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  1. Pregnancy in HIV-Positive Patients: Effects on Vaginal Flora

    PubMed Central

    Vallone, Cristina; Rigon, Giuliano; Lucantoni, Valeria; Putignani, Lorenza; Signore, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    A high proportion of HIV-infected pregnant women present pathogenic organisms in their lower genital tract. This has been associated with the development of postpartum morbility, HIV transmission to the partner and offspring, and other gynaecological conditions, such as cervical dysplasia or cancer. Vaginal flora alterations can range from 47% in Western countries to 89% in Africa in pregnant HIV-positive patients, much higher than about 20% of the general population. Pathogen organism retrieval is high. As peripartum complications due to vaginal infections seem higher in HIV-positive patients, accurate investigation and treatment of such infections are strongly mandatory. PMID:22675241

  2. Intraoral Burkitt's lymphoma in an HIV positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Ajila, Vidya; Gopakumar, R.; Hegde, Shruthi; Babu, Subhas G.

    2012-01-01

    Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive form of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma composed of malignant cells of B lymphocyte origin. Burkitt's lymphoma is a rarity in the Indian subcontinent. Though intraoral Burkitt's lymphoma in HIV positive individuals is very uncommon, its importance lies in the fact that it is often the first sign of the underlying immunosuppression. We present a case of Burkitt's lymphoma in right maxillary region which was the first manifestation of HIV in the patient. PMID:23188938

  3. Sublingual allergen immunotherapy in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Iemoli, E; Borgonovo, L; Fusi, A; Magni, C; Ricci, E D; Rizzardini, G; Piconi, S

    2016-03-01

    HIV infection is a relative contraindication for allergic immunotherapy (AIT). In the last decade, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has improved the immune function and life expectancy in HIV-infected patients whose respiratory allergic incidence is similar to the general population. We evaluated the safety and clinical effectiveness of sublingual immunotherapy in a group of grass pollen-allergic HAART-treated HIV-positive patients. Thirteen patients received sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet (Oralair, Stallergenes©) and symptomatic therapy and were compared with nine patients receiving symptomatic therapy alone. Clinical benefits were evaluated by the analysis of total combined score (TCS), sum of symptom-medication score, and a quality of life (QoL) questionnaire. HIV viral load and peripheral TCD4 lymphocytes were analyzed at the beginning and at the end of the study. Clinical efficacy data showed a significant improvement in SLIT-treated patients compared to controls (TCS: P = 0.0001; QoL: P = 0.03). We did not observe any significant alteration of TCD4 cell counts and viral load (VL) in both groups. Our preliminary data showed that SLIT therapy in viro-immunological controlled HAART treated HIV positive patients was efficacious, safe and well tolerated. PMID:26228482

  4. Adenovirus infection of the large bowel in HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Maddox, A.; Francis, N.; Moss, J.; Blanshard, C.; Gazzard, B.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To describe the microscopic appearance of adenovirus infection in the large bowel of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with diarrhoea. METHODS: Large bowel biopsy specimens from 10 HIV positive patients, eight of whom were also infected with other gastrointestinal pathogens, with diarrhoea were examined, together with six small bowel biopsy specimens from the same group of patients. Eight of the patients had AIDS. The biopsy specimens were examined by light microscopy performed on haematoxylin and eosin stained and immunoperoxidase preparations, the latter using a commercially available antibody (Serotec MCA 489). Confirmation was obtained with electron microscopy. RESULTS: The morphological appearance of cells infected with adenovirus showed characteristic nuclear and cellular changes, although the inflammatory reaction was non-specific. Immunoperoxidase staining for adenovirus was sensitive and specific, and the presence of viral inclusions consistent with adenovirus was confirmed by electron microscopy. CONCLUSIONS: The light microscopic features of adenovirus infection are distinctive and immunocytochemistry with a commercially available antibody is a sensitive and specific means of confirming the diagnosis. Further studies of the role of adenovirus in causing diarrhoea in these patients are indicated. Images PMID:1401177

  5. Pill impaction mimicking appendicitis in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Torno, Mauro; Shallman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Abdominal pain is a frequent presenting symptom among HIV-positive patients seeking care at emergency departments. We report a case of a 45-year-old HIV-infected Hispanic man who presented with right lower quadrant pain accompanied by fever, decreased appetite, nausea, and vomiting. The results of a CT scan of his abdomen were normal with no evidence of appendicitis. A colonoscopy was performed and revealed an impacted pill in the appendiceal orifice. The pill was removed endoscopically, and pill impaction has not recurred. PMID:19209455

  6. Extensive Giant Molluscum Contagiosum in a HIV Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Vora, Rita V; Pilani, Abhishek P; Kota, Rahul Krishna

    2015-11-01

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a very common benign self-limiting cutaneous viral infection caused by molluscum contagiosum virus. Disease is self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals, while it is severe and prolonged when associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The widespread and refractory mollusca of HIV disease occur especially on the face. In advanced stages of immunosuppression, giant or verrucous forms of MC may occur. Molluscum contagiosum tends to take a chronic course and is usually not responsive to various treatments in immunocompromised patients. Here, we present a HIV positive male patient with extensive papulonodular lesions over face, neck, bilateral upper limbs since 2 months, diagnosed as giant molluscum contagiosum, treated with cryotherapy with little improvement for few weeks after which patient did not turn up. PMID:26672647

  7. Extensive Giant Molluscum Contagiosum in a HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pilani, Abhishek P.; Kota, Rahul Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a very common benign self-limiting cutaneous viral infection caused by molluscum contagiosum virus. Disease is self-limiting in immunocompetent individuals, while it is severe and prolonged when associated with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The widespread and refractory mollusca of HIV disease occur especially on the face. In advanced stages of immunosuppression, giant or verrucous forms of MC may occur. Molluscum contagiosum tends to take a chronic course and is usually not responsive to various treatments in immunocompromised patients. Here, we present a HIV positive male patient with extensive papulonodular lesions over face, neck, bilateral upper limbs since 2 months, diagnosed as giant molluscum contagiosum, treated with cryotherapy with little improvement for few weeks after which patient did not turn up. PMID:26672647

  8. Isolated penile Kaposi's sarcoma in a HIV-positive patient stable on treatment for three years.

    PubMed

    Lebari, Dornubari; Gohil, Jesal; Patnaik, Lipsita; Wasef, Wafaa

    2014-07-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is an AIDS-defining condition. Typically, KS affects the skin with or without visceral involvement. The extensive use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has decreased the incidence of KS amongst the HIV-positive population. We report a case of a 40-year-old man with HIV-1 infection with CD4 count of 551 cells/mm(3)and an undetectable viral load who presented with two skin-coloured KS lesions on the prepuce of the penis. Diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. He had been commenced on ART three years earlier with a nadir CD4 count of 255 cells/mm(3) He had achieved and maintained viral suppression since commencing ART. The patient was initially treated with cryotherapy and 5% imiquimod as the lesions were presumed to be warts. The lack of response to treatment prompted further investigation. We carried out a literature search of published cases of penile KS over the past 10 years. The majority of articles regarding penile KS were published in the pre-ART era and involved patients with AIDS. Over the past 10 years, published cases of penile KS have almost exclusively been in HIV-negative men. We found 10 published cases of penile KS in HIV-negative men and only one other published case of penile KS in a HIV-positive man, who had severe immune suppression with CD4 count below 200 cells/mm(3) This is the first case report to describe a HIV-positive patient stable on ART with a CD4 count above 200 cells/mm(3)and suppressed HIV-1 viral load, to develop two KS lesions on the penis. Clinicians have to remain suspicious of penile lesions and appreciate the crucial role a biopsy with histopathological analysis plays in confirming a diagnosis. In addition, this case illustrates that unusual presentations of KS can still occur in treated HIV-positive patients with sustained immune recovery. PMID:24492851

  9. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance. PMID:26136407

  10. Pembrolizumab for HIV-Positive Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In this phase I clinical trial, HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy who have cancer that has recurred after or has not responded to previous treatment will receive the immune checkpoint inhibitor pembrolizumab.

  11. Uveitis secondary to leishmaniasis immune reconstitution syndrome in a HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Davies, Olubanke; Allen, Felicity; Gruener, Anna M; Simons, Rebecca; Graham, Elizabeth M; Larbalestier, Nick

    2016-06-01

    We describe the case of a HIV-positive patient treated for visceral leishmaniasis who developed uveitis as part of a leishmaniasis immune reconstitution syndrome. Visceral leishmaniasis is increasingly found in HIV-positive adults. Its ophthalmic manifestations can range from relatively minor to complicated anterior uveitis, leading to secondary glaucoma and loss of vision. Clinicians caring for people living with HIV should be alert to the complications of leishmaniasis that can occur before and during treatment. PMID:26002317

  12. Optimizing care for African-American HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Kimberly Y; Brutus, Andre; Cathcart, Ronald; Gathe, Joseph; Johnson, William; Jordan, Wilbert; Kwakwa, Helena A; Nkwanyou, Joseph; Page, Carlos; Scott, Robert; Vaughn, Anita C; Virgil, Luther A; Williamson, Diana

    2003-10-01

    The African-American community has been disproportionately affected HIV/AIDS, as noted by higher reported rates of HIV infection, higher proportion of AIDS cases, and more deaths caused by complications of AIDS than whites and other ethnic groups. In addition, epidemiologic trends suggest that African Americans with HIV infection are more often diagnosed later in the course of HIV disease than whites. Numerous reasons account for this disparity, including the lack of perception of risk and knowledge about HIV transmission as well as a delays in HIV testing and diagnosis in the African-American community. Understanding the important considerations in the management of HIV infection in the African-American patient may create awareness among health care professionals and broaden the knowledge of HIV-infected patients within the African-American community. PMID:14588093

  13. The HIV-positive dentist: balancing the rights of the health care worker and the patient.

    PubMed

    Gardam, M A; Flanagan, W F; Salit, I E

    2001-06-12

    We describe a hypothetical case of an HIV-positive dentist without cognitive impairment who uses proper infection control procedures. The dentist's physician notifies the medical officer of health without the dentist's consent. Although HIV-positive health care workers, including dentists, have been identified in the past, proven HIV transmission to patients is very rare. Most authorities recommend that an HIV-positive health care worker be monitored by an expert panel, which could then, if necessary, refer to the regulatory body to revoke or restrict the person's license to practice. Mandatory HIV testing is not required for health care workers because they generally do not pose a risk for infecting their patients; they are, however, ethically and legally obligated to report their HIV status to their profession's regulatory body. PMID:11450216

  14. Assessing Riverside Community College Nursing Student Attitudes toward Exposure to AIDS/HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kross, Carolyn Sue

    In fall 1990, a study was conducted to assess the attitudes of nursing students who were attending Riverside Community College (RCC), in California, toward exposure to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome/Human Immunodeficiency Virus (AIDS/HIV) positive patients in a hospital setting. All students enrolled in RCC's associate degree nursing program…

  15. Dihydropteroate synthase gene mutation rates in Pneumocystis jirovecii strains obtained from Iranian HIV-positive and non-HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Maryam-Fatemeh; Sadraei, Javid; Farnia, Parisa; Forozandeh Moghadam, Mehdi; Emadikochak, Hamid

    2015-05-01

    The dihydropteroate sulfate (DHPS) gene is associated with resistance to sulfa/sulfone drugs in Pneumocystis jirovecii. We investigated the DHPS mutation rate in three groups of Iranian HIV-positive and HIV-negative patients by polymerase chain reaction-restricted fragment length polymorphism analysis. Furthermore, an association between P. jirovecii DHPS mutations and strain typing was investigated based on direct sequencing of internal transcribed spacer region 1 (ITS1) and ITS2. The overall P. jirovecii DHPS mutation rate was (5/34; 14.7%), the lowest rate identified was in HIV-positive patients (1/16; 6.25%) and the highest rate was in malignancies patients (3/11; 27.3%). A moderate rate of mutation was detected in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients (1/7; 14.3%). Most of the isolates were wild type (29/34; 85.3%). Double mutations in DHPS were detected in patients with malignancies, whereas single mutations at codons 55 and 57 were identified in the HIV-positive and COPD patients, respectively. In this study, two new and rare haplotypes were identified with DHPS mutations. Additionally, a positive relationship between P. jirovecii strain genotypes and DHPS mutations was identified. In contrast, no DHPS mutations were detected in the predominant (Eg) haplotype. This should be regarded as a warning of an increasing incidence of drug-resistant P. jirovecii strains. PMID:25631478

  16. Clinicopathologic Features of Colorectal Carcinoma in HIV-Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Carlie; Cavalcanti, Marcela S.; Daniel, Tanisha; Vakiani, Efsevia; Shia, Jinru; Sigel, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Background Emerging evidence suggests differences in colo-rectal cancer in HIV-infected patients (HIV+) compared with HIV− patients. Microsatellite instability (MSI), occurring in a subset of colorectal cancer, is present at a higher rate in certain cancers in HIV+ patients. Colorectal cancer with MSI share some characteristics with those reported for HIV+ colorectal cancer. On this premise, we studied clinical and pathologic features of HIV+ colorectal cancer and evaluated for MSI using matched HIV− colorectal cancer controls. Methods Two nested, matched cohorts were identified from a hospital-based cohort of colorectal cancer patients. HIV+ colo-rectal cancers were identified and random control patients were matched for selected characteristics. Mismatch repair protein (MMR) IHC was performed as the detection method for MSI. Variables were compared between cases and controls using fixed-effects logit modeling to account for matching. Results We included 184 colorectal cancer samples (38 HIV+, 146 HIV− control). Median patient age at colorectal cancer onset was 55. When compared with HIV− colorectal cancer, HIV+patients were more likely to have smoked (P = 0.001), have right-sided colorectal cancer (37% vs. 14%; P = 0.003), and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) above 50/10 high-power fields (21% vs. 7%). There was no difference in MMR protein expression (P = 0.6). HIV+ colorectal cancer patients had reduced overall survival (P = 0.02) but no difference in progression-free survival. Conclusions HIV+ patients developed colorectal cancer at a lower median age than population estimates, had a higher frequency of right-sided disease, and increased TILs, suggesting potential biologic differences compared with uninfected patients. Impact Clinicopathologic differences in colorectal cancer of HIV+ persons may have implications for tumor pathogenesis. PMID:27197294

  17. Case report: immediate dentures in an HIV positive patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Puneeta H; Jones, John D

    2014-07-01

    A 35-year-old patient with a previous history of recreational drug use, mainly cocaine, presented to the UTHSCSA Dental School with grossly carious remaining dentition. The pattern of the wear and caries on the teeth also indicated other recreational drug such as methamphetamine over a long period of time. He was planned for extractions of the remaining teeth and placement of immediate dentures considering the patient's wish for not being edentulous for the healing period. PMID:25265685

  18. A Suicide Prevention Program for HIV-Positive Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Seana; Rothberg, Joseph M.

    Research has shown that suicide risk is elevated in the patient who has tested positive for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Studies within the Army have found that the three most turbulent periods for the soldier with HIV infection are: (1) at the time of notification of diagnosis; (2) when the family and peer group learn of the diagnosis; and…

  19. Hepatitis E virus infection in the HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Debes, Jose D; Pisano, Maria Belen; Lotto, Martin; Re, Viviana

    2016-07-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a RNA virus that can cause hepatitis. In immunocompetent individuals, infection with HEV usually leads to asymptomatic seroconversion. However, in immunosuppressed patients, such as transplant recipients, HEV can develop into a chronic infection. Studies regarding the seroprevalence and clinical implications of HEV in patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are conflicting. Levels of CD4 count in blood seem to be the most widely associated risk factor, while other factors such as meat consumption or proximity to animals are less clearly associated with HEV infection. Progression to chronicity, as well as extrahepatic manifestations of HEV seem rare in HIV, and the implications of HEV in liver disease progression are poorly understood in the HIV-infected. In this review we describe the epidemiology, risk factors, and clinical implications of HEV infection in individuals infected with HIV. PMID:27243210

  20. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient*

    PubMed Central

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  1. Porphyria cutanea tarda in a HIV- positive patient.

    PubMed

    Franzon, Valéria Aparecida Zanela; Mikilita, Emanuella Stella; Camelo, Fernanda Henriques; Camargo, Rosana

    2016-01-01

    This is a case report about Porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT) and its relationship with the infection caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cutaneous porphyria is an illness caused by enzymatic modification that results in partial deficiency of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Urod), which may be hereditary or acquired. Several studies suggest that HIV infection associated with cofactors might trigger the development of porphyria cutanea tarda. In this case report, we present a patient infected with HIV, who after the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART) enjoyed clinical improvement of porphyria cutanea tarda symptoms. PMID:27579753

  2. Prevalence survey of infection with Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Badie; Yavari, Zeinab; Esmaeeli, Shooka; Paydary, Koosha; Emamzadeh-Fard, Sahra; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Rasoulinejad, Mehrnaz

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of syphilis among Iranian HIV-positive patients. Methods A cross-sectional study on the prevalence of syphilis and HIV co-infection among 450 patients diagnosed with HIV infection was conducted between 2004 and 2008 at Imam Khomeini hospital, Tehran, Iran. The lab tests including CD4 cell count, cerebrospinal fluid, veneral disease research laboratory (VDRL), fluorescent treponema antibody-absorption (FTA-Abs) and viral load were performed for all the patients. Data regarding medical history and their demographics were also collected. Results Of all 450 HIV-positive patients, 24 (5.3%) had a positive VDRL test and only two men had a FTA-Abs positive test which means 0.45% of them had a definite co-infection of syphilis. 65.3% of the HIV-positive patients were injection drug users that the co-infection prevalence of them was 0.7%. We did not find any patient with neurosyphilis. Conclusions Considering the increasing prevalence of HIV and also extensive use of highly active antiretroviral therapy in developing nations, the diagnosis of syphilis should be timely established using screening tests among such patients. PMID:23620862

  3. HIV-Positive-to-HIV-Positive Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Calmy, A; van Delden, C; Giostra, E; Junet, C; Rubbia Brandt, L; Yerly, S; Chave, J-P; Samer, C; Elkrief, L; Vionnet, J; Berney, T

    2016-08-01

    Most countries exclude human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients from organ donation because of concerns regarding donor-derived HIV transmission. The Swiss Federal Act on Transplantation has allowed organ transplantation between HIV-positive donors and recipients since 2007. We report the successful liver transplantation from an HIV-positive donor to an HIV-positive recipient. Both donor and recipient had been treated for many years with antiretroviral therapy and harbored multidrug-resistant viruses. Five months after transplantation, HIV viremia remains undetectable. This observation supports the inclusion of appropriate HIV-positive donors for transplants specifically allocated to HIV-positive recipients. PMID:27109874

  4. Dental Health Status of HIV-Positive Patients and Related Variables in Southeast Iran

    PubMed Central

    Saravani, Shirin; Nosrat Zehi, Tahereh; Kadeh, Hamideh; Mir, Sarvar

    2016-01-01

    Background Different factors can be responsible for the increased prevalence of dental caries and missing teeth in HIV-positive patients. Objectives This study evaluates dental health status and its relationship with social, behavioral, and medical factors in HIV-positive patients under the coverage of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences in Southeast Iran. Patients and Methods In a cross-sectional study, the dental health status of 119 HIV-positive patients was assessed in accordance with WHO indices and included decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMFT). A questionnaire on different social, behavioral, and medical variables was filled out for every case and the relationship and correlation of the variables to dental health status were investigated using One-way ANOVA, the Kruskal Wallis test, the t-test, the Mann-Whitney test, Spearman’s rho correlation coefficient, and Pearson correlation. Results The mean value of DMFT index was 11.87 ± 8.08, where the mean values of decayed and missing teeth were 8.42 ± 5.44 and 3.43 ± 4.07, respectively. DMFT index, decayed, and missing teeth correlated only with age (P < 0.0001, P = 0.009, P < 0.0001) and duration of HIV involvement (P = 0.004, P = 0.031, P = 0.007). Conclusions The dental health status of HIV-positive patients in this region was almost inappropriate. Most social, behavioral, and medical factors had no influence on dental health; only a correlation between dental health, age, and duration of HIV involvement was observed. PMID:27622173

  5. Oral ranula in an HIV-positive patient: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kinshuck, Andrew Jon; Schober, Marianne; Kokai, George; Clarke, Ray

    2012-01-01

    We describe the presentation and treatment of an HIV-positive patient with an oral ranula, and review the literature. Ranulas are mucoceles or retention cysts formed by the extravasation of mucus from the sublingual gland, presumably due to continued production of saliva in the presence of ductal obstruction. Oral ranulas in children are rare and the overall prevalence of mucoceles has been reported as 0.08% in children aged 0–12 years. However, there has been a documented increased occurrence in HIV-positive patients. This has been attributed to a blockage of the salivary gland by inflammation and peri-ductal fibrosis following HIV-associated salivary gland disease. Oral lesions may indicate infection with HIV and can also predict progression of HIV to AIDS. The most common oral manifestation is oral candidiasis occurring in 67% of children with HIV. Following this salivary gland disease, periodontal and gingival disease and herpes simplex are the next most common. The exact prevalence of ranulas in an HIV population is not known but the occurrence of a paediatric patient with HIV having at least one oral lesion has been documented as high as 63% and salivary gland disease at 50%. The true extent of the relationship between HIV and ranula is as yet unknown. This represents the only reported case of oral ranula in an HIV-positive patient in the UK. PMID:22783004

  6. Oral ranula in an HIV-positive patient: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kinshuck, Andrew Jon; Schober, Marianne; Kokai, George; Clarke, Ray

    2012-01-01

    We describe the presentation and treatment of an HIV-positive patient with an oral ranula, and review the literature. Ranulas are mucoceles or retention cysts formed by the extravasation of mucus from the sublingual gland, presumably due to continued production of saliva in the presence of ductal obstruction. Oral ranulas in children are rare and the overall prevalence of mucoceles has been reported as 0.08% in children aged 0-12 years. However, there has been a documented increased occurrence in HIV-positive patients. This has been attributed to a blockage of the salivary gland by inflammation and peri-ductal fibrosis following HIV-associated salivary gland disease. Oral lesions may indicate infection with HIV and can also predict progression of HIV to AIDS. The most common oral manifestation is oral candidiasis occurring in 67% of children with HIV. Following this salivary gland disease, periodontal and gingival disease and herpes simplex are the next most common. The exact prevalence of ranulas in an HIV population is not known but the occurrence of a paediatric patient with HIV having at least one oral lesion has been documented as high as 63% and salivary gland disease at 50%. The true extent of the relationship between HIV and ranula is as yet unknown. This represents the only reported case of oral ranula in an HIV-positive patient in the UK. PMID:22783004

  7. Diffuse Cerebral Vasculopathy in a HIV-Positive Patient with Recurrent Strokes.

    PubMed

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Chen, Cheng-Yu; Hsueh, Chun-Jen; Lo, Chung-Ping; Juan, Chun-Jung; Chang, Wei-Chou; Huang, Guo-Shu

    2008-02-18

    The causes of ischemic stroke in the young adult are diverse. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-related vasculopathy is usually not included in the list of differential diagnoses. HIV-positive patients may present with acute neurologic dysfunction of different causes, among which cerebral infarction is an uncommon one. Herein, we report a HIV-infected young man who suffered from recurrent ischemic strokes with evidence of cerebral vasculopathy on serial magnetic resonance images. PMID:24256749

  8. Factors Associated With Smoking Status among HIV-Positive Patients in Routine Clinical Care

    PubMed Central

    Zyambo, Cosmas M; Willig, James H; Cropsey, Karen L; Carson, April P; Wilson, Craig; Tamhane, Ashutosh R; Westfall, Andrew O; Burkholder, Greer A

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment-related reductions in morbidity and mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have been attenuated by cigarette smoking, which increases risk of cardiovascular, respiratory, and neoplastic diseases. This study investigated factors associated with smoking status among HIV-positive patients. Methods This cross-sectional study included 2,464 HIV-positive patients attending the HIV Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham between April 2008 and December 2013. Smoking status (current, former, never), psychosocial factors, and clinical characteristics were assessed. Multinomial logistic regression was used to obtain unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the association of the various factors with smoking status. Results Among HIV-positive patients (mean age 45 years, 75% male, 55% African-American), the majority reported a history of smoking (39% current and 22% former smokers). In adjusted models, patient characteristics associated with increased odds of current smoking were male gender (OR for heterosexual men, 1.8 [95% CI: 1.3–2.6]; for men who have sex with men, 1.5 [1.1–1.9]), history of respiratory diseases (1.5 [1.2–1.9]), unsuppressed HIV viral load (>50 copies/mL) (1.5 [1.1–1.9]), depression (1.6 [1.3–2.0]), anxiety (1.6 [1.2–2.1]), and prior and current substance abuse (4.7 [3.6–6.1] and 8.3 [5.3–13.3] respectively). Male gender, anxiety, and substance abuse were also associated with being a former smoker. Conclusions Smoking was common among HIV-positive patients, with several psychosocial factors associated with current and former smoking. This suggests smoking cessation programs in HIV clinic settings may achieve greater impact by integrating interventions that also address illicit substance abuse and mental health. PMID:26767146

  9. Fertility desires and intentions of HIV-positive patients at a suburban specialist center.

    PubMed Central

    Oladapo, Olufemi T.; Daniel, Olusoji J.; Odusoga, Okanlawon L.; Ayoola-Sotubo, Oluwafayokemi

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the extent of fertility desires and intentions of HIV-positive patients receiving care at a suburban specialist clinic and assess how these may vary by their sociodemographic and health-related factors. METHODS: Questionnaire-based interview of a consecutive sample of HIV-positive men (18-55 years) and HIV-positive women (18-45 years) who presented at the HIV clinic of the Center for Special Studies, Sagamu, Nigeria, between November and December 2004. RESULTS: 63.3% of the 147 studied participants expressed the desire for childbearing, even though 50.4% of them already had > or = 2 children. Respectively, 71.5% and 93.8% of men and women who desired children intended to have > or = 2 in the near future. Only 4.3% of those who desired children did not intend to have any. All 30 individuals who had no children intended to bear children in the future, and they constituted 32.3% of those who expressed the desire for childbearing. Multivariate logistic regression analyses of associated factors indicated that decreasing age, shorter time since diagnosis of HIV infection and nondisclosure of serostatus to current partner significantly increase the odds of desire for childbearing, while having no children and a poor most-recent CD4 count significantly increase the odds of intention to have > or = 3 children instead of 1-2. CONCLUSION: The extent of the fertility desires and intentions of these patients poses a threat to the preventive strategies against vertical and heterosexual transmission of HIV in this region. In view of their compelling desire for parenthood, it may be wise for caregivers to desist from the conventional systematic advice against pregnancy but, in addition to laying emphasis on the risks, provide adequate information on practicable reproductive options for HIV-positive individuals. PMID:16396059

  10. Effects of renal tubular dysfunction on bone in tenofovir-exposed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Lucy; Pope, Matthew; Burling, Keith; Fisher, Martin; Gilleece, Yvonne; Walker-Bone, Karen; Post, Frank A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) may cause renal tubular dysfunction (RTD) and reduce bone mineral density (BMD). We examined the relationship between RTD and BMD in TDF-exposed HIV-positive men. Design and methods We analysed urinary retinol binding protein/creatinine ratio (RBPCR) and fractional excretion of phosphate (FEPO4) to quantify RTD in a cross sectional sample of randomly selected HIV positive men at a single tertiary outpatient clinic. BMD at the lumbar spine and hip was measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse factors associated with RTD, and linear regression to examine the relationship between RTD and BMD. Results Of 293 men (mean age 48 years, 94% white ethnicity, median TDF exposure 2.1 years), 22.5% had RBPCR-defined RTD and 12.3% had FEPO4-defined RTD. We observed a negative correlation between RBPCR and BMD at the spine (β -0.2, p=0.002) and hip (total: β -0.1, p=0.02; femoral neck: β -0.1, p=0.02), but not between FePO4 and BMD. In multivariable analyses, RTD defined by >5 fold elevations in RBPCR was associated with significantly lower BMD of the spine. Conclusions RTD was associated with lower BMD of the spine in HIV-positive men. RBPCR quantification may identify patients at increased risk of TDF-associated BMD reduction. PMID:26372384

  11. Depression and diagnosis of neurocognitive impairment in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Pinheiro, C A T; Souza, L D M; Motta, J V S; Kelbert, E F; Souza, M S; Martins, C S R; Coelho, F M C; Pinheiro, K A T; Pinheiro, R T

    2016-01-01

    Neurocognitive impairment (NCI) is frequently observed in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and results from the compromise of subcortical brain structures by the virus. The manifestations of NCI range from asymptomatic impairment to dementia. In addition to cognitive impairment resulting from HIV infection, other factors such as depression are associated with the loss of cognitive functions. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of NCI in HIV-positive patients in a city in southern Brazil and to establish possible associations for the prevalence of NCI with HIV-related and other risk factors. This cross-sectional study of HIV-positive outpatients was conducted in a specialized care service in the city of Pelotas in Southern Brazil. Sociodemographic data and HIV-related information were collected, and all patients underwent psychiatric and neurocognitive evaluations. The prevalence of NCI among the 392 patients was 54.1% when tracked using the IHDS (International HIV Dementia Scale) and 36.2% when the IHDS was associated with a battery of complementary tests. A bivariate analysis suggested an association of NCI with gender, age, educational level, depression, current CD4 count and lowest CD4 count. The association of NCI with depression remained in the Poisson regression (PR=1.96, 95%CI=1.12-3.42). The prevalence of cognitive impairment in HIV-positive patients estimated in this study is in accordance with international and Brazilian data. Of the factors analyzed, depression showed the greatest evidence of association with neurocognitive loss. Based on our findings, the inclusion of instruments to evaluate depression in our services for patients with HIV and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is recommended. PMID:27626305

  12. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of gingiva in a 28-year-old HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, K. F.; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Sarkar, Amitabha; Muddaiah, Savitha

    2012-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is seldom seen in the oral cavity, and has been reported with some frequency in HIV-positive patients. Oral HIV-related lymphomas exhibit an aggressive course and can mimic other oral tumors and infections that make early recognition and diagnosis difficult. This paper presents a case of NHL on the gingiva of a 28-year-old HIV-positive male patient. PMID:23225984

  13. Confidentiality of the medical records of HIV-positive patients in the United Kingdom – a medicolegal and ethical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Mike

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the legal and ethical issues that surround the confidentiality of medical records, particularly in relation to patients who are HIV positive. It records some historical background of the HIV epidemic, and considers the relative risks of transmission of HIV from individual to individual. It explains the law as it pertains to confidentiality, and reports the professional guidance in these matters. It then considers how these relate to HIV-positive individuals in particular. PMID:22312224

  14. Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction among HIV-positive patients with early syphilis: azithromycin versus benzathine penicillin G therapy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Mao-Song; Yang, Chia-Jui; Lee, Nan-Yao; Hsieh, Szu-Min; Lin, Yu-Hui; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Lee, Kuan-Yeh; Yang, Shan-Ping; Liu, Wen-Chun; Wu, Pei-Ying; Ko, Wen-Chien; Hung, Chien-Ching

    2014-01-01

    macrolide resistance mutation (A2058G). In subgroup analyses confined to the 75 patients infected with T. pallidum lacking resistance mutation, a statistically significantly lower risk for the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction following azithromycin treatment was noted. Conclusions Treatment with azithromycin was associated with a lower risk for the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction than that with benzathine penicillin G in HIV-positive patients with early syphilis. Previous benzathine penicillin G therapy for syphilis decreased the risk, whereas higher RPR titres increased the risk, for the reaction. PMID:25174641

  15. [Follow-up of extensive burns in an HIV positive patient. Case report].

    PubMed

    de Roche, R; Lüscher, N J; Zimmerli, W

    1990-02-01

    The case of a 33-year-old HIV-positive patient who suffered from second- and third-degree burn injuries involving 30% of the body surface is reported. She was treated by early tangential excision of the burnt skin and split-thickness mesh grafting. The burn wounds healed without complications within the usual time, with excellent cosmetic and functional results. In spite of the successful treatment, she suffered from fever and various infections for several months. With the appearance of these constitutional symptoms, we recognized the AIDS-related complex. Her general condition deteriorated continuously and 10 months after the accident she had to be admitted to a hospital again. The skin had nevertheless healed perfectly and in spite of not having compression treatment for the grafts or physiotherapy, she did not show any signs of hypertrophic scars. Some important conclusions drawn from this case are discussed. The fact that healing occurred without complications is in contrast to the results reported in the literature concerning impaired wound healing in AIDS patients with anorectal surgery. We therefore believe that the reluctant and perhaps even anxious attitude of the medical and nursing staff towards performing technical and expensive procedures in HIV-positive burn patients is not justified. PMID:2315721

  16. Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-positive patients in Spain: epidemiology and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Palomares-Sancho, Ines; Diaz, Asuncion; Resino, Rosa; De Miguel, Angel Gil; Resino, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Specific environmental factors may play a role in the development of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the PCP incidence and mortality in hospitalized HIV-positive patients in Spain during the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era (1997 to 2011), as well as to analyze the climatological factors and air pollution levels in relation to hospital admissions and deaths. Methods We carried out a retrospective study. Data were collected from the National Hospital Discharge Database and the State Meteorological Agency of Spain. A case-crossover analysis was applied to identify environmental risk factors related to hospitalizations and deaths. For each patient, climatic factors and pollution levels were assigned based on readings from the nearest meteorological station to his or her postal code. Results There were 13,139 new PCP diagnoses and 1754 deaths in hospitalized HIV-positive patients from 1997 to 2011. The PCP incidence (events per 1000 person-years) dropped from 11.6 in 1997 to 2000, to 5.4 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). The mortality (events per 10,000 person-years) also decreased from 14.3 in 1997 to 2000, to 7.5 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). Most hospital admissions and deaths occurred in the winter season and the fewest occurred in the summer, overlapping respectively with the lowest and highest temperatures of the year in Spain. Moreover, lower temperatures prior to PCP admission, as well as higher concentrations of NO2 and particulate matter up to 10 m in size (PM10) at the time of admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission due to PCP when two weeks, one month, 1.5 months or two months were used as controls (p<0.01). Furthermore, higher concentrations of ozone at one month (p=0.007), 1.5 months (p<0.001) and two months (p=0.006) prior to admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission with PCP. For PCP-related deaths, lower

  17. Multifocal Buruli Ulcer Associated with Secondary Infection in HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Komenan, Kassi; Elidjé, Ecra J.; Ildevert, Gbery P.; Yao, Kouassi I.; Kanga, Kouame; Kouamé, Kouassi A.; Abdoulaye, Sangaré; Hamdam, Kourouma S.; Yao, Yoboué P.; Jean-Marie, Kanga

    2013-01-01

    Buruli ulcer is a chronic and infectious skin disease, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. It leads to large skin ulceration and sometimes bone infection which is responsible for deformities. Here, we report a case of multifocal form of Buruli ulcer associated with secondary infection in a 46-year-old human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive woman. The antimycobacterial drugs combined to surgery allowed curing this multifocal case and rose up two relevant issues: the susceptibility of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) occurrence and Mycobacterium dissemination. The deep immune depression, the underline biological, and clinical disorders of the patient might contribute to IRIS occurrence and Buruli ulcer dissemination. Future investigations have to be conducted on the mechanism of IRIS on set and on Mycobacterium ulcerans dissemination after ARV drugs initiation and the patient related underline clinical or biological disorders. PMID:24454398

  18. Reliability and validity of mobile teledermatology in HIV positive patients in Botswana: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Azfar, Rahat S; Lee, Robert A.; Castelo-Soccio, Leslie; Greenberg, Martin S.; Bilker, Warren B; Gelfand, Joel M; Kovarik, Carrie L

    2014-01-01

    Importance Mobile teledermatology may increase access to care. Objective To determine if mobile teledermatology in HIV positive patients in Gaborone, Botswana was reliable and produced valid consultations in comparison to face-to-face dermatology consultations. Design Cross-sectional study Setting Outpatient clinics and public inpatient settings in Botswana. Participants 76 HIV positive patients aged 18 years and up with a skin or mucosal complaint that had not been previously evaluated by a dermatologist. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) We calculated Cohen's kappa coefficient for diagnosis, diagnostic category and management for test-retest reliability and for inter-rater reliability. We also calculated sensitivity and specificity for each diagnosis. Results Cohen's kappa for test-retest reliability ranged from 0.47 (95% CI 0.35-0.59) to 0.78 (95% CI 0.67-0.88) for the primary diagnosis, 0.29 (95% CI 0.18-0.42) to 0.73 (95% CI 0.61-0.84) for diagnostic category, and 0.17 (95% CI -0.01-0.36) to 0.54 (95% CI 0.38-0.70) for management. Cohen's kappa for inter-rater reliability ranged from 0.41 (95% CI 0.31-0.52) to 0.51 (95% CI 0.41-0.61) for the primary diagnosis, from 0.22 (95% CI 0.14-0.31) to 0.43 (95% CI 0.34-0.53) for the diagnostic category for the primary diagnosis and from 0.08 (95% CI 0.02-0.15) to 0.12 (95% CI 0.01-0.23) for management. Sensitivity and specificity for the top ten diagnoses ranged from 0 to 0.88 and from 0.84 to 1 respectively. Conclusions and Relevance Our results suggest that while the use of mobile teledermatology technology in HIV-positive patients in Botswana has significant potential for improving access to care, additional work is needed to improve reliability and validity of this technology on a larger scale in this population. PMID:24622778

  19. An unusual presentation of diffuse granuloma annulare in an HIV-positive patient - immunohistochemical evidence of predominant CD8 lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Morris, S D; Cerio, R; Paige, D G

    2002-05-01

    Over the past decade there have been several reports in the literature of atypical forms of granuloma annulare (GA) occurring in HIV positive patients. We now report a case of diffuse granuloma annulare in an HIV positive patient with unusual clinical and immunohistological features. Our patient presented with a persistent extensive macular erythematous eruption on his face and upper trunk with bizarre sparing around the nipples and axillae. The histology showed an interstitial pattern of GA, with a predominance of CD8 positive cells, in contrast to the usual CD4 positive infiltrate typically seen in GA. PMID:12072009

  20. Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV-Positive Patients by Microscopic Observation Drug Susceptibility Assay ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Dang Thi Minh; Lan, Nguyen Thi Ngoc; Kiet, Vo Sy; Wolbers, Marcel; Hang, Hoang Thi Thanh; Day, Jeremy; Hien, Nguyen Quang; Tien, Nguyen Anh; An, Pham Thuy; Anh, Truong Thi; Oanh, Do Thi Tuong; Hoa, Chau Luong; Chau, Nguyen Thi Minh; Hai, Nguyen Ngoc; Binh, Ngo Thanh; Ngoc, Le Hong; Phuong, Doan Thanh; Quyet, Tran Van; Tuyen, Nguyen Thi Bich; Ha, Vo Thi; Nho, Nguyen Thi; Hoa, Dai Viet; Anh, Phan Thi Hoang; Dung, Nguyen Huy; Farrar, Jeremy; Caws, Maxine

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic observation drug susceptibility assay (MODS) is a novel and promising test for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). We evaluated the MODS assay for the early diagnosis of TB in HIV-positive patients presenting to Pham Ngoc Thach Hospital for Tuberculosis and Lung Diseases in southern Vietnam. A total of 738 consecutive sputum samples collected from 307 HIV-positive individuals suspected of TB were tested by smear, MODS, and the mycobacteria growth indicator tube method (MGIT). The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of MODS compared to the microbiological gold standard (either smear or MGIT) were 87 and 93%, respectively. The sensitivities of smear, MODS, and MGIT were 57, 71, and 75%, respectively, against clinical gold standard (MODS versus smear, P < 0.001; MODS versus MGIT, P = 0.03). The clinical gold standard was defined as patients who had a clinical examination and treatment consistent with TB, with or without microbiological confirmation. For the diagnosis of smear-negative patients, the sensitivities of MODS and MGIT were 38 and 45%, respectively (P = 0.08). The median times to detection using MODS and MGIT were 8 and 11 days, respectively, and they were 11 and 17 days, respectively, for smear-negative samples. The original bacterial/fungal contamination rate of MODS was 1.1%, while it was 2.6% for MGIT. The cross-contamination rate of MODS was 4.7%. In conclusion, MODS is a sensitive, specific, and rapid test that is appropriate for the detection of HIV-associated TB; its cost and ease of use make it particularly useful in resource-limited settings. PMID:20926704

  1. HIV Transmission Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Kiene, Susan M.; Mahlase, Gethwana; MacDonald, Susan; Christie, Sarah; Cornman, Deborah H.; Fisher, William A.; Greener, Ross; Lalloo, Umesh G.; Pillay, Sandy; van Loggerenberg, Francois; Fisher, Jeffrey D.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to identify factors associated with HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-positive women and men receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Across 16 clinics, 1,890 HIV+ patients on ART completed a risk-focused audio computer-assisted self-interview upon enrolling in a prevention-with-positives intervention trial. Results demonstrated that 62 % of HIV-positive patients’ recent unprotected sexual acts involved HIV-negative or HIV status unknown partners. For HIV-positive women, multivariable correlates of unprotected sex with HIV-negative or HIV status unknown partners were indicative of poor HIV prevention-related information and of sexual partnership-associated behavioral skills barriers. For HIV-positive men, multivariable correlates represented motivational barriers, characterized by negative condom attitudes and the experience of depressive symptomatology, as well as possible underlying information deficits. Findings suggest that interventions addressing gender-specific and culturally-relevant information, motivation, and behavioral skills barriers could help reduce HIV transmission risk behavior among HIV-positive South Africans. PMID:24158486

  2. Right iliac fossa lymphoma in an HIV positive patient: A diagnostic dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Sinnott, Joseph; Natin, Danial; Foster, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Lymphoma should be considered early in patients with HIV when there is a history of weight loss. Although B-cell lymphoma is an AIDS-defining cancer, and many reports of lymphoma in HIV positive patients exist in the literature, this case report illustrates that even in patients with well-controlled HIV the diagnosis must be considered, and puts forward an unusual presentation in an otherwise asymptomatic patient. A 52 year old woman presented for a routine HIV follow-up appointment and was found to be experiencing weight loss. An abdominal examination revealed a right iliac fossa mass. Subsequent CT thorax, abdomen, pelvis imaging confirmed a large mass but did not allow determination of the primary source. Serological tumour marker investigations were unyielding. Trans-vaginal ultrasound guided biopsy of the mass demonstrated diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. This case report emphasises the importance of having a high index of suspicion for these cancers even in patients with low viral load who are on anti-retroviral treatment. It also demonstrates the importance of taking a multidisciplinary approach to diagnosis of the condition to enable prompt treatment and thus improve the outcome for the patient. PMID:26971281

  3. Herbal product use in non-HIV and HIV-positive Hispanic patients.

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, José O.; González-Stuart, Armando; Ortiz, Melchor; Rodríguez, José C.; Anaya, Jaime P.; Meza, Armando

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: The primary endpoint of this study was to determine the prevalence of herbal product use by a sample of Mexican-American patients in the El Paso, TX region. Even though medicinal plants are popularly assumed to be a safe and natural alternative to conventional medications, some herbal products may pose a potential health risk to the consumer. Currently, there are few studies related to herbal use by Mexican Americans and none in HIV patients living on the U.S./México border. METHODS: A prospective observational study was conducted in hospitals and clinics throughout the El Paso region area. A semistructured interview was conducted by trained bilingual interviewers. A 45-item bilingual questionnaire was used to collect the information. RESULTS: A total of 439 non-HIV patients as well as 35 patients afflicted with HIV participated in the study. Seventy-nine percent (347/439) of non-HIV and 71% (25/35) of HIV patients reported using herbal products. The percentages of herbal use among the two groups did not show any statistically significant differences (p=0.29), and both groups reflected that herbal products are commonly used. CONCLUSIONS: The use of herbal products was very common among non-HIV (79%) and HIV-positive (71%) Mexican-Americans patients in the El Paso region. PMID:16396061

  4. Cholelithiasis and Nephrolithiasis in HIV-Positive Patients in the Era of Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Yin; Liao, Sih-Han; Liu, Wen-Chun; Cheng, Aristine; Lin, Shu-Wen; Chang, Sui-Yuan; Tsai, Mao-Song; Kuo, Ching-Hua; Wu, Mon-Ro; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Hung, Chien-Ching; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis among HIV-positive patients in the era of combination antiretroviral therapy. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of HIV-positive patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography for chronic viral hepatitis, fatty liver, or elevated aminotransferases between January 2004 and January 2015. Therapeutic drug monitoring of plasma concentrations of atazanavir was performed and genetic polymorphisms, including UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1*28 and multidrug resistance gene 1 (MDR1) G2677T/A, were determined in a subgroup of patients who received ritonavir-boosted or unboosted atazanavir-containing combination antiretroviral therapy. Information on demographics, clinical characteristics, and laboratory testing were collected and analyzed. Results During the 11-year study period, 910 patients who underwent routine abdominal sonography were included for analysis. The patients were mostly male (96.9%) with a mean age of 42.2 years and mean body-mass index of 22.9 kg/m2 and 85.8% being on antiretroviral therapy. The anchor antiretroviral agents included non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors (49.3%), unboosted atazanavir (34.4%), ritonavir-boosted lopinavir (20.4%), and ritonavir-boosted atazanavir (5.5%). The overall prevalence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 12.5% and 8.2%, respectively. Among 680 antiretroviral-experienced patients with both baseline and follow-up sonography, the crude incidence of cholelithiasis and nephrolithiasis was 4.3% and 3.7%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, the independent factors associated with incident cholelithiasis were exposure to ritonavir-boosted atazanavir for >2 years (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12–35.16) and older age (AOR, 1.04; 95% CI, 1.00–1.09). The positive association between duration of exposure to ritonavir

  5. Adequacy of Mental Health Services for HIV-Positive Patients with Depression: Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Stephanie K. Y.; Boyle, Eleanor; Cairney, John; Gardner, Sandra; Collins, Evan J.; Bacon, Jean; Rourke, Sean B.

    2016-01-01

    Background Major depression can profoundly impact clinical and quality-of-life outcomes of people living with HIV, and this disease is underdiagnosed and undertreated in many HIV-positive individuals. Here, we describe the prevalence of publicly funded primary and secondary mental health service use and antidepressant use, as well as mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines for HIV-positive patients with depression in Ontario, Canada. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study linking data from the Ontario HIV Treatment Network Cohort Study with administrative health databases in the province of Ontario, Canada. Current depression was assessed using the Center for Epidemiologic Depression Scale or the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale. Multivariable regressions were used to characterize prevalence outcomes. Results Of 990 HIV-positive patients with depression, 493 (50%) patients used mental health services; 182 (18%) used primary services (general practitioners); 176 (18%) used secondary services (psychiatrists); and 135 (14%) used both. Antidepressants were used by 407 (39%) patients. Patients who identified as gay, lesbian, or bisexual, as having low income or educational attainment, or as non-native English speakers or immigrants to Canada were less likely to obtain care. Of 493 patients using mental health services, 250 (51%) received mental health care for depression in accordance with existing Canadian guidelines. Conclusions Our results showed gaps in delivering publicly funded mental health services to depressed HIV-positive patients and identified unequal access to these services, particularly among vulnerable groups. More effective mental health policies and better access to mental health services are required to address HIV-positive patient needs and reduce depression’s impact on their lives. PMID:27280751

  6. Comparison of Serum Lipid Profile in HIV Positive Patients on ART with ART Naïve Patients

    PubMed Central

    V, Vijay; Shekhanawar, M.S.; Rajeshwari; M, Amareshwaras; D, Shantala

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The widespread use of effective highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in HIV patients has coincided with increasing reports of complications like HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome and the metabolic alterations, affecting the lipid and glucose metabolism. Evidences in support of lipodystrophy and dyslipidaemia associated with First- line HAART in our area is scarce. The aim of the present study was 1) to study and compare Lipid profile in HIV positive patients on ART with that of freshly diagnosed HIV positive patients who were yet to be started on ART. 2) To assess lipodystrophy syndrome in patients on ART. Materials and Methods: Hundred newly diagnosed HIV positive patients who were yet to be started on ART were taken as controls (ART-Naïve).Hundred randomly selected HIV+ patients who were already on First-line ART regimen (Stavudine/Zudovudine + Lamivudine + Nevirapine) for more than 12 months were taken as cases (ART). This study was conducted for a period of 12 months at the VIMS ART centre, Bellary, Karnataka, India. Results: There was a significant increase (p<0.001) in serum Total Cholesterol, LDL-C, TG, VLDL, Non-HDL -C & TC/HDL-C ratio in ART patients compared to ART-naïve patients. Of the 100 ART patients 23 had lipodystrophy syndrome (buffalo hump, abnormal fat deposition around neck & back, buccal fat resorption, increase in abdominal fat). Conclusion: To conclude, it is evident from our study that there is increase in lipid profile (except HDL) in ART patients compared to ART Naïve group and 23 ART patients showed lipodystrophy syndrome. Hence it appears reasonable to measure fasting lipid levels before and 3-6 months after antiretroviral therapy is initiated or when ART regimen is changed. PMID:25478335

  7. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A.J.; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  8. Progressive Resistance Training in Elderly HIV-Positive Patients: Does it Work?

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Paula Maria Loiola; Jacob-Filho, Wilson; Santarém, José Maria; da Silva, Alexandre Rodrigues; Li, Ho Yeh; Burattini, Marcelo Nascimento

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Elderly people present alterations in body composition and physical fitness, compromising their quality of life. Chronic diseases, including HIV/AIDS, worsen this situation. Resistance exercises are prescribed to improve fitness and promote healthier and independent aging. Recovery of strength and physical fitness is the goal of exercise in AIDS wasting syndrome. OBJECTIVE This study describes a case series of HIV-positive elderly patients who participated in a progressive resistance training program and evaluates their body composition, muscular strength, physical fitness and the evolution of CD4+ and CD8+ cell counts. METHODS Subjects were prospectively recruited for nine months. The training program consisted of three sets of 8–12 repetitions of leg press, seated row, lumbar extension and chest press, performed with free weight machines hts, twice/week for one year. Infectious disease physicians followed patients and reported all relevant clinical data. Body composition was assessed by anthropometric measures and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry before and after the training program. RESULTS Fourteen patients, aged 62–71 years old, of both genders, without regular physical activity who had an average of nine years of HIV/AIDS history were enrolled. The strengths of major muscle groups increased (74%–122%, p=0.003–0.021) with a corresponding improvement in sit-standing and walking 2.4 m tests (p=0.003). There were no changes in clinical conditions and body composition measures, but triceps and thigh skinfolds were significantly reduced (p=0.037). In addition, there were significant increases in the CD4+ counts (N=151 cells; p=0.008) and the CD4+/CD8+ ratio (0.63 to 0.81, p=0.009). CONCLUSION Resistance training increased strength, improved physical fitness, reduced upper and lower limb skinfolds, and were associated with an improvement in the CD4+ and CD4+/CD8+ counts in HIV positive elderly patients without significant side effects. PMID

  9. Proton 1H- and Phosphorus 31P-MR spectroscopy (MRS) in asymptomatic HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Schuettfort, Gundolf; Hattingen, Elke; Pilatus, Ulrich; Stephan, Christoph; Wolf, Timo; Goepel, Siri; Haberl, Annette; Blasel, Stella; Zanella, Freidhelm; Brodt, Hans-Reinhard; Bickel, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Introduction HIV infection is accompanied by a variety of neurological disorders. Depression of cell-mediated immunity is followed by the development of central nervous system opportunistic infections/tumours, and frequently by the occurrence of the AIDS dementia complex (ADC). However, the pathophysiology of the emergence of neuro-AIDS is still unknown. Despite the development of cognitive impairments, the early diagnosis, objectification and quantification of the existence and extent of this impairment during infection are difficult to recognize in each individual case. To support the early diagnosis of ADC, there is a need for additional, non-invasive diagnostic methods. In this study, it is of interest to answer the clinically relevant question of whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect changes in the cerebral metabolism of asymptomatic HIV-positive patients and is possibly suitable for the early diagnosis and prevention of HIV encephalopathy. Methods A group of 13 asymptomatic, HIV-positive patients with combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) and 13 healthy controls were examined with 2D 1H-MRS and 3D 31P-MRS at 3T. The patients were treated with cART for at least 12 months. Changes in the absolute concentrations of phosphorylated metabolites (ATP), N-acetyl-aspartate, creatine, myo-Isonitol, glutamate/glutamine and choline-containing compounds were compared with that of control subjects. Results Asymptomatic HIV-positive patients had significantly lower N-acetyl-aspartate in the white matter in a frontal and parietal target region. The other evaluated metabolites in the 1H MRS showed no significant difference between the HIV-positive patients and healthy controls. The 31P-MRS detected significant elevated values regarding the choline-containing compounds PEth, GPE and PCho. Conclusions This spectroscopic study revealed a significantly lower N-acetyl-aspartate in the white matter in a frontal and parietal cerebral target region in asymptomatic, HIV-positive

  10. Cytodiagnosis of cutaneous histoplasmosis in HIV positive patient initially presenting with multiple umbilicated disseminated skin nodules.

    PubMed

    Arghya, Bandyopadhyay; Kaushik, Majumdar; Mimi, Gangopadhyay; Subrata, Chakraborty

    2013-05-01

    Histoplasmosis is usually an opportunistic fungal infection in patients with defective cell mediated immunity, and has been considered as one of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) defining illness. However, cutaneous involvement in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients is less common, and very rarely can be the initial presenting symptom for the diagnosis of AIDS. We present here an unusual case of multiple diffuse cutaneous nodular lesions predominantly in face, trunk, and upper extremities diagnosed initially on aspiration cytology as histoplasmosis. Subsequent serological test revealed positivity for HIV 1 and 2, along with a low CD4 count and low CD4:CD3 ratio. The cytomorphological features were further corroborated by histology and histochemical stains. Hence, cutaneous histoplasmosis can cause multiple wide spread nodular or umbilicated lesions in AIDS patients as the initial presentation. Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) is a rapid, cost effective tool for diagnosis of the fungi from such lesions and initiating work up for immunocompromised states including AIDS. PMID:21987498

  11. STIGMA, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS IN CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2016-01-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients. PMID:25299810

  12. Stigma, social support, and treatment adherence among HIV-positive patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-10-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients. PMID:25299810

  13. Provision of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-positive TB patients--19 countries, sub-Saharan Africa, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Dokubo, E Kainne; Baddeley, Annabel; Pathmanathan, Ishani; Coggin, William; Firth, Jacqueline; Getahun, Haileyesus; Kaplan, Jonathan; Date, Anand

    2014-11-28

    Considerable progress has been made in the provision of life-saving antiretroviral therapy (ART) for persons with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection worldwide, resulting in an overall decrease in HIV incidence and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related mortality. In the strategic scale-up of HIV care and treatment programs, persons with HIV and tuberculosis (TB) are a priority population for receiving ART. TB is the leading cause of death among persons living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa and remains a potential risk to the estimated 35 million persons living with HIV globally. Of the 9 million new cases of TB disease globally in 2013, an estimated 1.1 million (13%) were among persons living with HIV; of the 1.5 million deaths attributed to TB in 2013, a total of 360,000 (24%) were among persons living with HIV. ART reduces the incidence of HIV-associated TB disease, and early initiation of ART after the start of TB treatment reduces progression of HIV infection and death among HIV-positive TB patients. To assess the progress in scaling up ART provision among HIV-positive TB patients in 19 countries in sub-Saharan Africa with high TB and HIV burdens, TB and HIV data collected by the World Health Organization (WHO) were reviewed. The results found that the percentage of HIV-positive TB patients receiving ART increased from 37% in 2010 to 69% in 2013. However, many TB cases among persons who are HIV-positive go unreported, and only 38% of the estimated number of HIV-positive new TB patients received ART in 2013. Although progress has been made, the combination of TB and HIV continues to pose a threat to global health, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25426652

  14. Understanding HIV-positive patients' preferences for healthcare services: a protocol for a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Youssef, Elaney; Cooper, Vanessa; Miners, Alec; Llewellyn, Carrie; Pollard, Alex; Lagarde, Mylene; Sachikonye, Memory; Sabin, Caroline; Foreman, Claire; Perry, Nicky; Nixon, Eileen; Fisher, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction While the care of HIV-positive patients, including the detection and management of comorbidities, has historically been provided in HIV specialist outpatient clinics, recent years have seen a greater involvement of non-HIV specialists and general practitioners (GPs). The aim of this study is to determine whether patients would prefer to see their GP or HIV physician given general symptoms, and to understand what aspects of care influence their preferences. Methods/analysis We have developed and piloted a discrete choice experiment (DCE) to better understand patients' preferences for care of non-HIV-related acute symptoms. The design of the DCE was informed by our exploratory research, including the findings of a systematic literature review and a qualitative study. Additional questionnaire items have been included to measure demographics, service use and experience of non-HIV illnesses and quality of life (EQ5D). We plan to recruit 1000 patients from 14 HIV clinics across South East England. Data will be analysed using random-effects logistic regression and latent class analysis. ORs and 95% CIs will be used to estimate the relative importance of each of the attribute levels. Latent class analysis will identify whether particular groups of people value the service attribute levels differently. Ethics/dissemination Ethical approval for this study was obtained from the Newcastle and North Tyneside Research Ethics Committee (reference number 14/NE/1193). The results will be disseminated at national and international conferences and peer-reviewed publications. A study report, written in plain English, will be made available to all participants. The Patient Advisory Group will develop a strategy for wider dissemination of the findings to patients and the public. PMID:27431895

  15. Factors Associated with Length of Hospital Stay among HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients with Tuberculosis in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gonçalves, Maria Jacirema Ferreira; Ferreira, Alaidistania A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Identify and analyze the factors associated to length of hospital stay among HIV positive and HIV negative patients with tuberculosis in Manaus city, state of Amazonas, Brazil, in 2010. Methods Epidemiological study with primary data obtained from monitoring of hospitalized patients with tuberculosis in Manaus. Data were collected by interviewing patients and analyzing medical records, according to the following study variables age, sex, co-morbidities, education, race, income, lifestyle, history of previous treatment or hospitalization due to tuberculosis, treatment regimen, adverse reactions, smear test, clinical form, type of discharge, and length of hospital stay. The associated factors were identified through chi-square or t-Student test at a 5% significance level. Results Income from 1 to 3 minimum wages (P = 0.028), pulmonary tuberculosis form (P = 0.011), negative smear test or no information in this regard (P = 0.014), initial 6-month treatment scheme (P = 0.029), and adverse drug reactions (P = 0.021) were associated to prolonged hospital stay in HIV positive patients. Conclusion We found out that although there were no significant differences in the length of hospital stay in HIV positive patients, all factors significantly associated to prolonged hospital stay occurred in this group of patients. This finding corroborates other studies indicating the severity of tuberculosis in HIV patients, which may also contribute to lengthen their hospital stay. PMID:23593227

  16. Trends and Predictors of Mortality Among HIV Positive Patients in the Era of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Rubaihayo, John; Tumwesigye, Nazarius M.; Konde-Lule, Joseph; Makumbi, Fredrick; Nakku, Edith J.; Wamani, Henry; Etukoit, Michael B.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of mortality trends and predictors among HIV-positive patients in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource poor settings is still limited. The aim of this study was to describe trends and predictors of mortality among HIV-positive patients in the era of HAART in Uganda. Data from 2004 to 2013 for adult HIV-positive patients (≥15 years) obtaining care and treatment from the AIDS Support Organization in Uganda were reviewed for mortality. Descriptive statistics were analyzed by frequencies and cross tabulations. Calendar period was used as a proxy measure for HAART exposure and a time plot of the proportion of HIV-positive patients reporting dead per year was used to describe the trends. Logistic regression was used to determine the predictors of mortality at bivariate and multivariate levels, respectively. We included in the analysis 95,857 HIV positive patients; 64% were female with median age of 33 years (interquartile range 27-40). Of these 36,133 (38%) were initiated on ART and a total of 4279 (4.5%) died; 19.5% (835/4279) of those who died had an opportunistic infection. Overall, mortality first increased between 2004 and 2006 and thereafter substantially declined (X2trend=211.9, P<0.001). Mortality was relatively higher in Eastern Uganda compared to other geographical areas. Male gender, older age (>45 years), being from Eastern or Northern Uganda, having none or primary education, being unemployed, advanced immunodeficiency (CD4 count <100 cell/µL or WHO stage III or IV) and underweight (<45 kg weight) at HAART initiation and calendar period 2004-2008 were significant predictors of mortality (P<0.001). Overall, the expanding coverage of HAART is associated with a declining trend in mortality among HIV positive patients in Uganda. However, mortality trends differed significantly by geographical area and men remain potentially at higher risk of death probably because of delayed initiation on ART. There is urgent need for

  17. Risk factors and assessment for cardiovascular disease among HIV-positive patients attending a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Osegbe, Ifeyinwa Dorothy; Soriyan, Oyetunji Olukayode; Ogbenna, Abiola Ann; Okpara, Henry Chima; Azinge, Elaine Chinyere

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiovascular risk factors are prevalent in HIV-positive patients which places them at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). We aimed to determine the risk factors and risk assessment for CVD in HIV-positive patients with and without antiretroviral therapy. Methods This was a cross-sectional study of HIV-positive patients attending the Lagos University Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Anthropometric and blood pressure measurements were performed; fasting lipid profile, plasma glucose, homocysteine and hsCRP were determined, as well as prevalences and risk assessments. Statistical tests were used to compare the groups and p-value <0.05 was considered to be significant. Results 283 subjects were recruited for this study (100 HIV-positive treatment-naive, 100 HIV-positive treated and 83 HIV negative controls). Compared to the controls, mean (sd) values were significantly higher among HIV-treated subjects: waist circumference = 88.7 (10.4), p = 0.035; systolic bp= 124.9 (20.7), p = 0.014; glucose= 5.54 (1.7), p = 0.015; triglyceride= 2.0 (1.2), p < 0.001; homocysteine= 10.9 (8.9-16.2), p = 0.0003; while hsCRP= 2.9 (1.4-11.6), p = 0.002 and HDL-C = 0.9 (0.4), p = < 0.0001 were higher among the HIV-naïve subjects. Likewise, higher prevalences of the risk factors were noted among the HIV-treated subjects except low HDL-C (p < 0.001) and hsCRP (p = 0.03) which were higher in the HIV-naïve group. Risk assessment using ratios showed high risk for CVD especially in the HIV-naïve group. The median range for Framingham risk assessment was 1.0 - 7.5%. Conclusion Risk factors and risk assessment for CVD are increased in HIV-positive patients with and without antiretroviral therapy. Routine evaluation and risk assessment for CVD irrespective of therapy status is necessary to prevent future cardiovascular events. PMID:27347295

  18. Observations on two cases of apparent submandibular gland cysts in HIV positive patients: MR and CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesman, R.I.; Som, P.M.; Mester, J.; Silvers, A.R.

    1996-05-01

    To present two cases of probable lymphoepithelial cysts of the submandibular glands in patients who were human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive and who also had lymphoepithelial cysts of the parotid glands. Computed tomography and MRI of two HIV positive patients with lymphoepithelial cysts of the parotid glands and cysts in tile submandibular glands were correlated with the histories and the possible presence of other known causes of submandibular gland multiple cysts. Because of the present treatment philosophy regarding HIV positive patients with major salivary gland cysts, surgical resection of these glands was not performed. All other known causes of multiple submandibular gland cysts were excluded by either history or laboratory data. Computed tomography and MRI on two patients with known HIV infection and bilateral parotid lymphoepithelial cysts are presented. Both patients also had bilateral multiple submandibular gland cysts and no evidence of obstructive glandular diseases autoimmune disease, or other organ system cysts. These cases of presumed submandibular gland lymphoepithelial cysts are rare in the literature. They are presented in the hope that other radiologists will be stimulated to document the occurrence of this entity. 22 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Chronic sorrow in the HIV-positive patient: issues of race, gender, and social support.

