduction in binding affinity. A detailed understanding of the molecular forces governing binding and drug resistance might assist in the design of efficient inhibitors against HIV-2 protease. PMID:22280246

  5. HIV-1 Protease with 20 Mutations Exhibits Extreme Resistance to Clinical Inhibitors through Coordinated Structural Rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Aniana, Annie; Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-06-28

    The escape mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) containing 20 mutations (PR20) undergoes efficient polyprotein processing even in the presence of clinical protease inhibitors (PIs). PR20 shows >3 orders of magnitude decreased affinity for PIs darunavir (DRV) and saquinavir (SQV) relative to PR. Crystal structures of PR20 crystallized with yttrium, substrate analogue p2-NC, DRV, and SQV reveal three distinct conformations of the flexible flaps and diminished interactions with inhibitors through the combination of multiple mutations. PR20 with yttrium at the active site exhibits widely separated flaps lacking the usual intersubunit contacts seen in other inhibitor-free dimers. Mutations of residues 35-37 in the hinge loop eliminate interactions and perturb the flap conformation. Crystals of PR20/p2-NC contain one uninhibited dimer with one very open flap and one closed flap and a second inhibitor-bound dimer in the closed form showing six fewer hydrogen bonds with the substrate analogue relative to wild-type PR. PR20 complexes with PIs exhibit expanded S2/S2' pockets and fewer PI interactions arising from coordinated effects of mutations throughout the structure, in agreement with the strikingly reduced affinity. In particular, insertion of the large aromatic side chains of L10F and L33F alters intersubunit interactions and widens the PI binding site through a network of hydrophobic contacts. The two very open conformations of PR20 as well as the expanded binding site of the inhibitor-bound closed form suggest possible approaches for modifying inhibitors to target extreme drug-resistant HIV.

  6. Multistage virtual screening and identification of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors by integrating SVM, shape, pharmacophore and docking methods.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yu; Li, Jinlong; Chen, Zeming; Wang, Fengwei; Huang, Weiqiang; Hong, Zhangyong; Lin, Jianping

    2015-08-28

    The HIV-1 protease has proven to be a crucial component of the HIV replication machinery and a reliable target for anti-HIV drug discovery. In this study, we applied an optimized hierarchical multistage virtual screening method targeting HIV-1 protease. The method sequentially applied SVM (Support Vector Machine), shape similarity, pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. Using a validation set (270 positives, 155,996 negatives), the multistage virtual screening method showed a high hit rate and high enrichment factor of 80.47% and 465.75, respectively. Furthermore, this approach was applied to screen the National Cancer Institute database (NCI), which contains 260,000 molecules. From the final hit list, 6 molecules were selected for further testing in an in vitro HIV-1 protease inhibitory assay, and 2 molecules (NSC111887 and NSC121217) showed inhibitory potency against HIV-1 protease, with IC50 values of 62 μM and 162 μM, respectively. With further chemical development, these 2 molecules could potentially serve as HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:26185005

  7. The QSAR and docking calculations of fullerene derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saleh, Noha A.

    2015-02-01

    The inhibition of HIV-1 protease is considered as one of the most important targets for drug design and the deactivation of HIV-1. In the present work, the fullerene surface (C60) is modified by adding oxygen atoms as well as hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups to form 6 investigated fullerene derivative compounds. These compounds have one, two, three, four or five O atoms + HMC groups at different positions on phenyl ring. The effect of the repeating of these groups on the ability of suggested compounds to inhibit the HIV protease is studied by calculating both Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties and docking simulation. Based on the QSAR descriptors, the solubility and the hydrophilicity of studied fullerene derivatives increased with increasing the number of oxygen atoms + HMC groups in the compound. While docking calculations indicate that, the compound with two oxygen atoms + HMC groups could interact and binds with HIV-1 protease active site. This is could be attributed to the active site residues of HIV-1 protease are hydrophobic except the two aspartic acids. So that, the increase in the hydrophilicity and polarity of the compound is preventing and/or decreasing the hydrophobic interaction between the compound and HIV-1 protease active site.

  8. The QSAR and docking calculations of fullerene derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Noha A

    2014-10-30

    The inhibition of HIV-1 protease is considered as one of the most important targets for drug design and the deactivation of HIV-1. In the present work, the fullerene surface (C60) is modified by adding oxygen atoms as well as hydroxymethylcarbonyl (HMC) groups to form 6 investigated fullerene derivative compounds. These compounds have one, two, three, four or five O atoms+HMC groups at different positions on phenyl ring. The effect of the repeating of these groups on the ability of suggested compounds to inhibit the HIV protease is studied by calculating both Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) properties and docking simulation. Based on the QSAR descriptors, the solubility and the hydrophilicity of studied fullerene derivatives increased with increasing the number of oxygen atoms+HMC groups in the compound. While docking calculations indicate that, the compound with two oxygen atoms+HMC groups could interact and binds with HIV-1 protease active site. This is could be attributed to the active site residues of HIV-1 protease are hydrophobic except the two aspartic acids. So that, the increase in the hydrophilicity and polarity of the compound is preventing and/or decreasing the hydrophobic interaction between the compound and HIV-1 protease active site. PMID:25459714

  9. Joint X-ray/neutron crystallographic study of HIV-1 protease with clinical inhibitor amprenavir – insights for drug design

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Irene T.; Waltman, Mary Jo; Mustyakimov, Marat; Blakeley, Matthew P.; Keen, David A.; Ghosh, Arun K.; Langan, Paul; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 protease is an important target for the development of antiviral inhibitors to treat AIDS. A room-temperature joint X-ray/neutron structure of the protease in complex with clinical drug amprenavir has been determined at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure provides direct determination of hydrogen atom positions in the enzyme active site. Analysis of the enzyme-drug interactions suggests that some hydrogen bonds may be weaker than deduced from the non-hydrogen interatomic distances. This information may be valuable for the design of improved protease inhibitors. PMID:23772563

  10. A new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitor: the crystallographic structure, inhibition and chemical synthesis of an aminimide peptide isostere.

    PubMed

    Rutenber, E E; McPhee, F; Kaplan, A P; Gallion, S L; Hogan, J C; Craik, C S; Stroud, R M

    1996-09-01

    The essential role of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) in the viral life cycle makes it an attractive target for the development of substrate-based inhibitors that may find efficacy as anti-AIDS drugs. However, resistance has arisen to potent peptidomimetic drugs necessitating the further development of novel chemical backbones for diversity based chemistry focused on probing the active site for inhibitor interactions and binding modes that evade protease resistance. AQ148 is a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 PR and represents a new class of transition state analogues incorporating an aminimide peptide isostere. A 3-D crystallographic structure of AQ148, a tetrapeptide isostere, has been determined in complex with its target HIV-1 PR to a resolution of 2.5 A and used to evaluate the specific structural determinants of AQ148 potency and to correlate structure-activity relationships within the class of related compounds. AQ148 is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 PR with a Ki value of 137 nM. Twenty-nine derivatives have been synthesized and chemical modifications have been made at the P1, P2, P1', and P2' sites. The atomic resolution structure of AQ148 bound to HIV-1 PR reveals both an inhibitor binding mode that closely resembles that of other peptidomimetic inhibitors and specific protein/inhibitor interactions that correlate with structure-activity relationships. The structure provides the basis for the design, synthesis and evaluation of the next generation of hydroxyethyl aminimide inhibitors. The aminimide peptide isostere is a scaffold with favorable biological properties well suited to both the combinatorial methods of peptidomimesis and the rational design of potent and specific substrate-based analogues. PMID:8894111

  11. Cellular HIV-1 DNA quantitation in patients during simplification therapy with protease inhibitor-sparing regimens.

    PubMed

    Sarmati, Loredana; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe; Nicastri, Emanuele; d'Ettorre, Gabriella; Andreoni, Carolina; Dori, Luca; Gatti, Francesca; Montano, Marco; Buonomini, Anna Rita; Boldrin, Caterina; Palù, Giorgio; Vullo, Vincenzo; Andreoni, Massimo

    2007-07-01

    Simplified regimens containing protease-inhibitors (PI)-sparing combinations were used in patients with virological suppression after prolonged highly active antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the total HIV-1 DNA quantitation as a predictor of long-term success for PI-sparing simplified therapy. Sixty-two patients were enrolled in a prospective non-randomized cohort. All patients have been receiving a triple-therapy regimen, two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus one PI, for at least 9 months and were characterized by undetectable plasma HIV-1 RNA levels (<50 cp/ml) for at least 6 months. Patients were changed to a simplified PI-sparing regimen to overcome PI-associated adverse effects. HIV-DNA levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were evaluated at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Patients with proviral DNA levels below the median value (226 copies/10(6) PBMCs) had a significant higher CD4 cell count at nadir (P = 0.003) and at enrolment (P = 0.001) with respect to patients with HIV-DNA levels above the median value. At month 18, 53 out of 62 (85%) patients on simplified regimen showed virological success, 4 (6.4%) patients experienced virological failure and 5 (8%) patients showed viral blip. At logistic regression analysis, HIV-DNA levels below 226 copies/10(6) PBMCs at baseline were associated independently to a reduced risk of virological failure or viral blip during simplified therapy (OR 0.002, 95% CI 0.001-0.46, P = 0.025). The substitution of PI with NRTI or non-NRTIs may represent an effective treatment option. Indeed, treatment failure or viral blip were experienced by 6% and 8% of the patients on simplified therapy, respectively. In addition, sustained suppression of the plasma viral load was significantly correlated with low levels of proviral DNA before treatment simplification. PMID:17516532

  12. Thermodynamic linkage between the binding of protons and inhibitors to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Trylska, J.; Antosiewicz, J.; Geller, M.; Hodge, C. N.; Klabe, R. M.; Head, M. S.; Gilson, M. K.

    1999-01-01

    The aspartyl dyad of free HIV-1 protease has apparent pK(a)s of approximately 3 and approximately 6, but recent NMR studies indicate that the aspartyl dyad is fixed in the doubly protonated form over a wide pH range when cyclic urea inhibitors are bound, and in the monoprotonated form when the inhibitor KNI-272 is bound. We present computations and measurements related to these changes in protonation and to the thermodynamic linkage between protonation and inhibition. The Poisson-Boltzmann model of electrostatics is used to compute the apparent pK(a)s of the aspartyl dyad in the free enzyme and in complexes with four different inhibitors. The calculations are done with two parameter sets. One assigns epsilon = 4 to the solute interior and uses a detailed model of ionization; the other uses epsilon = 20 for the solute interior and a simplified representation of ionization. For the free enzyme, both parameter sets agree well with previously measured apparent pK(a)s of approximately 3 and approximately 6. However, the calculations with an internal dielectric constant of 4 reproduce the large pKa shifts upon binding of inhibitors, but the calculations with an internal dielectric constant of 20 do not. This observation has implications for the accurate calculation of pK(a)s in complex protein environments. Because binding of a cyclic urea inhibitor shifts the pK(a)s of the aspartyl dyad, changing the pH is expected to change its apparent binding affinity. However, we find experimentally that the affinity is independent of pH from 5.5 to 7.0. Possible explanations for this discrepancy are discussed. PMID:10210196

  13. Effect of Biomolecular Conformation on Docking Simulation: A Case Study on a Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Razzaghi-Asl, Nima; Sepehri, Saghi; Ebadi, Ahmad; Miri, Ramin; Shahabipour, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a disease pertained to the human immune system. Given its crucial role in viral replication, HIV-1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is a prime therapeutic target in AIDS therapy. In this regard, the dynamic aspects of ligand-enzyme interactions may indicate an important role of conformational variability in HIV-1 PR inhibitor/drug design. In the present contribution, the effect of HIV-1 PR flexibility (within multiple crystallographic structures of HIV-1 PR) on binding to the Amprenavir was elucidated via an ensemble docking approach. Molecular docking studies were performed via advanced AutoDock4.2 software. Ensemble docking of Amprenavir into the active site of various conformations of HIV-1 PR predicted different interaction modes/energies. Analysis of binding factors in terms of docking false negatives/positives revealed a determinant role of enzyme conformational variation in prediction of optimum induced fit (PDB ID: 1HPV). The outcomes of this study demonstrated that conformation of receptor may significantly affect the accuracy of docking/binding results in structure-based rational design of anti HIV-1 PR agents. Furthermore; some strategies to re-score the docking results in HIV-1 PR targeted docking studies were proposed. PMID:26330867

  14. A preference-based free-energy parameterization of enzyme-inhibitor binding. Applications to HIV-1-protease inhibitor design.

    PubMed Central

    Wallqvist, A.; Jernigan, R. L.; Covell, D. G.

    1995-01-01

    The interface between protein receptor-ligand complexes has been studied with respect to their binary interatomic interactions. Crystal structure data have been used to catalogue surfaces buried by atoms from each member of a bound complex and determine a statistical preference for pairs of amino-acid atoms. A simple free energy model of the receptor-ligand system is constructed from these atom-atom preferences and used to assess the energetic importance of interfacial interactions. The free energy approximation of binding strength in this model has a reliability of about +/- 1.5 kcal/mol, despite limited knowledge of the unbound states. The main utility of such a scheme lies in the identification of important stabilizing atomic interactions across the receptor-ligand interface. Thus, apart from an overall hydrophobic attraction (Young L, Jernigan RL, Covell DG, 1994, Protein Sci 3:717-729), a rich variety of specific interactions is observed. An analysis of 10 HIV-1 protease inhibitor complexes is presented that reveals a common binding motif comprised of energetically important contacts with a rather limited set of atoms. Design improvements to existing HIV-1 protease inhibitors are explored based on a detailed analysis of this binding motif. PMID:8528086

  15. Critical differences in HIV-1 and HIV-2 protease specificity for clinical inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Boross, Peter I.; Chiu, Ting-Yi; Ghosh, Arun K.; Tozser, Jozsef; Louis, John M.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-03-15

    Clinical inhibitor amprenavir (APV) is less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR{sub 2}) than on HIV-1 protease (PR{sub 1}). We solved the crystal structure of PR{sub 2} with APV at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution to identify structural changes associated with the lowered inhibition. Furthermore, we analyzed the PR{sub 1} mutant (PR{sub 1M}) with substitutions V32I, I47V, and V82I that mimic the inhibitor binding site of PR{sub 2}. PR{sub 1M} more closely resembled PR{sub 2} than PR{sub 1} in catalytic efficiency on four substrate peptides and inhibition by APV, whereas few differences were seen for two other substrates and inhibition by saquinavir (SQV) and darunavir (DRV). High resolution crystal structures of PR{sub 1M} with APV, DRV, and SQV were compared with available PR{sub 1} and PR{sub 2} complexes. Val/Ile32 and Ile/Val47 showed compensating interactions with SQV in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 1}, however, Ile82 interacted with a second SQV bound in an extension of the active site cavity of PR{sub 1M}. Residues 32 and 82 maintained similar interactions with DRV and APV in all the enzymes, whereas Val47 and Ile47 had opposing effects in the two subunits. Significantly diminished interactions were seen for the aniline of APV bound in PR{sub 1M} and PR{sub 2} relative to the strong hydrogen bonds observed in PR{sub 1}, consistent with 15- and 19-fold weaker inhibition, respectively. Overall, PR{sub 1M} partially replicates the specificity of PR{sub 2} and gives insight into drug resistant mutations at residues 32, 47, and 82. Moreover, this analysis provides a structural explanation for the weaker antiviral effects of APV on HIV-2.

  16. Computing Clinically Relevant Binding Free Energies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The use of molecular simulation to estimate the strength of macromolecular binding free energies is becoming increasingly widespread, with goals ranging from lead optimization and enrichment in drug discovery to personalizing or stratifying treatment regimes. In order to realize the potential of such approaches to predict new results, not merely to explain previous experimental findings, it is necessary that the methods used are reliable and accurate, and that their limitations are thoroughly understood. However, the computational cost of atomistic simulation techniques such as molecular dynamics (MD) has meant that until recently little work has focused on validating and verifying the available free energy methodologies, with the consequence that many of the results published in the literature are not reproducible. Here, we present a detailed analysis of two of the most popular approximate methods for calculating binding free energies from molecular simulations, molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MMPBSA) and molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MMGBSA), applied to the nine FDA-approved HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Our results show that the values obtained from replica simulations of the same protease–drug complex, differing only in initially assigned atom velocities, can vary by as much as 10 kcal mol–1, which is greater than the difference between the best and worst binding inhibitors under investigation. Despite this, analysis of ensembles of simulations producing 50 trajectories of 4 ns duration leads to well converged free energy estimates. For seven inhibitors, we find that with correctly converged normal mode estimates of the configurational entropy, we can correctly distinguish inhibitors in agreement with experimental data for both the MMPBSA and MMGBSA methods and thus have the ability to rank the efficacy of binding of this selection of drugs to the protease (no account is made for free energy penalties associated with

  17. The Effect of Clade-Specific Sequence Polymorphisms on HIV-1 Protease Activity and Inhibitor Resistance Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Bandaranayake, Rajintha M.; Kolli, Madhavi; King, Nancy M.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Heroux, Annie; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-09-08

    The majority of HIV-1 infections around the world result from non-B clade HIV-1 strains. The CRF01{_}AE (AE) strain is seen principally in Southeast Asia. AE protease differs by {approx}10% in amino acid sequence from clade B protease and carries several naturally occurring polymorphisms that are associated with drug resistance in clade B. AE protease has been observed to develop resistance through a nonactive-site N88S mutation in response to nelfinavir (NFV) therapy, whereas clade B protease develops both the active-site mutation D30N and the nonactive-site mutation N88D. Structural and biochemical studies were carried out with wild-type and NFV-resistant clade B and AE protease variants. The relationship between clade-specific sequence variations and pathways to inhibitor resistance was also assessed. AE protease has a lower catalytic turnover rate than clade B protease, and it also has weaker affinity for both NFV and darunavir (DRV). This weaker affinity may lead to the nonactive-site N88S variant in AE, which exhibits significantly decreased affinity for both NFV and DRV. The D30N/N88D mutations in clade B resulted in a significant loss of affinity for NFV and, to a lesser extent, for DRV. A comparison of crystal structures of AE protease shows significant structural rearrangement in the flap hinge region compared with those of clade B protease and suggests insights into the alternative pathways to NFV resistance. In combination, our studies show that sequence polymorphisms within clades can alter protease activity and inhibitor binding and are capable of altering the pathway to inhibitor resistance.

  18. 3D-QSAR studies on chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Samee, Weerasak; Pimthon, Jutarat

    2004-02-01

    The three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) approach using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) was applied to a series of 30 chromone derivatives, a new class of HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The best predictive CoMFA model gives cross-validated r2 ( q2)=0.763, non-cross-validated r2=0.967, standard error of estimate ( S)=5.092, F=90.701. The best CoMSIA model has q2=0.707, non-cross-validated r2=0.943, S=7.018, F=51.734, included steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen bond donor fields. The predictive ability of these models was validated by a set of five compounds that were not included in the training set. The calculated (predicted) and experimental inhibitory activities were well correlated. The contour maps obtained from CoMFA and CoMSIA models were in agreement with the previous docking study for this chromone series.

  19. Evaluating the substrate-envelope hypothesis: structural analysis of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors designed to be robust against drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Nalam, Madhavi N L; Ali, Akbar; Altman, Michael D; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Chellappan, Sripriya; Kairys, Visvaldas; Ozen, Aysegül; Cao, Hong; Gilson, Michael K; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M; Schiffer, Celia A

    2010-05-01

    Drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 protease selectively alter inhibitor binding without significantly affecting substrate recognition and cleavage. This alteration in molecular recognition led us to develop the substrate-envelope hypothesis which predicts that HIV-1 protease inhibitors that fit within the overlapping consensus volume of the substrates are less likely to be susceptible to drug-resistant mutations, as a mutation impacting such inhibitors would simultaneously impact the processing of substrates. To evaluate this hypothesis, over 130 HIV-1 protease inhibitors were designed and synthesized using three different approaches with and without substrate-envelope constraints. A subset of 16 representative inhibitors with binding affinities to wild-type protease ranging from 58 nM to 0.8 pM was chosen for crystallographic analysis. The inhibitor-protease complexes revealed that tightly binding inhibitors (at the picomolar level of affinity) appear to "lock" into the protease active site by forming hydrogen bonds to particular active-site residues. Both this hydrogen bonding pattern and subtle variations in protein-ligand van der Waals interactions distinguish nanomolar from picomolar inhibitors. In general, inhibitors that fit within the substrate envelope, regardless of whether they are picomolar or nanomolar, have flatter profiles with respect to drug-resistant protease variants than inhibitors that protrude beyond the substrate envelope; this provides a strong rationale for incorporating substrate-envelope constraints into structure-based design strategies to develop new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:20237088

  20. Evaluating the Substrate-Envelope Hypothesis: Structural Analysis of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors Designed To Be Robust against Drug Resistance ▿

    PubMed Central

    Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Ali, Akbar; Altman, Michael D.; Reddy, G. S. Kiran Kumar; Chellappan, Sripriya; Kairys, Visvaldas; Özen, Ayşegül; Cao, Hong; Gilson, Michael K.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2010-01-01

    Drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 protease selectively alter inhibitor binding without significantly affecting substrate recognition and cleavage. This alteration in molecular recognition led us to develop the substrate-envelope hypothesis which predicts that HIV-1 protease inhibitors that fit within the overlapping consensus volume of the substrates are less likely to be susceptible to drug-resistant mutations, as a mutation impacting such inhibitors would simultaneously impact the processing of substrates. To evaluate this hypothesis, over 130 HIV-1 protease inhibitors were designed and synthesized using three different approaches with and without substrate-envelope constraints. A subset of 16 representative inhibitors with binding affinities to wild-type protease ranging from 58 nM to 0.8 pM was chosen for crystallographic analysis. The inhibitor-protease complexes revealed that tightly binding inhibitors (at the picomolar level of affinity) appear to “lock” into the protease active site by forming hydrogen bonds to particular active-site residues. Both this hydrogen bonding pattern and subtle variations in protein-ligand van der Waals interactions distinguish nanomolar from picomolar inhibitors. In general, inhibitors that fit within the substrate envelope, regardless of whether they are picomolar or nanomolar, have flatter profiles with respect to drug-resistant protease variants than inhibitors that protrude beyond the substrate envelope; this provides a strong rationale for incorporating substrate-envelope constraints into structure-based design strategies to develop new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:20237088

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Biological and Structural Evaluations of Novel HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors To Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Parai, Maloy Kumar; Huggins, David J.; Cao, Hong; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Ali, Akbar; Schiffer, Celia A.; Tidor, Bruce; Rana, Tariq M.

    2012-09-11

    A series of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) were designed using a general strategy that combines computational structure-based design with substrate-envelope constraints. The PIs incorporate various alcohol-derived P2 carbamates with acyclic and cyclic heteroatomic functionalities into the (R)-hydroxyethylamine isostere. Most of the new PIs show potent binding affinities against wild-type HIV-1 protease and three multidrug resistant (MDR) variants. In particular, inhibitors containing the 2,2-dichloroacetamide, pyrrolidinone, imidazolidinone, and oxazolidinone moieties at P2 are the most potent with Ki values in the picomolar range. Several new PIs exhibit nanomolar antiviral potencies against patient-derived wild-type viruses from HIV-1 clades A, B, and C and two MDR variants. Crystal structure analyses of four potent inhibitors revealed that carbonyl groups of the new P2 moieties promote extensive hydrogen bond interactions with the invariant Asp29 residue of the protease. These structure-activity relationship findings can be utilized to design new PIs with enhanced enzyme inhibitory and antiviral potencies.

  2. A cell-free enzymatic activity assay for the evaluation of HIV-1 drug resistance to protease inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Satoko; Masaoka, Takashi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Morishita, Ryo; Iwatani, Yasumasa; Tatsumi, Masashi; Endo, Yaeta; Yamamoto, Naoki; Sugiura, Wataru; Ryo, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Due to their high frequency of genomic mutations, human retroviruses often develop resistance to antiretroviral drugs. The emergence of drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a significant obstacle to the effective long-term treatment of HIV infection. The development of a rapid and versatile drug-susceptibility assay would enable acquisition of phenotypic information and facilitate determination of the appropriate choice of antiretroviral agents. In this study, we developed a novel in vitro method, termed the Cell-free drug susceptibility assay (CFDSA), for monitoring phenotypic information regarding the drug resistance of HIV-1 protease (PR). The CFDSA utilizes a wheat germ cell-free protein production system to synthesize enzymatically active HIV-1 PRs directly from PCR products amplified from HIV-1 molecular clones or clinical isolates in a rapid one-step procedure. Enzymatic activity of PRs can be readily measured by AlphaScreen (Amplified Luminescent Proximity Homogeneous Assay Screen) in the presence or absence of clinically used protease inhibitors (PIs). CFDSA measurement of drug resistance was based on the fold resistance to the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of various PIs. The CFDSA could serve as a non-infectious, rapid, accessible, and reliable alternative to infectious cell-based phenotypic assays for evaluation of PI-resistant HIV-1. PMID:26583013

  3. HIV-1 Protease: Structure, Dynamics and Inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Louis, John M.; Ishima, R.; Torchia, D.A.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-06-03

    The HIV-1 protease is synthesized as part of a large Gag-Pol precursor protein. It is responsible for its own release from the precursor and the processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins into the mature structural and functional proteins required for virus maturation. Because of its indispensable role, the mature HIV-1 protease dimer has proven to be a successful target for the development of antiviral agents. In the last 5 years, a major emphasis in protease research has been to improve inhibitor design and treatment regimens.

  4. Evaluation of the substrate envelope hypothesis for inhibitors of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Chellappan, Sripriya; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X; Schiffer, Celia; Gilson, Michael K

    2007-08-01

    Crystallographic data show that various substrates of HIV protease occupy a remarkably uniform region within the binding site; this region has been termed the substrate envelope. It has been suggested that an inhibitor that fits within the substrate envelope should tend to evade viral resistance because a protease mutation that reduces the affinity of the inhibitor will also tend to reduce the affinity of substrate, and will hence decrease the activity of the enzyme. Accordingly, inhibitors that fit the substrate envelope better should be less susceptible to clinically observed resistant mutations, since these must also allow substrates to bind. The present study describes a quantitative measure of the volume of a bound inhibitor falling outside the substrate envelope, and observes that this quantity correlates with the inhibitor's losses in affinity to clinically relevant mutants. This measure may thus be useful as a penalty function in the design of robust HIV protease inhibitors. PMID:17474129

  5. Solvent accessibility as a predictive tool for the free energy of inhibitor binding to the HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Nauchitel, V.; Villaverde, M. C.; Sussman, F.

    1995-01-01

    We have developed a simple approach for the evaluation of the free energies of inhibitor binding to the protease of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 PR). Our algorithm is based on the observation that most groups that line the binding pockets of this enzyme are hydrophobic in nature. Based on this fact, we have likened the binding of an inhibitor to this enzyme to its transfer from water to a medium of lower polarity. The resulting expression produced values for the free energy of binding of inhibitors to the HIV-1 PR that are in good agreement with experimental values. The additive nature of this approach has enabled us to partition the free energy of binding into the contributions of single fragments. The resulting analysis clearly indicates the existence of a ranking in the participation of the enzyme's subsites in binding. Although all the enzyme's pockets contribute to binding, the ones that bind the P2-P'2 span of the inhibitor are in general the most critical for high inhibitor potency. Moreover, our method has allowed us to determine the nature of the functional groups that fit into given enzyme binding pockets. Perusal of the energy contributions of single side chains has shown that a large number of hydrophobic and aromatic groups located in the central portion of the HIV-1 PR inhibitors present optimal binding. All of these observations are in agreement with experimental evidence, providing a validation for the physical relevancy of our model. PMID:7670378

  6. Conformation of inhibitor-free HIV-1 protease derived from NMR spectroscopy in a weakly oriented solution

    PubMed Central

    Roche, Julien; Louis, John M.; Bax, Ad

    2014-01-01

    Flexibility of the glycine-rich flaps is known to be essential for catalytic activity of the HIV-1 protease, but their exact conformations at the different stages of the enzymatic pathway remain subject to much debate. While hundreds of crystal structures of protease-inhibitor complexes have been solved, only about a dozen inhibitor-free protease structures have been reported. These apo-structures reveal a large diversity of flap conformations, ranging from closed, to semi-open and wide-open. To evaluate the average structure in solution, we measured residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) and compared these to values calculated for crystal structures representative of the closed, semi-open and wide-open states. The RDC data clearly indicate that the inhibitor-free protease, on average, adopts a closed conformation in solution that is very similar to the inhibitor-bound state. By contrast, a highly drug-resistant protease mutant, PR20, adopts the wide-open flap conformation. PMID:25470009

  7. Crystal structure of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and a ketomethylene isostere inhibitor based on the p2/NC cleavage site

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Mandal, Kalyaneswar; Terechko, Valentina A.; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2009-09-02

    Here we report the X-ray structures of chemically synthesized HIV-1 protease and the inactive [D25N]HIV-1 protease complexed with the ketomethylene isostere inhibitor Ac-Thr-Ile-Nle{psi}[CO-CH{sub 2}]Nle-Gln-Arg.amide at 1.4 and 1.8 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. In complex with the active enzyme, the keto-group was found to be converted into the hydrated gem-diol, while the structure of the complex with the inactive D25N enzyme revealed an intact keto-group. These data support the general acid-general base mechanism for HIV-1 protease catalysis.

  8. Synthesis, in vitro evaluation, and docking studies of novel chromone derivatives as HIV-1 protease inhibitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungwitayatorn, Jiraporn; Wiwat, Chanpen; Samee, Weerasak; Nunthanavanit, Patcharawee; Phosrithong, Narumol

    2011-08-01

    Novel chromone derivatives with a benzopyran-4-one scaffold have been prepared by the one-pot cyclization reaction. The in vitro inhibitory activity of these new compounds towards HIV-1 protease have been evaluated using stop time HPLC method as the preliminary screening. The most potent compound, 7,8-dihydroxy-2-(3'-trifluoromethyl phenyl)-3-(3″-trifluoromethylbenzoyl)chromone ( 32), showed IC 50 = 0.34 μM. The molecular docking study supported results from experimental activity testing and also provided structure-activity relationship of this series.

  9. Enhancement of Probe Signal for Screening of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Huantong; Jin, Sha

    2012-01-01

    The global human immunodeficiency virus infection/acquired immuno-deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) epidemic is one of the biggest threats to human life. Mutation of the virus and toxicity of the existing drugs necessitate the development of new drugs for effective AIDS treatment. Previously, we developed a molecular probe that utilizes the Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) principle to visualize HIV-1 protease inhibition within living cells for drug screening. We explored using AcGFP1 (a fluorescent mutant of the wild-type green fluorescent protein) as a donor and mCherry (a mutant of red fluorescent protein) as an acceptor for FRET microscopy imaging measurement of HIV-1 protease activity within living cells and demonstrated that the molecular probe is suitable for the High-Content Screening (HCS) of anti-HIV drugs through an automated FRET microscopy imaging measurement. In this study, we genetically engineered a probe with a tandem acceptor protein structure to enhance the probe’s signal. Both in vitro and in vivo studies revealed that the novel structure of the molecular probe exhibits a significant enhancement of FRET signals, reaching a probe FRET efficiency of 34%, as measured by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) measurement. The probe developed herein would enable high-content screening of new anti-HIV agents. PMID:23223077

  10. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with C3-Substituted Hexahydrocyclopentafuranyl Urethanes as P2-Ligands: Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Crystal Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K; Chapsal, Bruno D; Parham, Garth L; Steffey, Melinda; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2011-11-07

    We report the design, synthesis, biological evaluation, and the X-ray crystal structure of a novel inhibitor bound to the HIV-1 protease. Various C3-functionalized cyclopentanyltetrahydrofurans (Cp-THF) were designed to interact with the flap Gly48 carbonyl or amide NH in the S2-subsite of the HIV-1 protease. We investigated the potential of those functionalized ligands in combination with hydroxyethylsulfonamide isosteres. Inhibitor 26 containing a 3-(R)-hydroxyl group on the Cp-THF core displayed the most potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Our studies revealed a preference for the 3-(R)-configuration over the corresponding 3-(S)-derivative. Inhibitor 26 exhibited potent activity against a panel of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants. A high resolution X-ray structure of 26-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insight into the ligand-binding site interactions.

  11. Potential Elucidation of a Novel CTL Epitope in HIV-1 Protease by the Protease Inhibitor Resistance Mutation L90M

    PubMed Central

    Smidt, Werner

    2013-01-01

    The combination of host immune responses and use of antiretrovirals facilitate partial control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection and result in delayed progression to Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Both treatment and host immunity impose selection pressures on the highly mutable HIV-1 genome resulting in antiretroviral resistance and immune escape. Researchers have shown that antiretroviral resistance mutations can shape cytotoxic T-lymphocyte immunity by altering the epitope repertoire of HIV infected cells. Here it was discovered that an important antiretroviral resistance mutation, L90M in HIV protease, occurs at lower frequencies in hosts that harbor the B*15, B*48 or A*32 human leukocyte antigen subtypes. A likely reason is the elucidation of novel epitopes by L90M. NetMHCPan predictions reveal increased affinity of the peptide spanning the HIV protease region, PR 89–97 and PR 90–99 to HLA-B*15/B*48 and HLA-A*32 respectively due to the L90M substitution. The higher affinity could increase the chance of the epitope being presented and recognized by Cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and perhaps provide additional immunological pressures in the presence of antiretroviral attenuating mutations. This evidence supports the notion that knowledge of HLA allotypes in HIV infected individuals could augment antiretroviral treatment by the elucidation of epitopes due to antiretroviral resistance mutations in HIV protease. PMID:24015196

  12. HIV-1 protease inhibitors from inverse design in the substrate envelope exhibit subnanomolar binding to drug-resistant variants.