    PubMed

    Lichtenstein, Bronwen; Laska, Mary K; Clair, Jeffrey M

    2002-01-01

    This study used Olshansky's (1962) concept of chronic sorrow to examine social support needs of 21 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men and women in a southern U.S. city. The methods of inquiry consisted of narrative interviews and a quantitative assessment of depression (the Center of Epidemiological Studies on Depression [CES-D] Scale). This combined approach indicated that chronic sorrow in HIV-positive persons is related to illness, fear of death, poverty, and social isolation, especially for women with children. More than half of the subjects scored as depressed, with African American women scoring significantly higher than Caucasian men or women. Social isolation often resulted from the effects of stigma, as framed in Erving Goffman's theory of discredited identity. The women were likely to be stigmatized because of their association with "dirty sex," contagion, and moral threat in heterosexual communities. Most of the men had been protected from the worst effects of stigma because of their ties to the gay community and associated health networks. Based on these preliminary findings, stigma should be considered a marker of chronic depression in the HIV-positive, and support services should take account of the stigmatizing contexts of HIV-positive persons. PMID:11839216

  20. Subtypes of depressive symptoms and inflammatory biomarkers: An exploratory study on a sample of HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Norcini Pala, A; Steca, P; Bagrodia, R; Helpman, L; Colangeli, V; Viale, P; Wainberg, M L

    2016-08-01

    Depressive symptoms cause major impairment and may accelerate HIV progression despite the use of antiretroviral medication. The somatic symptoms criteria for HIV infection and depression partially overlap, which can make differential diagnosis challenging. Because of chronic inflammation caused by HIV infection, HIV-positive patients may develop somatic and affective-cognitive symptoms of depression. Inflammation-related depression is primarily characterized with severe somatic symptoms such as fatigue and sleep disturbance. This study sought to explore the patterns of somatic and cognitive-affective depressive symptoms that characterize HIV-positive patients. Our specific aims were (1) to identify subtypes of depressive symptoms in a sample of HIV-positive patients; and (2) to test the subtypes' difference on inflammatory and HIV disease progression biomarkers. HIV-positive men and women (N=102) with and without depressive symptoms were randomly selected from an Italian HIV clinic. Depressive symptoms (PHQ-9), viral load (VL), CD4+, Il-6, TNF-α, and monocytes were assessed. The three subtypes formed using Latent Class Analysis (LCA) identified patients with (1) severe cognitive-affective and somatic depressive symptoms; (2) severe/moderate somatic symptoms; and (3) absent or low depressive symptoms. The subtype with severe/moderate somatic symptoms was characterized with elevated levels of Il-6 and monocytes. No difference on HIV progression biomarkers was found. The subtypes of depressive symptoms might help differentiating depressive symptoms from HIV- and inflammatory-related somatic symptoms. When present, cognitive-affective and/or somatic symptoms cause significant impairment to patients' lives and thus warrant further assessment and treatment. PMID:26883521

  1. An observational study of comorbidity and healthcare utilisation among HIV-positive patients aged 50 years and over.

    PubMed

    Patel, Roshani; Moore, Thomas; Cooper, Vanessa; McArdle, Conor; Perry, Nicky; Cheek, Elizabeth; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fisher, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The number of HIV-positive people aged ≥50 years is rising each year. We measured the prevalence of non-infectious illnesses and their risk factors and described healthcare use in this UK population. A cross-sectional, observational study was conducted at an outpatient HIV specialist clinic in south east England. Patients age ≥50 years were invited to complete questionnaires measuring demographics, non-infectious illnesses, medication use, lifestyle and healthcare utilisation. The response rate was 67%. Of 299 participants, 84% reported ≥1 comorbid condition and 61% reported ≥2 (multimorbidity). Most commonly reported were high cholesterol, sexual dysfunction, hypertension and depression. In multivariate analyses, age, number of years HIV-positive and duration of antiretroviral therapy remained significant predictors of comorbidity when controlling for lifestyle factors (exercise, smoking and use of recreational drugs and alcohol). Use of non-HIV healthcare services was associated with increasing comorbidity, a longer duration of HIV and recreational drug use. The majority of HIV-patients aged ≥50 years reported multiple comorbidities and this was associated with polypharmacy and increased use of non-HIV services. Further research examining the quality, safety and patient experience of healthcare is needed to inform development of services to optimally meet the needs of older HIV-positive patients. PMID:26068965

  2. Prevalence of hepatitis B and C viruses in HIV-positive patients in China: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Jing; Han, Yang; Qiu, Zhifeng; Li, Yijia; Li, Yanling; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Huanling; Thio, Chloe L; Li, Taisheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Liver disease related to hepatitis B (HBV) and hepatitis C (HCV) may temper the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in China. Limited data exist on their prevalence in HIV-positive Chinese. A multi-centre, cross-sectional study was carried out to determine the prevalence and disease characteristics of HBV and HCV co-infection in HIV-positive patients across 12 provinces. Methods HIV-positive ART-naïve patients were recruited from two parent cohorts established during November 2008–January 2010 and August 2012–September 2014. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), hepatitis B e antigen and HCV antibody (anti-HCV) status were retrieved from parent databases at the visit prior to ART initiation. HBV DNA was then determined in HBsAg+ patients. HCV RNA was quantified in anti-HCV+ patients. Aspartate aminotransferase-to-platelet ratio index (APRI) and the fibrosis-4 (FIB4) were calculated. Chi-square test, Kruskal–Wallis test and logistic regression were used for statistical analysis, as appropriate. Results Of 1944 HIV-positive patients, 186 (9.5%) were HIV–HBV co-infected and 161 (8.3%) were HIV–HCV co-infected. The highest HIV–HBV prevalence (14.5%) was in Eastern China while the highest HIV–HCV prevalence was in the Central region (28.2%). HIV–HBV patients had lower median CD4 + T cell count (205 cells/μL) than either HIV monoinfected (242 cells/μL, P=0.01) or HIV–HCV patients (274 cells/μL, P=0.001). Moderate-to-significant liver disease was present in >65% of the HIV–HCV, ~35% of the HIV–HBV and ~20% of the HIV monoinfected patients. Independent associations with moderate-to-significant liver disease based on APRI included HBV (Odds ratio, OR 2.37, P < 0.001), HCV (OR 9.64, P<0.001), CD4 count≤200 cells/μL (OR 2.55, P<0.001) and age ≥30 years (OR 1.80, P=0.001). Conclusions HBV and HCV prevalence is high in HIV-positive Chinese and differs by geographic region. HBV and HCV co-infection and HIV monoinfection are risks

  3. Predictive and prognostic properties of TB-LAM among HIV-positive patients initiating ART in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    d'Elia, Alexander; Evans, Denise; McNamara, Lynne; Berhanu, Rebecca; Sanne, Ian; Lönnermark, Elisabet

    2015-01-01

    While the diagnostic properties of the TB LAM urine assay (LAM) have been well-described, little is known about its predictive and prognostic properties at ART initiation in a routine clinic setting. We describe the predictive and prognostic properties of LAM in HIV-positive patients initiating ART at an urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa. Retrospective study of HIV-positive adults (>18 years) who initiated standard first-line ART between February 2012 and April 2013 and had a LAM test at initiation. In HIV-positive patients with no known TB at ART initiation, we assessed the sensitivity, specificity and positive/negative likelihood ratios of LAM to predict incident TB within 6 months of ART initiation. In addition, in patients with a TB diagnosis and on TB treatment <3 months at ART initiation, we measured the CD4 response at 6 months on ART. Of the 274 patients without TB at ART initiation, 65% were female with median CD4 count of 213 cells/mm3. Among the 14 (5.1%) patients who developed active TB, none were urine LAM +ve at baseline. LAM had poor sensitivity (0.0% 95% CI 0.00-23.2) to predict incident TB within 6 months of initiation. We analyzed 22 patients with a confirmed TB diagnosis at initiation separately. Of these, LAM +ve patients (27%) showed lower CD4 gains compared to LAM negative patients (median increase 103 vs 199 cells/mm3; p = 0.08). LAM has limited value for accurately predicting incident TB in patients with higher CD4 counts after ART initiation. LAM may help identify TB/HIV co-infected patients at ART initiation who respond more slowly to treatment and require targeted interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Larger studies with longer patient follow-up are needed. PMID:26600904

  4. Chinese HIV-positive patients and their healthcare providers: contrasting Confucian versus Western notions of secrecy and support.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ti; Starks, Helene; Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Simoni, Jane; Zhang, Fujie; Pearson, Cynthia; Zhao, Hongxin

    2007-01-01

    In this qualitative study, 29 HIV-positive, Chinese patients reported highly favorable impressions of their healthcare providers, who were seen as providing important medical-related, financial, and emotional support. Generally, the patient-provider relationship positively impacted the participants and their ability to maintain their health and was especially critical when patients were isolated from familial sources of support due to intense AIDS stigma. Often family members were informed of an HIV diagnosis before the patient, revealing tensions between Confucian principles of collectivism and familial authority and increasingly prevalent Western ideals of individual autonomy and the privileged status of personal health information. PMID:18025868

  5. HIV generations? Generational discourse in interviews with Australian general practitioners and their HIV positive gay male patients.

    PubMed

    Newman, Christy; Mao, Limin; Canavan, Peter G; Kidd, Michael R; Saltman, Deborah C; Kippax, Susan C

    2010-06-01

    The introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) is typically represented as a turning point in the social and medical history of HIV/AIDS, leading to a conceptual division into pre- and post-HAART eras. This paper explores how generational discourse is produced in interviews with general practitioners (GPs) and their HIV positive gay male patients in making sense of this moment and related changes in the Australian HIV epidemic. A theme of 'HIV generations' was identified in in-depth interviews with GPs who have HIV medication prescribing rights (based in Sydney, Adelaide and rural-coastal New South Wales) and the HIV positive gay men who attend their practices. In a closer analysis, generational discourse was identified across the interviews with GPs, characterising pre- and post-HAART HIV generations through three main features: treatment histories, socioeconomic status, and modes of survivorship. While generational discourse was less common in the accounts of HIV positive gay men, many of their examples wove together two narrative forms - 'a different time' and 'difference today' - suggesting that concepts of time and inequity are deeply embedded in these men's understandings of the HIV experience. Our analysis indicates that generational concepts play a significant role in shaping both professional and 'lay' understandings of changes and patterns in the HIV epidemic. PMID:20347197

  6. Long-term outcomes of oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients: A retrospective case series

    PubMed Central

    Gay-Escoda, Cosme; Pérez-Álvarez, Débora; Camps-Font, Octavi

    2016-01-01

    Background The existing information on oral rehabilitations with dental implants in VIH-positive patients is scarce and of poor quality. Moreover, no long-term follow-up studies are available. Hence, the aims of this study were to describe the long-term survival and success rates of dental implants in a group of HIV-positive patients and to identify the most common postoperative complications, including peri-implant diseases. Material and Methods A retrospective case series of HIV-positive subjects treated with dental implants at the School of Dentistry of the University of Barcelona (Spain) was studied. Several clinical parameters were registered, including CD4 cell count, viral load and surgical complications. Additionally, the patients were assessed for implant survival and success rates and for the prevalence of peri-implant diseases. A descriptive statistical analysis of the data was performed. Results Nine participants (57 implants) were included. The patients’ median age was 42 years (IQR=13.5 years). The implant survival and success rates were 98.3% and 68.4%, respectively, with a mean follow-up of 77.5 months (SD=16.1 months). The patient-based prevalence of peri-implant mucositis and peri-implantitis were 22.2% and 44.4% respectively at the last appointment. Patients that attended regular periodontal maintenance visits had significantly less mean bone loss than non-compliant patients (1.3 mm and 3.9 mm respectively). Conclusions Oral rehabilitation with dental implants in HIV-positive patients seems to provide satisfactory results. In order to reduce the considerably high prevalence of peri-implant diseases, strict maintenance programmes must be implemented. Key words:HIV infection, dental implants, oral implantology, complications, peri-implantitis, peri-implant diseases. PMID:26946205

  7. Respiratory failure associated with the lipodystrophy syndrome in an HIV-positive patient with compromised lung function.

    PubMed

    Press, N; Montessori, V; Bai, T R; Montaner, J

    2001-01-01

    Protease inhibitors, used as treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, are associated with a syndrome of peripheral lipodystrophy, central adiposity, hyperlipidemia and insulin resistance. An HIV-positive patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is presented who developed the lipodystrophy syndrome that is associated with the use of protease inhibitors. It is postulated that the lipodystrophy syndrome further compromised his lung function, leading to respiratory failure. Patients who have pulmonary disease and are taking protease inhibitors require monitoring of clinical status and pulmonary function tests. PMID:11521144

  8. Depletion of neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsy specimens from HIV positive patients.

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, J. B.; Batman, P. A.; Miller, A. R.; Sedgwick, P. M.; Griffin, G. E.

    1992-01-01

    AIMS: To compare the density of neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsy specimens from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected individuals with that of a control group. METHODS: Neuroendocrine cells in rectal biopsies were identified using an immunohistochemical stain for chromogranin and subsequently quantified using a method of linear intercept. RESULTS: Neuroendocrine cells were found to be significantly decreased in the HIV positive group. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of neuroendocrine cells may contribute to apoptotic bodies seen in this condition. This could be related to infection of these cells with HIV and could contribute to diarrhoeal disease in HIV infection. Images PMID:1624601

  9. Recovery of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in respiratory specimens from HIV positive patients being evaluated for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, R. L.; Doherty, J. J.; Zimmerman, L. H.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Despite the immune suppression, frequent hospital admissions, and many intercurrent illnesses associated with HIV infection, Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been cited relatively infrequently as a respiratory pathogen in HIV positive patients. METHODS--The microbiological isolates, medical records, radiographic reports, and laboratory data from 224 patients undergoing sputum induction and/or bronchoalveolar lavage for evaluation of respiratory symptoms suspicious for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) from 1989 to 1992 were reviewed retrospectively. RESULTS--An increasing number of respiratory isolates with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was found over this time period. Eighteen of the 224 patients were identified in whom P aeruginosa was recovered on at least one occasion. These patients were more likely to have a history of smoking and prior PCP than those in whom Pseudomonas was not recovered. Mean CD4 counts were also significantly lower in these patients. CONCLUSIONS--Pseudomonas aeruginosa may be recovered from a substantial number of respiratory isolates from HIV positive patients suspected of having PCP. The prevalence of this phenomenon may be increasing. PMID:7597670

  10. Emergence of co-infection of visceral leishmaniasis in HIV-positive patients in northeast Iran: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Reza; Mohebali, Mehdi; Akhoundi, Behnaz; Galian, Meysam Sharifdini; Kalantar, Fathollah; Ashkan, Saeedeh; Fata, Abdolmajid; Farash, Bibi Razieh Hosseini; Ghasemian, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) serosurvey was carried out on 49 HIV/AIDS patients among 500 asymptomatic HIV/infected patients who registered in the Khorasan Razavi Province during the last 14 years. HIV infections were detected by ELISA and confirmed using western blot assay at the AIDS centre of the Khorasan Razavi Province. All collected sera were screened using the direct agglutination test (DAT). The sera with anti-Leishmania infantum antibodies at a titre of 1:100 were considered positive for VL infection and serum titration was performed from 1:100 to 1:102,400. Nine (18.4%) patients were sero-positive according to DAT. The distribution of sera titrations were as follows: 1:100 (n = 6) 1:1600 (n = 1); 1:25,600 (n = 1) and 1:102,400 (n = 1). All sero-positive cases showed clinical signs and symptoms. The most predominant signs and symptoms of co-infection of visceral leishmaniasis in HIV-positive patients were pneumonia (n = 2), hepatosplenomegaly (n = 2), lymphadenopathy (n = 2), anaemia (n = 1), prolonged fever (n = 1) and cachexia (n = 1). Our finding shows that VL (or kala-azar) is an opportunistic disease in HIV-positive patients that may be occurred in VL endemic areas of Iran. PMID:24100200

  11. Bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma and bilateral gigantomastia in HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Saumya; Mishra, Anand K; Tewari, S; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Accessory breast is a rare entity that can present as asymptomatic masses or can cause symptoms like heaviness, pain, restriction of arm movement and limitation in daily pursuits with allied apprehension and anxiety for the patient. We present a case of bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma in a 28 years, nulliparous, Indian woman who is HIV positive, which proves to be a diagnostic dilemma. Excisional biopsy was diagnostic. The rarity of such cases imposes challenges on the management in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options. PMID:23813993

  12. Bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma and bilateral gigantomastia in HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Saumya; Mishra, Anand K; Tewari, S; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2013-01-01

    Accessory breast is a rare entity that can present as asymptomatic masses or can cause symptoms like heaviness, pain, restriction of arm movement and limitation in daily pursuits with allied apprehension and anxiety for the patient. We present a case of bilateral axillary masses mimicking as accessory breast with multiple fibroadenoma in a 28 years, nulliparous, Indian woman who is HIV positive, which proves to be a diagnostic dilemma. Excisional biopsy was diagnostic. The rarity of such cases imposes challenges on the management in terms of diagnosis, prognosis and therapeutic options. PMID:23813993

  13. Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS) and dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) bone analysis in adult HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Clò, Alberto; Gibellini, Davide; Damiano, Davide; Vescini, Fabio; Ponti, Cristina; Morini, Silvia; Miserocchi, Anna; Musumeci, Giuseppina; Calza, Leonardo; Colangeli, Vincenzo; Viale, Pierluigi; Re, Maria Carla; Borderi, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients have an increased risk of developing osteopenia or osteoporosis compared with healthy individuals. Our aim was to compare dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the gold standard for measuring bone mineral density (BMD), with bone quantitative ultrasound (QUS), an alternative technique for predicting fractures and screening low BMD, at least in postmenopausal populations. We analyzed DXA and QUS parameters to investigate their accuracy in the diagnosis and prediction of bone alterations in a cohort of 224 HIV-1-positive patients. The speed of sound (SOS), broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA) and stiffness index (SI) parameters showed a moderate correlation with DXA, especially with total-body BMD (r coefficient of 0.38, 0.4 and 0.42 respectively), particularly in the female subgroup. In addition, multivariate analysis of HIV-positive patients assessed for vertebral fractures indicated that QUS was more effective than DXA at predicting the risk of fracture. QUS can be used as an additional tool for analyzing bone density in HIV-positive patients and its case of use and low cost make it especially suitable for resource-limited settings where DXA is not employed. PMID:26147144

  14. Disseminated Kaposi's Sarcoma in an HIV-Positive Patient: A Rare Entity in an Indian Patient

    PubMed Central

    Behera, Biswanath; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan; Toi, Pampa Ch; Vinod, Kolar Vishwanath

    2016-01-01

    AIDS-associated disseminated Kaposi sarcoma (KS) is a rare entity, especially in India due to the low prevalence of human herpes virus-8 infections in Indian population. Due to its rapid and progressive nature, early diagnosis and institution of highly active antiretroviral therapy is crucial in AIDS-associated KS, with a view to achieving favorable prognosis. We report a case of disseminated KS in an HIV-1 positive patient, who presented with two months history of multiple violaceous patches and plaques over the trunk, bilateral upper limbs, lower limbs, and hard palate. The patient died of recurrent massive pleural effusion before starting antiretroviral therapy. This case is being reported due to the paucity of KS in the Indian literature, especially the disseminated type and to highlight its rapidly progressive course which can be fatal. PMID:27293276

  15. Ethical and scientific issues surrounding solid organ transplantation in HIV-positive patients: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

    PubMed

    Christie, Timothy; Jiwani, Bashir; Asrat, Getnet; Montessori, Valentina; Mathias, Richard; Montaner, Julio

    2006-01-01

    End-stage liver disease is emerging as a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients. Historically, an HIV diagnosis was a contraindication for a liver transplant; however, because of the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-positive patients have one-year, two-year, and three-year post-transplantation survival rates similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Based on this evidence, HIV-positive patients are now considered eligible for transplantation. However, newly emerging guidelines include the stipulation that HIV-positive patients must be on HAART to be placed on a waiting list for transplantation. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the scientific and ethical probity of requiring HIV-positive patients to be on HAART as a condition for being on a liver transplant waiting list. It is argued that the emphasis should be placed on the probability of post-transplantation HAART tolerance, and that concerns about pretransplantation HAART tolerance are of secondary importance. PMID:18418478

  16. Who is not using condoms among HIV-positive patients in treatment in the largest city in Brazil?

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Luciana Donola; Malbergier, André

    2015-01-01

    Data on risky sexual behaviors in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) is still scarce in some populations around the world. The purpose of this study was to assess the factors associated with the use of condoms in a representative sample of PLWHA in outpatient treatment in the city of São Paulo. Six hundred and sixty-seven HIV-positive patients (383 men and 284 women) who were being treated at eight centers participated in this study. Data were collected using a sociodemographic survey, the Beck depression and anxiety inventories, a survey of alcohol and other drugs use, the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, a sexual behavior survey, and the Sexual Risk Behavior Assessment Schedule. The majority of study participants were sexually active (almost 62% of the sample had at least one sexual partner in the last three months), and at least one-fourth engaged in unsafe sex (25.3% did not use condoms during at least one instance of anal and/or vaginal intercourse in the past three months). Multivariate logistic regression showed that engaging in unprotected sex was more likely among females (p < .001), persons with an HIV-positive partner (p < .001), and people using cannabis before sex (p = .002). These findings should stimulate health-care workers to create specific groups for women, seroconcordant couples, and cannabis users to discuss condom use, as they seem to be vulnerable groups. PMID:25495898

  17. Effects of cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence on adherence to antiretroviral therapy among HIV-positive patients in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung T P; Tran, Bach X; Hwang, Lu Y; Markham, Christine M; Swartz, Michael D; Vidrine, Jennifer I; Phan, Huong T T; Latkin, Carl A; Vidrine, Damon J

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is increasingly recognized as an indicator for inferior adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) among HIV-positive patients. Given the limited body of work on this issue, we aimed to explore the relations between cigarette smoking, nicotine dependence, and ART adherence in Vietnam. A cross-sectional study of 1050 HIV-positive people was conducted from January to September 2013 in Hanoi (the capital) and Nam Dinh (a rural city). Adherence to ART during the last 30 days was measured by the 100-point visual analog scale (VAS). Smoking history and nicotine dependence (Fagerstrom Test of Nicotine Dependence) were self-reported by participants. Multiple logistic regression was performed to examine the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with ART nonadherence. Using the established VAS cut point of 95 to indicate adequate adherence, the prevalence of ART nonadherence was 30.9%. Approximately 35.5% of the sample reported current smoking. No association between smoking status and ART nonadherence was found. However, participants with greater nicotine dependence (OR = 1.1, 95%CI = 1.0-1.2 per unit increase) were more likely to be nonadherent. Also, individuals who were female (OR = 1.70, 95%CI = 1.19-2.42), receiving ART in Nam Dinh (OR = 1.6, 95%CI = 1.1-2.4), and currently feeling anxiety (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.2-2.1) had a higher likelihood of ART nonadherence. Additionally, current smokers reporting current pain (OR = 1.9, 95%CI = 1.2-3.1) were more likely to be nonadherent. Conversely, protective factors included living with a spouse/partner (OR = 0.5, 95%CI = 0.3-0.7) and having more than a high school education (OR = 0.4, 95%CI = 0.1-1.0). Given the high prevalence of suboptimal adherence and current smoking among HIV-positive patients, screening for smoking status and nicotine dependence during ART treatment may help to improve patients' adherence to medication. More efforts

  18. Prevalence of antibodies against Treponema pallidum among HIV-positive patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mata-Marín, José Antonio; Sandoval-Sánchez, Juan Joel; Huerta-García, Gloria; Arroyo-Anduiza, Carla Ileana; Alcalá-Martínez, Enrique; Mata-Marín, Luis Alberto; Sandoval-Ramirez, Jorge Luis; Gaytán-Martínez, Jesús

    2015-02-01

    Our objective was to determine the seroprevalence of syphilis among HIV-infected patients in a tertiary care hospital in Mexico City. A cross-sectional study was developed, and 318 HIV-positive patients were evaluated from January to February 2013 at Hospital de Infectología, National Medical Center 'La Raza' (a tertiary care hospital specialising in infectious diseases in Mexico City). Laboratory data were screened for the detection of antibodies against Treponema pallidum. Patients completed a questionnaire relating to socio-demographic data and factors associated with syphilis. Of the 318 patients, 83% were men. The mean age ± SD was 36 ± 11 years; 52% were men who have sex with men and 47% had undertaken higher education. The overall seroprevalence of syphilis among these patients was 25% (95% confidence interval 21%, 30%). Men who have sex with men had a significantly higher seroprevalence (30% vs. 15%, p = 0.009). We conclude that, in Mexico, there is a high seroprevalence of syphilis antibodies in HIV-infected patients and that men who have sex with men are the group most affected. PMID:24713227

  19. Spoligotype profile of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex strains from HIV-positive and -negative patients in Nigeria: a comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    Cadmus, Simeon; Hill, Véronique; van Soolingen, Dick; Rastogi, Nalin

    2011-01-01

    We ran a comparative analysis of all patients for whom a positive culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was available between April 2004 and October 2005 and whose HIV serology results were known, with spoligotyping results (n = 163) split into 49 HIV-positive patients and 114 HIV-negative patients. Spoligotype international type 373 (SIT373) (T1 lineage), which was highly prevalent among the HIV(+) patients, was totally absent from the HIV(-) population, suggesting that we had a specific clone affecting nearly 1/3 of all HIV-tuberculosis (TB)-coinfected patients. Among the LAM10-CAM sublineage strains, we had only a single strain of SIT403 among HIV(-) patients (0.88%), as opposed to 12.25% of the HIV(+) population (χ(2) = 10.77; P < 0.01), indicating a strong association between the strain and the HIV(+) population. The LAM10-CAM lineage spoligotype SIT61 was prevalent among the 2 subsets (37.72% in HIV(-) versus 12.24% in HIV(+) populations), though, with a significant difference between the 2 groups (χ(2) = 10.53; P < 0.01). However, there was no significant difference for SIT53 (T1 lineage) in the 2 subsets: 6.14 versus 8.2% (χ(2) = 0.22; P > 0.05). A total of 7/49, or 14.3%, other SITs among HIV(+) patients were not found among the HIV(-) patients. When added to the most prevalent SIT among HIV(+) patients (SIT373; n = 16), 23/49, or 47%, isolates among HIV-TB-coinfected patients were unique. We conclude that further studies should be carried out to investigate the evolution of these genotypes and others in the emergence of multidrug resistance and control of tuberculosis in Nigeria. PMID:21048016

  20. Survey of both hepatitis B virus (HBsAg) and hepatitis C virus (HCV-Ab) coinfection among HIV positive patients

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background HIV, HBVand HCV is major public health concerns. Because of shared routes of transmission, HIV-HCV coinfection and HIV-HBV coinfection are common. HIV-positive individuals are at risk of coinfection with HBV and HCV infections. The prevalence rates of coinfection with HBV and HCV in HIV-patients have been variable worldwide depending on the geographic regions, and the type of exposure. Aim This study aimed to examine HBV and HCV coinfection serologically and determine the shared and significant factors in the coinfection of HIV-positive patients. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was carried out on 391 HIV-positive patients including 358 males and 33 females in Lorestan province, west Iran, to survey coinfection with HBsAg and anti-HCV. The retrospective demographic data of the subjects was collected and the patients' serums were analyzed by ELISA kits including HBsAg and anti-HCV. The collected data was analyzed with SPSS software (15) and Chi-square. Fisher's exact test with 5% error intervals was used to measure the correlation of variables and infection rates. Results The results of the study indicated that the prevalence of coinfection in HIV-positive patients with hepatitis viruses was 94.4% (370 in 391), out of whom 57 (14.5%) cases were HBsAg positive, 282 (72%) cases were anti-HCV positive, and 31 (7.9%) cases were both HBsAg and anti-HCV positive. Conclusion There was a significant correlation between coinfection with HCV and HBV and/or both among HIV-positive patients depending on different variables including sex, age, occupation, marital status, exposure to risk factors.(p < 0.001). PMID:19922624

  1. Effect of Vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation on neuropsychiatric symptoms and immune response in HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Prabha M.; Chowta, Mukta N.; Ramapuram, John T.; Rao, Satish B.; Udupa, Karthik; Acharya, Sahana D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Micronutrients such as B12 and folic acid deficiencies are found in higher number in HIV-infected patients. Objective: We conducted a study to examine the effect of Vitamin B12 and folic acid supplementation on neuropsychiatric manifestations, CD4 count, and anthropometric measurements in HIV-positive patients. Materials and Methods: Three different groups of HIV patients, namely, HIV patients with tuberculosis, HIV patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations, and asymptomatic HIV patients with 50 patients in each group were included in the study. Baseline and follow-up CD4 count, anthropometric measurements, neuropsychiatric assessments, Vitamin B12, and folic acid estimation were done. Results: The prevalence of folic acid deficiency was 27.1% in Group I, 31.9% in Group II, and 23.4% in Group III. The prevalence of Vitamin B12 deficiency was 8.16% in Group I, 6.12% in Group II, and 4.16% in Group III. HIV patients with neuropsychiatric manifestations were noted to have the lowest mean mini–mental score. After the supplementation of vitamins, anthropometric measurements, MMSE as well as Hamilton depression scores, improved in all the three groups whereas Hamilton anxiety scores improved only in Group III. The CD4 count also improved in Groups I and II after the supplementation of vitamins. Conclusion: Folic acid deficiency was highest among neuropsychiatric patients. The majority of people who had a folic acid deficiency have shown improvement in their neuropsychiatric assessment scores as well as CD4 count after its supplementation. PMID:27365952

  2. Hepatitis C in HIV-positive patients--treatment and liver disease outcomes.

    PubMed

    Adeyemi, Oluwatoyin M

    2007-01-01

    Many human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected persons are coinfected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, liver disease from HCV has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality. The current guidelines recommend that human immunodeficiency virus and HCV coinfected patients be evaluated and treated for HCV if there are no major contraindications to treatment. Coinfected patients treated with pegylated interferon-a and ribavirin have sustained virologic responses (SVRs) of 27% to 40% which for a variety of reasons are lower than those reported in HCV mono-infected patients. Understanding that most patients will not achieve SVRs, strategies to evaluate for the role of maintenance interferon in delaying complications of liver disease are being evaluated. In patients who have failed prior treatment, cannot tolerate treatment, or who have contraindications to HCV treatment, the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy with careful monitoring for hepatotoxicity and aggressive counseling on alcohol and substance abuse may slow down fibrosis progression. As the data on liver transplantation in coinfected patients accumulate, patients with end stage liver disease should be referred early for evaluation in a transplant center. As new drugs for HCV are being developed, it will be of utmost importance to include coinfected patients earlier in the process on new drug trials and therapeutic strategies. PMID:17198069

  3. Cause-Specific Mortality in HIV-Positive Patients Who Survived Ten Years after Starting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    May, Margaret T.; Vehreschild, Janne; Obel, Niels; Gill, Michael John; Crane, Heidi; Boesecke, Christoph; Samji, Hasina; Grabar, Sophie; Cazanave, Charles; Cavassini, Matthias; Shepherd, Leah; d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Smit, Colette; Saag, Michael; Lampe, Fiona; Hernando, Vicky; Montero, Marta; Zangerle, Robert; Justice, Amy C.; Sterling, Timothy; Miro, Jose; Ingle, Suzanne; Sterne, Jonathan A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To estimate mortality rates and prognostic factors in HIV-positive patients who started combination antiretroviral therapy between 1996–1999 and survived for more than ten years. Methods We used data from 18 European and North American HIV cohort studies contributing to the Antiretroviral Therapy Cohort Collaboration. We followed up patients from ten years after start of combination antiretroviral therapy. We estimated overall and cause-specific mortality rate ratios for age, sex, transmission through injection drug use, AIDS, CD4 count and HIV-1 RNA. Results During 50,593 person years 656/13,011 (5%) patients died. Older age, male sex, injecting drug use transmission, AIDS, and low CD4 count and detectable viral replication ten years after starting combination antiretroviral therapy were associated with higher subsequent mortality. CD4 count at ART start did not predict mortality in models adjusted for patient characteristics ten years after start of antiretroviral therapy. The most frequent causes of death (among 340 classified) were non-AIDS cancer, AIDS, cardiovascular, and liver-related disease. Older age was strongly associated with cardiovascular mortality, injecting drug use transmission with non-AIDS infection and liver-related mortality, and low CD4 and detectable viral replication ten years after starting antiretroviral therapy with AIDS mortality. Five-year mortality risk was <5% in 60% of all patients, and in 30% of those aged over 60 years. Conclusions Viral replication, lower CD4 count, prior AIDS, and transmission via injecting drug use continue to predict higher all-cause and AIDS-related mortality in patients treated with combination antiretroviral therapy for over a decade. Deaths from AIDS and non-AIDS infection are less frequent than deaths from other non-AIDS causes. PMID:27525413

  4. Is hand-grip another culprit for the risk of fractures in HIV-positive patients?

    PubMed

    Postorino, Maria Concetta; Torti, Carlo; Carè, Ilaria; Pisani, Vincenzo; Strazzulla, Alessio; Vaccaro, Vittoria; Costa, Chiara; Provenzano, Francesco; Mazzitelli, Maria; Pujia, Arturo; Montalcini, Tiziana

    2016-01-01

    Risk of bone fractures in patients with HIV infection is greater than in the general population, particularly in those co-infected with hepatitis viruses. We compared bone mineral density (BMD) and muscular strength, measured by hand grip test (HG), in HIV mono-infected and co-infected patients. T-score values were lower in HIV patients co-infected with hepatitis viruses vs. mono-infected individuals. Since no significant correlations between HG and T-scores were found, we hypothesize that these factors belong, at least in part, to independent pathways, so both should be taken into account as risks for fragility fractures. Larger prospective studies are needed to confirm this hypothesis. PMID:26922987

  5. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare brain abscess in HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Karne, Sampada S.; Sangle, Shashikala A.; Kiyawat, Dilip S.; Dharmashale, Sujata N.; Kadam, Dilip B.; Bhardwaj, Renu S.

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterial opportunistic infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality among patients living with HIV (PLHIV) worldwide. Nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection is one of the leading causes of opportunistic infection in patients with advanced acquired immunodeficiency syndrome i.e., with CD4 count less than 50/cu.mm. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is among the most common opportunistic bacterial infections in those patients with advanced immunodeficiency apart from cryptococcal meningitis, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy, etc. Common presentations of mycobacterium avium complex are fever, lymphadenitis and respiratory disease. Immune reconstitution disease is also known to manifest with MAC infections in PLHIV on highly active antiretroviral therapy. Very few cases of central nervous system involvement due to NTM infection have been described. We are reporting a case of advanced acquired immunodeficiency who presented with brain abscess due to Mycobacterium avium intracellulare. PMID:22412276

  6. An interesting case of 'diabetic foot ulcer' in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Venkat; Chima-Okereke, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    Kaposi sarcoma is a highly vascularised tumour affecting the skin, lymph nodes and viscera. Kaposi sarcoma is most common in HIV-infected homosexual or bisexual men. We present here a 70-year-old white British male patient, who was under the care of the podiatric team for longstanding 'diabetic foot ulcers'. He was later referred to the Dermatology team who took a biopsy; this revealed features of Kaposi sarcoma which prompted an HIV test which was positive. This patient had previously presented to several healthcare professionals with symptoms suggestive of HIV infection. He was started on antiretroviral therapy and the HIV and human herpesvirus-8 viral loads became undetectable in the blood within weeks and he showed significant clinical improvement. This case report is a reminder to clinicians to have a high index of suspicion in patients presenting with symptoms and signs suggestive of HIV infection. PMID:24841196

  7. A paradoxical decline: intracranial lesions in two HIV-positive patients recovering from cryptococcal meningitis.

    PubMed

    Pettersen, Kenneth D; Pappas, Peter G; Chin-Hong, Peter; Baxi, Sanjiv M

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcal immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (C-IRIS) is an increasingly important manifestation among patients with HIV/AIDS, especially as the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is expanding worldwide. Cryptococcus and associated C-IRIS are common causes of meningitis. While intracranial lesions are common in HIV/AIDS, they are rarely due to cryptococcosis or C-IRIS. We describe two cases of paradoxical C-IRIS associated with the development of intracranial cryptococcomas in HIV/AIDS. Both patients had an initial episode of cryptococcal meningitis treated with antifungal therapy. At the time, they had initiated or modified ART with subsequent evidence of immune reconstitution. Two months later, they developed aseptic meningitis with intracranial lesions. After exhaustive work ups, both patients were diagnosed with paradoxical C-IRIS and biopsy confirmed intracranial cryptococcomas. We review the important clinical, diagnostic and therapeutic features of cryptococcomas associated with C-IRIS in HIV/AIDS. PMID:26475880

  8. SERUM AND BAL BETA-D-GLUCAN FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF PNEUMOCYSTIS PNEUMONIA IN HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Salerno, D.; Mushatt, D.; Myers, L.; Zhuang, Y.; de la Rua, N.; Calderon, EJ.; Welsh, DA.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis of patients with pulmonary infiltrates and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection remains a challenge. In current clinical practice the gold standard for Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) diagnosis remains the identification of the organism in broncoalveolar lavage (BAL) using microscopy (e.g., silver stain). (1->3)-β -D-glucan (BG) is a polysaccharide that is present within the cell wall of Pneumocystis and other fungi. We analyzed serum and BAL lavage fluid from a cohort of 119 patients that did have HIV, a diagnosis of pneumonia and underwent bronchoscopy (FOB) for diagnosis of PCP. The discriminative power of serum BG for the diagnosis of PCP in this group of patients was very high. Using a cutoff of 300 pg/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 91%, 92%, 89% and 93% respectively. A model for ROC with just serum BG (N = 108) had an AUC of 0.95. Serum procalcitonin (PCT) and BAL BG were not as accurate for the diagnosis of PCP. For BAL BG using a cutoff of 783 pg/mL, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 72%, 79%, 72% and 79% respectively. The differences between the medians for serum PCT between the group with a without PCP did not reach statistical significance (p=0.6137). The measurement of serum BG should be incorporated in the diagnostic work up of HIV positive patients with dyspnea and infiltrates on chest X ray. Our study confirms the diagnostic value of serum BG previously reported by others but we add a cutoff value that we believe is more accurate for patients with AIDS and suspicion of PCP. PMID:25448310

  9. Using Electronic Drug Monitor Feedback to Improve Adherence to Antiretroviral Therapy Among HIV-Positive Patients in China

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, Mary Bachman; Hamer, Davidson H.; Xu, Keyi; Zhang, Jianbo; Li, Tao; Wilson, Ira B.; Gill, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) requires excellent adherence. Little is known about how to improve ART adherence in many HIV/AIDS-affected countries, including China. We therefore assessed an adherence intervention among HIV-positive patients in southwestern China. Eighty subjects were enrolled and monitored for 6 months. Sixty-eight remaining subjects were randomized to intervention/control arms. In months 7–12, intervention subjects were counseled using EDM feedback; controls continued with standard of care. Among randomized subjects, mean adherence and CD4 count were 86.8 vs. 83.8% and 297 vs. 357 cells/μl in intervention vs. control subjects, respectively. At month 12, among 64 subjects who completed the trial, mean adherence had risen significantly among intervention subjects to 96.5% but remained unchanged in controls. Mean CD4 count rose by 90 cells/μl and declined by 9 cells/μl among intervention and control subjects, respectively. EDM feedback as a counseling tool appears promising for management of HIV and other chronic diseases. PMID:19771504

  10. Human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease in an HIV-positive patient presenting with relapsing and remitting hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroaki; Maeda, Takuya; Hara, Yu; Osa, Morichika; Imai, Kazuo; Moriguchi, Kota; Mikita, Kei; Fujikura, Yuji; Kaida, Kenichi; Kawana, Akihiko

    2015-10-01

    We report a case of human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease in an HIV-positive patient with hyponatraemia. A 65-year-old man was admitted with relapsing and remitting fever, scattered skin eruptions and hepatosplenomegaly following combination antiretroviral therapy for his HIV infection. Based on histopathological findings, he was diagnosed as having human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and was treated with four-weekly infusions of rituximab. Prior to receiving chemotherapy, we observed several suspected biomarkers of disease activity, positive correlations between plasma human herpes virus-8 viral load and the levels of plasma interleukin-6, C-reactive protein and soluble interleukin-2 receptor, and negative correlations between platelet count, albumin levels and especially serum sodium levels. We hypothesize that non-osmotic release of plasma antidiuretic hormone is a cause of hyponatraemia in human herpes virus-8-associated multicentric Castleman's disease and that relapsing and remitting hyponatraemia could be correlated with plasma human herpes virus-8 viral load. PMID:25504830

  11. Endovascular management of ruptured common iliac mycotic aneurysm in an HIV-positive patient.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Aamir; Mooka, Busi; Clarke Moloney, Mary; Kavanagh, Eamon

    2013-01-01

    Isolated iliac artery aneurysms are a rare entity. The majority of cases are asymptomatic and often escape detection. Mortality rates after sudden rupture and emergent surgery for iliac artery aneurysm are very high. We report a case of a 56-year-old man who presented with right hip pain masquerading as septic arthritis or psoas abscess. CT showed ruptured right common iliac artery aneurysm with extensive active extravasation into psoas with a retroperitoneal haematoma. Aneurysm was repaired using an endovascular technique. Postoperative recovery was eventful with the patient experiencing severe back pain radiating down the leg accompanied with fever. CT showed persistent, right iliopsoas haematoma and pelvic haematoma with secondary hydronephrosis. Viral screen for hepatitis B, C and HIV returned positive. The patient was started on intravenous meropenem. Fever and pain settled. Repeated CT scan showed decrease in retroperitoneal pelvic haematoma. PMID:23917370

  12. Visceral Leishmaniasis with an Unusual Presentation in an HIV Positive Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jawhar, Nazar M.T.

    2011-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a disease caused by a haemoflagellate protozoan of the genus Leishmania. It has a wide geographical spread. Classic cases are found primarily in children and present with typical features that include fever, anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and pancytopenia. The diagnosis is usually achieved by bone marrow smears, culture and serology; however, it can manifest itself atypically, mostly in patients infected with HIV and geriatric immunocompetent patients. We report an unusual case of visceral leishmaniasis diagnosed in a 27 year-old HIV-infected male who presented with abdominal discomfort and diarrhoea of four weeks duration associated with nausea and vomiting, but with no typical symptoms or signs of visceral leishmaniasis. The diagnosis was established through the identification of the Leishmania organism in duodenal and colonic biopsies and confirmed by subsequent bone marrow smears. PMID:21969901

  13. Visceral Leishmaniasis with an Unusual Presentation in an HIV Positive Patient.

    PubMed

    Jawhar, Nazar M T

    2011-05-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis is a disease caused by a haemoflagellate protozoan of the genus Leishmania. It has a wide geographical spread. Classic cases are found primarily in children and present with typical features that include fever, anaemia, hepatosplenomegaly, hypergammaglobulinaemia, and pancytopenia. The diagnosis is usually achieved by bone marrow smears, culture and serology; however, it can manifest itself atypically, mostly in patients infected with HIV and geriatric immunocompetent patients. We report an unusual case of visceral leishmaniasis diagnosed in a 27 year-old HIV-infected male who presented with abdominal discomfort and diarrhoea of four weeks duration associated with nausea and vomiting, but with no typical symptoms or signs of visceral leishmaniasis. The diagnosis was established through the identification of the Leishmania organism in duodenal and colonic biopsies and confirmed by subsequent bone marrow smears. PMID:21969901

  14. Stigmatized Attitude of Healthcare Providers: A Barrier for Delivering Health Services to HIV Positive Patients

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Nooshin; Joulaei, Hassan; Darabi, Elahe; Fararouei, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Despite the success of developed countries in preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS, the disease is expanding in developing countries where an unfavorable attitude exists among people, health professionals and employees. This study aimed to assess the stigmatized attitude among health care providers toward people living with HIV (PLWHA). Methods: The study is a cross-sectional survey. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire. The study sample included 575 health care providers of public and private hospitals in Shiraz. The data were gathered using a structured questionnaire in spring 2014. Data analysis was carried out using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences, version 21. Results: The most dominant attitude of the health care providers toward HIV/AIDS patients was related to fear (42.42%). According to the results of this study, there was a significant relationship between stigmatized attitude of the health care providers and their religious beliefs, society stigmatized attitude, and knowledge of transmission routes. The relationship between social stigmatized attitude of health care providers and their knowledge of transmission routes, with their willingness to provide services to patients is significant, as well (P<0.05). 39.6% and 46.2% of the respondents preferred not to provide services to the prostitutes and homosexual patients. Conclusion: Fear of contamination and social stigmatized attitude are the main impediments to dealing with patients and providing services to them. Hence, it seems that creating an effective knowledge about transmission and correcting the socio-cultural beliefs of health providers are two key strategies to tackle this problem. PMID:26448956

  15. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in HIV-positive patients with hematological disorders: A report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR)

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vikas; Tomblyn, Marcie; Pedersen, Tanya L.; Atkins, Harry L.; Battiwalla, Minoo; Gress, Ronald E.; Pollack, Marilyn S.; Storek, Jan; Thompson, Jill C.; Tiberghien, Pierre; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Ribaud, Patricia; Horowitz, Mary; Keating, Armand

    2010-01-01

    The role of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) in HIV-positive patients is not known. Using the CIBMTR database, we retrospectively evaluated 23 HIV-positive patients undergoing matched sibling (n=19) or unrelated (n=4) donor transplants between 1987 and 2003. The median age at alloHCT was 32 years. Indications for alloHCT were diverse and included malignant (n=21) and non-malignant (n=2) hematologic disorders. Nine patients (39%) were transplanted after 1996, the approximate year highly active anti-retroviral therapy became standard. The median time to neutrophil engraftment was 16 days (range 7–30) and the cumulative incidences of grades II – IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at 100 days, chronic GVHD and survival at 2 years were 30% (95% C.I. 14-50), 28% (95% C.I. 12-48) and 30% (95% C.I. 14-50), respectively. At a median follow-up of 59 months, 6 patients are alive. Survival appears better among the patients transplanted after 1996: 4 of 9 patients transplanted after 1996 survive compared to 2 of 14 patients transplanted prior to 1996. These data suggest that alloHCT is feasible for selected HIV-positive patients with malignant and non-malignant disorders. Prospective studies are needed in these patients to evaluate the safety and efficacy of this modality in specific diseases. PMID:19539219

  16. A Binational Study of Patient-Initiated Changes to Antiretroviral Therapy Regimen Among HIV-positive Latinos Living in the Mexico–U.S. Border Region

    PubMed Central

    Zúñiga, María Luisa; Muñoz, Fátima; Kozo, Justine; Blanco, Estela; Scolari, Rosana

    2015-01-01

    Research is lacking on factors associated with antiretroviral therapy (ART) sub-optimal adherence among U.S. Latinos, who are disproportionately affected by HIV and face substantial health care barriers. We examined self-reported, patient-initiated changes to ART (i.e., made small/major changes from the antiretroviral drugs prescribed) among HIV-positive Latinos. Trained interviewers administered surveys to 230 participants currently on ART in San Diego, U.S. and Tijuana, Mexico. We identified factors independently associated with ART changes. Participants were Spanish-language dominant (86%), mean age of 41 years, male (77%), and born in Mexico (93%). Patient-initiated changes to ART were reported in 43% of participants. Being female, having ≥1 sexual partner (past 3 months), ≥6 years since HIV diagnosis and poor health were associated with increased odds of ART changes. Findings raise concern about sub-optimal adherence among this binational population. Longitudinal studies are needed to further explore adherence barriers and avenues for intervention. PMID:21800182

  17. Methadone Maintenance for HIV Positive and HIV Negative Patients in Kyiv: Acceptability and Treatment Response

    PubMed Central

    Dvoriak, Sergii; Karachevsky, Andrey; Chhatre, Sumedha; Booth, Robert; Metzger, David; Schumacher, Joseph; Chychula, Nina; Pecoraro, Anna; Woody, George

    2014-01-01

    Background With up to 40% of opioid injectors infected with HIV, Ukraine has one of the most concentrated HIV epidemics in the world, mainly due to unsterile injection practices and a historical absence of effective prevention services. Harm reduction programs, including syringe exchange and a small buprenorphine treatment program, were introduced in 2004 and methadone maintenance was allowed in 2007. Despite an initial expansion, by 2009, only 3221 injectors were receiving methadone treatment. A growing body of research on methadone maintenance has found high retention rates with reduction in opioid use and HIV risk behaviors. We report on the acceptability and initial outcome of methadone treatment as a function of HIV status, an issue that has not yet been reported for injectors in Ukraine. Methods Longitudinal observational study of a 12-week course of methadone treatment in 25 HIV+ and 25 HIV− opioid addicted individuals recruited from a harm reduction program and the city AIDS Center. Drug use and HIV risk were assessed at baseline and weeks 4, 8, 12 and 20; all patients were offered continued methadone maintenance in the Kyiv city program at the end of 12 weeks. Results Fifty-four individuals were asked if they were interested in the study and 50, demographically similar to other samples of opioid addicted Ukrainians, agreed to participate. Two died of non-study related causes; the other 48 completed assessments at weeks 4, 8 and 12, and 47 completed followups at week 20. Significant reductions were seen in use of heroin (p<. 0001), other opiates/analgesics (p< 0.0001), and HIV risk behaviors (drug, sex, total; all p <0.0001). All 48 patients chose to continue methadone after the 12-weeks of study medication ended. Unlike most opioid treatment studies, sexual risk was somewhat higher than injecting risk at study intake. Conclusions Methadone maintenance was well accepted by HIV+ and HIV− opioid dependent individuals and has the potential for significant

  18. Cryptococcal Neuroradiological Lesions Correlate with Severity during Cryptococcal Meningoencephalitis in HIV-Positive Patients in the HAART Era

    PubMed Central

    Charlier, Caroline; Dromer, Françoise; Lévêque, Christophe; Chartier, Loïc; Cordoliani, Yves-Sébastien; Fontanet, Arnaud; Launay, Odile; Lortholary, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Cryptococcal meningoencephalitis has an overall global mortality rate of 20% in AIDS patients despite antifungals. There is a need for additional means of precise assessment of disease severity. We thus studied the radiological brain images available from 62 HIV-positive patients with cryptococcocal meningoencephalitis to analyse the brain lesions associated with cryptococcosis in relationship with disease severity, and the respective diagnostic contribution of magnetic resonance (MR) versus computed tomography (CT). In this retrospective multicenter analysis, two neuroradiologists blindly reviewed the brain imaging. Prospectively acquired clinical and mycological data were available at baseline and during follow-up. Baseline images were abnormal on 92% of the MR scans contrasting with 53% of the CT scans. MR/CT cryptococcosis-related lesions included mass(es) (21%/9%), dilated perivascular spaces (46%/5%) and pseudocysts (8%/4%). The presence compared to absence of cryptococcosis-related lesions was significantly associated with high serum (78% vs. 42%, p = 0.008) and CSF (81% vs. 50%, p = 0.024) antigen titers, independently of neurological abnormalities. MR detected significantly more cryptococcosis-related lesions than CT for 17 patients who had had both investigations (76% vs. 24%, p = 0.005). In conclusion, MR appears more effective than CT for the evaluation of AIDS-associated cerebral cryptococcosis. Furthermore, brain imaging is an effective tool to assess the initial disease severity in this setting. Given this, we suggest that investigation for cryptococcosis-related lesions is merited, even in the absence of neurological abnormality, if a high fungal burden is suspected on the basis of high serum and/or CSF antigen titers. PMID:18414656

  19. [Investigation of human herpesvirus-8 seroprevalence in blood donors and HIV-positive patients admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Altuğlu, İmre; Yolcu, Ayfer; Öcek, Zeliha Aslı; Yazan Sertöz, Rüçhan; Gökengin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), classified in Herpesviridae family, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. In contrast to the other herpesviruses, HHV-8 seroprevalence is low in general populations; however, the higher prevalence observed in individuals with immunodeficiencies such as AIDS poses an increased risk for KS. The global distribution of HHV-8 shows great variations, with the highest seroprevalence seen in Africa. The number of studies on the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in Turkey are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the HHV-8 seroprevalences in healthy blood donors and HIV-positive patients, that will contribute HHV-8 seroepidemiological data in our country. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. A total of 551 healthy donors (76 female, 475 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Blood Center for blood donation between December 2013-January 2014, and 173 HIV-positive patients (30 female, 143 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to infectious diseases outpatient clinic between October 2013-January 2014, were included in the study. A commercial ELISA method (KSHV/HHV-8 IgG ELISA Kit, Advanced Biotechnologies Inc, USA) was used for the detection of IgG antibodies that were structured against HHV-8 lytic antigens. In the study, 29 (29/551, 5.3%) of blood donors and 44 (44/173, 25.4%) of HIV-positive patients, with a total of 73 (73/724, 10.1%) cases were found as HHV-8 seropositive. The difference between blood donors and HIV-positive patients in terms of HHV-8 seropositivity rates was statistically significant (5.3% versus 25.4%; p< 0.05). In both of the study groups, no statistically significant difference was detected between HHV-8 seropositivity with gender and age. When considering HIV-positive patients, no statistically significant difference was observed between HHV-8 seropositivity with the duration of anti-HIV

  20. A model of integrated primary care for HIV-positive patients with underlying substance use and mental illness.

    PubMed

    Zaller, N; Gillani, F S; Rich, J D

    2007-10-01

    There is a high burden of underlying substance use and mental illness in HIV-infected populations. HIV-care settings provide an important opportunity to assess substance and mental health needs among HIV-positive patients and to provide or make referrals for appropriate treatment services. In 2003, with funding from the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), we developed a model of integrated substance-use counselling and referral for treatment within a primary care HIV-care setting at The Miriam Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island. The project uses a multidisciplinary approach to provide linkage to treatment services for substance use and mental illness as well as to help participants with social service needs, such as housing and medical coverage, to ensure continuity of care and optimal HIV treatment adherence. Twelve percent of the 965 HIV-infected patients in care at our center have been enrolled in the project. Of these, all have a current substance-use disorder and 79.3% have been diagnosed with a mental illness. In addition, most participants are hepatitis C-positive (HCV) (65.5%). The majority of participants are on antiretroviral therapy (76.7%). Participants have been referred for the following treatment modalities: intensive outpatient services, methadone, buprenorphine, outpatient services and residential as well as individual and group counselling. Our model has been successful in assessing the substance-use and mental health needs of HIV-infected individuals with numerous co-morbidities and referring them for ancillary medical and social services. PMID:18058396

  1. Acceptability of Mobile Phone Technology for Medication Adherence Interventions among HIV-Positive Patients at an Urban Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Christopher W. T.; Himelhoch, Seth

    2013-01-01

    Mobile phone technology is increasingly used to overcome traditional barriers limiting access to care. The goal of this study was to evaluate access and willingness to use smart and mobile phone technology for promoting adherence among people attending an urban HIV clinic. One hundred consecutive HIV-positive patients attending an urban HIV outpatient clinic were surveyed. The questionnaire evaluated access to and utilization of mobile phones and willingness to use them to enhance adherence to HIV medication. The survey also included the CASE adherence index as a measure of adherence. The average age was 46.4 (SD = 9.2). The majority of participants were males (63%), black (93%), and Hispanic (11.4%) and reported earning less than $10,000 per year (67.3%). Most identified themselves as being current smokers (57%). The vast majority reported currently taking HAART (83.5%). Approximately half of the participants reported some difficulty with adherence (CASE < 10). Ninety-six percent reported owning a mobile phone. Among owners of mobile phones 47.4% reported currently owning more than one device. Over a quarter reported owning a smartphone. About 60% used their phones for texting and 1/3 used their phone to search the Internet. Nearly 70% reported that they would use a mobile device to help with HIV adherence. Those who reported being very likely or likely to use a mobile device to improve adherence were significantly more likely to use their phone daily (P = 0.03) and use their phone for text messages (P = 0.002). The vast majority of patients in an urban HIV clinic own mobile phones and would use them to enhance adherence interventions to HIV medication. PMID:23997948

  2. Ocular lesions in 1,000 consecutive HIV-positive patients in India: a long-term study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ocular lesions in patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) have shown changes in disease prevalence and pattern. Although they have been described in the Western population, there are not many such studies in the HAART era from India. This study aims to present the clinical profile, systemic correlation, and visual outcome in HIV-positive patients in relation to HAART in comparison with pre-HAART Indian studies and current Western data. Ocular findings and systemic correlation in 1,000 consecutive patients with HIV seen at a tertiary eye care center were analyzed. This study uses a prospective observational case series design. Results Age range of the patients was 1.5 to 75 years. Ocular lesions were seen in 68.5% of the patients (cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis was the commonest). The commonest systemic disease was pulmonary TB. Mean interval between HIV diagnosis and onset of ocular lesions was 2.43 years. CD4 counts range from 2 to 1,110 cells/mm3. Immune recovery uveitis (IRU) was seen in 17.4%. Interval between HAART initiation and IRU was 4 months to 2.5 years. Recurrence of ocular infection was seen in 2.53% (post-HAART) and > 20% (pre-HAART). Overall visual outcome showed improvement in about 14.3% and was maintained in 71.6% of the patients. Conclusions CMV retinitis is the commonest ocular opportunistic infection in India, even in the HAART era. Newer manifestations of known diseases and newer ocular lesions are being seen. In contrast to Western studies, in our patients on HAART, ocular lesions do not always behave as in immunocompetent individuals. Ocular TB needs to be kept in mind in India, as well as other neuro-ophthalmic manifestations related to cryptococci, especially in gravely ill patients. Occurrence and frequency of various ocular opportunistic infections in developing nations such as India have significant variations from those reported in Western literature and need to be managed accordingly. PMID:23514612

  3. Knowledge of HIV Transmission and Associated Factors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Patients in Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Steven Y; Thompson, Daria; Wanke, Christine; Omosa, Gloria; Jordan, Michael R; Tang, Alice M; Patta, Shem; Mwero, Ben; Mjomba, Innocent; Mwamburi, Mkaya

    2012-01-01

    Summary Knowledge of HIV transmission is a prerequisite to practicing safer behaviors to prevent HIV infections and may be expected to vary by region because of cultural and socioeconomic determinants. A cross-sectional study was conducted in rural Kenya using a standardized questionnaire assessing HIV transmission knowledge, socio-demographic and other characteristics. Participants were recruited from the voluntary counseling and testing clinic and the general hospital population of Moi District Hospital. “High” HIV transmission knowledge scorers (≥ 81%) (Mean score) were compared with “low” scorers (<81%). Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine factors associated with HIV transmission knowledge. Of 214 participants, 70 (33%) were HIV-positive, 104 (49%) were HIV-negative, and 40 (19%) did not know. Factors associated with low knowledge in multivariate analyses were lower education (OR 2.36, CI 1.03–5.46), lower household money on healthcare (OR 2.03, CI 1.28–3.21), higher clinic transportation costs (OR 3.14, CI 1.20–9.82), sex without a condom (OR 2.18, CI 1.12–4.26), positive HIV status vs. negative (OR 2.50, CI 1.22–5.26) and positive HIV status vs. unknown (OR 3.57, CI 1.33–9.09). Mean HIV transmission knowledge score was relatively high; however, a large proportion of patients demonstrated low knowledge. Identifying individuals at risk for low knowledge will support targeted HIV education and prevention programs. PMID:23495369

  4. Why HIV positive patients on antiretroviral treatment and/or cotrimoxazole prophylaxis use traditional medicine: perceptions of health workers, traditional healers and patients: a study in two provinces of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Puoane, T R; Hughes, G D; Uwimana, J; Johnson, Q; Folk, W R

    2012-01-01

    The study explored the perceptions, knowledge and attitudes of patients, health workers and traditional healers about the use of traditional medicine and Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART). The study explored the perceptions, knowledge and attitudes of patients, health workers and traditional healers about the use of traditional medicine and Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART), using an exploratory qualitative design in two provinces of South Africa: an urban township health facility in the Western Cape, and a rural district hospital in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) with antennal HIV rate of 32% and 28%'respectively. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 participants: six HIV patients on ART and using Traditional Medicine(TM), two doctors, two nurses and four traditional healers. Two focus group discussions -one at each site - were held with community health workers who work with HIV-positive patients (Western Cape [5] and in KZN [4]). Patient said to have used Traditional Healing Practices (THP) before they were diagnosed with HIV, and some who have been diagnosed with HIV continue using TM in conjunction with ART and/or Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis. Patients preferred not to disclose THP to health professionals because of lack of support and understanding. Patients utilize THP because of family expectations, privacy and confidentiality, especially when they have not disclosed their HIV status. Healthcare professionals had strong negative opinions about THP, especially for HIV-positive patients. Traditional healers supported the patient's rationale for THP use. This study revealed a need to better understand factors involved in patients' choosing to use THP concurrently with ART. PMID:23983385

  5. Short message service broadcasting to improve the uptake of influenza vaccination in HIV-positive patients at a metropolitan sexual health clinic.

    PubMed

    Stowers, Chanelle; Healey, Loretta; O'Connor, Catherine C

    2014-12-01

    A trial of using Short Message Service (SMS) broadcasting at a metropolitan sexual health clinic in 2013 to promote the awareness and uptake of influenza vaccinations in HIV-positive patients resulted in a significant increase in the number of patients contacted (35% vs 81% P<0.0001) and vaccinated by the clinic (26% vs 47% P<0.001) compared with 2012, when individual telephone calls were made to patients. Additional benefits were less staff time used promoting influenza vaccination and the resultant lower staff cost. SMS broadcasting is an efficient and inexpensive method of communicating health messages to large numbers of patients. PMID:25435196

  6. Low Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus Infection Among HIV-Positive Patients: Data From a Large-Scale Cohort Study in Istanbul, Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Ozlem Altuntas; Yemisen, Mucahit; Karaosmanoglu, Hayat Kumbasar; Sargin, Fatma; Gunduz, Alper; Ceylan, Bahadir; Mete, Bilgul; Ozgunes, Nail; Sevgi, Dilek Yildiz; Ozaras, Resat; Tabak, Fehmi

    2014-01-01

    Background: Rate of coinfection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) varies in different countries. This may be attributable to common transmission routes as well as social, economic, and cultural factors. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and risk factors of HCV infection among HIV-positive patients in Istanbul, Turkey. Patients and Methods: Since January 2006 to November 2013, 949 HIV-positive patients that were enrolled in this study by ACTHIV-IST (Action Against HIV in Istanbul) Study Group, which consists of five centers to follow up HIV-positive patients in Istanbul. Epidemiologic and clinical data were collected retrospectively from medical records and were transferred to an HIV database system. Results: Among 949 patients, 84% were men and the mean age was 37.92 ± 11.54 years (range, 17-79). The most frequent route of transmission was heterosexual intercourse (48.8%), followed by men having sex with men (30.5%). Only nine patients (0.9%) had history of injection drug use (IDU). The prevalence of HIV/HCV coinfection was 0.9% (9:949). The IDU rate was 44.4% (4:9) in patients with HIV/HCV coinfection (three of them were not Turkish citizens), whereas this rate was only 0.6% (5:881) in patients with only HIV infection (P < 0.01). Genotypes 1b, 2a/2c, and 3 were determined in five, one, and two patients, respectively. Genotype could not be determined in one patient. History of residence in a foreign country (P < 0.01) and imprisonment (P < 0.01) were also considered as risk factors in terms of HIV/HCV coinfection. Conclusions: Prevalence of HIV/HCV coinfection is considerably low in Turkey. The extremely rare prevalence of IDU might have a role in this low prevalence. PMID:25337142

  7. Plasma Levels of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17 in HIV-Positive Patients With Oral Candidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Ayatollahi Mousavi, Seyyed Amin; Asadikaram, Gholamreza; Nakhaee, Nouzar; Izadi, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) by CD4 + Th (T helper)-type cells is the predominant host defense mechanism against Oral Candidiasis (OC) in HIV-infected individuals. Weakened CMI and depletion of CD4 + T cells are the main factor contributing to the output of OC in HIV-positive individuals. The cytokines produced by Th1, Th2 and Th17 cells play a role in mediating an increased susceptibility to OC during HIV infection. Objectives: The present study investigated plasma concentration of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17 in HIV-1 patients suffering from OC. Patients and Methods: In total, 98 samples in four groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative persons with and without OC) were obtained from the oral cavities and cultured on Sabouraud’s dextrose agar and CHROMagar. Also blood samples were obtained to assess plasma level of IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-17 using ELISA technique. Results: There was a statistically significant difference in the plasma concentration of IFN-γ, IL-6 and IL-17 but not about IL-4. Our findings suggest a significant interaction between fungal infection and HIV on expression of assessed cytokines. Conclusions: Fungal infection and HIV alone and together could seriously alter immune system function as assessed by measuring the levels of the plasma cytokines. Therefore, these results provide important new information relative to the putative immune-based factors associated with resistance and/or susceptibility to OC in HIV-positive persons. PMID:27127595

  8. Detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii by Quantitative PCR To Differentiate Colonization and Pneumonia in Immunocompromised HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Patients.

    PubMed

    Fauchier, T; Hasseine, L; Gari-Toussaint, M; Casanova, V; Marty, P M; Pomares, C

    2016-06-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) is an acute and life-threatening lung disease caused by the fungus Pneumocystis jirovecii The presentation of PCP in HIV-positive patients is well-known and consists of a triad of dyspnea, fever, and cough, whereas the presentation of PCP in HIV-negative patients is atypical and consists of a sudden outbreak, O2 desaturation, and a rapid lethal outcome without therapy. Despite the availability of direct and indirect identification methods, the diagnosis of PCP remains difficult. The cycle threshold (CT) values obtained by quantitative PCR (qPCR) allow estimation of the fungal burden. The more elevated that the fungal burden is, the higher the probability that the diagnosis is pneumonia. The purposes of the present study were to evaluate the CT values to differentiate colonization and pneumonia in a population of immunocompromised patients overall and patients stratified on the basis of their HIV infection status. Testing of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid samples from the whole population of qPCR-positive patients showed a mean CT value for patients with PCP of 28 (95% confidence interval [CI], 26 to 30) and a mean CT value for colonized patients of 35 (95% CI, 34 to 36) (P < 10(-3)). For the subgroup of HIV-positive patients, we demonstrated that a CT value below 27 excluded colonization and a CT value above 30 excluded PCP with a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 80%, respectively. In the subgroup of HIV-negative patients, we demonstrated that a CT value below 31 excluded colonization and a CT value above 35 excluded PCP with a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 80%, respectively. Thus, qPCR of BAL fluid samples is an important tool for the differentiation of colonization and pneumonia in P. jirovecii-infected immunocompromised patients and patients stratified on the basis of HIV infection status with different CT values. PMID:27008872

  9. Isoniazid-resistant Mycobacterium kansasii in an HIV-positive patient, and possible development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy: case report.