    PubMed

    Altman, Michael D; Ali, Akbar; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Nalam, Madhavi N L; Anjum, Saima Ghafoor; Cao, Hong; Chellappan, Sripriya; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X; Gilson, Michael K; Schiffer, Celia A; Rana, Tariq M; Tidor, Bruce

    2008-05-14

    The acquisition of drug-resistant mutations by infectious pathogens remains a pressing health concern, and the development of strategies to combat this threat is a priority. Here we have applied a general strategy, inverse design using the substrate envelope, to develop inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. Structure-based computation was used to design inhibitors predicted to stay within a consensus substrate volume in the binding site. Two rounds of design, synthesis, experimental testing, and structural analysis were carried out, resulting in a total of 51 compounds. Improvements in design methodology led to a roughly 1000-fold affinity enhancement to a wild-type protease for the best binders, from a Ki of 30-50 nM in round one to below 100 pM in round two. Crystal structures of a subset of complexes revealed a binding mode similar to each design that respected the substrate envelope in nearly all cases. All four best binders from round one exhibited broad specificity against a clinically relevant panel of drug-resistant HIV-1 protease variants, losing no more than 6-13-fold affinity relative to wild type. Testing a subset of second-round compounds against the panel of resistant variants revealed three classes of inhibitors: robust binders (maximum affinity loss of 14-16-fold), moderate binders (35-80-fold), and susceptible binders (greater than 100-fold). Although for especially high-affinity inhibitors additional factors may also be important, overall, these results suggest that designing inhibitors using the substrate envelope may be a useful strategy in the development of therapeutics with low susceptibility to resistance. PMID:18412349

  13. HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors from Inverse Design in the Substrate Envelope Exhibit Subnanomolar Binding to Drug-Resistant Variants

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Michael D.; Ali, Akbar; Reddy, G. S. Kiran Kumar; Nalam, Madhavi N. L.; Anjum, Saima Ghafoor; Cao, Hong; Chellappan, Sripriya; Kairys, Visvaldas; Fernandes, Miguel X.; Gilson, Michael K.; Schiffer, Celia A.; Rana, Tariq M.; Tidor, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The acquisition of drug-resistance mutations by infectious pathogens remains a pressing health concern, and the development of strategies to combat this threat is a priority. Here we have applied a general strategy, inverse design using the substrate envelope, to develop inhibitors of HIV-1 protease. Structure-based computation was used to design inhibitors predicted to stay within a consensus substrate volume in the binding site. Two rounds of design, synthesis, experimental testing, and structural analysis were carried out, resulting in a total of 51 compounds. Improvements in design methodology led to a roughly 1000-fold affinity enhancement to a wild-type protease for the best binders, from Ki of 30–50 nM in round one to below 100 pM in round two. Crystal structures of a subset of complexes revealed a binding mode similar to each design that respected the substrate envelope in nearly all cases. All four best binders from round one exhibited broad specificity against a clinically relevant panel of drug-resistant HIV-1 protease variants, losing no more than 6–13 fold affinity relative to wild type. Testing a subset of second-round compounds against the panel of resistant variants revealed three classes of inhibitors — robust binders (maximum affinity loss of 14–16 fold), moderate binders (35–80 fold), and susceptible binders (greater than 100 fold). Although for especially high-affinity inhibitors additional factors may also be important, overall, these results suggest that designing inhibitors using the substrate envelope may be a useful strategy in the development of therapeutics with low susceptibility to resistance. PMID:18412349

  14. HIV-1 subtype influences susceptibility and response to monotherapy with the protease inhibitor lopinavir/ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Sutherland, K. A.; Ghosn, J.; Gregson, J.; Mbisa, J. L.; Chaix, M. L.; Cohen Codar, I.; Delfraissy, J. F.; Delaugerre, C.; Gupta, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective PI susceptibility results from a complex interplay between protease and Gag proteins, with Gag showing wide variation across HIV-1 subtypes. We explored the impact of pre-treatment susceptibility on the outcome of lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy. Methods Treatment-naive individuals who experienced lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy failure from the MONARK study were matched (by subtype, viral load and baseline CD4 count) with those who achieved virological response (‘successes’). Successes were defined by viral load <400 copies/mL after week 24 and <50 copies/mL from week 48 to week 96. Full-length Gag–protease was amplified from patient samples for in vitro phenotypic susceptibility testing, with susceptibility expressed as fold change (FC) relative to a subtype B reference strain. Results Baseline lopinavir susceptibility was lower in viral failures compared with viral successes, but the differences were not statistically significant (median lopinavir susceptibility: 4.4 versus 8.5, respectively, P = 0.17). Among CRF02_AG/G patients, there was a significant difference in lopinavir susceptibility between the two groups (7.1 versus 10.4, P = 0.047), while in subtype B the difference was not significant (2.7 versus 3.4, P = 0.13). Subtype CRF02_AG/G viruses had a median lopinavir FC of 8.7 compared with 3.1 for subtype B (P = 0.001). Conclusions We report an association between reduced PI susceptibility (using full-length Gag–protease sequences) at baseline and subsequent virological failure on lopinavir/ritonavir monotherapy in antiretroviral-naive patients harbouring subtype CRF02_AG/G viruses. We speculate that this may be important in the context of suboptimal adherence in determining viral failure. PMID:25228587

  15. A Novel Substrate-Based HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor Drug Resistance Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Nijhuis, Monique; van Maarseveen, Noortje M; Lastere, Stephane; Schipper, Pauline; Coakley, Eoin; Glass, Bärbel; Rovenska, Mirka; de Jong, Dorien; Chappey, Colombe; Goedegebuure, Irma W; Heilek-Snyder, Gabrielle; Dulude, Dominic; Cammack, Nick; Brakier-Gingras, Lea; Konvalinka, Jan; Parkin, Neil; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Brun-Vezinet, Francoise; Boucher, Charles A. B

    2007-01-01

    Background HIV protease inhibitor (PI) therapy results in the rapid selection of drug resistant viral variants harbouring one or two substitutions in the viral protease. To combat PI resistance development, two approaches have been developed. The first is to increase the level of PI in the plasma of the patient, and the second is to develop novel PI with high potency against the known PI-resistant HIV protease variants. Both approaches share the requirement for a considerable increase in the number of protease mutations to lead to clinical resistance, thereby increasing the genetic barrier. We investigated whether HIV could yet again find a way to become less susceptible to these novel inhibitors. Methods and Findings We have performed in vitro selection experiments using a novel PI with an increased genetic barrier (RO033-4649) and demonstrated selection of three viruses 4- to 8-fold resistant to all PI compared to wild type. These PI-resistant viruses did not have a single substitution in the viral protease. Full genomic sequencing revealed the presence of NC/p1 cleavage site substitutions in the viral Gag polyprotein (K436E and/or I437T/V) in all three resistant viruses. These changes, when introduced in a reference strain, conferred PI resistance. The mechanism leading to PI resistance is enhancement of the processing efficiency of the altered substrate by wild-type protease. Analysis of genotypic and phenotypic resistance profiles of 28,000 clinical isolates demonstrated the presence of these NC/p1 cleavage site mutations in some clinical samples (codon 431 substitutions in 13%, codon 436 substitutions in 8%, and codon 437 substitutions in 10%). Moreover, these cleavage site substitutions were highly significantly associated with reduced susceptibility to PI in clinical isolates lacking primary protease mutations. Furthermore, we used data from a clinical trial (NARVAL, ANRS 088) to demonstrate that these NC/p1 cleavage site changes are associated with

  16. Highly Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Novel Tricyclic P2 Ligands: Design, Synthesis, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Parham, Garth L.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Nyalapatla, Prasanth R.; Osswald, Heather L.; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2013-10-08

    The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating stereochemically defined fused tricyclic P2 ligands are described. Various substituent effects were investigated to maximize the ligand-binding site interactions in the protease active site. Inhibitors 16a and 16f showed excellent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity, although the incorporation of sulfone functionality resulted in a decrease in potency. Both inhibitors 16a and 16f maintained activity against a panel of multidrug resistant HIV-1 variants. A high-resolution X-ray crystal structure of 16a-bound HIV-1 protease revealed important molecular insights into the ligand-binding site interactions, which may account for the inhibitor’s potent antiviral activity and excellent resistance profiles.

  17. A radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, L.J.; Dayton, B.D.; Moore, M.L.; Shu, A.Y.; Heys, J.R.; Meek, T.D. )

    1990-08-01

    A rapid, high-throughput radiometric assay for HIV-1 protease has been developed using ion-exchange chromatography performed in 96-well filtration plates. The assay monitors the activity of the HIV-1 protease on the radiolabeled form of a heptapeptide substrate, (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr-Pro-Val-Val-NH2, which is based on the p17-p24 cleavage site found in the viral polyprotein substrate Pr55gag. Specific cleavage of this uncharged heptapeptide substrate by HIV-1 protease releases the anionic product (tyrosyl-3,5-3H)Ac-Ser-Gln-Asn-Tyr, which is retained upon minicolumns of the anion-exchange resin AG1-X8. Protease activity is determined from the recovery of this radiolabeled product following elution with formic acid. This facile and highly sensitive assay may be utilized for steady-state kinetic analysis of the protease, for measurements of enzyme activity during its purification, and as a routine assay for the evaluation of protease inhibitors from natural product or synthetic sources.

  18. Design, Synthesis, and X-ray Structure of Substituted Bis-tetrahydrofuran (Bis-THF)-Derived Potent HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Steffey, Melinda; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Agniswamy, Johnson; Amano, Masayuki; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2012-06-18

    We investigated substituted bis-THF-derived HIV-1 protease inhibitors in order to enhance ligand-binding site interactions in the HIV-1 protease active site. In this context, we have carried out convenient syntheses of optically active bis-THF and C4-substituted bis-THF ligands using a [2,3]-sigmatropic rearrangement as the key step. The synthesis provided convenient access to a number of substituted bis-THF derivatives. Incorporation of these ligands led to a series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors. Inhibitor 23c turned out to be the most potent (K{sub i} = 2.9 pM; IC{sub 50} = 2.4 nM) among the inhibitors. An X-ray structure of 23c-bound HIV-1 protease showed extensive interactions of the inhibitor with the protease active site, including a unique water-mediated hydrogen bond to the Gly-48 amide NH in the S2 site.

  19. Docking and 3-D QSAR studies on the binding of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Shashidhar N.; Balaji, Govardhan A.; Balaji, Vitukudi N.

    2013-06-01

    We present molecular docking and 3-D QSAR studies on a series of tetrahydropyrimid-2-one HIV-1 protease inhibitors whose binding affinities to the enzyme span nearly 6 orders of magnitude. The docking investigations have been carried out with Surflex (GEOM, GEOMX) and Glide (SP and XP) methodologies available through Tripos and Schrodinger suite of tools in the context of Sybyl-X and Maestro interfaces, respectively. The alignments for 3-D QSAR studies were obtained by using the automated Surflex-SIM methodology in Sybyl-X and the analyses were performed using the CoMFA and CoMSIA methods. Additionally, the top-ranked poses obtained from various docking protocols were also employed to generate CoMFA and CoMSIA models to evaluate the qualitative consistency of the docked models with experimental data. Our studies demonstrate that while there are a number of common features in the docked models obtained from Surflex-dock and Glide methodologies, the former sets of models are generally better correlated with deduced experimental binding modes based on the X-ray structures of known HIV-1 protease complexes with cyclic ureas. The urea moiety common to all the ligands are much more tightly aligned in Surflex docked structures than in the models obtained from Glide SP and XP dockings. The 3-D QSAR models are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to those previously reported, suggesting the utility of automatically generated alignments from Surflex-SIM methodology.

  20. Trp42 rotamers report reduced flexibility when the inhibitor acetyl-pepstatin is bound to HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Ullrich, B.; Laberge, M.; Tölgyesi, F.; Szeltner, Z.; Polgár, L.; Fidy, J.

    2000-01-01

    The Q7K/L331/L631 HIV-1 protease mutant was expressed in Escherichia coli and the effect of binding a substrate-analog inhibitor, acetyl-pepstatin, was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and molecular dynamics. The dimeric enzyme has four intrinsic tryptophans, located at positions 6 and 42 in each monomer. Fluorescence spectra and acrylamide quenching experiments show two differently accessible Trp populations in the apoenzyme with k(q1) = 6.85 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) and k(q2) = 1.88 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1), that merge into one in the complex with k(q) = 1.78 x 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). 500 ps trajectory analysis of Trp X1/X2 rotameric interconversions suggest a model to account for the observed Trp fluorescence. In the simulations, Trp6/Trp6B rotameric interconversions do not occur on this timescale for both HIV forms. In the apoenzyme simulations, however, both Trp42s and Trp42Bs are flipping between X1/X2 states; in the complexed form, no such interconverions occur. A detailed investigation of the local Trp environments sampled during the molecular dynamics simulation suggests that one of the apoenzyme Trp42B rotameric interconversions would allow indole-quencher contact, such as with nearby Tyr59. This could account for the short lifetime component. The model thus interprets the experimental data on the basis of the conformational fluctuations of Trp42s alone. It suggests that the rotameric interconversions of these Trps, located relatively far from the active site and at the very start of the flap region, becomes restrained when the apoenzyme binds the inhibitor. The model is thus consistent with associating components of the fluorescence decay in HIV-1 protease to ground state conformational heterogeneity. PMID:11152134

  1. Probing Lipophilic Adamantyl Group as the P1-Ligand for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Protein X-ray Structural Studies, and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Arun K; Osswald, Heather L; Glauninger, Kristof; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2016-07-28

    A series of potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors with a lipophilic adamantyl P1 ligand have been designed, synthesized, and evaluated. We have developed an enantioselective synthesis of adamantane-derived hydroxyethylamine isosteres utilizing Sharpless asymmetric epoxidation as the key step. Various inhibitors incorporating P1-adamantylmethyl in combination with P2 ligands such as 3-(R)-THF, 3-(S)-THF, bis-THF, and THF-THP were examined. The S1' pocket was also probed with phenyl and phenylmethyl ligands. Inhibitor 15d, with an isobutyl P1' ligand and a bis-THF P2 ligand, proved to be the most potent of the series. The cLogP value of inhibitor 15d is improved compared to inhibitor 2 with a phenylmethyl P1-ligand. X-ray structural studies of 15d, 15h, and 15i with HIV-1 protease complexes revealed molecular insight into the inhibitor-protein interaction. PMID:27389367

  2. Modulation of HIV-1 Gag NC/p1 cleavage efficiency affects protease inhibitor resistance and viral replicative capacity

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mutations in the substrate of HIV-1 protease, especially changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site, can directly contribute to protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and also compensate for defects in viral replicative capacity (RC) due to a drug resistant protease. These NC/p1 changes are known to enhance processing of the Gag protein. To investigate the capacity of HIV-1 to modulate Gag cleavage and its consequences for PI resistance and RC, we performed a detailed enzymatic and virological analysis using a set of PI resistant NC/p1 variants (HXB2431V, HXB2436E+437T, HXB2437T and HXB2437V). Results Here, we demonstrate that single NC/p1 mutants, which displayed only a slight increase in PI resistance did not show an obvious change in RC. In contrast, the double NC/p1 mutant, which displayed a clear increase in processing efficiency and PI resistance, demonstrated a clear reduction in RC. Cleavage analysis showed that a tridecameric NC/p1 peptide representing the double NC/p1 mutant was cleaved in two specific ways instead of one. The observed decrease in RC for the double NC/p1 mutant (HXB2436E+437T) could (partially) be restored by either reversion of the 436E change or by acquisition of additional changes in the NC/p1 cleavage site at codon 435 or 438 as was revealed during in vitro evolution experiments. These changes not only restored RC but also reduced PI resistance levels. Furthermore these changes normalized Gag processing efficiency and obstructed the novel secondary cleavage site observed for the double NC/p1 mutant. Conclusions The results of this study clearly demonstrate that HIV-1 can modulate Gag processing and thereby PI resistance. Distinct increases in Gag cleavage and PI resistance result in a reduced RC that can only be restored by amino acid changes in NC/p1 which reduce Gag processing to an optimal rate. PMID:22462820

  3. Design, Synthesis, Evaluation, and Crystallographic-Based Structural Studies of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Reduced Response to the V82A Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente,J.; Robbins, A.; Grana, P.; Paleo, M.; Correa, J.; Villaverde, M.; Sardina, F.; Govindasamy, L.; Agbandje-McKenna, M.; et al

    2008-01-01

    In our quest for HIV-1 protease inhibitors that are not affected by the V82A resistance mutation, we have synthesized and tested a second generation set of C2-symmetric HIV-1 protease inhibitors that contain a cyclohexane group at P1 and/or P1'. The binding affinity results indicate that these compounds have an improved response to the appearance of the V82A mutation than the parent compound. The X-ray structure of one of these compounds with the V82A HIV-1 PR variant provides the structural rationale for the better resistance profile of these compounds. Moreover, scrutiny of the X-ray structure suggests that the ring of the Cha side chain might be in a boat rather than in the chair conformation, a result supported by molecular dynamics simulations.

  4. Fuzzy ARTMAP prediction of biological activities for potential HIV-1 protease inhibitors using a small molecular data set.

    PubMed

    Andonie, Răzvan; Fabry-Asztalos, Levente; Abdul-Wahid, Christopher Badi'; Abdul-Wahid, Sarah; Barker, Grant I; Magill, Lukas C

    2011-01-01

    Obtaining satisfactory results with neural networks depends on the availability of large data samples. The use of small training sets generally reduces performance. Most classical Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) studies for a specific enzyme system have been performed on small data sets. We focus on the neuro-fuzzy prediction of biological activities of HIV-1 protease inhibitory compounds when inferring from small training sets. We propose two computational intelligence prediction techniques which are suitable for small training sets, at the expense of some computational overhead. Both techniques are based on the FAMR model. The FAMR is a Fuzzy ARTMAP (FAM) incremental learning system used for classification and probability estimation. During the learning phase, each sample pair is assigned a relevance factor proportional to the importance of that pair. The two proposed algorithms in this paper are: 1) The GA-FAMR algorithm, which is new, consists of two stages: a) During the first stage, we use a genetic algorithm (GA) to optimize the relevances assigned to the training data. This improves the generalization capability of the FAMR. b) In the second stage, we use the optimized relevances to train the FAMR. 2) The Ordered FAMR is derived from a known algorithm. Instead of optimizing relevances, it optimizes the order of data presentation using the algorithm of Dagher et al. In our experiments, we compare these two algorithms with an algorithm not based on the FAM, the FS-GA-FNN introduced in [4], [5]. We conclude that when inferring from small training sets, both techniques are efficient, in terms of generalization capability and execution time. The computational overhead introduced is compensated by better accuracy. Finally, the proposed techniques are used to predict the biological activities of newly designed potential HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:21071799

  5. Free energy calculation of single molecular interaction using Jarzynski's identity method: the case of HIV-1 protease inhibitor system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Chang; Ji, Bao-Hua

    2012-06-01

    Jarzynski' identity (JI) method was suggested a promising tool for reconstructing free energy landscape of biomolecular interactions in numerical simulations and experiments. However, JI method has not yet been well tested in complex systems such as ligand-receptor molecular pairs. In this paper, we applied a huge number of steered molecular dynamics (SMD) simulations to dissociate the protease of human immunodeficiency type I virus (HIV-1 protease) and its inhibitors. We showed that because of intrinsic complexity of the ligand-receptor system, the energy barrier predicted by JI method at high pulling rates is much higher than experimental results. However, with a slower pulling rate and fewer switch times of simulations, the predictions of JI method can approach to the experiments. These results suggested that the JI method is more appropriate for reconstructing free energy landscape using the data taken from experiments, since the pulling rates used in experiments are often much slower than those in SMD simulations. Furthermore, we showed that a higher loading stiffness can produce higher precision of calculation of energy landscape because it yields a lower mean value and narrower bandwidth of work distribution in SMD simulations.

  6. Design, synthesis and evaluation of a potent substrate analog inhibitor identified by scanning Ala/Phe mutagenesis, mimicking substrate co-evolution, against multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Muhuhi, Joseck M.; Liu, Zhigang; Bencze, Krisztina Z.; Koupparis, Kyriacos; O’Connor, Carrie E.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Spaller, Mark R.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Inhibitors against MDR HIV-1 protease were designed, synthesized and evaluated. •Lead peptide (6a) showed potent inhibition (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) of MDR HIV-1 protease. •(6a) Showed favorable binding isotherms against NL4-3 and MDR proteases. •(6a) Induced perturbations in the {sup 15}N-HSQC spectrum of MDR HIV-1 protease. •Molecular modeling suggested that (6a) may induce total flap closure inMDR protease. -- Abstract: Multidrug-resistant (MDR) clinical isolate-769, human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PDB ID: (1TW7)), was shown to exhibit wide-open flaps and an expanded active site cavity, causing loss of contacts with protease inhibitors. In the current study, the expanded active site cavity of MDR769 HIV-1 protease was screened with a series of peptide-inhibitors that were designed to mimic the natural substrate cleavage site, capsid/p2. Scanning Ala/Phe chemical mutagenesis approach was incorporated into the design of the peptide series to mimic the substrate co-evolution. Among the peptides synthesized and evaluated, a lead peptide (6a) with potent activity (IC{sub 50}: 4.4 nM) was identified against the MDR769 HIV-1 protease. Isothermal titration calorimetry data showed favorable binding profile for 6aagainst both wild type and MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectrum of {sup 15}N-labeled MDR769 HIV-1 protease in complex with 6a showed some major perturbations in chemical shift, supporting the peptide induced conformational changes in protease. Modeling analysis revealed multiple contacts between 6a and MDR769 HIV-1 protease. The lead peptide-inhibitor, 6a, with high potency and good binding profile can be used as the basis for developing potent small molecule inhibitors against MDR variants of HIV.

  7. Extreme multidrug resistant HIV-1 protease with 20 mutations is resistant to novel protease inhibitors with P1′-pyrrolidinone or P2-tris-tetrahydrofuran

    PubMed Central

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Ghosh, Arun K.; Rao, Kalapala Venkateswara; Xu, Chun-Xiao; Sayer, Jane M.; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T.

    2013-01-01

    Extreme drug resistant mutant of HIV-1 protease (PR) bearing 20 mutations (PR20) has been studied with the clinical inhibitor amprenavir (1) and two potent antiviral investigational inhibitors GRL-02031 (2) and GRL-0519 (3). Clinical inhibitors are >1000-fold less active on PR20 than on wild type enzyme, which is consistent with dissociation constants (KL) from isothermal titration calorimetry of 40 nM for 3, 178 nM for amprenavir, and 960 nM for 2. High resolution crystal structures of PR20-inhibitor complexes revealed altered interactions compared with the corresponding wild-type PR complexes in agreement with relative inhibition. Amprenavir lacks interactions due to PR20 mutations in the S2/S2′ subsites relative to PR. Inhibitors 2 and 3 lose interactions with Arg8′ in PR20 relative to the wild type enzyme since Arg8′ shifts to interact with mutated L10F side chain. Overall, inhibitor 3 compares favorably with darunavir in affinity for PR20 and shows promise for further development. PMID:23590295

  8. Mutational anatomy of an HIV-1 protease variant conferring cross-resistance to protease inhibitors in clinical trials. Compensatory modulations of binding and activity.

    PubMed

    Schock, H B; Garsky, V M; Kuo, L C

    1996-12-13

    Site-specific substitutions of as few as four amino acids (M46I/L63P/V82T/I84V) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease engenders cross-resistance to a panel of protease inhibitors that are either in clinical trials or have recently been approved for HIV therapy (Condra, J. H., Schleif, W. A., Blahy, O. M. , Gadryelski, L. J., Graham, D. J., Quintero, J. C., Rhodes, A., Robbins, H. L., Roth, E., Shivaprakash, M., Titus, D., Yang, T., Teppler, H., Squires, K. E., Deutsch, P. J., and Emini, E. A. (1995) Nature 374, 569-571). These four substitutions are among the prominent mutations found in primary HIV isolates obtained from patients undergoing therapy with several protease inhibitors. Two of these mutations (V82T/I84V) are located in, while the other two (M46I/L63P) are away from, the binding cleft of the enzyme. The functional role of these mutations has now been delineated in terms of their influence on the binding affinity and catalytic efficiency of the protease. We have found that the double substitutions of M46I and L63P do not affect binding but instead endow the enzyme with a catalytic efficiency significantly exceeding (110-360%) that of the wild-type enzyme. In contrast, the double substitutions of V82T and I84V are detrimental to the ability of the protease to bind and, thereby, to catalyze. When combined, the four amino acid replacements institute in the protease resistance against inhibitors and a significantly higher catalytic activity than one containing only mutations in its active site. The results suggest that in raising drug resistance, these four site-specific mutations of the protease are compensatory in function; those in the active site diminish equilibrium binding (by increasing Ki), and those away from the active site enhance catalysis (by increasing kcat/KM). This conclusion is further supported by energy estimates in that the Gibbs free energies of binding and catalysis for the quadruple mutant are quantitatively

  9. The effect of desolvation on the binding of inhibitors to HIV-1 protease and cyclin-dependent kinases: Causes of resistance.

    PubMed

    Fong, Clifford W

    2016-08-01

    Studies of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors and HIV-1 protease inhibitors have confirmed that ligand-protein binding is dependent on desolvation effects. It has been found that a four parameter linear model incorporating desolvation energy, lipophilicity, dipole moment and molecular volume of the ligands is a good model to describe the binding between ligands and kinases or proteases. The resistance shown by MDR proteases to the anti-viral drugs is multi-faceted involving varying changes in desolvation, lipophilicity and dipole moment interaction compared to the non-resistant protease. Desolvation has been shown to be the dominant factor influencing the effect of inhibitors against the cyclin-dependent kinases, but lipophilicity and dipole moment are also significant factors. The model can differentiate between the inhibitory activity of CDK2/cycE, CDK1/cycB and CDK4/cycD enzymes. PMID:27317642

  10. A copper(I)-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole azide-alkyne click compound, is a potent inhibitor of a multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease variant

    PubMed Central

    Giffin, Michael J.; Heaslet, Holly; Brik, Ashraf; Lin, Ying-Chuan; Cauvi, Gabrielle; Wong, Chi-Huey; McRee, Duncan E.; Elder, John H.; Stout, C. David; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2009-01-01

    Treatment with protease inhibitors, a component of Highly Active Anti-retroviral Therapy (HAART), often results in viral resistance. Structural and biochemical characterization of a 6X mutant arising from in vitro selection with compound 1, a C2-symmetric diol protease inhibitor, has been previously described. We now show that compound 2, a copper(I)-catalyzed 1,2,3-triazole derived compound previously shown to be potently effective against wild-type protease (IC50 = 6.0 nM), has low nM activity (IC50 = 15.7 nM) against the multidrug-resistant 6X HIV-1 protease mutant. Compound 2 displays similar efficacy against wild-type and 6X HIV-1 in viral replication assays. While structural studies of compound 1 bound to wild type and mutant protease revealed a progressive change in binding mode in the mutants, the 1.3 Å resolution 6X protease–compound 2 crystal structure reveals nearly identical interactions for 2 as in the wild-type protease complex with very little change in compound 2 or protease conformation. PMID:18823110

  11. C-5-Modified Tetrahydropyrano-Tetrahydofuran-Derived Protease Inhibitors (PIs) Exert Potent Inhibition of the Replication of HIV-1 Variants Highly Resistant to Various PIs, including Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Manabu; Hayashi, Hironori; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Takamatsu, Yuki; Aoki-Ogata, Hiromi; Nakamura, Teruya; Nakata, Hirotomo; Das, Debananda; Yamagata, Yuriko; Ghosh, Arun K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We identified three nonpeptidic HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs), GRL-015, -085, and -097, containing tetrahydropyrano-tetrahydrofuran (Tp-THF) with a C-5 hydroxyl. The three compounds were potent against a wild-type laboratory HIV-1 strain (HIV-1WT), with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) of 3.0 to 49 nM, and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity, with 50% cytotoxic concentrations (CC50) for GRL-015, -085, and -097 of 80, >100, and >100 μM, respectively. All the three compounds potently inhibited the replication of highly PI-resistant HIV-1 variants selected with each of the currently available PIs and recombinant clinical HIV-1 isolates obtained from patients harboring multidrug-resistant HIV-1 variants (HIVMDR). Importantly, darunavir (DRV) was >1,000 times less active against a highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variant (HIV-1DRVRP51); the three compounds remained active against HIV-1DRVRP51 with only a 6.8- to 68-fold reduction. Moreover, the emergence of HIV-1 variants resistant to the three compounds was considerably delayed compared to the case of DRV. In particular, HIV-1 variants resistant to GRL-085 and -097 did not emerge even when two different highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 variants were used as a starting population. In the structural analyses, Tp-THF of GRL-015, -085, and -097 showed strong hydrogen bond interactions with the backbone atoms of active-site amino acid residues (Asp29 and Asp30) of HIV-1 protease. A strong hydrogen bonding formation between the hydroxyl moiety of Tp-THF and a carbonyl oxygen atom of Gly48 was newly identified. The present findings indicate that the three compounds warrant further study as possible therapeutic agents for treating individuals harboring wild-type HIV and/or HIVMDR. IMPORTANCE Darunavir (DRV) inhibits the replication of most existing multidrug-resistant HIV-1 strains and has a high genetic barrier. However, the emergence of highly DRV-resistant HIV-1 strains (HIVDRVR) has recently been observed in vivo and in

  12. Dual inhibitors for aspartic proteases HIV-1 PR and renin: advancements in AIDS-hypertension-diabetes linkage via molecular dynamics, inhibition assays, and binding free energy calculations.

    PubMed

    Tzoupis, Haralambos; Leonis, Georgios; Megariotis, Grigorios; Supuran, Claudiu T; Mavromoustakos, Thomas; Papadopoulos, Manthos G

    2012-06-28

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) and renin are primary targets toward AIDS and hypertension therapies, respectively. Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) free-energy calculations and inhibition assays for canagliflozin, an antidiabetic agent verified its effective binding to both proteins (ΔG(pred) = -9.1 kcal mol(-1) for canagliflozin-renin; K(i,exp)= 628 nM for canagliflozin-HIV-1 PR). Moreover, drugs aliskiren (a renin inhibitor) and darunavir (an HIV-1 PR inhibitor) showed high affinity for HIV-1 PR (K(i,exp)= 76.5 nM) and renin (K(i,pred)= 261 nM), respectively. Importantly, a high correlation was observed between experimental and predicted binding energies (r(2) = 0.92). This study suggests that canagliflozin, aliskiren, and darunavir may induce profound effects toward dual HIV-1 PR and renin inhibition. Since patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have a high risk of developing hypertension and diabetes, aliskiren-based or canagliflozin-based drug design against HIV-1 PR may eliminate these side-effects and also facilitate AIDS therapy. PMID:22621689

  13. Exploring the drug resistance of V32I and M46L mutant HIV-1 protease to inhibitor TMC114: flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1-pr) generally only bind to the active site of the protease. However, for some mutants such as V32I and M46L the TMC114 can bind not only to the active cavity but also to the groove of the flexible flaps. Although the second binding site suggests the higher efficiency of the drug against HIV-1-pr, the drug resistance in HIV-1-pr due to mutations cannot be ignored, which prompts us to investigate the molecular mechanisms of drug resistance and behavior of double bound TMC114 (2T) to HIV-1-pr. The conformational dynamics of HIV-1-pr and the binding of TMC114 to the WT, V32I and M46L mutants were investigated with all-atom molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. The 20 ns MD simulation shows many fascinating effects of the inhibitor binding to the WT and mutant proteases. MM-PBSA calculations explain the binding free energies unfavorable for the M46L and V32I mutants as compared to the WT. For the single binding (1T) the less binding affinity can be attributed to the entropic loss for both V32I-1T and M46L-1T. Although the second binding of TMC114 with flap does increase binding energy for the mutants (V32I-2T and M46L-2T), the considerable entropy loss results in the lower binding Gibbs free energies. Thus, binding of TMC114 in the flap region does not help much in the total gain in binding affinity of the system, which was verified from this study and thereby validating experiments. PMID:25562662

  14. Design of HIV-1 protease inhibitors with pyrrolidinones and oxazolidinones as novel P1'-ligands to enhance backbone-binding interactions with protease: synthesis, biological evaluation, and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Anderson, David D.; Baldridge, Abigail; Noetzel, Marcus; Miller, Heather B.; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2009-09-02

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to enhance interactions with protease backbone atoms, we have incorporated stereochemically defined methyl-2-pyrrolidinone and methyl oxazolidinone as the P1{prime}-ligands. These ligands are designed to interact with Gly-27{prime} carbonyl and Arg-8 side chain in the S1{prime}-subsite of the HIV protease. We have investigated the potential of these ligands in combination with our previously developed bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) and cyclopentanyltetrahydrofuran (Cp-THF) as the P2-ligands. Inhibitor 19b with a (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone and a Cp-THF was shown to be the most potent compound. This inhibitor maintained near full potency against multi-PI-resistant clinical HIV-1 variants. A high resolution protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 19b-bound HIV-1 protease revealed that the P1{prime}-pyrrolidinone heterocycle and the P2-Cp-ligand are involved in several critical interactions with the backbone atoms in the S1{prime} and S2 subsites of HIV-1 protease.

  15. Flexible Cyclic Ethers/Polyethers as Novel P2-Ligands for HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-Ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Baldridge, Abigal; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    We report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors. The inhibitors incorporate stereochemically defined flexible cyclic ethers/polyethers as high affinity P2-ligands. Inhibitors containing small ring 1,3-dioxacycloalkanes have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 3d and 3h are the most active inhibitors. Inhibitor 3d maintains excellent potency against a variety of multi-PI-resistant clinical strains. Our structure-activity studies indicate that the ring size, stereochemistry, and position of oxygens are important for the observed activity. Optically active synthesis of 1,3-dioxepan-5-ol along with the syntheses of various cyclic ether and polyether ligands have been described. A protein-ligand X-ray crystal structure of 3d-bound HIV-1 protease was determined. The structure revealed that the P2-ligand makes extensive interactions including hydrogen bonding with the protease backbone in the S2-site. In addition, the P2-ligand in 3d forms a unique water-mediated interaction with the NH of Gly-48.

  16. Lead expansion and virtual screening of Indinavir derivate HIV-1 protease inhibitors using pharmacophoric - shape similarity scoring function

    PubMed Central

    Shityakov, Sergey; Dandekar, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Indinavir (Crivaxan®) is a potent inhibitor of the HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) protease. This enzyme has an important role in viral replication and is considered to be very attractive target for new antiretroviral drugs. However, it becomes less effective due to highly resistant new viral strains of HIV, which have multiple mutations in their proteases. For this reason, we used a lead expansion method to create a new set of compounds with a new mode of action to protease binding site. 1300 compounds chemically diverse from the initial hit were generated and screened to determine their ability to interact with protease and establish their QSAR properties. Further computational analyses revealed one unique compound with different protease binding ability from the initial hit and its role for possible new class of protease inhibitors is discussed in this report. PMID:20978602

  17. NFV, an HIV-1 protease inhibitor, induces growth arrest, reduced Akt signalling, apoptosis and docetaxel sensitisation in NSCLC cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Y; Ikezoe, T; Nishioka, C; Bandobashi, K; Takeuchi, T; Adachi, Y; Kobayashi, M; Takeuchi, S; Koeffler, H P; Taguchi, H

    2006-12-18

    HIV-1 protease inhibitor (PI), nelfinavir (NFV) induced growth arrest and apoptosis of NCI-H460 and -H520, A549, EBC-1 and ABC-1 non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells in association with upregulation of p21waf1, p27kip1 and p53, and downregulation of Bcl-2 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 proteins. We found that NFV blocked Akt signalling in these cells as measured by Akt kinase assay with glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha/beta (GSK-3alpha/beta) as a substrate. To explore the role of Akt signalling in NFV-mediated growth inhibition of NSCLC cells, we blocked this signal pathway by transfection of Akt small interfering RNA (siRNA) in these cells; transient transfection of Akt siRNA in NCI-H460 cells decreased the level of Bcl-2 protein and slowed their proliferation compared to the nonspecific siRNA-transfected cells. Conversely, forced-expression of Akt partially reversed NFV-mediated growth inhibition of these cells, suggesting that Akt may be a molecular target of NFV in NSCLC cells. Also, we found that inhibition of Akt signalling by NFV enhanced the ability of docetaxel to inhibit the growth of NCI-H460 and -H520 cells, as measured by MTT assay. Importantly, NFV slowed the proliferation and induced apoptosis of NCI-H460 cells present as tumour xenografts in nude mice without adverse systemic effects. Taken together, this family of compounds might be useful for the treatment of individuals with NSCLC. PMID:17133272

  18. Antitumor and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities of a Hemagglutinin and a Protease Inhibitor from Mini-Black Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Xiu Juan; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2011-01-01

    Protease inhibitors (PIs) and hemagglutinins are defense proteins produced by many organisms. From Chinese mini-black soybeans, a 17.5-kDa PI was isolated using chromatography on Q-Sepharose, SP-Sepharose, and DEAE-cellulose. A 25-kDa hemagglutinin was purified similarly, but using Superdex 75 instead of DEAE-cellulose in the final step. The PI inhibited trypsin and chymotrypsin (IC50 = 7.2 and 8.8 μM). Its trypsin inhibitory activity was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 70°C. The hemagglutinin activity of the hemagglutinin was stable from pH 2 to pH 13 and from 0°C to 75°C. The results indicated that both PI and hemagglutinin were relatively thermostable and pH-stable. The trypsin inhibitory activity was inhibited by dithiothreitol, signifying the importance of the disulfide bond to the activity. The hemagglutinating activity was inhibited most potently by D (+)-raffinose and N-acetyl-D-galactosamine, suggesting that the hemagglutinin was specific for these two sugars. Both PI and hemagglutinin inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (IC50 = 3.2 and 5.5 μM), proliferation of breast cancer cells (IC50 = 9.7 and 3.5 μM), and hepatoma cells (IC50 = 35 and 6.2 μM), with relatively high potencies. PMID:21527979

  19. A Randomized Trial of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Protease Inhibitors in Antiretroviral-Experienced, HIV-1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Demeter, Lisa M.; Jiang, Hongyu; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Morse, Gene D.; DiFrancesco, Robin; Dykes, Carrie; Sista, Prakash; Bacheler, Lee; Klingman, Karin; Rinehart, Alex; Albrecht, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Objective Whether therapeutic drug monitoring of protease inhibitors (PIs) improves outcomes in HIV-infected patients is controversial. We evaluated this strategy in a randomized, open-label clinical trial, using a normalized inhibitory quotient (NIQ), which incorporates drug exposure and viral drug resistance. NIQs≤1 may predict poor outcome and identify patients who could benefit from dose escalation. Design/Methods Eligible patients had a viral load ≥1,000 copies/mL on a failing regimen, and began a new PI-containing regimen at entry. All FDA-approved PIs available during study recruitment (June 2002-May 2006) were allowed. One-hundred-eighty-three participants with NIQ≤1, based on their week 2 PI trough concentration and pre-entry drug resistance test, were randomized at week 4 to standard of care (SOC) or PI dose escalation (TDM). The primary endpoint was change in log10 plasma HIV-1 RNA concentration from randomization to 20 weeks later. Results Ninety-one subjects were randomized to SOC, 92 to TDM. NIQs increased more in the TDM arm compared to SOC (+69% versus +25%, p=0.01). Despite this, TDM and SOC arms showed no difference in outcome (+0.09 versus +0.02 log10, p=0.17). In retrospective subgroup analyses, patients with less HIV resistance to their PIs benefited from TDM (p=0.002), as did black and Hispanic patients (p=0.035 and 0.05, respectively). Differences between black and white patients persisted when accounting for PI susceptibility. Conclusions There was no overall benefit of TDM. In post-hoc, subgroup analyses, TDM appeared beneficial in black and Hispanic patients, and in patients whose virus retained some susceptibility to the PIs in their regimen. PMID:19114860

  20. Synthesis, X-ray Analysis, and Biological Evaluation of a New Class of Stereopure Lactam-Based HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to identify a new class of druglike HIV-1 protease inhibitors, four different stereopure β-hydroxy γ-lactam-containing inhibitors have been synthesized, biologically evaluated, and cocrystallized. The impact of the tether length of the central spacer (two or three carbons) was also investigated. A compound with a shorter tether and (3R,4S) absolute configuration exhibited high activity with a Ki of 2.1 nM and an EC50 of 0.64 μM. Further optimization by decoration of the P1′ side chain furnished an even more potent HIV-1 protease inhibitor (Ki = 0.8 nM, EC50 = 0.04 μM). According to X-ray analysis, the new class of inhibitors did not fully succeed in forming two symmetric hydrogen bonds to the catalytic aspartates. The crystal structures of the complexes further explain the difference in potency between the shorter inhibitors (two-carbon spacer) and the longer inhibitors (three-carbon spacer). PMID:22376008

  1. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This “shock” approach is then followed by “kill” of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  2. Specific Elimination of Latently HIV-1 Infected Cells Using HIV-1 Protease-Sensitive Toxin Nanocapsules.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Yan, Ming; Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Xie, Yiming; Lu, Yunfeng; Kamata, Masakazu; Chen, Irvin S Y

    2016-01-01

    Anti-retroviral drugs suppress HIV-1 plasma viremia to undetectable levels; however, latent HIV-1 persists in reservoirs within HIV-1-infected patients. The silent provirus can be activated through the use of drugs, including protein kinase C activators and histone deacetylase inhibitors. This "shock" approach is then followed by "kill" of the producing cells either through direct HIV-1-induced cell death or natural immune mechanisms. However, these mechanisms are relatively slow and effectiveness is unclear. Here, we develop an approach to specifically target and kill cells that are activated early in the process of virus production. We utilize a novel nanocapsule technology whereby the ricin A chain is encapsulated in an inactive form within a polymer shell. Specificity for release of the ricin A toxin is conferred by peptide crosslinkers that are sensitive to cleavage by HIV-1 protease. By using well-established latent infection models, J-Lat and U1 cells, we demonstrate that only within an HIV-1-producing cell expressing functional HIV-1 protease will the nanocapsule release its ricin A cargo, shutting down viral and cellular protein synthesis, and ultimately leading to rapid death of the producer cell. Thus, we provide proof of principle for a novel technology to kill HIV-1-producing cells without effects on non-target cells. PMID:27049645

  3. Low rate of virological failure and maintenance of susceptibility to HIV-1 protease inhibitors with first-line lopinavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral treatment in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Prosperi, Mattia C F; Zazzi, Maurizio; Punzi, Grazia; Monno, Laura; Colao, Grazia; Corsi, Paola; Di Giambenedetto, Simona; Meini, Genny; Ghisetti, Valeria; Bonora, Stefano; Pecorari, Monica; Gismondo, Maria Rita; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Carli, Tiziana; De Luca, Andrea

    2010-12-01

    Protease inhibitor (PI)-resistant HIV-1 has hardly ever been detected at failed boosted PI-based first-line antiretroviral regimens in clinical trials. However, this phenomenon has not been investigated in clinical practice. To address this gap, data from patients starting a first-line lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/rtv)-based therapy with available baseline HIV-1 RNA load, a viral genotype and follow-up viral load after 3 and 6 months of treatment were extracted from the Italian Antiretroviral Resistance Cohort Analysis (ARCA) observational database. Based on survival analysis, 39 (7.1%) and 43 (7.8%) of the 548 examined patient cases had an HIV-1 RNA >500 and >50 copies/ml, respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Cox proportional hazard models detected baseline HIV-1 RNA (RH 1.79, 95%CI 1.10-2.92 per 1-log(10) increase, P=0.02) and resistance to the nucleoside backbone (RH 1.04, 95%CI 1.02-1.06 per 10-point increase using the Stanford HIVdb algorithm, P<0.001) as independent predictors of HIV-1 RNA at >500 copies/ml, but not at the >50 copies/ml cutoff criteria. Higher baseline viral load, older patient age, heterosexual route of infection and use of tenofovir/emtricitabine were predictors of failure at month 3 using the 50-copy and/or 500-copy threshold. Resistance to LPV/rtv did not occur or increase in any of the available 36 follow-up HIV-1 genotypes. Resistance to the nucleoside backbone (M184V) developed in four cases. Despite the likely differences in patient population and adherence, both the low rate of virological failure and the lack of development of LPV/rtv resistance documented in clinical trials are thus confirmed in clinical practice. PMID:20981785

  4. HIV-1 protease-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Apoptosis is one of the presumptive causes of CD4+ T cell depletion during HIV infection and progression to AIDS. However, the precise role of HIV-1 in this process remains unexplained. HIV-1 protease (PR) has been suggested as a possible factor, but a direct link between HIV-1 PR enzymatic activity and apoptosis has not been established. Results Here, we show that expression of active HIV-1 PR induces death in HeLa and HEK-293 cells via the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. This conclusion is based on in vivo observations of the direct localization of HIV-1 PR in mitochondria, a key player in triggering apoptosis. Moreover, we observed an HIV-1 PR concentration-dependent decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and the role of HIV-1 PR in activation of caspase 9, PARP cleavage and DNA fragmentation. In addition, in vitro data demonstrated that HIV-1 PR mediates cleavage of mitochondrial proteins Tom22, VDAC and ANT, leading to release of AIF and Hsp60 proteins. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we also identified a new HIV-1 PR interaction partner, breast carcinoma-associated protein 3 (BCA3). We found that BCA3 accelerates p53 transcriptional activity on the bax promoter, thus elevating the cellular level of pro-apoptotic Bax protein. Conclusion In summary, our results describe the involvement of HIV-1 PR in apoptosis, which is caused either by a direct effect of HIV-1 PR on mitochondrial membrane integrity or by its interaction with cellular protein BCA3. PMID:24886575

  5. The hunt for HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lataillade, Max; Kozal, Michael J

    2006-07-01

    Currently, there are three distinct mechanistic classes of antiretrovirals: inhibitors of the HIV- 1 reverse transcriptase and protease enzymes and inhibitors of HIV entry, including receptor and coreceptor binding and cell fusion. A new drug class that inhibits the HIV-1 integrase enzyme (IN) is in development and may soon be available in the clinic. IN is an attractive drug target because it is essential for a stable and productive HIV-1 infection and there is no mammalian homologue of IN. Inhibitors of integrase enzyme (INI) block the integration of viral double-stranded DNA into the host cell's chromosomal DNA. HIV-1 integration has many potential steps that can be inhibited and several new compounds that target specific integration steps have been identified by drug developers. Recently, two INIs, GS-9137 and MK-0518, demonstrated promising early clinical trial results and have been advanced into later stage trials. In this review, we describe how IN facilitates HIV-1 integration, the needed enzyme cofactors, and the resultant byproducts created during integration. Furthermore, we review the different INIs under development, their mechanism of actions, site of IN inhibition, potency, resistance patterns, and discuss the early clinical trial results. PMID:16839248

  6. Decomposing the Energetic Impact of Drug-Resistant Mutations: The Example of HIV-1 Protease - DRV Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yufeng; Schiffer, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Summary HIV-1 protease is a major drug target for AIDS therapy. With the appearance of drug-resistant HIV-1 protease variants, understanding the mechanism of drug resistance becomes critical. Computational methods can provide more details about inhibitor-protease binding other than crystallography and isothermal titration calorimetry. Darunavir is the latest FDA approved HIV-1 protease inhibitor. In this context, the free energy component analysis is performed on the DRV binding to WT protease and ACT, a drug resistant variant, to evaluate contribution of each atoms of DRV to the binding affinity. This information can contribute to the rationale design of new HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:22183557

  7. Potent Antiviral HIV-1 Protease Inhibitor GRL-02031 Adapts to the Structures of Drug Resistant Mutants with Its P1;#8242;-Pyrrolidinone Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Yu-Chung E.; Yu, XiaXia; Zhang, Ying; Tie, Yunfeng; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Yashchuk, Sofiya; Ghosh, Arun K.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2012-11-14

    GRL-02031 (1) is an HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor containing a novel P1' (R)-aminomethyl-2-pyrrolidinone group. Crystal structures at resolutions of 1.25-1.55 {angstrom} were analyzed for complexes of 1 with the PR containing major drug resistant mutations, PR{sub I47V}, PR{sub L76V}, PR{sub V82A}, and PR{sub N88D}. Mutations of I47V and V82A alter residues in the inhibitor-binding site, while L76V and N88D are distal mutations having no direct contact with the inhibitor. Substitution of a smaller amino acid in PR{sub I47V} and PR{sub L76V} and the altered charge of PR{sub N88D} are associated with significant local structural changes compared to the wild-type PR{sub WT}, while substitution of alanine in PR{sub V82A} increases the size of the S1' subsite. The P1' pyrrolidinone group of 1 accommodates to these local changes by assuming two different conformations. Overall, the conformation and interactions of 1 with PR mutants resemble those of PR{sub WT} with similar inhibition constants in good agreement with the antiviral potency on multidrug resistant HIV-1.

  8. An oral high dose of cholecalciferol restores vitamin D status in deficient postmenopausal HIV-1-infected women independently of protease inhibitors therapy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Jessica; Mezzaroma, Ivano; Fantauzzi, Alessandra; Falciano, Mario; Salotti, Alessandra; Di Traglia, Mario; Diacinti, Daniele; Biondi, Piergianni; Cipriani, Cristiana; Cilli, Mirella; Minisola, Salvatore

    2016-07-01

    The best repletion and maintenance dosing regimens with cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 patients remain unknown. Protease inhibitors (PIs) have been shown to inhibit vitamin D 1α- and 25α-hydroxylation in hepatocyte and monocyte cultures. We therefore evaluated the effect of a single high dose of cholecalciferol in vitamin D-deficient HIV-1 postmenopausal women undergoing treatment with highly active anti-retroviral therapy (cART), with and without PIs. Forty HIV-1 postmenopausal women treated with cART, with hypovitaminosis D (<20 ng/ml), were enrolled. We measured serum changes of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D]; 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D], parathyroid hormone (PTH), serum calcium, and urinary calcium excretion following a loading dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol after 3, 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. Patients were divided into two groups, whether or not they were taking PI. A significant increase in mean 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels at day 3 and throughout the entire observation period was found in both groups (p < 0.001). PTH levels concomitantly decreased in both groups (p < 0.001). Mean albumin-adjusted serum calcium increases with respect to baseline were significant only at day 3 and day 30 for both groups (p < 0.01). Considering remaining parameters, there were no significant differences between the groups at any time, by two-way RM ANOVA. An oral dose of 600,000 IU of cholecalciferol in HIV-1 postmenopausal women rapidly increases 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D levels reducing PTH levels, regardless of the presence of PIs in the cART scheme. PMID:26254790

  9. Nine Crystal Structures Determine the Substrate Envelope of the MDR HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-03-27

    Under drug selection pressure, emerging mutations render HIV-1 protease drug resistant, leading to the therapy failure in anti-HIV treatment. It is known that nine substrate cleavage site peptides bind to wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease in a conserved pattern. However, how the multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease binds to the substrate cleavage site peptides is yet to be determined. MDR769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90) was selected for present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. MDR769 HIV-1 protease was co-crystallized with nine substrate cleavage site hepta-peptides. Crystallographic studies show that MDR769 HIV-1 protease has an expanded substrate envelope with wide open flaps. Furthermore, ligand binding energy calculations indicate weaker binding in MDR769 HIV-1 protease-substrate complexes. These results help in designing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by targeting the MDR HIV-1 protease.

  10. In Vitro Characterization of GS-8374, a Novel Phosphonate-Containing Inhibitor of HIV-1 Protease with a Favorable Resistance Profile ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Callebaut, Christian; Stray, Kirsten; Tsai, Luong; Williams, Matt; Yang, Zheng-Yu; Cannizzaro, Carina; Leavitt, Stephanie A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Kelly; Murray, Bernard P.; Mulato, Andrew; Hatada, Marcos; Priskich, Tina; Parkin, Neil; Swaminathan, Swami; Lee, William; He, Gong-Xin; Xu, Lianhong; Cihlar, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    GS-8374 is a novel bis-tetrahydrofuran HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitor (PI) with a unique diethylphosphonate moiety. It was selected from a series of analogs containing various di(alkyl)phosphonate substitutions connected via a linker to the para position of a P-1 phenyl ring. GS-8374 inhibits HIV-1 PR with high potency (Ki = 8.1 pM) and with no known effect on host proteases. Kinetic and thermodynamic analysis of GS-8374 binding to PR demonstrated an extremely slow off rate for the inhibitor and favorable contributions of both the enthalpic and entropic components to the total free binding energy. GS-8374 showed potent antiretroviral activity in T-cell lines, primary CD4+ T cells (50% effective concentration [EC50] = 3.4 to 11.5 nM), and macrophages (EC50 = 25.5 nM) and exhibited low cytotoxicity in multiple human cell types. The antiviral potency of GS-8374 was only moderately affected by human serum protein binding, and its combination with multiple approved antiretrovirals showed synergistic effects. When it was tested in a PhenoSense assay against a panel of 24 patient-derived viruses with high-level PI resistance, GS-8374 showed lower mean EC50s and lower fold resistance than any of the clinically approved PIs. Similar to other PIs, in vitro hepatic microsomal metabolism of GS-8374 was efficiently blocked by ritonavir, suggesting a potential for effective pharmacokinetic boosting in vivo. In summary, results from this broad in vitro pharmacological profiling indicate that GS-8374 is a promising candidate to be further assessed as a new antiretroviral agent with potential for clinical efficacy in both treatment-naïve and -experienced patients. PMID:21245449

  11. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guodong; Ma, Aijing; Dou, Xianghua; Zhao, Liling; Wang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A) and inhibitor (GRL-0519) complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson–Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT) complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors. PMID:27240358

  12. Computational Studies of a Mechanism for Binding and Drug Resistance in the Wild Type and Four Mutations of HIV-1 Protease with a GRL-0519 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Hu, Guodong; Ma, Aijing; Dou, Xianghua; Zhao, Liling; Wang, Jihua

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance of mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) is the most severe challenge to the long-term efficacy of HIV-1 PR inhibitor in highly active antiretroviral therapy. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of drug resistance associated with mutations (D30N, I50V, I54M, and V82A) and inhibitor (GRL-0519) complexes, we have performed five molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and calculated the binding free energies using the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method. The ranking of calculated binding free energies is in accordance with the experimental data. The free energy spectra of each residue and inhibitor interaction for all complexes show a similar binding model. Analysis based on the MD trajectories and contribution of each residues show that groups R2 and R3 mainly contribute van der Waals energies, while groups R1 and R4 contribute electrostatic interaction by hydrogen bonds. The drug resistance of D30N can be attributed to the decline in binding affinity of residues 28 and 29. The size of Val50 is smaller than Ile50 causes the residue to move, especially in chain A. The stable hydrophobic core, including the side chain of Ile54 in the wild type (WT) complex, became unstable in I54M because the side chain of Met54 is flexible with two alternative conformations. The binding affinity of Ala82 in V82A decreases relative to Val82 in WT. The present study could provide important guidance for the design of a potent new drug resisting the mutation inhibitors. PMID:27240358

  13. HIV-1 Protease in the Fission Yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    PubMed Central

    Benko, Zsigmond; Elder, Robert T.; Li, Ge; Liang, Dong; Zhao, Richard Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-1 protease (PR) is an essential viral enzyme. Its primary function is to proteolyze the viral Gag-Pol polyprotein for production of viral enzymes and structural proteins and for maturation of infectious viral particles. Increasing evidence suggests that PR cleaves host cellular proteins. However, the nature of PR-host cellular protein interactions is elusive. This study aimed to develop a fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe) model system and to examine the possible interaction of HIV-1 PR with cellular proteins and its potential impact on cell proliferation and viability. Results A fission yeast strain RE294 was created that carried a single integrated copy of the PR gene in its chromosome. The PR gene was expressed using an inducible nmt1 promoter so that PR-specific effects could be measured. HIV-1 PR from this system cleaved the same indigenous viral p6/MA protein substrate as it does in natural HIV-1 infections. HIV-1 PR expression in fission yeast cells prevented cell proliferation and induced cellular oxidative stress and changes in mitochondrial morphology that led to cell death. Both these PR activities can be prevented by a PR-specific enzymatic inhibitor, indinavir, suggesting that PR-mediated proteolytic activities and cytotoxic effects resulted from enzymatic activities of HIV-1 PR. Through genome-wide screening, a serine/threonine kinase, Hhp2, was identified that suppresses HIV-1 PR-induced protease cleavage and cell death in fission yeast and in mammalian cells, where it prevented PR-induced apoptosis and cleavage of caspase-3 and caspase-8. Conclusions This is the first report to show that HIV-1 protease is functional as an enzyme in fission yeast, and that it behaves in a similar manner as it does in HIV-1 infection. HIV-1 PR-induced cell death in fission yeast could potentially be used as an endpoint for mechanistic studies, and this system could be used for developing a high-throughput system for drug screenings. PMID:26982200

  14. Potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating meso-bicyclic urethanes as P2-ligands: structure-based design, synthesis, biological evaluation and protein-ligand X-ray studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun; Gemma, Sandra; Takayama, Jun; Baldridge, Abigail; Leshchenko-Yashchuk, Sofiya; Miller, Heather; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Koh, Yashiro; Weber, Irene; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-12-05

    Recently, we designed a series of novel HIV-1 protease inhibitors incorporating a stereochemically defined bicyclic fused cyclopentyl (Cp-THF) urethane as the high affinity P2-ligand. Inhibitor 1 with this P2-ligand has shown very impressive potency against multi-drug-resistant clinical isolates. Based upon the 1-bound HIV-1 protease X-ray structure, we have now designed and synthesized a number of meso-bicyclic ligands which can conceivably interact similarly to the Cp-THF ligand. The design of meso-ligands is quite attractive as they do not contain any stereocenters. Inhibitors incorporating urethanes of bicyclic-1,3-dioxolane and bicyclic-1,4-dioxane have shown potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activities. Inhibitor 2 (K{sub i} = 0.11 nM; IC{sub 50} = 3.8 nM) displayed very potent antiviral activity in this series. While inhibitor 3 showed comparable enzyme inhibitory activity (K{sub i} = 0.18 nM) its antiviral activity (IC{sub 50} = 170 nM) was significantly weaker than inhibitor 2. Inhibitor 2 maintained an antiviral potency against a series of multi-drug resistant clinical isolates comparable to amprenavir. A protein-ligand X-ray structure of 3-bound HIV-1 protease revealed a number of key hydrogen bonding interactions at the S2-subsite. We have created an active model of inhibitor 2 based upon this X-ray structure.

  15. Hypofibrinolytic state in HIV-1-infected patients treated with protease inhibitor-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Kristina; Bratt, Göran; Schulman, Sam; Bylund, Håkan; Sandström, Eric

    2002-04-15

    Decreased insulin sensitivity, hyperlipidemia, and body fat changes are considered as risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD). A clustering of such factors (metabolic syndrome [MSDR]) exponentially increases the risk. Impaired fibrinolysis and increased coagulation are additional independent risk factors for CHD. We studied the effects of protease inhibitor (PI)-containing highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) on metabolic and hemostatic parameters in 363 HIV-infected individuals, of whom 266 were receiving PI-containing HAART and 97 were treatment naive. The fasting plasma levels of insulin, glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1 (PAI-1), and fibrinogen were evaluated together with the areas of visceral adipose tissue and the visceral adipose tissue/subcutaneous adipose tissue area ratio. The levels of insulin, triglycerides, cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol; visceral adipose tissue area; low-density lipoprotein/high-density lipoprotein ratio; and visceral adipose tissue/subcutaneous adipose tissue area ratio were significantly increased in patients receiving PI-containing HAART compared with treatment-naive patients. The levels of PAI-1 and fibrinogen were significantly higher in patients receiving PI-containing HAART. PAI-1 levels were higher in individuals with MSDR but also in patients without MSDR who were receiving PI-containing HAART. PAI-1 was independently correlated to use of PI-containing HAART, triglyceride level, insulin level, and body mass index (p <.001). These findings suggest that patients receiving PI-containing HAART have decreased fibrinolysis and increased coagulability, which may thus represent additional risk factors for cardiovascular disease in this patient group. PMID:11981359

  16. Design of HIV-1 Protease Inhibitors with Amino-bis-tetrahydrofuran Derivatives as P2-Ligands to Enhance Backbone-Binding Interactions. Synthesis, Biological Evaluation, and Protein-Ligand X-ray Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Martyr, Cuthbert D.; Osswald, Heather L.; Sheri, Venkat Reddy; Kassekert, Luke A.; Chen, Shujing; Agniswamy, Johnson; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Hayashi, Hironori; Aoki, Manabu; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2015-10-30

    Structure-based design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of very potent HIV-1 protease inhibitors are described. In an effort to improve backbone ligand–binding site interactions, we have incorporated basic-amines at the C4 position of the bis-tetrahydrofuran (bis-THF) ring. We speculated that these substituents would make hydrogen bonding interactions in the flap region of HIV-1 protease. Synthesis of these inhibitors was performed diastereoselectively. A number of inhibitors displayed very potent enzyme inhibitory and antiviral activity. Inhibitors 25f, 25i, and 25j were evaluated against a number of highly-PI-resistant HIV-1 strains, and they exhibited improved antiviral activity over darunavir. Two high resolution X-ray structures of 25f- and 25g-bound HIV-1 protease revealed unique hydrogen bonding interactions with the backbone carbonyl group of Gly48 as well as with the backbone NH of Gly48 in the flap region of the enzyme active site. These ligand–binding site interactions are possibly responsible for their potent activity.

  17. Hydrophobic Core Flexibility Modulates Enzyme Activity in HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Seema; Cai, Yufeng; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Bolon, Daniel N.A.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-09-11

    Human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 (HIV-1) protease is crucial for viral maturation and infectivity. Studies of protease dynamics suggest that the rearrangement of the hydrophobic core is essential for enzyme activity. Many mutations in the hydrophobic core are also associated with drug resistance and may modulate the core flexibility. To test the role of flexibility in protease activity, pairs of cysteines were introduced at the interfaces of flexible regions remote from the active site. Disulfide bond formation was confirmed by crystal structures and by alkylation of free cysteines and mass spectrometry. Oxidized and reduced crystal structures of these variants show the overall structure of the protease is retained. However, cross-linking the cysteines led to drastic loss in enzyme activity, which was regained upon reducing the disulfide cross-links. Molecular dynamics simulations showed that altered dynamics propagated throughout the enzyme from the engineered disulfide. Thus, altered flexibility within the hydrophobic core can modulate HIV-1 protease activity, supporting the hypothesis that drug resistant mutations distal from the active site can alter the balance between substrate turnover and inhibitor binding by modulating enzyme activity.

  18. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance. X-ray structure analysis of multi-drug resistant HIV-1 protease ritonavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Wang, Yong; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2013-01-08

    Ritonavir (RTV) is a first generation HIV-1 protease inhibitor with rapidly emerging drug resistance. Mutations at residues 46, 54, 82 and 84 render the HIV-1 protease drug resistant against RTV. We report the crystal structure of multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (carrying resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84 and 90) complexed with RTV and the in vitro enzymatic IC50 of RTV against MDR HIV-1 protease. The structural and functional studies demonstrate significant drug resistance of MDR HIV-1 protease against RTV, arising from reduced hydrogen bonds and Van der Waals interactions between RTV and MDR HIV-1 protease.

  19. Conserved hydrogen bonds and water molecules in MDR HIV-1 protease substrate complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-12-19

    Success of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in anti-HIV therapy is severely compromised by the rapidly developing drug resistance. HIV-1 protease inhibitors, part of HAART, are losing their potency and efficacy in inhibiting the target. Multi-drug resistant (MDR) 769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, 90) was selected for the present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. The nine crystal structures of MDR769 HIV-1 protease substrate hepta-peptide complexes were analyzed in order to reveal the conserved structural elements for the purpose of drug design against MDR HIV-1 protease. Our structural studies demonstrated that highly conserved hydrogen bonds between the protease and substrate peptides, together with the conserved crystallographic water molecules, played a crucial role in the substrate recognition, substrate stabilization and protease stabilization. Additionally, the absence of the key flap-ligand bridging water molecule might imply a different catalytic mechanism of MDR769 HIV-1 protease compared to that of wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease.

  20. Contribution of the 80s loop of HIV-1 protease to the multidrug-resistance mechanism: crystallographic study of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Proteasa, Georghe; Martinez, Jorge L.; Vickrey, John F.; Martin, Philip D.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Liu, Zhigang; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-09-06

    The flexible flaps and the 80s loops (Pro79-Ile84) of HIV-1 protease are crucial in inhibitor binding. Previously, it was reported that the crystal structure of multidrug-resistant 769 (MDR769) HIV-1 protease shows a wide-open conformation of the flaps owing to conformational rigidity acquired by the accumulation of mutations. In the current study, the effect of mutations on the conformation of the 80s loop of MDR769 HIV-1 protease variants is reported. Alternate conformations of Pro81 (proline switch) with a root-mean-square deviation of 3-4.8 {angstrom} in the C{alpha} atoms of the I10V mutant and a side chain with a 'flipped-out' conformation in the A82F mutant cause distortion in the S1/S1' binding pockets that affects inhibitor binding. The A82S and A82T mutants show local changes in the electrostatics of inhibitor binding owing to the mutation from nonpolar to polar residues. In summary, the crystallographic studies of four variants of MDR769 HIV-1 protease presented in this article provide new insights towards understanding the drug-resistance mechanism as well as a basis for design of future protease inhibitors with enhanced potency.

  1. Flap Conformations in HIV-1 Protease are Altered by Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fanucci, Gail; Blackburn, Mandy; Veloro, Angelo; Galiano, Luis; Fangu, Ding; Simmerling, Carlos

    2009-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (PR) is an enzyme that is a major drug target in the treatment of AIDS. Although the structure and function of HIV-1 PR have been studied for over 20 years, questions remain regarding the conformations and dynamics of the β-hairpin turns (flaps) that cover the active site cavity. Distance measurements with pulsed EPR spectroscopy of spin labeled constructs of HIV-1 PR have been used to characterize the flap conformations in the apo and inhibitor bound states. From the most probably distances and the breadth of the distance distribution profiles from analysis of the EPR data, insights regarding the flap conformations and flexibility are gained. The EPR results clearly show how drug pressure selected mutations alter the average conformation of the flaps and the degree of opening of the flaps. Molecular dynamics simulations successfully regenerate the experimentally determined distance distribution profiles, and more importantly, provide structural models for full interpretation of the EPR results. By combining experiment and theory to understand the role that altered flap flexibility/conformations play in the mechanism of drug resistance, key insights are gained toward the rational development of new inhibitors of this important enzyme.

  2. The higher barrier of darunavir and tipranavir resistance for HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yong; Liu, Zhigang; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Dewdney, Tamaria G.; Reiter, Samuel J.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2011-11-17

    Darunavir and tipranavir are two inhibitors that are active against multi-drug resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease variants. In this study, the invitro inhibitory efficacy was tested against a MDR HIV-1 protease variant, MDR 769 82T, containing the drug resistance mutations of 46L/54V/82T/84V/90M. Crystallographic and enzymatic studies were performed to examine the mechanism of resistance and the relative maintenance of potency. The key findings are as follows: (i) The MDR protease exhibits decreased susceptibility to all nine HIV-1 protease inhibitors approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), among which darunavir and tipranavir are the most potent; (ii) the threonine 82 mutation on the protease greatly enhances drug resistance by altering the hydrophobicity of the binding pocket; (iii) darunavir or tipranavir binding facilitates closure of the wide-open flaps of the MDR protease; and (iv) the remaining potency of tipranavir may be preserved by stabilizing the flaps in the inhibitor-protease complex while darunavir maintains its potency by preserving protein main chain hydrogen bonds with the flexible P2 group. These results could provide new insights into drug design strategies to overcome multi-drug resistance of HIV-1 protease variants.