    PubMed

    Despotovic, A; Savic, B; Salemovic, D; Ranin, J; Jevtovic, Dj

    2016-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacteria are rare but important causes of infection in HIV-positive individuals. A 28-year-old HIV-positive male presented with a high fever, non-productive cough, right subcostal pain, splenomegaly, a very low CD4 count, elevated C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and a normal white blood cell count. The suspicion of tuberculosis (TB) was very high, and sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Standard quadruple anti-TB therapy was initiated, but once culture of the sample revealed Mycobacterium kansasii, pyrazinamide was withdrawn. Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was initiated soon after, consisting of abacavir/lamivudine and efavirenz. The patient's general condition deteriorated 2 weeks after HAART initiation, which could have been due to the development of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). The patient recovered and was discharged in good condition. However, the results of resistance testing of the isolated organism arrived after discharge, and showed isoniazid and streptomycin resistance. This is the first case report of M. kansasii infection from Serbia and shows the difficulties encountered during the course of treatment. PMID:26603644

  10. Interactive “Video Doctor” Counseling Reduces Drug and Sexual Risk Behaviors among HIV-Positive Patients in Diverse Outpatient Settings

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Paul; Ciccarone, Daniel; Gansky, Stuart A.; Bangsberg, David R.; Clanon, Kathleen; McPhee, Stephen J.; Calderón, Sophia H.; Bogetz, Alyssa; Gerbert, Barbara

    2008-01-01

    Background Reducing substance use and unprotected sex by HIV-positive persons improves individual health status while decreasing the risk of HIV transmission. Despite recommendations that health care providers screen and counsel their HIV-positive patients for ongoing behavioral risks, it is unknown how to best provide “prevention with positives” in clinical settings. Positive Choice, an interactive, patient-tailored computer program, was developed in the United States to improve clinic-based assessment and counseling for risky behaviors. Methodology and Findings We conducted a parallel groups randomized controlled trial (December 2003–September 2006) at 5 San Francisco area outpatient HIV clinics. Eligible patients (HIV-positive English-speaking adults) completed an in-depth computerized risk assessment. Participants reporting substance use or sexual risks (n = 476) were randomized in stratified blocks. The intervention group received tailored risk-reduction counseling from a “Video Doctor” via laptop computer and a printed Educational Worksheet; providers received a Cueing Sheet on reported risks. Compared with control, fewer intervention participants reported continuing illicit drug use (RR 0.81, 95% CI: 0.689, 0.957, p = 0.014 at 3 months; and RR 0.65, 95% CI: 0.540, 0.785, p<0.001 at 6 months) and unprotected sex (RR 0.88, 95% CI: 0.773, 0.993, p = 0.039 at 3 months; and RR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.686, 0.941, p = 0.007 at 6 months). Intervention participants reported fewer mean days of ongoing illicit drug use (-4.0 days vs. -1.3 days, p = 0.346, at 3 months; and -4.7 days vs. -0.7 days, p = 0.130, at 6 months) than did controls, and had fewer casual sex partners at (−2.3 vs. −1.4, p = 0.461, at 3 months; and −2.7 vs. −0.6, p = 0.042, at 6 months). Conclusions The Positive Choice intervention achieved significant cessation of illicit drug use and unprotected sex at the group-level, and modest individual

  11. Association of BMI Category Change with TB Treatment Mortality in HIV-Positive Smear-Negative and Extrapulmonary TB Patients in Myanmar and Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Benova, Lenka; Fielding, Katherine; Greig, Jane; Nyang'wa, Bern-Thomas; Casas, Esther Carrillo; da Fonseca, Marcio Silveira; du Cros, Philipp

    2012-01-01

    Objective The HIV epidemic has increased the proportion of patients with smear-negative and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (TB) diagnoses, with related higher rates of poor TB treatment outcomes. Unlike in smear-positive pulmonary TB, no interim markers of TB treatment progress are systematically used to identify individuals most at risk of mortality. The objective of this study was to assess the association of body mass index (BMI) change at 1 month (±15 days) from TB treatment start with mortality among HIV-positive individuals with smear-negative and extrapulmonary TB. Methods and Findings A retrospective cohort study of adult HIV-positive new TB patients in Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) treatment programmes in Myanmar and Zimbabwe was conducted using Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate the association between BMI category change and mortality. A cohort of 1090 TB patients (605 smear-negative and 485 extrapulmonary) was followed during TB treatment with mortality rate of 28.9 per 100 person-years. In multivariable analyses, remaining severely underweight or moving to a lower BMI category increased mortality (adjusted hazard ratio 4.05, 95% confidence interval 2.77–5.91, p<0.001) compared with remaining in the same or moving to a higher BMI category. Conclusions We found a strong association between BMI category change during the first month of TB treatment and mortality. BMI category change could be used to identify individuals most at risk of mortality during TB treatment among smear-negative and extrapulmonary patients. PMID:22545150

  12. Study on local inflammatory reactions and other parameters during subcutaneous mistletoe application in HIV-positive patients and HIV-negative subjects over a period of 18 weeks.

    PubMed

    Stoss, M; van Wely, M; Musielsky, H; Gorter, R W

    1999-04-01

    Subcutaneous injections of fermented and unfermented aqueous extracts of Viscum album L. result in a local inflammatory reaction at the injection site. In this trial, the symptoms associated with this local reaction were investigated. Furthermore the occurrence of local reactions was tried to correlate with an increase in CD3/25- and CD8/38-positive lymphocyte counts, with eosinophilic granulocyte numbers, and with the formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies. Included in the trial were 30 HIV-antibody-positive patients and 17 healthy non-smokers, aged 24-51 years. The CD4 cell count in the HIV-negative subjects was > 800/microliter, compared with 200-600/microliter in the HIV-positive patients. All study participants had a Karnofsky score > or = 70. The trial subjects were observed over a period of 18 weeks. With escalation of the dose of a fermented and unfermented extract of Viscum album L. (Iscador Qu Spezial and Viscum album QuFrF), there was an increase in local reactions. Erythema at the injection site was the most frequently reported symptom. Between the doses and the symptoms induration, swelling and pruritus were marked correlations. Effects of the application of mistletoe extracts on the immune system were demonstrated by an increase in CD3/25-positive lymphocyte counts and antibodies against mistletoe-lectins. There were no changes in eosinophilic granulocytes or CD8/38-positive lymphocyte populations. For evaluation of the therapeutic applications of mistletoe extracts in HIV-positive patients it is advisable to assess primarily activation of CD3-positive lymphocytes and the patient response on the basis of the local reaction. The local inflammatory reaction at the injection site is desirable and well tolerated if the reaction is smaller than 5 cm in diameter. PMID:10337457

  13. HIV disclosure status and factors among adult HIV positive patients in a secondary health facility in North-Eastern Nigeria, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Dankoli, Raymond Salanga; Aliyu, Alhaji A; Nsubuga, Peter; Nguku, Patrick; Ossai, Okechukwu P; Tukur, Dahiru; Ibrahim, Luka; Madi, James E.; Dalhat, Mahmood; Abdullaziz, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Disclosure of HIV status especially to sexual partners is an important prevention goal. This study was conducted to determine the prevalence of HIV status disclosure and the factors associated with disclosure by HIV positive patients attending the adult Anti-retroviral therapy (ART) clinic in State Specialist Hospital Gombe (SSHG) a secondary health facility in north-eastern Nigeria. Methods We conducted a cross sectional study among adult HIV positive patients enrolled into the HIV/AIDS programme of SSHG. Study participant were sampled using a systematic random sampling. Interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect data on socio-demographic characteristics, disclosure status and factors associated with disclosure. Data was analyzed using Epi-info software. Results Of the 198 (99%) respondents, 159 (80.3%) were females. The mean age of respondents was 32.9years (SD ± 9.5). Sixty percent of the respondents were married. Most (97.5%) had disclosed their HIV status and majority (36.8%) disclosed to their spouses. Sixty four percent of the respondents had treatment supporter and spouses (42.9%) were their choice of a treatment supporter. Disclosure of HIV status was found to be associated with age < 40years Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) 38.16; 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 2.42-602.61. Gender, employment status, educational level, duration of infection and marital status were not found to be significantly associated with disclosure of HIV status. Conclusion Disclosure of HIV status was high in the study population. Spouses were the most preferred choice of persons to disclose HIV status to, and the most adopted as treatment supporter. HIV status disclosure is encouraged after diagnosis because of its importance especially among couples. PMID:25328623

  14. RT-PCR analysis of Candida albicans ALS gene expression in a hyposalivatory rat model of oral candidiasis and in HIV-positive human patients

    PubMed Central

    GREEN, CLAYTON B.; MARRETTA, SANDRA MANFRA; CHENG, GEORGINA; FADDOUL, FADY F.; EHRHART, E. J.; HOYER, LOIS L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary ALS gene expression was studied in the hyposalivatory rat model of oral candidiasis and in clinical specimens collected from HIV-positive patients to assess similarities in expression patterns between the model system and clinical isolates. Two C. albicans strains, SC5314 and OY-2-76, were used in the rat model system and infection progressed for 3 or 5 days. The strains produced similar oral lesions at 3 days. At 5 days, strain OY-2-76 produced more superficial lesions containing relatively more yeast forms compared to invasive hyphal forms observed for strain SC5314. For all infections, the most severe lesions were observed on the tongue and gingiva overlying the mandible. ALS transcripts were easier to detect by RT-PCR later in infection and under other conditions where more fungal cells were present. Expression of ALS1, ALS2, ALS3 and ALS4 was observed in rats infected for 3 days with ALS5 and ALS9 transcripts detected after 5 days of infection. Expression of ALS6 was observed in a single specimen from a 5-day infection while ALS7 transcript was never found. Expression of all ALS genes was observed in oral clinical material collected from HIV-positive patients although ALS6 and ALS7 transcripts required an extra PCR amplification step to be detected. Overall, the patterns of ALS gene expression were similar between the rat model and human clinical specimens, suggesting that the model would be useful for studying the phenotype of als/als mutant strains. PMID:16519012

  15. CD4:CD8 ratio as a frontier marker for clinical outcome, immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in virologically suppressed HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wei; Mehraj, Vikram; Vyboh, Kishanda; Cao, Wei; Li, Taisheng; Routy, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Absolute CD4 T cell count and plasma viral load have been established as predictors of HIV disease progression, and CD4 T cell count is used as an indicator for initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Following long-term therapy, patients generally present with significant CD4 T cell recovery contrasting with persistently elevated CD8 T cell counts, which leads to a partial restoration of CD4:CD8 ratio. This review focuses on the relevance of the CD4:CD8 ratio on clinical outcomes, immune dysfunction and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated patients. Method We conducted a comprehensive literature review of publications in English language using major electronic databases. Our search was focused on factors contributing to CD4:CD8 T cell ratio and clinical outcome in adult HIV-positive patients in the context of treated infection. Discussion Low CD4:CD8 ratio has been linked to ageing and acts as a predictor of mortality in the general population. This ratio may represent the combined effects of inflammation and immunological changes called “inflammaging.” Although the mechanisms underlying partial correction of the CD4:CD8 ratio and persistently elevated CD8 T cell count in long-term treated patients remain poorly understood, it has been recently indicated that patients with optimal CD4 T cell recovery and low CD4:CD8 ratio still harbour increased immune activation, an immune senescent phenotype and have a higher risk of non-AIDS morbidity and mortality. This review reconsiders CD4:CD8 ratio in the light of advances in the understanding of immune dysfunction and examines its pathophysiological features and implications on clinical outcome and HIV reservoir size in long-term treated HIV-positive adults. Conclusion The CD4:CD8 ratio can contribute to the immunological evaluation of treated patients in a long-term follow-up and may be applied for monitoring both immune dysfunction and viral reservoir size in immune-based clinical trials. PMID:26130226

  16. CD4 trajectory adjusting for dropout among HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in an East African HIV care centre

    PubMed Central

    Kiragga, Agnes N; Lok, Judith J; Musick, Beverly S; Bosch, Ronald J; Mwangi, Ann; Wools-Kaloustian, Kara K; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T

    2014-01-01

    Objective Estimates of CD4 response to antiretroviral therapy (ART) obtained by averaging data from patients in care, overestimate population CD4 response and treatment program effectiveness because they do not consider data from patients who are deceased or not in care. We use mathematical methods to assess and adjust for this bias based on patient characteristics. Design We examined data from 25,261 HIV-positive patients from the East Africa IeDEA Consortium. Methods We used inverse probability of censoring weighting (IPCW) to represent patients not in care by patients in care with similar characteristics. We address two questions: What would the median CD4 be “had everyone starting ART remained on observation?” and “were everyone starting ART maintained on treatment?” Results Routine CD4 count estimates were higher than adjusted estimates even under the best-case scenario of maintaining all patients on treatment. Two years after starting ART, differences between estimates diverged from 30 cells/µL, assuming similar mortality and treatment access among dropouts as patients in care, to over 100 cells/µL assuming 20% lower survival and 50% lower treatment access among dropouts. When considering only patients in care, the proportion of patients with CD4 above 350 cells/µL was 50% adjusted to below 30% when accounting for patients not in care. One-year mortality diverged 6–14% from the naïve estimates depending on assumptions about access to care among lost patients. Conclusions Ignoring mortality and loss to care results in over-estimation of ART response for patients starting treatment and exaggerates the efficacy of treatment programs administering it. PMID:25131801

  17. Multiple frequency bioimpedance is an adequate tool to assess total and regional fat mass in HIV-positive patients but not to diagnose HIV-associated lipoatrophy: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Matute, Patricia; Pérez-Martínez, Laura; Blanco, José R; Ibarra, Valvanera; Metola, Luis; Sanz, Mercedes; Hernando, Luis; Martínez, Sagrario; Ramírez, Arsenio; Ramalle-Gomara, Enrique; Oteo, José A

    2013-01-01

    Introduction HIV-associated lipodystrophy syndrome causes systemic metabolic alterations and psychological distress that worsen the quality of life of these patients. An early detection should be considered to efficiently treat it. Objective criteria or reference indices are needed for an early diagnosis. Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA) is an operator-independent, repeatable and non-invasive method of body composition evaluation that is less expensive than dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and/or CT scans. The aims of this pilot study were to validate the data obtained by BIA to measure fat mass in HIV-positive patients with/without lipoatrophy and to determine if BIA correctly diagnoses lipoatrophy in HIV-positive patients. Methods Thirty-nine participants were included in this preliminary study. Fourteen were HIV-negative (eight men) whereas 25 were HIV-positive patients (17 men). Eleven of the HIV-positive patients were classified as lipoatrophic according to subjective evaluation by the physicians. Total and regional body composition was measured in basal conditions by DXA and by BIA. To obtain abdominal CT scan fat values, transverse slices with 6-mm thickness were acquired at the L4-L5 intervertebral space. Results BIA measurements of total and regional body fat were significantly correlated with those obtained by DXA (p < 0.05 to <0.01) in HIV-positive patients. However, agreement between methods was poor as not very high ICC (intraclass correlation coefficient) values were observed. BIA and DXA showed higher ICC values in lipoatrophic patients. The visceral index obtained by BIA was correlated with total and visceral fat in L4 measured by CT scan (r = 0.607 and r = 0.617, respectively, p < 0.01) in HIV-positive patients. The Fat Mass Ratio (FMR) calculated by BIA did not correlate or agree with DXA values. Conclusions Multi-frequency BIA could be an effective method to evaluate the evolution of total and regional fat composition in HIV-positive

  18. A comparative study between conventional and liquid-based cytology in screening for anal intraepithelial lesions in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Maia, Livia Bravo; Marinho, Larissa Cardoso; Wanderley Paes Barbosa, Tania; Batalha Filho, Eronides Salustiano; Ribeiro Velasco, Lara Franciele; Garcia Costa, Patrícia Godoy; Carneiro, Fabiana Pirani; de Oliveira, Paulo Gonçalves

    2014-10-01

    Anal intraepithelial neoplasia (AIN) is associated with HPV infection and can be detected by cytological screening. While conventional exfoliative cytology (CC) is a low-cost and nonaggressive method, liquid-based cytology (LBC) tends to give clearer readings. Although studies of the efficacy of anal cancer screening methods would be of great importance for groups at high risk for AIN, few such studies have been conducted. The aim of the present study was to assess the concordance of CC and LBC in diagnosing anal pre-neoplastic lesions, and to compare cytological results with anoscopy, histopathological, and molecular biology findings. Comparative study involving 33 HIV-positive patients, who underwent anoscopy and biopsy of suspected lesions. Concordance between the two cytology methods was calculated, as were the associations between cytology results and findings from other screening methods. A total of 54.5% of cases were considered AIN-negative by CC and LBC, and concordance between the two methods was statistically significant (P < 0.05). Anoscopy was negative in 15 of the 18 CC- and LBC-negative cases. CC identified 75% of patients with positive biopsy, while LBC identified 85.71% of these patients. Molecular biology results showed that patients with LSIL tested positive for the highest number of HPV subtypes. The associations between positive biopsy and high grade HPV, HPV 16, and multiple HPV infections were not statistically significant. Conventional and liquid-based cytology are equally effective in screening for anal preneoplastic lesions. PMID:24591207

  19. Is human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) stage an independent risk factor for altering the periodontal status of HIV-positive patients? A South African study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The immunosuppresion in HIV patients makes them highly susceptible to microbial infections. The aim of the study was to establish whether HIV stage (as depicted by CD4+ T lymphocyte counts) could independently be associated with periodontal status (as revealed by the measurement of clinical indices). Methods One hundred and twenty HIV-infected patients attending an infectious diseases clinic in the Western Cape, South Africa were included in the study. The periodontal clinical indices such as plaque index, gingival index, pocket probing depth and clinical attachment levels were measured on the mesial aspect of the six Ramfjord teeth. The CD4 + T cell counts were taken from the patients’ medical records and patients’ HIV stage determined and grouped according to their CD4+ T cell counts into A (<200 cells /mm3), B (200–500 cells /mm3) and C (>500 cells /mm3). Results The mean age of 120 HIV-positive patients was 33.25 years and the mean CD4 + T cell count was 293.43 cells/mm3. The probing depth and clinical attachment loss were found to be significantly associated with the total CD4 + T cell counts but not with HIV stage. Significant correlations were found between age and all clinical indices except for clinical attachment loss. No correlation was found between age and HIV stage of the patients. The use of antiretroviral therapy was significantly associated with probing depth and clinical attachment loss, but not with plaque nor gingival index. Significant associations were observed between smoking and all of the clinical indices except for the gingival index. A significant association was observed between the use of interdental aids and all the clinical indices except for probing depth, while brushing was significantly associated with plaque index only. CD4 + T cell counts were significantly associated with brushing frequency (p = 0.0190) and the use of interdental aids (p = 0.0170). Conclusion The findings of this study

  20. Barriers and Facilitators of Adherence to Antiretroviral Drug Therapy and Retention in Care among Adult HIV-Positive Patients: A Qualitative Study from Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Bezabhe, Woldesellassie M.; Chalmers, Leanne; Bereznicki, Luke R.; Peterson, Gregory M.; Bimirew, Mekides A.; Kassie, Desalew M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been life saving for hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians. With increased availability of ART in recent years, achievement of optimal adherence and patient retention are becoming the greatest challenges in the management of HIV/AIDS in Ethiopia. However, few studies have explored factors influencing medication adherence to ART and retention in follow-up care among adult Ethiopian HIV-positive patients, especially in the Amhara region of the country, where almost one-third of the country’s ART is prescribed. The aim of this qualitative study was to collect such data from patients and healthcare providers in the Amhara region of Ethiopia. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 24 patients, of whom 11 had been lost to follow-up and were non-persistent with ART. In addition, focus group discussions were performed with 15 ART nurses and 19 case managers. All interviews and focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and coded for themes and patterns in Amharic using a grounded theory approach. The emergent concepts and categories were translated into English. Results Economic constraints, perceived stigma and discrimination, fasting, holy water, medication side effects, and dissatisfaction with healthcare services were major reasons for patients being non-adherent and lost to follow-up. Disclosure of HIV status, social support, use of reminder aids, responsibility for raising children, improved health on ART, and receiving education and counseling emerged as facilitators of adherence to ART. Conclusions Improving adherence and retention requires integration of enhanced treatment access with improved job and food security. Healthcare providers need to be supported to better equip patients to cope with the issues associated with ART. Development of social policies and cooperation between various agencies are required to facilitate optimal adherence to ART, patient retention, and improved patient outcomes

  1. Time above 1500 copies: a viral load measure for assessing transmission risk of HIV-positive patients in care

    PubMed Central

    Marks, Gary; Gardner, Lytt I.; Rose, Charles E.; Zinski, Anne; Moore, Richard D.; Holman, Susan; Rodriguez, Allan E.; Sullivan, Meg; Giordano, Thomas P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective We examined HIV transmission potential of patients in care by analyzing the amount of person-time spent above a viral load threshold that increases risk for transmission. Design Observational cohort and supplemental data. Methods The cohort included HIV patients who received care at six HIV clinics in the United States, from 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2013, and had two or more viral load tests during this interval. Person-time (in days) above a viral load of 1500 copies/ml out of the total observation time was determined by inspecting consecutive pairs of viral load results and the time intervals between those pairs. The person-time rate ratios comparing demographic and clinical subgroups were estimated with Poisson regression. Results The cohort included 14 532 patients observed for a median of 1073 days with a median of nine viral load records. Ninety percent of the patients had been prescribed antiretroviral therapy. On average, viral load exceeded 1500 copies/ml during 23% of the patients’ observation time (average of 84 days per year, per patient). Percentage of person-time above the threshold was higher among patients who had more than a fourth of their viral load pairs exceeding a 6-month interval (34% of observation time), patients not on antiretroviral therapy (58% of time), new/re-engaging patients (34% of time), patients 16–39 years of age (32% of time), and patients of black race (26% of time). Conclusion HIV patients in care spent an average of nearly a quarter of their time with viral loads above 1500 copies/ml, higher among some subgroups, placing them at risk for potentially transmitting HIV to others. PMID:25768835

  2. Prevention and management of tuberculosis in HIV positive patients living in countries with a low prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Brook, M G; Miller, R F

    1996-01-01

    We have re-examined the evidence on which current British Thoracic Society recommendations for primary and secondary prophylaxis and therapy of tuberculosis are based. We suggest that in a country such as the UK with a low prevalence of tuberculosis, primary prophylaxis should be offered primarily to tuberculin positive or anergic patients from high-incidence groups, including immigrants from high-prevalence countries, intravenous drug users and those with previous tuberculosis, that secondary prophylaxis be withheld from all but very high-risk patients and that four drug regimens which include ethambutol should be used for patients originating from, or who have lived in areas of the world with more than 2% primary isoniazid resistance. PMID:8698373

  3. Increased Sensitivity in Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in HIV-Positive Patients through the Small-Membrane-Filter Method of Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Quincó, Patrícia; Brandão, Walber; Monte, Rossiclea; Souza, Silvia Leopoldina; Saraceni, Valeria; Palaci, Moises; Dietze, Reynaldo; Cordeiro-Santos, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    The sensitivity of microscopy for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) is around 50% but decreases by about 15% in patients with suspected TB who are coinfected with HIV. Here, we compared the accuracies of three microscopy methods for processing sputum smears (concentration by centrifugation with or without N-acetyl-l-cysteine [NALC] and concentration by filtration on a polycarbonate membrane) to that of culture on Ogawa-Kudoh medium as the gold standard method. Sputum samples were obtained from 432 patients with suspected pulmonary TB, of whom 60% were infected with HIV. Analysis was performed using the first specimen. Compared to the gold standard culture, the small-membrane-filter (SMF) method was the most sensitive microscopic method. In HIV-infected TB patients, the sensitivity of the SMF method was significantly higher than those for centrifugation of sputum samples with or without NALC treatment (61.9%, 47.6%, and 45.2%, respectively; P = 0.001). Similarly, in TB patients without HIV infection, the sensitivity of the SMF method was significantly higher than those for centrifugation of sputum samples with or without NALC treatment (81.8%, 63.6%, and 57.5%, respectively; P = 0.001). In the two study groups, TB patients with or without HIV, no significant differences between the specificities of the three methods were observed. Handling of the second sputum sample similarly by centrifugation with or without NALC and by the SMF method increased positivities by 13%, 11%, and 4%, respectively. The overall agreement between microscopy and culture was above 90% for all groups. Microscopic evaluation of the sputum samples treated with NALC compared to those not treated with NALC did not show any increase in sensitivity. Altogether, the sensitivity of the SMF method is higher than those of the other two microscopic methods studied without a loss of specificity. PMID:23804389

  4. A Binational Comparison of HIV Provider Attitudes Towards the Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among HIV-Positive Latino Patients Receiving Care in the US-Mexico Border Region

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima A.; Servin, Argentina E.; Kozo, Justine; Lam, Mario; Zúñiga, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among Latinos living with HIV in the United States (U.S.)-Mexico border region. Health providers may vary in their approach to communicating acceptance or non acceptance of CAM use, which can undermine patient confidence in disclosing CAM use. Patient-provider communication about CAM is important because certain types of CAM can affect antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We undertook the present binational study to understand U.S. and Mexican provider beliefs, and perceptions surrounding CAM use among Latino patients, and to learn if and how CAM communication occurs. Between July and December 2010, we conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in Tijuana and San Diego. Analysis procedures drew upon principles of Grounded Theory. The sample was comprised of 19 HIV-health care providers, including 7 women and 12 men. Emerging CAM-related themes were: Provider's perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about CAM; CAM types and modalities; and patient-provider CAM communication. Many clinicians were uncomfortable supporting CAM use with their patients. San Diego providers reported more frequent instances of CAM use among Latino patients than Tijuana providers. Providers from both cities reported that patients infrequently disclose CAM use and almost half do not routinely ask patients about CAM practices. Most of the providers acknowledged that they lack information about CAM, and are concerned about the drug interaction as well as the effects of CAM on adherence. Our findings have important implications for understanding provider communication surrounding CAM use in a highly transnational population and context. Because CAM use may undermine ART adherence and is highly prevalent among Latinos, provider communication about CAM is critical to improved health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos. Considering the significant growth of U.S. Latinos, especially in the U.S.-Mexico border region, assessment of

  5. A binational comparison of HIV provider attitudes towards the use of complementary and alternative medicine among HIV-positive Latino patients receiving care in the US-Mexico border region.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima A; Servin, Argentina E; Kozo, Justine; Lam, Mario; Zúñiga, María Luisa

    2013-08-01

    Use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among Latinos living with HIV in the United States (US)-Mexico border region. Health providers may vary in their approach to communicating acceptance or non acceptance of CAM use, which can undermine patient confidence in disclosing CAM use. Patient-provider communication about CAM is important because certain types of CAM can affect antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence. We undertook the present binational study to understand US and Mexican provider beliefs, and perceptions surrounding CAM use among Latino patients, and to learn if and how CAM communication occurs. Between July and December 2010, we conducted in-depth, qualitative interviews in Tijuana and San Diego. Analysis procedures drew upon principles of Grounded Theory. The sample was comprised of 19 HIV-health care providers, including 7 women and 12 men. Emerging CAM-related themes were: Provider's perceptions, attitudes and knowledge about CAM; CAM types and modalities; and patient-provider CAM communication. Many clinicians were uncomfortable supporting CAM use with their patients. San Diego providers reported more frequent instances of CAM use among Latino patients than Tijuana providers. Providers from both cities reported that patients infrequently disclose CAM use and almost half do not routinely ask patients about CAM practices. Most of the providers acknowledged that they lack information about CAM, and are concerned about the drug interaction as well as the effects of CAM on adherence. Our findings have important implications for understanding provider communication surrounding CAM use in a highly transnational population and context. Because CAM use may undermine ART adherence and is highly prevalent among Latinos, provider communication about CAM is critical to improved health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos. Considering the significant growth of US Latinos, especially in the US-Mexico border region, assessment of Mexican and US

  6. Impact of nutritional supplementation on immune response, body mass index and bioelectrical impedance in HIV-positive patients starting antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Challenges to HIV care in resource limited settings (RLS) include malnutrition. Limited evidence supports the benefit of nutritional supplementation when starting antiretroviral therapy (ART) in RLS. Methods Randomized controlled pilot study. HIV-positive ART-naive adults with self-reported weight loss were randomized to receive ART plus FutureLife porridge® nutritional supplement (NS) (388 kcal/day) or ART alone (Controls) for 6 months. Patients returned for monthly assessments and blood was drawn at enrolment and 6 months on ART. Differences in body composition, biochemical and laboratory parameters were estimated at 6 months on treatment. Results Of the 36 randomized patients, 26 completed the 6 month follow-up (11 NS vs 15 Controls). At enrolment, groups were similar in terms of age, gender, body mass index (BMI) and bioelectrical impedance. NS patients had a lower median CD4 count (60 cells/mm3 [IQR 12–105 vs 107 cells/mm3 [IQR 63–165]; p = 0.149) and hemoglobin (10.3 g/dL [IQR 9.0-11.3] vs 13.1 g/dL [IQR 11.1-14.7]; p = 0.001). At 6 months, NS patients increased their median CD4 count by 151 cells/mm3 [IQR 120–174) vs 77 cells/mm3 [IQR 33–145] in the Controls. NS patients had higher mean percentage change in body weight (12.7% vs 4.9%; p = 0.047), BMI (7.8% vs 5.5%; p = 0.007), absolute CD4 count (83.0% vs 46.4%, p = 0.002) and hemoglobin (9.5% vs 1.0%; p = 0.026). Patients in the NS arm had a higher mean percentage fat-free mass (16.7% vs −3.5%, p = 0.036), total body water (13.0% vs −1.9%, p = 0.026), intracellular water (16.1% vs −4.1%, p = 0.010) and basal metabolic rate (5.3% vs −0.2%, p = 0.014) compared to Controls. Patients in the NS arm also showed an improvement in physical activity at 6 months post-ART initiation compared to Controls (p = 0.037). Conclusion Preliminary results are encouraging and suggest that NS taken concurrently with ART can promote weight gain

  7. Improving Monitoring and Reporting of Adverse Drug Reactions (ADRs) in HIV positive patients on Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Agu, Kenneth Anene; Oparah, Azuka Cyriacus; Ochei, Uche M.

    2012-01-01

    Under-reporting of ADR may be associated with poor knowledge, attitudes and practices to pharmacovigilance. This study evaluated knowledge, attitudes and practices of healthcare professionals about ADR monitoring and reporting following interventions. This longitudinal study included 36 healthcare professionals participating in ART program in a tertiary hospital. Interventions included group training on pharmacovigilance (PV) and provision of ADR reporting forms amongst others. Assessments were conducted at months 0 and 6 post-interventions using study-specific Likert-type instruments. Mean attitude scores above midpoint of 3.6 on 5-point scale were regarded as positive and below as negative. P<0.05 used to determine statistical significance. Mean age of participants was 36.6 (95%CI, 34.5–38.7) years; 61.1% males; 44.4% doctors, 13.9% pharmacists, 19.4% nurses, 8.3% laboratory scientists, 8.3% record officers and 5.6% welfare officers. None had received training on PV previously. Mean knowledge test score increased from 53.6% (95%CI, 44.6–63.6) at pre-intervention to 77.1% (95%CI, 72.8–81.4) at post-intervention with a mean change of 146.9% (95%CI, 60.5–233.3; p=0.000). Mean rated attitude scores increased from 3.6 (95%CI, 3.4–3.8) at pre-intervention to 4.2 (95%CI, 4.0–4.4) at post-intervention; the difference was statistically significant (p=0.000). 75.8% reported that ADR reporting forms were not readily available at pre-intervention compared to 18.2% at postintervention; 15.2% had reported ADR previously at pre-intervention compared to 69.7% at post-intervention; 12.1% reported providing information regarding ADRs and its management always at pre-intervention compared to 45.5% at post-intervention; these differences were statistically significant (p<0.05). Lack/inadequate knowledge, unavailability of reporting forms and negative attitudes were barriers identified; and addressing them resulted in significant improvement in this setting. Scaling up

  8. Fractional Brownian motion and multivariate-t models for longitudinal biomedical data, with application to CD4 counts in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Stirrup, Oliver T; Babiker, Abdel G; Carpenter, James R; Copas, Andrew J

    2016-04-30

    Longitudinal data are widely analysed using linear mixed models, with 'random slopes' models particularly common. However, when modelling, for example, longitudinal pre-treatment CD4 cell counts in HIV-positive patients, the incorporation of non-stationary stochastic processes such as Brownian motion has been shown to lead to a more biologically plausible model and a substantial improvement in model fit. In this article, we propose two further extensions. Firstly, we propose the addition of a fractional Brownian motion component, and secondly, we generalise the model to follow a multivariate-t distribution. These extensions are biologically plausible, and each demonstrated substantially improved fit on application to example data from the Concerted Action on SeroConversion to AIDS and Death in Europe study. We also propose novel procedures for residual diagnostic plots that allow such models to be assessed. Cohorts of patients were simulated from the previously reported and newly developed models in order to evaluate differences in predictions made for the timing of treatment initiation under different clinical management strategies. A further simulation study was performed to demonstrate the substantial biases in parameter estimates of the mean slope of CD4 decline with time that can occur when random slopes models are applied in the presence of censoring because of treatment initiation, with the degree of bias found to depend strongly on the treatment initiation rule applied. Our findings indicate that researchers should consider more complex and flexible models for the analysis of longitudinal biomarker data, particularly when there are substantial missing data, and that the parameter estimates from random slopes models must be interpreted with caution. © 2015 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26555755

  9. Population-Based Assessment of Hypertension Epidemiology and Risk Factors among HIV-Positive and General Populations in Rural Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kwarisiima, Dalsone; Balzer, Laura; Heller, David; Kotwani, Prashant; Chamie, Gabriel; Clark, Tamara; Ayieko, James; Mwangwa, Florence; Jain, Vivek; Byonanebye, Dathan; Petersen, Maya; Havlir, Diane; Kamya, Moses R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy scale-up in Sub-Saharan Africa has created a growing, aging HIV-positive population at risk for non-communicable diseases such as hypertension. However, the prevalence and risk factors for hypertension in this population remain incompletely understood. Methods We measured blood pressure and collected demographic data on over 65,000 adults attending multi-disease community health campaigns in 20 rural Ugandan communities (SEARCH Study: NCT01864603). Our objectives were to determine (i) whether HIV is an independent risk factor for hypertension, and (ii) awareness and control of hypertension in HIV-positive adults and the overall population. Results Hypertension prevalence was 14% overall, and 11% among HIV-positive individuals. 79% of patients were previously undiagnosed, 85% were not taking medication, and 50% of patients on medication had uncontrolled blood pressure. Multivariate predictors of hypertension included older age, male gender, higher BMI, lack of education, alcohol use, and residence in Eastern Uganda. HIV-negative status was independently associated with higher odds of hypertension (OR 1.2, 95% CI: 1.1–1.4). Viral suppression of HIV did not significantly predict hypertension among HIV-positives. Significance The burden of hypertension is substantial and inadequately controlled, both in HIV-positive persons and overall. Universal HIV screening programs could provide counseling, testing, and treatment for hypertension in Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:27232186

  10. HIV-positive status disclosure in patients in care in rural South Africa: implications for scaling up treatment and prevention interventions.

    PubMed

    Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Dellar, Rachael C; Bearnot, Benjamin; Werner, Lise; Frohlich, Janet A; Kharsany, Ayesha B M; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-02-01

    A nuanced understanding of HIV-positive status disclosure is urgently needed to inform the implementation of prevention interventions, including TasP and PrEP. To provide such understanding for the high HIV-burden setting of rural KwaZulu-Natal, we conducted a prospective cohort study to characterize determinants and trends in HIV-positive status disclosure. 687 consenting HIV-positive individuals (73.2 % female; 60.3 % ART initiated) were enrolled. Reports of any incidence of disclosure to either a family member or sexual partner at enrollment and follow-up visits (median 4.4 months post-enrolment) were common (91.0 %); however, reports of disclosure specifically to sexual partners were relatively rare (34.1 %), especially in women (29.8 %). Participants not engaged in a stable partnerships, not ART-imitated, and/or who had disclosed to their family were at risk of non-disclosure to sexual partners. These data highlight both an urgent need to empower HIV-positive individuals, and the significant barriers to targeting sero-discordant couples for HIV prevention in this setting. PMID:25677128

  11. HIV-Positive Status Disclosure in Patients in Care in Rural South Africa: Implications for Scaling up Treatment and Prevention Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Dellar, Rachael C; Bearnot, Benjamin; Werner, Lise; Frohlich, Janet A; Kharsany, Ayesha BM; Abdool Karim, Salim S

    2015-01-01

    A nuanced understanding of HIV-positive status disclosure is urgently needed to inform the implementation of prevention interventions, including TasP and PrEP. To provide such understanding for the high HIV-burden setting of rural KwaZulu-Natal, we conducted a prospective cohort study to characterize determinants and trends in HIV-positive status disclosure. 687 consenting HIV-positive individuals (73.2% female; 60.3% ART initiated) were enrolled. Reports of any incidence of disclosure to either a family member or sexual partner at enrollment and follow-up visits (median 4.4 months post-enrolment) were common (91.0%); however, reports of disclosure specifically to sexual partners were relatively rare (34.1%), especially in women (29.8%). Participants not engaged in a stable partnerships, not ART-imitated, and/or who had disclosed to their family were at risk of non-disclosure to sexual partners. These data highlight both an urgent need to empower HIV-positive individuals, and the significant barriers to targeting sero-discordant couples for HIV prevention in this setting. PMID:25677128

  12. A Diagnostic Accuracy Study of Xpert®MTB/RIF in HIV-Positive Patients with High Clinical Suspicion of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Carriquiry, Gabriela; Otero, Larissa; González-Lagos, Elsa; Zamudio, Carlos; Sánchez, Eduardo; Nabeta, Pamela; Campos, Miguel; Echevarría, Juan; Seas, Carlos; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients remains complex and demands easy to perform and accurate tests. Xpert®MTB/RIF (MTB/RIF) is a molecular TB diagnostic test which is rapid and convenient; the test requires minimal human resources and reports results within two hours. The majority of performance studies of MTB/RIF have been performed in high HIV burden settings, thus TB diagnostic studies among HIV patients in low HIV prevalence settings such as Peru are still needed. Methodology/Principal Findings From April 2010 to May 2011, HIV-positive patients with high clinical suspicion of TB were enrolled from two tertiary hospitals in Lima, Peru. Detection of TB by MTB/RIF was compared to a composite reference standard Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and liquid culture. Detection of rifampicin resistance was compared to the LJ proportion method. We included 131 patients, the median CD4 cell count was 154.5 cells/mm3 and 45 (34.4%) had TB. For TB detection among HIV patients, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 97.8% (95% CI 88.4–99.6) (44/45); specificity was 97.7% (95% CI 91.9–99.4) (84/86); the positive predictive value was 95.7% (95% CI 85.5–98.8) (44/46); and the negative predictive value, 98.8% (95% CI 93.6–99.8) (84/85). MTB/RIF detected 13/14 smear-negative TB cases, outperforming smear microscopy [97.8% (44/45) vs. 68.9% (31/45); p = 0.0002]. For rifampicin resistance detection, sensitivity of MTB/RIF was 100% (95% CI 61.0–100.0) (6/6); specificity was 91.0% (95% CI 76.4–96.9) (30/33); the positive predictive value was 66.7% (95% CI 35.4–87.9) (6/9); and the negative predictive value was 100% (95% CI 88.7 –100.0) (30/30). Conclusions/Significance In HIV patients in our population with a high clinical suspicion of TB, MTB/RIF performed well for TB diagnosis and outperformed smear microscopy. PMID:22970271

  13. CD4 criteria improves the sensitivity of a clinical algorithm developed to identify viral failure in HIV-positive patients on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Denise H; Fox, Matthew P; Maskew, Mhairi; McNamara, Lynne; MacPhail, Patrick; Mathews, Christopher; Sanne, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Several studies from resource-limited settings have demonstrated that clinical and immunologic criteria are poor predictors of virologic failure, confirming the need for viral load monitoring or at least an algorithm to target viral load testing. We used data from an electronic patient management system to develop an algorithm to identify patients at risk of viral failure using a combination of accessible and inexpensive markers. Methods We analyzed data from HIV-positive adults initiated on antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Johannesburg, South Africa, between April 2004 and February 2010. Viral failure was defined as ≥2 consecutive HIV-RNA viral loads >400 copies/ml following suppression ≤400 copies/ml. We used Cox-proportional hazards models to calculate hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Weights for each predictor associated with virologic failure were created as the sum of the natural logarithm of the adjusted HR and dichotomized with the optimal cut-off at the point with the highest sensitivity and specificity (i.e. ≤4 vs. >4). We assessed the diagnostic accuracy of predictor scores cut-offs, with and without CD4 criteria (CD4 <100 cells/mm3; CD4 < baseline; >30% drop in CD4), by calculating the proportion with the outcome and the observed sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of the predictor score compared to the gold standard of virologic failure. Results We matched 919 patients with virologic failure (1:3) to 2756 patients without. Our predictor score included variables at ART initiation (i.e. gender, age, CD4 count <100 cells/mm3, WHO stage III/IV and albumin) and laboratory and clinical follow-up data (drop in haemoglobin, mean cell volume (MCV) <100 fl, CD4 count <200 cells/mm3, new or recurrent WHO stage III/IV condition, diagnosis of new condition or symptom and regimen change). Overall, 51.4% had a score 51.4% had a score ≥4 and 48.6% had a score <4. A predictor score including CD4

  14. Evaluation of Paracheck-PfTM rapid malaria diagnostic test for the diagnosis of malaria among HIV-positive patients in Ibadan, south-western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Falade, C O; Adesina-Adewole, B; Dada-Adegbola, H O; Ajayi, I O; Akinyemi, J O; Ademowo, O G; Adewole, I F; Kanki, P

    2013-01-01

    Febrile illnesses occur frequently among HIV positive patients and these are often treated presumptively as malaria in endemic areas. Parasite-based diagnosis of malaria will eliminate unnecessary treatment, reduce drug–drug interactions and the chances for the emergence of drug resistant Plasmodium. We evaluated finger prick blood samples from 387 people living with HIV (PLWHIV) and suspected of having malaria by expert microscopy and Paracheck-PfTM – a histidine-rich protein-II based malaria rapid diagnostic test. The study was conducted at the PEPFAR supported AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria (APIN) Clinic of the University College Hospital Ibadan, southwest Nigeria. Outcome parameters were prevalence of malaria parasitemia, sensitivity and specificity of Paracheck-Pf as well as the positive and negative predictive values for Paracheck-Pf using microscopy of Giemsa-stained blood film as gold standard. Malaria parasites were detected in 19.1% (74/387) of enrollees by microscopy and 19.3% (74/383) by Paracheck-Pf. Geometric mean parasite density was 501/μl (range 39–749 202/μl). Sensitivity and specificity of Paracheck-Pf at all parasite densities were 55.4% and 89.3% while corresponding figures at parasite densities ≧200/μl were 90.9% and 90.3%. Sensitivity and specificity at parasite densities ≧500/μl was 97.6% and 90.3%. Positive and negative predictive values for parasite density ≧200/μl were 55.4% and 98.7%, respectively. Paracheck-pf was found to be a useful malaria diagnostic tool at parasite densities ≧200/μl facilitating appropriate clinical management. PMID:23683333

  15. Presence of p24-Antigen Associated to Erythrocyte in HIV-Positive Individuals Even in Patients with Undetectable Plasma Viral Load

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Maria Noé; dos Ramos Farias, Maria Sol; Ávila, Maria Mercedes; Rabinovich, Roberto Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Background HIV adherence to erythrocytes has been demonstrated in vitro, and it has been suggested that erythrocytes may be carriers of the virus. However, the association between HIV particles or viral proteins and erythrocytes in HIV-infected individuals is still to be elucidated. Methodology/Principal Findings HIV-positive participants (n = 112) were classified into two groups according to values of three plasma viral loads (pVL) determined during the 12-month period prior to the study. The first group included 71 individuals with detectable pVL, whereas the second group included 41 individuals with undetectable pVL. Plasma viral load, erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and p24-antigen in plasma were determined at the moment of the study. A total of 51 out of the 71 patients with detectable pVL showed erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen whereas 13 showed p24-antigen in plasma. Twenty-two out of the 51 patients with erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen showed pVL<10,000 copies/ml and undetectable p24-antigen in plasma. The data indicates that the amount of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen was not related to p24-antigen in plasma or pVL levels in this group. Among the 41 patients with prior undetectable pVL, eight presented detectable pVL and erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen at the moment of the study. The other 33 showed undetectable pVL and five of these presented erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen. A positive relationship was found between the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen and the detectable pVL at the moment of the study (p<0.00001). Even more, in another series of assays, a detectable viral load associated to erythrocytes was determined and it was always accompanied by erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen detection. Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates the presence of erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen in HIV-infected individuals. Since erythrocyte-associated p24-antigen is not always related to pVL or p24-antigen in plasma

  16. Contemplating abortion: HIV-positive women's decision to terminate pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Maccarthy, Sarah; Rasanathan, Jennifer J K; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Dourado, Ines; Gruskin, Sofia

    2014-01-01

    Research on pregnancy termination largely assumes HIV status is the only reason why HIV-positive women contemplate abortion. As antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes increasingly available and women are living longer, healthier lives, the time has come to consider the influence of other factors on HIV-positive women's reproductive decision-making. Because ART has been free and universally available to Brazilians for more than two decades, Brazil provides a unique context in which to explore these issues. A total of 25 semi-structured interviews exploring women's pregnancy termination decision-making were conducted with women receiving care at the Reference Centre for HIV/AIDS in Salvador, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed, translated into English and coded for analysis. HIV played different roles in women's decision-making. In all, 13 HIV-positive women did not consider terminating their pregnancy. Influential factors described by those who did consider terminating their pregnancy included fear of HIV transmission, fear of HIV-related stigma, family size, economic constraints, partner and provider influence, as well as lack of access to pregnancy termination services and abortifacients. For some HIV-positive women in Brazil, HIV can be the only reason to consider terminating a pregnancy, but other factors are significant. A thorough understanding of all variables affecting reproductive decision-making is necessary for enhancing services and policies and better meeting the needs and rights of HIV-positive women. PMID:24387297

  17. Comparison of Antigen Detection and Nested PCR in CSF Samples of HIV Positive and Negative Patients with Suspected Cryptococcal Meningitis in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Sunita; Singh, Dharmendra Prasad; Yadav, Ramakant

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The cases of cryptococcal meningitis and other forms of cryptococcosis have increased in recent time and the present scenario of the condition with significant morbidity and mortality is actually posing a serious threat to the community, so an early and prompt diagnosis is necessary to prevent serious complications and thus improving the overall disease outcome. Aim Comparison of diagnostic efficacy of nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) with Latex Agglutination Test (LAT) in the Cerebro Spinal Fluid (CSF) samples of the cases of meningitis in HIV positive and negative cases. Materials and Methods We have compared the diagnostic efficacy of Latex Agglutination Test (LAT) with nested Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 200 Cerebrospinal Fluid (CSF) samples, including 14 HIV positive also, in the cases of suspected cryptococcal meningitis. Nested PCR was done in all cases reporting positive by LAT and results were then compared with that of India ink and culture on Sabouraud Dextrose Agar (SDA), and the isolates were further identified by urease, nitrate and sugar assimilation tests. Results Of the 200 cases, including 14 HIV positive, LAT was positive in 46 cases while 154 were negative. Out of these 46 LAT positive cases, nested PCR was positive in 40 cases only, while culture and India ink was positive in 38 and 33 cases respectively. Majority of the cases, 30 (65.2%) were between age group 21-50 years, while 2 (4.3%) in 0-20, and 14 (30.4%) in 51-80 years age group. Conclusion Although negative staining like India ink and nigrosin are most widely used techniques, but these suffer with subjective error. Rapid method like LAT is available but it always has the scope of false positive and negative results. In such cases nested PCR can help in establishing final diagnosis. PMID:27190801

  18. Predicting the short-term risk of diabetes in HIV-positive patients: the Data Collection on Adverse Events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study

    PubMed Central

    Petoumenos, Kathy; Worm, Signe W; Fontas, Eric; Weber, Rainer; De Wit, Stephane; Bruyand, Mathias; Reiss, Peter; El-Sadr, Wafaa; Monforte, Antonella D'Arminio; Friis-Møller, Nina; Lundgren, Jens D; Law, Matthew G

    2012-01-01

    Introduction HIV-positive patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) frequently experience metabolic complications such as dyslipidemia and insulin resistance, as well as lipodystrophy, increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes mellitus (DM). Rates of DM and other glucose-associated disorders among HIV-positive patients have been reported to range between 2 and 14%, and in an ageing HIV-positive population, the prevalence of DM is expected to continue to increase. This study aims to develop a model to predict the short-term (six-month) risk of DM in HIV-positive populations and to compare the existing models developed in the general population. Methods All patients recruited to the Data Collection on Adverse events of Anti-HIV Drugs (D:A:D) study with follow-up data, without prior DM, myocardial infarction or other CVD events and with a complete DM risk factor profile were included. Conventional risk factors identified in the general population as well as key HIV-related factors were assessed using Poisson-regression methods. Expected probabilities of DM events were also determined based on the Framingham Offspring Study DM equation. The D:A:D and Framingham equations were then assessed using an internal-external validation process; area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve and predicted DM events were determined. Results Of 33,308 patients, 16,632 (50%) patients were included, with 376 cases of new onset DM during 89,469 person-years (PY). Factors predictive of DM included higher glucose, body mass index (BMI) and triglyceride levels, and older age. Among HIV-related factors, recent CD4 counts of<200 cells/µL and lipodystrophy were predictive of new onset DM. The mean performance of the D:A:D and Framingham equations yielded AUROC of 0.894 (95% CI: 0.849, 0.940) and 0.877 (95% CI: 0.823, 0.932), respectively. The Framingham equation over-predicted DM events compared to D:A:D for lower glucose and lower

  19. Perceived discrimination and stigma toward children affected by HIV/AIDS and their HIV-positive caregivers in central Haiti.

    PubMed

    Surkan, Pamela J; Mukherjee, Joia S; Williams, David R; Eustache, Eddy; Louis, Ermaze; Jean-Paul, Thierry; Lambert, Wesler; Scanlan, Fiona C; Oswald, Catherine M; Fawzi, Mary Smith

    2010-07-01

    In many settings worldwide, HIV-positive individuals have experienced a significant level of stigma and discrimination. This discrimination may also impact other family members affected by the disease, including children. The aim of our study was to identify factors associated with stigma and/or discrimination among HIV-affected youth and their HIV-positive caregivers in central Haiti. Recruitment of HIV-positive patients with children aged 10-17 years was conducted in 2006-2007. Data on HIV-related stigma and/or discrimination were based on interviews with 451 youth and 292 caregivers. Thirty-two percent of caregivers reported that children were discriminated against because of HIV/AIDS. Commune of residence was associated with discrimination against children affected by HIV/AIDS and HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive caregivers, suggesting variability across communities. Multivariable regression models showed that lacking social support, being an orphan, and caregiver HIV-related stigma were associated with discrimination in HIV-affected children. Caregiver HIV-related stigma demonstrated a strong association with depressive symptoms. The results could inform strategies for potential interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination. These may include increasing social and caregiver support of children affected by HIV, enhancing support of caregivers to reduce burden of depressive symptoms, and promoting reduction of HIV-related stigma and discrimination at the community-level. PMID:20635244

  20. Perceived discrimination and stigma toward children affected by HIV/AIDS and their HIV-positive caregivers in central Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Surkan, Pamela J.; Mukherjee, Joia S.; Williams, David R.; Eustache, Eddy; Louis, Ermaze; Jean-Paul, Thierry; Lambert, Wesler; Scanlan, Fiona C.; Oswald, Catherine M.; Fawzi, Mary C. Smith

    2010-01-01

    In many settings worldwide, HIV-positive individuals have experienced a significant level of stigma and discrimination. This discrimination may also impact other family members affected by the disease, including children. The aim of our study was to identify factors associated with stigma and/or discrimination among HIV-affected youth and their HIV-positive caregivers in central Haiti. Recruitment of HIV-positive patients with children aged 10–17 years was conducted in 2006–2007. Data on HIV-related stigma and/or discrimination were based on interviews with 451 youth and 292 caregivers. Thirty-two percent of caregivers reported that children were discriminated against because of HIV/AIDS. Commune of residence was associated with discrimination against children affected by HIV/AIDS and HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive caregivers, suggesting variability across communities. Multivariable regression models showed that lacking social support, being an orphan, and caregiver HIV-related stigma were associated with discrimination in HIV-affected children. Caregiver HIV-related stigma demonstrated a strong association with depressive symptoms. The results could inform strategies for potential interventions to reduce HIV-related stigma and discrimination. These may include increasing social and caregiver support of children affected by HIV, enhancing support of caregivers to reduce burden of depressive symptoms, and promoting reduction of HIV-related stigma and discrimination at the community-level. PMID:20635244

  1. Telling Others You Are HIV Positive

    MedlinePlus

    ... Language: Fact Sheet 204 Telling Others You are HIV Positive WHAT ARE THE ISSUES? GENERAL GUIDELINES SPECIAL ... SPECIAL SITUATIONS People You May Have Exposed to HIV: It can be very difficult to disclose your ...

  2. Asymptomatic reproductive tract infections/sexually transmitted infections among HIV positive women.

    PubMed

    Bhattar, S; Bhalla, P; Rawat, D; Tripathi, R; Kaur, R; Sardana, K

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to highlight the importance of screening all HIV positive women for various reproductive tract infections/sexually transmitted infections (RTIs/STIs) irrespective of symptoms and to determine its occurrence in asymptomatic HIV positive women. Relevant specimens were collected for diagnosis of various RTIs/STIs. STIs were diagnosed in nearly one-third of the HIV positive asymptomatic patients which is quite high. The national strategy for STIs/RTIs control misses out large number of asymptomatic RTIs/STIs in HIV positive women which is responsible for silently transmitting these infections in the community. So this strategy should be modified to include screening of all HIV positives women irrespective of symptoms of STIs/RTIs. PMID:26068345

  3. Evaluation of patient care cascade for HIV-positive patients diagnosed in La Romana, Dominican Republic in 2011: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Alex S; Lerebours, Leonel; Amesty, Silvia; de la Rosa, Milagros; Gil, Elizabeth; Halpern, Mina; Nicholas, Stephen; Lamb, Matthew R

    2016-04-01

    The Caribbean has the highest adult HIV prevalence in the world after sub-Saharan Africa (2011). One sub-population in the Dominican Republic is the migratory Batey community primarily comprised of Haitian immigrants with limited access to healthcare and HIV prevalence rates of between 3.0% and 9.0%, compared to 0.7% nationally. This retrospective cohort study describes the cumulative retention from diagnosis to virological suppression for newly-diagnosed HIV-infected adults presenting to the Clínica de Familia and its Batey programme in La Romana, during 2011. Of the patients diagnosed with HIV, 65% entered into care, 59% completed immunologic testing, 53% were eligible for antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, 36% initiated ART within three months of eligibility and 27% were retained in care. Seventeen per cent of those retained on ART with a 12-month viral load measure had undetectable viral load. Attrition primarily occurred before ART initiation. The Batey programme had a first step lost-to-follow-up of 88% compared to 20% at the clinic (p < 0.001). This retrospective study details the continuum of care and indicates where structural changes must occur to increase continuity between steps. The manuscript results are important to help implement programmes to enhance engagement and retention in HIV primary care. PMID:25941055

  4. Associated Factors of Suicidal Thoughts in HIV-Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Dabaghzadeh, Fatemeh; Jabbari, Fatemeh; Khalili, Hossein; Abbasian, Ladan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: As a first study, suicidal ideation and its correlates have been evaluated in Iranian HIV positive population. Methods: One hundred and fifty HIV-positive individuals were recruited in this cross-sectional study. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Positive and Negative Suicide Ideation (PANSI), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Inventory (PSQI) and Somatization subscale of Symptom Checklist 90 (SCL 90) as self- reported questionnaires were used to assess the patients’ anxiety and depression status, suicidal thoughts, sleep quality and physiological factors, respectively. Results: Antiretroviral therapy and efavirenz intake did not show any significant effects on the patients’ suicidal ideation. Anxiety (p<0.001), depression (p<0.001), poor physical activity (P<0.001) and sleep quality (p<0.001) were significantly associated with the patients’ negative suicidal ideation. From the patients’ demographic data, unemployment (p = 0.04), living alone (p = 0.01), and lack of family support (p = 0.01) were correlated with the patients’ negative suicidal thoughts. Conclusion: Although hospitals are the main referral centers for providing care for HIV-positive individuals in Tehran, Iran, conducting a multi-center study with sufficient sample size from different areas of our country that include individuals with different behaviors and cultures is essential to confirm the results of this study. PMID:26877752

  5. Trends of CD4 cell count levels at the initiation of antiretroviral therapy over time and factors associated with late initiation of antiretroviral therapy among Asian HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    Kiertiburanakul, Sasisopin; Boettiger, David; Lee, Man Po; Omar, Sharifah Fs; Tanuma, Junko; Ng, Oon Tek; Durier, Nicolas; Phanuphak, Praphan; Ditangco, Rossana; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Kantipong, Pacharee; Lee, Christopher Kc; Mustafa, Mahiran; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Ratanasuwan, Winai; Merati, Tuti Parwati; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Wong, Wing Wai; Zhang, Fujie; Pham, Thanh Thuy; Pujari, Sanjay; Choi, Jun Yong; Yunihastuti, Evy; Sungkanuparph, Somnuek

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been rapidly scaled up in Asia, most HIV-positive patients in the region still present with late-stage HIV disease. We aimed to determine trends of pre-ART CD4 levels over time in Asian HIV-positive patients and to determine factors associated with late ART initiation. Methods Data from two regional cohort observational databases were analyzed for trends in median CD4 cell counts at ART initiation and the proportion of late ART initiation (CD4 cell counts <200 cells/mm3 or prior AIDS diagnosis). Predictors for late ART initiation and mortality were determined. Results A total of 2737 HIV-positive ART-naïve patients from 22 sites in 13 Asian countries and territories were eligible. The overall median (IQR) CD4 cell count at ART initiation was 150 (46–241) cells/mm3. Median CD4 cell counts at ART initiation increased over time, from a low point of 115 cells/mm3 in 2008 to a peak of 302 cells/mm3 after 2011 (p for trend 0.002). The proportion of patients with late ART initiation significantly decreased over time from 79.1% before 2007 to 36.3% after 2011 (p for trend <0.001). Factors associated with late ART initiation were year of ART initiation (e.g. 2010 vs. before 2007; OR 0.40, 95% CI 0.27–0.59; p<0.001), sex (male vs. female; OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.18–1.93; p=0.001) and HIV exposure risk (heterosexual vs. homosexual; OR 1.66, 95% CI 1.24–2.23; p=0.001 and intravenous drug use vs. homosexual; OR 3.03, 95% CI 1.77–5.21; p<0.001). Factors associated with mortality after ART initiation were late ART initiation (HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.19–3.79; p=0.010), sex (male vs. female; HR 2.12, 95% CI 1.31–3.43; p=0.002), age (≥51 vs. ≤30 years; HR 3.91, 95% CI 2.18–7.04; p<0.001) and hepatitis C serostatus (positive vs. negative; HR 2.48, 95% CI 1.−4.36; p=0.035). Conclusions Median CD4 cell count at ART initiation among Asian patients significantly increases over time but the proportion of patients with late

  6. A ‘good hospital’: Nurse and patient perceptions of good clinical care for HIV-positive people on antiretroviral treatment in rural Zimbabwe—A mixed-methods qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catherine; Scott, Kerry; Madanhire, Claudius; Nyamukapa, Constance; Gregson, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral treatment for HIV is gradually being made available across sub-Saharan Africa. With antiretroviral treatment, HIV can be approached as a chronic, manageable condition rather than a shorter-term issue of palliative care. This treatment involves repeated interaction between health staff and patients for ongoing check-ups and prescription refills. Objective This study aimed to understand patient and healthcare staff perceptions of good clinical antiretroviral treatment care. Design Over 100 h of ethnographic observation at healthcare sites; interviews and focus groups with 25 healthcentre workers (mostly nurses), 53 HIV-positive adults taking ARVs and 40 carers of children on ART. The data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Setting Three healthcare sites providing free antiretroviral drugs in rural Zimbabwe, where the adult HIV infection rate is approximately 20%. Results Contrary to reports of poor antiretroviral treatment adherence and task-oriented rather than patient-oriented nursing, our study found great patient commitment to adherence, outstanding nurse dedication and a pervasive sense of hope about coping with HIV. Within this context however there were some situations where patients and nurses had different expectations of the medical encounter, leading to stress and dissatisfaction. Patients and staff both emphasized the importance of nurse kindness, understanding, confidentiality and acceptance (i.e. treating HIV patients ‘like normal’) and patient adherence to medical directions. However, nurses at times overlooked the negative effects of long wait times and frequent hospital visits. Further, nurses sometimes conflated medical adherence with general patient obedience in all aspects of the nurse–patient relationships. Patients and staff were frustrated by the ambiguity and unpredictability surrounding key elements of hospital visits such as how much patients had to pay for service, how long it would take to be

  7. Cervical cancer screening among HIV-positive women

    PubMed Central

    Leece, Pamela; Kendall, Claire; Touchie, Claire; Pottie, Kevin; Angel, Jonathan B.; Jaffey, James

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To determine the rate of cervical screening among HIV-positive women who received care at a tertiary care clinic, and to determine whether screening rates were influenced by having a primary care provider. DESIGN Retrospective chart review. SETTING Tertiary care outpatient clinic in Ottawa, Ont. PARTICIPANTS Women who were HIV-positive receiving care at the Ottawa Hospital General Campus Immunodeficiency Clinic between July 1, 2002, and June 30, 2005. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Whether patients had primary care providers and whether they received cervical screening. We recorded information on patient demographics, HIV status, primary care providers, and cervical screening, including date, results, and type of health care provider ordering the screening. RESULTS Fifty-eight percent (126 of 218) of the women had at least 1 cervical screening test during the 3-year period. Thirty-three percent (42 of 126) of the women who underwent cervical screening had at least 1 abnormal test result. The proportion of women who did not have any cervical tests performed was higher among women who did not have primary care providers (8 of 12 [67%] vs 84 of 206 [41%]; relative risk 1.6, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 2.52, P < .05), although this group was small. CONCLUSION Despite the high proportion of abnormal cervical screening test results among HIV-positive women, screening rates remained low. Our results support our hypothesis that those women who do not have primary care providers are less likely to undergo cervical screening. PMID:21375064

  8. Factors Associated with Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery among HAART-Naïve HIV-Positive Women in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT) P1025 Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T.; Leister, Erin; Kacanek, Deborah; Hughes, Michael D.; Bardeguez, Arlene; Livingston, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Shapiro, David E.; Tuomala, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background High delivery maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level (viral load, VL) is a risk factor for mother to child transmission and poor maternal health. Objective To identify factors associated with detectable VL at delivery despite initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Design Multicenter observational study. Setting 67 US AIDS clinical research sites. Patients HIV-1-positive pregnant women who initiated HAART during pregnancy. Measurements Descriptive summaries and associations between socio-demographic, HIV disease, treatment and pregnancy-related risk factors and detectable VL (>400copies/mL) at delivery. Results Between October 2002 and December 2011, 671 women met inclusion criteria and 13% had detectable VL at delivery. Factors associated with detectable VL included multiparity (16.4% vs 8% nulliparous, p=0.002), black non-Hispanic ethnicity (17.6% vs 6.6% Hispanic and 6.6% white/non-Hispanic, p<0.001), 11th grade or less education (17.6% vs.12.1% high school graduate and 6.7% some college or higher, p=0.013), and initiation of HAART in third trimester (23.9% vs 12.3% second and 8.6% first, p=0.002), timing of HIV diagnosis prior to current pregnancy (16.1% vs 11% during current pregnancy, p=0.051), and timing of first prenatal visit in 3rd trimester (33.3% vs 14.3% second and 10.5% first, p=0.002). Women who experienced treatment interruptions or reported poor medication adherence during pregnancy were more likely to have detectable VL at delivery than women with no interruptions or who reported better adherence. Limitations Women entered the study at varying times during pregnancy and for this and other reasons there was incomplete data on many covariates. Conclusions In this large U.S.-based cohort of HIV-1 positive women, 13% of women who initiated HAART during pregnancy had detectable VL at delivery. The timing of HAART initiation and prenatal care along with medication adherence during pregnancy appear to be

  9. Patients who lack capacity and lack surrogates: can they enroll in hospice?

    PubMed

    Effiong, Andem; Harman, Stephanie

    2014-10-01

    Patients who lack capacity and lack surrogates are among the most vulnerable patients we care for in palliative care. In the case we present here, we have considered how to make end-of-life decisions for a patient who lacks both capacity and surrogates, who has a terminal illness, and who is not a candidate for disease-modifying treatments. We first define and characterize this population of patients through a review of the literature and then explore some decision-making quandaries that are encountered at the end of life. Finally, we make recommendations on how best to proceed with decision making for this vulnerable population. PMID:24709366

  10. Incidence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) in a Multicenter Cohort of HIV-Positive Patients in Spain 2004–2011: Increasing Rates of HCV Diagnosis but Not of HCV Seroconversions

    PubMed Central

    Sobrino-Vegas, Paz; Monge Corella, Susana; Serrano-Villar, Sergio; Gutiérrez, Félix; Blanco, José Ramón; Santos, Ignacio; del Romero, Jorge; Segura, Ferrán; Portilla, Joaquín; Guillén, Santiago Moreno; del Amo, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We aim to describe rates and risk factors of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) diagnoses, follow-up HCV testing and HCV seroconversion from 2004–2011 in a cohort of HIV-positive persons in Spain. Methods CoRIS is a multicentre, open and prospective cohort recruiting adult HIV-positive patients naïve to antiretroviral therapy. We analysed patients with at least one negative and one follow-up HCV serology. Incidence Rates (IR) were calculated and multivariate Poisson regression was used to estimate adjusted Rates Ratios (aIRR). Results Of 2112 subjects, 53 HCV diagnoses were observed, IR = 0.93/100py (95%CI: 0.7–1.2). IR increased from 0.88 in 2004–05 to 1.36 in 2010–11 (aIRR = 1.55; 95%CI: 0.37–6.55). In men who have sex with men (MSM) from 0.76 to 1.10 (aIRR = 1.45; 95%CI: 0.31–6.82); in heterosexual (HTX) subjects from 1.19 to 1.28 (aIRR = 1.08; 95%CI: 0.11–10.24). HCV seroconversion rates decreased from 1.77 to 0.65 (aIRR = 0.37; 95%CI: 0.12–1.11); in MSM from 1.06 to 0.49 (aIRR = 0.46; 95%CI: 0.09–2.31); in HTX from 2.55 to 0.59 (aIRR = 0.23; 95%CI: 0.06–0.98). HCV infection risk was higher for injecting drug users (IDU) compared to HTX (aIRR = 9.63;95%CI: 2.9–32.2); among MSM, for subjects aged 40–50 compared to 30 or less (IRR = 3.21; 95%CI: 1.7–6.2); and among HTX, for female sex (aIRR = 2.35; 95%CI: 1.03–5.34) and <200 CD4-count (aIRR = 2.39; 95%CI: 0.83–6.89). Conclusion We report increases in HCV diagnoses rates which seem secondary to intensification of HCV follow-up testing but not to rises in HCV infection rates. HCV IR is higher in IDU. In MSM, HCV IR increases with age. Among HTX, HCV IR is higher in women and in subjects with impaired immunological situation. PMID:25549224

  11. Lay Counsellor-Based Risk Reduction Intervention with HIV Positive Diagnosed Patients at Public HIV Counselling and Testing Sites in Mpumalanga, South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peltzer, Karl; Tabane, Cily; Matseke, Gladys; Simbayi, Leickness

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the feasibility, fidelity, and effect of a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk reduction intervention delivered to HIV-infected patients by lay counsellors during routine HIV counselling and testing (HCT) public service in Mpumalanga, South Africa. Methods: A total of 488 HIV-infected patients, aged 18 years and older,…

  12. [Kidney transplantation in HIV positive patients: two case reports from Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre initial experience].