  3. Understanding HIV-1 protease autoprocessing for novel therapeutic development

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Liangqun; Chen, Chaoping

    2013-01-01

    In the infected cell, HIV-1 protease (PR) is initially synthesized as part of the GagPol polyprotein. PR autoprocessing is a virus-specific process by which the PR domain embedded in the precursor catalyzes proteolytic reactions responsible for liberation of free mature PRs, which then recognize and cleave at least ten different peptide sequences in the Gag and GagPol polyproteins. Despite extensive structure and function studies of the mature PRs as well as the successful development of ten US FDA-approved catalytic-site inhibitors, the precursor autoprocessing mechanism remains an intriguing yet-to-be-solved puzzle. This article discusses current understanding of the autoprocessing mechanism, in an effort to prompt the development of novel anti-HIV drugs that selectively target precursor autoprocessing. PMID:23859204

  4. Identification of potent maturation inhibitors against HIV-1 clade C

    PubMed Central

    Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Timalsina, Bivek; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.; Freed, Eric O.; Gaur, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to a profound improvement in the clinical care of HIV-infected patients. However, drug tolerability and the evolution of drug resistance have limited treatment options for many patients. Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents for treatment of HIV-1. They act by interfering with the maturation of the virus by blocking the last step in Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA by the viral protease (PR). The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) failed against a subset of HIV-1 isolates in clinical trials due to polymorphisms present in the CA-SP1 region of the Gag protein. Sequence analysis indicated that these polymorphisms are more common in non-clade B strains of HIV-1 such as HIV-1 clade C. Indeed, BVM was found to be ineffective against HIV-1 clade C molecular clones tested in this study. A number of BVM analogs were synthesized by chemical modifications at the C-28 position to improve its activity. The new BVM analogs displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B and C and also reduced infectivity of the virus. This study identifies novel and broadly active BVM analogs that may ultimately demonstrate efficacy in the clinic. PMID:27264714

  5. Identification of potent maturation inhibitors against HIV-1 clade C.

    PubMed

    Timilsina, Uddhav; Ghimire, Dibya; Timalsina, Bivek; Nitz, Theodore J; Wild, Carl T; Freed, Eric O; Gaur, Ritu

    2016-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has led to a profound improvement in the clinical care of HIV-infected patients. However, drug tolerability and the evolution of drug resistance have limited treatment options for many patients. Maturation inhibitors are a new class of antiretroviral agents for treatment of HIV-1. They act by interfering with the maturation of the virus by blocking the last step in Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA by the viral protease (PR). The first-in-class maturation inhibitor bevirimat (BVM) failed against a subset of HIV-1 isolates in clinical trials due to polymorphisms present in the CA-SP1 region of the Gag protein. Sequence analysis indicated that these polymorphisms are more common in non-clade B strains of HIV-1 such as HIV-1 clade C. Indeed, BVM was found to be ineffective against HIV-1 clade C molecular clones tested in this study. A number of BVM analogs were synthesized by chemical modifications at the C-28 position to improve its activity. The new BVM analogs displayed potent activity against HIV-1 clade B and C and also reduced infectivity of the virus. This study identifies novel and broadly active BVM analogs that may ultimately demonstrate efficacy in the clinic. PMID:27264714

  6. Comparison of HIV-1 protease expression in different fusion forms.

    PubMed

    Wan, M; Takagi, M; Loh, B N; Imanaka, T

    1995-06-01

    Earlier observations showed that the expression of recombinant protease of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 PR) was usually in a low level, and its proteolytic activity and hydrophobicity were believed to be toxic for the host cells. Various constructs were investigated that contained an N-terminal extended HIV-1 PR gene (PR107) in order to find a system which can express this protease in high level. The constructs of PR107 gene expressed as fusion proteins either with glutathione S-transferase (GST) by pGEX-PR107 or with maltose-binding protein (MBP) by pMAL-PR107 showed that the full length of fusion protein exhibited self-cleavage in E. coli. The results from expression experiments indicated that the size of the fusion portion does not affect the self-processing of fused HIV-1 PR to release its mature form, despite the attachment of only one subunit of the dimeric protease to GST or MBP. The construct, pET-PR107, under the control of strong bacteriophage T7 promoter system, did not show clear advantages for expression of this HIV-1 PR. Comparing these three constructs, the pGEX-PR107 system showed the highest expression level. Quantitative immuno-blotting indicated that the amount of HIV-1 PR expressed by pGEX-PR107 was twice that expressed by pMAL-PR107, and thrice that expressed by pET-PR107. More than 1 mg of pure HIV-1 PR from per liter culture of E. coli. DH5 alpha containing pGEX-PR107 can be obtained via the purification procedures [Biochem. Mol. Biol. International, (1995) 35:899-912].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7663445

  7. An inhibitor of HIV-1 protease modulates constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation to trigger a specific integrated stress response

    PubMed Central

    De Gassart, Aude; Bujisic, Bojan; Zaffalon, Léa; Decosterd, Laurent A.; Di Micco, Antonia; Frera, Gianluca; Tallant, Rémy; Martinon, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitors of the HIV aspartyl protease [HIV protease inhibitors (HIV-PIs)] are the cornerstone of treatment for HIV. Beyond their well-defined antiretroviral activity, these drugs have additional effects that modulate cell viability and homeostasis. However, little is known about the virus-independent pathways engaged by these molecules. Here we show that the HIV-PI Nelfinavir decreases translation rates and promotes a transcriptional program characteristic of the integrated stress response (ISR). Mice treated with Nelfinavir display hallmarks of this stress response in the liver, including α subunit of translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α) phosphorylation, activating transcription factor-4 (ATF4) induction, and increased expression of known downstream targets. Mechanistically, Nelfinavir-mediated ISR bypassed direct activation of the eIF2α stress kinases and instead relied on the inhibition of the constitutive eIF2α dephosphorylation and down-regulation of the phophatase cofactor CReP (Constitutive Repressor of eIF2α Phosphorylation; also known as PPP1R15B). These findings demonstrate that the modulation of eIF2α-specific phosphatase cofactor activity can be a rheostat of cellular homeostasis that initiates a functional ISR and suggest that the HIV-PIs could be repositioned as therapeutics in human diseases to modulate translation rates and stress responses. PMID:26715744

  8. Local and spatial factors determining HIV-1 protease substrate recognition.

    PubMed Central

    Hazebrouck, S; Machtelinckx-Delmas, V; Kupiec, J J; Sonigo, P

    2001-01-01

    Insertional mutagenesis of the Escherichia coli thymidylate synthase (TS) was used to address substrate recognition of HIV-1 protease in a well characterized structural context. By modifying the TS conformation while maintaining its enzymic activity, we investigated the influence of protein folding on protease-substrate recognition. A slight destabilization of the TS structure permitted the cleavage of a target site, which was resistant in the native TS. This result supports a dynamic interpretation of HIV-1 protease specificity. Exposure time of the potential cleavage site, which depends on the stability of the global conformation, must be compatible with the cleavage kinetics, which are determined by the local sequence. Cleavage specificity has been described as the consequence of cumulative interactions, globally favourable, between at least six amino acids around the cleavage site. To investigate influence of local sequence, we introduced insertions of variable lengths in two exposed loops of the TS. In both environments, insertion of only two amino acids could determine specific cleavage. We then inserted libraries of dipeptides naturally cleaved by the HIV-1 protease in order to assess the limitations of established classifications of substrates in different conformational contexts. PMID:11513751

  9. Quenched near-infrared fluorescent peptide substrate for HIV-1 protease assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Xinzhan; Draney, Daniel R.; Volcheck, William M.

    2006-02-01

    The HIV-1 protease enzyme is an excellent target for drug therapy of HIV infection/AIDS. To measure the protease activity and screen for potent protease inhibitors, homogeneous protease assays based on quenched fluorescent peptide substrates have been widely used as a high-throughput screening methods. The major problem in these assays is the compound interference or assay artifacts from colored or insoluble materials in the assay, e.g. assay components, screening library compounds, etc. We report in this paper a near-infrared fluorescence resonance energy transfer (NIRFRET) based HIV-1 protease assay that can dramatically reduce or completely eliminate these assay artifacts by using a novel near-IR donor-quencher pair and long wavelength excitation (780 nm) and detection (820+/-10 nm). In this assay, a HIV-1 protease peptide substrate is conjugated with a near-IR fluorescent donor (IRDye TM 800CW), and a novel near-IR non-fluorescent quencher (QC1) on opposite sides of the proteolytic cleavage site. The quencher, QC1, has extremely good spectral overlap of its absorption spectrum with the donor emission spectrum to ensure the efficient quenching of the donor's fluorescence. In the HIV-1 protease assay, this NIR-FRET system shows a large dynamic range, high signal to noise ratio, excellent Z'-factors, a wide range of DMSO tolerance, and no compound interference. This system provides a sensitive, robust assay for high-throughput screening (HTS) and can be readily adapted to other therapeutically significant protease targets.

  10. Full quantum mechanical study of binding of HIV-1 protease drugs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Da W.; Zhang, John Z. H.

    Fully quantum mechanical studies of detailed binding interactions between HIV-1 protease and six FDA (Food and Drug Administration)-approved drugs (saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, nelfinavir, amprenavir, and lopinavir) are carried out using a recently developed MFCC (molecular fractionation with conjugate caps) method. The MFCC calculation produces a quantum mechanical interaction spectrum for any protease drug binding complex. Detailed quantitative analysis on binding of lopinavir to specific residues of the protease is given from the current study. The present calculation shows that the dominant binding of lopinavir to the protease is through the formation of a strong hydrogen bond between the central hydroxyl group of the drug to the aspartate oxygen of Asp25 in one of the two chains of the protease (A chain). This is closely followed by hydrogen binding of the drug to Asp29 in the B chain and somewhat weak hydrogen bonding to Asp30, Gly27, Gly48, and Ile50 in both chains. By partitioning all six drugs into four building blocks besides the central component containing the hydroxyl group, MFCC calculation finds that block III has essentially no binding interaction with the protease and the major binding interactions of these drugs are from blocks II and IV, in addition to the dominant central hydroxyl group. This detailed quantitative information on drug binding to the protease is very useful in rational design of new and improved inhibitors of HIV-1 protease and its mutants.

  11. Effects of drug-resistant mutations on the dynamic properties of HIV-1 protease and inhibition by Amprenavir and Darunavir

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Jinan; Shao, Qiang; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to investigate the dynamic properties of wild-type HIV-1 protease and its two multi-drug-resistant variants (Flap + (L10I/G48V/I54V/V82A) and Act (V82T/I84V)) as well as their binding with APV and DRV inhibitors. The hydrophobic interactions between flap and 80 s (80’s) loop residues (mainly I50-I84’ and I50’-I84) play an important role in maintaining the closed conformation of HIV-1 protease. The double mutation in Act variant weakens the hydrophobic interactions, leading to the transition from closed to semi-open conformation of apo Act. APV or DRV binds with HIV-1 protease via both hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. The hydrophobic interactions from the inhibitor is aimed to the residues of I50 (I50’), I84 (I84’), and V82 (V82’) which create hydrophobic core clusters to further stabilize the closed conformation of flaps, and the hydrogen bonding interactions are mainly focused with the active site of HIV-1 protease. The combined change in the two kinds of protease-inhibitor interactions is correlated with the observed resistance mutations. The present study sheds light on the microscopic mechanism underlying the mutation effects on the dynamics of HIV-1 protease and the inhibition by APV and DRV, providing useful information to the design of more potent and effective HIV-1 protease inhibitors. PMID:26012849

  12. An allosteric modulator of HIV-1 protease shows equipotent inhibition of wild-type and drug-resistant proteases.

    PubMed

    Ung, Peter M-U; Dunbar, James B; Gestwicki, Jason E; Carlson, Heather A

    2014-08-14

    NMR and MD simulations have demonstrated that the flaps of HIV-1 protease (HIV-1p) adopt a range of conformations that are coupled with its enzymatic activity. Previously, a model was created for an allosteric site located between the flap and the core of HIV-1p, called the Eye site (Biopolymers 2008, 89, 643-652). Here, results from our first study were combined with a ligand-based, lead-hopping method to identify a novel compound (NIT). NIT inhibits HIV-1p, independent of the presence of an active-site inhibitor such as pepstatin A. Assays showed that NIT acts on an allosteric site other than the dimerization interface. MD simulations of the ligand-protein complex show that NIT stably binds in the Eye site and restricts the flaps. That bound state of NIT is consistent with a crystal structure of similar fragments bound in the Eye site (Chem. Biol. Drug Des. 2010, 75, 257-268). Most importantly, NIT is equally potent against wild-type and a multidrug-resistant mutant of HIV-1p, which highlights the promise of allosteric inhibitors circumventing existing clinical resistance. PMID:25062388

  13. Inhibition of the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases by a monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Brynda, J.; Rezacova, P.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody 1696, directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme of both the HIV-1 and HIV-2 isolates. This antibody cross-reacts with peptides that include the N-terminus of the enzyme, a region that is well conserved in sequence among different viral strains and which, furthermore, is crucial for homodimerization to the active enzymatic form. This observation, as well as antigen-binding studies in the presence of an active site inhibitor, suggest that 1696 inhibits the HIV protease by destabilizing its active homodimeric form. To characterize further how the antibody 1696 inhibits the HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases, we have solved the crystal structure of its Fab fragment by molecular replacement and refined it at 3.0 A resolution. The antigen binding site has a deep cavity at its center, which is lined mainly by acidic and hydrophobic residues, and is large enough to accommodate several antigen residues. The structure of the Fab 1696 could form a starting basis for the design of alternative HIV protease-inhibiting molecules of broad specificity. PMID:10631984

  14. Structural, kinetic, and thermodynamic studies of specificity designed HIV-1 protease

    SciTech Connect

    Alvizo, Oscar; Mittal, Seema; Mayo, Stephen L.; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2012-10-23

    HIV-1 protease recognizes and cleaves more than 12 different substrates leading to viral maturation. While these substrates share no conserved motif, they are specifically selected for and cleaved by protease during viral life cycle. Drug resistant mutations evolve within the protease that compromise inhibitor binding but allow the continued recognition of all these substrates. While the substrate envelope defines a general shape for substrate recognition, successfully predicting the determinants of substrate binding specificity would provide additional insights into the mechanism of altered molecular recognition in resistant proteases. We designed a variant of HIV protease with altered specificity using positive computational design methods and validated the design using X-ray crystallography and enzyme biochemistry. The engineered variant, Pr3 (A28S/D30F/G48R), was designed to preferentially bind to one out of three of HIV protease's natural substrates; RT-RH over p2-NC and CA-p2. In kinetic assays, RT-RH binding specificity for Pr3 increased threefold compared to the wild-type (WT), which was further confirmed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Crystal structures of WT protease and the designed variant in complex with RT-RH, CA-p2, and p2-NC were determined. Structural analysis of the designed complexes revealed that one of the engineered substitutions (G48R) potentially stabilized heterogeneous flap conformations, thereby facilitating alternate modes of substrate binding. Our results demonstrate that while substrate specificity could be engineered in HIV protease, the structural pliability of protease restricted the propagation of interactions as predicted. These results offer new insights into the plasticity and structural determinants of substrate binding specificity of the HIV-1 protease.

  15. Crystal structures of multidrug-resistant HIV-1 protease in complex with two potent anti-malarial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Yedidi, Ravikiran S.; Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph S.; Kovari, Iulia A.; Woster, Patrick M.; Kovari, Ladislau C.; Gupta, Deepak

    2012-06-19

    Two potent inhibitors (compounds 1 and 2) of malarial aspartyl protease, plasmepsin-II, were evaluated against wild type (NL4-3) and multidrug-resistant clinical isolate 769 (MDR) variants of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) aspartyl protease. Enzyme inhibition assays showed that both 1 and 2 have better potency against NL4-3 than against MDR protease. Crystal structures of MDR protease in complex with 1 and 2 were solved and analyzed. Crystallographic analysis revealed that the MDR protease exhibits a typical wide-open conformation of the flaps (Gly48 to Gly52) causing an overall expansion in the active site cavity, which, in turn caused unstable binding of the inhibitors. Due to the expansion of the active site cavity, both compounds showed loss of direct contacts with the MDR protease compared to the docking models of NL4-3. Multiple water molecules showed a rich network of hydrogen bonds contributing to the stability of the ligand binding in the distorted binding pockets of the MDR protease in both crystal structures. Docking analysis of 1 and 2 showed a decrease in the binding affinity for both compounds against MDR supporting our structure-function studies. Thus, compounds 1 and 2 show promising inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease variants and hence are good candidates for further development to enhance their potency against NL4-3 as well as MDR HIV-1 protease variants.

  16. Unique Flap Conformation in an HIV-1 Protease with High-Level Darunavir Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Ode, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Koji; Fujino, Masayuki; Maejima, Masami; Kimura, Yuki; Masaoka, Takashi; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Atsuo; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is one of the most powerful protease inhibitors (PIs) for treating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and presents a high genetic barrier to the generation of resistant viruses. However, DRV-resistant HIV-1 infrequently emerges from viruses exhibiting resistance to other protease inhibitors. To address this resistance, researchers have gathered genetic information on DRV resistance. In contrast, few structural insights into the mechanism underlying DRV resistance are available. To elucidate this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand-free state of a protease with high-level DRV resistance and six DRV resistance-associated mutations (including I47V and I50V), which we generated by in vitro selection. This crystal structure showed a unique curling conformation at the flap regions that was not found in the previously reported ligand-free protease structures. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the curled flap conformation altered the flap dynamics. These results suggest that the preference for a unique flap conformation influences DRV binding. These results provide new structural insights into elucidating the molecular mechanism of DRV resistance and aid to develop PIs effective against DRV-resistant viruses. PMID:26870021

  17. Unique Flap Conformation in an HIV-1 Protease with High-Level Darunavir Resistance.

    PubMed

    Nakashima, Masaaki; Ode, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Koji; Fujino, Masayuki; Maejima, Masami; Kimura, Yuki; Masaoka, Takashi; Hattori, Junko; Matsuda, Masakazu; Hachiya, Atsuko; Yokomaku, Yoshiyuki; Suzuki, Atsuo; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Sugiura, Wataru; Iwatani, Yasumasa

    2016-01-01

    Darunavir (DRV) is one of the most powerful protease inhibitors (PIs) for treating human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infection and presents a high genetic barrier to the generation of resistant viruses. However, DRV-resistant HIV-1 infrequently emerges from viruses exhibiting resistance to other protease inhibitors. To address this resistance, researchers have gathered genetic information on DRV resistance. In contrast, few structural insights into the mechanism underlying DRV resistance are available. To elucidate this mechanism, we determined the crystal structure of the ligand-free state of a protease with high-level DRV resistance and six DRV resistance-associated mutations (including I47V and I50V), which we generated by in vitro selection. This crystal structure showed a unique curling conformation at the flap regions that was not found in the previously reported ligand-free protease structures. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the curled flap conformation altered the flap dynamics. These results suggest that the preference for a unique flap conformation influences DRV binding. These results provide new structural insights into elucidating the molecular mechanism of DRV resistance and aid to develop PIs effective against DRV-resistant viruses. PMID:26870021

  18. Inhibitors of rhomboid proteases.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Eliane V; Verhelst, Steven H L

    2016-03-01

    Rhomboid proteases form one of the most widespread families of intramembrane proteases. They utilize a catalytic serine-histidine dyad located several Å below the surface of the membrane for substrate hydrolysis. Multiple studies have implicated rhomboid proteases in biologically and medically relevant processes. Several assays have been developed that are able to monitor rhomboid activity. With the aid of these assays, different types of inhibitors have been found, all based on electrophiles that covalently react with the active site machinery. Although the currently available inhibitors have limited selectivity and moderate potency, they can function as research tools and as starting point for the development of activity-based probes, which are reagents that can specifically detect active rhomboid species. Structural studies on complexes of inhibitors with the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG have provided insight into how substrate recognition may occur. Future synthetic efforts, aided by high-throughput screening or structure-based design, may lead to more potent and selective inhibitors for this interesting family of proteases. PMID:26166068

  19. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T; Harrison, Robert W

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×10(4) known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  20. Sparse Representation for Prediction of HIV-1 Protease Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xiaxia; Weber, Irene T.; Harrison, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV rapidly evolves drug resistance in response to antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. Estimating the specific resistance of a given strain of HIV to individual drugs from sequence data has important benefits for both the therapy of individual patients and the development of novel drugs. We have developed an accurate classification method based on the sparse representation theory, and demonstrate that this method is highly effective with HIV-1 protease. The protease structure is represented using our newly proposed encoding method based on Delaunay triangulation, and combined with the mutated amino acid sequences of known drug-resistant strains to train a machine-learning algorithm both for classification and regression of drug-resistant mutations. An overall cross-validated classification accuracy of 97% is obtained when trained on a publically available data base of approximately 1.5×104 known sequences (Stanford HIV database http://hivdb.stanford.edu/cgi-bin/GenoPhenoDS.cgi). Resistance to four FDA approved drugs is computed and comparisons with other algorithms demonstrate that our method shows significant improvements in classification accuracy. PMID:24910813

  1. Importance of polar solvation and configurational entropy for design of antiretroviral drugs targeting HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Kar, Parimal; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Knecht, Volker

    2013-05-16

    Both KNI-10033 and KNI-10075 are high affinity preclinical HIV-1 protease (PR) inhibitors with affinities in the picomolar range. In this work, the molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) method has been used to investigate the potency of these two HIV-1 PR inhibitors against the wild-type and mutated proteases assuming that potency correlates with the affinity of the drugs for the target protein. The decomposition of the binding free energy reveals the origin of binding affinities or mutation-induced affinity changes. Our calculations indicate that the mutation I50V causes drug resistance against both inhibitors. On the other hand, we predict that the mutant I84V causes drug resistance against KNI-10075 while KNI-10033 is more potent against the I84V mutant compared to wild-type protease. Drug resistance arises mainly from unfavorable shifts in van der Waals interactions and configurational entropy. The latter indicates that neglecting changes in configurational entropy in the computation of relative binding affinities as often done is not appropriate in general. For the bound complex PR(I50V)-KNI-10075, an increased polar solvation free energy also contributes to the drug resistance. The importance of polar solvation free energies is revealed when interactions governing the binding of KNI-10033 or KNI-10075 to the wild-type protease are compared to the inhibitors darunavir or GRL-06579A. Although the contributions from intermolecular electrostatic and van der Waals interactions as well as the nonpolar component of the solvation free energy are more favorable for PR-KNI-10033 or PR-KNI-10075 compared to PR-DRV or PR-GRL-06579A, both KNI-10033 and KNI-10075 show a similar affinity as darunavir and a lower binding affinity relative to GRL-06579A. This is because of the polar solvation free energy which is less unfavorable for darunavir or GRL-06579A relative to KNI-10033 or KNI-10075. The importance of the polar solvation as revealed here

  2. A novel small-molecule inhibitor of HIV-1 entry

    PubMed Central

    Heredia, Alonso; Latinovic, Olga S; Barbault, Florent; de Leeuw, Erik PH

    2015-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy has transformed HIV-1 infection into a managed condition with near-normal life expectancy. However, a significant number of patients remain with limited therapeutic options due to HIV-1 resistance, side effects, or drug costs. Further, it is likely that current drugs will not retain efficacy, due to risks of side effects and transmitted resistance. Results We describe compound 5660386 (3-ethyl-2-[3-(1,3,3-trimethyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-indol-2-ylidene)-1-propen-1-yl]-1,3-benzothiazol-3-ium) as a novel inhibitor of HIV-1 entry. Compound 5660386 inhibits HIV-1 entry in cell lines and primary cells, binds to HIV-1 envelope protein, and inhibits the interaction of GP120 to CD4. Further, compound 5660386 showed a unique and broad-range activity against primary HIV-1 isolates from different subtypes and geographical areas. Conclusion Development of small-molecule entry inhibitors of HIV-1 such as 5660386 may lead to novel classes of anti-HIV-1 therapeutics. These inhibitors may be particularly effective against viruses resistant to current antiretroviral drugs and could have potential applications in both treatment and prevention. PMID:26491257

  3. HIV-1 Protease, Reverse Transcriptase, and Integrase Variation

    PubMed Central

    Sankaran, Kris; Varghese, Vici; Winters, Mark A.; Hurt, Christopher B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Parkin, Neil; Holmes, Susan P.; Holodniy, Mark; Shafer, Robert W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1 protease (PR), reverse transcriptase (RT), and integrase (IN) variability presents a challenge to laboratories performing genotypic resistance testing. This challenge will grow with increased sequencing of samples enriched for proviral DNA such as dried blood spots and increased use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to detect low-abundance HIV-1 variants. We analyzed PR and RT sequences from >100,000 individuals and IN sequences from >10,000 individuals to characterize variation at each amino acid position, identify mutations indicating APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing, and identify mutations resulting from selective drug pressure. Forty-seven percent of PR, 37% of RT, and 34% of IN positions had one or more amino acid variants with a prevalence of ≥1%. Seventy percent of PR, 60% of RT, and 60% of IN positions had one or more variants with a prevalence of ≥0.1%. Overall 201 PR, 636 RT, and 346 IN variants had a prevalence of ≥0.1%. The median intersubtype prevalence ratios were 2.9-, 2.1-, and 1.9-fold for these PR, RT, and IN variants, respectively. Only 5.0% of PR, 3.7% of RT, and 2.0% of IN variants had a median intersubtype prevalence ratio of ≥10-fold. Variants at lower prevalences were more likely to differ biochemically and to be part of an electrophoretic mixture compared to high-prevalence variants. There were 209 mutations indicative of APOBEC-mediated G-to-A editing and 326 mutations nonpolymorphic treatment selected. Identification of viruses with a high number of APOBEC-associated mutations will facilitate the quality control of dried blood spot sequencing. Identifying sequences with a high proportion of rare mutations will facilitate the quality control of NGS. IMPORTANCE Most antiretroviral drugs target three HIV-1 proteins: PR, RT, and IN. These proteins are highly variable: many different amino acids can be present at the same position in viruses from different individuals. Some of the amino acid variants cause drug

  4. Virtual screening of Indonesian herbal database as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Syahdi, Rezi Riadhi; Mun'im, Abdul; Suhartanto, Heru; Yanuar, Arry

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 (Human immunodeficiency virus type 1) is a member of retrovirus family that could infect human and causing AIDS disease. AIDS epidemic is one of most destructive diseases in modern era. There were more than 33 million people infected by HIV until 2010. Various studies have been widely employed to design drugs that target the essential enzymes of HIV-1 that is, reverse transcriptase, protease and integrase. In this study, in silico virtual screening approach is used to find lead molecules from the library or database of natural compounds as HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor. Virtual screening against Indonesian Herbal Database using AutoDock4 performed on HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. From the virtual screening, top ten compounds were mulberrin, plucheoside A, vitexilactone, brucine N-oxide, cyanidin 3-arabinoside, alpha-mangostin, guaijaverin, erycristagallin, morusin and sanggenol N. PMID:23275721

  5. HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor from Phyllanthus niruri.

    PubMed

    Ogata, T; Higuchi, H; Mochida, S; Matsumoto, H; Kato, A; Endo, T; Kaji, A; Kaji, H

    1992-11-01

    An aqueous extract of Phyllanthus niruri (Euphorbiaceae) inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1-RT). The inhibitor against HIV-1-RT in this plant was purified by combination of three column chromatographies, Sephadex LH-20, cellulose, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. The inhibitor was then identified by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra as repandusinic acid A monosodium salt (RA) which was originally isolated from Mallotus repandus. The 50% inhibitory doses (ID50) of RA on HIV-1-RT and DNA polymerase alpha (from HeLa cells) were 0.05 microM and 0.6 microM, respectively, representing approximately a 10-fold more sensitivity of HIV-1-RT compared with DNA polymerase alpha. RA was shown to be a competitive inhibitor with respect to the template-primer while it was a noncompetitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate. RA as low as 10.1 microM inhibited HIV-1-induced cytopathogenicity in MT-4 cells. In addition, 4.5 microM of RA inhibited HIV-1-induced giant cell formation of SUP-T1 approximately 50%. RA (2.5 microM) inhibited up to 90% of HIV-1 specific p24 antigen production in a Clone H9 cell system. PMID:1283310

  6. Potent D-Peptide Inhibitors of HIV-1 Entry

    SciTech Connect

    Welch,B.; VanDemark, A.; Heroux, A.; Hill, C.; Kay, M.

    2007-01-01

    During HIV-1 entry, the highly conserved gp41 N-trimer pocket region becomes transiently exposed and vulnerable to inhibition. Using mirror-image phage display and structure-assisted design, we have discovered protease-resistant D-amino acid peptides (D-peptides) that bind the N-trimer pocket with high affinity and potently inhibit viral entry. We also report high-resolution crystal structures of two of these D-peptides in complex with a pocket mimic that suggest sources of their high potency. A trimeric version of one of these peptides is the most potent pocket-specific entry inhibitor yet reported by three orders of magnitude (IC50 = 250 pM). These results are the first demonstration that D-peptides can form specific and high-affinity interactions with natural protein targets and strengthen their promise as therapeutic agents. The D-peptides described here address limitations associated with current L-peptide entry inhibitors and are promising leads for the prevention and treatment of HIV/AIDS.

  7. In Silico Prediction of Mutant HIV-1 Proteases Cleaving a Target Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Jan H.; Willemoës, Martin; Winther, Jakob R.; De Vico, Luca

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 protease represents an appealing system for directed enzyme re-design, since it has various different endogenous targets, a relatively simple structure and it is well studied. Recently Chaudhury and Gray (Structure (2009) 17: 1636–1648) published a computational algorithm to discern the specificity determining residues of HIV-1 protease. In this paper we present two computational tools aimed at re-designing HIV-1 protease, derived from the algorithm of Chaudhuri and Gray. First, we present an energy-only based methodology to discriminate cleavable and non cleavable peptides for HIV-1 proteases, both wild type and mutant. Secondly, we show an algorithm we developed to predict mutant HIV-1 proteases capable of cleaving a new target substrate peptide, different from the natural targets of HIV-1 protease. The obtained in silico mutant enzymes were analyzed in terms of cleavability and specificity towards the target peptide using the energy-only methodology. We found two mutant proteases as best candidates for specificity and cleavability towards the target sequence. PMID:24796579

  8. Action of anti-HIV drugs and resistance: reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Imamichi, Tomozumi

    2004-01-01

    Currently, 20 drugs have been approved for Human Immunodeficiency Virus type-1 (HIV-1) clinical therapy. These drugs inhibit HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, protease, or virus entry. Introduction of a combination therapy with reverse transcriptase inhibitors and protease inhibitors has resulted in a drastic decrease in HIV-1 related mortality. Although the combination therapy can suppress viral replication below detection levels in current available assays, low levels of on-going viral replication still persist in some patients. Long-term administration of the combination therapy may increase selective pressure against viruses, and subsequently induce emergence of multiple drug-resistant HIV-1 variants. Attempts have been made to design novel antiretroviral drugs that would be able to suppress replication of the resistant variants. At present, several investigational drugs are being tested in clinical trials. These drugs target not only the resistant variants, but also improvement in oral bioavilability or other viral proteins such as HIV-1 integrase, ribonuclease H, and HIV-1 entry (CD4 attachment inhibitors, chemokine receptors antagonists, and fusion inhibitors). Understanding mechanism(s) of action of the drugs and mechanisms of drug resistance is necessary for successful designs in the next generation of anti-HIV-1 drugs. In this review, the mechanisms of action of reverse transcriptase- and protease-inhibitors, and the mechanism of resistance to these inhibitors, are described. PMID:15579086

  9. Computational study of protein specificity: The molecular basis of HIV-1 protease drug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Kollman, Peter A.

    2001-01-01

    Drug resistance has sharply limited the effectiveness of HIV-1 protease inhibitors in AIDS therapy. It is critically important to understand the basis of this resistance for designing new drugs. We have evaluated the free energy contribution of each residue in the HIV protease in binding to one of its substrates and to the five FDA-approved protease drugs. Analysis of these free energy profiles and the variability at each sequence position suggests: (i) single drug resistance mutations are likely to occur at not well conserved residues if they interact more favorably with drugs than with the substrate; and (ii) resistance-evading drugs should have a free energy profile similar to the substrate and interact most favorably with well conserved residues. We also propose an empirical parameter, called the free energy/variability value, which combines free energy calculation and sequence analysis to suggest possible drug resistance mutations on the protease. The free energy/variability value is defined as the product of one residue's contribution to the binding free energy and the variability of that residue. This parameter can assist in designing resistance-evading drugs for any target. PMID:11752442

  10. Solvation effects are responsible for the reduced inhibitor affinity of some HIV-1 PR mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, F.; Villaverde, M. C.; Davis, A.

    1997-01-01

    The formulation of HIV-1 PR inhibitors as anti-viral drugs has been hindered by the appearance of protease strains that present drug resistance to these compounds. The mechanism by which the HIV-1 PR mutants lower their affinity for the inhibitor is not yet fully understood. We have applied a modified Poisson-Boltzmann method to the evaluation of the molecular interactions that contribute to the lowering of the inhibitor affinity to some polar mutants at position 82. These strains present drug resistance behavior and hence are ideally suited for these studies. Our results indicate that the reduction in binding affinity is due to the solvation effects that penalize the binding to the more polar mutants. The inhibitor binding ranking of the different mutants can be explained from the analysis of the different components of our free energy scoring function. PMID:9144773

  11. Chemically Programmed Antibodies As HIV-1 Attachment Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we describe the design and application of two small-molecule anti-HIV compounds for the creation of chemically programmed antibodies. N-Acyl-β-lactam derivatives of two previously described molecules BMS-378806 and BMS-488043 that inhibit the interaction between HIV-1 gp120 and T-cells were synthesized and used to program the binding activity of aldolase antibody 38C2. Discovery of a successful linkage site to BMS-488043 allowed for the synthesis of chemically programmed antibodies with affinity for HIV-1 gp120 and potent HIV-1 neutralization activity. Derivation of a successful conjugation strategy for this family of HIV-1 entry inhibitors enables its application in chemically programmed antibodies and vaccines and may facilitate the development of novel bispecific antibodies and topical microbicides. PMID:23750312

  12. Evolution under Drug Pressure Remodels the Folding Free-Energy Landscape of Mature HIV-1 Protease.

    PubMed

    Louis, John M; Roche, Julien

    2016-07-01

    Using high-pressure NMR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry, we investigate the folding landscape of the mature HIV-1 protease homodimer. The cooperativity of unfolding was measured in the absence or presence of a symmetric active site inhibitor for the optimized wild type protease (PR), its inactive variant PRD25N, and an extremely multidrug-resistant mutant, PR20. The individual fit of the pressure denaturation profiles gives rise to first order, ∆GNMR, and second order, ∆VNMR (the derivative of ∆GNMR with pressure); apparent thermodynamic parameters for each amide proton considered. Heterogeneity in the apparent ∆VNMR values reflects departure from an ideal cooperative unfolding transition. The narrow to broad distribution of ∆VNMR spanning the extremes from inhibitor-free PR20D25N to PR-DMP323 complex, and distinctively for PRD25N-DMP323 complex, indicated large variations in folding cooperativity. Consistent with this data, the shape of thermal unfolding transitions varies from asymmetric for PR to nearly symmetric for PR20, as dimer-inhibitor ternary complexes. Lack of structural cooperativity was observed between regions located close to the active site, including the hinge and tip of the glycine-rich flaps, and the rest of the protein. These results strongly suggest that inhibitor binding drastically decreases the cooperativity of unfolding by trapping the closed flap conformation in a deep energy minimum. To evade this conformational trap, PR20 evolves exhibiting a smoother folding landscape with nearly an ideal two-state (cooperative) unfolding transition. This study highlights the malleability of retroviral protease folding pathways by illustrating how the selection of mutations under drug pressure remodels the free-energy landscape as a primary mechanism. PMID:27170547

  13. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface

    PubMed Central

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  14. HIV-1 Protease Dimerization Dynamics Reveals a Transient Druggable Binding Pocket at the Interface.

    PubMed

    Pietrucci, Fabio; Vargiu, Attilio Vittorio; Kranjc, Agata

    2015-01-01

    The binding mechanism of HIV-1 protease monomers leading to the catalytically competent dimeric enzyme has been investigated by means of state-of-the-art atomistic simulations. The emerging picture allows a deeper understanding of experimental observations and reveals that water molecules trapped at the interface have an important role in slowing down the kinetics of the association process. Unexpectedly, a cryptic binding pocket is identified at the interface of the complex, corresponding to a partially bound dimer that lacks enzymatic function. The pocket has a transient nature with a lifetime longer than 1 μs, and it displays very favorable druggability features. Docking as well as MM-GBSA free-energy calculations further support the possibility to target the new binding site by means of inhibitors able to prevent the complete dimerization by capturing the inactive conformation. This discovery could open the way to the rational design of a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26692118

  15. Four Amino Acid Changes in HIV-2 Protease Confer Class-Wide Sensitivity to Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Robert A.; Gottlieb, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protease is essential for retroviral replication, and protease inhibitors (PI) are important for treating HIV infection. HIV-2 exhibits intrinsic resistance to most FDA-approved HIV-1 PI, retaining clinically useful susceptibility only to lopinavir, darunavir, and saquinavir. The mechanisms for this resistance are unclear; although HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share just 38 to 49% sequence identity, all critical structural features of proteases are conserved. Structural studies have implicated four amino acids in the ligand-binding pocket (positions 32, 47, 76, and 82). We constructed HIV-2ROD9 molecular clones encoding the corresponding wild-type HIV-1 amino acids (I32V, V47I, M76L, and I82V) either individually or together (clone PRΔ4) and compared the phenotypic sensitivities (50% effective concentration [EC50]) of mutant and wild-type viruses to nine FDA-approved PI. Single amino acid replacements I32V, V47I, and M76L increased the susceptibility of HIV-2 to multiple PI, but no single change conferred class-wide sensitivity. In contrast, clone PRΔ4 showed PI susceptibility equivalent to or greater than that of HIV-1 for all PI. We also compared crystallographic structures of wild-type HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases complexed with amprenavir and darunavir to models of the PRΔ4 enzyme. These models suggest that the amprenavir sensitivity of PRΔ4 is attributable to stabilizing enzyme-inhibitor interactions in the P2 and P2′ pockets of the protease dimer. Together, our results show that the combination of four amino acid changes in HIV-2 protease confer a pattern of PI susceptibility comparable to that of HIV-1, providing a structural rationale for intrinsic HIV-2 PI resistance and resolving long-standing questions regarding the determinants of differential PI susceptibility in HIV-1 and HIV-2. IMPORTANCE Proteases are essential for retroviral replication, and HIV-1 and HIV-2 proteases share a great deal of structural similarity. However, only three of nine

  16. Copper inhibits the HIV-1 protease by both oxygen-dependent and oxygen-independent mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Karlstroem, A.R.; Levine, R.L. )

    1991-03-11

    The protease encoded by HIV-1 is essential for the processing of the viral polyproteins encoded by the gag and pol genes into mature viral proteins. Mutation or deletion of the protease gene blocks replication of the virus, making the protease an attractive target for antiviral therapy. The authors found that the HIV-1 protease is inhibited by micromolar concentrations of Cu{sup 2+}. Protease was 50% inhibited by exposure to 5 {mu}M copper for 5 min while exposure to 25 {mu}M caused complete inhibition. This inhibition was not oxygen-dependent and was not reversed by treatment with EDTA, presumably due to the slow off-rate of copper from the protease. Consistent with this interpretation, enzyme activity was recovered after denaturation and refolding of the copper exposed protease. Titration of the inactivated enzyme with Ellman's reagent demonstrated a loss of one of the two sulfhydryl groups present in the molecule, suggesting that copper inhibition was mediated through binding to a cysteine. This was confirmed in studies with a chemically synthesize, mutant protease in which the two cysteine residues were replaced by {alpha}-amino butyrate: The mutant protease was not inhibited by copper. However, both the wild-type and mutant protease were inactivated when exposed to copper, oxygen, and dithiothreitol. This inactivation required oxygen. Thus, the protease can also be inactivated by metal catalyzed oxidation (MCO), a presumably irreversible covalent modification.

  17. Purification and characterization of naturally occurring HIV-1 (South African subtype C) protease mutants from inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Sibusiso B; Natarajan, Satheesh; Sharma, Vikas; Bhattacharyya, Neelakshi; Govender, Thavendran; Sayed, Yasien; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lin, Johnson; Kruger, Hendrik G

    2016-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections in sub-Saharan Africa represent about 56% of global infections. Many studies have targeted HIV-1 protease for the development of drugs against AIDS. Recombinant HIV-1 protease is used to screen new drugs from synthetic compounds or natural substances. Along with the wild type (C-SA) we also over-expressed and characterized two mutant forms from patients that had shown resistance to protease inhibitors. Using recombinant DNA technology, we constructed three recombinant plasmids in pGEX-6P-1 and expressed them containing a sequence encoding wild type HIV protease and two mutants (I36T↑T contains 100 amino acids and L38L↑N↑L contains 101 amino acids). These recombinant proteins were isolated from inclusion bodies by using QFF anion exchange and GST trap columns. In SDS-PAGE, we obtained these HIV proteases as single bands of approximately 11.5, 11.6 and 11.7 kDa for the wild type, I36T↑Tand L38L↑N↑L mutants, respectively. The enzyme was recovered efficiently (0.25 mg protein/L of Escherichia coli culture) and had high specific activity of 2.02, 2.20 and 1.33 μmol min(-1) mg(-1) at an optimal pH of 5 and temperature of 37 °C for the wild type, I36T↑T and L38L↑N↑L, respectively. The method employed here provides an easy and rapid purification of the HIV-1(C-SA) protease from the inclusion bodies, with high yield and high specific activities. PMID:26917227

  18. Alkyl Amine Bevirimat Derivatives Are Potent and Broadly Active HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Urano, Emiko; Ablan, Sherimay D.; Mandt, Rebecca; Pauly, Gary T.; Sigano, Dina M.; Schneider, Joel P.; Martin, David E.; Nitz, Theodore J.; Wild, Carl T.

    2015-01-01

    Concomitant with the release of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles from the infected cell, the viral protease cleaves the Gag polyprotein precursor at a number of sites to trigger virus maturation. We previously reported that a betulinic acid-derived compound, bevirimat (BVM), blocks HIV-1 maturation by disrupting a late step in protease-mediated Gag processing: the cleavage of the capsid-spacer peptide 1 (CA-SP1) intermediate to mature CA. BVM was shown in multiple clinical trials to be safe and effective in reducing viral loads in HIV-1-infected patients. However, naturally occurring polymorphisms in the SP1 region of Gag (e.g., SP1-V7A) led to a variable response in some BVM-treated patients. The reduced susceptibility of SP1-polymorphic HIV-1 to BVM resulted in the discontinuation of its clinical development. To overcome the loss of BVM activity induced by polymorphisms in SP1, we carried out an extensive medicinal chemistry campaign to develop novel maturation inhibitors. In this study, we focused on alkyl amine derivatives modified at the C-28 position of the BVM scaffold. We identified a set of derivatives that are markedly more potent than BVM against an HIV-1 clade B clone (NL4-3) and show robust antiviral activity against a variant of NL4-3 containing the V7A polymorphism in SP1. One of the most potent of these compounds also strongly inhibited a multiclade panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. These data demonstrate that C-28 alkyl amine derivatives of BVM can, to a large extent, overcome the loss of susceptibility imposed by polymorphisms in SP1. PMID:26482309

  19. Structural Basis of Why Nelfinavir-Resistant D30N Mutant of HIV-1 Protease Remains Susceptible to Saquinavir.

    PubMed

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash C; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan V

    2015-09-01

    Although anti-HIV-1 protease drugs nelfinavir (NFV) and saquinavir (SQV) share common functional groups, D30N is a major resistance mutation against NFV but remains susceptible to SQV. We have determined the crystal structure of D30N mutant-tethered HIV-1 protease in complex with SQV to 1.79 Å resolution. Structural analysis showed that SQV forms two direct hydrogen bonds with the main chain atoms of the residues Asp29 and Asp30 that are not observed in the D30N-NFV complex. Apart from maintaining these two main chain hydrogen bonds, the P2-asparagine of SQV forms an additional hydrogen bond to the mutated side chain of the residue 30. These could be the reasons why D30N is not a drug resistance mutation against SQV. This structure supports the previous studies showing that the interactions between a potential inhibitor and backbone atoms of the enzyme are important to maintain potency against drug-resistant HIV-1 protease. PMID:25487655

  20. Sulfonation Pathway Inhibitors Block Reactivation of Latent HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Murry, Jeffrey P.; Godoy, Joseph; Mukim, Amey; Swann, Justine; Bruce, James W.; Ahlquist, Paul; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Spina, Celsa A.; Young, John A. T.

    2015-01-01

    Long-lived pools of latently infected cells are a significant barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1 infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of reactivation from latency is needed to facilitate the development of novel therapies that address this problem. Here we show that chemical inhibitors of the sulfonation pathway prevent virus reactivation, both in latently infected J-Lat and U1 cell lines and in a primary human CD4+ T cell model of latency. In each of these models, sulfonation inhibitors decreased transcription initiation from the HIV-1 promoter. These inhibitors block transcription initiation at a step that lies downstream of nucleosome remodeling and affects RNA polymerase II recruitment to the viral promoter. These results suggest that the sulfonation pathway acts by a novel mechanism to regulate efficient virus transcription initiation during reactivation from latency, and further that augmentation of this pathway could be therapeutically useful. PMID:25310595

  1. Binding of single walled carbon nanotube to WT and mutant HIV-1 proteases: analysis of flap dynamics and binding mechanism.

    PubMed

    Meher, Biswa Ranjan; Wang, Yixuan

    2012-09-01

    Most of the currently treated HIV-1 protease (HIV-PR) inhibitors have been prone to suffer from the mutations associated drug resistance. Therefore, it is necessary to search for potent alternatives against the drug resistance. In the current study we have tested the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) as an inhibitor in wild type (WT) as well as in three primary mutants (I50V(PR), V82A(PR) and I84V(PR)) of the HIV-1-PR through docking the SWCNT in the active site region, and then performed all-atom MD simulations for the complexes. The conformational dynamics of HIV-PR with a 20 ns trajectory reveals that the SWCNT can effectively bind to the HIV-1-PR active site and regulate the flap dynamics such as maintaining the flap-flap closed. To gain an insight into the binding affinity, we also performed the MM-PBSA based binding free energy calculations for the four HIV-PR/SWCNT complexes. It was observed that, although the binding between the SWCNT and the HIV-PR decreases due to the mutations, the SWCNTs bind to the HIV-PRs 3-5 folds stronger than the most potent HIV-1-PR inhibitor, TMC114. Remarkably, the significant interactions with binding energy higher than 1kcal/mol focus on the flap and active regions, which favors closing flap-flap and deactivating the active residues of the HIV-PR. The flap dynamics and binding strength information for HIV-PR and SWCNTs can help design SWCNT-based HIV-1-PR inhibitors. PMID:23142620

  2. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  3. Structure based activity prediction of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Marc R; Koymans, Lucien M H; Vinkers, H Maarten; Daeyaert, Frits F D; Heeres, Jan; Lewi, Paul J; Janssen, Paul A J

    2005-03-24

    We have developed a fast and robust computational method for prediction of antiviral activity in automated de novo design of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. This is a structure-based approach that uses a linear relation between activity and interaction energy with discrete orientation sampling and with localized interaction energy terms. The localization allows for the analysis of mutations of the protein target and for the separation of inhibition and a specific binding to the enzyme. We apply the method to the prediction of pIC(50) of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors. The model predicts the activity of an arbitrary compound with a q(2) of 0.681 and an average absolute error of 0.66 log value, and it is fast enough to be used in high-throughput computational applications. PMID:15771460

  4. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M.

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  5. Effect of transcription peptide inhibitors on HIV-1 replication.

    PubMed

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Cardenas, Jessica; Easley, Rebecca; Wu, Weilin; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Klase, Zak; Mendez, Susana; Zeng, Chen; Chen, Hao; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2008-07-01

    HIV-1 manipulates cellular machineries such as cyclin dependent kinases (cdks) and their cyclin elements, to stimulate virus production and maintain latent infection. Specifically, the HIV-1 viral protein Tat increases viral transcription by binding to the TAR promoter element. This binding event is mediated by the phosphorylation of Pol II by complexes such as cdk9/Cyclin T and cdk2/Cyclin E. Recent studies have shown that a Tat 41/44 peptide derivative prevents the loading of cdk2 onto the HIV-1 promoter, inhibiting gene expression and replication. Here we show that Tat peptide analogs computationally designed to dock at the cyclin binding site of cdk2 have the ability to bind to cdk2 and inhibit the association of cdk2 with the HIV promoter. Specifically, the peptide LAALS dissociated the complex and decreased kinase activity in vitro. We also describe our novel small animal model which utilizes humanized Rag2(-/-)gamma(c)(-/-) mice. This small peptide inhibitor induces a decrease in HIV-1 viral transcription in vitro and minimizes viral loads in vivo. PMID:18455747

  6. Improving Viral Protease Inhibitors to Counter Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Kurt Yilmaz, Nese; Swanstrom, Ronald; Schiffer, Celia A

    2016-07-01

    Drug resistance is a major problem in health care, undermining therapy outcomes and necessitating novel approaches to drug design. Extensive studies on resistance to viral protease inhibitors, particularly those of HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV) protease, revealed a plethora of information on the structural and molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. These insights led to several strategies to improve viral protease inhibitors to counter resistance, such as exploiting the essential biological function and leveraging evolutionary constraints. Incorporation of these strategies into structure-based drug design can minimize vulnerability to resistance, not only for viral proteases but for other quickly evolving drug targets as well, toward designing inhibitors one step ahead of evolution to counter resistance with more intelligent and rational design. PMID:27090931

  7. Preliminary crystallographic studies of an anti-HIV-1 protease antibody that inhibits enzyme activity.

    PubMed Central

    Lescar, J.; Stouracova, R.; Riottot, M. M.; Chitarra, V.; Brynda, J.; Fabry, M.; Horejsi, M.; Sedlacek, J.; Bentley, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    F11.2.32, a monoclonal antibody directed against the HIV-1 protease, displays strong inhibitory effects toward the catalytic activity of the enzyme. The antibody cross-reacts with peptides 36-46 and 36-57 from the protease. Crystals of the Fab have been obtained both in the free state and as complexes formed with the protease peptide fragments, 36-46 and 36-57. Diffraction data have been collected for the free and complexed forms of Fab F11.2.32 and preliminary models for the crystal structures were obtained by molecular replacement. PMID:8732768

  8. Effect of Flap Mutations on Structure of HIV-1 Protease and Inhibition by Sanquinavir and Darunavir

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, F.; Kovalevsky, A.; Tie, Y.; Ghosh, A.; Harrison, R.; Weber, I.

    2008-08-25

    HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) protease (PR) and its mutants are important antiviral drug targets. The PR flap region is critical for binding substrates or inhibitors and catalytic activity. Hence, mutations of flap residues frequently contribute to reduced susceptibility to PR inhibitors in drug-resistant HIV. Structural and kinetic analyses were used to investigate the role of flap residues Gly48, Ile50, and Ile54 in the development of drug resistance. The crystal structure of flap mutants PR{sub I50V} (PR with I50V mutation), PR{sub I54V} (PR with I54V mutation), and PR{sub I54M} (PR with I54M mutation) complexed with saquinavir (SQV) as well as PR{sub G48V} (PR with G48V mutation), PR{sub I54V}, and PR{sub I54M} complexed with darunavir (DRV) were determined at resolutions of 1.05--1.40 {angstrom}. The PR mutants showed changes in flap conformation, interactions with adjacent residues, inhibitor binding, and the conformation of the 80s loop relative to the wild-type PR. The PR contacts with DRV were closer in PR{sub G48V}-DRV than in the wild-type PR-DRV, whereas they were longer in PR{sub I54M}-DRV. The relative inhibition of PR{sub I54V} and that of PR{sub I54M} were similar for SQV and DRV. PR{sub G48V} was about twofold less susceptible to SQV than to DRV, wheres the opposite was observed for PR{sub I50V}. The observed inhibition was in agreement with the association of G48V and I50V with clinical resistance to SQV and DRV, respectively. This analysis of structural and kinetic effects of the mutants will assist in the development of more effective inhibitors for drug-resistant HIV.

  9. Microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    PubMed

    Kędzior, Mateusz; Seredyński, Rafał; Gutowicz, Jan

    2016-08-01

    Cysteine proteases are one of the major classes of proteolytic enzymes involved in a number of physiological and pathological processes in plants, animals and microorganisms. When their synthesis, activity and localization in mammalian cells are altered, they may contribute to the development of many diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, osteoporosis and cancer. Therefore, cysteine proteases have become promising drug targets for the medical treatment of these disorders. Inhibitors of cysteine proteases are also produced by almost every group of living organisms, being responsible for the control of intracellular proteolytic activity. Microorganisms synthesize cysteine protease inhibitors not only to regulate the activity of endogenous, often virulent enzymes, but also to hinder the host's proteolytic defense system and evade its immune responses against infections. Present work describes known to date microbial inhibitors of cysteine proteases in terms of their structure, enzyme binding mechanism, specificity and pathophysiological roles. The overview of both proteinaceous and small-molecule inhibitors produced by all groups of microorganisms (bacteria, archaea, fungi, protists) and viruses is provided. Subsequently, possible applications of microbial inhibitors in science, medicine and biotechnology are also highlighted. PMID:27048482

  10. Predicting drug resistance of the HIV-1 protease using molecular interaction energy components.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Jian; Wang, Wei

    2009-03-01

    Drug resistance significantly impairs the efficacy of AIDS therapy. Therefore, precise prediction of resistant viral mutants is particularly useful for developing effective drugs and designing therapeutic regimen. In this study, we applied a structure-based computational approach to predict mutants of the HIV-1 protease resistant to the seven FDA approved drugs. We analyzed the energetic pattern of the protease-drug interaction by calculating the molecular interaction energy components (MIECs) between the drug and the protease residues. Support vector machines (SVMs) were trained on MIECs to classify protease mutants into resistant and nonresistant categories. The high prediction accuracies for the test sets of cross-validations suggested that the MIECs successfully characterized the interaction interface between drugs and the HIV-1 protease. We conducted a proof-of-concept study on a newly approved drug, darunavir (TMC114), on which no drug resistance data were available in the public domain. Compared with amprenavir, our analysis suggested that darunavir might be more potent to combat drug resistance. To quantitatively estimate binding affinities of drugs and study the contributions of protease residues to causing resistance, linear regression models were trained on MIECs using partial least squares (PLS). The MIEC-PLS models also achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. Analysis of the fitting coefficients of MIECs in the regression model revealed the important resistance mutations and shed light into understanding the mechanisms of these mutations to cause resistance. Our study demonstrated the advantages of characterizing the protease-drug interaction using MIECs. We believe that MIEC-SVM and MIEC-PLS can help design new agents or combination of therapeutic regimens to counter HIV-1 protease resistant strains. PMID:18704937

  11. Bis-Tetrahydrofuran: a Privileged Ligand for Darunavir and a New Generation of HIV Protease Inhibitors That Combat Drug Resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Arun K.; Sridhar, Perali Ramu; Kumaragurubaran, Nagaswamy; Koh, Yasuhiro; Weber, Irene T.; Mitsuya, Hiroaki

    2008-06-06

    Two inhibitors that incorporate bis-THF as an effective high-affinity P{sub 2} ligand for the HIV-1 protease substrate binding site maintain impressive potency against mutant strains resistant to currently approved protease inhibitors. Crystallographic structures of protein-ligand complexes help to explain the superior antiviral property of these inhibitors and their potency against a wide spectrum of HIV-1 strains.

  12. Novel Bifunctional Quinolonyl Diketo Acid Derivatives as HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors: Design, Synthesis, Biological Activities and Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Di Santo, Roberto; Costi, Roberta; Roux, Alessandra; Artico, Marino; Lavecchia, Antonio; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Palmisano, Lucia; Andreotti, Mauro; Amici, Roberta; Galluzzo, Clementina Maria; Nencioni, Lucia; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Pommier, Yves; Marchand, Christophe

    2008-01-01

    The virally encoded integrase protein is an essential enzyme in the life cycle of the HIV-1 virus and represents an attractive and validated target in the development of therapeutics against HIV infection. Drugs that selectively inhibit this enzyme, when used in combination with inhibitors of reverse transcriptase and protease, are believed to be highly effective in suppressing the viral replication. Among the HIV-1 integrase inhibitors, the β-diketo acids (DKAs) represent a major lead for anti-HIV-1drug development. In this study, novel bifunctional quinolonyl diketo acid derivatives were designed, synthesized and tested for their inhibitory ability against HIV-1 integrase. The compounds are potent inhibitors of integrase activity. Particularly, derivative 8 is a potent IN inhibitor for both steps of the reaction (3′-processing and strand transfer) and exhibits both high antiviral activity against HIV-1 infected cells and low cytotoxicity. Molecular modeling studies provide a plausible mechanism of action, which is consistent with ligand SARs and enzyme photo-crosslinking experiments. PMID:16539381

  13. Screening of the Pan-African Natural Product Library Identifies Ixoratannin A-2 and Boldine as Novel HIV-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Tietjen, Ian; Ntie-Kang, Fidele; Mwimanzi, Philip; Onguéné, Pascal Amoa; Scull, Margaret A.; Idowu, Thomas Oyebode; Ogundaini, Abiodun Oguntuga; Meva’a, Luc Mbaze; Abegaz, Berhanu M.; Rice, Charles M.; Andrae-Marobela, Kerstin; Brockman, Mark A.; Brumme, Zabrina L.; Fedida, David

    2015-01-01

    The continued burden of HIV in resource-limited regions such as parts of sub-Saharan Africa, combined with adverse effects and potential risks of resistance to existing antiretroviral therapies, emphasize the need to identify new HIV inhibitors. Here we performed a virtual screen of molecules from the pan-African Natural Product Library, the largest collection of medicinal plant-derived pure compounds on the African continent. We identified eight molecules with structural similarity to reported interactors of Vpu, an HIV-1 accessory protein with reported ion channel activity. Using in vitro HIV-1 replication assays with a CD4+ T cell line and peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we confirmed antiviral activity and minimal cytotoxicity for two compounds, ixoratannin A-2 and boldine. Notably, ixoratannin A-2 retained inhibitory activity against recombinant HIV-1 strains encoding patient-derived mutations that confer resistance to protease, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase, or integrase inhibitors. Moreover, ixoratannin A-2 was less effective at inhibiting replication of HIV-1 lacking Vpu, supporting this protein as a possible direct or indirect target. In contrast, boldine was less effective against a protease inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 strain. Both ixoratannin A-2 and boldine also inhibited in vitro replication of hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, BIT-225, a previously-reported Vpu inhibitor, demonstrated antiviral activity but also cytotoxicity in HIV-1 and HCV replication assays. Our work identifies pure compounds derived from African plants with potential novel activities against viruses that disproportionately afflict resource-limited regions of the world. PMID:25830320

  14. Inhibitors of HIV-1 entry and integration: recent developments and impact on treatment.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anil K; George, Varghese; Valiathan, Ranjini; Pilakka-Kanthikeel, Sudheesh; Pallikkuth, Suresh

    2013-05-01

    Advances in the drug development against HIV-1 have lead to the identification of new compounds which could be used to target cellular entry and nuclear integration of virus in addition to drugs that commonly target reverse transcriptase and protease. These additional targets have added a new dimension to fight against HIV. Cellular entry of HIV is a multistep procedure involving a range of cellular and molecular interactions between virus envelope protein and receptors expressed on the surface of the target cells, thus providing many opportunities to block infection. Some of these entry inhibitors are currently being used in the clinic and more compounds are under various stages of development. Integration of the HIV-1 DNA is required and essential to maintain the viral DNA in the infected cell. The design and discovery of integrase inhibitors were first focused at targeting the catalytic site of integrase that selectively acting on strand transfer and thus inhibits integration of virus DNA with host cell genome. Thus, entry and integrase inhibitors present a real added value in combined treatment against HIV infection. This review discusses the recent development in the discovery of inhibitors of HIV entry and integration along with some of recent patents in the field. PMID:23578097

  15. Neutralizing antibody and anti-retroviral drug sensitivities of HIV-1 isolates resistant to small molecule CCR5 inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugach, Pavel; Ketas, Thomas J.; Michael, Elizabeth; Moore, John P.

    2008-08-01

    The small molecule CCR5 inhibitors are a new class of drugs for treating infection by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). They act by binding to the CCR5 co-receptor and preventing its use during HIV-1-cell fusion. Escape mutants can be raised against CCR5 inhibitors in vitro and will arise when these drugs are used clinically. Here, we have assessed the responses of CCR5 inhibitor-resistant viruses to other anti-retroviral drugs that act by different mechanisms, and their sensitivities to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). The rationale for the latter study is that the resistance pathway for CCR5 inhibitors involves changes in the HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env), which are also targets for NAbs. The escape mutants CC101.19 and D1/85.16 were selected for resistance to AD101 and vicriviroc (VVC), respectively, from the primary R5 HIV-1 isolate CC1/85. Each escape mutant was cross-resistant to other small molecule CCR5 inhibitors (aplaviroc, maraviroc, VVC, AD101 and CMPD 167), but sensitive to protein ligands of CCR5: the modified chemokine PSC-RANTES and the humanized MAb PRO-140. The resistant viruses also retained wild-type sensitivity to the nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (RTI) zidovudine, the non-nucleoside RTI nevirapine, the protease inhibitor atazanavir and other attachment and fusion inhibitors that act independently of CCR5 (BMS-806, PRO-542 and enfuvirtide). Of note is that the escape mutants were more sensitive than the parental CC1/85 isolate to a subset of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and to some sera from HIV-1-infected people, implying that sequence changes in Env that confer resistance to CCR5 inhibitors can increase the accessibility of some NAb epitopes. The need to preserve NAb resistance may therefore be a constraint upon how escape from CCR5 inhibitors occurs in vivo.

  16. Protein conformational dynamics in the mechanism of HIV-1 protease catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Torbeev, Vladimir Yu.; Raghuraman, H.; Hamelberg, Donald; Tonelli, Marco; Westler, William M.; Perozo, Eduardo; Kent, Stephen B.H.

    2013-09-17

    We have used chemical protein synthesis and advanced physical methods to probe dynamics-function correlations for the HIV-1 protease, an enzyme that has received considerable attention as a target for the treatment of AIDS. Chemical synthesis was used to prepare a series of unique analogues of the HIV-1 protease in which the flexibility of the 'flap' structures (residues 37-61 in each monomer of the homodimeric protein molecule) was systematically varied. These analogue enzymes were further studied by X-ray crystallography, NMR relaxation, and pulse-EPR methods, in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations. We show that conformational isomerization in the flaps is correlated with structural reorganization of residues in the active site, and that it is preorganization of the active site that is a rate-limiting factor in catalysis.

  17. A Consistency-Based Feature Selection Method Allied with Linear SVMs for HIV-1 Protease Cleavage Site Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Öztürk, Orkun; Aksaç, Alper; Elsheikh, Abdallah; Özyer, Tansel; Alhajj, Reda

    2013-01-01

    Background Predicting type-1 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV-1) protease cleavage site in protein molecules and determining its specificity is an important task which has attracted considerable attention in the research community. Achievements in this area are expected to result in effective drug design (especially for HIV-1 protease inhibitors) against this life-threatening virus. However, some drawbacks (like the shortage of the available training data and the high dimensionality of the feature space) turn this task into a difficult classification problem. Thus, various machine learning techniques, and specifically several classification methods have been proposed in order to increase the accuracy of the classification model. In addition, for several classification problems, which are characterized by having few samples and many features, selecting the most relevant features is a major factor for increasing classification accuracy. Results We propose for HIV-1 data a consistency-based feature selection approach in conjunction with recursive feature elimination of support vector machines (SVMs). We used various classifiers for evaluating the results obtained from the feature selection process. We further demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method by comparing it with a state-of-the-art feature selection method applied on HIV-1 data, and we evaluated the reported results based on attributes which have been selected from different combinations. Conclusion Applying feature selection on training data before realizing the classification task seems to be a reasonable data-mining process when working with types of data similar to HIV-1. On HIV-1 data, some feature selection or extraction operations in conjunction with different classifiers have been tested and noteworthy outcomes have been reported. These facts motivate for the work presented in this paper. Software availability The software is available at http://ozyer.etu.edu.tr/c-fs-svm.rar. The software

  18. HIV-1 escape from the entry-inhibiting effects of a cholesterol-binding compound via cleavage of gp41 by the viral protease.

    PubMed

    Waheed, Abdul A; Ablan, Sherimay D; Roser, James D; Sowder, Raymond C; Schaffner, Carl P; Chertova, Elena; Freed, Eric O

    2007-05-15

    HIV-1 virions are highly enriched in cholesterol relative to the cellular plasma membrane. We recently reported that a cholesterol-binding compound, amphotericin B methyl ester (AME), blocks HIV-1 entry and that single amino acid substitutions in the cytoplasmic tail of the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein gp41 confer resistance to AME. In this study, we defined the mechanism of resistance to AME. We observed that the gp41 in AME-resistant virions is substantially smaller than wild-type gp41. Remarkably, we found that this shift in gp41 size is due to cleavage of the gp41 cytoplasmic tail by the viral protease. We mapped the protease-mediated cleavage to two sites in the cytoplasmic tail and showed that gp41 truncations in this region also confer AME resistance. Thus, to escape the inhibitory effects of AME, HIV-1 evolved a mechanism of protease-mediated envelope glycoprotein cleavage used by several other retroviruses to activate envelope glycoprotein fusogenicity. In contrast to the mechanism of AME resistance observed for HIV-1, we demonstrate that simian immunodeficiency virus can escape from AME via the introduction of premature termination codons in the gp41 cytoplasmic tail coding region. These findings demonstrate that in human T cell lines, HIV-1 and simian immunodeficiency virus can evolve distinct strategies for evading AME, reflecting their differential requirements for the gp41 cytoplasmic tail in virus replication. These data reveal that HIV-1 can escape from an inhibitor of viral entry by acquiring mutations that cause the cytoplasmic tail of gp41 to be cleaved by the viral protease. PMID:17483482

  19. Protease Cleavage Leads to Formation of Mature Trimer Interface in HIV-1 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Danxia; Ning, Jiying; DeLucia, Maria; Ahn, Jinwoo; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Aiken, Christopher; Zhang, Peijun

    2012-01-01

    During retrovirus particle maturation, the assembled Gag polyprotein is cleaved by the viral protease into matrix (MA), capsid (CA), and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins. To form the mature viral capsid, CA rearranges, resulting in a lattice composed of hexameric and pentameric CA units. Recent structural studies of assembled HIV-1 CA revealed several inter-subunit interfaces in the capsid lattice, including a three-fold interhexamer interface that is critical for proper capsid stability. Although a general architecture of immature particles has been provided by cryo-electron tomographic studies, the structural details of the immature particle and the maturation pathway remain unknown. Here, we used cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) to determine the structure of tubular assemblies of the HIV-1 CA-SP1-NC protein. Relative to the mature assembled CA structure, we observed a marked conformational difference in the position of the CA-CTD relative to the NTD in the CA-SP1-NC assembly, involving the flexible hinge connecting the two domains. This difference was verified via engineered disulfide crosslinking, revealing that inter-hexamer contacts, in particular those at the pseudo three-fold axis, are altered in the CA-SP1-NC assemblies compared to the CA assemblies. Results from crosslinking analyses of mature and immature HIV-1 particles containing the same Cys substitutions in the Gag protein are consistent with these findings. We further show that cleavage of preassembled CA-SP1-NC by HIV-1 protease in vitro leads to release of SP1 and NC without disassembly of the lattice. Collectively, our results indicate that the proteolytic cleavage of Gag leads to a structural reorganization of the polypeptide and creates the three-fold interhexamer interface, important for the formation of infectious HIV-1 particles. PMID:22927821

  20. Defining the level of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease activity required for HIV-1 particle maturation and infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Rosé, J R; Babé, L M; Craik, C S

    1995-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease is the enzyme required for processing of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins to yield mature, infectious virions. Although the complete absence of proteolytic activity prevents maturation, the level of activity sufficient for maturation and subsequent infectivity has not been determined. Amino acid substitutions that reduce catalytic activity without affecting substrate recognition have been engineered into the active site of the HIV-1 protease. The catalytic efficiency (kcat) of the HIV-1 protease is decreased 4-fold when threonine 26 is replaced by serine (T26S) and approximately 50-fold when alanine 28 is replaced by serine (A28S). Genes containing these mutations were cloned into a proviral vector for analysis of their effects on virion maturation and infectivity. The results show that virions containing the T26S protease variant, in which only 25% of the protease is active, are very similar to wild-type virions, although slight reductions in infectivity are observed. Virions containing the A28S protease variant are not infectious, even though a limited amount of polyprotein processing does occur. There appears to be a linear correlation between the level of protease activity and particle infectivity. Our observations suggest that a threshold of protease activity exists between a 4-fold and 50-fold reduction, below which processing is insufficient to yield infectious particles. Our data also suggest that a reduction of protease activity by 50-fold or greater is sufficient to prevent the formation of infectious particles. PMID:7535864

  1. HIV-1 integrase inhibitor resistance and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Jose-Luis; Varghese, Vici; Rhee, Soo-Yon; Gatell, Jose M; Shafer, Robert W

    2011-05-01

    With the approval in 2007 of the first integrase inhibitor (INI), raltegravir, clinicians became better able to suppress virus replication in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) who were harboring many of the most highly drug-resistant viruses. Raltegravir also provided clinicians with additional options for first-line therapy and for the simplification of regimens in patients with stable virological suppression. Two additional INIs in advanced clinical development-elvitegravir and S/GSK1349572-may prove equally versatile. However, the INIs have a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance in that 1 or 2 mutations are capable of causing marked reductions in susceptibility to raltegravir and elvitegravir, the most well-studied INIs. This perspective reviews the genetic mechanisms of INI resistance and their implications for initial INI therapy, the treatment of antiretroviral-experienced patients, and regimen simplification. PMID:21459813

  2. QSAR study of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Sharma, Anju; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2013-03-01

    A QSAR study was performed on curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors using multiple linear regression. The statistically significant model was developed with squared correlation coefficients (r(2)) 0.891 and cross validated r(2) (r(2) cv) 0.825. The developed model revealed that electronic, shape, size, geometry, substitution's information and hydrophilicity were important atomic properties for determining the inhibitory activity of these molecules. The model was also tested successfully for external validation (r(2) pred = 0.849) as well as Tropsha's test for model predictability. Furthermore, the domain analysis was carried out to evaluate the prediction reliability of external set molecules. The model was statistically robust and had good predictive power which can be successfully utilized for screening of new molecules. PMID:23286784

  3. Evolution of Primary Protease Inhibitor Resistance Mutations during Protease Inhibitor Salvage Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kantor, Rami; Fessel, W. Jeffrey; Zolopa, Andrew R.; Israelski, Dennis; Shulman, Nancy; Montoya, Jose G.; Harbour, Michael; Schapiro, Jonathan M.; Shafer, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    In order to track the evolution of primary protease inhibitor (PI) resistance mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates, baseline and follow-up protease sequences were obtained from patients undergoing salvage PI therapy who presented initially with isolates containing a single primary PI resistance mutation. Among 78 patients meeting study selection criteria, baseline primary PI resistance mutations included L90M (42% of patients), V82A/F/T (27%), D30N (21%), G48V (6%), and I84V (4%). Despite the switching of treatment to a new PI, primary PI resistance mutations present at the baseline persisted in 66 of 78 (85%) patients. D30N persisted less frequently than L90M (50% versus 100%, respectively; P < 0.001) and V82A/F/T (50% versus 81%, respectively; P = 0.05). HIV-1 isolates from 38 (49%) patients failing PI salvage therapy developed new primary PI resistance mutations including L90M, I84V, V82A, and G48V. Common combinations of primary and secondary PI resistance mutations after salvage therapy included mutations at amino acid positions 10, 82, and 46 and/or 54 in 16 patients; 10, 90, and 71 and/or 73 in 14 patients; 10, 73, 84, 90, and 46 and/or 54 in 5 patients; 10, 48, and 82 in 5 patients; and 30, 88 and 90 in 5 patients. In summary, during salvage PI therapy, most HIV-1 isolates with a single primary PI resistance mutation maintained their original mutations, and 49% developed additional primary PI resistance mutations. The persistence of L90M, V82A/F/T, G48V, and I84V during salvage therapy suggests that these mutations play a role in clinical resistance to multiple PIs. PMID:11897594

  4. Synthesis and Inhibiting Activity of Some 4-Hydroxycoumarin Derivatives on HIV-1 Protease

    PubMed Central

    Stanchev, Stancho; Jensen, Frank; Hinkov, Anton; Atanasov, Vasil; Genova-Kalou, Petia; Argirova, Radka; Manolov, Ilia

    2011-01-01

    Six novel 4-hydroxycoumarin derivatives were rationally synthesized, verified, and characterized by molecular docking using crystal HIV-1 protease. Molecular docking studies predicted antiprotease activity of (7) and (10). The most significant functional groups, responsible for the interaction with HIV-1 protease by hydrogen bonds formation are pyran oxygen, atom, lactone carbonyl oxygen and one of the hydroxyl groups. The newly synthesized compounds were biologically tested in MT-4 cells for inhibiting HIV-1 replication, exploring the protection of cells from the cytopathic effect of HIV measured by cell survival in MTT test. One derivative −7 showed 76–78% inhibition of virus infectivity with IC50 = 0.01 nM, much less than the maximal nontoxic concentration (1 mM). Antiprotease activity of 7 in two different concentrations was detected to be 25%. Nevertheless, the results of study of (7) encourage using it as a pharmacophore for further synthesis and evaluation of anti-HIV activity. PMID:22389842

  5. Prediction of Mutational Tolerance in HIV-1 Protease and Reverse Transcriptase Using Flexible Backbone Protein Design

    PubMed Central

    Varela, Rocco; Ó Conchúir, Shane; Kortemme, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Predicting which mutations proteins tolerate while maintaining their structure and function has important applications for modeling fundamental properties of proteins and their evolution; it also drives progress in protein design. Here we develop a computational model to predict the tolerated sequence space of HIV-1 protease reachable by single mutations. We assess the model by comparison to the observed variability in more than 50,000 HIV-1 protease sequences, one of the most comprehensive datasets on tolerated sequence space. We then extend the model to a second protein, reverse transcriptase. The model integrates multiple structural and functional constraints acting on a protein and uses ensembles of protein conformations. We find the model correctly captures a considerable fraction of protease and reverse-transcriptase mutational tolerance and shows comparable accuracy using either experimentally determined or computationally generated structural ensembles. Predictions of tolerated sequence space afforded by the model provide insights into stability-function tradeoffs in the emergence of resistance mutations and into strengths and limitations of the computational model. PMID:22927804

  6. Insights into the structural function of the complex of HIV-1 protease with TMC-126: molecular dynamics simulations and free-energy calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dan; Han, Ju-Guang; Chen, Hang; Li, Liang; Zhao, Run-Ning Zhao; Liu, Guang; Duan, Yuhua

    2012-05-01

    The binding properties of the protein-inhibitor complex of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease with the inhibitor TMC-126 are investigated by combining computational alanine scanning (CAS) mutagenesis with binding free-energy decomposition (BFED). The calculated results demonstrate that the flap region (residues 38-58) and the active site region (residues 23-32) in HIV-1 protease contribute 63.72% of the protease to the binding of the inhibitor. In particular, the mechanisms for the interactions of key residues of these species are fully explored and analyzed. Interestingly, the regression analyses show that both CAS and BFED based on the generalized Born model yield similar results, with a correlation coefficient of 0.94. However, compared to CAS, BFED is faster and can decompose the per-residue binding free-energy contributions into backbone and sidechain contributions. The results obtained in this study are useful for studying the binding mechanism between receptor and ligand and for designing potent inhibitors that can combat diseases.