    PubMed

    Spuldaro, Fábio; Ribeiro, Adriana Reginato; Vicari, Alessandra Rosa; Denicol, Nancy Tamara; Dini, Leonardo Infantini; dos Santos, Emanuel Burck; Pegas, Karla Laís; Gonçalves, Luiz Felipe Santos; Manfro, Roberto Ceratti

    2012-01-01

    Recently kidney transplantation has become an accepted treatment modality for the treatment of HIV infected patients with end-stage renal diseases. For such treatment it is required stability of clinical and laboratory parameters related to HIV infection and the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy. In this report we present the first two cases in Brazil of patients with HIV infection transplanted with organs from deceased donors performed successfully in our institution. The interactions between immunosuppressive and antiretroviral drugs, the co-infections, cardiovascular risk profile and the high incidence of acute rejection remain the major problems to be dealt with in these patients. PMID:23318828

  13. Treatment outcomes of HIV-positive patients on first-line antiretroviral therapy in private versus public HIV clinics in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Moyo, Faith; Chasela, Charles; Brennan, Alana T; Ebrahim, Osman; Sanne, Ian M; Long, Lawrence; Evans, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the widely documented success of antiretroviral therapy (ART), stakeholders continue to face the challenges of poor HIV treatment outcomes. While many studies have investigated patient-level causes of poor treatment outcomes, data on the effect of health systems on ART outcomes are scarce. Objective We compare treatment outcomes among patients receiving HIV care and treatment at a public and private HIV clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Patients and methods This was a retrospective cohort analysis of ART naïve adults (≥18.0 years), initiating ART at a public or private clinic in Johannesburg between July 01, 2007 and December 31, 2012. Cox proportional-hazards regression was used to identify baseline predictors of mortality and loss to follow-up (>3 months late for the last scheduled visit). Generalized estimating equations were used to determine predictors of failure to suppress viral load (≥400 copies/mL) while the Wilcoxon rank-sum test was used to compare the median absolute change in CD4 count from baseline to 12 months post-ART initiation. Results 12,865 patients initiated ART at the public clinic compared to 610 at the private clinic. The patients were similar in terms of sex and age at initiation. Compared to public clinic patients, private clinic patients initiated ART at higher median CD4 counts (159 vs 113 cells/mm3) and World Health Organization stage I/II (76.1% vs 58.5%). Adjusted hazard models showed that compared to public clinic patients, private clinic patients were less likely to die (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 0.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.35–0.70) but were at increased risk of loss to follow-up (aHR 1.80; 95% CI 1.59–2.03). By 12 months post-ART initiation, private clinic patients were less likely to have a detectable viral load (adjusted relative risk 0.65; 95% CI 0.49–0.88) and recorded higher median CD4 change from baseline (184 cells/mm3 interquartile range 101–300 vs 158 cells/mm3 interquartile

  14. Peripheral Arterial Disease and Ankle-Brachial Index Abnormalites in Young and Middle-Aged HIV-Positive Patients in Lower Silesia, Poland

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Wiesława; Knysz, Brygida; Arczyńska, Katarzyna; Drelichowska, Justyna; Czarnecki, Marcin; Gąsiorowski, Jacek; Karczewski, Maciej; Witkiewicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a clinical manifestation of atherosclerosis and mainly refers to elderly patients, having a negative impact on their functionality and quality of life. The findings of previous studies in HIV-infected patients have shown that cardiovascular risk is higher and PAD occurs more frequently than in the general population. There are also contradictory observations. Much less is known about the ankle-brachial index (ABI) value in asymptomatic HIV-infected patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of PAD and ankle-brachial index abnormalities as well as to determine risk factors related to the disease in a group of Polish HIV–positive patients. Methods and Findings One hundred and eleven young to middle aged HIV–positive subjects and 40 noninfected subjects were enrolled into the study. Resting ABI measurements were performed and cardiovascular risk was analysed as well. Subgroups were created according to the ABI values: low (PAD), borderline, normal, high and altered ABI. Symptomatic PAD was observed in 2 HIV–positive patients, asymptomatic PAD was not diagnosed. The ABI value is lower and more varied, in 22.5% of the study group altered ABI values were found. Six subjects demonstrated borderline ABI, and 15 high ABI, including >1.4. In the control group no low or very high values were reported. A relation between low ABI and cardiovascular family history and between altered ABI and high–density–lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL–C) level was demonstrated. Conclusions In young and middle–aged HIV–positive patients, symptomatic PAD prevalence is comparable to that observed in the overall population. Among asymptomatic patients PAD is not reported. The ABI value in HIV–positive patients is more varied compared to the HIV–negative subjects; the altered ABI shows a strong relation with low HDL–C levels and metabolic syndrome. PMID:25503743

  15. Temporal distribution of baseline characteristics and association with early mortality among HIV-positive patients at University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Joshua O; Adesina, Olubukola A; Kuti, Modupe O; Ogunbosi, Babatunde O; Irabor, Achiaka E; Odaibo, Georgina N; Olaleye, David O; Adewole, Isaac F

    2015-01-01

    The first six months of HIV care and treatment are very important for long-term outcome. Early mortality (within 6 months of care initiation) undermines care and treatment goals. This study assessed the temporal distribution in baseline characteristics and early mortality among HIV patients at the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria from 2006-2013. Factors associated with early mortality were also investigated. This was a retrospective analysis of data from 14 857 patients enrolled for care and treatment at the adult antiretroviral clinic of the University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. Effects of factors associated with early mortality were summarised using a hazard ratio with a 95% confidence interval obtained from Cox proportional hazard regression models. The mean age of the subjects was 36.4 (SD=10.2) years with females being in the majority (68.1%). While patients' demographic characteristics remained virtually the same over time, there was significant decline in the prevalence of baseline opportunistic infections (2006-2007=55.2%; 2011-2013=38.0%). Overall, 460 (3.1%) patients were known to have died within 6 months of enrollment in care/treatment. There was no significant trend in incidence of early mortality. Factors associated with early mortality include: male sex, HIV encephalopathy, low CD4 count (< 50 cells), and anaemia. To reduce early mortality, community education should be promoted, timely access to care and treatment should be facilitated and the health system further strengthened to care for high risk patients. PMID:26282931

  16. Expression of arginase I and inducible nitric oxide synthase in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes of HIV-positive patients

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, NAICHUN; DENG, JIANNING; WU, FENGYAO; LU, XIANGCHAN; HUANG, LEI; ZHAO, MIN

    2016-01-01

    Arginase I (Arg I) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are important in regulating immune functions through their metabolites. Previous studies have revealed that the expression of Arg I is increased and the expression of iNOS is reduced in the serum and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. As one of the most important immune organs and HIV replication sites, whether similar changes are present in the lymph nodes following HIV infection remains to be elucidated. To investigate this, the present study collected lymph node and blood specimens from 52 HIV-infected patients to measure the expression levels of Arg I and iNOS by immunohistochemistry and fluoresence-based flow cytometry. Compared with control subjects without HIV infection, the patients with HIV had significantly higher expression levels of Arg I in the lymph nodes and higher frequencies of Arg I+ CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells in the blood and lymph nodes, and these results were contrary the those of iNOS in the corresponding compartments. The expression levels of Arg I in the lymph nodes and blood were negatively associated with peripheral CD4+ T cell count and positively associated with viral load. However, the expression levels of iNOS in the lymph nodes and blood were positively associated with peripheral CD4+ T cell count and negatively associated with viral load. These results showed that alterations in the expression levels of Arg I and iNOS in the peripheral T cells and peripheral nodes of HIV infected patients are associated with disease progression in these patients. These results indicate a potential to therapeutic strategy for delaying disease progression through regulating and manipulating the expression levels of Arg I and iNOS in patients infected with HIV. PMID:26647762

  17. Lost opportunities to identify and treat HIV-positive patients: results from a baseline assessment of provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling (PITC) in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Saeed; Schwarz, Monica; Flick, Robert; Rees, Chris A.; Harawa, Mwelura; Simon, Katie; Robison, Jeff; Kazembe, Peter N.; Kim, Maria H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess implementation of provider-initiated testing and counseling (PITC) for HIV in Malawi. Methods A review of PITC practices within 118 departments in 12 Ministry of Health (MoH) facilities across Malawi was conducted. Information on PITC practices was collected via a health facility survey. Data describing patient visits and HIV tests were abstracted from routinely collected program data. Results Reported PITC practices were highly variable. Most providers practiced symptom-based PITC. Antenatal clinics and maternity wards reported widespread use of routine opt-out PITC. In 2014, there was approximately 1 HIV test for every 15 clinic visits. HIV status was ascertained in 94.3% (5,293/5,615) of patients at tuberculosis clinics, 92.6% (30,675/33,142) of patients at antenatal clinics, and 49.4% (6,871/13,914) of patients at sexually transmitted infection clinics. Reported challenges to delivering PITC included test kit shortages (71/71 providers), insufficient physical space (58/71), and inadequate number of HIV counselors (32/71) while providers from inpatient units cited the inability to test on weekends. Conclusions Various models of PITC currently exist at MoH facilities in Malawi. Only antenatal and maternity clinics demonstrated high rates of routine opt-out PITC. The low ratio of facility visits to HIV tests suggests missed opportunities for HIV testing. However, the high proportion of patients at TB and antenatal clinics with known HIV status suggests routine PITC is feasible. These results underscore the need to develop clear, standardized PITC policy and protocols, and to address obstacles of limited health commodities, infrastructure, and human resources. PMID:26806378

  18. The HIV positive dentist in the United Kingdom--a legal perspective.

    PubMed

    Williams, M

    2009-07-25

    In 1991, the United Kingdom Advisory Panel (UKAP) was set up under the aegis of the Expert Advisory Group on AIDS (EAGA) to consider individual cases of HIV infected healthcare workers. Policy and guidance relating to HIV infected healthcare workers is set out in a Department of Health report. Although more recently the EAGA has advised that an HIV positive dentist may under certain conditions provide clinical treatment for patients who are also HIV positive, the advice from UKAP relating to exposure-prone procedures means, in effect, that dentists who become HIV positive must cease contemporary clinical dentistry. The plight of dentists who become HIV positive and face this situation has been poignantly described as '...the dental practice equivalent of clearing your desk and being escorted off the premises.' PMID:19629114

  19. The ACTN3 R577X polymorphism affects the lipid profile and the prognosis of nutritional intervention in HIV-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Aranalde, Laura C R; Pederzoli, Bruna S; Marten, Thais; Barros, Flavio C; Basso, Rossana P; Silveira, Jussara M; Valle, Sandra C; Pieniz, Simone; Araujo, Ronaldo C; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; Schadock, Ines; Schneider, Augusto; Barros, Carlos C

    2016-06-01

    The hypothesis of the present study is that the polymorphisms in the APOC3, CEPT, ACE, and ACTN3 genes can affect the outcome of nutritional intervention and the plasma lipid profile of HIV+ patients. To test the hypothesis, genetic material was collected from buccal cells, and serum was collected for biochemical analysis. Sixty-five patients were analyzed. The incorporation of protease inhibitor (PI) was more frequent in women (77% vs 33% in men). Nutritional intervention improved anthropometric parameters independent of the genotype. Patients with the RR genotype for the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism had lower glycemia (RR = 95.4 ± 6.5 mg/dL, RX = 102.6 ± 10.6 mg/dL, XX = 110.1 ± 16.3 mg/dL; P = .03) and a greater reduction in low-density lipoproteins (LDL) after intervention (LDL: RR = -23.7 ± 15.8 mg/dL, RX = 1.32 ± 5.13 mg/dL, XX = 30.21 ± 24.4 mg/dL; P = .01). Patients using PI had a negative response to dietary intervention regarding the levels of high-density lipoprotein (-2.4 ± 1.70 with PI, 2.56 ± 1.60 mg/dL without PI; P = .02), very low density lipoprotein (0.84 ± 2.73 with IP, -5.46 ± 3.37 mg/dL without PI; P = .03), and triglycerides (1.79 ± 13.22 with PI, -34.00 ± 17.67 mg/dL without PI; P = .052). This response was also independent of the genotype (P > 0.05) and suggested the need for oral lipid-lowering drugs in all HIV+ patients using PI. Our results indicate that the ACTN3 R577X polymorphism is a good predictor of both the lipid profile and the prognosis of nutritional intervention in reducing LDL in HIV+ patients. PMID:27188902

  20. Evaluation of T, B and natural killer lymphocyte in the cervical stroma of HIV-positive and negative patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lucena, Adriana A S; Guimarães, Mírian Viviane M B; Michelin, Márcia A; Lodi, Cláudia T C; Lima, Maria Inês M; Murta, Eddie Fernando Candido; Melo, Victor Hugo

    2016-01-01

    Cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) are closely associated with oncogenic subtypes of the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the presence of this virus, it is known that the activation or suppression of immune system is the key to the development, progression and/or regression of cervical lesions. Therefore, the objective of this study is to compare the local immune response among HIV-seropositive and seronegative patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia regarding the expression of T lymphocytes (CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+), B lymphocytes (CD20+) and natural killers cells (CD56+) in the cervical stroma. A cross-sectional study of paraffin blocks containing cervical tissue after conization by the Loop Electrosurgical Excision Procedure (LEEP) from 47 HIV-seropositive and 38 seronegative patients with CIN. Cervical stroma immunohistochemistry was performed in the CIN area. The Fisher's exact test was used for the statistical analysis. When HIV-seropositive and seronegative women were compared, the seropositive women had a higher count of CD8+ T lymphocytes (52.1% versus 28.9%, P<0.04). Considering CIN degree (CIN 1 and CIN 2/3), the HIV-seronegative patients with CIN 1 had a low count of CD20+B-lymphocytes (7.1%) in comparison with CIN 1 HIV seropositive and with CIN 2/3 HIV-seronegative patients, respectively 50% (P<0.018) and 54.5% (P<0.0048). The HIV infection and degree of CIN influenced the cytotoxic lymphocytes inducing an increase in the number of cells high count of CD20+ lymphocytes with CIN 1. PMID:26545568

  1. Treatment failure and drug resistance in HIV-positive patients on tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy in western Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Katherine; Diero, Lameck; DeLong, Allison; Balamane, Maya; Reitsma, Marissa; Kemboi, Emmanuel; Orido, Millicent; Emonyi, Wilfred; Coetzer, Mia; Hogan, Joseph; Kantor, Rami

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Tenofovir-based first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) is recommended globally. To evaluate the impact of its incorporation into the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, we examined treatment failure and drug resistance among a cohort of patients on tenofovir-based first-line ART at the Academic Model Providing Access to Healthcare, a large HIV treatment programme in western Kenya. Methods We determined viral load (VL), drug resistance and their correlates in patients on ≥six months of tenofovir-based first-line ART. Based on enrolled patients’ characteristics, we described these measures in those with (prior ART group) and without (tenofovir-only group) prior non-tenofovir-based first-line ART using Wilcoxon rank sum and Fisher's exact tests. Results Among 333 participants (55% female; median age 41 years; median CD4 336 cells/µL), detectable (>40 copies/mL) VL was found in 18%, and VL>1000 copies/mL (WHO threshold) in 10%. Virologic failure at both thresholds was significantly higher in 217 participants in the tenofovir-only group compared with 116 in the prior ART group using both cut-offs (24% vs. 7% with VL>40 copies/mL; 15% vs. 1% with VL>1000 copies/mL). Failure in the tenofovir-only group was associated with lower CD4 values and advanced WHO stage. In 35 available genotypes from 51 participants in the tenofovir-only group with VL>40 copies/mL (69% subtype A), any resistance was found in 89% and dual-class resistance in 83%. Tenofovir signature mutation K65R occurred in 71% (17/24) of the patients infected with subtype A. Patients with K65R had significantly lower CD4 values, higher WHO stage and more resistance mutations. Conclusions In this Kenyan cohort, tenofovir-based first-line ART resulted in good (90%) virologic suppression including high suppression (99%) after switch from non-tenofovir-based ART. Lower virologic suppression (85%) and high observed resistance levels (89%) in the tenofovir-only group impact future treatment

  2. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes, assessment of HPV 16 and 18 viral load and anal related lesions in HIV positive patients: a cross-sectional analysis.

    PubMed

    Tamalet, Catherine; Obry-Roguet, Veronique; Ressiot, Emmanuelle; Bregigeon, Sylvie; Del Grande, Jean; Poizot-Martin, Isabelle

    2014-03-01

    Natural history of anal intraepithelial neoplasia and anal cancer is not fully understood. Factors associated with cytological abnormalities and predictors of progression to high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia still deserve investigation. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to assess the prevalence of HPV types, the relationship between HPV genotypes, HPV 16/18 viral load and cytological abnormalities in male and female HIV-infected patients. One hundred and twenty-two (72.6%) patients were infected with HPV, 75 (61%) had multiple HPV infection, and 94 (77%) had high-risk HPV infection. The most frequently identified HPV types were HPV 16 (64%), HPV 6 (39%), HPV 18 (31%), HPV 53 (14.7%), HPV 33 (10.6%), HPV 11 (8.2%), HPV 70 (5.7%), and HPV 61 (4.9%). The HPV types which were most frequently found in combination were HPV 6 + 16 (9.8%), 6 + 16 + 18 (8.2%), 16 + 18 (6.6%), 6 + 18 (4.9%), 16 + 33 (3.3%), 16 + 53 (3.3%). Median HPV16 and 18 viral loads were 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.0-7.3] and 6.1 log10 copies/10(6) cells [IQR 5.7-6.0], respectively. Male gender (P = 0.03, OR: 1.2 [1.0-1.4]) and homo/bisexual transmission routes (P = 0.044, OR: 1.4 [1.0-1.9]) were associated with HPV 16 infection. An HPV 16 viral load cut-off ≥5.3 log10 copies/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl were independent factors associated with abnormal cytology. In the absence of national consensus guidelines, a strict regular follow-up at shorter intervals is recommended for HIV-infected patients with abnormal cytology, especially low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, an HPV 16 viral load ≥5.3 log/10(6) cells and a CD4+ cell count ≤200/µl. PMID:24154930

  3. Death rates in HIV-positive antiretroviral-naive patients with CD4 count greater than 350 cells per microL in Europe and North America: a pooled cohort observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether antiretroviral (ART) naive HIV-positive individuals with high CD4 counts have a raised mortality risk compared with the general population, but this is relevant for considering earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Methods Pooling data from 23 European and North American cohorts, we calculated country-, age-, sex-, and year-standardised mortality ratios (SMRs), stratifying by risk group. Included patients had at least one pre-ART CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3. The association between CD4 count and death rate was evaluated using Poisson regression methods. Findings Of 40,830 patients contributing 80,682 person-years of follow up with CD4 count above 350 cells/mm3, 419 (1.0%) died. The SMRs (95% confidence interval) were 1.30 (1.06-1.58) in homosexual men, and 2.94 (2.28-3.73) and 9.37 (8.13-10.75) in the heterosexual and IDU risk groups respectively. CD4 count above 500 cells/mm3 was associated with a lower death rate than 350-499 cells/mm3: adjusted rate ratios (95% confidence intervals) for 500-699 cells/mm3 and above 700 cells/mm3 were 0.77 (0.61-0.95) and 0.66 (0.52-0.85) respectively. Interpretation In HIV-infected ART-naive patients with high CD4 counts, death rates were raised compared with the general population. In homosexual men this was modest, suggesting that a proportion of the increased risk in other groups is due to confounding by other factors. Even in this high CD4 count range, lower CD4 count was associated with raised mortality. PMID:20638118

  4. High Rates of Sexually transmitted infections in HIV-positive patients in the Australian HIV Observational Database - a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Mulhall, Brian P; Wright, Stephen; Allen, Debbie; Brown, Katherine; Dickson, Bridget; Grotowski, Miriam; Jackson, Eva; Petoumenos, Kathy; Read, Phillip; Read, Timothy; Russell, Darren; Smith, David J; Templeton, David J; Fairley, Christopher K; Law, Matthew G

    2015-01-01

    Background Sexually transmitted infections (STI) may directly increase the risk of HIV infection, or may indicate sexual practices that increase the risk of HIV infection. In persons with HIV they probably also increase the infectiousness of HIV, even in the context of treatment with antiretroviral drugs (ARV). Estimating STI in this group has proved problematic, and there are few longitudinal studies able to accurately measure incidence. Methods In 2010, we established a cohort of individuals from ten widely dispersed sexual health clinics that were already enrolled in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD). We calculated retrospective diagnosis rates for four STI (chlamydia, gonorrhoea, infectious syphilis, anogenital warts) from 2005-2010, and prospective incidence rates from 2010-2011. Results At baseline (2010) , the patient characteristics (n=554) were similar to the rest of AHOD (n=1767), namely they were predominantly male, homosexual, middle-aged, and pre- treated with ARV. Overall, the incidence of any STI was 12.5/100 person years (py). There was a gradual increase in chlamydial infections , from 3.4/100 py (95% CI 1.9-5.7) in 2005 to 6.7/100py (95% CI 4.5-9.5) in 2011, with a substantial peak of 8.1/100py (95% CI 5.6-11.2) in 2010. The cases were distributed between rectal ( 61.9%), urethral (34%), and pharyngeal (6.3%) sites. Similarly, gonococcal infections increased, with a peak in 2010 of 4.7/100py (95% CI 5.6-11.2), (p value for trend=0.0099), distributed between rectal (63.9%), urethral (27.9%), and pharyngeal (14.8%) sites. Infectious syphilis showed several peaks, the largest in 2008 (5.3/100py , (95% CI 3.3-8.0), but the overall trend was not significant (p=0.113). Diagnoses of genital warts declined from 7.5/100py (95% CI 4.8-11.3) in 2005 (95% CI 4.8-11.3) to 2.4/100py (95% CI 1.1-4.5) in 2011 (p value for trend=0.0016). Conclusions The incidence of chlamydial and gonococcal infections in this cohort was higher than previous

  5. Helicobacter pylori Infection Is Associated with Higher CD4 T Cell Counts and Lower HIV-1 Viral Loads in ART-Naïve HIV-Positive Patients in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Eberhardt, Kirsten Alexandra; Dompreh, Albert; Kuffour, Edmund Osei; Soltau, Mareike; Schachscheider, Marei; Drexler, Jan Felix; Eis-Hübinger, Anna Maria; Häussinger, Dieter; Oteng-Seifah, Emelia Efua; Bedu-Addo, George; Phillips, Richard Odame; Norman, Betty; Burchard, Gerd; Feldt, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Background Worldwide, there is a high co-endemicity of HIV and H. pylori infection and there is growing evidence that H. pylori co-infection is associated with parameters of HIV disease progression. The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of H. pylori infection, and the association with clinical, immunological and virological parameters in a large cohort of HIV-infected individuals and uninfected controls in a West African country. Methods HIV-patients (n = 1,095) and HIV-negative individuals (n = 107) were recruited at a university hospital in Ghana. H. pylori status was determined using stool antigen testing. HIV-related, clinical and socio-demographic parameters were recorded and analyzed according to H. pylori status. Results The prevalence of H. pylori infection was significantly lower in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals (51.5 vs. 88%, p<0.0001). In HIV patients, H. pylori prevalence decreased in parallel with CD4+ T cell counts. In ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals, but not in those taking ART, H. pylori infection was associated with higher CD4 cell counts (312 vs. 189 cells/μL, p<0.0001) and lower HIV-1 viral loads (4.92 vs. 5.21 log10 copies/mL, p = 0.006). The findings could not be explained by socio-demographic confounders or reported use of antibiotics. Having no access to tap water and higher CD4+ T cell counts were identified as risk factors for H. pylori infection. Conclusions H. pylori prevalence was inversely correlated with the degree of immunosuppression. In ART-naïve individuals, H. pylori infection is associated with favorable immunological and virological parameters. The underlying mechanisms for this association are unclear and warrant investigation. PMID:26599971

  6. Elevated Risk of Suicidal Ideation in HIV-Positive Persons

    PubMed Central

    Schlebusch, L.; Govender, R. D.

    2015-01-01

    Globally, suicide and HIV/AIDS remain two of the greatest healthcare issues, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. Several studies have observed a relationship between suicidal behaviour and HIV/AIDS. Materials and Methods. The main objective of this research was to determine the prevalence of elevated risk of suicidal ideation in HIV-positive persons immediately following voluntary HIV counselling and testing (VCT). The study sample consisted of adult volunteers attending the VCT clinic at a university-affiliated, general state hospital. Participants completed a sociodemographic questionnaire, Beck's Hopeless Scale, and Beck's Depression Inventory. Results. A significantly elevated risk of suicidal ideation was found in 83.1% of the patients who tested seropositive. Despite a wide age range in the cohort studied, the majority of patients with suicidal ideation were males in the younger age group (age < 30 years), consistent with the age-related spread of the disease and an increase in suicidal behaviour in younger people. Relevant associated variables are discussed. Conclusion. The results serve as important markers that could alert healthcare professionals to underlying suicide risks in HIV-positive patients. It is recommended that screening for elevated risk of suicidal ideation and prevention of suicidal behaviour should form a routine aspect of comprehensive patient care at VCT clinics. PMID:26491561

  7. Barriers and Facilitators of Linkage to and Engagement in HIV Care Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Osborn, Chandra Y; Qian, Han-Zhu; Yin, Lu; Xiao, Dong; Ruan, Yuhua; Simoni, Jane M; Zhang, Xiangjun; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H; Amico, K Rivet

    2016-02-01

    Linking and engaging HIV-positive patients in care is the key bridging step to glean the documented health and prevention advantages of antiretroviral therapy (ART). In China, HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM) is surging, yet many HIV-positive MSM do not use HIV care services. We conducted a qualitative study in order to help positive interventions to promote linkage-to-care in this key population. Four focus group discussions (FGD) were held among HIV-positive MSM in Beijing, China, to ascertain knowledge, beliefs, attitudes, and practices related to HIV care. FGD participates highlighted six major barriers of linkage to/engagement in HIV care: (1) perceived discrimination from health care workers; (2) lack of guidance and follow-up; (3) clinic time or location inconvenience; (4) privacy disclosure concerns; (5) psychological burden of committing to HIV care; and (6) concerns about treatment. Five major sub-themes emerged from discussions on the facilitators of linkage to/engagement in care: (1) peer referral and accompaniment; (2) free HIV care; (3) advocacy from HIV-positive MSM counselors; (4) extended involvement for linking MSM to care; and (5) standardization of HIV care (i.e., reliable high quality care regardless of venue). An understanding of the barriers and facilitators that may impact the access to HIV care is essential for improving the continuum of care for MSM in China. Findings from our study provide research and policy guidance for how current HIV prevention and care interventions can be enhanced to link and engage HIV-positive MSM in HIV care. PMID:26784360

  8. Contemplating abortion: HIV-positive women’s decision to terminate pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Crawford-Roberts, Ann; Dourado, Ines; Gruskin, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Research on pregnancy termination (PT) largely assumes HIV status is the only reason why HIV-positive women contemplate abortion. As antiretroviral treatment (ART) becomes increasingly available and women are living longer, healthier lives, the time has come to consider the influence of other factors on HIV-positive women’s reproductive decision-making. Because ART has been free and universally available to Brazilians for more than two decades, Brazil provides a unique context in which to explore these issues. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews exploring women’s PT decision-making were conducted with women receiving care at the Reference Centre for HIV/AIDS in Salvador, Brazil. Interviews were transcribed, translated into English, and coded for analysis. HIV played different roles in women’s decision-making. 13 HIV-positive women did not consider PT. Influential factors described by those who did consider PT included fear of HIV transmission, fear of HIV-related stigma, family size, economic constraints, partner and provider influence, as well as lack of access to such services as PT and abortifacients. For some HIV-positive women in Brazil, HIV can be the only reason to consider PT, but other factors are significant. A thorough understanding of all variables affecting reproductive decision-making is necessary for enhancing services and policies and better meeting the needs and rights of HIV-positive women. PMID:24387297

  9. Prevalence of sexually transmitted infections in HIV positive and HIV negative females, in a tertiary care hospital - An observational study

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Dimple; Sandhu, Ivy; Bahl, RK; Bhatia, Ruby; Goyal, Anupama

    2015-01-01

    The presentation and course of Sexually transmitted diseases(STI) may be altered by presence of coexisting HIV status. Aim of the study was to study the prevalence of STI in 50 females with HIV infection and 50 females without HIV infection and to study the pap smear of patients to look for any cellular changes (dysplasia) due to sexually transmitted infections. Material and methods: The present study was an observational study, which was undertaken on 100 females with STIs (50 females with coexistent HIV infection and 50 females without HIV infection), in the age group 15-49 years attending Skin and VD OPD of Rajindra hospital, Patiala. Results: In our study, the commonest presenting complaint in case of both HIV positive (66%) and HIV negative (80%) women was vaginal discharge. PAP smear abnormalities were present in 28 (56%) HIV positive women and 11 (22%) HIV negative women. In case of HIV positive women, the inflammation was trichomonal in 4 (8%), bacterial in 2 (4%), fungal in 2 (4%) and non-specific in 20 (40%) patients. In HIV negative women, the inflammation was trichomonal in 2 (4%) patients, bacterial in 2 (4%) patients and non-specific in 7 (14%) patients. The difference in abnormality seen in PAP smear between HIV positive and HIV negative women is statistically significant only in case of non-specific inflammation which is more common in case of HIV positive women. Conclusion: From the present study, it was concluded vaginal discharge was the commonest presenting complaint in both HIV positive and HIV negative women, though the commonest cause of vaginal discharge was candidiasis in HIV positive females and bacterial vaginosis in HIV negative females. Also, PAP smear abnormalities were significantly higher in HIV positive women than HIV negative women. So it is important that HIV positive women should have complete gynecological evaluation including a PAP smear with aggressive screening of STIs. PMID:26392656

  10. Evaluating mental health difficulties and associated outcomes among HIV-positive adolescents in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Dow, Dorothy E; Turner, Elizabeth L; Shayo, Aisa M; Mmbaga, Blandina; Cunningham, Coleen K; O'Donnell, Karen

    2016-07-01

    AIDS-related mortality among HIV-positive adolescents has risen by 50% despite the scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART). ART maladherence likely plays a role in the increase of AIDS-related deaths among adolescents and has shown to be associated with psychosocial and mental health difficulties. Addressing the specific mental health needs of HIV-positive adolescents is critical to ending the HIV epidemic. This cross-sectional study prospectively enrolled HIV-positive adolescents (12-24 years) in Moshi, Tanzania. A structured questionnaire was administered that included questions about home, school, adherence, and measures of stigma (Berger Stigma Scale) and mental health. Mental health measures included depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), emotional/behavioral difficulties (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire), and traumatic experiences/post-traumatic stress symptoms (The University of California Los Angeles-post-traumatic stress disorder-Reaction Index). Mental health difficulties were prevalent among HIV-positive adolescents and were associated with incomplete adherence and stigma. Resources are needed to reduce HIV stigma and address mental health among HIV-positive adolescents in low-resource settings. This will improve not only mental health, but may also improve ART adherence and virologic suppression, improving overall health of the individual and reducing the risk of HIV transmission to others. PMID:26837437

  11. Cervical Cytopathology in a Population of HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

    PubMed Central

    de Lemos, Patrícia Abreu Pinheiro; García-Zapata, Marco Túlio Antonio; Tavares, Suelene Brito do Nascimento

    2012-01-01

    The association between abnormal cervical cytology and HIV infection status in women was evaluated to correlate with CD4 cell count and viral load in HIV-positive patients with the presence of low-grade (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). Cervical samples were collected at the Tropical Disease Hospital, Maternal and Child Healthcare Hospital and at the Nascer Cidadão Maternity Hospital in Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. An Ayre's spatula was used to collect samples from the ectocervix and a cytology brush to collect samples from the endocervix. Of a total of 237 women, 125 were HIV positive and 112 were HIV negative. Abnormal cytology (n = 21; 8.9%) was more common in the HIV positive group (n = 15; 12.1%) compared to the HIV-negative group (n = 6; 5.4%) (P = 0.05). Cytological abnormalities were not found to be associated with immunosuppression, defined as CD4 count < 200 cells/mm3. A higher frequency was found between higher viral loads (>10,000/mm3) and the presence of abnormal cytology. Pregnant women, irrespective of whether they were HIV positive or negative, were less likely to have lesions compared to the nonpregnant women in the same groups. The higher frequency of abnormal findings in Papanicolaou cytology in HIV-positive women with higher viral loads suggests the association between preinvasive cervical lesions and human immunodeficiency. PMID:22888358

  12. Predictive value of weight loss on mortality of HIV-positive mothers in a prolonged breastfeeding setting.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Ai; Humphrey, Jean H; Moulton, Lawrence H; Ntozini, Robert; Mutasa, Kuda; Iliff, Peter; Ruff, Andrea J

    2011-11-01

    HIV-positive lactating women may be at high risk of weight loss due to increased caloric requirements and postpartum physiological weight loss. Ten percent weight loss is associated with a higher risk of mortality in HIV-positive patients and this alone is a criterion for highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation where CD4 counts are not available. However, no study has investigated this association in lactating postpartum women. We investigated whether 10% weight loss predicts death in postpartum HIV-positive women. A total of 9207 HIV-negative and 4495 HIV-positive mothers were recruited at delivery. Women were weighed at 6 weeks, 3 months, and every 3 months thereafter for up to 24 months postpartum and data on mortality up to 2 years were collected. The median duration of breastfeeding was longer than 18 months. Among HIV-positive women, the independent predictors of ≥10% weight loss were CD4 cell count, body mass index, and household income. Mortality was up to 7.12 (95% CI 3.47-14.61) times higher in HIV-positive women with ≥10% weight loss than those without weight loss. Ten percent weight loss in postpartum lactating HIV-positive women was significantly predictive of death. Our findings suggest that 10% weight loss is an appropriate criterion for HAART initiation among postpartum breastfeeding women. PMID:21226627

  13. Self-disclosure of HIV status: perception of malaysian HIV-positive subjects towards attitude of dental personnel in providing oral care.

    PubMed

    Sujak, S L; Abdul-Kadir, R; Omar, R

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the perceptions of Malaysian HIV-positive subjects towards the attitude of dental personnel in providing oral care to them. The study design was cross-sectional with the sampling frame comprising of 27 Government Drug Rehabilitation Centres throughout Malaysia. A convenience sample was then taken from 20 centres with the highest enrolment of HIV-positive subjects. A self-administered questionnaire was used to elicit information on the perception of HIV-positive subjects towards the attitude of dental personnel in providing oral care to the patient with HIV-positive. The study sample consisted of 509 HIV-positive individuals with a mean age of 31.3+/-12.9 years old. Of these, only 15.1% attended a dental clinic after confirmation of HIV-positive status. The study demonstrated that 67.5% of the HIV-positive subjects disclosed their status voluntarily to the dentists and majority of the dentists (76.9%) did not show any negative reaction on knowing their HIV positive status. There was also no difference in the attitude of auxiliary staff toward the above disclosure. In conclusion, the study showed that oral health care personnel are more receptive to the HIV-positive subjects receiving dental care and treatment. PMID:16044826

  14. HPV infection-associated anogenital cyto-colpo-histological findings and molecular typing in HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Tso, F K; Rodrigues, C L L; Levi, J E; Mattosinho de Castro Ferraz, M G; Speck, N M G; Ribalta, J C L

    2015-01-01

    HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) coinfection is increasing, especially in the anal canal (AC) and cervico-vaginal regions. We identified anal epithelium abnormalities related to high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) lesions in the lower genital tracts (LGTs) of HIV-positive women, described the HPV genotypes identified, and assessed the expression of E6/E7 oncogenes in coinfected patients. Ninety-eight women were enrolled in groups combining HIV status and presence or absence of HPV in the LGT. Anal and cervical smears were collected for cytology and HR-HPV assays using Cobas(®) and/or PapilloCheck(®). Samples with highly oncogenic HPV genotypes were confirmed by NucliSENS EasyQ(®). Forty-two HIV-positive (25-52; mean age 39.5) and 56 HIV-negative (18-58; mean age 35.7) patients were included. E2 and C1 groups presented AC alterations (P = 0.002); altered images for high-resolution anoscopy were higher in E1 and C2 (P < 0.001). Of the 29 women with alterations, 41.38% were HIV-negative and 58.62% were HIV-positive (P < 0.001). HIV-positive patients accounted for 29% of the anal high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (P = 0.015). The Cobas(®) positive result frequency was higher in three AC groups than in the other groups. There was variation in the number of HPV types in the cervico-vaginal samples among the study groups (P < 0.001). Anal cytology and anoscopy showed more altered findings in HIV-positive patients with HPV in the LGT. HR-HPV anal infections by various genotypes are common and are associated with cervical infections in HIV-positive patients. E6/E7 expression is apparently more common in the AC of HIV-positive women. PMID:26782408

  15. Brainstem Auditory Evoked Potential in HIV-Positive Adults

    PubMed Central

    Matas, Carla Gentile; Samelli, Alessandra Giannella; Angrisani, Rosanna Giaffredo; Magliaro, Fernanda Cristina Leite; Segurado, Aluísio C.

    2015-01-01

    Background To characterize the findings of brainstem auditory evoked potential in HIV-positive individuals exposed and not exposed to antiretroviral treatment. Material/Methods This research was a cross-sectional, observational, and descriptive study. Forty-five HIV-positive individuals (18 not exposed and 27 exposed to the antiretroviral treatment – research groups I and II, respectively – and 30 control group individuals) were assessed through brainstem auditory evoked potential. Results There were no significant between-group differences regarding wave latencies. A higher percentage of altered brainstem auditory evoked potential was observed in the HIV-positive groups when compared to the control group. The most common alteration was in the low brainstem. Conclusions HIV-positive individuals have a higher percentage of altered brainstem auditory evoked potential that suggests central auditory pathway impairment when compared to HIV-negative individuals. There was no significant difference between individuals exposed and not exposed to antiretroviral treatment. PMID:26485202

  16. Diversity management: the treatment of HIV-positive employees.

    PubMed

    Yap, Matthew H T; Ineson, Elizabeth M

    2012-01-01

    Socio-demographic dimensions such as age, gender, sexual orientation, race and ethnicity are commonly included in diversity studies. With a view to helping Asian hospitality managers to manage HIV-positive employees in their workplaces through diversity management (DM) theory, this research extends the boundaries of previous diversity studies by considering Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection as a diverse characteristic. Both quantitative and qualitative primary data were collected from purposively selected Asian hospitality managers through postal questionnaire and follow-up telephone interviews. Transformed raw data were analysed using summary statistics and template analysis. Asian hospitality managers agreed that DM would be appropriate in the management of HIV-positive employees and that it could generate substantial benefits for employees and employers. However, they believe that the successful adoption and implementation of DM is not easy; it requires training and, ideally, the recruitment of experienced directors. Nevertheless, Asian hospitality managers are confident that implementing DM to manage HIV-positive employees can enhance tolerance, improve understanding and promote equality. The purposive sampling technique and the small number of respondents have impacted the external validity of the study. However, this exploratory study initiates an equality discussion to include HIV-positive employees in DM discourse beyond antidiscrimination legislation. It also supplements the sparse literature addressing HIV-positive employees in the Asian hospitality workplace. Asian hospitality managers are advised to understand and employ DM to treat HIV-positive employees fairly to overcome hospitality workplace marginalisation, discrimination and stigmatisation. PMID:22293097

  17. Correlates and Longitudinal Renal and Cardiovascular Implications of FGF23 Levels in HIV-Positive Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Atta, Mohamed G.; Estrella, Michelle M.; Fine, Derek M.; Zook, Katie; Monroy Trujillo, Jose Manuel; Stein, James H.; Lucas, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor23 (FGF23), an early marker of kidney dysfunction, is associated with cardiovascular death. Its role in HIV-positive individuals is unknown. We measured FGF23 in 100 HIV-negative and 191 HIV-positive nondiabetic adults with normal baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR). We measured GFR by iohexol annually, albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) every 6 months, as well as pulse wave velocity, carotid plaque, and carotid intima media thickness (IMT) at baseline and 2 years. Progressive albuminuria was defined as follow-up ACR ≥2-fold than baseline and ≥30 mg/g. Regression models assessed associations of FGF23 with baseline factors and longitudinal changes in disease markers. FGF23 levels were similar in HIV serostatus. Among HIV-positive persons, factors independently associated with higher baseline FGF23 levels included female (adjusted ratio of geometric means [95% CI],1.46 [1.21,1.76]), serum phosphorus (1.20 [1.03,1.40]), HCV (1.31 [1.10,1.56]) and non-suppressed HIV RNA (1.27 [1.01,1.76]). At baseline, FGF23 was not associated with GFR, albuminuria, carotid plaque, or carotid IMT in cross-sectionally adjusted analysis of HIV-positive individuals. However, higher baseline FGF23 was associated with progressive albuminuria (odds ratio1.48 [95% CI]:1.05,2.08) and a more rapid increase in IMT (13 μm/year, 95% CI,3,24). These findings suggest a role for FGF23 in HIV-positive populations in identifying patients at greater risk for cardiovascular and kidney disease. PMID:27176000

  18. Experiences of HIV Positive Mothers From Rural South India during Intra-Natal Period

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Anbarasi; Sarkar, Sonali; Roy, Gautam; Lakshminarayanan, Subitha

    2013-01-01

    Context: Tamil Nadu comes under group I high prevalence state, with less than 1% prevalence of HIV infection in antenatal women but above 5% prevalence in high risk group. One of the ways to control HIV/AIDS in India is through Prevention of Parent to Child Transmission (PPTCT), the success of which lies in identifying pregnant women with HIV infection. But due to the stigma against HIV/AIDS among health care providers, HIV positive patients face discrimination in the health sector. Aims: To explore the difficulties faced by rural HIV positive mothers during the intra-natal period. Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted among HIV positive mothers, in Gingee block of Villupuram district, Tamil Nadu, India. All the mothers who tested positive between June 2006 and May 2010 were interviewed in-depth using an interview guide. Results: There were 21 HIV positive mothers during this period, 19 of whom gave consent. Majority of the mothers were <30 years of age from families belonging to lower socio-economic class. The discriminations faced from the health staff was avoidance of physical examination, rude behaviour like throwing of records on the face, discriminatory comments, unnecessary referrals and even refusal to provide intra-partum services. The negative attitude of the staff made a few mothers to deliver in some other institution without disclosing their HIV status. Conclusion: Stigma among health care providers towards HIV positive pregnant women acts as a barrier for improving access to PPTCT services in India and it poses high risk to the mothers, babies and also the health care providers. There is a pressing need to improve access to quality PPTCT services especially during the intranatal period. PMID:24298476

  19. Understanding the Effects of Multiple Stigmas Among Formerly Incarcerated HIV-Positive African American Men.

    PubMed

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren

    2015-04-01

    Race, HIV, and incarceration, as individual and intersecting markers of social identity, have associated stigma. While some research has indicated multiple burdens of stigma can be additive, there remains a lack of investigation relative to the effects of stigma among minorities who experience both HIV and incarceration. Therefore, the current study examines the impact of multiple forms of stigma via a series of ethnographic interviews (n = 46) conducted with 12 African American men over a one-year period. Results suggest that intersecting forms of stigma can have a severe impact on the general health, mental health, and the reintegration process of formerly incarcerated HIV-positive men. Additionally, participants often conceptualized all forms of stigma separately, which resulted in compounded burden of navigation. The experience of multiple forms of stigma was also often internalized as self-stigma whereby HIV-positive individuals with a history of incarceration assumed dominant norms related to both HIV and incarceration. PMID:25915701

  20. Mutations Associated With Occult Hepatitis B in HIV-Positive South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Eleanor A.; Gededzha, Maemu P.; Rentz, Michael; Rakgole, Nare J.; Selabe, Selokela G.; Seleise, Tebogo A.; Mphahlele, M. Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T.

    2015-01-01

    Occult hepatitis B is characterized by the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) but the presence of HBV DNA. Because diagnosis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) typically includes HBsAg detection, occult HBV remains largely undiagnosed. Occult HBV is associated with increased risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation to chronic HBV during immune suppression, and transmission during blood transfusion and liver transplant. The mechanisms leading to occult HBV infection are unclear, although viral mutations are likely a significant factor. In this study, sera from 394 HIV-positive South Africans were tested for HBV DNA and HBsAg. For patients with detectable HBV DNA, the overlapping surface and polymerase open reading frames (ORFs) were sequenced. Occult-associated mutations—those mutations found exclusively in individuals with occult HBV infection but not in individuals with chronic HBV infection from the same cohort or GenBank references—were identified. Ninety patients (22.8%) had detectable HBV DNA. Of these, 37 had detectable HBsAg, while 53 lacked detectable surface antigen. The surface and polymerase ORFs were cloned successfully for 19 patients with chronic HBV and 30 patients with occult HBV. In total, 235 occult-associated mutations were identified. Ten occult-associated mutations were identified in more than one patient. Additionally, 15 amino acid positions had two distinct occult-associated mutations at the same residue. Occult-associated mutations were common and present in all regions of the surface and polymerase ORFs. Further study is underway to determine the effects of these mutations on viral replication and surface antigen expression in vitro. PMID:25164924

  1. Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, and Risk-Taking Behaviors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Heroin Dependent Persons.

    PubMed

    Paydary, Koosha; Mahin Torabi, Somayeh; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Noori, Mehri; Noroozi, Alireza; Ameri, Sara; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare impulsivity and risky decision making among HIV-positive and negative heroin dependent persons. Methods. We compared different dimensions of impulsivity and risky decision making in two groups of 60 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative male heroin dependent persons. Each group was comprised of equal numbers of current (treatment seeker) and former (abstinent) heroin addicts. Data collection tools included Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), and Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS). Results. In SSS, comprised of four subscales including thrill and adventure seeking (TAS), experience seeking (ES), disinhibition (DIS), and boredom susceptibility (BS), there was a borderline difference in DIS (P = 0.08) as HIV-positive group scored higher than HIV-negative group. Also, ES and total score were significantly higher among HIV-positive patients. In BART, HIV-positive subjects scored higher in risk taking than HIV-negative subjects as reflected in higher Average Number of puffs in Successful Balloons (ANSB). In BIS, HIV-positive group scored significantly higher in cognitive impulsivity (CI) (P = 0.03) and nonplanning impulsivity (NPI) (P = 0.05) in comparison to HIV-negative group. Also, current heroin addicts scored significantly higher in NPI compared to former addict HIV-negative participants (P = 0.015). IGT did not show any significant difference between groups. Conclusion. Higher levels of impulsivity and risk taking behaviors among HIV-positive heroin addicts will increase serious concerns regarding HIV transmission from this group to other opiate dependents and healthy people. PMID:27051528

  2. Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, and Risk-Taking Behaviors among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Heroin Dependent Persons

    PubMed Central

    Paydary, Koosha; Mahin Torabi, Somayeh; SeyedAlinaghi, SeyedAhmad; Noori, Mehri; Noroozi, Alireza; Ameri, Sara; Ekhtiari, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to compare impulsivity and risky decision making among HIV-positive and negative heroin dependent persons. Methods. We compared different dimensions of impulsivity and risky decision making in two groups of 60 HIV-positive and 60 HIV-negative male heroin dependent persons. Each group was comprised of equal numbers of current (treatment seeker) and former (abstinent) heroin addicts. Data collection tools included Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART), Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), and Zuckerman Sensation Seeking Scale (SSS). Results. In SSS, comprised of four subscales including thrill and adventure seeking (TAS), experience seeking (ES), disinhibition (DIS), and boredom susceptibility (BS), there was a borderline difference in DIS (P = 0.08) as HIV-positive group scored higher than HIV-negative group. Also, ES and total score were significantly higher among HIV-positive patients. In BART, HIV-positive subjects scored higher in risk taking than HIV-negative subjects as reflected in higher Average Number of puffs in Successful Balloons (ANSB). In BIS, HIV-positive group scored significantly higher in cognitive impulsivity (CI) (P = 0.03) and nonplanning impulsivity (NPI) (P = 0.05) in comparison to HIV-negative group. Also, current heroin addicts scored significantly higher in NPI compared to former addict HIV-negative participants (P = 0.015). IGT did not show any significant difference between groups. Conclusion. Higher levels of impulsivity and risk taking behaviors among HIV-positive heroin addicts will increase serious concerns regarding HIV transmission from this group to other opiate dependents and healthy people. PMID:27051528

  3. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon

    PubMed Central

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010–2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%–2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%–3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%–7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%–10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  4. Broad Range of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Patterns, Dual Circulation of Quasi-Subgenotype A3 and HBV/E and Heterogeneous HBV Mutations in HIV-Positive Patients in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Bivigou-Mboumba, Berthold; François-Souquière, Sandrine; Deleplancque, Luc; Sica, Jeanne; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Amougou-Atsama, Marie; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Njouom, Richard; Rouet, François

    2016-01-01

    Integrated data on hepatitis B virus (HBV) patterns, HBV genotypes and mutations are lacking in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) co-infected patients from Africa. This survey was conducted in 2010-2013 among 762 HIV-1-positive adults from Gabon who were predominantly treated with 3TC-based antiretroviral treatment. HBV patterns were identified using immunoassays detecting total antibody to hepatitis B core antigen (HBcAb), hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), IgM HBcAb, hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg), antibody to HBsAg (HBsAb) and an in-house real-time PCR test for HBV DNA quantification. Occult hepatitis B (OBI) was defined by the presence of isolated anti-HBc with detectable serum HBV DNA. HBV genotypes and HBV mutations were analyzed by PCR-direct sequencing method. Seventy-one (9.3%) patients tested positive for HBsAg, including one with acute hepatitis B (0.1%; 95% CI, 0.0%-0.2%), nine with HBeAg-positive chronic hepatitis B (CHB) (1.2%; 95% CI, 0.6%-2.2%), 16 with HBeAg-negative CHB (2.1%; 95% CI, 1.2%-3.3%) and 45 inactive HBV carriers (5.9%; 95% CI, 4.4%-7.8%). Sixty-one (8.0%; 95% CI, 6.2%-10.1%) patients showed OBI. Treated patients showed similar HBV DNA levels to those obtained in untreated patients, regardless of HBV patterns. Around 15.0% of OBI patients showed high (>1,000 UI/mL) viremia. The mutation M204V/I conferring resistance to 3TC was more common in HBV/A (47.4%) than in HBV/E isolates (0%) (P = .04). Our findings encouraged clinicians to promote HBV vaccination in patients with no exposure to HBV and to switch 3TC to universal TDF in those with CHB. PMID:26764909

  5. After the fall from grace: Negotiation of new identities among HIV-positive women in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Valencia-Garcia, Dellanira; Starks, Helene; Strick, Lara; Simoni, Jane M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite increasing rates of HIV infection among heterosexual women in Peru, married women remain virtually invisible as a group at risk of HIV or requiring treatment. This study analyzed the intersections of HIV with machismo and marianismo, the dominant discourses in Latin America that prescribe gender roles for men and women. Data sources include recent literature on machismo and marianismo and interviews conducted with 14 HIV-positive women in Lima, Peru. Findings indicate how the stigma associated with HIV constructs a discourse that restricts the identities of HIV-positive women to those of ‘fallen women’ whether or not they adhere to social codes that shape and inform their identities as faithful wives and devoted mothers. Lack of public discourse concerning HIV-positive marianas silences women as wives and disenfranchises them as mothers, leaving them little room to negotiate identities that allow them to maintain their respected social positions. Efforts must be aimed at expanding the discourse of acceptable gender roles and behaviour for both men and women within the context of machismo and marianismo so that there can be better recognition of all persons at risk of, and living with, HIV infection. PMID:18821355

  6. HIV-Positive Youth's Perspectives on the Internet and eHealth

    PubMed Central

    Flicker, Sarah; Goldberg, Eudice; Read, Stanley; Veinot, Tiffany; McClelland, Alex; Saulnier, Paul

    2004-01-01

    Background Globally, half of all new HIV infections occur among young people. Despite this incidence, there is a profound lack of resources for HIV-positive youth. Objective To investigate Internet access, use and acceptability as a means for health promotion and health service delivery among HIV-positive youth. Methods A community-based participatory approach was used to conduct a mixed methods research study. Thirty-five qualitative in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with youth (ages 12-24) living with HIV in Ontario. Also, brief structured demographic surveys were administered at the time of the interview. A stakeholder group of youth living with HIV, professionals and researchers collaboratively analyzed the data for emerging themes. Results Five main themes were identified with respect to the youth's use of and interest in the Internet as a health promotion strategy. These include: (1) high rates of Internet use and access; (2) issues around public and private terminals; (3) their use of the Internet primarily for communication and entertainment; (4) the rarity of health information seeking behavior in this group; and (5) wanting "one-stop shopping" from an e-health site. HIV-positive youth were enthusiastic about the possibility of content that was developed specifically to target them and their needs. Also, they were keen about the possibilities for increased social support that youth-specific online chat rooms and message boards might provide. Conclusion Given high rates of use, access and interest, the Internet provides an important way to reach young people living with HIV using health services and health promotion programs. The onus is on e-Health developers to understand the particular needs of HIV-positive youth and create relevant content. PMID:15471758

  7. Total laparoscopic intestinal vaginoplasty as neovaginal reconstruction in an HIV-positive transgender woman.

    PubMed

    van der Sluis, Wouter B; Verweij, Stephan P; Özer, Mujde; Meijerink, Wilhelmus J; Bouman, Mark-Bram

    2016-07-01

    A 46-year-old, HIV-positive transgender woman of South American ethnicity consulted our outpatient clinic to discuss the possibilities of a surgical, secondary neovaginal reconstruction because of complete stenosis of her inverted penile skin-lined neovagina. She was taking abacavir/lamivudine and nevirapine as antiretroviral therapy. We successfully performed a total laparoscopic sigmoid vaginoplasty without any complications. There was no short-term morbidity and no complications were reported after 15 months of follow-up. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic sigmoid vaginoplasty as vaginal reconstruction in a HIV-positive transgender woman. Worldwide, transgender women have a high burden of HIV infection. This report shows that intestinal vaginoplasty is a feasible surgical option for HIV-positive transgender women in need of vaginal reconstruction. Because patients are again able to engage in penetrative sexual intercourse, we emphasise the importance of practicing safe sex and early initiation of adequate antiretroviral therapy in this patient population. PMID:26037643

  8. A Pilot Study to Engage and Counsel HIV-Positive African American Youth Via Telehealth Technology

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Patrick; John, Malcolm; Sheon, Nicolas; Johnson, Mallory O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Antiretroviral nonadherence is a strong determinant of virologic failure and is negatively correlated with survival. HIV-positive African American youth have lower antiretroviral adherence and treatment engagement than other populations. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a telehealth (remote videoconferencing) medication counseling intervention as an innovative approach to address these disparities. HIV-positive African American youth (18–29 years old) on antiretrovirals were enrolled in a telehealth medication counseling session, followed by a semi-structured qualitative interview to explore likes/dislikes of the format, modality, and content; potential impact on adherence; privacy issues; and interaction quality. Fourteen participants with a mean age of 24 years, who were 86% male, and had a mean self-reported adherence in the past month of 89%, were interviewed. Participants stated that they liked telehealth, would use it if offered in clinic/research settings, and indicated that their privacy was maintained. Participants described telehealth as convenient and efficient, with positive impact on their knowledge. Telehealth provided a modality to interact with providers that participants described as less intimidating than in-person visits. Telehealth is feasible and acceptable for delivering medication counseling to HIV-positive African American youth when conducted in a controlled clinical setting and may improve quality of patient-provider dialogue. Use of telehealth may lead to more disclosure of treatment difficulties, increased patient comfort, and improved health education. PMID:23991691

  9. Comparison of Abnormal Cervical Cytology from HIV Positive Women, Female Sex Workers and General Population

    PubMed Central

    Vafaei, Homeira; Asadi, Nasrin; Foroughinia, Leila; Salehi, Alireza; Kuhnavard, Safieh; Akbarzadeh, Mojgan; Ravanbod, Hamid Reza; Mohamadalian, Ferdos; Kasraeian, Maryam

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex workers and HIV seropositive women are at high risk of abnormal cervical cytology. The objective of this study was to compare the cervical cytology among three groups of women: active sex workers, HIV-infected women, and general population in Iran. Methods This was a cross-sectional study performed in Hazrat Zeinab, Lavan clinics and drop in center (DIC) in Shiraz, Iran. This study was performed from October 2009 to October 2011. A total of 266 patients were assigned into three groups: sex-workers (85), HIV positive patients (100), and general population (81). Pap smear was performed for all participants from the exocervix and endocervix, using a plastic Ayres’s spatula and cytobrush. The samples were sent to a pathology center, using a liquid-based media.  Results The risk of cervical infection in sex workers and HIV positive women was greater than the general population (OR=5.47, 95% confidence interval [CI]:2.24, 13.40), (OR=3.71, 95% CI:1.52, 9.09), respectively. The frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in the HIV positive and sex worker groups was higher than the general population (OR=6. 76, 95% CI:2.25, 20.32), (OR=3. 80, 95% CI:1.19, 12.07), respectively. Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) were associated with CD4 cell count<200Í106/L, P=0.021 and P<0.001, respectively. Conclusion Vaginal infections were seen more often in the sex worker group, and abnormal cervical cytology was greater in the HIV positive group. PMID:26005687

  10. Asserting a Positive Role: HIV-Positive People in Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allan, Brent; Leonard, William

    2005-01-01

    The best HIV prevention programs--those that effect change on a multiplicity of levels by changing knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors and that are sustained over time--are also those that place HIV-positive people at the center of program design, implementation, and evaluation.

  11. Psychotherapy with HIV-positive gay men: a psychodynamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Weiss, J J

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines psychotherapy with HIV-positive gay men from a psychodynamic perspective. Adjustment to being HIV-positive is conceptualized as an ongoing process of confrontation with loss and uncertainty. Interventions offered to HIV-positive gay men range from counseling, indicated in response to an "uncomplicated" adjustment process; to dynamically oriented psychotherapy, indicated when the functioning of the self has been thrown off balance by HIV illness. The client's process of accepting his HIV illness is shaped and colored by the degree to, and manner in, which he has accepted being gay and integrated this into his identity. Sexuality is a core theme in psychotherapy with this population. It often plays a prominent role in the past unresolved conflicts (feelings about having become HIV-infected) as well as present concerns (feelings about living with HIV illness) which the client has come to therapy to address. The process of addressing the meanings being HIV-positive holds for the client in therapy can promote acceptance of the illness and cohesiveness of the self. Cultural and subcultural differences in how life stress is experienced must also be taken into account by the therapist in order to fully appreciate the client's concerns. PMID:9139546

  12. Present and Past Influences on Current Smoking Among HIV-Positive Male Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Fernanda T.; Cohen-Blair, Hannah; Liappis, Angelike P.; Poppen, Paul J.; Zea, Maria Cecilia; Benator, Debra A.; Labriola, Ann M.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Cigarette smoking has become an important influence of morbidity and mortality for HIV-positive individuals in the era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Although smoking is common among military personnel and veterans, the lasting impact of military service on smoking at a later stage of life has not been examined. The current study investigated present and past influences on current smoking among HIV-positive male veterans. Methods: Participants were 200 HIV-positive men served by the Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A survey was administered via audio-enhanced computer-assisted self-interview, and additional information was extracted from the computerized patient record system. Results: Logistic regression was performed to test hypotheses concerning the participants’ current situations as well as characteristics of their past military service. Having smokers in one's environment, being more depressed, and having used alcohol or drugs were associated with having smoked in the previous 30 days, whereas stronger endorsement of attitudes stating adverse effects of smoking was linked to lower likelihood of smoking. Neither having been in a military conflict nor the length of the military service was significantly related to current smoking. Conclusions: Remote experiences in the military did not have a sustained effect on smoking behavior years later. Implications of this study for the development of smoking cessation programs targeting HIV-positive veterans include the importance of altering attitudes about tobacco, treating underlying depression, addressing social influence, decreasing substance use, and increasing awareness of the heightened vulnerability to a variety of negative consequences of smoking among infected individuals. PMID:21436293

  13. Cigarette smoking among Chinese PLWHA: An exploration of changes in smoking after being tested HIV positive.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuanhui; Chen, Xinguang; Li, Xiaoming; Wang, Yan; Shan, Qiao; Zhou, Yuejiao; Shen, Zhiyong

    2016-03-01

    Prevention and cessation of Tobacco use among persons living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) represents a significant challenge for HIV/AIDS patient care in China and across the globe. Awareness of HIV-positive status may alter the likelihood for PLWHA smokers to change their smoking habit. In this study, we tested the risk enhancement and risk reduction hypotheses by assessing changes in cigarette smoking behavior among PLWHA after they received the positive results of their HIV tests. Cross-sectional survey data collected from a random sample of 2973 PLWHA in care in Guangxi, China were analyzed. Changes in cigarette smoking after receiving the HIV-positive test results, as well as the current levels of cigarette smoking were measured. Among the total participants, 1529 (51.7%) were self-identified as cigarette smokers, of whom 436 (28.9%) reduced smoking and 286 (19.0%) quit after receiving their HIV-positive test results. Among the quitters, 210 (73.9%) remained abstinent for a median duration of two years. There were also 124 (8.2%) who increased cigarette smoking. Older age, female gender, more education, and receiving antiretroviral therapy were associated with quitting. In conclusion, our study findings support the risk reduction and risk enhancement hypotheses. A large proportion of smoking PLWHA reduced or quit smoking, while a small proportion increased smoking. Findings of this study suggest that the timing when a person receives his or her HIV-positive test result may be an ideal opportunity for care providers to deliver tobacco cessation interventions. Longitudinal studies are indicated to verify the findings of this study and to support smoking cessation intervention among PLWHA in the future. PMID:26457812

  14. The High Cost of HIV-Positive Inpatient Care at an Urban Hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Long, Lawrence C.; Fox, Matthew P.; Sauls, Celeste; Evans, Denise; Sanne, Ian; Rosen, Sydney B.

    2016-01-01

    Background While most HIV care is provided on an outpatient basis, hospitals continue to treat serious HIV-related admissions, which is relatively resource-intensive and expensive. This study reports the primary reasons for HIV-related admission at a regional, urban hospital in Johannesburg, South Africa and estimates the associated lengths of stay and costs. Methods and Findings A retrospective cohort study of adult, medical admissions was conducted. Each admission was assigned a reason for admission and an outcome. The length of stay was calculated for all patients (N = 1,041) and for HIV-positive patients (n = 469), actual utilization and associated costs were also estimated. Just under half were known to be HIV-positive admissions. Deaths and transfers were proportionately higher amongst HIV-positive admissions compared to HIV-negative and unknown. The three most common reasons for admission were tuberculosis and other mycobacterial infections (18%, n = 187), cardiovascular disorders (12%, n = 127) and bacterial infections (12%, n = 121). The study sample utilized a total of 7,733 bed days of those, 55% (4,259/7,733) were for HIV-positive patients. The average cost per admission amongst confirmed HIV-positive patients, which was an average of 9.3 days in length, was $1,783 (United States Dollars). Conclusions Even in the era of large-scale antiretroviral treatment, inpatient facilities in South Africa shoulder a significant HIV burden. The majority of this burden is related to patients not on ART (298/469, 64%), and accounts for more than half of all inpatient resources. Reducing the costs of inpatient care is thus another important benefit of expanding access to ART, promoting earlier ART initiation, and achieving rates of ART retention and adherence. PMID:26885977

  15. “Silent Voices”: A Description of Views and Attitudes of Health Professionals towards Reproduction by HIV Positive People

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The role of health professionals in the decision making process of patients is usually heard or seen from the perspective of the patients. This paper gives the usually silent and invisible health professionals voice and visibility. It describes their views and attitudes towards reproduction by couples who are HIV positive and attempts to understand their perspectives. Methods. In-depth interviews were conducted with twelve health professionals at an opportunistic infections clinic. Transcribed interviews were analysed using the grounded approach to identify patterns and themes concerning views and attitudes of health professionals towards reproduction by HIV positive people. Results. The study found that most health professionals generally had a negative attitude towards childbearing by HIV positive couples. Their views and approaches on the issue were based mainly on biomedical considerations. The main discourses on childbearing that emerged from the study were the conditional choice, the antichildbearing, and the prorights. Conclusion. Most of the health professionals interviewed tend to take a generally negative stance towards reproduction by people with HIV/AIDS. There is a need for a clear set of guidelines for health professionals (HPs) on how to deal with HIV positive people who may desire to reproduce. PMID:27350998

  16. A study of HIV positive undocumented African migrants' access to health services in the UK.

    PubMed

    Whyte, James; Whyte, Maria D; Hires, Kimberly

    2015-01-01

    Newly immigrated persons, whatever their origin, tend to fall in the lower socioeconomic levels. In fact, failure of an asylum application renders one destitute in a large proportion of cases, often resulting in a profound lack of access to basic necessities. With over a third of HIV positive failed asylum seekers reporting no income, and the remainder reporting highly limited resources, poverty is a reality for the vast majority. The purpose of the study was to determine the basic social processes that guide HIV positive undocumented migrant's efforts to gain health services in the UK. The study used the Grounded Theory Approach. Theoretical saturation occurred after 16 participants were included in the study. The data included reflections of the prominent factors related to the establishment of a safe and productive life and the ability of individuals to remain within the UK. The data reflected heavily upon the ability of migrants to enter the medical care system during their asylum period, and on an emerging pattern of service denial after loss on immigration appeal. The findings of this study are notable in that they have demonstrated sequence of events along a timeline related to the interaction between the asylum process and access to health-related services. The results reflect that African migrants maintain a degree of formal access to health services during the period that they possess legal access to services and informal access after the failure of their asylum claim. The purpose of this paper is to examine the basic social processes that characterize efforts to gain access to health services among HIV positive undocumented African migrants to the UK. The most recent estimates indicate that there are a total of 618,000 migrants who lack legal status within the UK. Other studies have placed the number of undocumented migrants within the UK in the range of 525,000-950,000. More than 442,000 are thought to dwell in the London metropolitan area. Even in

  17. Support Groups, Marriage, and the Management of Ambiguity among HIV-Positive Women in Northern Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Rhine, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the African HIV epidemic, support groups are not simply spaces for discussions of social and health well-being; neither are they institutions functioning solely to cultivate self-responsible and economically empowered patients. HIV-positive women in northern Nigeria have appropriated a support group to facilitate their marriage arrangements. In this group, women negotiate the threats of stigma and the promises of respectable marriage through what I call the management of ambiguity surrounding their HIV status. I further argue that the practice of support group matchmaking reveals the local political economic dynamics that shape social and illness trajectories in resource-poor settings. PMID:23946544

  18. Incidence of HCV and sexually transmitted diseases among hiv positive msm in antwerp, belgium, 2001-2011.

    PubMed

    Apers, L; Koole, O; Bottieau, E; Vandenbruaene, M; Ophoff, D; Van Esbroeck, M; Crucitti, T; Florence, E

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) are an indication of unsafe sexual practices and may be associated with HCV-infection among HIV-positive men who have sex with men. In a retrospective study we analysed the laboratory data of 99 HIV-positive MSM who acquired HCV during the observation period (cases) and 176 HIV-positive MSM who remained HCV negative during the observation period (controls), all followed at the HIV/STI-clinic in Antwerp, Belgium. All laboratory confirmed STI-episodes were recorded since the date of first consultation at our clinic, until the date of HCV-diagnosis of the cases. The HCV incidence varied between 0.24 (2001) and 1.36 (2011) new cases per hundred person-years, with a peak of 2.93 new cases per hundred person-years in 2009. The number of STI-episodes per person-year follow-up was significantly higher for the cases as compared to the controls for syphilis, non-LGV and LGV Chlamydia infections (p < 0.005). When considering the incidence of STIs that occurred 1 year prior to HCV conversion, all laboratory confirmed STIs remained more frequent among cases, but only the difference in syphilis incidence was statistically significant (p < 0.01). Recurrent STIs among HIV positive MSM should be considered as a behavioural and biological risk factor for acquiring HCV and should lead to intensified screening for HCV and counselling of the patient. PMID:24635329

  19. Identification of Optimal Donor-Recipient Combinations Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-Positive Kidney Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Locke, J E; Shelton, B A; Reed, R D; MacLennan, P A; Mehta, S; Sawinski, D; Segev, D L

    2016-08-01

    For some patient subgroups, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been associated with worse outcomes after kidney transplantation (KT); potentially modifiable factors may be responsible. The study goal was to identify factors that predict a higher risk of graft loss among HIV-positive KT recipients compared with a similar transplant among HIV-negative recipients. In this study, 82 762 deceased donor KT recipients (HIV positive: 526; HIV negative: 82 236) reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) (2001-2013) were studied by interaction term analysis. Compared to HIV-negative recipients, the hepatitis C virus (HCV) amplified risk 2.72-fold among HIV-positive KT recipients (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 2.72, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.75-4.22, p < 0.001). Forty-three percent of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and HCV (attributable proportion of risk due to the interaction [AP]: 0.43, 95% CI: 0.23-0.63, p = 0.02). Among HIV-positive recipients with more than three HLA mismatches (MMs), risk was amplified 1.80-fold compared to HIV-negative (aHR: 1.80, 95% CI: 1.31-2.47, p < 0.001); 42% of the excess risk was attributable to the interaction between HIV and more than three HLA MMs (AP: 0.42, 95% CI: 0.24-0.60, p = 0.01). High-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-positive HLAwith more than three MMs) recipients had a 3.86-fold increased risk compared to low-HIV-risk (HIV-positive/HCV-negative HLA with three or fewer MMs)) recipients (aHR: 3.86, 95% CI: 2.37-6.30, p < 0.001). Avoidance of more than three HLA MMs in HIV-positive KT recipients, particularly among coinfected patients, may mitigate the increased risk of graft loss associated with HIV infection. PMID:27140837

  20. Early Repeated Infections with Trichomonas vaginalis among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women

    PubMed Central

    Kissinger, Patricia; Secor, W. Evan; Leichliter, Jami S.; Clark, Rebecca A.; Schmidt, Norine; Curtin, Erink; Martin, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the study was to examine whether early repeated infections due to Trichomonas vaginalis among human immunuodeficiency virus (HIV)–positive and HIV-negative women are reinfections, new infections, or cases of treatment failure. Methods Women attending an HIV outpatient clinic and a family planning clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, who had culture results positive for T. vaginalis were treated with 2 g of metronidazole under directly observed therapy. At 1 month, detailed sexual exposure and sexual partner treatment information was collected. Isolates from women who had clinical resistance (i.e., who tested positive for a third time after treatment at a higher dose) were tested for metronidazole susceptibility in vitro. Results Of 60 HIV-positive women with trichomoniasis, 11 (18.3%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 11 recurrences were classified as 3 probable reinfections (27%), 2 probable infections from a new sexual partner (18%), and 6 probable treatment failures (55%); 2 of the 6 patients who experienced probable treatment failure had isolates with mild resistance to metronidazole. Of 301 HIV-negative women, 24 (8.0%) were T. vaginalis positive 1 month after treatment. The 24 recurrences were classified as 2 probable reinfections (8%) and 22 probable treatment failures (92%); of the 22 patients who experienced probable treatment failure, 2 had strains with moderate resistance to metronidazole, and 1 had a strain with mild resistance to metronidazole. Conclusion HIV-positive women were more likely to have sexual re-exposure than were HIV-negative women, although the rate of treatment failure was similar in both groups. High rates of treatment failure among both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women indicate that a 2-g dose of metronidazole may not be adequate for treatment of some women and that rescreening should be considered. PMID:18444815

  1. Active and latent tuberculosis among HIV-positive injecting drug users in Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    Meijerink, Hinta; Wisaksana, Rudi; Lestari, Mery; Meilana, Intan; Chaidir, Lydia; van der Ven, Andre JAM; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Injecting drug use (IDU) is associated with tuberculosis but few data are available from low-income settings. We examined IDU in relation to active and latent tuberculosis (LTBI) among HIV-positive individuals in Indonesia, which has a high burden of tuberculosis and a rapidly growing HIV epidemic strongly driven by IDU. Methods Active tuberculosis was measured prospectively among 1900 consecutive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naïve adult patients entering care in a clinic in West Java. Prevalence of LTBI was determined cross-sectionally in a subset of 518 ART-experienced patients using an interferon-gamma release assay. Results Patients with a history of IDU (53.1%) more often reported a history of tuberculosis treatment (34.8% vs. 21.9%, p<0.001), more often received tuberculosis treatment during follow-up (adjusted HR=1.71; 95% CI: 1.25–2.35) and more often had bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (OR=1.67; 95% CI: 0.94–2.96). LTBI was equally prevalent among people with and without a history of IDU (29.1 vs. 30.4%, NS). The risk estimates did not change after adjustment for CD4 cell count or ART. Conclusions HIV-positive individuals with a history of IDU in Indonesia have more active tuberculosis, with similar rates of LTBI. Within the HIV clinic, LTBI screening and isoniazid preventive therapy may be prioritized to patients with a history of IDU. PMID:25690530

  2. Lack of tolerable treatment options for patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Citrome, Leslie; Eramo, Anna; Francois, Clement; Duffy, Ruth; Legacy, Susan N; Offord, Steve J; Krasa, Holly B; Johnston, Stephen S; Guiraud-Diawara, Alice; Kamat, Siddhesh A; Rohman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Atypical antipsychotics (AAs), an effective treatment for schizophrenia, have a range of pharmacologic properties leading to differences in tolerability as well as heterogeneity in treatment response. Individual patient characteristics must be considered when making treatment choices, especially from an adverse event (AE) or tolerability perspective. Despite the availability of numerous AAs, after appraising patient characteristics at the time of treatment selection, physicians may quickly run out of tolerable treatment options. Patients and methods AE risk factors, defined as having either a prior history of an AE or a risk factor for that AE, were determined for Medicaid-insured and Commercially insured patients using database analysis. Patients receiving AA treatment between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2012 defined the index date of first observed AA prescription during this period. Nine AAs were evaluated for association with AE risk factors as informed by drug prescribing information from the different manufacturers and published meta-analyses. The proportion of patients with pre-index AE risk factors prescribed an AA associated with that risk factor was then determined. Results A high proportion of patients (>80%) were prescribed an AA associated with extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia despite experiencing extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia prior to AA treatment initiation. Similar trends were observed among patients with diabetes (>60%) and obesity (>40%). From the nine treatment options available, the number of optimal choices for individual patient segments were limited based on their prior history, including those with cardiometabolic and cardiovascular comorbidities (four); experiencing prolactin elevation-related problems (seven); needing to avoid excessive sedation (four); or at risk of extrapyramidal symptoms or akathisia (two). Options were then further restricted among patients in more than one segment when multiple pre-index AE

  3. Ethical issues in videorecording patients lacking capacity to consent.

    PubMed

    Petrini, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Videorecording of patients requires the utmost respect for the privacy and confidentiality of the patients. Consent should be requested from patients for all videorecording. When a mental disability or mental or physical illness prevents patients from giving their permission, agreement to recording from a legal representative or from a close relative or carer are necessary. Three documents on this subject issued in the United Kingdom, the United State of America and Italy are briefly summarized and discussed. The problem of consent for videorecording is addressed particularly in reference to persons incapable of making decisions on their own, such as persons in vegetative state. The general ethical framework is outlined and a few practical proposals are given. PMID:21952148

  4. Evaluation of virulence factors of Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive individuals using HAART.

    PubMed

    de Paula Menezes, Ralciane; de Melo Riceto, Érika Bezerra; Borges, Aércio Sebastião; de Brito Röder, Denise Von Dolingër; dos Santos Pedroso, Reginaldo

    2016-06-01

    The colonization by Candida species is one of the most important factors related to the development of oral candidiasis in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of the study was to evaluate and discuss the phospholipase, proteinase, DNAse and haemolytic activities of Candida albicans isolated from the oral cavity of HIV individuals with high efficiency antiretroviral therapy. Seventy-five isolates of C. albicans obtained from saliva samples of patients with HIV and 41 isolates from HIV-negative individuals were studied. Haemolytic activity was determined in Sabouraud dextrose agar plates containing 3% glucose and 7% sheep red cells. Culture medium containing DNA base-agar, egg yolk, and bovine albumin were used to determine DNase, phospholipase and proteinase activities, respectively. All isolates from the HIV patients group had haemolytic activity, 98% showed phospholipase activity, 92% were positive for proteinase and 32% DNAse activity. Regarding the group of indivídios HIV negative, all 41 isolates presented hemolytic activity, 90.2% showed phospholipase and proteinase activity and 12.2% were positive for DNAse. The phospholipase activity was more intense for the group of HIV positive individuals. DNase production was more frequently observed in the group of HIV-positive individuals. The percentage of isolates having DNAse activity was also significantly different between the groups of patients not using any antiretroviral therapy, those using transcriptase inhibitors and those using transcriptase inhibitor and protease inhibitor in combination. PMID:26913969

  5. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection & cervical abnormalities in HIV-positive women in eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarty, Jaya; Chourasia, Ankita; Thakur, Minaxi; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Sundar, Shyam; Agrawal, Nisha Rani

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: India has the third highest burden of HIV and highest number of cervical cancer in the world. A cross-sectional study was performed to determine the prevalence and types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the factors associated with HPV infection and abnormal cervical cytology in HIV-positive women attending the Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Centre in a tertiary care hospital in eastern India. Methods: We screened 216 HIV- positive women with Papanicolau smear cytology and HPV testing. HPV DNA was detected by using consensus primers followed by sequencing. Results: Of the 216 HIV-positive women screened, 58 (26.85%) were HPV-positive; 56 (25.9%) were of high-risk (HR) HPV type. The most prevalent HPV type was HPV-16 (7.9%); non 16 and 18 HPV types were present in 17.6 per cent patients. Age ≤ 35 yr [(OR), 2.56 (1.26-5.19)], illiteracy [OR, 2.30 (1.19-4.46)], rural residence [OR, 3.99 (1.27-12.56)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.46 (1.26-4.83)] were associated with increased risk of acquisition of HPV. One hundred thirty nine (74.33%) patients had normal/ negative for intraepithelial lesions (NILM) cytology, three (1.60%) had atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS), 32 (17.11%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 10 (5.35%) had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and three (1.60%) had carcinoma cervix. WHO clinical Stage III and IV [OR, 2.83 (1.07-7.49)] and CD4 ≤350/μl [OR, 2.84 (1.30-6.20)] were risk factors for abnormal cytology. Interpretation &conclusions: Our study showed 26.85 per cent HPV positivity in HIV infected women in this region, with HPV-16 as the commonest genotype. Abnormal cervical cytology was seen in about 25 per cent women. Regular Pap smear screening as recommended by the National AIDS Control Organization will help in early detection of cervical abnormalities in HIV- positive women. PMID:26997018

  6. Lack of health maintenance examinations and risk in myeloma patients.

    PubMed

    Tariman, Joseph D; Gleason, Charise; Faiman, Beth; Doss, Deborah; Catamero, Donna; Bishop-Royse, Jessica; Katz, Mike; Kurtin, Sandra; Moran, Diane; Lonial, Sagar

    2016-07-01

    Health maintenance (HM) practices are essential to prevent illness, promote well-being, and maximize health. Patients with multiple myeloma (MM) are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease and cancers, yet, research on HM practices and preventative care of MM survivors has limited report. The study comprised a descriptive, correlational, and cross-sectional online survey design. Survey of patients with MM was carried out through the International Myeloma Foundation (IMF) and the Association of Cancer Online Resources (ACOR) e-mail list services. The members of the IMF and ACOR e-mail list services were surveyed, of which 237 patients responded. The modified Medical Expenditure Preventive Survey-Preventive Care questionnaire was used; it included items that ask patients regarding their healthcare practices that relate to dental care, cancer prevention, addiction, lifestyles, sensory screening, immunizations, cardiovascular, endocrine, psychosocial, and bone health. Descriptive statistics, Pearson's chi-square, and Spearman's rho correlation coefficient were obtained. In this study, men had statistically significant inferior global health maintenance scores than women (P = 0.002). Being employed (P = 0.054) and married or partnered (P = 0.017) were significantly correlated with better health maintenance patterns among male respondents. In contrast, no statistically significant correlations between sociodemographic factors and health maintenance patterns were found in women. Patients with MM, particularly men, require continued education and close monitoring of health maintenance practices. These findings are consistent with publications looking at gender disparities in healthcare utilization in the United States. Studies show that men, in general, are less likely to seek preventative healthcare screenings. Healthcare providers must incorporate health maintenance promotion during clinic visits. PMID:27119422

  7. Psychometric validation of the BDI-II among HIV-positive CHARTER study participants.

    PubMed

    Hobkirk, Andréa L; Starosta, Amy J; De Leo, Joseph A; Marra, Christina M; Heaton, Robert K; Earleywine, Mitch

    2015-06-01

    Rates of depression are high among individuals living with HIV. Accurate assessment of depressive symptoms among this population is important for ensuring proper diagnosis and treatment. The Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) is a widely used measure for assessing depression, however its psychometric properties have not yet been investigated for use with HIV-positive populations in the United States. The current study was the first to assess the psychometric properties of the BDI-II among a large cohort of HIV-positive participants sampled at multiple sites across the United States as part of the CNS HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Effects Research (CHARTER) study. The BDI-II test scores showed good internal consistency (α = .93) and adequate test-retest reliability (internal consistency coefficient = 0.83) over a 6-mo period. Using a "gold standard" of major depressive disorder determined by the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, sensitivity and specificity were maximized at a total cut-off score of 17 and a receiver operating characteristic analysis confirmed that the BDI-II is an adequate diagnostic measure for the sample (area under the curve = 0.83). The sensitivity and specificity of each score are provided graphically. Confirmatory factor analyses confirmed the best fit for a three-factor model over one-factor and two-factor models and models with a higher-order factor included. The results suggest that the BDI-II is an adequate measure for assessing depressive symptoms among U.S. HIV-positive patients. Cut-off scores should be adjusted to enhance sensitivity or specificity as needed and the measure can be differentiated into cognitive, affective, and somatic depressive symptoms. PMID:25419643

  8. Factors influencing utilization of postpartum CD4 count testing by HIV-positive women not yet eligible for antiretroviral treatment.

    PubMed

    Gilles, Kate P; Zimba, Chifundo; Mofolo, Innocent; Bobrow, Emily; Hamela, Gloria; Martinson, Francis; Hoffman, Irving; Hosseinipour, Mina

    2011-03-01

    Delayed antiretroviral initiation is associated with increased mortality, but individuals frequently delay seeking treatment. To increase early antiretroviral therapy (ART) enrollment of HIV-positive women, antenatal clinics are implementing regular, postpartum CD4 count testing. We examined factors influencing women's utilization of extended CD4 count testing. About 53 in-depth interviews were conducted with nurses, patients, social support persons, and government health officials at three antenatal clinics in Lilongwe, Malawi. Counseling and positive interactions with staff emerged as facilitating factors. Women wanted to know their CD4 count, but didn't understand the importance of early ART initiation. Support from husbands facilitated women's return to the clinic. Reminders were perceived as helpful but ineffectively employed. Staff identified lack of communication, difficulty in tracking, and referring women as barriers. Counseling messages should emphasize the importance of starting ART early. Clinics should focus on male partner involvement, case management, staff communication, and appointment reminders. Follow-up should be offered at multiple service points. PMID:21347895

  9. Reconsidering the Lack of Urea Toxicity in Dialysis Patients.

    PubMed

    Massy, Ziad A; Pietrement, Christine; Touré, Fatouma

    2016-09-01

    Urea is an old uremic toxin which has been used for many years as a global biomarker of CKD severity and dialysis adequacy. Old studies were not in favor of its role as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of complications associated with the uremic state. However, recent experimental and clinical evidence is compatible with both direct and indirect toxicity of urea, particularly via the deleterious actions of urea-derived carbamylated molecules. Further studies are clearly needed to explore the potential relevance of urea-related CKD complications for patient management, in particular the place of new therapeutic strategies to prevent urea toxicity. PMID:27174444

  10. Response to First-Line Ritonavir-Boosted Protease Inhibitors (PI/r)-Based Regimens in HIV Positive Patients Presenting to Care with Low CD4 Counts: Data from the Icona Foundation Cohort

    PubMed Central

    d’Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Maggiolo, Franco; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Manconi, Paolo Emilio; Gianotti, Nicola; Quirino, Tiziana; Pinnetti, Carmela; Rusconi, Stefano; De Luca, Andrea; Antinori, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background There are no data comparing the response to PI/r-based regimens in people presenting for care with low CD4 counts or AIDS (LC). Aim To compare the response to LPV/r-, DRV/r- or ATV/r-based cART regimens in LC initiating cART from ART-naive. Methods We included people enrolled in Icona with either CD4 counts ≤350 cells/mm3 (low CD4-LC) or CD4 counts ≤200 cells/mm3 (very low CD4-VLC) and/or AIDS, starting their first PI/r-based regimen after 2008. Initial regimens were compared by intention-to-treat: i) time to viral failure (VF) (first of 2 consecutive VL>200 copies/mL after≥6 months); II) time to PI/r discontinuation/switching for any cause (TD) and for toxicity (TDT); III) treatment failure (TF) (VF or TD). Kaplan-Meier and Cox analyses were used. Results 1,362 LC patients were included (DRV/r 607; ATV/r 552; LPV/r 203); 813 VLC. In a median of 18 months (IQR:7–35), the 1-year probability of VF and TF were 2.8% (1.9–3.8) and 21.1% (18.7–23.4). In the adjusted analysis, patients initiating ATV/r had a 53% lower chance, and those initiating DRV/r a 61% lower chance of TD, as compared to LPV/r; the risk of TF was more likely in people starting LPV/r. Results were similar among VLC; in this subgroup LPV/r including regimens demonstrated a lower chance of VF. Conclusions We confirmed in LC a low chance of virological failure by 1 year, with small differences according to PI/r. However, larger differences were observed when comparing longer-term endpoints such as treatment failure. These results are important for people presenting late for care. PMID:27348592

  11. A longitudinal study of the changes in body fat and metabolic parameters in a South African population of HIV-positive patients receiving an antiretroviral therapeutic regimen containing stavudine.

    PubMed

    George, Jaya A; Venter, Willem D F; Van Deventer, Hendrick E; Crowther, Nigel J

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the patterns of change in body fat and metabolic parameters in a South African cohort on a first line ART regimen containing stavudine. Fasting lipogram, blood glucose and insulin levels, CD4 cell count, viral load, BMI, waist-to-hip ratio (WHR), and skinfold thickness at the triceps, scapula, and iliac crest were measured before starting ART in 42 (27 female) subjects. Repeat measurements were performed at four monthly intervals for 2 years. Lipodystrophy was diagnosed using patient perception and assessment by a physician. At baseline, subjects who went on to develop lipodystrophy (LD group) were fatter and had higher skinfold thickness at all three sites and higher insulin levels than subjects who never developed lipodystrophy (NLD group). The WHR increased to a greater extent while hip circumference and tricep skinfolds fell more significantly in the LD than NLD group. Triglyceride and cholesterol levels increased significantly in both groups while lactate and glucose levels increased more and insulin levels increased less in the LD than the NLD group. Neither viral load nor CD4 count differed between the groups during the study. Viral load correlated positively with insulin levels at baseline. Thus, lipodystrophy in the South African population is characterized by a higher BMI before initiation of ART and lipoatrophy of the arms and hips, lipohypertrophy of the waist, and increased lactate production. When compared to the NLD group, the LD subjects display attenuated insulin secretory output in response to a higher weight gain. PMID:19619010

  12. Intestinal Parasite Profile in the Stool of HIV Positive Patients in relation to Immune Status and Comparison of Various Diagnostic Techniques with Special Reference to Cryptosporidium at a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Moorkoth, Anitha Puduvail; Mathew, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and related opportunistic infections are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in susceptible population. This study aims to negate the paucity of data regarding the relation between CD4 levels, prevalence of enteric parasites, and the outcome of treatment with HAART (highly active antiretroviral therapy) and Cotrimoxazole in Kerala, India. Multiple stool samples from 200 patients in a cross-sectional study were subjected to microscopy and Cryptosporidium stool antigen ELISA. Parasites were identified in 18 samples (9%). Cystoisospora and Cryptosporidium spp. were seen in 9 cases (4.5%) and 5 cases (2.5%), respectively. Microsporidium spores and Chilomastix mesnili cysts were identified in 1 case each (0.5% each). Seven cases of Cystoisospora diarrhoea recovered after treatment with Cotrimoxazole. Diarrhoea due to Cryptosporidium spp. in all 5 cases subsided after immune reconstitution with HAART. This study concludes that a positive association was seen between low CD4 count (<200 cells/μL) and overall parasite positivity (P value < 0.01). ELISA is a more sensitive modality for the diagnosis of Cryptosporidium diarrhoea. Chilomastix mesnili, generally considered a nonpathogen, may be a cause of diarrhoeal disease in AIDS. Immune reconstitution and Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis remain to be the best therapeutic approach in AIDS-related diarrhoea. PMID:27493988

  13. Hotel found liable in firing of HIV-positive bartender.

    PubMed

    1997-03-01

    A Federal jury in the court of U.S. Magistrate Judge Leslie G. Foschio of the Western District of New York found the Buffalo [name removed] liable for more than $630,000 in damages to bartender [name removed], who was fired because of his HIV infection. The [name removed] unsuccessfully argued that [name removed] was terminated because of unfavorable performance reviews. The plaintiffs claimed that the [name removed] issued false citations for infractions of hotel rules and that these citations were only issued after hotel management determined that [name removed] was HIV-positive. Testimony showed that all relevant decision-making personnel at the hotel were aware that [name removed] was HIV-positive. The hotel failed to show that all but the personnel manager had a legitimate need to know about [name removed]'s HIV status. The jury awarded [name removed] $1,439,000 in damages. Foschio lowered the amount to $637,388 in damages and $133,705 in attorneys' fees. PMID:11364135

  14. Living with AIDS: an HIV-positive mother's story.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    This article narrates the story of Peati, an HIV-positive mother who had already lost her husband and 1-year-old son to AIDS. Peati's ordeal began when her rugby-star husband Malaki tested positive 4 years after they were married in June 27, 1992. She had to endure many things, including the people's judgmental reactions towards them and the pressure from her own family who wanted her to leave her husband. Following her husband and child's deaths, she, too, tested positive for HIV. Consequently, she lost not only her job but also her family and friends, leaving her all alone to take care of her other son, Natal. Luckily, a Samoan businesswoman named Fatima Strickland offered to help her both financially and emotionally. She then decided to share her story so that others may learn from her experience. The first time she spoke was at the First Pacific Regional HIV/AIDS and STDs Conference in Fiji, where she described her personal trauma as an HIV-positive person now taking care of a 6-year-old son. Peati now works for the Ministry of Women's Affairs in Apia with a commitment to help other Samoan women understand the disease and how to protect themselves against it. PMID:12349393

  15. Realizing HOPE: The Ethics of Organ Transplantation From HIV-Positive Donors.

    PubMed

    Durand, Christine M; Segev, Dorry; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2016-07-19

    The HIV Organ Policy Equity (HOPE) Act now allows transplantation of organs from HIV-positive living and deceased donors to HIV-positive individuals with end-stage organ disease in the United States. Although clinical experience with such transplants is limited to a small number of deceased-donor kidney transplants from HIV-positive to HIV-positive persons in South Africa, unprecedented HIV-positive-to-HIV-positive liver transplantations and living-donor kidney transplantations are also now on the horizon. Initially, all HIV-positive-to-HIV-positive transplantations will occur under research protocols with safeguards and criteria mandated by the National Institutes of Health. Nevertheless, this historic change brings ethical opportunities and challenges. For HIV-positive individuals needing an organ transplant, issues of access, risk, and consent must be considered. For potential HIV-positive donors, there are additional ethical challenges of privacy, fairness, and the right to donate. Careful consideration of the ethical issues involved is critical to the safe and appropriate evaluation of this novel approach to transplantation. PMID:27043422

  16. HIV Positivity but not HPV/p16 Status is Associated with Higher Recurrence Rate in Anal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Joshua E.; Panico, Vinicius J. A.; Marconato, Heloisa M. F.; Sherr, David L.; Christos, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Aim Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a pathogenic factor of squamous cell carcinoma in various mucosal locations, including anal carcinoma (ACA). It is also known that patients positive for HIV are at high risk of ACA. The goal of this study was to examine clinical outcome in ACA in relation to HPV/p16 positivity, histologic tumor differentiation, and HIV status. Patients with oropharyngeal cancers that are positive for HPV and show overexpression of p16 as well as having non-keratinizing/basaloid histology have been reported to have better outcomes following chemoradiation (CRT). However, such relationships in ACA remain unknown. Methods Forty-two patients with SCC of the anus treated with CRT between 1997 and 2009 were identified. The tumors were subclassified as either non-keratinizing (including basaloid) or keratinizing categories. HPV testing was performed using SPF10-PCR, and all cases were immunostained for p16. Results There were 23 men and 19 women; 43 % of men and 11 % of women were HIV-positive (p =0.04). Fifty-five percent of patients had local disease (stages I and II) and 41 % were stages III and IV, with 4 % stage unknown. All tumors were positive for high-oncogenic risk HPVs, and all were positive with p16 immunostain. Sixty-four percent of tumors were non-keratinizing/basaloid and 36 % were keratinizing. The keratinizing tumors were more common in HIV-positive patients (67 %), whereas non-keratinizing/basaloid tumors were more common in HIV-negative patients (77 %) (p =0.008). Thirty-one percent of patients had recurrence of disease, including 50 % HIV-positive patients and 23 % HIV-negative patients (p =0.09). There was no difference in the recurrence rate between non-keratinizing and keratinizing tumor subtypes (p =0.80). The 24-month recurrence-free survival for the cohort was 66 % (95 % CI=46 %, 81 %), with HIV-positive patients having worse recurrence-free survival compared to HIV-negative patients (HR=2.85, 95 % CI= 0.95, 8.53; p =0

  17. The Study of Gonadal Hormonal Abnormalities and Sexual Dysfunction in HIV Positive Females: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Kallikadavil, Abithraj; Shivaswamy, Rajendraprasad; Menon, Vineetha Bharathan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Every endocrine gland has been reported to be affected at varying rates in HIV. HIV is a highly stigmatized chronic disease with a substantial co-occurrence of mental and sexual health problems; however the sexual health problems in women have not been extensively studied. Aim To study the gonadal hormonal abnormalities and sexual dysfunction in HIV positive female patients and its possible association. Materials and Methods This descriptive/exploratory study was conducted in the Department of General Medicine at a tertiary care hospital from September 2013 to August 2015. The study group included 50 diagnosed HIV-positive patients. They were also subjected to specific questions regarding sexual dysfunction by female counselors using female sexual function index. Visits of the subjects were scheduled independent of the menstrual cycle. Hormonal levels (free testosterone, FSH, LH) were measured. Results Out of 50 patients, 26 patients in our study had sexual dysfunction (52%). Patients with age group between 30-39 years had the maximum sexual dysfunction compared to the other groups (<0.001). Patients with a CD4 count between 200 and 499 had the maximum sexual dysfunction (<0.02). Mean duration of HIV in the study was 30 months in sexual dysfunction group which was significant (p<0.005). Hormonal levels were found to be in normal range. All the study patients reported desire, arousal and lubrication problems whereas orgasm and satisfaction problems were noted in 60% patients with pain reported in 52%. Conclusion We identified that although the hormonal levels were in the normal range, they were comparatively in the lower range in the dysfunction group than the non-dysfunctional group. Both free testosterone and FSH levels were low indicating involvement of the pituitary rather than the gonads. We also conclude that duration of HIV and also level of CD4 count is related to sexual dysfunction. PMID:27190860

  18. Detection of microsporidia in local HIV-positive population in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Lono, Angela; Kumar, Suresh; Chye, Tan Tian

    2011-07-01

    The HIV-positive population, due to their immuno-compromised nature, is considered more susceptible to parasitic infections than other populations. However despite the reports of other opportunistic pathogens such as Cryptosporidium and tuberculosis reported in vulnerable communities, microsporidia have not been highlighted in the local HIV-positive population in Malaysia. This study aimed to provide preliminary information on the prevalence of microsporidia in the local HIV-population. Microsporidia were detected in 21/247 (8.5%) stool samples from the HIV-infected individuals, a significantly higher (P-value <0.05) prevalence than in the control group, in which 5/173 (2.9%) were positive. HIV patients were 3x more at risk for acquiring microspordium (OR: 3.12; 95% CI 1.15-8.44). Spores were ellipsoid in shape with outlines that stained dark pink with the interior a lighter shade. Approximately 21% of the positive specimens were from individuals in the 40-49 years age group. Ten individuals who were positive for microsporidia were also positive for other enteric parasites such as Blastocystis hominis and Giardia lamblia. We detected Encephalitozoon intestinalis DNA following nested PCR from three of 10 samples analysed, as demonstrated by an amplicon of 370bp. From the findings reported, it appears that microsporidial infection in humans may actually be more common than reported. We strongly advocate greater emphasis on personal hygiene through public education on personal hygiene and the consumption of boiled or filtered water. PMID:21596411

  19. Self-reported history of Pap-smear in HIV-positive women in Northern Italy: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The incidence of invasive cervical cancer in HIV-positive women is higher than in the general population. There is evidence that HIV-positive women do not participate sufficiently in cervical cancer screening in Italy, where cervical cancer is more than 10-fold higher in women with AIDS than in the general population. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the history of Pap-smear in HIV-positive women in Italy in recent years. We also examined the sociodemographic, clinical, and organizational factors associated with adherence to cervical cancer screening. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted between July 2006 and June 2007 in Emilia-Romagna region (Northern Italy). All HIV-positive women who received a follow-up visit in one of the 10 regional infectivology units were invited to participate. History of Pap-smear, including abnormal smears and subsequent treatment, was investigated through a self-administered anonymous questionnaire. The association between lack of Pap-smear in the year preceding the interview and selected characteristics was assessed by means of odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals adjusted for study centre and age. Results A total of 1,002 HIV-positive women were interviewed. Nine percent reported no history of Pap-smear, and 39% had no Pap-smear in the year prior to the date of questionnaire (last year). The lack of Pap-smear in the last year was significantly associated with age <35 years (OR = 1.4, compared to age ≥45 years), lower education level (OR = 1.3), first HIV-positive test in the last 2 years (OR = 1.4), and CD4 count <200 cells/μl (OR = 1.6). Conversely, when women were advised by a gynecologist rather than other health workers to undergo screening, it significantly increased adherence. Non-significantly higher proportions of lack of Pap-smear in the last year were found in women born in Central-Eastern Europe (OR = 1.8) and Africa (OR = 1.3). No difference in history of Pap-smear emerged by

  20. Recruitment of HIV-Positive Women in Research: Discussing Barriers, Facilitators, and Research Personnel’s Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona R; V, Logan Kennedy; Mohammed, Saira; Wu, Wei; Muchenje, Marvelous; Masinde, Khatundi; Salam, Khaled; Soje, Lena; Gregorovich, Sandra; Tharao, Wangari

    2014-01-01

    Background : Women have historically been under-represented in HIV research, partly due to ineffective recruitment strategies. Objective : To improve the existing understanding of recruitment for HIV-positive women based on a province-wide cross-sectional study. Methods : A survey was emailed to all site coordinators who recruited participants in a study involving 490 HIV-positive women living in Ontario, Canada. The survey consisted of questions regarding the important recruitment barriers and successes. Quantitative data were then contextualized within extensive knowledge from research personnel and team members. Results : Completed surveys were received from (89%) site coordinators (34/38) and 98% (31/34) were women. The highest ranked recruitment barriers identified were: sensitivity of the research topic (59%), time/availability constraints (59%), language barriers (53%), HIV disclosure/stigma issues (47%), lack of trust of research personnel (41%), fear of research (41%) and inaccessibility to child care and transportation (41%). The respondents felt that the most important personal attributes for recruitment were research personnel who were respectful (97%), skilled (91%), flexible (88%) and empathetic (88%) and had good communication skills (88%). The most successful recruitment strategies identified were: developing a strong rapport (88%) that was facilitated by an empathetic relationship (100%), acknowledging the sensitive nature of the research topic (94%), providing cash financial compensation (88%), and developing recruitment strategies unique to women (88%). Conclusion : There are differences in the approaches needed for the recruitment of HIV-positive women in research. For successful recruitment of HIV-positive women, a strong rapport between the research personnel and study participants is important. This rapport is facilitated by having study personnel who are respectful, trustworthy, empathetic, and flexible. Population-specific recruitment

  1. HIV-seropositivity is not important in childbearing decision-making among HIV-positive Ghanaian women receiving antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Laar, Amos K; Taylor, Araba E; Akasoe, Bismark A

    2015-01-01

    Women in their reproductive years make up about 50% of all HIV-positive persons globally. These women, just as their HIV-negative counterparts, wield the right to procreate. However, HIV infection and lack of appropriate information on reproductive options may negatively impact women's procreative decision-making. This study assessed fertility intentions of HIV-positive women receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) in southern Ghana. Quantitative methods were used to collect data from HIV-positive women receiving ART at four treatment centers. HIV-positive aged 18-49 years, and receiving ART were selected using systematic random sampling technique. Three hundred eighteen women were interviewed after informed consent. We used univariate analysis to generate descriptive tabulations for key variables. Bivariate analysis and logistic regression modeling respectively produced unadjusted and adjusted associations between background attributes of respondents and their childbearing decision-making. All analyses were performed using IBM SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 20.0. Irrespective of age, reproductive history, and duration of HIV diagnosis, 46% of the women were desirous of procreating. The bivariate level analysis shows that women in their late reproductive ages (30-39 years) had the strongest desire to procreate (p < 0.001). After controlling for a number of covariates, primiparous and secundiparious women were about twice as likely to desire children (aOR = 2.553; 95% CI 1.480-4.401), and so were women aged 30-39 years (aOR = 2.149; 95% CI 1.202-3.843). Of 54% women who do not wish to procreate, achievement of desired family size (64.3%) was more popular a reason than fear of vertical transmission of HIV (7.5%), poor health status (5%), and pregnancy-related complications (1.6%). PMID:25650646

  2. Delays in antiretroviral therapy initiation among HIV-positive individuals: results of the positive living with HIV study

    PubMed Central

    Poudel, Krishna C.; Buchanan, David R.; Poudel-Tandukar, Kalpana

    2016-01-01

    Background Lack of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains a major health concern due to increased risk of premature mortality and further HIV transmission. This study explored CD4+ cell count monitoring in relation to delays in ART initiation among HIV-positive individuals in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal, where ART coverage was only 23.7% in 2011. Design We recruited a total of 87 ART-naïve, HIV-positive individuals aged 18 to 60 years through the networks of five non-government organizations working with HIV-positive individuals. We collected data on the history of ART initiation, CD4+ cell count monitoring, socio-demographic variables, perceived family support (measured with 10-item Nepali Family Support and Difficulty Scale), depression, and HIV symptom burden. Correlates of ART eligibility were examined using multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results A total of 72 of the 87 ART-naïve participants (82.8%) had monitored their CD4+ cell count in the past 6 months. Of these, 36 (50%) participants were eligible for ART initiation with CD4+ cell count <350 cells/mm3. A total of 12 participants had CD4+ cell count <200 cells/mm3. Lower level of perceived family support was associated with 6.05-fold higher odds (95% confidence interval =1.95 to 18.73) of being ART eligible with a CD4+ cell count <350 cells/mm3. Conclusions High rate of delays in ART initiation and the strong association of low perceived family support with ART eligibility in our study participants suggest that HIV service providers should consider the role and impact of family support in influencing individual decisions to initiate ART among eligible HIV-positive individuals. PMID:27369221

  3. Appeals panel vacates sentence of HIV-positive sex offender.

    PubMed

    1998-02-20

    The Ohio Court of Appeals rejected [name removed]'s arguments for a lighter sentence, but remanded the case for resentencing on other grounds. [Name removed] pleaded guilty to one count of corrupting a minor, a plea bargain with prosecutors in which they dropped rape and kidnapping charges. The case involved oral sex with a 13-year-old boy in which [name removed] did not disclose his HIV-positive status. The lower court erred in neglecting to explain its reason for giving [name removed] the maximum allowable sentence, and should not have raised Megan's Law concerns, as the crime took place before that statute was enacted. This was [name removed]'s first offense for a sex crime. PMID:11365098

  4. Clinical mimicry by herpetic ulceration in a HIV positive teenager.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Abhishek; Rathore, Bhagirath S; Sharma, Charu; Singh, Garima

    2015-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is known to cause altered disease presentations. We present here, the case of a 14-year-old boy who came to us with a chronic, painful, nonhealing ulcer of 4 months duration over the dorsum of right hand. Before our observation, he was variably diagnosed and treated as atypical mycobacterial infection, deep fungal infection, squamous cell carcinoma, and pyoderma gangrenosum. On administration of systemic corticosteroids his condition worsened, after which he was tested for, and found to be HIV positive. He was put onto valacyclovir, responded slowly, with healing after 2 months of antiviral therapy. The case report highlights unusual presentation in an under-considered age group and a slow response to otherwise effective therapy. PMID:26392660

  5. Denying painkiller to HIV-positive inmate was not cruel.

    PubMed

    1996-07-26

    A Federal appeals court upheld a lower court's finding that South Carolina prison officials did not subject [name removed], who is HIV-positive, to cruel and unusual punishment by refusing to fill his medication requests. [Name removed] charged that officials and health care workers were deliberately indifferent to his medical needs while he was awaiting trial in the Berkeley County jail. Prison officials refused his request for Darvocet, a narcotic, and Restoril, a sleep aid, although drugs to treat his other conditions were provided. The prison nurse could not be held liable because she was not permitted to dispense the drugs. The appeals court also rejected [name removed]' claim that he was denied his due-process right to be free from the use of excessive force. Prison gaurds sprayed [name removed] with pepper mace after he threatened to sling blood at them. The court said the effects of the spray were minimal and officials followed proper clean up procedures. PMID:11363666

  6. Sexually-transmitted seronegative HCV infection in an HIV-positive post-liver transplant recipient. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Alshatti, Faisal; Moosavi, Sarvee; Yoshida, Eric M; Hull, Mark W

    2016-06-01

    We report an HIV-positive patient post liver transplant for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Posttransplant liver enzymes became persistently elevated, however HCV antibody was repeatedly negative. Nucleic acid testing subsequently revealed ongoing HCV viremia. Exposure to HCV was on the basis of sexual transmission. The patient was subsequently successfully treated with sofosbuvir/ledipasvir. PMID:27105314

  7. The transplantation of solid organs from HIV-positive donors to HIV-negative recipients: ethical implications.

    PubMed

    Wispelwey, Bram P; Zivotofsky, Ari Z; Jotkowitz, Alan B

    2015-05-01

    HIV-positive individuals have traditionally been barred from donating organs due to transmission concerns, but this barrier may soon be lifted in the USA in limited settings when recipients are also infected with HIV. Recipients of livers and kidneys with well-controlled HIV infection have been shown to have similar outcomes to those without HIV, erasing ethical concerns about poorly chosen beneficiaries of precious organs. But the question of whether HIV-negative patients should be disallowed from receiving an organ from an HIV-positive donor has not been adequately explored. In this essay, we will discuss the background to this scenario and the ethical implications of its adoption from the perspectives of autonomy, beneficence/non-maleficence and justice. PMID:24899522

  8. Disclosure of HIV-positive status to sexual partner and associated factors among ART users in Mekelle Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Gultie, Teklemariam; Genet, Minichil; Sebsibie, Girum

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the disclosure of HIV-positive status and its associated factors to sexual partners among patients attending antiretroviral therapy (ART) clinic follow-up at Mekelle Hospital, Tigray, Ethiopia. Patients and methods An institution-based cross-sectional study was conducted at Mekelle hospital. Samples of 324 individuals were selected by using systematic random sampling techniques from July 1 until July 30, 2013. The data were collected by trained data collectors through a pretested semi-structured questionnaire. The collected data were cleaned, coded, entered, and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0 Windows program. Descriptive statistics and binary and multivariable regression analysis with 95% confidence interval was carried out and P-value less than 0.05 used to determine the significant association. Results A total of 324 people on ART care follow-up were interviewed with 100% response rate. The overall HIV status disclosure to sexual partner was 57.4%. Among those who disclosed their HIV status, 58% of them told their partner after 1 month after diagnosis. The study showed that there is significant association between knowing HIV status of sexual partner (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] =16.69, 95% CI: 5.4, 51.65), duration of HIV-related care follow-up (AOR =5.48, 95% CI =2.17, 13.80), and discussion before HIV testing (AOR =4.33, 95% CI =1.43, 13.08), with HIV-positive status disclosure to sexual partner. Conclusion An HIV-positive status disclosure to a sexual partner in this study was lower than what was reported in other studies in Ethiopia. The duration of HIV-related care follow-up, knowing partner’s HIV status, and prior discussion were the main factors that affected the practice of HIV-positive status disclosure to their sexual partners. PMID:26185470

  9. Group Training of Stress Management vs. Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Depression, Anxiety and Perceived Stress Among HIV-Positive Men

    PubMed Central

    Hemmati Sabet, Akbar; Khalatbari, Javad; Abbas Ghorbani, Maryam; Haghighi, Mohammad; Ahmadpanah, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of group training of stress management with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing depression, anxiety and stress perceived among HIV-positive men. Methods:Inthis semi-experimental study, three groups of HIV-positive men (CBT group, stress management group, and control group) including 15 patients in each group were compared regarding depression, anxiety, and stress using pre-test and post-test tools. Results: Both interventions (CBT and stress management) were effective in reducing depression, anxiety and perceived stress. Evaluating adjustedmean showed the more effectivenessofthe group stressmanagementtraining than CBT. Conclusion: Group stress management training is more effective than group CBT in HIV-positive mentodecreasedepression, anxiety and stress management. Declaration of interest: None. Clinical Trial Registration: URL: http://.irct.ir. Unique identifier: 2012121711782N1 PMID:24644493

  10. Prevalence of prenatal depression and associated factors among HIV-positive women in primary care in Mpumalanga province, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Rodriguez, Violeta J; Jones, Deborah

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence of depressed symptoms and associated factors in prenatal HIV-positive women in primary care facilities in rural South Africa. In a cross-sectional study, 663 HIV-positive prenatal women in 12 community health centres in Mpumalanga province, South Africa, were recruited by systematic sampling (every consecutive patient after HIV post-test counselling). Results indicate that overall, 48.7% [95% CI: 44.8, 52.6] of women during the prenatal period reported depressed mood (scores of ≥ 13 on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale 10). In multivariate analysis, not being employed, unplanned pregnancy, not having an HIV-positive child, poor antiretroviral therapy adherence, non-condom use at last sex, and intimate partner violence were associated with depressive symptoms. Potential risk factors among HIV-infected prenatal women were identified which could be utilized in interventions. Routine screening for depression may be integrated into prenatal care settings. PMID:27250738

  11. Sexual Risk Taking among HIV-Positive Injection Drug Users: Contexts, Characteristics, and Implications for Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Kelly R.; Purcell, David; Dawson-Rose, Carol; Halkitis, Perry N.; Gomez, Cynthia A.

    2005-01-01

    HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) (N = 161) were recruited to complete a qualitative interview and a quantitative survey about sexual behavior and transmission risk. We identified two contexts in which exposure encounters occurred most commonly for HIV-positive IDUs: in intimate serodiscordant relationships and in the drug/sex economy.…

  12. A Qualitative Investigation of Adherence Issues for Men Who Are HIV Positive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerfelt, Alex

    2004-01-01

    People who are HIV positive and people who have been diagnosed with AIDS have new hope in the form of antiretroviral medications. However, many social workers remain unaware of the rigors of this treatment regimen and the difficulties it presents. This article presents the results of a qualitative study of HIV-positive individuals who have…

  13. Healthy Choices: Motivational Enhancement Therapy for Health Risk Behaviors in HIV-Positive Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Wright, Kathryn; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Frey, Maureen; Templin, Thomas; Lam, Phebe; Murphy, Debra

    2006-01-01

    This study piloted a brief individual motivational intervention targeting multiple health risk behaviors in HIV-positive youth aged 16-25. Interviews about sexual behavior and substance use and viral load testing were obtained from 51 HIV-positive youth at baseline and post intervention. Youth were randomized to receive a four-session motivational…

  14. Deficiencies of macronutrient intake among HIV-positive breastfeeding women in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kim, Faith; Neke, Nyasule M; Hendricks, Kristy; Wamsele, Joyce; Lukmanji, Zohra; Waddell, Richard; Maro, Isaac; Connor, Ruth; Mackenzie, Todd; Matee, Mecky; Bakari, Muhammad; Pallangyo, Kisali; von Reyn, C Fordham

    2014-12-15

    We compared macronutrient intake, food insecurity, and anthropometrics in breastfeeding women: 40 HIV-positive women not yet on antiretroviral therapy and 40 HIV-negative women. Calculated deficits at 2 weeks were 517 kcal per day for HIV-positive women vs 87 kcal per day surplus for HIV-negative women (P = 0.01) and 29 g protein per day for HIV-positive women vs 16 g protein per day for HIV-negative women (P = 0.04). Food insecurity scores were 11.3 for HIV-positive women vs 7.8 for HIV-negative women (P < 0.01). Enhanced dietary education together with macronutrient supplementation may be required to improve health outcomes in HIV-positive women and their infants. PMID:25230293

  15. Prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and its correlation with CD4 count in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive adults--a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Dev, Nishanth; Sahoo, Ratnakar; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Gadpayle, A K; Sharma, S C

    2015-11-01

    Prevalence of subclinical hypothyroidism in HIV-positive patients is reported to be high in those with severe immune deficiency. However, there is paucity of literature in newly-diagnosed HIV-positive population. Our aim was to estimate the prevalence of thyroid dysfunction and study its correlation with CD4 count in this population. In this cross-sectional study, patients presenting to the antiretroviral therapy clinic were screened with thyroid function tests, including thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine, and anti-thyroid peroxidase antibody levels at the time of diagnosis. Two hundred and twenty-five HIV-positive and an equal number of healthy volunteers were enrolled. The mean (SD) CD4 count in the study group was 147.1 (84) and 70.7% had advanced immune deficiency with CD4 count <200 cells/µL. The overall prevalence of thyroid dysfunction was 75.5% in the study group and 16% in the control group. Subclinical hypothyroidism was the commonest abnormality noted in almost 53%. Significant correlation was observed between CD4 count and thyroid stimulating hormone, free triiodothyronine, and free thyroxine levels (r = -0.86, r = 0.77, and r = 0.84, respectively, p < 0.0001 for all). The present study demonstrated high prevalence of thyroid dysfunction in HIV-positive patients. The dysfunction is subclinical in most cases and correlates well with declining CD4 counts. PMID:25505045

  16. Despondency among HIV-positive older men and women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Wright, Stuart; Zalwango, Flavia; Seeley, Janet; Mugisha, Joseph; Scholten, Francien

    2012-12-01

    Forty people over 60 years of age took part in longitudinal research over the course of a year on the impact of the HIV epidemic in southern Uganda. In this paper we focus mainly on the data from 26 of the 40 who were HIV-positive. While we observed that feelings of depression were frequently experienced by many of the people in our study, the state of 'being depressed' was not constant. Participants regularly expressed economic frustration (because of a lack of money to buy food and other commodities including sugar and soap); medical problems (including those related to HIV) as well as old age, the burden of dependents (including concerns about school fees for grandchildren), feelings of sadness and isolation, and a lack of support from others, as well as stigma, whether real or perceived. However, while worries, sorrow and despondent thoughts were reported in many of the interviews across the study, moods fluctuated moving from happiness and hope, to sadness and despair, from month to month. Concerns regarding the psychological wellbeing amongst older people, including those living with HIV and older carers in Uganda deserve greater attention. PMID:22930234

  17. Prevalence of suicidal ideation and associated factors among HIV-positive MSM in Anhui, China.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Le; Yang, Hui-Yun; Wang, Jun; Yao, Hui; Zhao, Xue; Chen, Jian; Ding, Xiu-Xiu; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Bi, Peng; Sun, Ye-Huan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and factors associated with suicidal ideation among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in Anhui, China. A cross-sectional study was conducted to recruit HIV-positive MSM in Anhui, China. A total of 184 HIV-positive MSM gave informed consent and completed the interview. Correlates of suicidal ideation were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Fifty-seven (31%) of HIV-positive MSM had suicidal ideations within six months before the interview. Multivariable analyses showed that learning of their HIV status in the past 12 months (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 3.4, 95% CI = 1.6-7.3), perceived HIV stigma (AOR = 2.4, 95% CI = 1.1-5.2), depression symptoms (AOR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.1-5.9) and anxiety symptoms (AOR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.2-6.1) were significantly associated with the suicidal ideation among HIV-positive MSM. The results indicated that suicidal ideation was common among HIV-positive MSM in Anhui, China. There is an urgent need to establish psychological counselling services among HIV-positive MSM in China. Targeting of these potential risk factors could be an effective approach to reduce the suicide risk among this high-risk subgroup by the implementation of early intervention measurements. PMID:25060699

  18. Prevalence of enteric protozoa in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men from Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Stark, Damien; Fotedar, Rashmi; van Hal, Sebastian; Beebe, Nigel; Marriott, Deborah; Ellis, John T; Harkness, John

    2007-03-01

    A prospective, comparative study of the prevalence of enteric protozoa was determined among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)- positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM) in Sydney, Australia. A total of 1,868 patients submitted stool specimens; 1,246 were from MSM (628 HIV positive and 618 HIV positive) and 622 from non-MSM were examined over a 36-month period. A total of 651 (52.2%) stool specimens from MSM were positive for protozoa compared with 85 (13%) from non-MSM. There was a significant difference in the prevalence of Blastocystis hominis, Endolimax nana, Entamoeba histolytica/dispar complex, Entamoeba hartmanni, Iodamoeba butschlii, and Enteromonas hominis detected between MSM and non-MSM (P<0.001). The only notable difference between HIV-negative and HIV-positive MSM was that HIV-infected MSM were found to more likely have a Cryptosporidium parvum infection. Entamoeba histolytica was found in 3 patients, E. dispar in 25, and E. moshkovskii in 17, all of whom were MSM. When compared with a control group, MSM were significantly more likely to harbor intestinal protozoa and have multiple parasites present. The results of this study show high rates of enteric parasites persist in MSM and highlight the importance of testing for intestinal parasites in MSM. This is the first report of E. moshkovskii from MSM. PMID:17360882

  19. Minimal Cognitive Impairment in UK HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men: Effect of Case Definitions and Comparison With the General Population and HIV-Negative Men

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Jeffrey; Haddow, Lewis; Daskalopoulou, Marina; Lampe, Fiona; Speakman, Andrew; Gilson, Richard; Phillips, Andrew; Sherr, Lorraine; Wayal, Sonali; Harrison, John; Antinori, Andrea; Maruff, Paul; Schembri, Adrian; Johnson, Margaret; Collins, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Background: To determine the prevalence of neurocognitive impairment (NCI) in UK HIV-positive and HIV-negative men who have sex with men (MSM). Methods: HIV-positive and HIV-negative participants were recruited to a cross-sectional study from 2 London clinics and completed computer-assisted neuropsychological tests and questionnaires of depression, anxiety, and activities of daily living. Published definitions of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) and global deficit scores were used. Age- and education-adjusted neuropsychological test scores were directly compared with reference population data. Results: A total of 248 HIV-positive and 45 HIV-negative MSM participated. In the HIV-positive group, median time since diagnosis was 9.4 years, median CD4+ count was 550 cells per cubic millimeter, and 88% were on antiretroviral therapy. Prevalence of HAND was 21.0% in HIV-positive MSM (13.7% asymptomatic neurocognitive impairment, 6.5% mild neurocognitive disorder, and 0.8% HIV-associated dementia). Using a global deficit score threshold of 0.5, the prevalence of NCI was 31.5% (when averaged over 5 neuropsychological domains) and 40.3% (over 10 neuropsychological test scores). These results were not significantly different from the HIV-negative study sample. No consistent pattern of impairment was seen in HIV-positive patients relative to general male population data (n = 380). Conclusions: We found a prevalence of HAND and degree of impairment on neuropsychological testing of HIV-positive MSM that could represent a normal population distribution. These findings suggest that NCI may be overestimated in HIV-positive MSM, and that the attribution of NCI to HIV infection implied by the term HAND requires revision. PMID:24991974

  20. Breastfeeding in HIV-positive women: What can be recommended?

    PubMed

    Slater, Mackenzie; Stringer, Elizabeth M; Stringer, Jeffrey S A

    2010-01-01

    Breastfeeding remains a common practice in parts of the world where the burden of HIV is highest and the fewest alternative feeding options exist. The impossible dilemma faced by HIV-positive mothers is whether to breastfeed their infants in keeping with cultural norms but in doing so risk transmitting the virus through breast milk, or to pursue formula feeding, which comes with its own set of risks, including a higher rate of infant mortality from diarrheal illnesses, while reducing transmission of HIV. Treatment of mothers and/or their infants with antiretroviral drugs is a strategy that has been employed for several decades to reduce HIV transmission through pregnancy and delivery, but the effect of these agents when taken during breastfeeding is a newer field of study. In this article we evaluate the latest clinical research, from trials that encourage exclusive breastfeeding to trials of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for either the mother or infant, in an attempt to prevent transmission of HIV through breast milk. Additionally, we discuss research that is in progress, with results anticipated in the next few years that will further shape clinical guidelines and practice. Exclusive breastfeeding is much safer than mixed feeding (the supplementation of breastfeeding with other foods), and should be encouraged even in settings where ART for either the mother or infant is not readily available. The research published regarding maternal treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy and the breastfeeding period has all been non-randomized with relatively little statistical power, but suggests maternal HAART can drastically reduce the risk of transmission of HIV. Infant prophylaxis has been intensively studied in several trials and has been shown to be as effective as maternal treatment with antiretrovirals, reducing the transmission rate after 6 weeks to as low as 1.2%. Research that is in progress will provide us with more answers

  1. Community attitudes towards childbearing and abortion among HIV-positive women in Nigeria and Zambia.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Megan L; Moore, Ann M; Akinyemi, Odunayo; Adewole, Isaac; Dzekedzeke, Kumbutso; Awolude, Olutosin; Arulogun, Oyedunni

    2013-01-01

    Although stigma towards HIV-positive women for both continuing and terminating a pregnancy has been documented, to date few studies have examined relative stigma towards one outcome versus the other. This study seeks to describe community attitudes towards each of two possible elective outcomes of an HIV-positive woman's pregnancy - induced abortion or birth - to determine which garners more stigma and document characteristics of community members associated with stigmatising attitudes towards each outcome. Data come from community-based interviews with reproductive-aged men and women, 2401 in Zambia and 2452 in Nigeria. Bivariate and multivariate analyses revealed that respondents from both countries overwhelmingly favoured continued childbearing for HIV-positive pregnant women, but support for induced abortion was slightly higher in scenarios in which anti-retroviral therapy (ART) was unavailable. Zambian respondents held more stigmatising attitudes towards abortion for HIV-positive women than did Nigerian respondents. Women held more stigmatising attitudes towards abortion for HIV-positive women than men, particularly in Zambia. From a sexual and reproductive health and rights perspective, efforts to assist HIV-positive women in preventing unintended pregnancy and to support them in their pregnancy decisions when they do become pregnant should be encouraged in order to combat the social stigma documented in this paper. PMID:23173695

  2. Comparison among dental, skeletal and chronological development in HIV-positive children: a radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Holderbaum, Rejane Maria; Veeck, Elaine Bauer; Oliveira, Helena Willhelm; Silva, Carmem Lúcia da; Fernandes, Angela

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate skeletal, dental and chronological development in an HIV-positive group of children, as compared with a control group, during a four-year period. Panoramic radiographs and hand and wrist radiographs of 60 children were taken. The children, of both sexes, aged 5 years and 2 months to 15 years and 5 months, were selected as follows: 30 HIV-positive volunteers who had acquired the disease vertically, and 30 volunteers who did not present the HIV infection or any other systemic disease. All radiographs were technically standardized and analyzed according to criteria established by Nolla (dental age), Greulich and Pyle (bone age), and Eklöf and Ringertz (bone age). The results were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% level of significance. Based on the comparison between the chronological age and the dental or the skeletal age, significant differences were observed between HIV-positive and HIV-negative children, both in 1999 and in 2003 (p < or = 0.05). Considering the results obtained with the methodology used, it was concluded that HIV-positive children of both sexes presented delayed bone development despite the administration of antiretroviral drugs, and that HIV-positive female children presented younger dental ages compared with their chronological ages in 1999 and in 2003; and HIV-positive males, in 1999. PMID:16308610

  3. Contraception for the HIV-Positive Woman: A Review of Interactions between Hormonal Contraception and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Jennifer A.; Jamshidi, Roxanne; Burke, Anne E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Preventing unintended pregnancy in HIV-positive women can significantly reduce maternal-to-child HIV transmission as well as improve the woman's overall health. Hormonal contraceptives are safe and effective means to avoid unintended pregnancy, but there is concern that coadministration of antiretroviral drugs may alter contraceptive efficacy. Materials and Methods. We performed a literature search of PubMed and Ovid databases of articles published between January 1980 and February 2012 to identify English-language reports of drug-drug interactions between hormonal contraceptives (HCs) and antiretroviral drugs (ARVs). We also reviewed the FDA prescribing information of contraceptive hormone preparations and antiretrovirals for additional data and recommendations. Results. Twenty peer-reviewed publications and 42 pharmaceutical package labels were reviewed. Several studies of combined oral contraceptive pills (COCs) identified decreased serum estrogen and progestin levels when coadministered with certain ARVs. The contraceptive efficacy of injectable depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) were largely unaffected by ARVs, while data on the contraceptive patch, ring, and implant were lacking. Conclusions. HIV-positive women should be offered a full range of hormonal contraceptive options, with conscientious counseling about possible reduced efficacy of COCs and the contraceptive implant when taken with ARVs. DMPA and the LNG-IUS maintain their contraceptive efficacy when taken with ARVs. PMID:22927715

  4. A qualitative analysis of barriers to accessing HIV/AIDS-related services among newly diagnosed HIV-positive men who have sex with men in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Haochu Howard; Holroyd, Eleanor; Li, Xiaoming; Lau, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    In China, specific HIV/AIDS-related services have been in place since 2004. However, utilisation of these services remains limited among people living with HIV. We explored barriers to accessing HIV/AIDS-related services from the perspective of newly diagnosed HIV-positive men who have sex with men. We conducted repeated in-depth interviews with 31 newly diagnosed HIV-positive men who have sex with men, using the socio-ecological framework and thematic content analysis. Multiple barriers for utilisation of HIV/AIDS-related services were identified, including perceptions of subjective health and poor quality of services, mental and emotional health problems, lack of trust and understanding of the services on offer, low economic status, lack of insurance, and high medical fees, being refused access to services, and restrictive attendance policies. The findings provide information on potential multi-level obstacles preventing newly diagnosed HIV-positive men who have sex with men to use services that they need. It is recommended that policy makers should create a trustful and non-discriminating environment and services integrating physical and mental healthcare. PMID:24626063