  7. Discovery of dual inhibitors targeting both HIV-1 capsid and human cyclophilin A to inhibit the assembly and uncoating of the viral capsid.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiebo; Tan, Zhiwu; Tang, Shixing; Hewlett, Indira; Pang, Ruifang; He, Meizi; He, Shanshan; Tian, Baohe; Chen, Kan; Yang, Ming

    2009-04-15

    HIV-1 assembly and disassembly (uncoating) processes are critical for the HIV-1 replication. HIV-1 capsid (CA) and human cyclophilin A (CypA) play essential roles in these processes. We designed and synthesized a series of thiourea compounds as HIV-1 assembly and disassembly dual inhibitors targeting both HIV-1 CA protein and human CypA. The SIV-induced syncytium antiviral evaluation indicated that all of the inhibitors displayed antiviral activities in SIV-infected CEM cells at the concentration of 0.6-15.8 microM for 50% of maximum effective rate. Their abilities to bind CA and CypA were determined by ultraviolet spectroscopic analysis, fluorescence binding affinity and PPIase inhibition assay. Assembly studies in vitro demonstrated that the compounds could potently disrupt CA assembly with a dose-dependent manner. All of these molecules could bind CypA with binding affinities (Kd values) of 51.0-512.8 microM. Fifteen of the CypA binding compounds showed potent PPIase inhibitory activities (IC(50) values<1 microM) while they could not bind either to HIV-1 Protease or to HIV-1 Integrase in the enzyme assays. These results suggested that 15 compounds could block HIV-1 replication by inhibiting the PPIase activity of CypA to interfere with capsid disassembly and disrupting CA assembly. PMID:19328002

  8. TOE1 is an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication with cell-penetrating capability

    PubMed Central

    Sperandio, Sabina; Barat, Corinne; Cabrita, Miguel A.; Gargaun, Ana; Berezovski, Maxim V.; Tremblay, Michel J.; de Belle, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Target of Egr1 (TOE1) is a nuclear protein localized primarily in nucleoli and Cajal bodies that was identified as a downstream target of the immediate early gene Egr1. TOE1 displays a functional deadenylation domain and has been shown to participate in spliceosome assembly. We report here that TOE1 can function as an inhibitor of HIV-1 replication and show evidence that supports a direct interaction of TOE1 with the viral specific transactivator response element as part of the inhibitory mechanism. In addition, we show that TOE1 can be secreted by activated CD8+ T lymphocytes and can be cleaved by the serine protease granzyme B, one of the main components of cytotoxic granules. Both full-length and cleaved TOE1 can spontaneously cross the plasma membrane and penetrate cells in culture, retaining HIV-1 inhibitory activity. Antiviral potency of TOE1 and its cell-penetrating capability have been identified to lie within a 35-amino-acid region containing the nuclear localization sequence. PMID:26056259

  9. Protein protease inhibitors in insects and comparison with mammalian inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, M

    1993-01-01

    1. Studies on insect protein protease inhibitors are summarized. Biochemical, genetic and physiological investigations of the silkworm are performed. 2. In addition, the properties and characteristics of fungal protease inhibitors from the silkworm (Bombyx mori) are described and their importance as defensive functions is emphasized. 3. This review also concerns comparative and evolutionary studies of protease inhibitors from various sources. 4. The biological significance of inhibitors is discussed in view of the extensive experimental results. PMID:8365101

  10. HIV-1 Gag as an Antiviral Target: Development of Assembly and Maturation Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Spearman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 Gag is the master orchestrator of particle assembly. The central role of Gag at multiple stages of the HIV lifecycle has led to efforts to develop drugs that directly target Gag and prevent the formation and release of infectious particles. Until recently, however, only the catalytic site protease inhibitors have been available to inhibit late stages of HIV replication. This review summarizes the current state of development of antivirals that target Gag or disrupt late events in the retrovirus lifecycle such as maturation of the viral capsid. Maturation inhibitors represent an exciting new series of antiviral compounds, including those that specifically target CA-SP1 cleavage and the allosteric integrase inhibitors that inhibit maturation by a completely different mechanism. Numerous small molecules and peptides targeting CA have been studied in attempts to disrupt steps in assembly. Efforts to target CA have recently gained considerable momentum from the development of small molecules that bind CA and alter capsid stability at the post-entry stage of the lifecycle. Efforts to develop antivirals that inhibit incorporation of genomic RNA or to inhibit late budding events remain in preliminary stages of development. Overall, the development of novel antivirals targeting Gag and the late stages in HIV replication appears much closer to success than ever, with the new maturation inhibitors leading the way. PMID:26329615

  11. Sargassum fusiforme fraction is a potent and specific inhibitor of HIV-1 fusion and reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Paskaleva, Elena E; Lin, Xudong; Duus, Karen; McSharry, James J; Veille, Jean-Claude L; Thornber, Carol; Liu, Yanze; Lee, David Yu-Wei; Canki, Mario

    2008-01-01

    Sargassum fusiforme (Harvey) Setchell has been shown to be a highly effective inhibitor of HIV-1 infection. To identify its mechanism of action, we performed bioactivity-guided fractionation on Sargassum fusiforme mixture. Here, we report isolation of a bioactive fraction SP4-2 (S. fusiforme), which at 8 μg/ml inhibited HIV-1 infection by 86.9%, with IC50 value of 3.7 μg. That represents 230-fold enhancement of antiretroviral potency as compared to the whole extract. Inhibition was mediated against both CXCR4 (X4) and CCR5 (R5) tropic HIV-1. Specifically, 10 μg/ml SP4-2 blocked HIV-1 fusion and entry by 53%. This effect was reversed by interaction of SP4-2 with sCD4, suggesting that S. fusiforme inhibits HIV-1 infection by blocking CD4 receptor, which also explained observed inhibition of both X4 and R5-tropic HIV-1. SP4-2 also inhibited HIV-1 replication after virus entry, by directly inhibiting HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in a dose dependent manner by up to 79%. We conclude that the SP4-2 fraction contains at least two distinct and biologically active molecules, one that inhibits HIV-1 fusion by interacting with CD4 receptor, and another that directly inhibits HIV-1 RT. We propose that S. fusiforme is a lead candidate for anti-HIV-1 drug development. PMID:18197976

  12. Crystal structures of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-07-01

    HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors are potentially specific and effective drugs in AIDS therapy. The presence of two aromatic systems with an angled orientation in the molecule of the inhibitor is crucial for interactions with HIV-1 RT. The inhibitor drives like a wedge into the cluster of aromatic residues of RT HIV-1 and restrains the enzyme in a conformation that blocks the chemical step of nucleotide incorporation. Structural studies provide useful information for designing new, more active inhibitors. The crystal structures of four NNRTIs are presented here. The investigated compounds are derivatives of N-benzyl-4-methyl-benzimidazole with various aliphatic and aromatic substituents at carbon 2 positions and a 2,6-dihalogeno-substituted N-benzyl moiety. Structural data reported here show that the conformation of the investigated compounds is relatively rigid. Such feature is important for the nonnucleoside inhibitor binding to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

  13. Characterization, biomedical and agricultural applications of protease inhibitors: A review.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Tooba Naz; Parveen, Romana; Fatima, Sadaf

    2016-10-01

    This review describes Protease Inhibitors (PIs) which target or inhibit proteases, protein digesting enzymes. These proteases play a crucial task in many biological events including digestion, blood coagulation, apoptosis etc. Regardless of their crucial roles, they need to be checked regularly by PIs as their excess may possibly damage host organism. On basis of amino acid composition of PIs where Protease-PI enzymatic reactions occur i.e. serine, cysteine, and aspartic acid, they are classified. Nowadays, various PIs are being worked upon to fight various parasitic or viral diseases including malaria, schistosomiasis, colds, flu', dengue etc. They prevent an ongoing process begun by carcinogen exposure by keeping a check on metastasis. They also possess potential to reduce carcinogen-induced, increased levels of gene amplification to almost normal levels. Some PIs can principally be used for treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure by blocking conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II for example Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs). Also PIs target amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) level in brain which is prime responsible for development of Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Also, PIs inhibit enzymatic activity of HIV-1 Protease Receptor (PR) by preventing cleavage events in Gag and Gag-Pol that result in production of non-virulent virus particles. PMID:26955746

  14. Structure of the Unbound Form of HIV-1 Subtype A Protease: Comparison with Unbound Forms of Proteases from other HIV Subtypes

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, Arthur H.; Coman, Roxana M.; Bracho-Sanchez, Edith; Fernandez, Marty A.; Gilliland, C.Taylor; Li, Mi; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dunn, Ben M.; McKenna, Robert

    2010-03-12

    The crystal structure of the unbound form of HIV-1 subtype A protease (PR) has been determined to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution and refined as a homodimer in the hexagonal space group P6{sub 1} to an R{sub cryst} of 20.5%. The structure is similar in overall shape and fold to the previously determined subtype B, C and F PRs. The major differences lie in the conformation of the flap region. The flaps in the crystal structures of the unbound subtype B and C PRs, which were crystallized in tetragonal space groups, are either semi-open or wide open. In the present structure of subtype A PR the flaps are found in the closed position, a conformation that would be more anticipated in the structure of HIV protease complexed with an inhibitor. The amino-acid differences between the subtypes and their respective crystal space groups are discussed in terms of the differences in the flap conformations.

  15. Progress and prospects on DENV protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Timiri, Ajay Kumar; Sinha, Barij Nayan; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan

    2016-07-19

    New treatments are desperately required to combat increasing rate of dengue fever cases reported in tropical and sub-tropical parts of the world. Among the ten proteins (structural and non-structural) encoded by dengue viral genome, NS2B-NS3 protease is an ideal target for drug discovery. It is responsible for the processing of poly protein that is required for genome replication of the virus. Moreover, inhibitors designed against proteases were found successful in Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV). Complete molecular mechanism and a survey of inhibitors reported against dengue protease will be helpful in designing effective and potent inhibitors. This review provides an insight on molecular mechanism of dengue virus protease and covers up-to-date information on different inhibitors reported against dengue proteases with medicinal chemistry perspective. PMID:27092412

  16. Akt inhibitors as an HIV-1 infected macrophage-specific anti-viral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chugh, Pauline; Bradel-Tretheway, Birgit; Monteiro-Filho, Carlos MR; Planelles, Vicente; Maggirwar, Sanjay B; Dewhurst, Stephen; Kim, Baek

    2008-01-01

    Background Unlike CD4+ T cells, HIV-1 infected macrophages exhibit extended life span even upon stress, consistent with their in vivo role as long-lived HIV-1 reservoirs. Results Here, we demonstrate that PI3K/Akt inhibitors, including clinically available Miltefosine, dramatically reduced HIV-1 production from long-living virus-infected macrophages. These PI3K/Akt inhibitors hyper-sensitize infected macrophages to extracellular stresses that they are normally exposed to, and eventually lead to cell death of infected macrophages without harming uninfected cells. Based on the data from these Akt inhibitors, we were able to further investigate how HIV-1 infection utilizes the PI3K/Akt pathway to establish the cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 infection, which extends the lifespan of infected macrophages, a key viral reservoir. First, we found that HIV-1 infection activates the well characterized pro-survival PI3K/Akt pathway in primary human macrophages, as reflected by decreased PTEN protein expression and increased Akt kinase activity. Interestingly, the expression of HIV-1 or SIV Tat is sufficient to mediate this cytoprotective effect, which is dependent on the basic domain of Tat – a region that has previously been shown to bind p53. Next, we observed that this interaction appears to contribute to the downregulation of PTEN expression, since HIV-1 Tat was found to compete with PTEN for p53 binding; this is known to result in p53 destabilization, with a consequent reduction in PTEN protein production. Conclusion Since HIV-1 infected macrophages display highly elevated Akt activity, our results collectively show that PI3K/Akt inhibitors may be a novel therapy for interfering with the establishment of long-living HIV-1 infected reservoirs. PMID:18237430

  17. Ion specific effects of alkali cations on the catalytic activity of HIV-1 protease.

    PubMed

    Pokorná, Jana; Heyda, Jan; Konvalinka, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus 1 protease (HIV-1 PR), an important therapeutic target for the treatment of AIDS, is one of the most well-studied enzymes. However, there is still much to learn about the regulation of the activity and inhibition of this key viral enzyme. Specifically, the mechanism of activation of HIV-1 PR from the viral polyprotein upon HIV maturation is still not understood. It has been suggested that external factors like pH or salt concentration might contribute to regulation of this crucial step in the viral life cycle. Recently, we analyzed the activity of HIV-1 PR in aqueous solutions of sodium and potassium chloride by experimental determination of enzyme kinetics and molecular dynamics simulations. We showed that the effect of salt concentration is cation-specific [Heyda et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2009 (11), 7599]. In this study, we extended this analysis for other alkali cations and found that the dependence of the initial velocity of peptide substrate hydrolysis on the nature of the cation follows the Hofmeister series, with the exception of caesium. Significantly higher catalytic efficiencies both in terms of substrate binding (K(M)) and turnover number (kcat) are observed in the presence of K+ compared to Na+ or Li+ at corresponding salt concentrations. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that both lithium and sodium are attracted more strongly than potassium and caesium to the protein surface, mostly due to stronger interactions with carboxylate side chain groups of aspartates and glutamates. Furthermore, we observed a surprising decrease in the K(M) value for a specific substrate at very low salt concentration. The molecular mechanism of this phenomenon will be further analyzed. PMID:23795510

  18. The importance of physicochemical characteristics and nonlinear classifiers in determining HIV-1 protease specificity.

    PubMed

    Manning, Timmy; Walsh, Paul

    2016-04-01

    This paper reviews recent research relating to the application of bioinformatics approaches to determining HIV-1 protease specificity, outlines outstanding issues, and presents a new approach to addressing these issues. Leading machine learning theory for the problem currently suggests that the direct encoding of the physicochemical properties of the amino acid substrates is not required for optimal performance. A number of amino acid encoding approaches which incorporate potentially relevant physicochemical properties of the substrate are identified, and are evaluated using a nonlinear task decomposition based neuroevolution algorithm. The results are evaluated, and compared against a recent benchmark set on a nonlinear classifier using only amino acid sequence and identity information. Ensembles of these nonlinear classifiers using the physicochemical properties of the substrate are demonstrated to consistently outperform the recently published state-of-the-art linear support vector machine based approach in out-of-sample evaluations. PMID:27212259

  19. Mechanism of Drug Resistance Revealed by the Crystal Structure of the Unliganded HIV-1 Protease with F53L Mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fengling; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Boross, Peter I.; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-12-03

    Mutations in HIV-1 protease (PR) that produce resistance to antiviral PR inhibitors are a major problem in AIDS therapy. The mutation F53L arising from antiretroviral therapy was introduced into the flexible flap region of the wild-type PR to study its effect and potential role in developing drug resistance. Compared to wild-type PR, PR{sub F53L} showed lower (15%) catalytic efficiency, 20-fold weaker inhibition by the clinical drug indinavir, and reduced dimer stability, while the inhibition constants of two peptide analog inhibitors were slightly lower than those for PR. The crystal structure of PR{sub F53L} was determined in the unliganded form at 1.35 {angstrom} resolution in space group P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2. The tips of the flaps in PR{sub F53L} had a wider separation than in unliganded wild-type PR, probably due to the absence of hydrophobic interactions of the side-chains of Phe53 and Ile50{prime}. The changes in interactions between the flaps agreed with the reduced stability of PR{sub F53L} relative to wild-type PR. The altered flap interactions in the unliganded form of PR{sub F53L} suggest a distinct mechanism for drug resistance, which has not been observed in other common drug-resistant mutants.

  20. Comparative docking and CoMFA analysis of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pawan; Garg, Prabha; Roy, Nilanjan

    2011-08-01

    The docking studies and comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) were performed on highly active molecules of curcumine derivatives against 3' processing activity of HIV-1 integrase (IN) enzyme. The optimum CoMFA model was selected with statistically significant cross-validated r(2) value of 0.815 and non-cross validated r (2) value of 0.99. The common pharmacophore of highly active molecules was used for screening of HIV-1 IN inhibitors. The high contribution of polar interactions in pharmacophore mapping is well supported by docking and CoMFA results. The results of docking, CoMFA, and pharmacophore mapping give structural insights as well as important binding features of curcumine derivatives as HIV-1 IN inhibitors which can provide guidance for the rational design of novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. PMID:21327540

  1. The BET inhibitor OTX015 reactivates latent HIV-1 through P-TEFb

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Panpan; Qu, Xiying; Shen, Yinzhong; Jiang, Zhengtao; Wang, Pengfei; Zeng, Hanxian; Ji, Haiyan; Deng, Junxiao; Yang, Xinyi; Li, Xian; Lu, Hongzhou; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2016-01-01

    None of the currently used anti-HIV-1 agents can effectively eliminate latent HIV-1 reservoirs, which is a major hurdle to a complete cure for AIDS. We report here that a novel oral BET inhibitor OTX015, a thienotriazolodiazepine compound that has entered phase Ib clinical development for advanced hematologic malignancies, can effectively reactivate HIV-1 in different latency models with an EC50 value 1.95–4.34 times lower than JQ1, a known BET inhibitor that can reactivate HIV-1 latency. We also found that OTX015 was more potent when used in combination with prostratin. More importantly, OTX015 treatment induced HIV-1 full-length transcripts and viral outgrowth in resting CD4+ T cells from infected individuals receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART), while exerting minimal toxicity and effects on T cell activation. Finally, biochemical analysis showed that OTX015-mediated activation of HIV-1 involved an increase in CDK9 occupancy and RNAP II C-terminal domain (CTD) phosphorylation. Our results suggest that the BET inhibitor OTX015 may be a candidate for anti-HIV-1-latency therapies. PMID:27067814

  2. In Vitro Reactivation of Replication-Competent and Infectious HIV-1 by Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Banga, Riddhima; Procopio, Francesco Andrea; Cavassini, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The existence of long-lived HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells is thought to be the primary obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. In the search for novel therapeutic approaches that may reverse HIV-1 latency, inhibitors of histone deacetylases (HDACis) have been tested to reactivate HIV-1 replication with the objective of rendering HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In the present study, we evaluated the efficiency of HDACis to reactivate HIV-1 replication from resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. We demonstrate that following prolonged/repeated treatment of resting memory CD4 T cells with HDACis, HIV-1 replication may be induced from primary resting memory CD4 T cells isolated from aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. More importantly, we demonstrate that HIV-1 reactivated in the cell cultures was not only replication competent but also infectious. Interestingly, givinostat, an HDACi that has not been investigated in clinical trials, was more efficient than vorinostat, panobinostat, and romidepsin in reversing HIV-1 latency in vitro. Taken together, these results support further evaluation of givinostat as a latency-reversing agent (LRA) in aviremic long-term-treated HIV-1-infected subjects. IMPORTANCE The major barrier to HIV cure is the existence of long-lived latently HIV-1-infected resting memory CD4 T cells. Latently HIV-1-infected CD4 T cells are transcriptionally silent and are therefore not targeted by conventional antiretroviral therapy (ART) or the immune system. In this context, one strategy to target latently infected cells is based on pharmacological molecules that may force the virus to replicate and would therefore render HIV-1-infected cells susceptible to elimination either by HIV-specific CD8 T cells or through virus-mediated cytopathicity. In this context, we developed an

  3. Cordysobin, a novel alkaline serine protease with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the medicinal mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Xian; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Guo-Qing; Zhao, Shuang; Xu, Feng; Geng, Xiao-Li; Wang, He-Xiang

    2012-01-01

    A novel serine protease, designated as cordysobin, was purified from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Cordyceps sobolifera. The isolation procedure utilized ion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and SP-Sepharose followed by gel filtration on Superdex 75. The protease did not adsorb on DEAE-cellulose but bound to SP-Sepharose. In sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), the protease resolved as a single band with an apparent molecular mass of 31 kDa. Its optimal pH was 10.0, and the optimal temperature was 65°C. The protease displayed a K(m) value of 0.41 μM and 13.44 μM·min⁻¹ using Suc-Leu-Leu-Val-Tyr-MCA as substrate at pH 10.0 and 37°C. Protease activity was enhanced by the Fe²⁺ ion at low concentration range of 1.25-10 mM and was strongly inhibited by Hg²⁺ up to 1.25 mM. The protease was strongly inhibited by chymostatin and phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), suggesting that it is a serine protease. It manifested significant inhibitory activity toward HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with an IC₅₀ value of 8.2×10⁻³ μM, which is the highest anti-HIV-1 RT activity of reported mushroom proteins. PMID:22014786

  4. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening.

    PubMed

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F; Tinetti, Ricky N; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S; Headey, Stephen J; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-06-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  5. Identification of mechanistically distinct inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase through fragment screening

    PubMed Central

    La, Jennifer; Latham, Catherine F.; Tinetti, Ricky N.; Johnson, Adam; Tyssen, David; Huber, Kelly D.; Sluis-Cremer, Nicolas; Simpson, Jamie S.; Headey, Stephen J.; Chalmers, David K.; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2015-01-01

    Fragment-based screening methods can be used to discover novel active site or allosteric inhibitors for therapeutic intervention. Using saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR and in vitro activity assays, we have identified fragment-sized inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) with distinct chemical scaffolds and mechanisms compared to nonnucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTIs) and nucleoside/nucleotide RT inhibitors (NRTIs). Three compounds were found to inhibit RNA- and DNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity of HIV-1 RT in the micromolar range while retaining potency against RT variants carrying one of three major NNRTI resistance mutations: K103N, Y181C, or G190A. These compounds also inhibit Moloney murine leukemia virus RT but not the Klenow fragment of Escherichia coli DNA polymerase I. Steady-state kinetic analyses demonstrate that one of these fragments is a competitive inhibitor of HIV-1 RT with respect to deoxyribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) substrate, whereas a second compound is a competitive inhibitor of RT polymerase activity with respect to the DNA template/primer (T/P), and consequently also inhibits RNase H activity. The dNTP competing RT inhibitor retains activity against the NRTI-resistant mutants K65R and M184V, demonstrating a drug resistance profile distinct from the nucleotide competing RT inhibitors indolopyridone-1 (INDOPY-1) and 4-dimethylamino-6-vinylpyrimidine-1 (DAVP-1). In antiviral assays, the T/P competing compound inhibits HIV-1 replication at a step consistent with an RT inhibitor. Screening of additional structurally related compounds to the three fragments led to the discovery of molecules with improved potency against HIV-1 RT. These fragment inhibitors represent previously unidentified scaffolds for development of novel drugs for HIV-1 prevention or treatment. PMID:26038551

  6. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal.

    PubMed

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2016-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  7. Small Molecule Inhibitors of BAF; A Promising Family of Compounds in HIV-1 Latency Reversal

    PubMed Central

    Stoszko, Mateusz; De Crignis, Elisa; Rokx, Casper; Khalid, Mir Mubashir; Lungu, Cynthia; Palstra, Robert-Jan; Kan, Tsung Wai; Boucher, Charles; Verbon, Annelies; Dykhuizen, Emily C.; Mahmoudi, Tokameh

    2015-01-01

    Persistence of latently infected cells in presence of Anti-Retroviral Therapy presents the main obstacle to HIV-1 eradication. Much effort is thus placed on identification of compounds capable of HIV-1 latency reversal in order to render infected cells susceptible to viral cytopathic effects and immune clearance. We identified the BAF chromatin remodeling complex as a key player required for maintenance of HIV-1 latency, highlighting its potential as a molecular target for inhibition in latency reversal. Here, we screened a recently identified panel of small molecule inhibitors of BAF (BAFi's) for potential to activate latent HIV-1. Latency reversal was strongly induced by BAFi's Caffeic Acid Phenethyl Ester and Pyrimethamine, two molecules previously characterized for clinical application. BAFi's reversed HIV-1 latency in cell line based latency models, in two ex vivo infected primary cell models of latency, as well as in HIV-1 infected patient's CD4 + T cells, without inducing T cell proliferation or activation. BAFi-induced HIV-1 latency reversal was synergistically enhanced upon PKC pathway activation and HDAC-inhibition. Therefore BAFi's constitute a promising family of molecules for inclusion in therapeutic combinatorial HIV-1 latency reversal. PMID:26870822

  8. Substituted indoles as HIV-1 non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: a patent evaluation (WO2015044928).

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-05-01

    The invention described in this patent (WO2015044928) is related to compounds based on the substituted indole scaffold, their synthetic process and application to inhibit HIV-1 replication as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs). Some of the newly claimed compounds presented improved potency against wild-type (WT) HIV-1 strain in comparison to previously disclosed indole-based NNRTIs and were also shown to be effective against common resistant HIV-1 strains. In light of their novel structural characteristics, simple synthetic route and improved anti-HIV activity, these compounds deserve further study as promising NNRTIs. PMID:26742549

  9. The design of 8-hydroxyquinoline tetracyclic lactams as HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Velthuisen, Emile J; Johns, Brian A; Temelkoff, David P; Brown, Kevin W; Danehower, Susan C

    2016-07-19

    A novel series of HIV-1 integrase strand transfer inhibitors were designed using the venerable two-metal binding pharmacophore model and incorporating structural elements from two different literature scaffolds. This manuscript describes a number of 8-hydroxyquinoline tetracyclic lactams with exceptional antiviral activity against HIV-1 and little loss of potency against the IN signature resistance mutations Q148K and G140S/Q148H. PMID:27092410

  10. Novel Neuroprotective GSK-3β Inhibitor Restricts Tat-Mediated HIV-1 Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guendel, Irene; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin C.; Senina, Svetlana; Shultz, Leonard; Narayanan, Aarthi; Chen, Hao; Lepene, Benjamin; Zeng, Chen

    2014-01-01

    The implementation of new antiretroviral therapies targeting transcription of early viral proteins in postintegrated HIV-1 can aid in overcoming current therapy limitations. Using high-throughput screening assays, we have previously described a novel Tat-dependent HIV-1 transcriptional inhibitor named 6-bromoindirubin-3′-oxime (6BIO). The screening of 6BIO derivatives yielded unique compounds that show potent inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. We have identified a second-generation derivative called 18BIOder as an inhibitor of HIV-1 Tat-dependent transcription in TZM-bl cells and a potent inhibitor of GSK-3β kinase in vitro. Structurally, 18BIOder is half the molecular weight and structure of its parental compound, 6BIO. More importantly, we also have found a different GSK-3β complex present only in HIV-1-infected cells. 18BIOder preferentially inhibits this novel kinase complex from infected cells at nanomolar concentrations. Finally, we observed that neuronal cultures treated with Tat protein are protected from Tat-mediated cytotoxicity when treated with 18BIOder. Overall, our data suggest that HIV-1 Tat-dependent transcription is sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of GSK-3β. PMID:24227837

  11. Revealing Origin of Decrease in Potency of Darunavir and Amprenavir against HIV-2 relative to HIV-1 Protease by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianzhong; Liang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Wei; Yi, Changhong; Zhang, Shaolong; Zhang, Qinggang

    2014-11-01

    Clinical inhibitors Darunavir (DRV) and Amprenavir (APV) are less effective on HIV-2 protease (PR2) than on HIV-1 protease (PR1). To identify molecular basis associated with the lower inhibition, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the effectiveness of the PR1 inhibitors DRV and APV against PR1/PR2. The rank of predicted binding free energies agrees with the experimental determined one. Moreover, our results show that two inhibitors bind less strongly to PR2 than to PR1, again in agreement with the experimental findings. The decrease in binding free energies for PR2 relative to PR1 is found to arise from the reduction of the van der Waals interactions induced by the structural adjustment of the triple mutant V32I, I47V and V82I. This result is further supported by the difference between the van der Waals interactions of inhibitors with each residue in PR2 and in PR1. The results from the principle component analysis suggest that inhibitor binding tends to make the flaps of PR2 close and the one of PR1 open. We expect that this study can theoretically provide significant guidance and dynamics information for the design of potent dual inhibitors targeting PR1/PR2.

  12. Synthesis of amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Rachel K; Khan, Tanweer A; Olsen, David B; Sleebs, Brad E

    2016-06-14

    Aspartyl proteases are important pharmacological targets. Historically aspartyl proteases have been commonly targeted with transition state derived peptidomimetics. The strategy to develop aspartyl protease inhibitors has undertaken a dramatic paradigm shift in the last 10 years. The pharmaceutical industry in 2005 disclosed several scaffolds or "head groups" that prompted the field to move beyond peptidomimetic derived inhibitors. Since the discovery of the first amino heterocycle aspartyl protease inhibitor, the amino hydantoin, industry and academia have positioned themselves for a foothold on the new molecular space, designing a variety of related "head groups". Both the design and synthetic efforts involved in constructing these scaffolds are varied and complex. Here we highlight the synthetic strategies used to access these amino heterocycle scaffolds. PMID:27143279

  13. Antiviral activity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease inhibitors in a single cycle of infection: evidence for a role of protease in the early phase.