  5. HIV-positive patients’ perceptions of care received at a selected antiretroviral therapy clinic in Vhembe district, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ndou, Tshifhiwa V.; Risenga, Patrone R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients’ experiences are a reflection of what has happened during the care process and, therefore, provide information about the performance of health care professional workers. They refer to the process of care provision at the antiretroviral therapy (ART) sites. Aim and setting This article explored the perceptions of HIV-positive patients of care received at the Gateway Clinic of the regional hospital that provides antiretroviral treatment in the Vhembe district. Methods A qualitative, explorative and descriptive design was used. A non-probability, convenient sampling method was used to select 20 HIV-positive patients who were above 18 years of age. In-depth individual interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed through Tech’s open coding method. Results One theme and two sub-themes emerged, namely positive experiences related to the environment and attitudes of health professionals, and negative experiences concerning the practices by health care providers. Conclusion Patients’ perceptions of quality of, and satisfaction with, health care may affect health outcomes. Recommendations are made to consider, practice and strengthen the protocols, the standard operating procedures and the principles of infection control in the health facilities. PMID:27380841

  6. Disengagement of HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women from antiretroviral therapy services: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Tamsin; Thebus, Elizabeth; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Mcintyre, James; Abrams, Elaine J; Myer, Landon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent international guidelines call for expanded access to triple-drug antiretroviral therapy (ART) in HIV-positive women during pregnancy and postpartum. However, high levels of non-adherence and/or disengagement from care may attenuate the benefits of ART for HIV transmission and maternal health. We examined the frequency and predictors of disengagement from care among women initiating ART during pregnancy in Cape Town, South Africa. Methods We used routine medical records to follow-up pregnant women initiating ART within prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV services in Cape Town, South Africa. Outcomes assessed through six months postpartum were (1) disengagement (no attendance within 56 days of a scheduled visit) and (2) missed visits (returning to care 14–56 days late for a scheduled visit). Results A total of 358 women (median age, 28 years; median gestational age, 26 weeks) initiated ART during pregnancy. By six months postpartum, 24% of women (n=86) had missed at least one visit and an additional 32% (n=115) had disengaged from care; together, 49% of women had either missed a visit or had disengaged by six months postpartum. Disengagement was more than twice as frequent postpartum compared to in the antenatal period (6.2 vs. 2.4 per 100 woman-months, respectively; p<0.0001). In a proportional hazards model, later gestational age at initiation (HR: 1.04; 95% CI: 1.00–1.07; p=0.030) and being newly diagnosed with HIV (HR: 1.57; 95% CI: 1.07–2.33; p=0.022) were significant predictors of disengagement after adjusting for patient age, starting CD4 cell count and site of ART initiation. Conclusions These results demonstrate that missed visits and disengagement from care occur frequently, particularly post-delivery, among HIV-positive women initiating ART during pregnancy. Women who are newly diagnosed with HIV may be particularly vulnerable and there is an urgent need for interventions both to promote retention overall, as well as

  7. Lopinavir/ritonavir dosage form affects quality of life during monotherapy in HIV-positive adults.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Rosa F; Lipman, Bryan A; Mayberry, Carl; Miguel, Bernie; Nemecek, John J; Gathe, Joseph C

    2010-01-01

    This was a single-center, open-label study of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) single-agent therapy in antiretroviral-naive, HIV-infected participants initiating therapy with twice-daily soft-gelatin capsules (SGC) and switched to tablets after ≥4 weeks. The objective was to evaluate quality of life and tolerability of the 2 formulations. Participants quality of life, depression, and tolerability were measured using the Medical Outcomes Study-HIV (MOS-HIV), Modified Global Condition Improvement (GCI), and Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression (CES-D), prior to and 4 weeks following switch. MOS-HIV showed significant improvements in general health perception (+6 (16), mean (SD); P = .047) and role functioning (+8 (19), mean (SD); P = .023) post-switch. GCI showed significant improvement in ease of taking medications with tablets (56.7% vs 83.3%; P = .021). No change was observed in CES-D. Tolerability improved in 47%. Reported diarrhea (grade 2) was higher during SGC (33.3% vs3.3%; P = .004). Quality-of-life measures, tolerability, and diarrhea improved with the LPV/r tablet formulation compared to SGC in HIV-positive patients not receiving other antiretroviral therapy (ART). PMID:20841439

  8. Lateral flow urine lipoarabinomannan assay for detecting active tuberculosis in Hiv-positive adults

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Maunank; Hanrahan, Colleen; Wang, Zhuo Yu; Dendukuri, Nandini; Lawn, Stephen D; Denkinger, Claudia M; Steingart, Karen R

    2016-01-01

    were selected for the studies, details of the test and reference standards (the benchmark test), and study flow and timing, using the standard QUADAS-2 approach. Few studies used multiple types of specimens for the reference standard (higher quality standard) and most relied on sputum culture alone (lower quality standard), which may have affected results. What do the results mean? In a population of 1000 HIV-positive individuals with TB symptoms, where 300 actually have TB, the test will correctly identify 135 people as having TB, but miss the remaining 165 people; for the 700 people who do not have TB, the test will correctly identify 644 people as not having TB, but will misclassify 56 as having TB. The sensitivity of the test is higher in people living with HIV with low CD4 cell counts who are at risk of life-threatening illnesses. In patients with a CD4 ≤ 100 cells per µL, LF-LAM sensitivity was 56% (41% to 70%) versus 26% (16% to 46%) in patients with a CD4 count = 100 cells per µL. If the test is used in screening HIV-positive people for TB, in a population of 1000 where 10 actually have TB, LF-LAM will correctly identify none of the 10, or up to four of the 10; on the other hand, the test will miss six to 10 people with TB; in the remaining 990 who do not have TB, the test will correctly identify 931 to 941 people as not having TB while misclassifying 49 to 59 as having TB. Limitations The main limitations of the review were the use of a lower quality reference standard in most included studies, and small number of studies and participants included in the analyses. The results should, therefore, be interpreted with caution. Conclusions In this Cochrane review, we found that LF-LAM, whether the test is used for diagnosis or screening, has low sensitivity to detect TB. However, in HIV-positive people with low CD4 counts who are seriously ill, LF-LAM may help with the diagnosis of TB. PMID:27163343

  9. Systematic Review of HIV Transmission between Heterosexual Serodiscordant Couples where the HIV-Positive Partner Is Fully Suppressed on Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Loutfy, Mona R.; Wu, Wei; Letchumanan, Michelle; Bondy, Lise; Antoniou, Tony; Margolese, Shari; Zhang, Yimeng; Rueda, Sergio; McGee, Frank; Peck, Ryan; Binder, Louise; Allard, Patricia; Rourke, Sean B.; Rochon, Paula A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The risk of sexual HIV transmission in serodiscordant couples when the HIV-positive partner has full virologic suppression on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is debated. This study aims to systematically review observational studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs), evaluating rates of sexual HIV transmission between heterosexual serodiscordant couples when the HIV-positive partner has full suppression on cART. Methods and Findings We searched major bibliographic databases to November 2012 for relevant observational studies and RCTs without language restrictions. Conference proceedings, key journals and bibliographies were also searched. Studies reporting HIV transmission rates, cART histories and viral loads of the HIV-positive partners were included. Two reviewers extracted methodologic characteristics and outcomes. Of 20,252 citations, 3 studies met all eligibility criteria with confirmed full virologic suppression in the HIV-positive partner. We included 3 additional studies (2 cohort studies, 1 RCT) that did not confirm viral suppression in the HIV-positive partner at transmission in a secondary meta-analysis. Methodologic quality was reasonable. The rate of transmission in the 3 studies confirming virologic suppression was 0 per 100 person-years (95% CI = 0–0.05), with low heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). When we included the 3 studies that did not confirm virologic suppression, the rate of transmission was 0.14 per 100 person-years (95%CI = 0.04–0.31) (I2 = 0%). In a sensitivity analysis including all 6 studies, the rate of transmission was 0 per 100 person-years (95%CI = 0–0.01) after omitting all transmissions with known detectable or unconfirmed viral loads, as full suppression in these cases was unlikely. Limitations included lack of data on same-sex couples, type of sexual intercourse (vaginal vs. anal), direction of HIV transmission, exact viral load at the time of transmission, sexually transmitted

  10. On the lack of polymorphism in Aβ-peptide aggregates derived from patient brains

    PubMed Central

    Alred, Erik J; Phillips, Malachi; Berhanu, Workalemahu M; Hansmann, Ulrich H E

    2015-01-01

    The amyloid beta (Aβ) oligomers and fibrils that are found in neural tissues of patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease may either cause or contribute to the pathology of the disease. In vitro, these Aβ-aggregates are characterized by structural polymorphism. However, recent solid state NMR data of fibrils acquired post mortem from the brains of two Alzheimer's patients indicate presence of only a single, patient-specific structure. Using enhanced molecular dynamic simulations we investigate the factors that modulate the stability of Aβ-fibrils. We find characteristic differences in molecular flexibility, dynamics of interactions, and structural behavior between the brain-derived Aβ-fibril structure and in vitro models. These differences may help to explain the lack of polymorphism in fibrils collected from patient brains, and have to be taken into account when designing aggregation inhibitors and imaging agents for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:25739352

  11. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  12. Performance of LED Fluorescence Microscopy for the Diagnosis of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in HIV Positive Individuals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Getachew, Konjit; Abebe, Tamrat; Kebede, Abebaw; Mihret, Adane; Melkamu, Getachew

    2015-01-01

    Background. Despite its lower sensitivity, smear microscopy remains the main diagnostic method for pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in resource-limited countries as TB culturing methods like LJ (Lowenstein-Jensen) are expensive to use as a routine base. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of LED-FM for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional study was conducted in Zewditu Memorial Hospital and Teklehaimanot Health Center HIV/ART clinics in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Each sample was stained with ZN and Auramine O staining and examined with bright-field microscope and LED-FM microscope, respectively. LJ culture was used as a reference. Results. Out of 178 study participants, twenty-four (13.5%) patients were confirmed as positive for MTB with LJ culture. The yield of ZN microscopy and LED-FM in direct and concentrated sample was 3.9%, 8.4%, 6.2%, and 8.4%, respectively. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of direct ZN microscopy were 29.2%, 100%, 100%, and 90.1%, respectively, and of LED-FM microscopy in direct sputum sample were 62.5%, 100%, 100%, and 94.5%, respectively. Conclusion. LED-FM has better sensitivity for the diagnosis of PTB in HIV positive individuals as compared to conventional ZN microscopy. LED-FM can be used as an alternative to conventional ZN microscopy. PMID:26688753

  13. Serostatus Disclosure, Stigma Resistance, and Identity Management Among HIV-Positive Gay Men in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J; Hevey, David; O'Dea, Siobhán; Ní Rathaille, Neans; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we examined how non-infectiousness due to antiretroviral therapy has affected HIV-positive gay men's experience of serostatus disclosure to casual sex partners. Interviews were conducted with 15 seropositive gay men living in Ireland. Using grounded theory, three constructions of non-disclosure were proposed-as self-protection, as a morally permissible act, and as a rejection of the HIV-positive identity. Each construction entailed an aspect related to the sexual exclusion of those living with HIV, and an aspect related to their social exclusion. The extent to which the lives of those interviewed were affected by stigma was starkly revealed, as was the extent to which they stigmatized others living with HIV and rejected the HIV-positive identity. The research highlights the failure to socially normalize HIV and that interventions are needed to reduce the distress associated with seropositivity. PMID:26386024

  14. HIV-Positive Mothers With Late Adolescent/Early Adult Children: “Empty Nest” Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Debra A.; Roberts, Kathleen Johnston; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    In-depth interviews about the “empty nest” were conducted with 57 HIV-positive mothers of late adolescent/early adult children. Empty nest worries included: (1) identity loss, (2) loss of social support, (3) financial insecurity, (4) worsening of physical health, and (5) death/dying. Hopes included: (1) self-improvement, (2) change of life focus, (3) travel, (4) romantic partners, and (5) familial ties. Respondents’ HIV/AIDS status colored their thoughts/feelings about the empty nest; some worries were specific to being HIV-positive, and would not occur for non-ill mothers. Midlife HIV positive women need healthcare/social service resources as they navigate health and social-psychological challenges to successful aging. PMID:22420679

  15. Coping Mediates Outcome Following a Randomized Group Intervention for HIV-Positive Bereaved Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Nathan Grant; Tarakeshwar, Nalini; Hansen, Nathan B.; Kochman, Arlene; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanisms responsible for the beneficial psychological effects of a coping-focused group intervention for HIV-positive individuals who had lost loved ones to AIDS. Data from 235 HIV-positive men and women enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial testing a coping-focused group intervention were analyzed using a multiple-indicator-multiple-cause (MIMIC) structural equation model. Results revealed that the effects of the intervention on decreases in depression and grief were mediated by decreases in avoidant coping. Specifically, participants in the intervention condition decreased their use of avoidant coping. Decreases in avoidant coping, in turn, were related to decreased depression and grief. The results of this study help to validate the use of coping-focused interventions for HIV-positive bereaved individuals. PMID:19152338

  16. Observational Research on NCDs in HIV-Positive Populations: Conceptual and Methodological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Maya; Yiannoutsos, Constantin T.; Justice, Amy; Egger, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) account for a growing burden of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). HIV infection and antiretroviral therapy interact with NCD risk factors in complex ways, and research into this “web of causation” has so far been largely based on data from high-income countries. However, improving the understanding, treatment, and prevention of NCDs in LMICs requires region-specific evidence. Priority research areas include: (1) defining the burden of NCDs among people living with HIV, (2) understanding the impact of modifiable risk factors, (3) evaluating effective and efficient care strategies at individual and health systems levels, and (4) evaluating cost-effective prevention strategies. Meeting these needs will require observational data, both to inform the design of randomized trials and to replace trials that would be unethical or infeasible. Focusing on Sub-Saharan Africa, we discuss data resources currently available to inform this effort and consider key limitations and methodological challenges. Existing data resources often lack population-based samples; HIV-negative, HIV-positive, and antiretroviral therapy–naive comparison groups; and measurements of key NCD risk factors and outcomes. Other challenges include loss to follow-up, competing risk of death, incomplete outcome ascertainment and measurement of factors affecting clinical decision making, and the need to control for (time-dependent) confounding. We review these challenges and discuss strategies for overcoming them through augmented data collection and appropriate analysis. We conclude with recommendations to improve the quality of data and analyses available to inform the response to HIV and NCD comorbidity in LMICs. PMID:25117964

  17. HIV positive men as fathers: Accounts of displacement, ir/responsibility and paternal emergence.

    PubMed

    Highton, Sean; Finn, Mark D

    2016-05-01

    It is now apparent that socio-cultural constructions of masculinity variously impact men's experiences of their HIV positive status, yet how being a father can feature in this mix remains under-researched. This study employed in-depth semi-structured interviews and Foucauldian-informed discourse analysis to explore the accounts of six self-identifying heterosexual fathers (four Black African migrants, two White European) who had been living with HIV from 5 to 24 years. While the HIV-related literature calls for the need to subvert 'traditional' expressions of masculinity as a means of promoting HIV prevention and HIV health, we argue that the lived experience for HIV positive men as fathers is more socially, discursively and thus more psychologically nuanced. We illustrate this by highlighting ways in which HIV positive men as fathers are not simply making sense of themselves as a HIV positive man for whom the modern (new) man and father positions are useful strategies for adapting to HIV and combating associated stigma. Discourses of modern and patriarchal fatherhoods, a gender-specific discourse of irresponsibility and the neoliberal conflation of heath and self-responsibility are also at work in the sense-making frames that HIV positive men, who are also fathers, can variously deploy. Our analysis shows how this discursive mix can underpin possibilities of often conflicted meaning and identity when living as a man and father with HIV in the United Kingdom, and specifically how discourses of fatherhood and HIV 'positive' health can complicate these men's expressions and inhabitations of masculinity. PMID:25908642

  18. Challenges to treatment of leukemia in HIV-positive children.

    PubMed

    Stefan, D Cristina; Dippenaar, Anel; De Bruin, Gerhard; Uys, Ronelle; van Toorn, Ronald

    2012-12-01

    We describe the challenges to treatment of leukemia in three cases of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected children with multiple infections and complications. Two of the three patients had acute myeloid leukemia and the other one acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two of the patients were known with HIV infection; the third was diagnosed on admission. All patients received antiretroviral therapy with standard doses of lamivudine, stavudine and efavirenz or lopinavir/retonavir. All three were diagnosed with Mycobacterium tuberculosis on one or more occasions: pulmonary or miliary involvement or tuberculous meningitis. One patient developed spinal paraplegia and needed an urgent laminectomy. Later he recovered almost completely. The interaction between antiretroviral and antituberculosis treatments combined with chemotherapy, antibiotics and supportive care is not known. Despite the severity and the complexity of several associated diseases, the outcome of the patients was rewarding and encouraging. PMID:22421805

  19. Sex and secrecy: How HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D.; Hodes, Rebecca; Kidia, Khameer K.

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10–19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085–17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to

  20. Dealing with the stress of an HIV-positive diagnosis at an Army medical center.

    PubMed

    Rothberg, J M; Bain, M W; Boggiano, W; Cline, W R; Grace, W C; Holloway, H C; Rock, N L

    1990-03-01

    Following mandatory military-wide testing for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Army medical facilities have gained extensive experience with HIV-positive persons who undergo special stresses as a result of their affiliation with the military. The consequences of evacuation to medical centers for evaluation of HIV status are presented and the impact of this process on the medical center staff are considered. This paper is a description of one system designed to evaluate, treat, and support HIV-positive soldiers and their families. PMID:2107473

  1. Sex and secrecy: How HIV-status disclosure affects safe sex among HIV-positive adolescents.

    PubMed

    Toska, Elona; Cluver, Lucie D; Hodes, Rebecca; Kidia, Khameer K

    2015-01-01

    HIV-positive adolescents who engage in unsafe sex are at heightened risk for transmitting or re-acquiring HIV. Disclosure of HIV-status to sexual partners may impact on condom use, but no study has explored the effects of (i) adolescent knowledge of one's HIV-status, (ii) knowledge of partner status and (iii) disclosure to partners, on safer sex behaviour. This study aimed to identify whether knowledge of HIV-status by HIV-positive adolescents and partners was associated with safer sex. Eight fifty eight HIV-positive adolescents (10-19 years old, 52% female, 68.1% vertically infected) who had ever initiated antiretroviral treatment in 41 health facilities in the Eastern Cape, South Africa, were interviewed using standardised questionnaires. Quantitative analyses used multivariate logistic regressions, controlling for confounders. Qualitative research included interviews, focus group discussions and observations with 43 HIV-positive teenagers and their healthcare workers. N = 128 (14.9%) of the total sample had ever had sex, while N = 109 (85.1%) of sexually active adolescents had boy/girlfriend. In total, 68.1% of the sample knew their status, 41.5% of those who were sexually active and in relationships knew their partner's status, and 35.5% had disclosed to their partners. For adolescents, knowing one's status was associated with safer sex (OR = 4.355, CI 1.085-17.474, p = .038). Neither knowing their partner's status, nor disclosing one's HIV-status to a partner, were associated with safer sex. HIV-positive adolescents feared rejection, stigma and public exposure if disclosing to sexual and romantic partners. Counselling by healthcare workers for HIV-positive adolescents focused on benefits of disclosure, but did not address the fears and risks associated with disclosure. These findings challenge assumptions that disclosure is automatically protective in sexual and romantic relationships for HIV-positive adolescents, who may be ill-equipped to

  2. Inflammatory Markers and Immune Response to Pneumococcal Vaccination in HIV-Positive and -Negative Adults

    PubMed Central

    Leggat, David J.; Ohtola, Jennifer A.; Saul-McBeth, Jessica L.; Khuder, Sadik A.; Westerink, M. A. Julie

    2016-01-01

    Background Members of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-superfamily have speculated roles in the response against T-independent type II antigens (TI-II) including pneumococcal polysaccharides (PPS). Dysregulation in their expression is associated with an enhanced risk for pneumococcal disease in neonates but their expression in other high-risk populations including HIV-positive individuals remains to be elucidated. Objective To investigate signals that contribute towards PPS-response and identify potential anomalies that may account for diminished serological response in HIV-positive individuals post Pneumovax (PPV23) immunization. Methods Markers of inflammation, C-reactive protein (CRP), IL-6, sCD27 and sCD30, were assessed in HIV-positive and -negative individuals as potential predictors of PPV23 response. Serum levels of B cell activating factor (BAFF), transmembrane activator and calcium-modulator and cytophilin ligand interactor (TACI), B cell maturation antigen (BCMA) and B cell expression of BAFF-R, TACI, BCMA, CD40 and CD21 were assessed in total (unselected) and PPS23F (antigen)-specific B cells of PPV23 immunized HIV-positive and -negative individuals. Results CRP, sCD27, sCD30 and BAFF were significantly elevated in the serum of HIV-positive individuals but did not adversely affect PPV23 response. Assessment of PPS-specific B cells revealed enhanced TACI and reduced BAFF-R expression compared to unselected B cells in HIV-positive and -negative individuals. Surface TACI was similar but soluble TACI was significantly lower in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals. Conclusion Current studies highlight a potential role for TACI in PPV23 response based on its enhanced expression on PPS-specific B cells. Although surface levels of TACI were similar, diminished soluble TACI (sTACI) in HIV-positive compared to HIV-negative individuals could potentially decrease BAFF responsiveness and Ig response. A better understanding of the role of TNF receptors

  3. Insurability of HIV-positive people treated with antiretroviral therapy in Europe: collaborative analysis of HIV cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Kaulich-Bartz, Josee; Dam, Wayne; May, Margaret T.; Lederberger, Bruno; Widmer, Urs; Phillips, Andrew N.; Grabar, Sophie; Mocroft, Amanda; Vilaro, Josep; van Sighem, Ard; Moreno, Santiago; Dabis, François; Monforte, Antonella D’Arminio; Teira, Ramon; Ingle, Suzanne M.; Sterne, Jonathan A.C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To increase equitable access to life insurance for HIV-positive individuals by identifying subgroups with lower relative mortality. Design: Collaborative analysis of cohort studies. Methods: We estimated relative mortality from 6 months after starting antiretroviral therapy (ART), compared with the insured population in each country, among adult patients from European cohorts participating in the ART Cohort Collaboration (ART-CC) who were not infected via injection drug use, had not tested positive for hepatitis C, and started triple ART between 1996–2008. We used Poisson models for mortality, with the expected number of deaths according to age, sex and country specified as offset. Results: There were 1236 deaths recorded among 34 680 patients followed for 174 906 person-years. Relative mortality was lower in patients with higher CD4 cell count and lower HIV-1 RNA 6 months after starting ART, without prior AIDS, who were older, and who started ART after 2000. Compared with insured HIV-negative lives, estimated relative mortality of patients aged 20–39 from France, Italy, United Kingdom, Spain and Switzerland, who started ART after 2000 had 6-month CD4 cell count at least 350 cells/μl and HIV-1 RNA less than104 copies/ml and without prior AIDS was 459%. The proportion of exposure time with relative mortality below 300, 400, 500 and 600% was 28, 43, 61 and 64%, respectively, suggesting that more than 50% of patients (those with lower relative mortality) could be insurable. Conclusion: The continuing long-term effectiveness of ART implies that life insurance with sufficiently long duration to cover a mortgage is feasible for many HIV-positive people successfully treated with ART for more than 6 months. PMID:23449349

  4. Biofilm-forming ability and adherence to poly-(methyl-methacrylate) acrylic resin materials of oral Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects

    PubMed Central

    Uzunoglu, Emel; Dolapci, Istar; Dogan, Arife

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the adhesion to acrylic resin specimens and biofilm formation capability of Candida albicans strains isolated from HIV positive subjects' oral rinse solutions. MATERIALS AND METHODS The material tested was a heat-cured acrylic resin (Acron Duo). Using the adhesion and crystal violet assays, 14 oral Candida albicans isolated from HIV-positive subjects and 2 references Candida strains (C. albicans ATCC 90028 and C. albicans ATCC 90128) were compared for their biofilm production and adhesion properties to acrylic surfaces in vitro. RESULTS There were no significant differences in adhesion (P=.52) and biofilm formation assays (P=.42) by statistical analysis with Mann-Whitney test. CONCLUSION Denture stomatitis and increased prevalence of candidal carriage in HIV infected patients is unlikely to be related to the biofilm formation and adhesion abilities of C. albicans to acrylic resin materials. PMID:24605203

  5. Different strategies of 25OH vitamin D supplementation in HIV-positive subjects.

    PubMed

    Falasca, Katia; Ucciferri, Claudio; Di Nicola, Marta; Vignale, Francesca; Di Biase, Jessica; Vecchiet, Jacopo

    2014-10-01

    Summary A high incidence of 25OH vitamin D deficiency has been observed in HIV-infected subjects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of cholecalciferol administration on serum 25OH vitamin D levels in HIV-infected patients. This prospective cohort study included 153 HIV-positive subjects; 47 were treated with 300,000 IU intramuscular cholecalciferol, 67 with 25,000 IU oral cholecalciferol monthly, while the remaining 39 did not receive any treatment. The group treated orally had an increase of serum 25OH vitamin D concentration, changing from 15.7 ± 12.2 ng/mL to 27.4 ± 11.6 ng/mL after 10 months (T10). The group treated with intramuscular supplementation had an improvement, changing from 18.5 ± 10.5 ng/mL to 32.9.0 ± 12.2 ng/mL at T10. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance indicated a significant difference for 25OH vitamin D variation (p = 0.002) among the three groups. A significant effect of time (p < 0.001) and group × time interaction (p < 0.001) was found: at T10, 25OH vitamin D values were significantly higher in the oral and intramuscular groups with respect to the control group. Our findings showed that the supplementation with cholecalciferol in patients with HIV-infection improved 25OH vitamin D serum levels, and suggest that the two types of administration are equivalent, but are insufficient for severe forms of hypovitaminosis. PMID:24469972

  6. Disease patterns and causes of death of hospitalized HIV-positive adults in West Africa: a multicountry survey in the antiretroviral treatment era

    PubMed Central

    Lewden, Charlotte; Drabo, Youssoufou J; Zannou, Djimon M; Maiga, Moussa Y; Minta, Daouda K; Sow, Papa S; Akakpo, Jocelyn; Dabis, François; Eholié, Serge P

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to describe the morbidity and mortality patterns in HIV-positive adults hospitalized in West Africa. Method We conducted a six-month prospective multicentre survey within the IeDEA West Africa collaboration in six adult medical wards of teaching hospitals in Abidjan, Ouagadougou, Cotonou, Dakar and Bamako. From April to October 2010, all newly hospitalized HIV-positive patients were eligible. Baseline and follow-up information until hospital discharge was recorded using standardized forms. Diagnoses were reviewed by a local event validation committee using reference definitions. Factors associated with in-hospital mortality were studied with a logistic regression model. Results Among 823 hospitalized HIV-positive adults (median age 40 years, 58% women), 24% discovered their HIV infection during the hospitalization, median CD4 count was 75/mm3 (IQR: 25–177) and 48% had previously received antiretroviral treatment (ART). The underlying causes of hospitalization were AIDS-defining conditions (54%), other infections (32%), other diseases (8%) and non-specific illness (6%). The most frequent diseases diagnosed were: tuberculosis (29%), pneumonia (15%), malaria (10%) and cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%). Overall, 315 (38%) patients died during hospitalization and the underlying cause of death was AIDS (63%), non-AIDS-defining infections (26%), other diseases (7%) and non-specific illness or unknown cause (4%). Among them, the most frequent fatal diseases were: tuberculosis (36%), cerebral toxoplasmosis (10%), cryptococcosis (9%) and sepsis (7%). Older age, clinical WHO stage 3 and 4, low CD4 count, and AIDS-defining infectious diagnoses were associated with hospital fatality. Conclusions AIDS-defining conditions, primarily tuberculosis, and bacterial infections were the most frequent causes of hospitalization in HIV-positive adults in West Africa and resulted in high in-hospital fatality. Sustained efforts are needed to integrate care of these disease

  7. Confronting Stigma: Community Involvement and Psychological Well-Being among HIV-Positive Latino Gay Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramirez-Valles, Jesus; Fergus, Stevenson; Reisen, Carol A.; Poppen, Paul J.; Zea, Maria Cecilia

    2005-01-01

    Theories of social integration and stress process posit that community involvement may buffer or may compensate the adverse effects of stigma on psychological well-being. In this article, the authors explore this thesis in a stigmatized and seldom studied group of HIV-positive Latino gay men. Specifically, they examine the effects of community…

  8. HIV-Positive Mothers' Communication about Safer Sex and Std Prevention with Their Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Debra A.; Roberts, Kathleen Johnston; Herbeck, Diane M.

    2012-01-01

    Mothers play an important role in promoting the sexual health of their adolescent children. Fifty-seven HIV-positive mothers with adolescent children participated in an in-depth, qualitative interview regarding whether they have talked to their children about safer sex and sexually transmitted disease (STD) prevention, including at what age they…

  9. Violence prevention among HIV-positive women with histories of violence: healing women in their communities.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Gail E; Hamilton, Alison B; Myers, Hector F; Ullman, Jodie B; Chin, Dorothy; Sumner, Lekeisha A; Loeb, Tamra B; Carmona, Jennifer V; Zhang, Muyu; Liu, Honghu

    2011-11-01

    Experiences of past and current gender-based violence are common among HIV-positive women in the United States, who are predominantly from ethnic minority groups. However, culturally congruent, feasible interventions for HIV-positive women who have experienced past and/or current violence are not widely available. The Office on Women's Health Gender Forum has made several recommendations for responding to the National HIV/AIDS Strategy Implementation Plan, including recommendations to incorporate gender-based violence prevention into a comprehensive, gender-responsive national strategy. This paper draws on an example of a community-based project for HIV-positive women, the Healing Our Women Project, to illustrate how violence prevention can be achieved within peer-led and community-based programming. Strong community partnerships, responsiveness to community needs and local cultural norms, a trained workforce, and culturally competent care are programmatic cornerstones of gender-responsive services. HIV-positive women with histories of gender-based violence and risk factors for current and future violence deserve the highest quality gender-responsive services to ensure that they can address their health needs within contexts of safety and respect. PMID:22055676

  10. HPV and Cervical Cancer Education Needs among HIV Positive Haitian Women

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Olveen; Fatil, Marie; Jones, Jamal; Jean, Chrystelle; Huff, India; Kobetz, Erin

    2015-01-01

    Background Haitian Immigrant women, the largest growing Black ethnic group in Miami, experience the highest rates of cervical cancer and account for one of the largest populations diagnosed with HIV/AIDS in South Florida. Using community-based participatory research methods, we conducted a pilot study to examine HPV/cervical cancer knowledge and identify intervention preferences among HIV positive Haitian women. Methods Community health workers (CHWs) conducted three focus groups with 21 HIV-positive Haitian women. All sessions were conducted in Haitian Kreyol, digitally recorded, and later interpreted and transcribed into English. The first focus group assessed HPV/Cervical Cancer Knowledge; the second session explored HPV/Cervical Cancer considerations specific to HIV positive women, and the third focus group discussed HPV/Cervical Cancer screening and intervention preferences. Data analysis was guided by a grounded theory approach. Findings Our sample had limited HPV/Cervical Cancer knowledge. Misconceptions about screening, transmission, and treatment were common. Participants felt stigma by providers negatively impacted the care they received and stigma by the community diminished social support. Strong support for culturally-tailored interventions to improve HPV/Cervical Cancer knowledge was expressed. Although no participants had previously participated in research, all were willing to participate in future trials. Conclusions There is critical need for culturally relevant interventions to improve HPV/Cervical Cancer knowledge among HIV-positive Haitian women. PMID:25864021

  11. Thoughts, Attitudes, and Feelings of HIV-Positive MSM Associated with High Transmission-Risk Sex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinta, Matthew D.; Murphy, Jessie L.; Paul, Jay P.; Schwarcz, Sandra K.; Dilley, James W.

    2012-01-01

    This study presents survey data collected from a sample of HIV-positive men (N = 182) who had high transmission-risk sex, defined as unprotected anal intercourse with a man whose HIV-status was negative or unknown, in the previous 6 months. Despite the tremendous changes in HIV treatment and their impact on people living with HIV, little recent…

  12. Risky Behaviors among HIV-Positive Female Sex Workers in Northern Karnataka, India

    PubMed Central

    Jadhav, Apoorva; Bhattacharjee, Parinita; Raghavendra, T.; Blanchard, James; Moses, Stephen; Isac, Shajy; Halli, Shiva S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Little is known about the risky sexual behaviors of HIV-positive female sex workers (FSWs) in the developing world, which is critical for programmatic purposes. This study aims to shed light on their condom use with regular clients as well as husband/cohabiting partner, a first in India. Methods. Multivariate logistic regression analyses for consistent condom use with regular clients and husband/cohabiting partner are conducted for the sample of 606 HIV-positive FSWs. Results. Older FSWs are 90% less likely and nonmobile FSWs are 70% less likely to consistently use condoms. FSWs on ART are 3.84 times more likely to use condoms. Additionally, FSWs who changed their occupation after HIV diagnosis are 70% less likely to use condoms. FSWs who are currently cohabiting are more likely to consistently use condoms with repeat clients and are 3.22 times more likely to do so if they have felt stigma associated with being HIV-positive. FSWs who have multiple repeat clients, and who do not know the sexual behavior of these clients, are more likely to use condoms consistently. Conclusion. This study would help inform programs to target the following particularly vulnerable HIV-positive FSWs: those who are older, those who changed their occupation post-HIV diagnosis, and those who are nonmobile. PMID:23365728

  13. Exclusion of HIV-Positive People with Disabilities in the Media

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghajarieh, Amir Biglar Beigi

    2012-01-01

    This current issue piece aims to address the harmful exclusion of people with disabilities in the Iranian media. In a case study, this author collected news related to statistics of HIV-positive people covered by popular news websites written in the Persian language between June 2011 and June 2012. Within the analysed electronic texts, no…

  14. Future Life Goals of HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Male Emerging Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, Douglas; Harper, Gary W.

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the future life goals reported by a sample of HIV-positive gay/bisexual male emerging adults. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 54 participants ages 17-24 at four geographically and demographically diverse adolescent HIV medicine programs to explore the content of participants' goals, perceived…

  15. What HIV-Positive Young Women Want from Behavioral Interventions: A Qualitative Approach

    PubMed Central

    Brothers, Jennifer; Lemos, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Young women living with HIV in the United States face many social and psychological challenges, including involvement in health care and secondary prevention efforts. The factors that put these young women at risk for HIV acquisition initially, such as poverty, gender roles, cultural norms, and limited perceived control over sexual relationships, continue to place them at risk for both adverse mental and physical health outcomes that impact their daily lives and secondary prevention efforts. This study utilized focus groups with young HIV-positive women in order to better understand their perceived problems and pressures and to inform a developmentally appropriate secondary prevention intervention for young HIV-positive women that could be implemented in clinical care settings. Focus groups with young HIV-positive women were convened in three U.S. cities: Baltimore, Chicago, and Tampa. A total of 17 young, HIV-positive women, age range 17–24 (mean age=21), participated in the focus groups. This article describes the psychological and social challenges these young women face as well as their suggestions regarding secondary HIV prevention intervention components. PMID:22675725

  16. Providers' views concerning family planning service delivery to HIV-positive women in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Hayford, Sarah R; Agadjanian, Victor

    2010-12-01

    This study explores challenges and obstacles in providing effective family planning services to HIV-positive women as described by staff of maternal and child health (MCH) clinics. It draws upon data from a survey of service providers carried out from late 2008 to early 2009 in 52 MCH clinics in southern Mozambique, some with and some without HIV services. In all clinics, surveyed providers reported that practical, financial, and social barriers made it difficult for HIV-positive clients to follow protocols to prevent mother-to-child transmission of the virus. Likewise, staff were skeptical of their seropositive clients' ability to adhere to recommendations to cease childbearing and to use condoms consistently. Providers' recommendations to HIV-positive clients and their assessment of barriers to adherence did not depend on availability of HIV services. Although integration of HIV and reproductive health services is advancing in Mozambique, service providers do not feel that they can influence the behaviors of HIV-positive women effectively. PMID:21258608

  17. The Scientist and the Artist: Adaptive Dissociation within the HIV-Positive Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Sacha; Miller, Erin; Cross, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings of two independent qualitative studies which were conducted with HIV-positive cohort over a period of 2010-2012. Although the original studies used different qualitative designs (IPA and Grounded Theory), the authors have nevertheless sought to explore the combined utility of their findings by using a broad…

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Infection in HIV Positive Attendees of Shiraz Behavioral Diseases Consultation Center in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Davarpanah, Mohammad Ali; Khademolhosseini, Farnaz; Rajaeefard, Abdolreza; Tavassoli, Alireza; Yazdanfar, Seyed Kamalaldin; Rezaianzadeh, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence of HCV co-infection and its correlation with demographic and risk factors among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals attending Shiraz behavioral diseases consultation (SBDC) Center in southern Iran. Materials and Methods: In a cross-sectional study, 226 consecutive HIV-positive patients who referred to SBDC Center from April 2006 to March 2007 were interviewed face-to-face to record demographic data and risk factors of HIV transmission. A 10ml sample of venous blood was drawn from every subject and tested for HCV-antibodies by third generation enzyme linked immunosorbant (ELISA) and recombinant immunoblot assays (RIBA). All samples were also analyzed by qualitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for detection of HCV-RNA. Results: The study population consisted of 214 men (94.7%) and 12 women (5.3%) with a mean age of 35.6 ± 7.9 years. The most prevalent risk factor was imprisonment (88.9%) followed by injecting drug use (79.2%). The prevalence of HCV infection was 88.5% by ELISA and 86.7% by RIBA, while HCV viremia was detected in 26.1% of the patients. HCV-antibody positivity was significantly associated with gender, age, marital status, occupation, injecting drug use, and history of imprisonment. It was inversely related to having an infected or high risk sexual partner. In the logistic regression model, the predictors of HCV-positivity were injecting drug use (OR = 24.9, P = 0.004) and imprisonment (OR = 21.4, P < 0.001). Conclusions: Prevalence of HCV infection among HIV-positive individuals in our region is very high and there is a need for stricter preventive actions against transmission of HCV among this group of patients. PMID:23878420

  19. Patients with chronic pain lack somatic markers during decision-making

    PubMed Central

    Elvemo, Nicolas-Andreas; Nilsen, Kristian Bernhard; Landrø, Nils Inge; Borchgrevink, Petter Christian; Håberg, Asta Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Patients with chronic pain have impaired cognitive functions, including decision making, as shown with the Iowa gambling task (IGT). The main aim of this study was to elucidate whether patients’ decision making is associated with a lack of the anticipatory skin conductance response (SCR). An increase in anticipatory SCR before making unfavorable choices is known to guide decisions in healthy controls during the IGT. Since several brain regions involved in decision making are reported to have altered morphology in patients with chronic pain, the second aim was to explore the associations between IGT performance and brain structure volumes. Eighteen patients with chronic pain of mixed etiology and 19 healthy controls matched in terms of age, sex, and education were investigated with a computerized IGT during the recording of SCR, heart rate, and blood pressure. The participants also underwent neuropsychological testing, and three-dimensional T1-weighted cerebral magnetic resonance images were obtained. Contrary to controls, patients did not generate anticipatory SCRs before making unfavorable choices, and they switched between decks of cards during the late phase of the IGT significantly more often, and this was still observed after adjusting for depression scores. None of the other autonomic measures differed during IGT performance in either group or between groups. In patients, IGT scores correlated positively with total cortical grey matter volume. In controls, there was no such association, but their IGT scores correlated with the anticipatory SCR. It may be speculated that the reduction in anticipatory SCRs makes the chronic pain patients rely more on cortical resources during decision making. PMID:25075199

  20. [Asymptomatic facial infiltrated papules in an HIV-positive male].

    PubMed

    Brenner, M; Rosin, C; Battegay, M; Häusermann, P

    2011-12-14

    A 65 year old HIV-infected patient (CDC A2, diagnosed in 07/2008) presented with facial, erythematous infiltrated papular lesions. Consistent with progressive immunodeficiency a low CD4+ T-cell count and an increase of the viral load was seen simultaneously and an eosinophilic pustular folliculitis (EPF) was assumed. Though, the lesional biopsy revealed a follicular eosinophilic infiltration and endotrichial hyphae, proving for an infiltrating dermatophytosis. This shows how an infiltrating Tinea faciei is mimicking clinically and histologically an HIV-associated EPF of the face. PMID:22161883

  1. A preliminary study of spiritual self-schema (3-S(+)) therapy for reducing impulsivity in HIV-positive drug users.

    PubMed

    Margolin, Arthur; Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Beitel, Mark; Arnold, Ruth M; Fulwiler, Carl E; Avants, S Kelly

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. First, pretreatment correlations are presented among impulsivity, intoxicant use, HIV risk behavior, spirituality, and motivation in a sample of 38 HIV-positive drug users. Second, treatment outcomes are presented from a preliminary study of spiritual self-schema (3-S(+)) therapy - a manual-guided psychotherapy integrating cognitive and Buddhist psychologies - for increasing motivation for abstinence, HIV prevention, and medication adherence. Impulsivity was negatively correlated with spiritual practices and motivation for recovery, and was positively related to intoxicant use and HIV risk behavior. Relative to a standard care comparison condition, patients completing 3-S(+) therapy reported greater decreases in impulsivity and intoxicant use, and greater increases in spiritual practices and motivation for abstinence, HIV prevention, and medication adherence. PMID:17828761

  2. Brief Report: Anal Cancer in the HIV-Positive Population: Slowly Declining Incidence After a Decade of cART.

    PubMed

    Richel, Olivier; Van Der Zee, Ramon P; Smit, Colette; De Vries, Henry J C; Prins, Jan M

    2015-08-15

    We surveyed trends in incidence (1995-2012) and risk factors for anal cancer in the Dutch HIV-positive population. After an initial increase with a peak incidence in 2005-2006 of 114 [95% confidence interval (CI): 74 to 169] in all HIV+ patients and 168 (95% CI: 103 to 259) in HIV+ men who have sex with men (MSM), a decline to 72 (95% CI: 43 to 113) and 100 (95% CI: 56 to 164), respectively, was seen in 2011-2012. Low nadir CD4, alcohol use, and smoking were significantly associated with anal cancer in MSM. In conclusion, anal cancer remains a serious problem in predominantly HIV+ MSM. However, it seems that incidence rates are leveling off. PMID:26167621

  3. Student Sexual Orientation, Promiscuity and Urban Acculturation as Factors That Influence Teacher Judgments about HIV[Positive] Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cruce, Michael K.; Stinnett, Terry A.; Choate, Kurt T.

    2003-01-01

    Attributions toward HIV[positive] adolescents made by teacher education students who graduated from rural or urban high schools were examined. Participants read vignettes in which level of promiscuity and sexual orientation were varied, then completed a rating scale that reflected various attitudes toward HIV[positive] students. The vignette…

  4. Mental Health Pathways from Interpersonal Violence to Health-Related Outcomes in HIV-Positive Sexual Minority Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantalone, David W.; Hessler, Danielle M.; Simoni, Jane M.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We examined mental health pathways between interpersonal violence (IPV) and health-related outcomes in HIV-positive sexual minority men engaged with medical care. Method: HIV-positive gay and bisexual men (N = 178) were recruited for this cross-sectional study from 2 public HIV primary care clinics that treated outpatients in an urban…

  5. RELATIVE EFFICIENCY OF FIELD AND ONLINE STRATEGIES IN THE RECRUITMENT OF HIV-POSITIVE MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Andrea C.; Starks, Tyrel J.; Parsons, Jeffrey T.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to reach HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) and link them to care must be expanded; however, finding and recruiting them remains a challenge. We compared the efficiency of three recruitment sources in reaching self-identified HIV-positive MSM with various characteristics. Relative to recruitment online and at clubs and bars, AIDS Service Organizations (ASOs) were significantly more efficient in reaching HIV-positive MSM in general. This was also true for those with specific characteristics of interest such as substance/stimulant use, and HIV-positive MSM who were racial/ethnic minorities. Both ASOs and online recruitment were more efficient than clubs and bars in reaching HIV-positive MSM not taking HIV medication. This was also the case for White HIV-positive MSM in general, and White HIV-positive MSM who used substances and stimulants. Online recruitment was also more efficient than clubs and bars in reaching HIV-positive MSM who were young across the board. PMID:25915696

  6. A Roy model study of adapting to being HIV positive.

    PubMed

    Perrett, Stephanie E; Biley, Francis C

    2013-10-01

    Roy's adaptation model outlines a generic process of adaptation useful to nurses in any situation where a patient is facing change. To advance nursing practice, nursing theories and frameworks must be constantly tested and developed through research. This article describes how the results of a qualitative grounded theory study have been used to test components of the Roy adaptation model. A framework for "negotiating uncertainty" was the result of a grounded theory study exploring adaptation to HIV. This framework has been compared to the Roy adaptation model, strengthening concepts such as focal and contextual stimuli, Roy's definition of adaptation and her description of adaptive modes, while suggesting areas for further development including the role of perception. The comparison described in this article demonstrates the usefulness of qualitative research in developing nursing models, specifically highlighting opportunities to continue refining Roy's work. PMID:24085671

  7. ALTERNATIVE DONORS EXTEND TRANSPLANTATION FOR PATIENTS WITH LYMPHOMA WHO LACK AN HLA MATCHED DONOR

    PubMed Central

    Bachanova, Veronika; Burns, Linda J.; Wang, Tao; Carreras, Jeanette; Gale, Robert Peter; Wiernik, Peter H.; Ballen, Karen K.; Wirk, Baldeep; Munker, Reinhold; Rizzieri, David A.; Chen, Yi-Bin; Gibson, John; Akpek, Görgün; Costa, Luciano J.; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Aljurf, Mahmoud D.; Hsu, Jack W.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Schouten, Harry C.; Bacher, Ulrike; Savani, Bipin N.; Wingard, John R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Smith, Sonali M.; Brunstein, Claudio; Saber, Wael

    2015-01-01

    Alternative donor transplantation is increasingly used for high risk lymphoma patients. We analyzed 1593 transplant recipients (2000 to 2010) and compared transplant outcomes in recipients of 8/8 allele human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C, and DRB1 matched unrelated donors (MUD; n=1176), 7/8 allele HLA-matched unrelated donors (MMUD; n=275) and umbilical cord blood donors (1 or 2 units UCB; n=142). Adjusted 3-year non-relapse mortality of MMUD (44%) was higher as compared to MUD (35%; p=0.004), but similar to UCB recipients (37%; p=0.19), although UCB had lower rates of neutrophil and platelet recovery compared to unrelated donor groups. With a median follow-up of 55 months, 3-year adjusted cumulative incidence of relapse was lower after MMUD compared with MUD (25% vs 33%, p=0.003) but similar between UCB and MUD (30% vs 33%; p=0.48). In multivariate analysis UCB recipients had lower risks of acute and chronic graft versus host disease compared with adult donor groups (UCB vs MUD: HR=0.68, p=0.05; HR=0.35; p<0.001). Adjusted 3-year overall survival was comparable (43% MUD, 37% MMUD and 41% UCB). Data highlight that patients with lymphoma have acceptable survival after alternative donor transplantation. MMUD and UCB can expand the curative potential of allotransplant to patients who lack suitable HLA-matched sibling or MUD. PMID:25402415

  8. Smoking and anal high-risk human papillomavirus DNA loads in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Ulrike; Hellmich, Martin; Wetendorf, Janna; Potthoff, Anja; Höfler, Daniela; Swoboda, Jochen; Fuchs, Wolfgang; Brockmeyer, Norbert; Pfister, Herbert; Kreuter, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) have an increased risk for anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, anal high-grade intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and anal cancer. Smoking is associated with abnormal anal cytology and with an increased risk for anal cancer. We collected 3736 intraanal swabs from 803 HIV-positive MSM who participated in an anal cancer screening program between October 2003 and August 2014. HPV prevalence, anal cytology and HPV DNA load of high-risk (HR) HPV-types 16, 18, 31 and 33 of non-smokers and smokers were compared. HPV-typing was performed by alpha-HPV genus-specific PCR and hybridization with 38 type-specific probes using a multiplex genotyping assay. In samples positive for HPV16, 18, 31, or 33, HPV DNA loads were determined by type-specific real-time PCRs and expressed as HPV DNA copies per betaglobin gene copy. At baseline, HR-HPV DNA (80.5 vs. 89.0%, p=0.001), HPV16 DNA (41.6 vs. 52.3%, p=0.003), HPV18 DNA (15.5 vs. 26.0%, p<0.001), anal dysplasia (LSIL+HSIL; 51.5 vs. 58.4%, p=0.045) and HSIL (17.2 vs. 22.7%, p=0.048) were detected more frequently in smokers compared to non-smokers. Throughout the study period 32.7% of non-smokers and 39.9% of smokers developed HSIL (p=0.011), and three smokers developed anal cancer. Considering swabs from the entire study period (median HPV load value per patient per cytology grade), smokers with normal anal cytology had significantly higher HPV16 loads (median 0.29 vs. 0.87, n=201, p=0.007) and cumulative high-risk-HPV loads (median 0.53 vs. 1.08, n=297, p=0.004) than non-smokers. Since elevated HR-HPV DNA loads are associated with an increased risk for HPV-induced anogenital cancers, HPV-infected HIV-positive MSM should be counseled to refrain from smoking. Additionally, for smokers, shorter anal cancer screening intervals than for non-smokers may be appropriate. PMID:26319939

  9. Patients with active inflammatory bowel disease lack immature peripheral blood plasmacytoid and myeloid dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Baumgart, D C; Metzke, D; Schmitz, J; Scheffold, A; Sturm, A; Wiedenmann, B; Dignass, A U

    2005-01-01

    Background: Breakdown of tolerance against the commensal microflora is believed to be a major factor in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Dendritic cells (DC) have been implicated in this process in various animal models, but data on human DC in IBD are very limited. Aim: To characterise plasmacytoid DC (PDC) and myeloid DC (MDC) in patients with active versus inactive IBD and healthy controls. Patients and Methods: Peripheral blood was obtained from 106 patients (Crohn’s disease (CD) n = 49, ulcerative colitis (UC) n = 57) and healthy controls (n = 19). Disease activity was scored using the modified Truelove Witts (MTWSI) for UC and the Harvey Bradshaw severity indices (HBSI) for CD. Four colour flow cytometric analysis was used to identify, enumerate, and phenotype DC. DC from patients with acute flare ups and healthy controls were cultured and stimulated with CpG ODN 2006 or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Results: IBD patients in remission (PDC UC, 0.39%; CD, 0.35%; MDC-1 UC, 0.23%; CD, 0.22% of PBMC) have slightly lower numbers of circulating DC compared with healthy controls (PDC 0.41%, MDC-1 0.25% of PBMC). In acute flare ups IBD patients experience a significant drop of DC (PDC UC, 0.04%; CD, 0.11%; MDC-1 UC, 0.11%; CD, 0.14% of PBMC) that correlates with disease activity (correlation coefficients: PDC MTWSI, 0.93; HBSI, 0.79; MDC-1 MTWSI, 0.75; HBSI, 0.81). Moreover, both express α4β7 integrin and display an immature phenotype. Freshly isolated PDC and MDC-1 from untreated flaring IBD patients express higher baseline levels of CD86 which increases further in culture and upon stimulation compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: IBD patients lack immature blood DC during flare ups which possibly migrate to the gut. An aberrant response to microbial surrogate stimuli suggests a disturbed interaction with commensals. PMID:15647187

  10. Exclusive breastfeeding prenatal intentions among HIV-positive mothers in Blantyre, Malawi: a correlation study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Exclusive breastfeeding is an important component of child survival and prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in resource-poor settings like Malawi. In Malawi, children under the age of six months are exclusively breastfed for an average duration of 3.7 months. This falls short of the recommendations by the World Health Organization as well as the Malawi Ministry of Health that mothers exclusively breastfeed for the first six months of the child’s life. Understanding factors that influence exclusive breastfeeding duration among HIV-positive mothers is important in promoting exclusive breastfeeding among these mothers. An exploratory study was therefore conducted to determine factors that influence HIV-positive mothers’ prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding and their likelihood to exclusively breastfeed for six months. Methods This paper is based on data from a longitudinal, descriptive and correlation study that was conducted at Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre, Malawi between May 12, 2009 and March 22, 2010. Theory of Planned Behavior guided the study. A face-to-face survey was utilized to collect data from a convenience sample of 110 HIV-positive mothers who were at least 36 weeks pregnant at baseline. A modified and pre-tested breastfeeding attrition prediction tool was used to measure exclusive breastfeeding beliefs, intentions and external influences at baseline. Data were analyzed using descriptive and association statistics. Additionally, multiple regressions were run to determine significant predictors of HIV-positive mothers’ prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding and their likelihood to exclusively breastfeed for six months. Results Results revealed high exclusive breastfeeding prenatal intentions among HIV-positive mothers. Prenatal intended duration of exclusive breastfeeding was positively associated with normative, control beliefs and negatively associated with positive beliefs

  11. Lack of prognostic significance of adiponectin immunohistochemical expression in patients with triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Olmez, Omer Fatih; Kanat, Ozkan; Kabul, Selva; Canhoroz, Mustafa; Avci, Nilufer; Hartavi, Mustafa; Deligonul, Adem; Çubukçu, Sinem; Manavoglu, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) – which lack the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) – have no established markers that can be used for prognostic stratification. As adiponectin has been previously implicated in a more aggressive phenotype of primary breast cancer, we explored the relation between adiponectin immunohistochemical expression and prognosis in TNBCs. Material and methods Immunohistochemical staining for adiponectin was performed in 38 TNBC patients. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) served as the main outcome measures. Results Of the 38 TNBC patients, 18 (47%) had negative and 20 (53%) positive adiponectin immunohistochemical expression. We did not find any significant association between adiponectin immunohistochemical expression and the baseline characteristics. In addition, there were no associations between adiponectin immunohistochemical expression and prognosis. Conclusions Although our results suggest that adiponectin immunohistochemical expression is not of prognostic significance in TNBCs, further studies are warranted to determine the role of this adipokine in breast cancer biology. PMID:24876819

  12. Relationship satisfaction of HIV-positive Ugandan individuals with HIV-negative partners.

    PubMed

    Pasipanodya, Elizabeth C; Heatherington, Laurie

    2015-01-01

    Challenges of relational coping are well documented in the literature on couples and chronic illnesses, but there is significantly less research on the psychological aspects of couple relationships and HIV, particularly in international contexts. Coping with the uncertainty of illness progression, family planning, disclosure to friends and family, social isolation and stigma, fear of transmission, sexual intimacy, changes to social and physical functioning, and receiving and providing care pose special challenges for couples with discordant HIV statuses. This study examined the correlates of relationship satisfaction in Ugandan HIV-positive individuals seeking treatment at a community clinic. Relationship satisfaction of HIV-positive individuals was uniquely predicted by their couple identity and depression, underscoring the importance of mental and relational health in HIV/AIDS. PMID:25483813

  13. Sexual Behavior and Risk Practices of HIV Positive and HIV Negative Rwandan Women.

    PubMed

    Adedimeji, Adebola A; Hoover, Donald R; Shi, Qiuhu; Gard, Tracy; Mutimura, Eugene; Sinayobye, Jean d'Amour; Cohen, Mardge H; Anastos, Kathryn

    2015-07-01

    It is not well understood how infection with HIV and prior experience of sexual violence affects sexual behavior in African women. We describe factors influencing current sexual practices of Rwandan women living with or without HIV/AIDS. By design, 75 % of participants were HIV positive and ~50 % reported having experienced genocidal rape. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fit to describe demographic and clinical characteristics that influenced sexual behavior in the previous 6 months, condom use, history of transactional sex, and prior infection with a non-HIV sexually transmitted disease. Respondents' age, where they lived, whether or not they lived with a husband or partner, experience of sexual trauma, CD4 count, CES-D and PTSD scores were strongly associated with risky sexual behavior and infection with non-HIV STI. HIV positive women with a history of sexual violence in the contexts of war and conflict may be susceptible to some high-risk sexual behaviors. PMID:25488169

  14. Declining mortality among HIV-positive indigenous people at a Vancouver indigenous-focused urban-core health care centre

    PubMed Central

    Klakowicz, Piotr; Zhang, Wen; Colley, Guillaume; Moore, David; Tu, David

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine mortality rates among HIV-positive indigenous people and others after initiation of HIV care improvements based on the chronic care model to address high HIV-related mortality. Design Retrospective cohort preintervention-to-postintervention evaluation study. Setting Urban-core primary health care centre focused on indigenous people in Vancouver, BC. Participants Individuals infected with HIV. Intervention Adoption of the chronic care model to improve HIV care over time. Main outcome measures All-cause mortality and HIV-related mortality rates, overall and from preintervention (2007 to 2009) to postintervention (2010 to 2012), by indigenous ethnicity, were calculated from clinical data linked with the provincial HIV treatment clinical registry. Results Of the 546 eligible study patients, 323 (59%) self-identified as indigenous. Indigenous persons had higher all-cause mortality compared with other patients (14% vs 8%, P = .035; 6.25 vs 4.02 per 100 person-years [PYRs], P = .113), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.77 (95% CI 0.95 to 3.30). Indigenous persons also had higher HIV-related mortality (6% vs 2%, P = .027; 2.50 vs 0.89 per 100 PYRs, P = .063), with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.88 (95% CI 0.93 to 8.92). Between 2007 to 2009 and 2010 to 2012, a significant decline was observed in all-cause mortality for indigenous patients (10.00 to 5.00 per 100 PYRs, P = .023) and a non-significant decline was observed in other patients (7.21 to 2.97 per 100 PYRs, P = .061). A significant decline in HIV-related mortality was also seen for indigenous patients (5.56 to 1.80 per 100 PYRs, P = .005). Conclusion Despite the overall higher risk of death among indigenous patients compared with others, the decline in mortality in HIV-positive indigenous patients after the initiation of efforts to improve HIV care at the clinic further support HIV primary care informed by indigenous issues and the adoption of the chronic care model.