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, K; Young, M; Baboonian, C; Merson, J; Whittle, P; Oroszlan, S

    1994-01-01

    The antiviral activities of two substrate-based inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease, UK-88,947 and Ro 31-8959, were studied in acute infections. H9 and HeLaCD4-LTR/beta-gal cells were infected either with HIV-1IIIB or a replication-defective virus, HIV-gpt(HXB-2). Both inhibitors were capable of blocking early steps of HIV-1 replication if added to cells prior to infection. Partial inhibition was also obtained by addition of inhibitor at the time of or as late as 15 min after infection. The inhibitors were ineffective if added 30 min postinfection. The inhibitory effects were studied by cDNA analysis with PCR followed by Southern blot hybridization and by infectivity assays allowing quantitation of HIV-1 in a single cycle of replication. When UK-88,947-treated H9 cells were coinfected with HIV-1 and human T-cell leukemia virus type I only the replication of HIV-1 was inhibited, demonstrating viral specificity. Pretreating the infectious virus stocks with the inhibitors also prevented replication, indicating that the inhibitors block the action of the viral protease and not a cellular protease. A panel of primer sets was used to analyze cDNA from cell lysates by PCR amplification at 4 and 18 h postinfection. Four hours after infection, viral specific cDNA was detected with all of the four primer pairs used: R/U5, nef/U3, 5' gag, and long terminal repeat (LTR)/gag. However, after 18 h, only the R/U5 and nef/U3 primer pairs and not the 5' gag or LTR/gag primer pair were able to allow amplification of cDNA. The results suggest a crucial role of HIV-1 protease in the early phase of viral replication. Although it is not clear what early steps are affected by the protease, it is likely that the target is the NC protein, as referred from our previous reports of the in situ cleavage of the nucleocapsid (NC) protein by the viral protease inside lentiviral capsids. The results suggest that it is not the inhibition of initiation and progression

  14. Escape of HIV-1 from a Small Molecule CCR5 Inhibitor Is Not Associated with a Fitness Loss

    PubMed Central

    Anastassopoulou, Cleo G; Marozsan, Andre J; Matet, Alexandre; Snyder, Amy D; Arts, Eric J; Kuhmann, Shawn E; Moore, John P

    2007-01-01

    Fitness is a parameter used to quantify how well an organism adapts to its environment; in the present study, fitness is a measure of how well strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replicate in tissue culture. When HIV-1 develops resistance in vitro or in vivo to antiretroviral drugs such as reverse transcriptase or protease inhibitors, its fitness is often impaired. Here, we have investigated whether the development of resistance in vitro to a small molecule CCR5 inhibitor, AD101, has an associated fitness cost. To do this, we developed a growth-competition assay involving dual infections with molecularly cloned viruses that are essentially isogenic outside the env genes under study. Real-time TaqMan quantitative PCR (QPCR) was used to quantify each competing virus individually via probes specific to different, phenotypically silent target sequences engineered within their vif genes. Head-to-head competition assays of env clones derived from the AD101 escape mutant isolate, the inhibitor-sensitive parental virus, and a passage control virus showed that AD101 resistance was not associated with a fitness loss. This observation is consistent with the retention of the resistant phenotype when the escape mutant was cultured for a total of 20 passages in the absence of the selecting compound. Amino acid substitutions in the V3 region of gp120 that confer complete AD101 resistance cause a fitness loss when introduced into an AD101-sensitive, parental clone; however, in the resistant isolate, changes elsewhere in env that occurred prior to the substitutions within V3 appear to compensate for the adverse effect of the V3 changes on replicative capacity. These in vitro studies may have implications for the development and management of resistance to other CCR5 inhibitors that are being evaluated clinically for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:17542646

  15. Ebselen, a Small-Molecule Capsid Inhibitor of HIV-1 Replication.

    PubMed

    Thenin-Houssier, Suzie; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S; Pedro-Rosa, Laura; Brady, Angela; Richard, Audrey; Konnick, Briana; Opp, Silvana; Buffone, Cindy; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Kota, Smitha; Billack, Blase; Pietka-Ottlik, Magdalena; Tellinghuisen, Timothy; Choe, Hyeryun; Spicer, Timothy; Scampavia, Louis; Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Kojetin, Douglas J; Valente, Susana T

    2016-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) capsid plays crucial roles in HIV-1 replication and thus represents an excellent drug target. We developed a high-throughput screening method based on a time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer (HTS-TR-FRET) assay, using the C-terminal domain (CTD) of HIV-1 capsid to identify inhibitors of capsid dimerization. This assay was used to screen a library of pharmacologically active compounds, composed of 1,280in vivo-active drugs, and identified ebselen [2-phenyl-1,2-benzisoselenazol-3(2H)-one], an organoselenium compound, as an inhibitor of HIV-1 capsid CTD dimerization. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic analysis confirmed the direct interaction of ebselen with the HIV-1 capsid CTD and dimer dissociation when ebselen is in 2-fold molar excess. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry revealed that ebselen covalently binds the HIV-1 capsid CTD, likely via a selenylsulfide linkage with Cys198 and Cys218. This compound presents anti-HIV activity in single and multiple rounds of infection in permissive cell lines as well as in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Ebselen inhibits early viral postentry events of the HIV-1 life cycle by impairing the incoming capsid uncoating process. This compound also blocks infection of other retroviruses, such as Moloney murine leukemia virus and simian immunodeficiency virus, but displays no inhibitory activity against hepatitis C and influenza viruses. This study reports the use of TR-FRET screening to successfully identify a novel capsid inhibitor, ebselen, validating HIV-1 capsid as a promising target for drug development. PMID:26810656

  16. In vitro Isolation and Identification of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Variants with Reduced Sensitivity to C-2 Symmetrical Inhibitors of HIV Type 1 Protease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otto, M. J.; Garber, S.; Winslow, D. L.; Reid, C. D.; Aldrich, P.; Jadhav, P. K.; Patterson, C. E.; Hodge, C. N.; Cheng, Y.-S. E.

    1993-08-01

    Protease inhibitors are another class of compounds for treatment of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-caused disease. The emergence of resistance to the current anti-HIV drugs makes the determination of potential resistance to protease inhibitors imperative. Here we describe the isolation of an HIV type 1 (HIV-1) resistant to an HIV-protease inhibitor. Serial passage of HIV-1 (strain RF) in the presence of the inhibitor, [2-pyridylacetylisoleucylphenylalanyl-psi(CHOH)]_2 (P9941), failed to yield a stock of virus with a resistance phenotype. However, variants of the virus with 6- to 8-fold reduced sensitivity to P9941 were selected by using a combination of plaque assay and endpoint titration. Genetic analysis and computer modeling of the variant proteases revealed a single change in the codon for amino acid 82 (Val -> Ala), which resulted in a protease with lower affinity and reduced sensitivity to this inhibitor and certain, but not all, related inhibitors.

  17. Identification of HIV-1 Inhibitors Targeting The Nucleocapsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Breuer, Sebastian; Chang, Max W.; Yuan, Jinyun; Torbett, Bruce E.

    2012-01-01

    The HIV-1 nucleocapsid (NC) is a RNA/DNA binding protein encoded within the Gag polyprotein, which is critical for the selection and chaperoning of viral genomic RNA during virion assembly. RNA/DNA binding occurs through a highly conserved zinc-knuckle motif present in NC. Given the necessity of NC-viral RNA/DNA interaction for viral replication, identification of compounds that disrupt the NC-RNA/DNA interaction may have value as an anti-viral strategy. To identify small molecules that disrupt NC-viral RNA/DNA binding a high-throughput fluorescence polarization assay was developed and a library of 14,400 diverse, drug-like compounds was screened. Compounds that disrupted NC binding to a fluorescence-labeled DNA tracer were next evaluated by differential scanning fluorimetry to identify compounds that must bind to NC or Gag to impart their effects. Two compounds were identified that inhibited NC-DNA interaction, specifically bound NC with nM affinity, and showed modest anti-HIV-1 activity in ex vivo cell assays. PMID:22587465

  18. Anti-HIV-1 protease triterpenoid saponins from the seeds of Aesculus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Yang, X W; Zhao, J; Cui, Y X; Liu, X H; Ma, C M; Hattori, M; Zhang, L H

    1999-11-01

    Eight bioactive triterpenoid saponins (1-8) were isolated from the seeds of Aesculus chinensis, four of which are novel compounds. The major saponins were identified as escin Ia (1), Ib (2), isoescin Ia (3) and Ib (4), while the new compounds were identified as 22alpha-tigloyl-28-acetylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta -D-glucopyranos yl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVc, 5), 22alpha-angeloyl-28-acetylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿bet a-D-glucopyrano syl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVd, 6), 28-tigloylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVe, 7), and 28-angeloylprotoaescigenin-3beta-O-¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-2) ¿beta-D-glucopyranosyl (1-4)-beta-D-glucopyranosiduronic acid (escin IVf, 8). The structures were determined by chemical and spectroscopic methods. All the above compounds were evaluated for their inhibitory activity against HIV-1 protease. PMID:10579862

  19. Pharmacological cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors as HIV-1 antiviral therapeutics.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Cynthia; Maddukuri, Anil; Kehn, Kylene; Baylor, Shanese Y; Deng, Longwen; Pumfery, Anne; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2003-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect quiescent cells; however, viral production is restricted to actively proliferating cells. Recent evidence has indicated that HIV-1 viral proteins, Vpr and Tat, perturb the cell cycle to optimize HIV-1 replication. Vpr arrests the cell cycle at G2 by inactivating the cyclin B/cdk1 complex. Tat regulates the cell cycle by altering factors involved in proliferation and differentiation (i.e. the cdk inhibitor p21/waf1) and associating with cyclin/cdk complexes (i.e. cyclin E/cdk2, cyclin H/cdk7, and cyclin T/cdk9). These studies indicate the importance of host cellular factors, such as cyclin/cdk complexes, in regulating HIV-1 replication and therefore represent novel targets for antiviral therapeutics. Recently, the efficacy of pharmalogical cdk inhibitors (PCIs) in abrogating viral replication has been under development. To date there are 25-30 PCIs that have been synthesized against known cdks, several of which have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 and other AIDS-associated viruses in vitro and in vivo. Targeting these critical cyclin/cdk complexes needed for viral propagation may solve the problems inherent in current HAART therapy, including the emergence of drug-resistant viruses. Thus, PCIs have the potential to become novel therapeutic antiviral drugs that can inhibit HIV-1 transcription and opens the possibility of new avenues of treatment. PMID:15043199

  20. Antiviral properties of palinavir, a potent inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    PubMed Central

    Lamarre, D; Croteau, G; Wardrop, E; Bourgon, L; Thibeault, D; Clouette, C; Vaillancourt, M; Cohen, E; Pargellis, C; Yoakim, C; Anderson, P C

    1997-01-01

    Palinavir is a potent inhibitor of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type 2 (HIV-2) proteases. Replication of laboratory strains (HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus) and HIV-1 clinical isolates is inhibited by palinavir with 50% effective concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 30 nM. The average cytotoxic concentration of palinavir (35 microM) in the various target cells indicates a favorable therapeutic index. Potent antiviral activity is retained with increased doses of virus and with clinical isolates resistant to zidovudine (AZT), didanosine (ddI), or nevirapine. Combinations of palinavir with either AZT, ddI, or nevirapine demonstrate synergy or additivity in the inhibition of HIV-1 replication. Palinavir retains anti-HIV-1 activity when administered postinfection until times subsequent to the reverse transcription step. In chronically infected CR-10 cells, palinavir blocks Gag precursor polyprotein processing completely, reducing greater than 99% of infectious particle production. The results indicate that the antiviral activity of palinavir is specific to inhibition of the viral protease and occurs at a late stage in the replicative cycle of HIV-1. On the basis of the potent in vitro activity, low-level cytotoxicity, and other data, palinavir was selected for in-depth preclinical evaluation. PMID:9145853

  1. The Novel Cyclophilin Inhibitor CPI-431-32 Concurrently Blocks HCV and HIV-1 Infections via a Similar Mechanism of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gallay, Philippe A.; Bobardt, Michael D.; Chatterji, Udayan; Trepanier, Daniel J.; Ure, Daren; Ordonez, Cosme; Foster, Robert

    2015-01-01

    HCV-related liver disease is the main cause of morbidity and mortality of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients. Despite the recent advent of anti-HCV direct acting antivirals (DAAs), the treatment of HCV/HIV-1 co-infected patients remains a challenge, as these patients are refractory to most therapies and develop liver fibrosis, cirrhosis and liver cancer more often than HCV mono-infected patients. Until the present study, there was no suitable in vitro assay to test the inhibitory activity of drugs on HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. Here we developed a novel in vitro “co-infection” model where HCV and HIV-1 concurrently replicate in their respective main host target cells—human hepatocytes and CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Using this co-culture model, we demonstrate that cyclophilin inhibitors (CypI), including a novel cyclosporin A (CsA) analog, CPI-431-32, simultaneously inhibits replication of both HCV and HIV-1 when added pre- and post-infection. In contrast, the HIV-1 protease inhibitor nelfinavir or the HCV NS5A inhibitor daclatasvir only blocks the replication of a single virus in the “co-infection” system. CPI-431-32 efficiently inhibits HCV and HIV-1 variants, which are normally resistant to DAAs. CPI-431-32 is slightly, but consistently more efficacious than the most advanced clinically tested CypI—alisporivir (ALV)—at interrupting an established HCV/HIV-1 co-infection. The superior antiviral efficacy of CPI-431-32 over ALV correlates with its higher potency inhibition of cyclophilin A (CypA) isomerase activity and at preventing HCV NS5A-CypA and HIV-1 capsid-CypA interactions known to be vital for replication of the respective viruses. Moreover, we obtained evidence that CPI-431-32 prevents the cloaking of both the HIV-1 and HCV genomes from cellular sensors. Based on these results, CPI-431-32 has the potential, as a single agent or in combination with DAAs, to inhibit both HCV and HIV-1 infections. PMID:26263487

  2. Development of tricyclic hydroxy-1H-pyrrolopyridine-trione containing HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Metifiot, Mathieu; Smith, Steven J; Vu, B Christie; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2011-05-15

    New tricyclic HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors were prepared that combined structural features of bicyclic pyrimidinones with recently disclosed 4,5-dihydroxy-1H-isoindole-1,3(2H)-diones. This combination resulted in the introduction of a nitrogen into the aryl ring and the addition of a fused third ring to our previously described inhibitors. The resulting analogues showed low micromolar inhibitory potency in in vitro HIV-1 integrase assays, with good selectivity for strand transfer relative to 3'-processing. PMID:21493066

  3. Function of ubiquitin (Ub) specific protease 15 (USP15) in HIV-1 replication and viral protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Pyeon, Dohun; Timani, Khalid Amine; Gulraiz, Fahad; He, Johnny J; Park, In-Woo

    2016-09-01

    HIV-1 Nef is necessary and may be sufficient for HIV-1-associated AIDS pathogenicity, in that knockout of Nef alone can protect HIV-infected patients from AIDS. We therefore investigated the feasibility of physical knockout of Nef, using the host ubiquitin proteasome system in HIV-1-infected cells. Our co-immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that Nef interacted with ubiquitin specific protease 15 (USP15), and that USP15, which is known to stabilize cellular proteins, degraded Nef. Nef could also cause decay of USP15, although Nef-mediated degradation of USP15 was weaker than USP15-mediated Nef degradation. Direct interaction between Nef and USP15 was essential for the observed reciprocal decay of the proteins. Further, USP15 degraded not only Nef but also HIV-1 structural protein, Gag, thereby substantially inhibiting HIV-1 replication. However, Gag did not degrade USP15, indicating that the Nef and USP15 complex, in distinction to other viral proteins, play an integral role in coordinating viral protein degradation and hence HIV-1 replication. Moreover, Nef and USP15 globally suppressed ubiquitylation of cellular proteins, indicating that these proteins are major determinants for the stability of cellular as well as viral proteins. Taken together, these data indicate that Nef and USP15 are vital in regulating degradation of viral and cellular proteins and thus HIV-1 replication, and specific degradation of viral, not cellular proteins, by USP15 points to USP15 as a candidate therapeutic agent to combat AIDS by eliminating viral proteins from the infected cells via USP15-mediated proteosomal degradation. PMID:27460547

  4. Novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor Development by Virtual Screening Based on QSAR Models.

    PubMed

    Guasch, Laura; Zakharov, Alexey V; Tarasova, Olga A; Poroikov, Vladimir V; Liao, Chenzhong; Nicklaus, Marc C

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and is responsible for integration of the virus into the human genome. We present computational approaches used to design novel HIV-1 IN inhibitors. We created an IN inhibitor database by collecting experimental data from the literature. We developed quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models of HIV-1 IN strand transfer (ST) inhibitors using this database. The prediction accuracy of these models was estimated by external 5-fold cross-validation as well as with an additional validation set of 308 structurally distinct compounds from the publicly accessible BindingDB database. The validated models were used to screen a small combinatorial library of potential synthetic candidates to identify hits, with a subsequent docking approach applied to further filter out compounds to arrive at a small set of potential HIV-1 IN inhibitors. As result, 236 compounds with good druglikeness properties and with correct docking poses were identified as potential candidates for synthesis. One of the six compounds finally chosen for synthesis was experimentally confirmed to inhibit the ST reaction with an IC50(ST) of 37 µM. The IN inhibitor database is available for download from http://cactus.nci.nih.gov/download/iidb/. PMID:26268340

  5. An effective conjugation strategy for designing short peptide-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Liang, Guodong; Wang, Huixin; Chong, Huihui; Cheng, Siqi; Jiang, Xifeng; He, Yuxian; Wang, Chao; Liu, Keliang

    2016-08-16

    Lengthy peptides corresponding to the C-terminal heptad repeat (C-peptides) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp41 are potent inhibitors against virus-cell fusion. Designing short C-peptide-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors could potentially redress the physicochemical and technical liabilities of a long-peptide therapeutic. However, designing such inhibitors with high potency has been challenging. We generated a conjugated architecture by incorporating small-molecule inhibitors of gp41 into the N-terminus of a panel of truncated C-peptides. Among these small molecule-capped short peptides, the 26-residue peptide Indole-T26 inhibited HIV-1 Env-mediated cell-cell fusion and viral replication at low nanomolar levels, reaching the potency of the only clinically used 36-residue peptide T20 (enfuvirtide). Collectively, our work opens up a new avenue for developing short peptide-based HIV-1 fusion inhibitors, and may have broad applicability to the development of modulators of other class I fusion proteins. PMID:27454320

  6. Insights into the mechanism of drug resistance: X-ray structure analysis of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease dimer/saquinavir complex

    SciTech Connect

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash C.; Das, Amit; Rao, D.R.; Hosur, M.V.

    2010-06-11

    The mutation G48V in HIV-1 protease is a major resistance mutation against the drug saquinavir. Recently, G48V mutation is found to co-exist with the mutation C95F in AIDS patients treated with saquinavir. We report here the three-dimensional crystal structure of G48V/C95F tethered HIV-1 protease/saquinavir complex. The structure indicates following as the possible causes of drug resistance: (1) loss of direct van der Waals interactions between saquinavir and enzyme residues PHE-53 and PRO-1081, (2) loss of water-mediated hydrogen bonds between the carbonyl oxygen atoms in saquinavir and amide nitrogen atoms of flap residues 50 and 1050, (3) changes in inter-monomer interactions, which could affect the energetics of domain movements associated with inhibitor-binding, and (4) significant reduction in the stability of the mutant dimer. The present structure also provides a rationale for the clinical observation that the resistance mutations C95F/G48V/V82A occur as a cluster in AIDS patients.

  7. Synthesis of a Vpr-Binding Derivative for Use as a Novel HIV-1 Inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Hagiwara, Kyoji; Ishii, Hideki; Murakami, Tomoyuki; Takeshima, Shin-nosuke; Chutiwitoonchai, Nopporn; Kodama, Eiichi N.; Kawaji, Kumi; Kondoh, Yasumitsu; Honda, Kaori; Osada, Hiroyuki; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko; Suzuki, Masaaki; Aida, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant viruses compromises the efficacy of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy and limits treatment options. Therefore, new targets that can be used to develop novel antiviral agents need to be identified. We previously identified a potential parent compound, hematoxylin, which suppresses the nuclear import of HIV-1 via the Vpr-importin α interaction and inhibits HIV-1 replication in a Vpr-dependent manner by blocking nuclear import of the pre-integration complex. However, it was unstable. Here, we synthesized a stable derivative of hematoxylin that bound specifically and stably to Vpr and inhibited HIV-1 replication in macrophages. Furthermore, like hematoxylin, the derivative inhibited nuclear import of Vpr in an in vitro nuclear import assay, but had no effect on Vpr-induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest or caspase activity. Interestingly, this derivative bound strongly to amino acid residues 54–74 within the C-terminal α-helical domain (αH3) of Vpr. These residues are highly conserved among different HIV strains, indicating that this region is a potential target for drug-resistant HIV-1 infection. Thus, we succeeded in developing a stable hematoxylin derivative that bound directly to Vpr, suggesting that specific inhibitors of the interaction between cells and viral accessory proteins may provide a new strategy for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:26701275

  8. Synergistic reduction of HIV-1 infectivity by 5-azacytidine and inhibitors of ribonucleotide reductase.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Jonathan M O; Roth, Megan E; Xie, Jiashu; Daly, Michele B; Clouser, Christine L; Landman, Sean R; Reilly, Cavan S; Bonnac, Laurent; Kim, Baek; Patterson, Steven E; Mansky, Louis M

    2016-06-01

    Although many compounds have been approved for the treatment of human immunodeficiency type-1 (HIV-1) infection, additional anti-HIV-1 drugs (particularly those belonging to new drug classes) are still needed due to issues such as long-term drug-associated toxicities, transmission of drug-resistant variants, and development of multi-class resistance. Lethal mutagenesis represents an antiviral strategy that has not yet been clinically translated for HIV-1 and is based on the use of small molecules to induce excessive levels of deleterious mutations within the viral genome. Here, we show that 5-azacytidine (5-aza-C), a ribonucleoside analog that induces the lethal mutagenesis of HIV-1, and multiple inhibitors of the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) interact in a synergistic fashion to more effectively reduce the infectivity of HIV-1. In these drug combinations, RNR inhibitors failed to significantly inhibit the conversion of 5-aza-C to 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine, suggesting that 5-aza-C acts primarily as a deoxyribonucleoside even in the presence of RNR inhibitors. The mechanism of antiviral synergy was further investigated for the combination of 5-aza-C and one specific RNR inhibitor, resveratrol, as this combination improved the selectivity index of 5-aza-C to the greatest extent. Antiviral synergy was found to be primarily due to the reduced accumulation of reverse transcription products rather than the enhancement of viral mutagenesis. To our knowledge, these observations represent the first demonstration of antiretroviral synergy between a ribonucleoside analog and RNR inhibitors, and encourage the development of additional ribonucleoside analogs and RNR inhibitors with improved antiretroviral activity. PMID:27117260

  9. Mass Spectrometric Characterization of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Interactions with Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Thammaporn, Ratsupa; Ishii, Kentaro; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Uchiyama, Susumu; Hannongbua, Supa; Kato, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) have been developed for the treatment of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. HIV-1 RT binding to NNRTIs has been characterized by various biophysical techniques. However, these techniques are often hampered by the low water solubility of the inhibitors, such as the current promising diarylpyrimidine-based inhibitors rilpivirine and etravirine. Hence, a conventional and rapid method that requires small sample amounts is desirable for studying NNRTIs with low water solubility. Here we successfully applied a recently developed mass spectrometric technique under non-denaturing conditions to characterize the interactions between the heterodimeric HIV-1 RT enzyme and NNRTIs with different inhibitory activities. Our data demonstrate that mass spectrometry serves as a semi-quantitative indicator of NNRTI binding affinity for HIV-1 RT using low and small amounts of samples, offering a new high-throughput screening tool for identifying novel RT inhibitors as anti-HIV drugs. PMID:26934936

  10. Approaches for identification of HIV-1 entry inhibitors targeting gp41 pocket.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fei; Lu, Lu; Du, Lanying; Zhu, Xiaojie; Debnath, Asim K; Jiang, Shibo

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic pocket in the HIV-1 gp41 N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR) domain plays an important role in viral fusion and entry into the host cell, and serves as an attractive target for development of HIV-1 fusion/entry inhibitors. The peptide anti-HIV drug targeting gp41 NHR, T-20 (generic name: enfuvirtide; brand name: Fuzeon), was approved by the U.S. FDA in 2003 as the first HIV fusion/entry inhibitor for treatment of HIV/AIDS patients who fail to respond to the current antiretroviral drugs. However, because T20 lacks the pocket-binding domain (PBD), it exhibits low anti-HIV-1 activity and short half-life. Therefore, several next-generation HIV fusion inhibitory peptides with PBD have been developed. They possess longer half-life and more potent antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains, including the T-20-resistant variants. Nonetheless, the clinical application of these peptides is still limited by the lack of oral availability and the high cost of production. Thus, development of small molecule compounds targeting the gp41 pocket with oral availability has been promoted. This review describes the main approaches for identification of HIV fusion/entry inhibitors targeting the gp41 pocket and summarizes the latest progress in developing these inhibitors as a new class of anti-HIV drugs. PMID:23344560

  11. Discovery of HIV-1 integrase inhibitors: pharmacophore mapping, virtual screening, molecular docking, synthesis, and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Hardik; Patel, Paresh; Pannecouque, Christophe

    2014-02-01

    HIV-1 integrase enzyme plays an important role in the life cycle of HIV and responsible for integration of virus into human genome. Here, both computational and synthetic approaches were used to design and synthesize newer HIV-1 integrase inhibitors. Pharmacophore mapping was performed on 20 chemically diverse molecules using DISCOtech, and refinement was carried out using GASP. Ten pharmacophore models were generated, and model 2, containing four features including two donor sites, one acceptor atom, and one hydrophobic region, was considered the best model as it has the highest fitness score. It was used as a query in NCI and Maybridge databases. Molecules having more than 99% Q(fit) value were used to design 30 molecules bearing pteridine ring and were docked on co-crystal structure of HIV-1 integrase enzyme. Among these, six molecules, showing good docking score compared with the reference standards, were synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. All compounds were characterized by physical and spectral data and evaluated for in vitro anti-HIV activity against the replication of HIV-1 (IIIB) in MT-4 cells. The used approach of molecular docking and anti-HIV activity data of designed molecules will provide significant insights to discover novel HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors. PMID:23957390

  12. Identification of a D-amino acid decapeptide HIV-1 entry inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Boggiano, Cesar; Jiang Shibo; Lu Hong; Zhao Qian; Liu Shuwen; Binley, James; Blondelle, Sylvie E. . E-mail: sylvieb@burnham.org

    2006-09-08

    Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) virion into host cells involves three major steps, each being a potential target for the development of entry inhibitors: gp120 binding to CD4, gp120-CD4 complex interacting with a coreceptor, and gp41 refolding to form a six-helix bundle. Using a D-amino acid decapeptide combinatorial library, we identified peptide DC13 as having potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory activity, and effectively inhibiting infection by several laboratory-adapted and primary HIV-1 strains. While DC13 did not block binding of gp120 to CD4, nor disrupt the gp41 six-helix bundle formation, it effectively blocked the binding of an anti-CXCR4 monoclonal antibody and chemokine SDF-1{alpha} to CXCR4-expressing cells. However, because R5-using primary viruses were also neutralized, the antiviral activity of DC13 implies additional mode(s) of action. These results suggest that DC13 is a useful HIV-1 coreceptor antagonist for CXCR4 and, due to its biostability and simplicity, may be of value for developing a new class of HIV-1 entry inhibitors.

  13. The long-term outcomes of antiretroviral treatment initiated with mono or dual nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV-1-infected children: an Asian observational study

    PubMed Central

    Wittawatmongkol, Orasri; Mohamed, Thahira J; Le, Thoa PK; Ung, Vibol; Maleesatharn, Alan; Hansudewechakul, Rawiwan; Nguyen, Lam V; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Lumbiganon, Pagakrong; Sudjaritruk, Tavitiya; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Yusoff, Nik KN; Kurniati, Nia; Fong, Moy S.; Nallusamy, Revathy; Kariminia, Azar; Sohn, Annette H.; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2016-01-01

    After a median of 115.9 months of follow-up, 90% of 206 HIV-1-infected children in a cohort in Asia who initiated antiretroviral treatment (ART) with mono or dual nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors were alive and had comparable immunological and virological outcomes as compared to the 1,915 children who had started with highly active antiretroviral regimens. However, these children had higher rates of treatment-related adverse events, opportunistic infections, and cumulative mortality, and were more likely to require protease inhibitor-containing regimens or other more novel ART-based regimens. PMID:27076917

  14. Protease inhibitors targeting coronavirus and filovirus entry.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yanchen; Vedantham, Punitha; Lu, Kai; Agudelo, Juliet; Carrion, Ricardo; Nunneley, Jerritt W; Barnard, Dale; Pöhlmann, Stefan; McKerrow, James H; Renslo, Adam R; Simmons, Graham

    2015-04-01

    In order to gain entry into cells, diverse viruses, including Ebola virus, SARS-coronavirus and the emerging MERS-coronavirus, depend on activation of their envelope glycoproteins by host cell proteases. The respective enzymes are thus excellent targets for antiviral intervention. In cell culture, activation of Ebola virus, as well as SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can be accomplished by the endosomal cysteine proteases, cathepsin L (CTSL) and cathepsin B (CTSB). In addition, SARS- and MERS-coronavirus can use serine proteases localized at the cell surface, for their activation. However, it is currently unclear which protease(s) facilitate viral spread in the infected host. We report here that the cysteine protease inhibitor K11777, ((2S)-N-[(1E,3S)-1-(benzenesulfonyl)-5-phenylpent-1-en-3-yl]-2-{[(E)-4-methylpiperazine-1-carbonyl]amino}-3-phenylpropanamide) and closely-related vinylsulfones act as broad-spectrum antivirals by targeting cathepsin-mediated cell entry. K11777 is already in advanced stages of development for a number of parasitic diseases, such as Chagas disease, and has proven to be safe and effective in a range of animal models. K11777 inhibition of SARS-CoV and Ebola virus entry was observed in the sub-nanomolar range. In order to assess whether cysteine or serine proteases promote viral spread in the host, we compared the antiviral activity of an optimized K11777-derivative with that of camostat, an inhibitor of TMPRSS2 and related serine proteases. Employing a pathogenic animal model of SARS-CoV infection, we demonstrated that viral spread and pathogenesis of SARS-CoV is driven by serine rather than cysteine proteases and can be effectively prevented by camostat. Camostat has been clinically used to treat chronic pancreatitis, and thus represents an exciting potential therapeutic for respiratory coronavirus infections. Our results indicate that camostat, or similar serine protease inhibitors, might be an effective option for treatment of SARS and

  15. Serine protease inhibitors of parasitic helminths.

    PubMed

    Molehin, Adebayo J; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2012-05-01

    Serine protease inhibitors (serpins) are a superfamily of structurally conserved proteins that inhibit serine proteases and play key physiological roles in numerous biological systems such as blood coagulation, complement activation and inflammation. A number of serpins have now been identified in parasitic helminths with putative involvement in immune regulation and in parasite survival through interference with the host immune response. This review describes the serpins and smapins (small serine protease inhibitors) that have been identified in Ascaris spp., Brugia malayi, Ancylostoma caninum Onchocerca volvulus, Haemonchus contortus, Trichinella spiralis, Trichostrongylus vitrinus, Anisakis simplex, Trichuris suis, Schistosoma spp., Clonorchis sinensis, Paragonimus westermani and Echinococcus spp. and discusses their possible biological functions, including roles in host-parasite interplay and their evolutionary relationships. PMID:22310379

  16. Discovery and crystallography of bicyclic arylaminoazines as potent inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Gil; Frey, Kathleen M; Gallardo-Macias, Ricardo; Spasov, Krasimir A; Chan, Albert H; Anderson, Karen S; Jorgensen, William L

    2015-11-01

    Non-nucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-RT) are reported that incorporate a 7-indolizinylamino or 2-naphthylamino substituent on a pyrimidine or 1,3,5-triazine core. The most potent compounds show below 10 nanomolar activity towards wild-type HIV-1 and variants bearing Tyr181Cys and Lys103Asn/Tyr181Cys resistance mutations. The compounds also feature good aqueous solubility. Crystal structures for two complexes enhance the analysis of the structure-activity data. PMID:26166629

  17. Identification of a small molecule HIV-1 inhibitor that targets the capsid hexamer.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jimmy P; Branson, Jeffrey D; Lawrence, Rae; Cocklin, Simon

    2016-02-01

    The HIV-1 CA protein is an attractive therapeutic target for the development of new antivirals. An inter-protomer pocket within the hexamer configuration of the CA, which is a binding site for key host dependency factors, is an especially appealing region for small molecule targeting. Using a field-based pharmacophore derived from an inhibitor known to interact with this region, coupled to biochemical and biological assessment, we have identified a new compound that inhibits HIV-1 infection and that targets the assembled CA hexamer. PMID:26747394

  18. Punica granatum (Pomegranate) juice provides an HIV-1 entry inhibitor and candidate topical microbicide

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, A Robert; Strick, Nathan; Li, Yun-Yao; Debnath, Asim K

    2004-01-01

    Background For ≈ 24 years the AIDS pandemic has claimed ≈ 30 million lives, causing ≈ 14,000 new HIV-1 infections daily worldwide in 2003. About 80% of infections occur by heterosexual transmission. In the absence of vaccines, topical microbicides, expected to block virus transmission, offer hope for controlling the pandemic. Antiretroviral chemotherapeutics have decreased AIDS mortality in industrialized countries, but only minimally in developing countries. To prevent an analogous dichotomy, microbicides should be: acceptable; accessible; affordable; and accelerative in transition from development to marketing. Already marketed pharmaceutical excipients or foods, with established safety records and adequate anti-HIV-1 activity, may provide this option. Methods Fruit juices were screened for inhibitory activity against HIV-1 IIIB using CD4 and CXCR4 as cell receptors. The best juice was tested for inhibition of: (1) infection by HIV-1 BaL, utilizing CCR5 as the cellular coreceptor; and (2) binding of gp120 IIIB and gp120 BaL, respectively, to CXCR4 and CCR5. To remove most colored juice components, the adsorption of the effective ingredient(s) to dispersible excipients and other foods was investigated. A selected complex was assayed for inhibition of infection by primary HIV-1 isolates. Results HIV-1 entry inhibitors from pomegranate juice adsorb onto corn starch. The resulting complex blocks virus binding to CD4 and CXCR4/CCR5 and inhibits infection by primary virus clades A to G and group O. Conclusion These results suggest the possibility of producing an anti-HIV-1 microbicide from inexpensive, widely available sources, whose safety has been established throughout centuries, provided that its quality is adequately standardized and monitored. PMID:15485580

  19. A cell-intrinsic inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcription in CD4(+) T cells from elite controllers.

    PubMed

    Leng, Jin; Ho, Hsin-Pin; Buzon, Maria J; Pereyra, Florencia; Walker, Bruce D; Yu, Xu G; Chang, Emmanuel J; Lichterfeld, Mathias

    2014-06-11

    HIV-1 reverse transcription represents the predominant target for pharmacological inhibition of viral replication, but cell-intrinsic mechanisms that can block HIV-1 reverse transcription in a clinically significant way are poorly defined. We find that effective HIV-1 reverse transcription depends on the phosphorylation of viral reverse transcriptase by host cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 2 at a highly conserved Threonine residue. CDK2-dependent phosphorylation increased the efficacy and stability of viral reverse transcriptase and enhanced viral fitness. Interestingly, p21, a cell-intrinsic CDK inhibitor that is upregulated in CD4(+) T cells from "elite controllers," potently inhibited CDK2-dependent phosphorylation of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and significantly reduced the efficacy of viral reverse transcription. These data suggest that p21 can indirectly block HIV-1 reverse transcription by inhibiting host cofactors supporting HIV-1 replication and identify sites of viral vulnerability that are effectively targeted in persons with natural control of HIV-1 replication. PMID:24922574

  20. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J.; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C.; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H.; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R.

    2012-01-01

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck’s raltegravir and Gilead’s elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5- positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  1. 6,7-Dihydroxy-1-oxoisoindoline-4-sulfonamide-containing HIV-1 integrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Maddali, Kasthuraiah; Smith, Steven J; Métifiot, Mathieu; Johnson, Barry C; Marchand, Christophe; Hughes, Stephen H; Pommier, Yves; Burke, Terrence R

    2012-12-15

    Although an extensive body of scientific and patent literature exists describing the development of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors, Merck's raltegravir and Gilead's elvitegravir remain the only IN inhibitors FDA-approved for the treatment of AIDS. The emergence of raltegravir-resistant strains of HIV-1 containing mutated forms of IN underlies the need for continued efforts to enhance the efficacy of IN inhibitors against resistant mutants. We have previously described bicyclic 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-ones that show good IN inhibitory potency. This report describes the effects of introducing substituents into the 4- and 5-positions of the parent 6,7-dihydroxyoxoisoindolin-1-one platform. We have developed several sulfonamide-containing analogs that enhance potency in cell-based HIV assays by more than two orders-of-magnitude and we describe several compounds that are more potent than raltegravir against the clinically relevant Y143R IN mutant. PMID:23149229

  2. Comparative study on the protease inhibitors from fish eggs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ustadi; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. M.

    2005-07-01

    The protease inhibitor was purified from five different fish eggs. The molecular weights of Pacific herring, chum salmon, pond smelt, glassfish, and Alaska pollock egg protease inhibitors were 120, 89, 84.5, 17, and l6.8kDa, respectively. The specific inhibitory activity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor was the highest followed by those of Pacific herring and Alaska pollock in order. The specific inhibitory activity and purity of glassfish egg protease inhibitor were 19.70 Umg-1 protein and 164.70 folds of purification, respectively. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was reasonably stable at 50-65°C and pH 8, which was more stable at high temperature and pH than protease inhibitors from the other fish species. Glassfish egg protease inhibitor was noncompetitive with inhibitor constant ( K i) of 4.44 nmolL-1.

  3. Susceptibility of the Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus to Reverse Transcriptase and Protease Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Shoukat H.; Magre, Saema; García-Lerma, J. Gerardo; Hussain, Althaf I.; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro; Patience, Clive; Weiss, Robin A.; Heneine, Walid

    2001-01-01

    Porcine xenografts may offer a solution to the shortage of human donor allografts. However, all pigs contain the porcine endogenous retrovirus (PERV), raising concerns regarding the transmission of PERV and the possible development of disease in xenotransplant recipients. We evaluated 11 antiretroviral drugs licensed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) therapy for their activities against PERV to assess their potential for clinical use. Fifty and 90% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s and IC90s, respectively) of five nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) were determined enzymatically for PERV and for wild-type (WT) and RTI-resistant HIV-1 reference isolates. In a comparison of IC50s, the susceptibilities of PERV RT to lamivudine, stavudine, didanosine, zalcitabine, and zidovudine were reduced >20-fold, 26-fold, 6-fold, 4-fold, and 3-fold, respectively, compared to those of WT HIV-1. PERV was also resistant to nevirapine. Tissue culture-based, single-round infection assays using replication-competent virus confirmed the relative sensitivity of PERV to zidovudine and its resistance to all other RTIs. A Gag polyprotein-processing inhibition assay was developed and used to assess the activities of protease inhibitors against PERV. No inhibition of PERV protease was seen with saquinavir, ritonavir, indinavir, nelfinavir, or amprenavir at concentrations >200-fold the IC50s for WT HIV-1. Thus, following screening of many antiretroviral agents, our findings support only the potential clinical use of zidovudine. PMID:11134319

  4. A Novel Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor, AR-42, Reactivates HIV-1 from Chronically and Latently Infected CD4+ T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Mates, Jessica M.; de Silva, Suresh; Lustberg, Mark; Van Deusen, Kelsey; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Wu, Li; Kwiek, Jesse J.

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) latency is a major barrier to a cure of AIDS. Latently infected cells harbor an integrated HIV-1 genome but are not actively producing HIV-1. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as vorinostat (SAHA), have been shown to reactivate latent HIV-1. AR-42, a modified HDAC inhibitor, has demonstrated efficacy against malignant melanoma, meningioma, and acute myeloid leukemia and is currently used in clinical trials for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma. In this study, we evaluated the ability of AR-42 to reactivate HIV-1 in the two established CD4+ T-cell line models of HIV-1 latency. In HIV-1 chronically infected ACH-2 cells, AR-42-induced histone acetylation was more potent and robust than that of vorinostat. Although AR-42 and vorinostat were equipotent in their ability to reactivate HIV-1, AR-42-induced maximal HIV-1 reactivation was twofold greater than vorinostat in ACH-2 and J-Lat (clone 9.2) cells. These data provide rationale for assessing the efficacy of AR-42-mediated HIV-1 reactivation within primary CD4+ T-cells. PMID:26855567

  5. Structural investigation of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: 2-Aryl-substituted benzimidazoles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2009-11-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is one of the most destructive epidemics in history. Inhibitors of HIV enzymes are the main targets to develop drugs against that disease. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic. Structural studies provide information necessary to design more active compounds. The crystal structures of four NNRTI derivatives of 2-aryl-substituted N-benzyl-benzimidazole are presented here. Analysis of the geometrical parameters shows that the structures of the investigated inhibitors are rigid. The important geometrical parameter is the dihedral angle between the planes of the π-electron systems of the benzymidazole and benzyl moieties. The values of these dihedral angles are in a narrow range for all investigated inhibitors. There is no significant difference between the structure of the free inhibitor and the inhibitor in the complex with RT HIV-1. X-ray structures of the investigated inhibitors are a good basis for modeling enzyme-inhibitor interactions in rational drug design.

  6. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System.

    PubMed

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-12-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  7. Inhibition Profiling of Retroviral Protease Inhibitors Using an HIV-2 Modular System

    PubMed Central

    Mahdi, Mohamed; Szojka, Zsófia; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2015-01-01

    Retroviral protease inhibitors (PIs) are fundamental pillars in the treatment of HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Currently used PIs are designed against HIV-1, and their effect on HIV-2 is understudied. Using a modular HIV-2 protease cassette system, inhibition profiling assays were carried out for protease inhibitors both in enzymatic and cell culture assays. Moreover, the treatment-associated resistance mutations (I54M, L90M) were introduced into the modular system, and comparative inhibition assays were performed to determine their effect on the susceptibility of the protease. Our results indicate that darunavir, saquinavir, indinavir and lopinavir were very effective HIV-2 protease inhibitors, while tipranavir, nelfinavir and amprenavir showed a decreased efficacy. I54M, L90M double mutation resulted in a significant reduction in the susceptibility to most of the inhibitors with the exception of tipranavir. To our knowledge, this modular system constitutes a novel approach in the field of HIV-2 protease characterization and susceptibility testing. PMID:26633459

  8. Crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase complexes with thiocarbamate non-nucleoside inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Spallarossa, Andrea Cesarini, Sara; Ranise, Angelo; Ponassi, Marco; Unge, Torsten; Bolognesi, Martino

    2008-01-25

    O-Phthalimidoethyl-N-arylthiocarbamates (TCs) have been recently identified as a new class of potent HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), by means of computer-aided drug design techniques [Ranise A. Spallarossa, S. Cesarini, F. Bondavalli, S. Schenone, O. Bruno, G. Menozzi, P. Fossa, L. Mosti, M. La Colla, et al., Structure-based design, parallel synthesis, structure-activity relationship, and molecular modeling studies of thiocarbamates, new potent non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitor isosteres of phenethylthiazolylthiourea derivatives, J. Med. Chem. 48 (2005) 3858-3873]. To elucidate the atomic details of RT/TC interaction and validate an earlier TC docking model, the structures of three RT/TC complexes were determined at 2.8-3.0 A resolution by X-ray crystallography. The conformations adopted by the enzyme-bound TCs were analyzed and compared with those of bioisosterically related NNRTIs.

  9. Neuroserpin, an axonally secreted serine protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Osterwalder, T; Contartese, J; Stoeckli, E T; Kuhn, T B; Sonderegger, P

    1996-01-01

    We have identified and chromatographically purified an axonally secreted glycoprotein of CNS and PNS neurons. Several peptides derived from it were microsequenced. Based on these sequences, a fragment of the corresponding cDNA was amplified and used as a probe to isolate a full length cDNA from a chicken brain cDNA library. Because the deduced amino acid sequence qualified the protein as a novel member of the serpin family of serine protease inhibitors, we called it neuroserpin. Analysis of the primary structural features further characterized neuroserpin as a heparin-independent, functional inhibitor of a trypsin-like serine protease. In situ hybridization revealed a predominantly neuronal expression during the late stages of neurogenesis and in the adult brain in regions which exhibit synaptic plasticity. Thus, neuroserpin might function as an axonally secreted regulator of the local extracellular proteolysis involved in the reorganization of the synaptic connectivity during development and synapse plasticity in the adult. Images PMID:8670795

  10. Effect of mimetic CDK9 inhibitors on HIV-1 activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin; Klase, Zachary; Chen, Hao; Zeng, Chen; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; el Kouni, Mahmoud H.; Lepene, Benjamin; Patanarut, Alexis; Nekhai, Sergei; Price, David H.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic manageable disease; however drug resistance remains a common problem that limits the effectiveness and clinical benefits of this type of treatment. The discovery of viral reservoirs in the body, in which HIV-1 may persist, has helped to explain why therapeutic eradication of HIV-1 has proved so difficult. In the current study we utilized a combination of structure based analysis of Cyclin/CDK complexes with our previously published Tat peptide derivatives. We modeled the Tat peptide inhibitors with CDKs and found a particular pocket which showed the most stable binding site (Cavity 1) using in silico analysis. Furthermore, we were able to find peptide mimetics that bound to similar regions using in silico searches of a chemical library, followed by cell based biological assays. Using these methods we obtained the first generation mimetic drugs and tested these compounds on HIV-1 LTR activated transcription. Using biological assays followed by similar in silico analysis to find a 2nd generation drugs resembling the original mimetic, we found the new targets of Cavity 1 and Cavity 2 regions on CDK9. We examined the 2nd generation mimetic against various viral isolates, and observed a generalized suppression of most HIV-1 isolates. Finally, the drug inhibited viral replication in humanized mouse models of Rag2-/-γc-/- with no toxicity to the animals at tested concentrations. Our results suggest that it may be possible to model peptide inhibitors into available crystal structures and further find drug mimetics using in silico analysis. PMID:23247501

  11. Amprenavir complexes with HIV-1 protease and its drug-resistant mutants altering hydrophobic clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Wang, Yuan-Fang; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Harrison, Robert W.; Weber, Irene T.

    2010-10-22

    The structural and kinetic effects of amprenavir (APV), a clinical HIV protease (PR) inhibitor, were analyzed with wild-type enzyme and mutants with single substitutions of V32I, I50V, I54V, I54M, I84V and L90M that are common in drug resistance. Crystal structures of the APV complexes at resolutions of 1.02-1.85 {angstrom} reveal the structural changes due to the mutations. Substitution of the larger side chains in PR{sub V32I}, PR{sub I54M} and PR{sub L90M} resulted in the formation of new hydrophobic contacts with flap residues, residues 79 and 80, and Asp25, respectively. Mutation to smaller side chains eliminated hydrophobic interactions in the PR{sub I50V} and PR{sub I54V} structures. The PR{sub I84V}-APV complex had lost hydrophobic contacts with APV, the PR{sub V32I}-APV complex showed increased hydrophobic contacts within the hydrophobic cluster and the PR{sub I50V} complex had weaker polar and hydrophobic interactions with APV. The observed structural changes in PR{sub I84V}-APV, PR{sub V32I}-APV and PR{sub I50V}-APV were related to their reduced inhibition by APV of six-, 10- and 30-fold, respectively, relative to wild-type PR. The APV complexes were compared with the corresponding saquinavir complexes. The PR dimers had distinct rearrangements of the flaps and 80's loops that adapt to the different P1{prime} groups of the inhibitors, while maintaining contacts within the hydrophobic cluster. These small changes in the loops and weak internal interactions produce the different patterns of resistant mutations for the two drugs.

  12. New Class of HIV-1 Integrase (IN) Inhibitors with a Dual Mode of Action

    PubMed Central

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S.; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B.; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-01-01

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3′-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  13. New class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors with a dual mode of action.

    PubMed

    Tsiang, Manuel; Jones, Gregg S; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Kan, Elaine; Lansdon, Eric B; Huang, Wayne; Hung, Magdeleine; Samuel, Dharmaraj; Novikov, Nikolai; Xu, Yili; Mitchell, Michael; Guo, Hongyan; Babaoglu, Kerim; Liu, Xiaohong; Geleziunas, Romas; Sakowicz, Roman

    2012-06-15

    tert-Butoxy-(4-phenyl-quinolin-3-yl)-acetic acids (tBPQA) are a new class of HIV-1 integrase (IN) inhibitors that are structurally distinct from IN strand transfer inhibitors but analogous to LEDGINs. LEDGINs are a class of potent antiviral compounds that interacts with the lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF) binding pocket on IN and were identified through competition binding against LEDGF. LEDGF tethers IN to the host chromatin and enables targeted integration of viral DNA. The prevailing understanding of the antiviral mechanism of LEDGINs is that they inhibit LEDGF binding to IN, which prevents targeted integration of HIV-1. We showed that in addition to the properties already known for LEDGINs, the binding of tBPQAs to the IN dimer interface inhibits IN enzymatic activity in a LEDGF-independent manner. Using the analysis of two long terminal repeat junctions in HIV-infected cells, we showed that the inhibition by tBPQAs occurs at or prior to the viral DNA 3'-processing step. Biochemical studies revealed that this inhibition operates by compound-induced conformational changes in the IN dimer that prevent proper assembly of IN onto viral DNA. For the first time, tBPQAs were demonstrated to be allosteric inhibitors of HIV-1 IN displaying a dual mode of action: inhibition of IN-viral DNA assembly and inhibition of IN-LEDGF interaction. PMID:22535962

  14. Kuwanon-L as a New Allosteric HIV-1 Integrase Inhibitor: Molecular Modeling and Biological Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Esposito, Francesca; Tintori, Cristina; Martini, Riccardo; Christ, Frauke; Debyser, Zeger; Ferrarese, Roberto; Cabiddu, Gianluigi; Corona, Angela; Ceresola, Elisa Rita; Calcaterra, Andrea; Iovine, Valentina; Botta, Bruno; Clementi, Massimo; Canducci, Filippo; Botta, Maurizio; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-11-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) active site inhibitors are the latest class of drugs approved for HIV treatment. The selection of IN strand-transfer drug-resistant HIV strains in patients supports the development of new agents that are active as allosteric IN inhibitors. Here, a docking-based virtual screening has been applied to a small library of natural ligands to identify new allosteric IN inhibitors that target the sucrose binding pocket. From theoretical studies, kuwanon-L emerged as the most promising binder and was thus selected for biological studies. Biochemical studies showed that kuwanon-L is able to inhibit the HIV-1 IN catalytic activity in the absence and in the presence of LEDGF/p75 protein, the IN dimerization, and the IN/LEDGF binding. Kuwanon-L also inhibited HIV-1 replication in cell cultures. Overall, docking and biochemical results suggest that kuwanon-L binds to an allosteric binding pocket and can be considered an attractive lead for the development of new allosteric IN antiviral agents. PMID:26360521

  15. Enhanced Secretory Leukocyte Protease Inhibitor in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Patients

    PubMed Central

    Baqui, A. A. M. A.; Meiller, Timothy F.; Falkler, William A.

    1999-01-01

    Secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) has been found to possess activity against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in vitro at physiological concentrations. A study was undertaken to evaluate SLPI levels in human saliva and plasma among HIV-positive (HIV+) patients with various HIV-1 viral loads in comparison to uninfected controls. Whole blood in EDTA and unstimulated saliva samples were collected from 37 HIV+ patients, of whom 20 had a history of intravenous drug abuse (IVDA). Control samples were collected from 20 appropriate age- and sex-matched HIV-1-negative individuals. SLPI was estimated from both saliva and serum samples by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. HIV viral load was determined using a quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. SLPI levels were increased 16.7% in plasma and 10.3% in saliva among HIV+ patients in comparison to uninfected controls. SLPI levels were increased 5.9% in saliva and 3.9% in plasma among HIV+ patients with a high viral load (>10,000 copies/ml) as compared to patients with a low viral load (<400 copies/ml). Only 23% of patients with a high viral load used combination therapy with protease inhibitor drugs, whereas 92.9% of HIV+ patients with a low viral load used protease inhibitors. SLPI levels did not differ significantly among the IVDA patients, patients with different viral loads, or patients using protease inhibitor drugs. There was a statistically significant increase in SLPI levels in saliva among HIV patients in comparison to non-HIV-infected controls. An increase in SLPI levels among HIV+ patients may be a natural consequence of HIV pathogenesis and an important factor in preventing oral transmission of HIV, but this increase may not be evident during plasma viremia in patients with a high viral load. PMID:10548568

  16. Antiviral properties of aminodiol inhibitors against human immunodeficiency virus and protease.

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, C M; Patick, A K; Alam, M; Greytok, J; Tino, J A; Chen, P; Gordon, E; Ahmad, S; Barrish, J C; Zahler, R

    1995-01-01

    A series of aminodiol inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease were identified by using an in vitro peptide cleavage assay. BMS 182,193, BMS 186,318, and BMS 187,071 protected cells against HIV-1, HIV-2, and simian immunodeficiency virus infections, with 50% effective doses ranging from 0.05 to 0.33 microM, while having no inhibitory effect on cells infected with unrelated viruses. These compounds were also effective in inhibiting p24 production in peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with HIV-1 IIIB and against the zidovudine-resistant HIV-1 strain A018C. Time-of-addition studies indicated that BMS 182,193 could be added as late as 27 h after infection and still retain its antiviral activity. To directly show that the activity of these compounds in culture was due to inhibition of proteolytic cleavage, the levels of HIV-1 gag processing in chronically infected cells were monitored by Western blot (immunoblot) analysis. All compounds blocked the processing of p55 in a dose-dependent manner, with 50% effective doses of 0.4 to 2.4 microM. To examine the reversibility of BMS 186,318, chronically infected CEM-SS cells were treated with drug and virions purified from the culture medium. Incubation of HIV-1 particles in drug-free medium indicated that inhibition of p55 proteolysis was slowly reversible. The potent inhibition of HIV-1 during both acute and chronic infections indicates that these aminodiol compounds are effective anti-HIV-1 compounds. PMID:7726501

  17. Asymmetric Deactivation of HIV-1 gp41 following Fusion Inhibitor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Kahle, Kristen M.; Steger, H. Kirby; Root, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Both equilibrium and nonequilibrium factors influence the efficacy of pharmaceutical agents that target intermediate states of biochemical reactions. We explored the intermediate state inhibition of gp41, part of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex (Env) that promotes viral entry through membrane fusion. This process involves a series of gp41 conformational changes coordinated by Env interactions with cellular CD4 and a chemokine receptor. In a kinetic window between CD4 binding and membrane fusion, the N- and C-terminal regions of the gp41 ectodomain become transiently susceptible to inhibitors that disrupt Env structural transitions. In this study, we sought to identify kinetic parameters that influence the antiviral potency of two such gp41 inhibitors, C37 and 5-Helix. Employing a series of C37 and 5-Helix variants, we investigated the physical properties of gp41 inhibition, including the ability of inhibitor-bound gp41 to recover its fusion activity once inhibitor was removed from solution. Our results indicated that antiviral activity critically depended upon irreversible deactivation of inhibitor-bound gp41. For C37, which targets the N-terminal region of the gp41 ectodomain, deactivation was a slow process that depended on chemokine receptor binding to Env. For 5-Helix, which targets the C-terminal region of the gp41 ectodomain, deactivation occurred rapidly following inhibitor binding and was independent of chemokine receptor levels. Due to this kinetic disparity, C37 inhibition was largely reversible, while 5-Helix inhibition was functionally irreversible. The fundamental difference in deactivation mechanism points to an unappreciated asymmetry in gp41 following inhibitor binding and impacts the development of improved fusion inhibitors and HIV-1 vaccines. The results also demonstrate how the activities of intermediate state inhibitors critically depend upon the final disposition of inhibitor-bound states. PMID:19956769

  18. Multi-drug resistance profile of PR20 HIV-1 protease is attributed to distorted conformational and drug binding landscape: molecular dynamics insights.

    PubMed

    Chetty, Sarentha; Bhakat, Soumendranath; Martin, Alberto J M; Soliman, Mahmoud E S

    2016-01-01

    The PR20 HIV-1 protease, a variant with 20 mutations, exhibits high levels of multi-drug resistance; however, to date, there has been no report detailing the impact of these 20 mutations on the conformational and drug binding landscape at a molecular level. In this report, we demonstrate the first account of a comprehensive study designed to elaborate on the impact of these mutations on the dynamic features as well as drug binding and resistance profile, using extensive molecular dynamics analyses. Comparative MD simulations for the wild-type and PR20 HIV proteases, starting from bound and unbound conformations in each case, were performed. Results showed that the apo conformation of the PR20 variant of the HIV protease displayed a tendency to remain in the open conformation for a longer period of time when compared to the wild type. This led to a phenomena in which the inhibitor seated at the active site of PR20 tends to diffuse away from the binding site leading to a significant change in inhibitor-protein association. Calculating the per-residue fluctuation (RMSF) and radius of gyration, further validated these findings. MM/GBSA showed that the occurrence of 20 mutations led to a drop in the calculated binding free energies (ΔGbind) by ~25.17 kcal/mol and ~5 kcal/mol for p2-NC, a natural peptide substrate, and darunavir, respectively, when compared to wild type. Furthermore, the residue interaction network showed a diminished inter-residue hydrogen bond network and changes in inter-residue connections as a result of these mutations. The increased conformational flexibility in PR20 as a result of loss of intra- and inter-molecular hydrogen bond interactions and other prominent binding forces led to a loss of protease grip on ligand. It is interesting to note that the difference in conformational flexibility between PR20 and WT conformations was much higher in the case of substrate-bound conformation as compared to DRV. Thus, developing analogues of DRV by

  19. Structure of HIV-1 nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole with different substituents in position 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziółkowska, Natasza E.; Michejda, Christopher J.; Bujacz, Grzegorz D.

    2010-01-01

    The constant development of new drugs against HIV-1 is necessary due to global expansion of AIDS and HIV-1 drug resistance. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors of HIV-1 (NNRTIs) are potentially effective and nontoxic drugs in AIDS therapy. The crystal structures of six nonnucleoside inhibitors of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) derivatives of N-benzyl-benzimidazole are reported here. The investigated compounds belong to the group of so called "butterfly like" inhibitors with characteristic two π-electron moieties with an angled orientation. The structural data show the influence of the substituents of the benzimidazole ring on the geometry of the molecule and correlation between the structure of the inhibitor and its biological activity.

  20. Identification of covalent active site inhibitors of dengue virus protease

    PubMed Central

    Koh-Stenta, Xiaoying; Joy, Joma; Wang, Si Fang; Kwek, Perlyn Zekui; Wee, John Liang Kuan; Wan, Kah Fei; Gayen, Shovanlal; Chen, Angela Shuyi; Kang, CongBao; Lee, May Ann; Poulsen, Anders; Vasudevan, Subhash G; Hill, Jeffrey; Nacro, Kassoum

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) protease is an attractive target for drug development; however, no compounds have reached clinical development to date. In this study, we utilized a potent West Nile virus protease inhibitor of the pyrazole ester derivative class as a chemical starting point for DENV protease drug development. Compound potency and selectivity for DENV protease were improved through structure-guided small molecule optimization, and protease-inhibitor binding interactions were validated biophysically using nuclear magnetic resonance. Our work strongly suggests that this class of compounds inhibits flavivirus protease through targeted covalent modification of active site serine, contrary to an allosteric binding mechanism as previously described. PMID:26677315

  1. Fragment Based Strategies for Discovery of Novel HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase and Integrase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Latham, Catherine F; La, Jennifer; Tinetti, Ricky N; Chalmers, David K; Tachedjian, Gilda

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remains a global health problem. While combined antiretroviral therapy has been successful in controlling the virus in patients, HIV can develop resistance to drugs used for treatment, rendering available drugs less effective and limiting treatment options. Initiatives to find novel drugs for HIV treatment are ongoing, although traditional drug design approaches often focus on known binding sites for inhibition of established drug targets like reverse transcriptase and integrase. These approaches tend towards generating more inhibitors in the same drug classes already used in the clinic. Lack of diversity in antiretroviral drug classes can result in limited treatment options, as cross-resistance can emerge to a whole drug class in patients treated with only one drug from that class. A fresh approach in the search for new HIV-1 drugs is fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD), a validated strategy for drug discovery based on using smaller libraries of low molecular weight molecules (<300 Da) screened using primarily biophysical assays. FBDD is aimed at not only finding novel drug scaffolds, but also probing the target protein to find new, often allosteric, inhibitory binding sites. Several fragment-based strategies have been successful in identifying novel inhibitory sites or scaffolds for two proven drug targets for HIV-1, reverse transcriptase and integrase. While any FBDD-generated HIV-1 drugs have yet to enter the clinic, recent FBDD initiatives against these two well-characterised HIV-1 targets have reinvigorated antiretroviral drug discovery and the search for novel classes of HIV-1 drugs. PMID:26324045

  2. Molecular modeling, synthesis and biological evaluation of N-heteroaryl compounds as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anuradha; Yadav, Dipti; Yadav, Madhu; Dhamanage, Ashwini; Kulkarni, Smita; Singh, Ramendra K

    2015-03-01

    Different N-heteroaryl compounds bearing pyrimidine and benzimidazole moieties have been designed in silico using Discovery studio 2.5 software, synthesized and evaluated for their inhibitory activity as reverse transcriptase inhibitors against HIV-1 replication using laboratory adapted strains HIV-1IIIB (X4, subtype B) and HIV-1Ada5 (R5, subtype B), and the primary isolates HIV-1UG070 (X4, subtype D) and HIV-1VB59 (R5, subtype C). Cell-based assay showed that compounds were active at 1.394 μm concentrations (Selectivity Index: 1.29-38.39). The studies on structure-activity relationship clearly suggested anti-HIV activity of pyrimidine and benzimidazole derivatives and these findings were consistent with the in vitro cell-based experimental data. The results of molecular modeling and docking confirmed that all compounds assumed a butterfly-like conformation and showed H-bond, 'π-π' and 'π-+' and hydrophobic interactions within flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, similar to known non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, such as nevirapine. In view of the results obtained, it can be said that the chemical skeletons of N, N'-bis-(pyridin-2-yl)-succinamide (14 and 15) and 1, 4-bis-benzoimidazol-1-yl-butane-1, 4-dione (16 and 17) may be used for developing potent inhibitors of HIV-1 replication, with suitable structure/pharmacophore modifications. PMID:25055732

  3. Discovery, characterization, and lead optimization of 7-azaindole non-nucleoside HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Richard A; Lu, Xiao; Detorio, Mervi; Montero, Catherine; Hammond, Emily T; Ehteshami, Maryam; Domaoal, Robert A; Nettles, James H; Feraud, Michel; Schinazi, Raymond F

    2016-08-15

    A library of 585 compounds built off a 7-azaindole core was evaluated for anti-HIV-1 activity, and ten hits emerged with submicromolar potency and therapeutic index >100. Of these, three were identified as non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors and were assayed against relevant resistant mutants. Lead compound 8 inhibited RT with submicromolar potency (IC50=0.73μM) and also maintained some activity against the clinically important RT mutants K103N and Y181C (IC50=9.2, 3.5μM) in cell-free assays. Free energy perturbation guided lead optimization resulted in the development of a compound with a two-fold increase in potency against RT (IC50=0.36μM). These data highlight the discovery of a unique scaffold with the potential to move forward as next-generation anti-HIV-1 agents. PMID:27390064

  4. HIV-1 Integrase Strand Transfer Inhibitors with Reduced Susceptibility to Drug Resistant Mutant Integrases.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xue Zhi; Smith, Steven J; Maskell, Daniel P; Metifiot, Mathieu; Pye, Valerie E; Fesen, Katherine; Marchand, Christophe; Pommier, Yves; Cherepanov, Peter; Hughes, Stephen H; Burke, Terrence R

    2016-04-15

    HIV integrase (IN) strand transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) are among the newest anti-AIDS drugs; however, mutant forms of IN can confer resistance. We developed noncytotoxic naphthyridine-containing INSTIs that retain low nanomolar IC50 values against HIV-1 variants harboring all of the major INSTI-resistant mutations. We found by analyzing crystal structures of inhibitors bound to the IN from the prototype foamy virus (PFV) that the most successful inhibitors show striking mimicry of the bound viral DNA prior to 3'-processing and the bound host DNA prior to strand transfer. Using this concept of "bi-substrate mimicry," we developed a new broadly effective inhibitor that not only mimics aspects of both the bound target and viral DNA but also more completely fills the space they would normally occupy. Maximizing shape complementarity and recapitulating structural components encompassing both of the IN DNA substrates could serve as a guiding principle for the development of new INSTIs. PMID:26808478

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral background plays a major role in development of resistance to protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R E; Gong, Y F; Greytok, J A; Bechtold, C M; Terry, B J; Robinson, B S; Alam, M; Colonno, R J; Lin, P F

    1996-01-01

    The observed in vitro and in vivo benefit of combination treatment with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) agents prompted us to examine the potential of resistance development when two protease inhibitors are used concurrently. Recombinant HIV-1 (NL4-3) proteases containing combined resistance mutations associated with BMS-186318 and A-77003 (or saquinavir) were either inactive or had impaired enzyme activity. Subsequent construction of HIV-1 (NL4-3) proviral clones containing the same mutations yielded viruses that were severely impaired in growth or nonviable, confirming that combination therapy may be advantageous. However, passage of BMS-186318-resistant HIV-1 (RF) in the presence of either saquinavir or SC52151, which represented sequential drug treatment, produced viable viruses resistant to both BMS-186318 and the second compound. The predominant breakthrough virus contained the G48V/A71T/V82A protease mutations. The clone-purified RF (G48V/A71T/V82A) virus, unlike the corresponding defective NL4-3 triple mutant, grew well and displayed cross-resistance to four distinct protease inhibitors. Chimeric virus and in vitro mutagenesis studies indicated that the RF-specific protease sequence, specifically the Ile at residue 10, enabled the NL4-3 strain with the triple mutant to grow. Our results clearly indicate that viral genetic background will play a key role in determining whether cross-resistance variants will arise. Images Fig. 1 PMID:8643685

  6. Pyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidine-based macrocycles as novel HIV-1 inhibitors: a patent evaluation of WO2015123182.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lin; Gao, Ping; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of drug resistance in Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART) confirms a continuing need to investigate novel HIV-1 inhibitors with unexplored mechanisms of action. Recently, a series of pyrazolopyrimidine-based macrocyclic compounds were reported as inhibitors of HIV-1 replication disclosed in the patent WO2015123182. Most of the disclosed compounds possessed in vitro antiviral potency in single-digit nanomolar range, which were determined by MT-2 cell assay. Then, the structural diversity, pharmacophore similarity of HIV-1 IN-LEDGF/p75 inhibitors, and implications for drug design were analyzed. In the end of this article, a glimpse of some macrocycles as potent antiviral agents (drug candidates) was provided. Some strategies and technologies enabling macrocycle design were also described. We expect that further development of these macrocyclic compounds will offer new anti-HIV-1 drug candidates. PMID:27398994

  7. A homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay to identify inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion.

    PubMed

    Smeulders, Liesbet; Bunkens, Lieve; Vereycken, Inge; Van Acker, Koen; Holemans, Pascale; Gustin, Emmanuel; Van Loock, Marnix; Dams, Géry

    2013-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) initiates infection through sequential interactions with CD4 and chemokine coreceptors unmasking the gp41 subunit of the viral envelope protein. Consequently, the N-terminal heptad repeats of gp41 form a trimeric coiled-coil groove in which the C-terminal heptad repeats collapse, generating a stable six-helix bundle. This brings the viral and cell membrane in close proximity enabling fusion and the release of viral genome in the cytosol of the host cell. In this chapter, we describe a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay to identify inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion, based on the ability of soluble peptides, derived from the N- and C-terminal domains of gp41, to form a stable six-helix bundle in vitro. Labeling of the peptides with allophycocyanin and the lanthanide europium results in a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) signal upon formation of the six-helix bundle. Compounds interfering with the six-helix bundle formation inhibit the HIV-1 fusion process and suppress the FRET signal. PMID:23821256

  8. Structural Evidence for Effectiveness of Darunavir and Two Related Antiviral Inhibitors against HIV-2 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Louis, John M.; Aniana, Annie; Ghosh, Arun K.; Weber, Irene T.

    2008-12-08

    No drug has been targeted specifically for HIV-2 (human immunodeficiency virus type 2) infection despite its increasing prevalence worldwide. The antiviral HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) protease (PR) inhibitor darunavir and the chemically related GRL98065 and GRL06579A were designed with the same chemical scaffold and different substituents at P2 and P2' to optimize polar interactions for HIV-1 PR (PR1). These inhibitors are also effective antiviral agents for HIV-2-infected cells. Therefore, crystal structures of HIV-2 PR (PR2) complexes with the three inhibitors have been solved at 1.2-{angstrom} resolution to analyze the molecular basis for their antiviral potency. Unusually, the crystals were grown in imidazole and zinc acetate buffer, which formed interactions with the PR2 and the inhibitors. Overall, the structures were very similar to the corresponding inhibitor complexes of PR1 with an RMSD of 1.1 {angstrom} on main-chain atoms. Most hydrogen-bond and weaker C-H...O interactions with inhibitors were conserved in the PR2 and PR1 complexes, except for small changes in interactions with water or disordered side chains. Small differences were observed in the hydrophobic contacts for the darunavir complexes, in agreement with relative inhibition of the two PRs. These near-atomic-resolution crystal structures verify the inhibitor potency for PR1 and PR2 and will provide the basis for the development of antiviral inhibitors targeting PR2.

  9. Collapse of an HIV-1 protease (1DIFA-dimer) in an effective solvent medium by a Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    2010-03-01

    HIV-1 protease (1DIFA) consists of two polypeptide chains, each monomer with 99 residues where two aspartic acid residues (Asp^25) form the active catalytic site. The conformation and dynamics of the protein chain (with 198 residues) are investigated on a cubic lattice where empty sites represent effective solvent. Specificities of residues are captured via an interaction matrix (residue-residue, residue-solvent) of the Lennard-Jones potential. We examine global properties such as the variation of the root mean square displacement and radius of gyration with the time steps for a range of solvent interaction strength. Local quantities include energy and mobility profiles of residues to understand the active segments (useful in proteolysis). The hydrophobic residues possess higher energy and lower mobility while the electrostatic and polar residues are more mobile despite their lower interaction energy. We find that the radius of gyration of the protein collapses (globular structure) in a narrow range of solvent interaction strength.

  10. Role of Protease-Inhibitors in Ocular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pescosolido, Nicola; Barbato, Andrea; Pascarella, Antonia; Giannotti, Rossella; Genzano, Martina; Nebbioso, Marcella

    2014-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that the balance between proteases and protease-inhibitors system plays a key role in maintaining cellular and tissue homeostasis. Indeed, its alteration has been involved in many ocular and systemic diseases. In particular, research has focused on keratoconus, corneal wounds and ulcers, keratitis, endophthalmitis, age-related macular degeneration, Sorsby fundus dystrophy, loss of nerve cells and photoreceptors during optic neuritis both in vivo and in vitro models. Protease-inhibitors have been extensively studied, rather than proteases, because they may represent a therapeutic approach for some ocular diseases. The protease-inhibitors mainly involved in the onset of the above-mentioned ocular pathologies are: α2-macroglobulin, α1-proteinase inhibitor (α1-PI), metalloproteinase inhibitor (TIMP), maspin, SERPINA3K, SERPINB13, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), and calpeptin. This review is focused on the several characteristics of dysregulation of this system and, particularly, on a possible role of proteases and protease-inhibitors in molecular remodeling that may lead to some ocular diseases. Recently, researchers have even hypothesized a possible therapeutic effect of the protease-inhibitors in the treatment of injured eye in animal models. PMID:25493637