  15. A qualitative exploration of HIV-positive pregnant women's decision-making regarding abortion in Cape Town, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Orner, Phyllis; de Bruyn, Maria; Harries, Jane; Cooper, Diane

    2010-08-01

    HIV-positive women's abortion decisions were explored by: (i) investigating influencing factors; (ii) determining knowledge of abortion policy and public health services; and (iii) exploring abortion experiences. In-depth interviews were held with 24 HIV-positive women (15 had an abortion; 9 did not), recruited at public health facilities in Cape Town, South Africa. Negative perceptions towards HIV-positive pregnant women were reported. Women wanted abortions due to socio-economic hardship in conjunction with HIV-positive status. Respondents were generally aware that women in South Africa had a right to free abortions in public health facilities. Both positive and negative abortion experiences were described. Respondents reported no discrimination by providers due to their HIV-positive status. Most respondents reported not using contraceptives, while describing their pregnancies as 'unexpected'. The majority of women who had abortions wanted to avoid another one, and would encourage other HIV-positive women to try to avoid abortion. However, most felt abortions were acceptable for HIV-positive women in some circumstances. Data suggested that stigma and discrimination affect connections between abortion, pregnancy and HIV/AIDS, and that abortion may be more stigmatised than HIV/AIDS. Study results provide important insights, and any revision of reproductive health policy, services, counselling for abortion and HIV/AIDS care should address these issues. PMID:21409294

  16. Clonal expansion accounts for an excess of antimicrobial resistance in Staphylococcus aureus colonising HIV-positive individuals in Lagos, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Olalekan, Adesola O; Schaumburg, Frieder; Nurjadi, Dennis; Dike, Adobi E; Ojurongbe, Olusola; Kolawole, Deboye O; Kun, Jürgen F; Zanger, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Nasal colonisation with Staphylococcus aureus is a risk factor for invasive infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive individuals. This study aimed to characterise colonising S. aureus from regions with a high HIV prevalence. Single nasal swabs were taken from a total of 374 HIV-positive and 370 healthy individuals. Overall, 202 S. aureus carriers were detected. Compared with healthy individuals, HIV-positive subjects were more likely to be S. aureus nasal carriers (33% vs. 21%; P=0.0001). Isolates from HIV-positive individuals were more often resistant to meticillin (16% vs. 8%; P=0.13), chloramphenicol (47% vs. 16%; P<0.0001), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT) (90% vs. 55%; P<0.0001) and ciprofloxacin (18% vs. 0%; P<0.0001). Strains belonging to the spa clonal complexes 3772/ST25 and 064/ST8 were significantly more often isolated from HIV-positive individuals and exhibited greater resistance to ciprofloxacin, SXT and chloramphenicol (spa-CC 3772) or to meticillin (spa-CC 064), respectively. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene content was high overall and was equally distributed between isolates from HIV-positive and healthy individuals (33% vs. 30%). Genotypic characteristics of colonising isolates were similar to those reported to cause invasive infection in Nigeria. The HIV pandemic contributes to the evolution of antimicrobial resistance in S. aureus. Measures to contain antimicrobial resistance of S. aureus in Nigeria must target risk groups such as HIV-positive individuals. PMID:22831840

  17. HIV-positive woman's appeal for absolute discharge dismissed on grounds of public safety.

    PubMed

    2008-07-01

    On 7 December 2007, the Nova Scotia Court of Appeal dismissed an appeal from a June 2007 order of the Nova Scotia Review Board providing that an HIV-positive woman, "K.A.S.," be discharged with conditions to reside in hospital-approved premises, to continue with recommended mental health treatment, and to abstain from alcohol and illicit drug use because she continued to present a significant risk to the safety of the public. PMID:18727198

  18. Recreational drug use and related social factors among HIV-positive men in Japan.

    PubMed

    Togari, Taisuke; Inoue, Yoji; Takaku, Yosuke; Abe, Sakurako; Hosokawa, Rikuya; Itagaki, Takashi; Yoshizawa, Shigeyuki; Oki, Sachiko; Katakura, Naoko; Yamauchi, Asae; Wakabayashi, Chihiro; Yajima, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    This study aims to determine the relationship between recreational drug use in HIV-positive males in the past year and socio-economic factors and/or social support networks in Japan. A national online survey in a cross-sectional study was conducted by HIV Futures Japan project from July 2013 to February 2014. Of the 1095 HIV-positive individuals who responded, 913 responses were determined to be valid; responses from the 875 males were analysed. A total of 282 participants used addictive drugs (32.2%) in past year. New psychoactive substances were used by 121 participants (13.8%), methamphetamine or amphetamine by 47 (5.4%), air dusters/sprays/gas by 31 (3.5%), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5MeO-DIPT) by 16 (1.8%) and cannabis (1.0%) by 9. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed with the use of alkyl nitrites, addictive drugs, air dusters and thinners, which are low illegality, as dependent variables. We found that the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) for use among participants with full-time and temp/contracted/part-time employees compared to management/administration professions were 2.59 (0.99-6.77) and 2.61 (0.91-7.51). Also, a correlation was observed between alkyl nitrites and new psychoactive substances and usage rates in people engaged in few HIV-positive networks. It is necessary to develop targeted policies for drug use prevention and user support among HIV-positive men and to support and provide care for drug users who are isolated or have a narrow HIV/AIDS support network. PMID:26887351

  19. Sexuality and Reproduction in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Synthesis.

    PubMed

    Carlsson-Lalloo, Ewa; Rusner, Marie; Mellgren, Åsa; Berg, Marie

    2016-02-01

    The increased access to effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) has made HIV comparable to a chronic disease in terms of life expectancy. Needs related to sexuality and reproduction are central to overall health and well-being. An interpretative meta-synthesis was performed to synthesize and assess how HIV-positive women's experiences of sexuality and reproduction have been described in qualitative studies. A total of 18 peer-reviewed qualitative studies were included, which comprised a total of 588 HIV-positive interviewed women. The studies originated from resource-rich countries outside the Asian and African continents. The analysis, resulting in a lines-of-argument synthesis, shows that HIV infection was a burden in relation to sexuality and reproduction. The weight of the burden could be heavier or lighter. Conditions making the HIV burden heavier were: HIV as a barrier, feelings of fear and loss, whereas motherhood, spiritual beliefs, and supportive relationships made the HIV burden lighter. The findings are important in developing optimal health care by addressing conditions making the burden of HIV infection lighter to bear. In future research there is a need to focus not only on examining how HIV-positive women's sexual and relationships manifest themselves, but also on how health care professionals should provide adequate support to the women in relation to sexuality and reproduction. PMID:26741804

  20. Spatial Analysis of HIV Positive Injection Drug Users in San Francisco, 1987 to 2005

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Alexis N.; Mobley, Lee R.; Lorvick, Jennifer; Novak, Scott P.; Lopez, Andrea M.; Kral, Alex H.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial analyses of HIV/AIDS related outcomes are growing in popularity as a tool to understand geographic changes in the epidemic and inform the effectiveness of community-based prevention and treatment programs. The Urban Health Study was a serial, cross-sectional epidemiological study of injection drug users (IDUs) in San Francisco between 1987 and 2005 (N = 29,914). HIV testing was conducted for every participant. Participant residence was geocoded to the level of the United States Census tract for every observation in dataset. Local indicator of spatial autocorrelation (LISA) tests were used to identify univariate and bivariate Census tract clusters of HIV positive IDUs in two time periods. We further compared three tract level characteristics (% poverty, % African Americans, and % unemployment) across areas of clustered and non-clustered tracts. We identified significant spatial clustering of high numbers of HIV positive IDUs in the early period (1987–1995) and late period (1996–2005). We found significant bivariate clusters of Census tracts where HIV positive IDUs and tract level poverty were above average compared to the surrounding areas. Our data suggest that poverty, rather than race, was an important neighborhood characteristic associated with the spatial distribution of HIV in SF and its spatial diffusion over time. PMID:24722543

  1. Stress and depression among HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay and bisexual AIDS caregivers.

    PubMed

    Land, Helen; Hudson, Sharon M; Stiefel, Burton

    2003-03-01

    From a survey of 416 gay and bisexual male AIDS caregivers, we examined differences in the stress process and predictors of depressive symptomatology by caregivers' HIV serostatus (n=164 HIV-positive and n=252 HIV-negative). Results indicate that HIV-positive caregivers reported higher levels of depressive symptomatology than those who were HIV-negative. Parallel regression analyses revealed that a younger age, role-related stress, and low self-esteem were common predictors of depressive symptomatology for both groups. Group-specific predictors of depression for the HIV-positive caregivers were poorer health and financial concerns. In contrast, the group-specific predictor for the HIV-negative caregivers was higher stress associated with direct acts of caregiving. These results suggest that in order to stem depressive symptomatology, gay and bisexual male caregivers need support directed at reducing stress stemming from their role as caregivers as well as services designed to address low self-esteem. In addition, serostatus should be taken into account when designing service plans because seropositive and seronegative caregivers may require different supportive services. PMID:14534389

  2. Predictors of sexual transmission risk behaviors among HIV-positive young men.

    PubMed

    Stein, J A; Rotheram-Borus, M-J; Swendeman, D; Milburn, N G

    2005-05-01

    Reduction in the incidence of high-risk sexual behaviors among HIV-positive men is a priority. We examined the roles of proximal substance use and delinquency-related variables, and more distal demographic and psychosocial variables as predictors of serious high-risk sexual behaviors among 248 HIV-positive young males, aged 15-24 years. In a mediated latent variable model, demographics (ethnicity, sexual orientation and poverty) and background psychosocial factors (coping style, peer norms, emotional distress, self-esteem and social support) predicted recent problem behaviors (delinquency, common drug use and hard drug use), which in turn predicted recent high-risk sexual behaviors. Hard drug use and delinquency were found to predict sexual risk behaviors directly, as did lower self-esteem, white ethnicity and being gay/bisexual. Negative peer norms strongly influenced delinquency and substance use and positive coping predicted less delinquency. In turn, less positive coping and negative peer norms exerted indirect effects on sexual transmission risk behavior through delinquency and hard drug use. Results suggest targeting hard drug use, delinquency, maladaptive peer norms, dysfunctional styles of escaping stress and self-esteem in the design of intervention programs for HIV-positive individuals. PMID:16036228

  3. Strategies and Outcomes of HIV Status Disclosure in HIV-Positive Young Women with Abuse Histories

    PubMed Central

    Czaplicki, Lauren; Andrinopoulos, Katherine; Muessig, Kathryn; Hamvas, L.; Ellen, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Young women with HIV and histories of physical and/or sexual abuse in childhood may be vulnerable to difficulties with disclosure to sexual partners. Abuse in childhood is highly prevalent in HIV-positive women, and has been associated with poorer communication, low assertiveness, low self worth, and increased risk for sexual and other risk behaviors that increase the risk of secondary transmission of HIV. HIV disclosure may be an important link between abuse and sexual risk behaviors. Qualitative interviews with 40 HIV-positive young women with childhood physical and/or sexual abuse were conducted; some women had also experienced adult victimization. Results suggest that HIV-positive women with abuse histories use a host of strategies to deal with disclosure of HIV status, including delaying disclosure, assessing hypothetical responses of partners, and determining appropriate stages in a relationship to disclose. Stigma was an important theme related to disclosure. We discuss how these disclosure processes impact sexual behavior and relationships and discuss intervention opportunities based on our findings. PMID:23596649

  4. The pregnancy decisions of HIV-positive women: the state of knowledge and way forward.

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Sarah; Rasanathan, Jennifer J K; Ferguson, Laura; Gruskin, Sofia

    2012-12-01

    Despite the growing number of women living with and affected by HIV, there is still insufficient attention to their pregnancy-related needs, rights, decisions and desires in research, policy and programs. We carried out a review of the literature to ascertain the current state of knowledge and highlight areas requiring further attention. We found that contraceptive options for pregnancy prevention by HIV-positive women are insufficient: condoms are not always available or acceptable, and other options are limited by affordability, availability or efficacy. Further, coerced sterilization of women living with HIV is widely reported. Information gaps persist in relation to effectiveness, safety and best practices regarding assisted reproductive technologies. Attention to neonatal outcomes generally outweighs attention to the health of women before, during and after pregnancy. Access to safe abortion and post-abortion care services, which are critical to women's ability to fulfill their sexual and reproductive rights, are often curtailed. There is inadequate attention to HIV-positive sex workers, injecting drug users and adolescents. The many challenges that women living with HIV encounter in their interactions with sexual and reproductive health services shape their pregnancy decisions. It is critical that HIV-positive women be more involved in the design and implementation of research, policies and programs related to their pregnancy-related needs and rights. PMID:23177686

  5. Quality of life and emotional distress among HIV-positive women during transition to motherhood.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marco; Canavarro, Maria Cristina

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this preliminary study was to describe the quality of life (QOL) and emotional distress during pregnancy and early postpartum, and to examine the ability of psychopathological symptoms to predict QOL at early postpartum. A sample of 75 pregnant women (31 HIV-positive and 44 HIV-negative) was assessed during the second trimester of pregnancy and two to four days postpartum. QOL was assessed with the WHOQOL-Bref. The emotional distress was assessed with the Brief Symptom Inventory, and with the Emotional Assessment Scale. Seropositive women reported increased negative emotional reactivity and lower scores in social relationships and overall QOL during pregnancy than HIV-negative women. Both HIV-positive and HIV-negative women reported better QOL after the birth of their child, when compared with the pregnancy period. Among HIV-positive women, lower anxiety and depressive symptoms during pregnancy were, respectively, significant predictors of better psychological QOL and overall QOL at early postpartum. Less intense somatic symptoms predicted better physical QOL. Longitudinal assessment of QOL and emotional status may provide potentially useful information for tailoring psychological interventions in the maternity care of HIV-infected women, during their transition to motherhood. PMID:23156934

  6. Sexuality and Reproduction in HIV-Positive Women: A Meta-Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Rusner, Marie; Mellgren, Åsa; Berg, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The increased access to effective antiretroviral treatment (ART) has made HIV comparable to a chronic disease in terms of life expectancy. Needs related to sexuality and reproduction are central to overall health and well-being. An interpretative meta-synthesis was performed to synthesize and assess how HIV-positive women's experiences of sexuality and reproduction have been described in qualitative studies. A total of 18 peer-reviewed qualitative studies were included, which comprised a total of 588 HIV-positive interviewed women. The studies originated from resource-rich countries outside the Asian and African continents. The analysis, resulting in a lines-of-argument synthesis, shows that HIV infection was a burden in relation to sexuality and reproduction. The weight of the burden could be heavier or lighter. Conditions making the HIV burden heavier were: HIV as a barrier, feelings of fear and loss, whereas motherhood, spiritual beliefs, and supportive relationships made the HIV burden lighter. The findings are important in developing optimal health care by addressing conditions making the burden of HIV infection lighter to bear. In future research there is a need to focus not only on examining how HIV-positive women's sexual and relationships manifest themselves, but also on how health care professionals should provide adequate support to the women in relation to sexuality and reproduction. PMID:26741804

  7. Determinants of Intimate Partner Violence Among HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Women in India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Patted, Shobhana; Gan, Anita; Islam, Farahnaz; Revankar, Amit

    2016-02-01

    To reduce the many adverse health outcomes associated with intimate partner violence (IPV), high-risk groups need to be specifically targeted in the fight against domestic violence in India. This study aims to examine the prevalence and correlates of IPV in HIV-positive and HIV-negative women from India. A convenience sample of HIV-positive and HIV-negative women responded to questionnaires to assess their experience and perception of violence. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to model the association between IPV and age, education, employment status, contraception use, age at first marriage, and HIV status. Although adjusting for age, education, employment status, contraception use, age at first marriage, and HIV status, women who are employed were 3.5 times more likely to suffer IPV (confidence interval [CI] = [1.5, 8.5]), women aged 18 or above at first marriage are 0.3 times less likely to face IPV (CI = [0.1, 0.6]), and women who use contraception are 7 times more likely to suffer IPV (CI = [1.4, 30.2]). Also, HIV-positive women are 3 times more likely to face sexual violence compared with HIV-negative women (CI = [1.1, 7.6]). PMID:25381267

  8. Optimism, community attachment and serostatus disclosure among HIV-positive men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Patrick J; Hevey, David; O'Dea, Siobhán; Ní Rathaille, Neans; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between HIV health optimism (HHO) (the belief that health will remain good after HIV infection due to treatment efficacy), HIV-positive community attachment (HCA), gay community attachment (GCA) and serostatus disclosure to casual sex partners by HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM). Cross-sectional questionnaire data were gathered from 97 HIV-positive MSM attending an HIV treatment clinic in Dublin, Ireland. Based on self-reported disclosure to casual partners, participants were classified according to their pattern of disclosure (consistent, inconsistent or non-disclosers). Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess HHO, HCA and GCA as predictors of participants' pattern of disclosure. Classification as a non-discloser (compared to a consistent discloser) was associated with higher HHO, less HCA and greater GCA. Classification as an inconsistent discloser (compared to a consistent discloser) was associated with higher GCA. The study provided novel quantitative evidence for associations between the constructs of interest. The results suggest that (1) HHO is associated with reduced disclosure, suggesting optimism may preclude individuals reaping the benefits of serostatus disclosure and (2) HCA and GCA represent competing attachments with conflicting effects on disclosure behaviour. Limitations and areas for future research are discussed. PMID:25495615

  9. Disclosure and Self-Efficacy Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men: A Comparison Between Older and Younger Adults.

    PubMed

    Brown, Monique J; Serovich, Julianne M; Kimberly, Judy A; Umasabor-Bubu, Ogie

    2015-11-01

    Men who have sex with men (MSM) continue to be disproportionately affected by HIV in the US. HIV among older adults also continues to be an important public health problem. Age is associated with disclosure of HIV serostatus and self-efficacy for condom use. However, studies examining self-efficacy and disclosure among older MSM (age 50 and older) living with HIV are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the associations between being 50 and older, and disclosure behaviors, intentions and attitudes, and self-efficacy for condom use, disclosure, and negotiation for safer sex practices among HIV-positive MSM. Data were gathered from 340 participants at the baseline assessment of a longitudinal disclosure intervention study. Linear regression was used to determine the association between being older (age 50 and older) and disclosure behaviors, intentions and attitudes, and self-efficacy for condom use, disclosure, and negotiation for safer sex practices. After adjusting for time since diagnosis and number of sexual partners, MSM aged 50 and older scored lower in disclosure behavior (β = -7.49; 95% CI: -14.8, -0.18) and in self-efficacy for negotiation of safer sex practices (β = -0.80; 95% CI: -1.57, -0.04) compared to MSM 18-34 years. Intervention and prevention programs should endeavor to improve disclosure and self-efficacy for negotiating safer sex practices among older HIV-positive MSM. More health care providers should initiate sexual health discussions, especially among older HIV-positive MSM populations, which may help to improve their disclosure behavior and self-efficacy for negotiating safer sex practices. PMID:26348705

  10. Patients' Perceptions of the Causes of Their Success and Lack of Success in Achieving Their Potential in Spinal Cord Rehabilitation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belciug, Marian P.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the patients' perception of the causes of their success and lack of success in achieving their potential in rehabilitation and their emotional reactions to the outcome of their rehabilitation. Thirty-five patients with spinal cord injury who were participating in the Rehabilitation Program at Hamilton…

  11. 38 CFR 1.484 - Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. 1.484 Section 1.484 Pensions...: (a) The patient lacks decision-making capacity; and (b) The practitioner deems the content of the... Patient Consent § 1.484 Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks...

  12. 38 CFR 1.484 - Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. 1.484 Section 1.484 Pensions...: (a) The patient lacks decision-making capacity; and (b) The practitioner deems the content of the... Patient Consent § 1.484 Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks...

  13. 38 CFR 1.484 - Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. 1.484 Section 1.484 Pensions...: (a) The patient lacks decision-making capacity; and (b) The practitioner deems the content of the... Patient Consent § 1.484 Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks...

  14. 38 CFR 1.484 - Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks decision-making capacity. 1.484 Section 1.484 Pensions...: (a) The patient lacks decision-making capacity; and (b) The practitioner deems the content of the... Patient Consent § 1.484 Disclosure of medical information to the surrogate of a patient who lacks...

  15. Health outcomes among HIV-positive Latinos initiating antiretroviral therapy in North America versus Central and South America

    PubMed Central

    Cesar, Carina; Koethe, John R; Giganti, Mark J; Rebeiro, Peter; Althoff, Keri N; Napravnik, Sonia; Mayor, Angel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wolff, Marcelo; Padgett, Denis; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Sterling, Timothy R; Willig, James; Levison, Julie; Kitahata, Mari; Rodriguez-Barradas, Maria C; Moore, Richard D; McGowan, Catherine; Shepherd, Bryan E; Cahn, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Latinos living with HIV in the Americas share a common ethnic and cultural heritage. In North America, Latinos have a relatively high rate of new HIV infections but lower rates of engagement at all stages of the care continuum, whereas in Latin America antiretroviral therapy (ART) services continue to expand to meet treatment needs. In this analysis, we compare HIV treatment outcomes between Latinos receiving ART in North America versus Latin America. Methods HIV-positive adults initiating ART at Caribbean, Central and South America Network for HIV (CCASAnet) sites were compared to Latino patients (based on country of origin or ethnic identity) starting treatment at North American AIDS Cohort Collaboration on Research and Design (NA-ACCORD) sites in the United States and Canada between 2000 and 2011. Cox proportional hazards models compared mortality, treatment interruption, antiretroviral regimen change, virologic failure and loss to follow-up between cohorts. Results The study included 8400 CCASAnet and 2786 NA-ACCORD patients initiating ART. CCASAnet patients were younger (median 35 vs. 37 years), more likely to be female (27% vs. 20%) and had lower nadir CD4 count (median 148 vs. 195 cells/µL, p<0.001 for all). In multivariable analyses, CCASAnet patients had a higher risk of mortality after ART initiation (adjusted hazard ratio (AHR) 1.61; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.32 to 1.96), particularly during the first year, but a lower hazard of treatment interruption (AHR: 0.46; 95% CI: 0.42 to 0.50), change to second-line ART (AHR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.51 to 0.62) and virologic failure (AHR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.48 to 0.57). Conclusions HIV-positive Latinos initiating ART in Latin America have greater continuity of treatment but are at higher risk of death than Latinos in North America. Factors underlying these differences, such as HIV testing, linkage and access to care, warrant further investigation. PMID:26996992

  16. HIV-negative and HIV-positive gay men's attitudes to medicines, HIV treatments and antiretroviral-based prevention.

    PubMed

    Holt, Martin; Murphy, Dean; Callander, Denton; Ellard, Jeanne; Rosengarten, Marsha; Kippax, Susan; de Wit, John

    2013-07-01

    We assessed attitudes to medicines, HIV treatments and antiretroviral-based prevention in a national, online survey of 1,041 Australian gay men (88.3% HIV-negative and 11.7% HIV-positive). Multivariate analysis of variance was used to identify the effect of HIV status on attitudes. HIV-negative men disagreed with the idea that HIV drugs should be restricted to HIV-positive people. HIV-positive men agreed and HIV-negative men disagreed that taking HIV treatments was straightforward and HIV-negative men were more sceptical about whether HIV treatment or an undetectable viral load prevented HIV transmission. HIV-negative and HIV-positive men had similar attitudes to pre-exposure prophylaxis but divergent views about 'treatment as prevention'. PMID:23001412

  17. Using Respondent Driven Sampling in a Hidden Population at Risk of HIV Infection: Who do HIV-positive recruiters recruit?

    PubMed Central

    Abramovitz, Daniela; Volz, Erik M.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Patterson, Thomas L.; Vera, Alicia; Frost, Simon D.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background Respondent driven sampling (RDS) is a network-based method used to recruit hidden populations. Since it is respondent-driven, RDS is prone to bias. However, these biases could facilitate recruitment of high risk networks. We examined recruitment patterns of HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) and identified factors associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU in a RDS-based study. Methods IDUs aged >=18, who injected within the last month and resided in Tijuana, Mexico, were recruited using RDS and underwent interviews and testing for HIV, syphilis, and TB. Weighted logistic regression was used to identify predictors of being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU. Results Of 1056 IDUs, HIV-positive subjects comprised 4.4% of the sample and generated 4.7% of recruits, indicating that recruitment effectiveness did not vary by HIV-status. However, 10% of the subjects recruited by HIV-positive recruiters were infected with HIV as compared to 4.1% of subjects recruited by HIV-negative recruiters, (P=0.06), a difference that, after controlling for whether the recruiter and recruit injected drugs together, attained statistical significance (P=0.04), indicating that recruitment patterns differed by HIV-status. Factors independently associated with being recruited by an HIV-positive IDU included lifetime syphilis infection, ever having sex with an HIV-positive person, knowing someone with HIV/AIDS, being recruited at a shooting gallery, having recently used the local needle exchange program, and having a larger number of recent arrests for track-marks. Conclusion HIV-positive IDUs have different recruitment patterns than HIV-negative IDUs, with HIV-positive IDUs tending to recruit other HIV-positive IDUs. Social and environmental factors along with risk behaviors were independently associated with being the recruit of an HIV-positive IDU in Tijuana. While the goal of this study was not to recruit HIV+ or other high-risk persons, our results suggest that

  18. Altered monoamine and acylcarnitine metabolites in HIV-positive and HIV-negative subjects with depression

    PubMed Central

    Cassol, Edana; Misra, Vikas; Morgello, Susan; Kirk, Gregory D.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Gabuzda, Dana

    2015-01-01

    Background Depression is a frequent comorbidity in HIV infection that has been associated with worse treatment outcomes and increased mortality. Recent studies suggest that increased innate immune activation and tryptophan catabolism are associated with higher risk of depression in HIV infection and other chronic inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms leading to depression remain poorly understood. Methods The severity of depressive symptoms was assessed by Beck Depression Inventory or Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. Untargeted metabolomic profiling of plasma from 104 subjects (68 HIV-positive and 36 HIV-negative) across three independent cohorts was performed using liquid or gas chromatography followed by mass spectrometry. Cytokine profiling was by Bioplex array. Bioinformatic analysis was performed in Metaboanalyst and R. Results Decreased monoamine metabolites (phenylacetate, 4-hydroxyphenylacetate) and acylcarnitines (propionylcarnitine, isobutyrylcarnitine, isovalerylcarnitine, 2-methylbutyrylcarnitine) in plasma distinguished depressed subjects from controls in HIV-positive and HIV-negative cohorts, and these alterations correlated with the severity of depressive symptoms. In HIV-positive subjects, acylcarnitines and other markers of mitochondrial function correlated inversely with tryptophan catabolism, a marker of IFN responses, suggesting inter-relationships between inflammatory pathways, tryptophan catabolism, and metabolic alterations associated with depression. Altered metabolites mapped to pathways involved in monoamine metabolism, mitochondrial function, and inflammation, suggesting a model in which complex relationships between monoamine metabolism and mitochondrial bioenergetics contribute to biological mechanisms involved in depression that may be augmented by inflammation during HIV infection. Conclusions Integrated approaches targeting inflammation, monoamine metabolism, and mitochondrial pathways may be important for

  19. A comparison of quality of life between HIV positive and negative diamond miners in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Gow, Jeff; George, Gavin; Govender, Kaymarlin

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyse the health-related quality of life (HR-QOL) in two groups of diamond miners (HIV negative and positive) in South Africa using three instruments. Two hypotheses were to be tested. One, was that the HR-QOL of HIV positive miners would be lower than that of HIV negative miners; and two, the selected instruments would behave consistently and thus all would confirm hypothesis one. Methods In our study, workers were recruited during a voluntary counselling and testing programme for HIV. HR-QOL were estimated using the Assessment of Quality of Life (AQOL) Mark 2, EQ-5D (EuroQOL), and Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI3) instruments. The data were analysed for utility values and for correlations between variables of interest (in particular HIV status). Goodness of fit, Pearson's r coefficient and t-tests were the statistical tests applied to the data. Results Just over 1100 respondents were included in the analysis. HIV positive workers scored significantly lower on quality of life on the HUI3 as compared to HIV negative workers but this relationship did not (surprisingly) hold for the AQOL or EQ-5D. There was a significant positive correlation between all three instruments. Conclusion There was inconsistency among the instruments in measuring quality of life differences according to HIV status. The HUI3 confirmed the a priori expectation that the HR-QOL of HIV positive miners would be lower than HIV negative miners. There was no statistical difference for the AQOL and a confounding result was found for the EQ5D. PMID:24405284

  20. Safety and efficacy of topical Cidofovir to treat high-grade perianal and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-positive men and women

    PubMed Central

    STIER, Elizabeth A; GOLDSTONE, Stephen E.; EINSTEIN, Mark H.; JAY, Naomi; BERRY, J. Michael; WILKIN, Timothy; LEE, Jeannette Y.; DARRAGH, Teresa M.; DA COSTA, Maria; PANTHER, Lori; ABOULAFIA, David; PALEFSKY, Joel M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the safety and efficacy of topical cidofovir for treatment of high-grade squamous perianal and vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (PAIN and VIN) lesions in HIV-positive individuals. Design Phase IIa prospective multicenter trial conducted at eight clinical sites through the AIDS Malignancy Consortium (AMC) Methods HIV-positive patients with biopsy-proven high-grade PAIN that was ≥ 3 cm2 were enrolled. PAIN biopsy specimens were assessed for HPV using PCR and type-specific HPV probing. Subjects applied 1% topical cidofovir to PAIN and VIN (if present) for 6 two-week cycles. Results were designated as complete response (CR), partial response (PR) (> 50% reduction in size), stable disease (SD), or progressive disease (PD). Results Twenty-four men and 9 women (8 with high-grade VIN as well) were enrolled. Mean age was 44 years, mean CD4+ count was 412 cells/μl. HPV DNA (most commonly HPV16) was detected in all pre-treatment study specimens. Twenty six (79%) subjects completed treatment per protocol—CR: 5 (15%); PR: 12 (36%), SD: 7 (21%); PD: 2 (6%) (1 with a superficially invasive cancer and 1 with new area of high-grade PAIN). Treatment was well tolerated with most common adverse events being mild to moderate affecting lesional skin: pain/burning/irritation (25 subjects) and ulceration (13 subjects). Conclusions Topical cidofovir had 51% efficacy in the short-term treatment of high-grade PAIN and VIN with acceptable toxicity in HIV-positive individuals. Randomized control studies with more prolonged treatment courses and longer follow-up to assess the durability of the response are needed. PMID:23032420

  1. Jury acquits seven prison guards in beating of HIV-positive inmate.

    PubMed

    1999-03-19

    Seven guards from the Charlotte Correctional Institution were acquitted of beating and harassing an HIV-positive inmate, [name removed] was transferred to that prison because he bit a guard in the face at another prison. He later attempted suicide and slowly bled to death while shackled to a bed. Prosecutor Doug Molloy said [name removed] was harassed from the moment he arrived, and slashed his own wrist after 3 days of abuse. The jurors found insufficient evidence to convict the seven with conspiring to deny [name removed] his civil rights. Three other corrections officers, who also faced charges, testified for the prosecution. PMID:11366445

  2. Predictors of HIV serostatus disclosure to partners among HIV-positive pregnant women in Morogoro, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Prevention of mother to child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) has been scaled, to more than 90% of health facilities in Tanzania. Disclosure of HIV results to partners and their participation is encouraged in the program. This study aimed to determine the prevalence, patterns and predictors of HIV sero-status disclosure to partners among HIV positive pregnant women in Morogoro municipality, Tanzania. Methods A cross sectional study was conducted in March to May 2010 among HIV-positive pregnant women who were attending for routine antenatal care in primary health care facilities of the municipality and had been tested for HIV at least one month prior to the study. Questionnaires were used to collect information on possible predictors of HIV disclosure to partners. Results A total of 250 HIV-positive pregnant women were enrolled. Forty one percent (102) had disclosed their HIV sero-status to their partners. HIV-disclosure to partners was more likely among pregnant women who were < 25 years old [Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.2; 95% CI: 1.2–4.1], who knew their HIV status before the current pregnancy [AOR = 3.7; 95% CI: 1.7–8.3], and discussed with their partner before testing [AOR = 6.9; 95% CI: 2.4–20.1]. Dependency on the partner for food/rent/school fees, led to lower odds of disclosure to partners [AOR = 0.4; 95% CI: 0.1–0.7]. Nine out of ten women reported to have been counseled on importance of disclosure and partner participation. Conclusions Six in ten HIV positive pregnant women in this setting had not disclosed their results of the HIV test to their partners. Empowering pregnant women to have an individualized HIV-disclosure plan, strengthening of the HIV provider initiated counseling and testing and addressing economic development, may be some of the strategies in improving HIV disclosure and partner involvement in this setting. PMID:23641927

  3. A Cultural Perspective on Sexual Health: HIV Positive and Negative Monolingual Hispanic Women in South Florida

    PubMed Central

    Villar-Loubet, Olga M.; Vamos, Szonja; Jones, Deborah L.; Lopez, Eliot; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored feelings and attitudes with regard to HIV and sexual health among 82 monolingual Spanish-speaking, HIV-positive (n = 30) and at-risk women (n = 52), participating in the NOW en Español Project—a cognitive behavioral sexual risk-reduction intervention in Miami, Florida. Hispanic cultural values and beliefs, such as machismo, marianismo, and sexual silence, emerged throughout the intervention as important determinants of sexual behavior. Recommendations for integrating these culture-specific issues in sexual health interventions for Hispanic women are provided. PMID:24994949

  4. CHARACTERISTICS AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES AMONGST HIV POSITIVE INDIVIDUALS WITHIN THE AUSTRALIAN TRIAL IN ACUTE HEPATITIS C (ATAHC)

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, G; Hellard, M; Haber, P; Yeung, B; Marks, P; Baker, D; McCaughan, G; Sasadeusz, J; White, P; Rawlinson, W; Lloyd, A; Kaldor, J; Dore, GJ

    2010-01-01

    Background The Australian Trial in Acute Hepatitis C (ATAHC) is an NIH funded prospective cohort study of natural history and treatment efficacy in individuals with recently acquired hepatitis C. Enrolment is open to both HIV positive and HIV negative individuals. The aim of this paper was to evaluate characteristics and virological outcomes within HIV positive individuals enrolled in ATAHC Methods Eligibility criteria include first anti-HCV antibody positive within 6 months and either clinical hepatitis C within the past 12 months or documented anti-HCV seroconversion within the past 24 months. Results Of the initial 103 subjects enrolled 27 (26%) were HIV positive. HIV positive subjects were more likely to be older, have genotype 1 infection and high HCV RNA at baseline than HCV monoinfected subjects. Sexual acquisition accounted for the majority (56%) of HCV infections in HIV positive subjects compared to only 8% of HCV monoinfected subjects. Median duration from estimated HCV infection to treatment was 30 weeks. Treatment with 24 weeks of Pegylated interferon and ribavirin resulted in rates of HCV RNA undetectability of 95%, 90% and 80% at weeks 12, 24 and 48 respectively. Week 4 undetectability was achieved in 44% of subjects and gave positive and negative predictive values for SVR of 100% and 33% respectively. Conclusions Significant differences are demonstrated between HIV positive and HIV negative individuals enrolled into ATAHC. Treatment responses in HIV positive individuals with both acute and early chronic infection are encouraging and support regular HCV screening of high risk individuals and early treatment for recently acquired HCV infection. PMID:19191653

  5. Relationship Power and Sexual Violence Among HIV-Positive Women in Rural Uganda.

    PubMed

    Conroy, Amy A; Tsai, Alexander C; Clark, Gina M; Boum, Yap; Hatcher, Abigail M; Kawuma, Annet; Hunt, Peter W; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David R; Weiser, Sheri D

    2016-09-01

    Gender-based power imbalances place women at significant risk for sexual violence, however, little research has examined this association among women living with HIV/AIDS. We performed a cross-sectional analysis of relationship power and sexual violence among HIV-positive women on anti-retroviral therapy in rural Uganda. Relationship power was measured using the Sexual Relationship Power Scale (SRPS), a validated measure consisting of two subscales: relationship control (RC) and decision-making dominance. We used multivariable logistic regression to test for associations between the SRPS and two dependent variables: recent forced sex and transactional sex. Higher relationship power (full SRPS) was associated with reduced odds of forced sex (AOR = 0.24; 95 % CI 0.07-0.80; p = 0.020). The association between higher relationship power and transactional sex was strong and in the expected direction, but not statistically significant (AOR = 0.47; 95 % CI 0.18-1.22; p = 0.119). Higher RC was associated with reduced odds of both forced sex (AOR = 0.18; 95 % CI 0.06-0.59; p < 0.01) and transactional sex (AOR = 0.38; 95 % CI 0.15-0.99; p = 0.048). Violence prevention interventions with HIV-positive women should consider approaches that increase women's power in their relationships. PMID:27052844

  6. The relationship between spirituality, purpose in life, and well-being in HIV-positive persons.

    PubMed

    Litwinczuk, Kathleen M; Groh, Carla J

    2007-01-01

    Research has shown that spirituality has a positive effect on mental and physical health; however, few studies have explored the influence of spirituality on purpose in life and well-being in persons living with HIV. This descriptive cross-sectional study was designed to examine the relationship between spirituality, purpose in life, and well-being in a sample of 46 HIV-positive men and women. Spirituality was measured using the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale-Revised (SIBS-R), purpose in life was measured using the Purpose in Life (PIL) test, and well-being was measured using the General Well-Being (GWB) Schedule. Demographic data on gender, age, length of time living with diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, employment status, and religious affiliation were also collected. Spirituality was reported to be significantly correlated with purpose in life (r = .295, p = .049) but not with well-being (r = .261, p = .084). Additionally, the SIBS-R, PIL, and GWB had alpha coefficients greater than .83, suggesting they are reliable and valid measures for this population of HIV-positive persons. The result that spirituality and purpose in life were significantly correlated offers the potential for designing nursing interventions and care delivery approaches that support psychological adaptation to HIV. Further studies with larger and more diverse samples are needed to better understand the role of well-being in healing. PMID:17570296

  7. Barriers to contraception among HIV-positive women in a periurban district of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Mbonye, A K; Hansen, K S; Wamono, F; Magnussen, P

    2012-09-01

    This study explored perceptions and care-seeking practices for HIV testing and contraception in order to obtain data for designing effective interventions to increase contraception among HIV-positive women. A triangulation of methods (household survey, focus group discussions and key informant interviews) were conducted in Wakiso district, central Uganda from January to April 2009. Results show that a majority of women, 2062/2896 (71.2%) would like to have an HIV test, while access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) was low at 237/879 (27%). Of the women who were on ART, 133/266 (50.0%) could not use contraception due to negative perceptions that a combination of ART and contraceptives would weaken them, as these drugs were perceived to be 'strong'. Fear of side-effects for contraceptives and resistance from spouses were other main reasons. Constraints to HIV testing included fear of clients knowing their own HIV status and fear of their spouses' reactions to the test results. Private midwives were identified as a potential outlet for delivering contraception to HIV-positive women. PMID:23033523

  8. Health impact of incarceration on HIV-positive African American males: a qualitative exploration.

    PubMed

    Brinkley-Rubinstein, Lauren; Turner, William L

    2013-08-01

    Previous research suggests that incarceration can have a negative effect on health. These health effects have an especially profound impact on HIV-positive individuals. As such, the current study investigates how incarceration affects the health of 12 African American HIV-positive formerly incarcerated males recruited via an AIDS Service Organization. Individuals were enrolled via purposive sampling and engaged in a series of in-depth interviews over a yearlong period (n=46). Participants ranged in age from 33 to 61 years. Most had finished high school, were not employed at time of first and last interview, and most were primarily residing at a homeless shelter. The time incarcerated ranged among participants from 3 months to 3 years. Findings suggest that health is impacted via limited and delayed access to medication, stigma, and poor quality of medical care while incarcerated. Health continues to worsen after release, largely due to incarceration's impact on individuals' social context. Macro-level policy limits opportunity to fulfill basic needs such as housing and hinders one's ability to be gainfully employed. Moreover, stigma, loss of social support, and a delay in accessing HIV-related services deleteriously impacts individuals' mental and physical health status. Implications for practice, policy and future research are also discussed. PMID:23968205

  9. Late ELISA Testing in Infants Born to HIV-Positive Mothers.

    PubMed

    Puertolas, Mora V; Bolton, Michael T; Steele, Russell W

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a young boy who was born to a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive mother and originally found to be uninfected. Evidence-based guidelines were followed regarding the mother's prenatal and infant's postnatal care, including the avoidance of breast milk. HIV DNA polymerase chain reaction qualitative tests were obtained at birth, 6 weeks and 4 months, and were all negative. He also received 6 weeks of prophylactic zidovudine. Despite these measures, his health began to decline at 17 months of age and antibody and serology tests performed at this time confirmed HIV infection. Guidelines no longer recommend routine antibody testing at 18 months of age to confirm the absence of infection in exposed infants with a record of negative virology in the first year of life. Based on this case and others we propose that this test be added back to the national guidelines for the early detection and prompt treatment of HIV infection in infants born to HIV-positive mothers. PMID:26294760

  10. Challenges faced by health workers in providing counselling services to HIV-positive children in Uganda: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The delivery of HIV counselling and testing services for children remains an uphill task for many health workers in HIV-endemic countries, including Uganda. We conducted a descriptive study to explore the challenges of providing HIV counselling and testing services to children in Uganda. Methods A descriptive study was conducted in the districts of Kampala and Kabarole in Uganda. The data were collected using semi-structured individual interviews and focus group discussions with health workers who are involved in the care of HIV-positive children. Key informant interviews were conducted with the administrators of the 10 study healthcare institutions. Quantitative data were summarized using frequency tables, while qualitative data were analyzed using the content thematic approach. Results Counselling children was reported to be a difficult exercise due to some children being unable to express themselves, being dependent on adults for their care, being fearful, and requiring more time to open up during counselling. This was compounded by some caretakers' unwillingness and difficulty to disclose the HIV status of their children. Other issues about the caretakers were: lack of consistency in caretakers; old age; sickness; and poverty. Health workers mentioned the following as some of the challenges they face in the delivery of HIV counselling and testing services for children: lack of counselling skills; failure to cope with the knowledge demand; difficulty to facilitate disclosure; heavy work load; and lack of other support services. Institutions were found to be constrained by limited space and lack of antiretrovirals for children. Conclusions The major challenges in the delivery of paediatric HIV services were related to the knowledge gap in paediatric HIV and the lack of counselling skills, as well as health system-related constraints. There is a need to train health workers in child-counselling skills, especially in the issues of disclosure, sexuality

  11. Substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) syndemic effects on viral suppression among HIV positive women of color.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kristen A; Messer, Lynne C; Quinlivan, E Byrd

    2015-01-01

    The combined epidemics of substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS, known as the SAVA syndemic, contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease among people of color in the US. To examine the association between HIV viral load suppression and SAVA syndemic variables, we used baseline data from 563 HIV+ women of color treated at nine HIV medical and ancillary care sites participating in HRSA's Special Project of National Significance Women of Color (WOC) Initiative. Just under half the women (n=260) were virally suppressed. Five psychosocial factors contributing to the SAVA syndemic were examined in this study: substance abuse, binge drinking, intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and sexual risk taking. Associations among the psychosocial factors were assessed and clustering confirmed. A SAVA score was created by summing the dichotomous (present/absent) psychosocial measures. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to account for site-level clustering and individual-covariates, a higher SAVA score (0 to 5) was associated with reduced viral suppression; OR (adjusted)=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99. The syndemic approach represents a viable framework for understanding viral suppression among HIV positive WOC, and suggests the need for comprehensive interventions that address the social/environmental contexts of patients' lives. PMID:25397666

  12. Substance Abuse, Violence, and HIV/AIDS (SAVA) Syndemic Effects on Viral Suppression Among HIV Positive Women of Color

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Lynne C.; Quinlivan, E. Byrd

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The combined epidemics of substance abuse, violence, and HIV/AIDS, known as the SAVA syndemic, contribute to the disproportionate burden of disease among people of color in the US. To examine the association between HIV viral load suppression and SAVA syndemic variables, we used baseline data from 563 HIV+ women of color treated at nine HIV medical and ancillary care sites participating in HRSA's Special Project of National Significance Women of Color (WOC) Initiative. Just under half the women (n=260) were virally suppressed. Five psychosocial factors contributing to the SAVA syndemic were examined in this study: substance abuse, binge drinking, intimate partner violence, poor mental health, and sexual risk taking. Associations among the psychosocial factors were assessed and clustering confirmed. A SAVA score was created by summing the dichotomous (present/absent) psychosocial measures. Using generalized estimating equation (GEE) models to account for site-level clustering and individual-covariates, a higher SAVA score (0 to 5) was associated with reduced viral suppression; OR (adjusted)=0.81, 95% CI: 0.66, 0.99. The syndemic approach represents a viable framework for understanding viral suppression among HIV positive WOC, and suggests the need for comprehensive interventions that address the social/environmental contexts of patients' lives. PMID:25397666

  13. Anal Human Papillomavirus Genotyping among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in Xi’an, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangwei; Yang, Yu; Xin, Henan; Li, Mufei; Feng, Boxuan; Gao, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and its related diseases are relatively common in men who have sex with men (MSM), especially in those HIV positive. In China, molecular epidemiology of anal HPV infection among HIV-positive MSM has been sparsely studied. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among HIV-positive MSM in Xi’an, China between April and July 2014. Anal swabs were collected for HPV genotyping. Results A total of 195 HIV-positive MSM were included in this study. HPV genotyping showed that 99.0% (191/193) of participants were positive for at least one of the targeted 37 HPV genotypes. 183 (94.8%) of them were infected with multiple high-risk types and 154 (79.8%) of them with low-risk HPV types. HPV 18 was the most frequently identified high-risk type, followed by HPV 16 and HPV 51. As for low-risk types, HPV11, HPV 6 and HPV 81 were most commonly observe. High-risk HPV infection was found to be associated with the status of antiretroviral therapy (ART), the distribution of low-risk types was observed to be varied by CD4+ T cell level. Conclusion Almost all HIV-positive MSM were anal HPV infected in our study. It is highly recommended to consider regular active screening and preventive intervention of HPV infection among this high risk population. PMID:25923768

  14. Antiretroviral Therapy Helps HIV-Positive Women Navigate Social Expectations for and Clinical Recommendations against Childbearing in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Kastner, Jasmine; Matthews, Lynn T.; Flavia, Ninsiima; Bajunirwe, Francis; Erikson, Susan; Berry, Nicole S.; Kaida, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Understanding factors that influence pregnancy decision-making and experiences among HIV-positive women is important for developing integrated reproductive health and HIV services. Few studies have examined HIV-positive women's navigation through the social and clinical factors that shape experiences of pregnancy in the context of access to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We conducted 25 semistructured interviews with HIV-positive, pregnant women receiving ART in Mbarara, Uganda in 2011 to explore how access to ART shapes pregnancy experiences. Main themes included: (1) clinical counselling about pregnancy is often dissuasive but focuses on the importance of ART adherence once pregnant; (2) accordingly, women demonstrate knowledge about the role of ART adherence in maintaining maternal health and reducing risks of perinatal HIV transmission; (3) this knowledge contributes to personal optimism about pregnancy and childbearing in the context of HIV; and (4) knowledge about and adherence to ART creates opportunities for HIV-positive women to manage normative community and social expectations of childbearing. Access to ART and knowledge of the accompanying lowered risks of mortality, morbidity, and HIV transmission improved experiences of pregnancy and empowered HIV-positive women to discretely manage conflicting social expectations and clinical recommendations regarding childbearing. PMID:25328693

  15. Prevalence and Characteristics of Anergia (Lack of Energy) in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Shaffer, Jonathan A.; Davidson, Karina W.; Schwartz, Joseph E.; Shimbo, Daichi; Newman, Jonathan D.; Gurland, Barry J.; Maurer, Mathew S.

    2012-01-01

    Anergia, a commonly occurring syndrome in older adults and patients with cardiovascular diseases, is associated with functional and clinical limitations. To date, the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of anergia in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) have not been elucidated. We examined the prevalence and clinical-demographic characteristics of anergia in a multiethnic sample of patients with ACS. Hospitalized patients with ACS (n = 472), enrolled in the Prescription Usage Lifestyle and Stress (PULSE) prospective cohort study, completed assessments of demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics within 7 days of hospitalization for an ACS event. Current depressive disorder was ascertained using a structured psychiatric interview 3 to 7 days post-discharge. Anergia was assessed at baseline and defined using patients’ binary responses (yes/no) to seven items related to energy level. At least 1 complaint of anergia was reported by 79.9% (n = 377) of patients, and 32% (n = 153) of patients met criteria for anergia. In a multivariable logistic regression model, anergia was independently associated with being female, white (compared to black), having bodily pain, participating in exercise, having current depressive disorder, and having higher values on the Charlson comorbidity index. In conclusion, anergia is a highly prevalent syndrome among patients with ACS. It is distinct from depression and is associated with modifiable clinical factors such as participation in exercise and bodily pain that may be appropriate targets for intervention. PMID:22835409

  16. Lack of KIR4.1 autoantibodies in Japanese patients with MS and NMO

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Osamu; Sakai, Waka; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Niino, Masaaki; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Fukazawa, Toshiyuki; Kikuchi, Seiji; Fujihara, Kazuo; Matsuo, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine anti-KIR4.1 antibodies by 2 different assays in Japanese patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO). Methods: One hundred sixty serum samples from 57 patients with MS, 40 patients with NMO/NMO spectrum disorder (NMOSD), and 50 healthy controls (all were Japanese) were tested with ELISA using a synthetic peptide of the first extracellular portion of human KIR4.1. In addition, we attempted to detect anti-KIR4.1 immunoglobulin G in the serum by the luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS) with the full length of human KIR4.1 produced in a human cell line, which is highly sensitive to single or multiple epitopes. Results: We failed to detect antibodies to the peptide fragment KIR4.183–120 in any case of MS and NMO/NMOSD using ELISA. Antibodies to the recombinant full length of KIR4.1 protein were detected in only 2 patients with MS and none in the patients with NMO/NMOSD by the LIPS assay. Conclusions: We developed 2 different methods (ELISA and LIPS) to measure autoantibodies to KIR4.1 in serum. We detected anti-KIR4.1 immunoglobulin G at a very low frequency in Japanese patients with MS or NMO/NMOSD. Serologic testing for human KIR4.1-specific antibodies is unlikely to improve the diagnosis of MS or NMO/NMOSD in Japanese patients. PMID:27489866

  17. Lack of contextual-word predictability during reading in patients with mild Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Gerardo; Manes, Facundo; Rotstein, Nora P; Colombo, Oscar; Mandolesi, Pablo; Politi, Luis E; Agamennoni, Osvaldo

    2014-09-01

    In the present work we analyzed the effect of contextual word predictability on the eye movement behavior of patients with mild Alzheimer disease (AD) compared to age-matched controls, by using the eyetracking technique and lineal mixed models. Twenty AD patients and 40 age-matched controls participated in the study. We first evaluated gaze duration during reading low and highly predictable sentences. AD patients showed an increase in gaze duration, compared to controls, both in sentences of low or high predictability. In controls, highly predictable sentences led to shorter gaze durations; by contrary, AD patients showed similar gaze durations in both types of sentences. Similarly, gaze duration in controls was affected by the cloze predictability of word N and N+1, whereas it was the same in AD patients. In contrast, the effects of word frequency and word length were similar in controls and AD patients. Our results imply that contextual-word predictability, whose processing is proposed to require memory retrieval, facilitated reading behavior in healthy subjects, but this facilitation was lost in early AD patients. This loss might reveal impairments in brain areas such as those corresponding to working memory, memory retrieval, and semantic memory functions that are already present at early stages of AD. In contrast, word frequency and length processing might require less complex mechanisms, which were still retained by AD patients. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study measuring how patients with early AD process well-defined words embedded in sentences of high and low predictability. Evaluation of the resulting changes in eye movement behavior might provide a useful tool for a more precise early diagnosis of AD. PMID:25080188

  18. Lack of antikeratin antibodies in patients with palmoplantar pustular eruptions and arthropathy.

    PubMed

    Jurik, A G; Graudal, H; Kirstein, H

    1989-01-01

    Assessment of antikeratin antibodies (AKAs), using an indirect immunofluorescence technique with rat esophageal keratin as antigen, was performed in 14 patients with arthropathy and palmoplantar pustular eruptions, six of whom also had psoriasis vulgaris. Twelve patients had seronegative spondyloarthropathy. They were all AKA negative. Two patients had classical seropositive-erosive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and were both AKA positive. This suggests that AKA is not related to the arthropathy associated with pustulosis palmoplantaris or psoriasis, or to the presence of pustular eruptions on the palms and soles. The finding of AKA in RA is in keeping with previous findings. PMID:2476081

  19. Site-nurse initiated Adherence and Symptom Support Telephone Calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretroviral therapy, ACTG 5031, a substudy of ACTG 384.

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Testa, Marcia A.; Su, Max; Safren, Steven A.; Morse, Gene; Lammert, Sara; Shafer, Robert W.; Reynolds, Nancy R.; Chesney, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Effective and easy to implement interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy are needed. Objective: To compare a site-nurse initiated adherence and symptom support telephone calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretroviral therapy compare to the study site’s standard of care. Methods: A randomized controlled trial of site-nurse initiated adherence and symptom support telephone calls for HIV-positive individuals starting antiretrovirals. Subjects were randomized to receive site-nurse initiated telephone calls (intervention) or no additional calls above the site’s standard of care (control). Subjects received calls 1-3 days after initiating antiretrovirals, weeks 1, 2, 3, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, and every 8 weeks thereafter. Self-reported adherence was captured during study visits. Results: A total of 333 subjects starting antiretrovirals as part of ACTG 384 were co-enrolled into ACTG 5031. Subjects were followed for up to 160 weeks and were contacted for 74% of scheduled calls. There was no significant difference in proportion of patients with >95% mean Total Adherence, 87.9% and 91.2% (p=0.34) and mean self-reported Total Adherence, 97.9% and 98.4% in the intervention and control, respectively, or in symptom distress and clinical endpoints. Conclusions: In the context of a clinical trial, where self-reported adherence was exceptionally high, the site-nurse initiated telephone calls did not further improve self-reported adherence, symptom distress or clinical outcomes. PMID:24144900

  20. Health care providers' perspectives on a weekly text-messaging intervention to engage HIV-positive persons in care (WelTel BC1).

    PubMed

    Murray, Melanie C M; O'Shaughnessy, Sara; Smillie, Kirsten; Van Borek, Natasha; Graham, Rebecca; Maan, Evelyn J; van der Kop, Mia L; Friesen, Karen; Albert, Arianne; Levine, Sarah; Pick, Neora; Ogilvie, Gina; Money, Deborah; Lester, Richard

    2015-10-01

    Though evidence shows that Mobile health (mHealth) interventions can improve adherence and viral load in HIV-positive persons, few have studied the health care providers' (HCP) perspective. We conducted a prospective mixed methods pilot study using the WelTel intervention wherein HIV-positive participants (n = 25) received weekly interactive text messages for 6 months. Text message response rate and topic data were collected to illustrate the HCP experience. The aim of this study is to explore intervention acceptability and feasibility from the HCP perspective through a baseline focus group and end of study interviews with HCP impacted by the intervention. Interview data were thematically coded using the Technology Acceptance Model. HCPs identified that the WelTel intervention engaged patients in building relationships, while organizing and streamlining existing mHealth efforts and dealing with privacy issues. HCPs recognized that although workload would augment initially, intervention benefits were many, and went beyond simply improving HIV viral load. PMID:26297567

  1. Lack of Association between Pulse Steroid Therapy and Bone Mineral Density in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zengin Karahan, Serap; Boz, Cavit; Kilic, Sevgi; Can Usta, Nuray; Ozmenoglu, Mehmet; Altunayoglu Cakmak, Vildan; Gazioglu, Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has been associated with reduced bone mineral density (BMD). The purpose of this study was to determine the possible factors affecting BMD in patients with MS. We included consecutive 155 patients with MS and 90 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Patients with MS exhibited significantly lower T-scores and Z-scores in the femoral neck and trochanter compared to the controls. Ninety-four (61%) patients had reduced bone mass in either the lumbar spine or the femoral neck; of these, 64 (41.3%) had osteopenia and 30 (19.4%) had osteoporosis. The main factors affecting BMD were disability, duration of MS, and smoking. There was a negative relationship between femoral BMD and EDSS and disease duration. No association with lumbar BMD was determined. There were no correlations between BMD at any anatomic region and cumulative corticosteroid dose. BMD is significantly lower in patients with MS than in healthy controls. Reduced BMD in MS is mainly associated with disability and duration of the disease. Short courses of high dose steroid therapy did not result in an obvious negative impact on BMD in the lumbar spine and femoral neck in patients with MS. PMID:26966578

  2. HIV-positive African-American women's perspectives on engaging communities in the response to HIV/AIDS in Washington, D.C.

    PubMed

    Sanicki, Anne; Mannell, Jenevieve

    2015-01-01

    The number of African-American women infected with HIV in Washington, D.C. is growing at an alarming rate. However, the perspectives of these women on engaging communities in the response to HIV/AIDS have been lacking in the literature. To fill this gap, in-depth interviews with 18 HIV-positive African-American women living in D.C. were conducted and analyzed using thematic network analysis. Three key themes emerged from these interviews: (1) the importance of the church in building HIV/AIDS community competence; (2) women's interest in HIV/AIDS advocacy; and (3) the negative effects of stigma and limited social bonds on community engagement. We conclude by suggesting that more research is needed on the role of African-American women in community capacity building, as well as greater involvement of churches in HIV/AIDS responses. PMID:26208602

  3. Lack of deafness in Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1: a patient survey.

    PubMed

    Suresh, G; Lucey, J F

    1997-11-01

    We performed a questionnaire survey about 42 patients with Crigler-Najjar syndrome type 1 who were currently alive. Information was obtained on their age, sex, birth weight, gestation, parental consanguinity, other family members affected, age of onset of jaundice, neonatal and postneonatal bilirubin values, neonatal and postneonatal therapy, problems faced with phototherapy, liver transplantation, current growth status, current neurologic status, and the status of hearing. Patients were between 2 months and 21 years of age. There were 18 males and 24 females. Thirty-nine patients had been born at full term gestation and 3 had been preterm. Jaundice was noted on postnatal day 1 in 34%, between days 2 and 4 in 55%, and after day 11 of life in 11% of patients. In the neonatal period bilirubin values (mean +/- SD) were typically 19.8 +/- 4.5 mg/dL. Eighty-six percent of patients had neonatal peak bilirubin values of >20 mg/dL. Parental consanguinity was present in 44% and a history of Gilbert's disease in one parent was present in 10% of patients. Causes of exacerbations of jaundice reported were respiratory infections, febrile illnesses, vaccinations, fasting, surgery, emotional stress, and noncompliance with treatment. Neonatal therapy consisted of exchange transfusion in 28%, phototherapy in 79%, phenobarbitone in 20%, and cholestyramine, albumin, infusions, and plasmapheresis in one case each. The mainstay of postneonatal therapy was home phototherapy for 10 to 16 hours, primarily at night during sleep, using blue lights or a combination of blue and fluorescent lights. Some patients used innovatively designed phototherapy units. Problems reported with phototherapy were decreased effectiveness with age, poor compliance, restriction of activity and play, inability to travel or take vacations, irritation from eye shades, difficulty keeping eye protection on, difficulties in temperature maintenance, tanning of the skin, embarrassment from the need to be nearly nude

  4. Lack of seasonal variation in blood pressure in patients on hemodialysis in a North American center.

    PubMed

    Fine, A

    2000-09-01

    Seasonal variation in blood pressure in patients undergoing hemodialysis in Europe has recently been described. If confirmed, this has important therapeutic, research, and epidemiological implications. All normotensive patients not administered antihypertensive drugs in our unit were studied. Predialysis blood pressures were measured before each dialysis treatment over two 2-month periods, January through February and July through August, in Winnipeg, Canada, a city with one of the most extreme seasonal temperature variations in North America. No difference in blood pressures was found between summer and winter (141 +/- 5/75 +/- 2 versus 140 +/- 4/74 +/- 2 mm Hg; P = not significant). Average daily temperatures were -16 degrees C in winter and 23 degrees C in summer. Interdialytic weight gain was the same in both groups. In conclusion, season has no effect on blood pressure in hemodialysis patients in a North American center. Reported seasonal changes in blood pressure in Europe may be related to nonclimatic factors. PMID:10977788

  5. Contending with Psychological Distress in Contexts with Limited Mental Health Resources: HIV-Positive Kenyan Women's Experiences.

    PubMed

    Kako, Peninnah M; Wendorf, Angela R; Stevens, Patricia E; Ngui, Emmanuel; Otto-Salaj, Laura L

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the psychosocial distress experiences of HIV-positive women in Kenya. In-depth narrative interviews were conducted three times over six months between 2009 and 2010 with 54 HIV-positive women living in Kenya to explore how the women perceived psychological distress and the steps they took to find support to cope with their HIV-positive diagnosis. Thematic analysis revealed that the women described psychological distress as: physical and emotional shock, worry, and hopelessness and suicidality. The women reported receiving support to cope through spiritual connections, family and friends, others coping with HIV/AIDS, and health care agencies. This study heightens awareness of the critical value of understanding culturally relevant mental health evaluations in a limited mental health access context. PMID:26818927

  6. Lack of pain in schizophrenia: a patient whose arm was burned and amputated.

    PubMed

    Virit, Osman; Savas, Haluk Asuman; Altindag, Abdurrahman

    2008-01-01

    Diminished pain sensitivity or loss of pain sensation in schizophrenic patients has previously been reported. We report an interesting case of a schizophrenia patient who had the disease for 20 years and who had his forearm amputated below the elbow level due to severe burn injury to his muscles, tendons, nerve fibers and bone tissue, caused by direct exposure to flames from a liquefied petroleum gas cylinder, in an attempt to make himself warm during a medicine-free period with active symptoms and without pain sensation. PMID:18585546

  7. Lack of association between MDM2 promoter SNP309 and clinical outcome in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Rihani, Ali; Van Maerken, Tom; De Wilde, Bram; Zeka, Fjoralba; Laureys, Geneviève; Norga, Koen; Tonini, Gian Paolo; Coco, Simona; Versteeg, Rogier; Noguera, Rosa; Schulte, Johannes H; Eggert, Angelika; Stallings, Raymond L; Speleman, Frank; Vandesompele, Jo

    2014-10-01

    While a polymorphism located within the promoter region of the MDM2 proto-oncogene, SNP309 (T > G), has previously been associated with increased risk and aggressiveness of neuroblastoma and other tumor entities, a protective effect has also been reported in certain other cancers. In this study, we evaluated the association of MDM2 SNP309 with outcome in 496 patients with neuroblastoma and its effect on MDM2 expression. No significant difference in overall or event-free survival was observed among patients with neuroblastoma with or without MDM2 SNP309. The presence of SNP309 does not affect MDM2 expression in neuroblastoma. PMID:24391119

  8. HIV Disclosure and Transmission Risks to Sex Partners Among HIV-Positive Men.

    PubMed

    Kalichman, Seth C; Kalichman, Moira O; Cherry, Chauncey; Grebler, Tamar

    2016-05-01

    Disclosure of HIV-positive status to sex partners is critical to protecting uninfected partners. In addition, people living with HIV often risk criminal prosecution when they do not inform sex partners of their HIV status. The current study examined factors associated with nondisclosure of HIV status by men living with HIV in Atlanta, GA (92% African African, mean age = 43.8), who engage in condomless sex with uninfected sex partners. Sexually active HIV-positive men (N = 538) completed daily electronic sexual behavior assessments over the course of 28 days and completed computerized interviews, drug testing, medication adherence assessments, and HIV viral load retrieved from medical records. Results showed that 166 (30%) men had engaged in condomless vaginal or anal intercourse with an HIV-uninfected or unknown HIV status sex partner to whom they had not disclosed their HIV status. Men who engaged in nondisclosed condomless sex were less adherent to their HIV treatment, more likely to have unsuppressed HIV, demonstrated poorer disclosure self-efficacy, enacted fewer risk reduction communication skills, and held more beliefs that people with HIV are less infectious when treated with antiretroviral therapy. We conclude that undisclosed HIV status is common and related to condomless sex with uninfected partners. Men who engage in nondisclosed condomless sex may also be more infectious given their nonadherence and viral load. Interventions are needed in HIV treatment as prevention contexts that attend to disclosure laws and enhance disclosure self-efficacy, improve risk reduction communication skills, and increase understanding of HIV infectiousness. PMID:27158850

  9. Chronic Kidney Disease and Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Individuals: Recent Developments.

    PubMed

    Achhra, Amit C; Nugent, Melinda; Mocroft, Amanda; Ryom, Lene; Wyatt, Christina M

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) has emerged as an important health concern in HIV-positive individuals. Preventing long-term kidney toxicity from an antiretroviral therapy is therefore critical. Selected antiretroviral agents, especially tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and some ritonavir-boosted protease inhibitors (PI/rs), have been associated with increased risk of CKD. However, the CKD risk attributable to these agents is overall small, especially in those with low baseline risk of CKD and normal renal function. CKD risk in HIV-positive individuals can be further minimized by timely identification of those with worsening renal function and discontinuation of potentially nephrotoxic agents. Clinicians can use several monitoring tools, including the D:A:D risk score and routine measurements of estimated glomerular filtration (eGFR) and proteinuria, to identify high-risk individuals who may require an intervention. Tenofovir alafenamide (TAF), a TDF alternative, promises to be safer in terms of TDF-associated kidney and bone toxicity. While the short-term data on TAF does indicate lower eGFR decline and lower risk of proteinuria (vs. TDF), long-term data on renal safety of TAF are still awaited. Promising results have also emerged from recent trials on alternative dual-therapy antiretroviral regimens which exclude the nucleoside(tide) reverse transcriptase class as well as possibly the PI/rs, thereby reducing the drug burden, and possibly the toxicity. However, long-term safety or benefits of these dual-therapy regimens are still unclear and will need to be studied in future prospective studies. Finally, addressing risk factors such as hypertension and diabetes will continue to be important in this population. PMID:27130284

  10. Lack of predictive value of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in patients after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty.

    PubMed

    Giudici, S; Farmer, W; Dollinger, A; Andrada, T; Torrington, K; Rajagopal, K

    2000-07-01

    The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) has been recognized as a valid measure of sleep propensity. Statistically significant correlations between ESS scores, the respiratory disturbance index (RDI), and the lowest arterial oxygen saturation (LSAT) have been described in patients with surgically untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We investigated whether the same relationships hold true after uvulopalatopharyngoplasty (UPPP). Forty-two adults with documented OSA treated by UPPP were reevaluated with the ESS questionnaire and 8-hour diagnostic nocturnal polysomnography (nPSG). We found no significant correlation between the ESS scores and the RDI or LSAT in patients after UPPP. Because postoperative ESS scores do not correlate with the RDI or LSAT, we conclude that the ESS is not a reliable surrogate for nPSG testing. PMID:10903045

  11. Novel missense mutation in the FH gene in familial renal cell cancer patients lacking cutaneous leiomyomas

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a rare tumor predisposition syndrome characterized by cutaneous and uterine leiomyomas and papillary type 2 renal cell cancer. Germline mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene is known to be associated with HLRCC. Case presentation We describe a 64-year-old father and his 39-year-old son with HLRCC who developed papillary type 2 RCCs lacking cutaneous leiomyomas at any site. A common missense mutation in the FH gene, (c.1021G > A, p.D341N) in exon 7, was detected in the 2 cases. Functional prediction with the bioinformatics programs, SIFT and Polyphen-2, reported “damaging (SIFT score 0.00)” and “probably damaging (PSIC score 1.621)” values, respectively. In 162 healthy individuals, there were no cases of a G transition to any base. Finally, (c.1021G > A) in exon 7, was identified as a point mutation. Conclusion We report a family with HLRCC in which a novel missense mutation was detected. A familial papillary type 2 renal cancer should be considered HLRCC unless typical cutaneous leiomyomas do not occur. PMID:24684806

  12. Lack of complementation in somatic cell hybrids between fibroblasts from patients with different forms of cystinosis

    SciTech Connect

    Pellett, O.L.; Smith, M.L.; Greene, A.A.; Schneider, J.A. )

    1988-05-01

    Cystinosis is an autosomal recessive disease in which three clinical forms are recognized: infantile nephropathic, with renal tubular damage by 1 year of age and progressive glomerular insufficiency; intermediate, with tubular and glomerular insufficiency beginning at a later age; benign, with no kidney damage. Skin fibroblasts cultured from patients with all types of cystinosis show increased intralysosomal free (nonprotein) cystine; however, fibroblasts from heterozygotes have normal free-cystine values. To determine whether genetic complementation occurs between the different forms, somatic cell hybrids were constructed between cells from a patient with infantile nephropathic cystinosis and cells from patients with other types of cystinosis. If complementation occurred, the hybrids would be expected to have normal cystine levels. To construct hybrid cells, a universal parent cell type (TG1-neo), which was hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine (HAT) sensitive and G418 resistant was constructed from an infantile nephropathic cystinosis fibroblast strain. Polyethylene glycol fusion of TG1-neo with other cells that are not HAT sensitive or G418 resistant allowed for selection of hybrid cells in a medium containing HAT and the aminoglycoside G418. As indicated by elevated cystine levels, complementation did not occur between TG1-neo and two different benign cystinosis strains, an intermediate cystinosis strain, or another nephropathic cystinosis cell strain. When a normal fibroblast strain was fused with TG1-neo, all 15 hybrid clones studied contained normal amounts of intracellular free cystine.

  13. [THE LACK OF PATIENT INFORMATION SANCTIONED BY JUDGMENT THE 9TH OF FEBRUARY 2012].

    PubMed

    Brasselet, Renato

    2015-03-01

    Patient's right to information was explicitly recognised by law No. 2002-303 the 4th of March 2002, relating to patients' rights and to the quality of the health care system. This humanism duty is acknowledged to the article L.llll-2 of the Public Health Code. It guarantees the personal self-determination, as well as the dignity of the human person. It establishes a balance in the relation between the professional care and the patient, by allowing this one to have the adequate level of information to be completely associated with the decisions affecting his body integrity. Before the 3rd of June 2010 decision, the damage compensation was founded by the notion of loss of opportunity to avoid the realisation of the risk. Since then, it appears that the compensation of information deficiency constitutes an autonomous prejudice resulting from the non-compliance with the right to be informed and to consent to a physical injury. However, in the light of the 9'" of February 2012 judgment, it is necessary to consider if for the First Civil Chamber of the Final Court of Appeal, the failure to comply with the obligation of information causes a repairable damage for human dignity respect. PMID:26606766

  14. Malignant astrocytomas of elderly patients lack favorable molecular markers: an analysis of the NOA-08 study collective

    PubMed Central

    Wiestler, Benedikt; Claus, Rainer; Hartlieb, Sabine A.; Schliesser, Maximilian G.; Weiss, Elisa K.; Hielscher, Thomas; Platten, Michael; Dittmann, Laura M.; Meisner, Christoph; Felsberg, Jörg; Happold, Caroline; Simon, Matthias; Nikkhah, Guido; Papsdorf, Kirsten; Steinbach, Joachim P.; Sabel, Michael; Grimm, Christiane; Weichenhan, Dieter; Tews, Björn; Reifenberger, Guido; Capper, David; Müller, Wolf; Plass, Christoph; Weller, Michael; Wick, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Background The number of patients age >65 years with malignant gliomas is increasing. Prognosis of these patients is worse compared with younger patients. To determine biological differences among malignant gliomas of different age groups and help to explain the survival heterogeneity seen in the NOA-08 trial, the prevalence and impact of recently established biomarkers for outcome in younger patients were characterized in elderly patients. Methods Prevalences of mutations of isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) and histone H3.3 (H3F3A), the glioma cytosine–phosphate–guanine island methylator phenotype (G-CIMP), and methylation of alkylpurine DNA N-glycosylase (APNG) and peroxiredoxin 1 (PRDX1) promoters were determined in a representative biomarker subset (n = 126 patients with anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma) from the NOA-08 trial. Results IDH1 mutations (R132H) were detected in only 3/126 patients, precluding determination of an association between IDH mutation and outcome. These 3 patients also displayed the G-CIMP phenotype. None of the IDH1 wild-type tumors were G-CIMP positive. Mutations in H3F3A were absent in all 103 patients sequenced for H3F3A. MassARRAY analysis of the APNG promoter revealed generally low methylation levels and failed to confirm any predictive properties for benefit from alkylating chemotherapy. Neither did PRDX1 promoter methylation show differential methylation or association with outcome in this cohort. In a 170-patient cohort from The Cancer Genome Atlas database matched for relevant prognostic factors, age ≥65 years was strongly associated with shorter survival. Conclusions Despite an age-independent stable frequency of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter hypermethylation, tumors in this age group largely lack prognostically favorable markers established in younger glioblastoma patients, which likely contributes to the overall worse prognosis of elderly patients. However, the survival differences hint

  15. Lack of effect of chronic dextromethorphan on experimental pain tolerance in methadone-maintained patients.

    PubMed

    Compton, Peggy A; Ling, Walter; Torrington, Matt A

    2008-09-01

    Good evidence exists to suggest that individuals on opioid maintenance for the treatment of addiction (i.e. methadone) are less tolerant of experimental pain than are matched controls or ex-opioid addicts, a phenomenon theorized to reflect opioid-induced hyperalgesia (OIH). Agonist activity at the excitatory ionotropic N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor on dorsal horn neurons has been implicated in the development of both OIH and its putative expression at the clinical level-opioid tolerance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential utility of the NMDA-receptor antagonist, dextromethorphan (DEX), to reverse or treat OIH in methadone-maintenance (MM) patients. Utilizing a clinical trial design and double-blind conditions, changes in pain threshold and tolerance [cold pressor (CP) and electrical stimulation (ES)] following a 5-week trial of DEX (titrated to 480 mg/day) in comparison with placebo was evaluated in a well-characterized sample of MM patients. The sample (n = 40) was 53% male and ethnically diverse (53% Latino, 28% African American, 10% White, 9% other), with a mean age of 48.0 years (SD = 6.97). Based on t-test analyses, no difference was found between groups on CP pain threshold, CP pain tolerance, ES pain threshold or ES pain tolerance, both pre- and postmedication. Notably, DEX-related changes significantly differed by gender, with women tending to show diminished tolerance for pain with DEX therapy. These results support that chronic high-dose NMDA antagonism does not improve tolerance for pain in MM patients, although a gender effect on DEX response is suggested. PMID:18507735

  16. Correlates of unstructured antiretroviral treatment interruption in a cohort of HIV-positive individuals in British Columbia.

    PubMed

    Samji, Hasina; Chen, Yalin; Salters, Kate; Montaner, Julio S G; Hogg, Robert S

    2014-11-01

    Treatment interruptions (TIs) limit the therapeutic success of combination antiretroviral therapy and are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. HIV-positive individuals dealing with concurrent health issues, access challenges and competing life demands are hypothesized to be more likely to interrupt treatment. Individuals were included if they initiated cART ≥1 year prior to interview date and had a CD4 cell count and initial regimen recorded at initiation. Using pharmacy recording, a TI was defined as a patient-initiated gap in treatment ≥90 consecutive days during the 12 months preceding or following the study interview. 117 (15.2 %) of 768 participants included in this study had a TI during the study window. 76.0 % of participants were male, 27.5 % were of Aboriginal ancestry and the median age was 46 (interquartile range 40-52). In multivariable logistic regression, TIs were significantly associated with current illicit drug use (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 1.68, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.05-2.68); <95 % adherence in the first year of treatment (aOR 2.68, 95 % CI 1.67-4.12); living with at least one person (aOR 1.95; 95 % CI 1.22-3.14) or living on the street (aOR 5.08, 95 % CI 1.72-14.99) compared to living alone; poor perception of overall health (aOR 1.64 95 % CI 1.05-2.55); being unemployed (aOR: 2.22, 95 % CI 1.16-4.23); and younger age at interview (aOR 0.57, 95 % CI 0.44-0.75, per 10 year increase). Addressing socioeconomic barriers to treatment retention is vital for supporting the continuous engagement of patients in care. PMID:24781638

  17. Lack of Association between Recurrent Pregnancy Loss and Inherited Thrombophilia in a Group of Colombian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Cardona, Henry; Castañeda, Serguei A.; Cardona Maya, Wálter; Alvarez, Leonor; Gómez, Joaquín; Gómez, Jorge; Torres, José; Tobón, Luis; Bedoya, Gabriel; Cadavid, Ángela P.

    2012-01-01

    Studies have shown an association between recurrent pregnancy loss and inherited thrombophilia in Caucasian populations, but there is insufficient knowledge concerning triethnic populations such as the Colombian. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether inherited thrombophilia is associated with recurrent pregnancy loss. Methods. We conducted a case-control study of 93 patients with recurrent pregnancy loss (cases) and 206 healthy multiparous women (controls) in a Colombian subpopulation. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) markers of the inherited thrombophilias factor V Leiden, prothrombin G20210A, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T were genotyped by PCR-RFLP. Activated protein C resistance and plasma levels of antithrombin, protein C, and protein S were also measured. Results. The frequency of thrombophilia-associated SNPs, activated protein C resistance, and anticoagulant protein deficiencies, was low overall, except for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T SNP. The differences between patients and controls had no statistical significance. Conclusion. Our study confirms the low prevalence of inherited thrombophilias in non-Caucasian populations and it is unlikely that the tested thrombophilias play a role in the pathogenesis of recurrent pregnancy loss in this Colombian population. PMID:22577540

  18. Social-structural contexts of needle and syringe sharing behaviours of HIV-positive injecting drug users in Manipur, India: a mixed methods investigation

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Few investigations have assessed risk behaviours and social-structural contexts of risk among injecting drug users (IDUs) in Northeast India, where injecting drug use is the major route of HIV transmission. Investigations of risk environments are needed to inform development of effective risk reduction interventions. Methods This mixed methods study of HIV-positive IDUs in Manipur included a structured survey (n = 75), two focus groups (n = 17), seven in-depth interviews, and two key informant interviews. Results One-third of survey participants reported having shared a needle/syringe in the past 30 days; among these, all the men and about one-third of the women did so with persons of unknown HIV serostatus. A variety of social-structural contextual factors influenced individual risk behaviours: barriers to carrying sterile needles/syringes due to fear of harassment by police and "anti-drug" organizations; lack of sterile needles/syringes in drug dealers' locales; limited access to pharmacy-sold needles/syringes; inadequate coverage by needle and syringe programmes (NSPs); non-availability of sterile needles/syringes in prisons; and withdrawal symptoms superseding concern for health. Some HIV-positive IDUs who shared needles/syringes reported adopting risk reduction strategies: being the 'last receiver' of needles/syringes and not a 'giver;' sharing only with other IDUs they knew to be HIV-positive; and, when a 'giver,' asking other IDUs to wash used needles/syringes with bleach before using. Conclusions Effective HIV prevention and care programmes for IDUs in Northeast India may hinge on several enabling contexts: supportive government policy on harm reduction programmes, including in prisons; an end to harassment by the police, army, and anti-drug groups, with education of these entities regarding harm reduction, creation of partnerships with the public health sector, and accountability to government policies that protect IDUs' human rights; adequate

  19. Lack of NF1 gene expression in a sporadic schwannoma from a patient without neurofibromatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, K.K.; Dowton, B.; Silow-Santiago, I.

    1994-09-01

    The neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) gene encodes a tumor suppressor protein, neurofibromin, which is expressed at high levels in Schwann cells and other adult tissues. Loss of NF1 gene expression has been reported in Schwann cell tumors (neurofibrosarcomas) from patients with NF1 and its loss is associated with increased proliferation of these cells. We examined one spinal schwannoma from a patient without clinical features of neurofibromatosis type 1 or 2. The tumor was a typical schwannoma confirmed by standard neuropathologic criteria and expressed S100 by immunocytochemistry. NF1 gene expression in this tumor was examined by in situ hybridization using an NF1-specific riboprobe, Northern blot analysis and reverse-transcribed (RT) PCR. Little or no expression of NF1 RNA could be detected using these methods whereas abundant expression of S100, cyclophilin and beta-action RNA was found in the tumor. Fibroblast and Schwann cells were then individually cultured from this schwannoma and the RNA extracted for Northern blot and RT-PCR analysis. In these cultured Schwann cells both from early and late passages, abundant expression of NF1 RNA could be detected. It is unlikely that our culture technique preferentially expanded {open_quotes}normal{close_quotes} Schwann cells, since NF1 acts as a tumor suppressor gene and its presence would not confer any growth advantage over the tumor-derived, neurofibromin-negative Schwann cells which presumably have an increased proliferation rate. Similarly, the conditions used to expand these Schwann cells do not result in increased NF1 gene expression as shown in previous studies. These results suggest that, in some tumors, expression of the NF1 gene can be downregulated by factors produced within the tumor and that this type of tumor suppressor gene downregulation may represent another mechanism other than mutation for turning off the expression of these growth-suppressing genes and allowing for cell proliferation in tumors.

  20. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. PMID:26898890

  1. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M M; Santos, Lina G; Freitas, Antônio C; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C; Rey, Juan A; Burbano, Rommel R; Silva, Benedito B da; Yoshioka, France K N; Pinto, Giovanny R

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  2. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P.; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M.M.; Santos, Lina G.; Freitas, Antônio C.; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C.; Rey, Juan A.; Burbano, Rommel R.; da Silva, Benedito B.; Yoshioka, France K.N.; Pinto, Giovanny R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  3. The relationship between sexual trauma, peritraumatic dissociation, posttraumatic stress disorder, and HIV-related health in HIV-positive men.

    PubMed

    Yiaslas, Themis A; Kamen, Charles; Arteaga, Ana; Lee, Susanne; Briscoe-Smith, Allison; Koopman, Cheryl; Gore-Felton, Cheryl

    2014-01-01

    This study tested a novel extension of P. P. Schnurr and B. L. Green's (2004) model of the relationships between trauma symptoms and health outcomes with specific application to HIV-positive men. A diverse sample of 167 HIV-positive men recruited from San Francisco Bay Area HIV clinics completed demographic, medical, trauma history, and symptom questionnaires. Mediation analyses were conducted using the method proposed by R. Baron and D. Kenny (1986). Regression analyses found that sexual revictimization (SR) significantly mediated the relationship between child sexual abuse and peritraumatic dissociation (PD), and PD mediated the relationship between SR and current posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptom severity. PTS symptoms partially mediated the relationship between SR and current HIV symptom severity. The findings indicate that among HIV-positive men, sexually revictimized men constitute a vulnerable group that is prone to PD, which places them at risk for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and worsened HIV-related health. Furthermore, traumatic stress symptoms were associated with worse HIV-related symptoms, suggesting that PTS symptoms mediate the link between trauma and health outcomes. This study highlights the need for future research to identify the biobehavioral mediators of the PTSD-health relationship in HIV-positive individuals. PMID:24354509

  4. Family-of-Origin Factors and Partner Violence in the Intimate Relationships of Gay Men Who Are HIV Positive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craft, Shonda M.; Serovich, Julianne M.

    2005-01-01

    This exploratory study examined the prevalence of intimate partner violence in a sample of gay men who are HIV positive. The concept of intergenerational transmission of violence, from family systems theory, provided the basis of this examination. It was hypothesized that men who had witnessed or experienced violence in their families of origin…

  5. Project Roadmap: Reeducating Older Adults in Maintaining AIDS Prevention--A Secondary Intervention for Older HIV-Positive Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illa, Lourdes; Echenique, Marisa; Saint Jean, Gilbert; Bustamante-Avellaneda, Victoria; Metsch, Lisa; Mendez-Mulet, Luis; Eisdorfer, Carl; Sanchez-Martinez, Mario

    2010-01-01

    The number of older adults living with HIV/AIDS is larger than ever. Little is known about their sexual behaviors, although contrary to stereotypes, older adults desire and engage in sexual activity. Despite increased recognition of the need for prevention interventions targeting HIV-positive individuals, no secondary HIV prevention interventions…

  6. Weighing the Consequences: Self-Disclosure of HIV-Positive Status among African American Injection Drug Users

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-01-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV…

  7. "I Don't Know Who to Blame": HIV-Positive South African Women Navigating Heterosexual Infection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Carol

    2009-01-01

    Women who become HIV infected through heterosexual transmission are faced with the task of making sense of how they became infected. This paper presents a qualitative analysis based on interviews with 35 HIV-positive South African Black women. A specific theme, that blame of a male partner was avoided or disavowed in interviews, is explored in…

  8. Exploring Unprotected Anal Intercourse among Newly Diagnosed HIV Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in China: An Ethnographic Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haochu; Holroyd, Eleanor; Lau, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Background Unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) is a major pathway towards secondary HIV transmission among men who have sex with men (MSM). We explored the socio-cultural environment and individual beliefs and experiences conducive to UAI in the context of Southern China. Methods We employed an ethnographic approach utilizing a socio-ecological framework to conduct repeated in-depth interviews with thirty one newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM as well as participant observations in Shenzhen based healthcare settings, MSM venues and NGO offices. Results Some men (6/31) reported continuing to practice UAI after an initial diagnosis of being HIV positive. For MSM who had existing lovers or stable partners, the fear of losing partners in a context of non-serostatus disclosure was testified to be a major concern. MSM with casual partners reported that anonymous sexual encounters and moral judgments played a significant role in their sexual risk behaviors. Simultaneously, self-reported negative emotional and psychological status, perception and idiosyncratic risk interpretation, as well as substance abuse informed the intrapersonal context for UAI. Conclusion UAI among these HIV positive MSM was embedded in an intrapersonal context, related to partner type, shaped by anonymous sexual encounters, psychological status, and moral judgments. It is important that prevention and intervention for secondary HIV transmission among newly diagnosed HIV positive MSM in China take into account these contextual factors. PMID:26461258

  9. Lack of mutation-histopathology correlation in a patient with Proteus syndrome.

    PubMed

    Doucet, Meggie E; Bloomhardt, Hadley M; Moroz, Krzysztof; Lindhurst, Marjorie J; Biesecker, Leslie G

    2016-06-01

    Proteus syndrome (PS) is characterized by progressive, disproportionate, segmental overgrowth, and tumor susceptibility caused by a somatic mosaic AKT1 activating mutation. Each individual has unique manifestations making this disorder extremely heterogeneous. We correlated three variables in 38 tissue samples from a patient who died with PS: the gross affection status, the microscopic affection status, and the mutation level. The AKT1 mutation was measured using a PCR-based RFLP assay. Thirteen samples were grossly normal; six had detectable mutation (2-29%) although four of these six were histopathologically normal. Of the seven grossly normal samples that had no mutation, only four were histologically normal. The mutation level in the grossly abnormal samples was 3-35% and all but the right and left kidneys, skull, and left knee bone, with mutation levels of 19%, 15%, 26%, and 17%, respectively, had abnormal histopathology. The highest mutation level was in a toe bone sample whereas the lowest levels were in the soft tissue surrounding that toe, and an omental fat nodule. We also show here that PS overgrowth can be caused by cellular proliferation or by extracellular matrix expansion. Additionally, papillary thyroid carcinoma was identified, a tumor not previously associated with PS. We conclude that gross pathology and histopathology correlate poorly with mutation levels in PS, that overgrowth can be mediated by cellular proliferation or extracellular matrix expansion, and that papillary thyroid carcinoma is part of the tumor susceptibility of PS. New methods need to be developed to facilitate genotype-phenotype correlation in mosaic disorders. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27112325

  10. Sexual and reproductive health needs of HIV-positive people in Tehran, Iran: a mixed-method descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Nedjat, Saharnaz; Moazen, Babak; Rezaei, Farimah; Hajizadeh, Shayesteh; Majdzadeh, Reza; Setayesh, Hamid Reza; Mohraz, Minoo; Gooya, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background: People Living with HIV (PLHIV) are highly stigmatized and consequently hard-to-access by researchers and importantly, public health outreach in Iran, possibly due to the existing socio-cultural situation in this country. The present study aimed to evaluate the sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Tehran, the capital of Iran. Methods: As a mixed-method descriptive study, this project was conducted in 2012 in Tehran, Iran. In this study, we evaluated and discussed socio-demographic characteristics, family and social support, sexual behaviors, fertility desires and needs, PMTCT services, contraceptive methods, unintended pregnancy and safe abortion, and Pap smear tests among 400 participants referring to the behavioral disorders consulting centers. Results: Of the sample 240 (60%) were male and 160 (40%) were female. About 50% of women and 40% of men were 25-34 years old. More than 60% of men and 96% of women were married, while more than 50% of the participants had HIV-positive spouses at the time of study. According to the results, fertility desire was observed among more than 30% of female and 40% of male participants. Results of the in-depth interviews indicate that the participants are not satisfied with most of the existing services offered to address their sexual and reproductive health needs. Conclusion: Despite the availability of services, most of sexual and reproductive health needs of the PLHIV are overlooked by the health system in Iran. Paying attention to sexual and reproductive health needs of PLHIV in Iran not only protects their right to live long and healthy lives, but also may prevent the transmission of HIV from the patients to others within the community. PMID:26340488

  11. Analysis of HLA association among North Indian HIV-positive individuals co-infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Biman; Wanchu, Ajay; Mahakur, Sobhana; Bind, Mahendra; Sarkar, Krishnakali; Minz, Ranjana W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic variation in HLA genes influence the immune response and may thus contribute to differential development of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals. The study was designed to determine whether HLA polymorphisms influence the development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected individuals. Materials and Methods: Fifty HIV-positive individuals without TB (HIV+TB−), 50 HIV patients co-infected with TB (HIV+TB+) and 50 control subjects (HIV-TB-) were analyzed for HLA Class I and II polymorphisms. Results: In HLA Class II, frequency of occurrence of DRB1*13 (OR 3.165, CI 1.176–8.518, P value 0.019), DRB5 (OR 2.253, CI 1.011–5.019, P value 0.045) and DQB1*06 (OR 2.705, CI 1.197–6.113, P value 0.016) were increased in HIV+TB+compared to HIV+TB−. HLA DQB1*02 (OR 0.436, CI 0.185–1.029, P value 0.05) on the other hand conferred a protective role. In HLA Class I, frequency of B*15 (OR 2.705, CI 1.040–7.036, P value 0.038) was increased, whereas B*51 (OR 0.148, CI 0.031–0.706, P value 0.007) was decreased in HIV+TB+group compared to HIV+TB−. These differences however were not significant when compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: HLA polymorphisms independently did not account for the susceptibility to either of the disease mostly, although they seem to play a role once the infection(s) has established in a particular individual. Further studies are needed on a larger sample size to confirm these observations. PMID:26628757

  12. Depressive and Anxiety Symptoms Predict Sustained Quality of Life Deficits in HIV-Positive Ugandan Adults Despite Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ezeamama, Amara E; Woolfork, Makhabele N; Guwatudde, David; Bagenda, Danstan; Manabe, Yukari C; Fawzi, Wafaie W; Smith Fawzi, Mary C

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The impact of psychosocial status at onset of antiretroviral therapy on changes in quality of life (QOL) and subjectively rated health (SRH) among adults on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in resource-limited settings is poorly understood. Therefore, we evaluate the association between stigma, anxiety, depression, and social support and change in QOL and SRH in HIV-infected Ugandan adults during an 18-month period. Psychosocial indicators were assessed at enrollment using structured questionnaires. QOL and SRH measures were assessed at months 0, 6, 12, and 18 using the Medical Outcomes Survey-HIV. Linear mixed models determined risk estimated differences in QOL and SRH in relation to quartiles of each psychosocial status indicator. Repeated measures generalized estimating equations modeling was implemented to assess differences in likelihood of improved versus nonimproved SRH during follow-up. QOL scores and SRH improved significantly for all participants over 18 months (P < 0.0001). The gain in QOL increased dose-dependently as baseline depressive symptoms (time∗depression P < 0.001) and anxiety levels (time∗anxiety P < 0.001) declined. Lower social support was associated with worse QOL at baseline (P = 0.0005) but QOL improvement during follow-up was not dependent on baseline level of social support (time∗social support P = 0.8943) or number of stigmatizing experiences (time∗stigma P = 0.8662). Psychosocial determinants did not predict changes in SRH in this study. High levels of depression and anxiety symptoms at HAART initiation predicts lower gains in QOL for HIV-positive patients for as long as 18 months. Long-term QOL improvements in HIV-infected adults may be enhanced by implementation of psychosocial interventions to reduce depression and anxiety in HIV-infected adults. PMID:26945347

  13. Molecular and Histological Association Between Candida albicans from Oral Soft Tissue and Carious Dentine of HIV-Positive Children.

    PubMed

    Blignaut, Elaine; van Heerden, Willie F P

    2015-10-01

    Candida albicans and caries are frequently investigated among healthy and immunosuppressed individuals. The objective of this study was to demonstrate the presence of C. albicans on both oral soft and hard tissue and to investigate, at molecular level, the genetic subtype of the organism from the two oral sites. Tongue swabs and dentine scrapings from 362 HIV-positive children, referred for the extraction of carious primary teeth, were cultured on CHROMagar and identified to species level with ID32C. Histological staining of extracted carious teeth was also done. In patients with positive C. albicans cultures from both the tongue and carious dentine, DNA fingerprinting of such paired isolates was performed, using Southern blot hybridisation with the Ca3 probe. Yeasts were cultured from the tongue of 151 (41.7 %) individuals and 57 (37.7 %) simultaneously yielded positive C. albicans cultures from carious dentine. Nine different yeast spp. were identified from the tongue using the ID32C commercial system, but C. albicans was the only species recovered from carious dentine and histological investigation demonstrated fungal elements penetrated into the dentine and not limited to superficial debris on the floor of the cavity. Twelve of 13 paired isolates of C. albicans revealed identical fingerprinting patterns. The findings from this study demonstrated that in a particular individual, the same genetic subtype of C. albicans was capable of colonising both oral soft tissue and carious dentine. This renders carious teeth a constant source, or reservoir, of potentially infectious agents and, particularly among immunosuppressed individuals, should therefore not be left unattended. PMID:26153022

  14. HIV-Positive Status Disclosure and Use of Essential PMTCT and Maternal Health Services in Rural Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Sydney A.; Onono, Maricianah; Bukusi, Elizabeth A.; Cohen, Craig R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In sub-Saharan Africa, women's disclosure of HIV-positive status to others may affect their use of services for prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) of HIV and maternal and child health—including antenatal care, antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) for PMTCT, and skilled birth attendance. Methods: Using data from the Migori and AIDS Stigma Study conducted in rural Nyanza Province, Kenya, we compared the use of PMTCT and maternal health services for all women by HIV status and disclosure category (n = 390). Among HIV-infected women (n = 145), associations between disclosure of HIV-positive status and the use of services were further examined with bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results: Women living with HIV who had not disclosed to anyone had the lowest levels of maternity and PMTCT service utilization. For example, only 21% of these women gave birth in a health facility, compared with 35% of HIV-negative women and 49% of HIV-positive women who had disclosed (P < 0.001). Among HIV-positive women, the effect of disclosure to anyone on ARV drug use [odds ratio (OR) = 5.8; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9 to 17.8] and facility birth (OR = 2.9; 95% CI: 1.4 to 5.7) remained large and significant after adjusting for confounders. Disclosure to a male partner had a particularly strong effect on the use of ARVs for PMTCT (OR = 7.9; 95% CI: 3.7 to 17.1). Conclusions: HIV-positive status disclosure seems to be a complex yet critical factor for the use of PMTCT and maternal health services in this setting. The design of interventions to promote such disclosure must recognize the impact of HIV-related stigma on disclosure decisions and protect women's rights, autonomy, and safety. PMID:25436823

  15. Disclosure of HIV Serostatus and Sexual Orientation Among HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiuyun; Chi, Peilian; Zhang, Liying; Zhang, Yan; Fang, Xiaoyi; Qiao, Shan; Li, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    This study addressed the issue of disclosing HIV status and sexual orientation, and explored the consequences of such disclosures among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) in China. In-depth individual interviews were conducted with 37 HIV-positive MSM. Of these participants, 3 (8.1 %) disclosed neither their HIV status nor their sexual orientation to anyone; 24 (64.9 %) voluntarily disclosed both their HIV-positive status and their sexual orientation; 7 (18.9 %) voluntarily disclosed their HIV status only, and 3 (8.1 %) involuntarily disclosed their HIV status and sexual orientation. Parents, partners, siblings and close friends were the most common disclosure targets. HIV-positive MSM were less likely to disclose their sexual orientation than their HIV status. The positive consequences of disclosure included receiving support, acquiring family care, reducing stress, improving mood and developing more positive values and beliefs. The negative consequences included the participants' perception of rejection and stigma toward themselves and their families. However, the stigma mainly comes from "outsiders" rather than family members and close friends. We did not find any differences with respect to consequences between participants who disclosed their HIV status only and those who disclosed both their HIV status and sexual orientation. In conclusion, partners, siblings and friends were main disclosure targets, and HIV positive MSM preferred to disclose their HIV serostatus than their sexual orientation. Voluntarily disclosing one's HIV status to significant others resulted in more positive consequences than negative consequences. Theses results were informative for developing mental health and coping interventions. PMID:26002087

  16. Pneumocystis jirovecii infection and the associated dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mutations in HIV-positive individuals from Pune, India.

    PubMed

    Mane, Arati; Gujar, Pankaj; Chandra, Jipsi; Lokhande, Rahul; Dhamgaye, Tilak; Ghorpade, Shivhari; Risbud, Arun

    2015-02-01

    The present study was undertaken to detect Pneumocystis jirovecii infection among HIV-positive patients presenting with symptoms of lower respiratory tract infection and analyze the associated dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) mutations. P. jirovecii infection was detected in 12.6% cases. We did not find DHPS gene mutations at the commonest positions of codon 55 and 57; however, mutation at codon 171 was detected in two cases. No mutations in DHFR gene were detected. The results indicate low prevalence of DHPS and DHFR mutations in Indian P. jirovecii isolates, suggesting that the selective pressure of sulfa drugs on the local strains has probably not reached the levels found in developed nations. PMID:25266324

  17. Sunitinib Malate in Treating HIV-Positive Patients With Cancer Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-14

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Aggressive NK-cell Leukemia; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Malignancies; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Eosinophilic Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Extramedullary Plasmacytoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Isolated Plasmacytoma of Bone; Light Chain Deposition Disease; Mast Cell Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Osteolytic Lesions of Multiple Myeloma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Polycythemia Vera; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Primary Systemic Amyloidosis; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Relevance of Interleukin-6 and D-Dimer for Serious Non-AIDS Morbidity and Death among HIV-Positive Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Jason V; Deeks, Steven G.; Wolfson, Julian; Wentworth, Deborah; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Cohen, Calvin J.; Phillips, Andrew; Lundgren, Jens D.; Neaton, James D.

    2016-01-01

    -dimer are independently associated with serious non-AIDS conditions or death among HIV-positive adults with suppressed virus. This suggests that treatments that reduce IL-6 and D-dimer levels might substantially decrease morbidity and mortality in patients on suppressive ART. Clinical trials are needed to test this hypothesis. PMID:27171281

  19. Internalized heterosexism among HIV-positive, gay-identified men: implications for HIV prevention and care.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mallory O; Carrico, Adam W; Chesney, Margaret A; Morin, Stephen F

    2008-10-01

    Internalized heterosexism (IH), or the internalization of societal antihomosexual attitudes, has been consistently linked to depression and low self-esteem among gay men, and it has been inconclusively associated with substance use and sexual risk in gay and bisexual men. Using structural equation modeling, the authors tested a model framed in social action theory (C. K. Ewart, 1991, 2004) in which IH is associated with HIV transmission risk and poor adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) through the mechanisms of negative affect and stimulant use. Data from a sample of 465 gay-identified men interviewed as part of an HIV risk reduction behavioral trial were used to test the fit of the model. Results support the hypothesized model in which IH was associated with unprotected receptive (but not insertive) anal intercourse with HIV-negative or unknown HIV status partners, and with ART nonadherence indirectly via increased negative affect and more regular stimulant use. The model accounted for 15% of the variance in unprotected receptive anal intercourse and 17% of the variance in ART nonadherence. Findings support the potential utility of addressing IH in HIV prevention and treatment with HIV-positive gay men. PMID:18837600

  20. A test of motivational plus nicotine replacement interventions for HIV positive smokers.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Karen S; Cropsey, Karen L; Heckman, Carolyn J

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test two combination motivational plus pharmacological interventions for smoking cessation among HIV positive smokers. Participants were 40 adults receiving HIV care who smoked daily reporting interest in smoking reduction. Measures were administered at baseline, 1-month, and 3-month follow-ups. Participants were randomly assigned to self-guided reading plus nicotine patch (n = 18) or motivational interviewing plus nicotine patch (n = 22). Groups did not differ at 3 months on biochemically-verified abstinence. The sample reduced cigarettes per day by half a pack and the percent of smoking days by 41%, and 22% were abstinent at 3-month follow-up. Compliance with the nicotine patch was poor and declined over time, but patch use was unrelated to carbon monoxide level at 3-month follow-up. Smoking cessation interventions for people with HIV can be helpful and should include components that encourage some smoke-free days, increase self-efficacy, and attend to adherence to nicotine replacement treatment. PMID:18066659

  1. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    SciTech Connect

    Dominy, Stephen; Brown, Joseph N.; Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-04-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last few years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse. However, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+) and 11 -negative (HIV-) heroin addicts. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores and that implicate disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, no proteins from the HIV- heroin addict cohort showed significant correlations with cognitive scores. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes.

  2. Social and Behavioral Characteristics of HIV-positive MSM Who Trade Sex for Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Shirley J.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Zians, Jim; Patterson, Thomas L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Previous research among drug-using men who have sex with men (MSM) indicates that trading sex for methamphetamine may be common. Objectives This study identified background characteristics, substance use variables, contextual factors, and sexual risk behaviors associated with trading sex for methamphetamine in a sample of HIV-positive MSM. Baseline data were gathered from 155 participants who were enrolled in a sexual risk-reduction intervention. Logistic regression was used to compare MSM who traded sex for methamphetamine with men who did not. Results Forty-three percent of the sample reported trading sex for methamphetamine in the past 2 months. Trading sex for methamphetamine was associated with being a binge user, homelessness, having an income of less than $20,000 per year, being less assertive at turning down drugs, engaging in more anal sex without a condom, and seeking out risky sex partners when high on methamphetamine. Conclusions and Scientific Significance These data suggest that the trading of sex for methamphetamine may be a primary source of new HIV infections within and outside of the MSM community, necessitating targeted interventions with this vulnerable subgroup. PMID:20955106

  3. The Law of Communicable Diseases Act and disclosure to sexual partners among HIV-positive youth

    PubMed Central

    Christiansen, Monica; Lalos, Ann; Johansson, Eva. E.

    2008-01-01

    In Sweden, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is included among the venereal diseases covered by the Law of Communicable Diseases Act. HIV-positive (HIV+) people are required to inform their sexual partners about their infection and adopt safe sex behaviours. However, it is unclear how the law is perceived. This study explores how HIV+ youth in Sweden perceive the law, handle their sexuality and disclose their HIV diagnosis to sexual partners. Ten HIV+ women and men between 17 and 24 years of age were recruited from three different HIV infection clinics. These participants were interviewed in depth. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to a grounded theory approach. The core category—cultured to take responsibility—illuminates the informants’ double-edged experiences regarding the law and how they handle disclosure to sexual partners. The legislation implies both support and burden for these HIV+ youth; they feel that they have a great deal of responsibility, sometimes more than they can handle. ‘Switch off lust’, ‘balancing lust, fear and obedience’ and ‘switch off the disease’ are strategies that describe how the informants manage sexuality and disclosure. Young HIV+ people have a difficult time informing partners of their HIV diagnosis and discussing safe sex strategies. These are challenges that health care providers need to take seriously. HIV+ youth need better communication strategies to negotiate safer sex. Staff with extended education on sexuality should be a part of HIV health care. PMID:22639678

  4. Increasing Antiretroviral Adherence for HIV-Positive African Americans (Project Rise): A Treatment Education Intervention Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Bogart, Laura M; Mutchler, Matt G; McDavitt, Bryce; Mutepfa, Kieta D; Risley, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background HIV-positive African Americans have been shown to have lower adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) than those of other races/ethnicities, yet adherence interventions have rarely been tailored to the needs of this population. Objective We developed and will evaluate a treatment education adherence intervention (called Rise) that was culturally adapted to address the needs of African Americans living with HIV. Methods This randomized controlled trial will examine the effects of the Rise intervention on ART adherence and HIV viral load. African Americans on ART who report adherence problems will be recruited from the community and randomly assigned to receive the intervention or usual care for 6 months. The intervention consists of 6-10 individual counseling sessions, with more sessions provided to those who demonstrate lower adherence. Primary outcomes include adherence as monitored continuously with Medication Event Monitoring Systems (MEMS) caps, and viral load data received from the participant’s medical provider. Survey assessments will be administered at baseline and month 6. Results The trial is ongoing. Conclusions If effective, the Rise intervention will provide community-based organizations with an intervention tailored to address the needs of African Americans for promoting optimal ART adherence and HIV clinical outcomes. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01350544; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01350544 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6fjqqnmn0). PMID:27025399

  5. Development of structured support groups for HIV-positive women in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Visser, Maretha; Mundell, Jonathan; de Villiers, Annelize; Sikkema, Kathleen; Jeffery, Bridget

    2005-11-01

    Women living with HIV in a stigmatising community need support to cope with their HIV status. In a process of action research, a structured support group programme was designed to meet the needs of women to cope with their diagnosis and interpersonal relationships. The emphasis was on identifying their needs and developing programme material to address those needs through group participation and interaction. The programme was pilot-tested at two sites located in two townships in Tshwane, South Africa. Feedback after each session made it possible to adjust the programme to the needs of the participants. In a formative evaluation, audio-taped sessions, process notes of facilitators, and experiences of the participants were used to identify therapeutic elements, the value of the groups and the problems in the implementation process. Women reported benefit from participation in the support groups. A 10-session structured programme to be used in support groups addressing the most important needs of HIV-positive women was developed. PMID:17600975

  6. The impact of structured support groups for pregnant South African women recently diagnosed HIV positive.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Jonathan P; Visser, Maretha J; Makin, Jennifer D; Kershaw, Trace S; Forsyth, Brian W C; Jeffery, Bridget; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2011-08-31

    The authors of this study evaluated a structured 10-session psychosocial support group intervention for newly HIV-diagnosed pregnant South African women. Participants were expected to display increases in HIV disclosure, self-esteem, active coping and positive social support, and decreases in depression, avoidant coping, and negative social support. Three hundred sixty-one pregnant HIV-infected women were recruited from four antenatal clinics in Tshwane townships from April 2005 to September 2006. Using a quasi-experimental design, assessments were conducted at baseline and two and eight months post-intervention. A series of random effects regression analyses were conducted, with the three assessment points treated as a random effect of time. At both follow-ups, the rate of disclosure in the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the comparison group (p<0.001). Compared to the comparison group at the first follow-up, the intervention group displayed higher levels of active coping (t=2.68, p<0.05) and lower levels of avoidant coping (t=-2.02, p<0.05), and those who attended at least half of the intervention sessions exhibited improved self-esteem (t=2.11, p<0.05). Group interventions tailored for newly HIV positive pregnant women, implemented in resource-limited settings, may accelerate the process of adjusting to one's HIV status, but may not have sustainable benefits over time. PMID:21973110

  7. The Impact of Structured Support Groups for Pregnant South African Women Recently Diagnosed HIV Positive

    PubMed Central

    Mundell, Jonathan P.; Visser, Maretha J.; Makin, Jennifer D.; Kershaw, Trace S.; Forsyth, Brian W. C.; Jeffery, Bridget; Sikkema, Kathleen J.

    2014-01-01

    The authors of this study evaluated a structured 10-session psychosocial support group intervention for newly HIV-diagnosed pregnant South African women. Participants were expected to display increases in HIV disclosure, self-esteem, active coping and positive social support, and decreases in depression, avoidant coping, and negative social support. Three hundred sixty-one pregnant HIV-infected women were recruited from four antenatal clinics in Tshwane townships from April 2005 to September 2006. Using a quasi-experimental design, assessments were conducted at baseline and two and eight months post-intervention. A series of random effects regression analyses were conducted, with the three assessment points treated as a random effect of time. At both follow-ups, the rate of disclosure in the intervention group was significantly higher than that of the comparison group (p < 0.001). Compared to the comparison group at the first follow-up, the intervention group displayed higher levels of active coping (t = 2.68, p < 0.05) and lower levels of avoidant coping (t = −2.02, p < 0.05), and those who attended at least half of the intervention sessions exhibited improved self-esteem (t = 2.11, p < 0.05). Group interventions tailored for newly HIV positive pregnant women, implemented in resource-limited settings, may accelerate the process of adjusting to one's HIV status, but may not have sustainable benefits over time. PMID:21973110

  8. Deportation history among HIV-positive Latinos in two U.S.-Mexico border communities

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Fátima A.; Servin, Argentina E.; Garfein, Richard S.; Ojeda, Victoria D.; Gómez, Gudelia Rangel; Zúñiga, María Luisa

    2013-01-01

    Background Health-related vulnerabilities associated with deportation are understudied. We conducted a cross-sectional study to identify factors associated with history of deportation from the U.S. to Mexico among HIV-positive Latinos. Methods From 2009-2010, we recruited a convenience sample from HIV clinics in San Diego, U.S. and Tijuana, Mexico. Results Of 283 participants, 25% reported a prior deportation. Factors independently associated with increased odds of deportation history were being male (AOR:2.77; 95%CI:1.18-6.48), having ≤high-school education (AOR:3.87;95%CI:1.84-8.14), ever using cocaine (AOR:2.46; 95%CI:1.33-4.57), and reporting personalized HIV-stigma: “some have told me HIV is what I deserve for how I lived” (AOR:2.23; 95%CI:1.14-4.37). Lower self-reported antiretroviral medication adherence (AOR:0.35; 95%CI: 0.12-0.96) and perceiving HIV-stigma: “most people believe a person who has HIV is dirty” (AOR:0.49; 95%CI: 0.25-0.94) were associated with decreased odds of deportation history. Conclusions Deportation is associated with specific socioeconomic indicators that are known to impact the health of individuals living with HIV. PMID:24136247

  9. Deportation history among HIV-positive Latinos in two US-Mexico border communities.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Fátima A; Servin, Argentina E; Garfein, Richard S; Ojeda, Victoria D; Rangel, Gudelia; Zúñiga, María Luisa

    2015-02-01

    Health-related vulnerabilities associated with deportation are understudied. We conducted a cross-sectional study to identify factors associated with history of deportation from the US to Mexico among HIV-positive Latinos. From 2009 to 2010, we recruited a convenience sample from HIV clinics in San Diego, US and Tijuana, Mexico. Of 283 participants, 25% reported a prior deportation. Factors independently associated with increased odds of deportation history were being male [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.77; 95% CI 1.18-6.48], having ≤high-school education (AOR 3.87; 95% CI 1.84-8.14), ever using cocaine (AOR 2.46; 95% CI 1.33-4.57), and reporting personalized HIV-stigma: "some have told me HIV is what I deserve for how I lived" (AOR 2.23; 95% CI 1.14-4.37). Lower self-reported antiretroviral medication adherence (AOR 0.35; 95% CI 0.12-0.96) and perceiving HIV-stigma: "most people believe a person who has HIV is dirty" (AOR 0.49; 95% CI 0.25-0.94) were associated with decreased odds of deportation history. Deportation is associated with specific socioeconomic indicators that are known to impact the health of individuals living with HIV. PMID:24136247

  10. The Law of Communicable Diseases Act and disclosure to sexual partners among HIV-positive youth.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, Monica; Lalos, Ann; Johansson, Eva E

    2008-12-01

    In Sweden, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is included among the venereal diseases covered by the Law of Communicable Diseases Act. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) people are required to inform their sexual partners about their infection and adopt safe sex behaviours. However, it is unclear how the law is perceived. This study explores how HIV(+) youth in Sweden perceive the law, handle their sexuality and disclose their HIV diagnosis to sexual partners. Ten HIV(+) women and men between 17 and 24 years of age were recruited from three different HIV infection clinics. These participants were interviewed in depth. The interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed according to a grounded theory approach. The core category-cultured to take responsibility-illuminates the informants' double-edged experiences regarding the law and how they handle disclosure to sexual partners. The legislation implies both support and burden for these HIV(+) youth; they feel that they have a great deal of responsibility, sometimes more than they can handle. 'Switch off lust', 'balancing lust, fear and obedience' and 'switch off the disease' are strategies that describe how the informants manage sexuality and disclosure. Young HIV(+) people have a difficult time informing partners of their HIV diagnosis and discussing safe sex strategies. These are challenges that health care providers need to take seriously. HIV(+) youth need better communication strategies to negotiate safer sex. Staff with extended education on sexuality should be a part of HIV health care. PMID:22639678

  11. Developing a nicotine patch adherence intervention for HIV-positive Latino smokers.

    PubMed

    Shadel, William G; Galvan, Frank H; Tucker, Joan S

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes two phases of formative research that had the goal of developing a treatment designed to improve adherence with the nicotine patch in HIV-positive Latino smokers. Each research phase (Phase I and II) was conducted independent of the other and used different qualitative methods to inform the development of the intervention. Phase I interviewed n=14 smokers who had previous experience using the nicotine patch to gain detailed understanding of how, when, and why they used it; their perceived barriers to using it; and their perspective on ways to improve adherence to it. Phase II provided n=35 smokers with brief smoking cessation treatment and nicotine patches, then interviewed them in "near real time" over a two month period about their use of the patch during a quit attempt (e.g., perceived barriers and facilitators). Authors of the paper extracted relevant themes emerging from the interview transcripts across the two phases. Results indicated that consistent use of the nicotine patch was associated with maintaining high motivation for use (i.e., not necessarily motivation to quit, but motivation to continue patch use); linking its use with established daily routines (e.g., with taking other medications, with brushing teeth); and maintaining realistic expectations for patch efficacy (e.g., that users may still experience some level of craving and/or withdrawal). This information will used to develop and pilot test a brief treatment module that focuses on improving nicotine patch adherence. PMID:27070097

  12. Proteomic Analysis of Saliva in HIV-Positive Heroin Addicts Reveals Proteins Correlated with Cognition

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Mark I.; Gritsenko, Marina; Jacobs, Jon M.; Smith, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) remains high despite effective antiretroviral therapies. Multiple etiologies have been proposed over the last several years to account for this phenomenon, including the neurotoxic effects of antiretrovirals and co-morbid substance abuse; however, no underlying molecular mechanism has been identified. Emerging evidence in several fields has linked the gut to brain diseases, but the effect of the gut on the brain during HIV infection has not been explored. Saliva is the most accessible gut biofluid, and is therefore of great scientific interest for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. This study presents a longitudinal, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics study investigating saliva samples taken from 8 HIV-positive (HIV+), 11 −negative (HIV−) heroin addicts. In addition, saliva samples were investigated from 11 HIV−, non-heroin addicted healthy controls. In the HIV+ group, 58 proteins were identified that show significant correlations with cognitive scores, implicating disruption of protein quality control pathways by HIV. Notably, only one protein from the HIV− heroin addict cohort showed a significant correlation with cognitive scores, and no proteins correlated with cognitive scores in the healthy control group. In addition, the majority of correlated proteins have been shown to be associated with exosomes, allowing us to propose that the salivary glands and/or oral epithelium may modulate brain function during HIV infection through the release of discrete packets of proteins in the form of exosomes. PMID:24717448

  13. Unrelated cord blood and mismatched unrelated volunteer donor transplants, two alternatives in patients who lack an HLA-identical donor.

    PubMed

    Ringdén, O; Okas, M; Uhlin, M; Uzunel, M; Remberger, M; Mattsson, J

    2008-11-01

    The aim was to evaluate two transplant strategies for patients who lack HLA-identical donors, namely HLA-A, HLA-B or -DR beta 1 mismatched unrelated donor (MM URD) transplants (n=14) and umbilical cord blood transplants (UCB, n=27). Diagnosis, disease stage and age were similar in the two groups. Cell dose was lower in the UCB group (P<0.001). Median time to ANC of >0.5 x 10(9)/l was 30 days in the UCB group and 17 days in the MM URD group (P=0.002). Engraftment of plt was delayed in the UCB group (P=0.03). The UCB patients required fewer erythrocyte transfusions (P=0.001). At 100 days, complete donor chimerism for CD3 was 63 and 44% in the UCB and MM URD groups, respectively. Acute GVHD of grades II-IV were 30% in the UCB group and 21% in the MM URD group. The corresponding figures for chronic GVHD were 9 and 20%, respectively. TRM was 30% in the UCB patients and 50% in the MM URD patients. Three-year survival was 66% in the UCB group and 14% in the MM URD group (P=0.006). Although the material is small and heterogeneous, engraftment was delayed, leukocyte chimerism was not significantly different and survival was superior using UCB rather than MM URD transplants. PMID:18762760

  14. Sexual and reproductive health needs of HIV-positive women in Botswana - a study of health care worker's views.

    PubMed

    Schaan, Michelle M; Taylor, Myra; Puvimanasinghe, John; Busang, Lesego; Keapoletswe, Koona; Marlink, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Botswana's HIV prevalence is one of the highest in the world at 31.8% in the 15-49 years antenatal population. Being HIV-positive for a woman presents unique challenges with regard to sexuality, child bearing, and partner relations. To ensure optimal sexual and reproductive health (SRH) of HIV-positive women, it is important to understand how health care workers (HCWs) are prepared to address SRH issues such as contraception, fertility desires, and partner violence. This study reports on a knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) questionnaire completed by 98 HCWs from clinics located in and nearby Gaborone and analyzed using descriptive and nonparametric statistics. The majority of participants were nurses (43%), health educators (27%), and lay counselors (19%), 82% female, median age of 35 (Interquartile Range (IQR): 29.25-43.75). General HIV/AIDS knowledge was high with a median score of 8.0/9 (89%) (IQR: 8-9). However, the median SRH knowledge score was much lower at 6.0/10 (60%) (IQR: 4-7). Of the three groups, the SRH knowledge scores of lay counselors were significantly lower than nurses (p=0.024). The attitude scores pertaining to issues such as family planning, sexual violence, the health system's ability to offer SRH services, and personal ability to offer SRH services were moderately positive with a median score of 75% (IQR: 69-81%); although nearly 25% of respondents felt that it is irresponsible for an HIV-positive woman to want to have a child. When presented with a case study of an abused, HIV-positive pregnant woman, most respondents indicated they would offer supportive care without judgment; however 28% of respondents indicated they would express disapproval or disappointment for becoming pregnant when she knows she is HIV-positive. The low SRH knowledge scores together with discriminatory attitudes and practices emphasize the need for increased and ongoing training in SRH issues for all HCWs who provide care for HIV-positive women. PMID:22568549

  15. Toward the integration of comprehensive mental health services in HIV care: an assessment of psychiatric morbidity among HIV-positive individuals in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Olagunju, Andrew T; Ogundipe, Olasimbo A; Erinfolami, Adebayo R; Akinbode, Abiola A; Adeyemi, Joseph D

    2013-01-01

    Existing evidence from research supports the desirability of integration of mental health services into HIV care in order to mitigate the grave consequences of unattended mental health morbidity among People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). This study aims to find out the burden and pattern of psychiatric disorders that is prevalent among HIV-positive individuals attending a Nigerian-based HIV clinic. The study participants, consisting of 295 HIV-positive adults were recruited using systematic random sampling method. The participants were subjected to questionnaire to elicit demographic profile and General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) to screen for probable psychiatric disorders. This was followed by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Non patient (SCID-NP) to diagnose the presence of psychiatric morbidity in any of the participant with a GHQ-28 score ≥5 and 10% of those with GHQ-28 score <5. Data were analyzed with SPSS 17. Of the 295 participants interviewed, approximately one-quarter (25.1%) of the participants had diagnosable psychiatric illness based on SCID-NP. Depression was the commonest mental disorder detected as 44 (14.9%) met the DSM-IV Axis 1 diagnosis of major depressive disorders. Anxiety disorders, concurrent Nicotine with Alcohol dependence and cannabis abuse were elicited in 24 (8.1%), 4 (1.3%), and 2 (0.7%) participants, respectively. This study finds a higher burden of psychiatric disorders in PLWHA in comparison to what is obtainable in the general population based on previous research works in similar context. Thus further underscores the need for integration of comprehensive psychiatric services into HIV care. We advocate the support and commitment of key stakeholders in HIV care to the translation of this research-based evidence into practice among PLWHA. PMID:23391152

  16. Managing potential drug-drug interactions between gastric acid-reducing agents and antiretroviral therapy: experience from a large HIV-positive cohort.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J M; Stott, K E; Monnery, D; Seden, K; Beeching, N J; Chaponda, M; Khoo, S; Beadsworth, M B J

    2016-02-01

    Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral therapy and other drugs are well described. Gastric acid-reducing agents are one such class. However, few data exist regarding the frequency of and indications for prescription, nor risk assessment in the setting of an HIV cohort receiving antiretroviral therapy. To assess prevalence of prescription of gastric acid-reducing agents and drug-drug interaction within a UK HIV cohort, we reviewed patient records for the whole cohort, assessing demographic data, frequency and reason for prescription of gastric acid-reducing therapy. Furthermore, we noted potential drug-drug interaction and whether risk had been documented and mitigated. Of 701 patients on antiretroviral therapy, 67 (9.6%) were prescribed gastric acid-reducing therapy. Of these, the majority (59/67 [88.1%]) were prescribed proton pump inhibitors. We identified four potential drug-drug interactions, which were appropriately managed by temporally separating the administration of gastric acid-reducing agent and antiretroviral therapy, and all four of these patients remained virally suppressed. Gastric acid-reducing therapy, in particular proton pump inhibitor therapy, appears common in patients prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Whilst there remains a paucity of published data, our findings are comparable to those in other European cohorts. Pharmacovigilance of drug-drug interactions in HIV-positive patients is vital. Education of patients and staff, and accurate data-gathering tools, will enhance patient safety. PMID:25721922

  17. Impact on ART initiation of point-of-care CD4 testing at HIV diagnosis among HIV-positive youth in Khayelitsha, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Patten, Gabriela EM; Wilkinson, Lynne; Conradie, Karien; Isaakidis, Petros; Harries, Anthony D; Edginton, Mary E; De Azevedo, Virginia; van Cutsem, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Despite the rapid expansion of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in developing countries, pre-treatment losses from care remain a challenge to improving access to treatment. Youth and adolescents have been identified as a particularly vulnerable group, at greater risk of loss from both pre-ART and ART care. Point-of-care (POC) CD4 testing has shown promising results in improving linkage to ART care. In Khayelitsha township, South Africa, POC CD4 testing was implemented at a clinic designated for youth aged 12–25 years. We assessed whether there was an associated reduction in attrition between HIV testing, assessment for eligibility and ART initiation. Methods A before-and-after observational study was conducted using routinely collected data. These were collected on patients from May 2010 to April 2011 (Group A) when baseline CD4 count testing was performed in a laboratory and results were returned to the clinic within two weeks. Same-day POC CD4 testing was implemented in June 2011, and data were collected on patients from August 2011 to July 2012 (Group B). Results A total of 272 and 304 youth tested HIV-positive in Group A and Group B, respectively. Group B patients were twice as likely to have their ART eligibility assessed compared to Group A patients: 275 (90%) vs. 183 (67%) [relative risk (RR)=2.4, 95% CI: 1.8–3.4, p<0.0001]. More patients in World Health Organization (WHO) Stage 1 disease (85% vs. 69%), with CD4 counts≥350 cells/µL (58% vs. 35%) and more males (13% vs. 7%) were detected in Group B. The proportion of eligible patients who initiated ART was 50% and 44% (p=0.6) in Groups B and A, respectively; and 50% and 43% (p=0.5) when restricted to patients with baseline CD4 count≤250 cells/µL. Time between HIV-testing and ART initiation was reduced from 36 to 28 days (p=0.6). Discussion POC CD4 testing significantly improved assessment for ART eligibility. The improvement in the proportion initiating ART and the reduction in

  18. Use of North America's first medically supervised safer injecting facility among HIV-positive injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Reddon, Hudson; Wood, Evan; Tyndall, Mark; Lai, Calvin; Hogg, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine supervised injecting facility (SIF) use among a cohort of 395 HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, Canada. The correlates of SIF use were identified using generalized estimating equation analyses. In multivariate analyses, frequent SIF use was associated with homelessness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.90), daily heroin injection (AOR = 1.56), and daily cocaine injection (AOR = 1.59). The reasons given for not using the SIF included a preference for injecting at home and already having a safe place to inject. The SIF services most commonly used were needle exchange and nursing services. The SIF appears to have attracted a high-risk subpopulation of HIV-positive IDUs; this coverage perhaps could be extended with the addition of HIV-specific services such as disease monitoring and the provision of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22010805

  19. A pilot study investigating the effects of trauma, experiential avoidance, and disease management in HIV-positive MSM using methamphetamine.

    PubMed

    Chartier, Maggie; Vinatieri, Trisha; Delonga, Kathryn; McGlynn, Lawrence M; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Koopman, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    With high rates of trauma among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (MSM) who use methamphetamine, this preliminary pilot study examined the associations between experiential avoidance, trauma symptoms, and management of a chronic illness. Among a small sample of HIV-positive, methamphetamine-using MSM in a California Bay Area County, greater reported experiential avoidance was significantly related to greater reported trauma and symptoms of traumatic stress. Furthermore, greater reported experiential avoidance was significantly related to reduced self-efficacy of illness management and more frequent methamphetamine use. Although further research is needed, these data suggest that addressing issues of experiential avoidance and trauma could affect behavioral choices and treatment outcomes in this high-risk population. PMID:20142604

  20. Weighing the consequences: self-disclosure of HIV-positive status among African American injection drug users.

    PubMed

    Valle, Maribel; Levy, Judith

    2009-02-01

    Theorists posit that personal decisions to disclose being HIV positive are made based on the perceived consequences of that disclosure. This study examines the perceived costs and benefits of self-disclosure among African American injection drug users (IDUs). A total of 80 African American IDUs were interviewed in-depth subsequent to testing HIV positive. Participants reported that interpersonal costs of self-disclosure included stigma, loss of sexual/romantic partners, emotional harming of family/friends, shattering of privacy, physical isolation, blame, and loss of income. The benefits of disclosure included social support, emotional catharsis, and income. Four factors that help to tip the scales in either direction were identified. Study findings have implications for the delivery of counseling, testing, and partner notification services to African American IDUs living with HIV. PMID:18697884

  1. Stigma and Sexual Health Risk in HIV-Positive African American Young Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Doty, Nathan; Hawkins, Linda A.; Gaskins, Clare S.; Beidas, Rinad; Rudy, Bret J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Understanding the multiple forms of stigma experienced by young HIV-positive African American men who have sex with men and how they relate to sexual risk behaviors is essential to design effective HIV prevention programs. This study of 40 African American young MSM found that 90% of those surveyed experienced sexual minority stigma, 88% experienced HIV stigma, and 78% experienced dual stigma. Sexual minority stigma was characterized by experiences of social avoidance, and HIV stigma, by shame. Individuals with high HIV stigma were significantly more likely to engage in unprotected sex while high or intoxicated. Associations between stigma and sexual practices were examined; youth endorsing higher levels of sexual minority stigma engaged in less insertive anal intercourse. Individuals endorsing more HIV stigma reported more receptive anal intercourse. These findings support the development of stigma-informed secondary prevention interventions for African American HIV-positive young MSM. PMID:20673080

  2. Syndemic vulnerability, sexual and injection risk behaviors, and HIV continuum of care outcomes in HIV-positive injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Yuko; Purcell, David W.; Knowlton, Amy R.; Wilkinson, James D.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Knight, Kelly R.

    2015-01-01

    Limited investigations have been conducted on syndemics and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Using baseline data from a multi-site, randomized controlled study of HIV-positive injection drug users (n=1052), we examined whether psychosocial factors co-occurred, and whether these factors were additively associated with behavioral and HIV continuum of care outcomes. Experiencing one type of psychosocial problem was significantly (p<0.05) associated with an increased odds of experiencing another type of problem. Persons with 3 or more psychosocial problems were significantly more likely to report sexual and injection risk behaviors and were less likely to be adherent to HIV medications. Persons with 4 or more problems were less likely to be virally suppressed. Reporting any problems was associated with not currently taking HIV medications. Our findings highlight the association of syndemics not only with risk behaviors, but also with outcomes related to the continuum of care for HIV-positive persons. PMID:25249392

  3. Use of North America’s first medically supervised safer injecting facility among HIV-positive injection drug users

    PubMed Central

    Reddon, Hudson; Wood, Evan; Tyndall, Mark; Lai, Calvin; Hogg, Robert; Montaner, Julio; Kerr, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine supervised injecting facility (SIF) use among a cohort of 395 HIV-positive injection drug users (IDUs) in Vancouver, Canada. The correlates of SIF use were identified using generalized estimating equation analyses. In multivariate analyses, frequent SIF use was associated with homelessness (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.90), daily heroin injection (AOR = 1.56), and daily cocaine injection (AOR = 1.59). The reasons given for not using the SIF included a preference for injecting at home and already having a safe place to inject. The SIF services most commonly used were needle exchange and nursing services. The SIF appears to have attracted a high-risk subpopulation of HIV-positive IDUs; this coverage perhaps could be extended with the addition of HIV- specific services such as disease monitoring and the provision of antiretroviral therapy. PMID:22010805

  4. Survival Tactics and Strategies of Methamphetamine-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in San Diego.

    PubMed

    Gideonse, Theodore K

    2015-01-01

    In this article, two ways that HIV-positive drug users survive under the supervision of law enforcement agencies, community health organizations, and social welfare offices are differentiated. First, strategies are long-ranging and often carefully planned, and they involve conscious utilization and manipulation of bureaucratic processes. Second, tactics are short-ranging and often haphazard, and they are used to survive on daily or weekly bases, with entrenched problems and structural solutions avoided or ignored. Data from three years of ethnographic fieldwork with 14 methamphetamine-using HIV-positive men who have sex with men in San Diego, California is used to expand upon these two categories, explaining the different, often ineffectual, ways these men accessed care, services, shelter, drugs, and companionship. This article also examines the policy implications of taking in consideration these different kinds of survival methods, arguing for intensive client-specific interventions when working with long-term addicts with multiple health problems. PMID:26421928

  5. Survival Tactics and Strategies of Methamphetamine-Using HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex with Men in San Diego

    PubMed Central

    Gideonse, Theodore K.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, two ways that HIV-positive drug users survive under the supervision of law enforcement agencies, community health organizations, and social welfare offices are differentiated. First, strategies are long-ranging and often carefully planned, and they involve conscious utilization and manipulation of bureaucratic processes. Second, tactics are short-ranging and often haphazard, and they are used to survive on daily or weekly bases, with entrenched problems and structural solutions avoided or ignored. Data from three years of ethnographic fieldwork with 14 methamphetamine-using HIV-positive men who have sex with men in San Diego, California is used to expand upon these two categories, explaining the different, often ineffectual, ways these men accessed care, services, shelter, drugs, and companionship. This article also examines the policy implications of taking in consideration these different kinds of survival methods, arguing for intensive client-specific interventions when working with long-term addicts with multiple health problems. PMID:26421928

  6. HIV disclosure patterns, predictors, and psychosocial correlates among HIV positive women in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rena; Ratner, Jamie; Gore-Felton, Cheryl; Kadzirange, Gerard; Woelk, Godfrey; Katzenstein, David

    2012-01-01

    Disclosure of positive HIV status in Sub-Saharan Africa has been associated with safer sexual practices and better antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence, but associations with psychosocial function are unclear. We examined patterns and psychosocial correlates of disclosure in a Zimbabwean community. Two hundred HIV positive women at different stages of initiating ART participated in a cross-sectional study examining actual disclosures, disclosure beliefs, perceived stigma, self-esteem, depression, and quality of life. Ninety-seven percent of the women disclosed to at least one person, 78% disclosed to their current husband/partner, with an average disclosure of four persons per woman. The majority (85-98%) of disclosures occurred in a positive manner and 72-95% of the individuals reacted positively. Factors significantly correlated with HIV disclosure to partners included being married, later age at menses, longer duration of HIV since diagnosis, being on ART, being more symptomatic at baseline, ever having used condoms, and greater number of partners in the last year. In multivariate analysis, being married and age at menses predicted disclosure to partners. Positive disclosure beliefs, but not the total number of disclosures, significantly correlated with lower perceived stigma (ρ = 0.44 for personalized subscale and ρ = 0.51 for public subscale, both p<0.0001), higher self-esteem (ρ = 0.15, p=0.04), and fewer depressive symptoms (ρ = -0.14, p=0.05). In conclusion, disclosure of positive HIV status among Zimbabwean women is common and is frequently met with positive reactions. Moreover, positive disclosure beliefs correlate significantly with psychosocial measures, including lower perceived stigma, higher self-esteem, and lower depression. PMID:21902570

  7. HIV Stigma and Missed Medications in HIV-Positive People in Five African Countries

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Priscilla S.; Wantland, Dean; Makoae, Lucy N.; Chirwa, Maureen; Kohi, Thecla W.; Greeff, Minrie; Naidoo, Joanne; Mullan, Joseph; Uys, Leana R.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The availability of antiretroviral medications has transformed living with HIV infection into a manageable chronic illness, and high levels of adherence are necessary. Stigma has been identified as one reason for missing medication doses. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between perceived HIV stigma and self-reported missed doses of antiretroviral medications in a 12-month, repeated measures cohort study conducted in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tanzania. Data were collected from 1457 HIV-positive individuals at three times between January 2006 and March 2007. Participants completed a series of questionnaires. Of the 1457 participants, 698 were taking ARVs during the study and are included in this analysis. There was a significant relationship between perceived HIV stigma and self-report of missed medications over time (t = 6.04, p ≤ 0.001). Individuals who reported missing more ARV medications also reported higher levels of perceived HIV stigma. Individuals reporting fewer medication worries reported decreased stigma over the one year period (t = −4.79, p ≤ 0.001). While those who reported increased symptom intensity also reported increased stigma initially (t = 8.67, p ≤ 0.001) that remained high over time. This study provides evidence of a significant and stable correlation that documents the relationship between perceived HIV stigma and self-reported reasons for missed medications over time. These findings suggest that part of the reason for poor adherence to ARV medications is linked to the stigma experienced by people living with HIV. PMID:19327098

  8. Rational interleukin 2 therapy for HIV positive individuals: daily low doses enhance immune function without toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, E L; Pilaro, F; Smith, K A

    1996-01-01

    When administered in high doses to HIV positive (HIV+) individuals, interleukin 2 (IL-2) causes extreme toxicity and markedly increases plasma HIV levels. Integration of the information from the structure-activity relationships of the IL-2 receptor interaction, the cellular distribution of the different classes of IL-2 receptors, and the pharmacokinetics of IL-2 provides for the rationale that low IL-2 doses should circumvent toxicity. Therefore, to identify a nontoxic, but effective and safe IL-2 treatment regimen that does not stimulate viral replication, doses of IL-2 from 62,500 to 250,000 IU/m2/day were administered subcutaneously for 6 months to 16 HIV+ individuals with 200-500 CD4+ T cells/mm3. IL-2 was already detectable in the plasma of most HIV+ individuals even before therapy. Peak plasma IL-2 levels were near saturating for high affinity IL-2 receptors in 10 individuals who received the maximum nontoxic dose, which ranged from 187,500 to 250,000 IU/m2/day. During the 6 months of treatment at this dose range, plasma levels of proinflammatory cytokines remained undetectable, and plasma HIV RNA levels did not change significantly. However, delayed type hypersensitivity responses to common recall antigens were markedly augmented, and there were IL-2 dose-dependent increases in circulating Natural Killer cells, eosinophils, monocytes, and CD4+ T cells. Expanded clinical trials of low dose IL-2 are now warranted, especially in combination with effective antivirals to test for the prevention of immunodeficiency and the emergence of drug-resistant mutants and for the eradication of residual virions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8816813

  9. HIV stigma and missed medications in HIV-positive people in five African countries.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, Priscilla S; Wantland, Dean; Makoae, Lucy N; Chirwa, Maureen; Kohi, Thecla W; Greeff, Minrie; Naidoo, Joanne; Mullan, Joseph; Uys, Leana R; Holzemer, William L

    2009-05-01

    The availability of antiretroviral medications has transformed living with HIV infection into a manageable chronic illness, and high levels of adherence are necessary. Stigma has been identified as one reason for missing medication doses. The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between perceived HIV stigma and self-reported missed doses of antiretroviral medications in a 12-month, repeated measures cohort study conducted in Lesotho, Malawi, South Africa, Swaziland, and Tanzania. Data were collected from 1457 HIV-positive individuals at three times between January 2006 and March 2007. Participants completed a series of questionnaires. Of the 1457 participants, 698 were taking ARVs during the study and are included in this analysis. There was a significant relationship between perceived HIV stigma and self-report of missed medications over time (t = 6.04, p

  10. Pregnancy is associated with elevation of liver enzymes in HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    HUNTINGTON, Susie; THORNE, Claire; NEWELL, Marie-Louise; ANDERSON, Jane; TAYLOR, Graham P; PILLAY, Deenan; HILL, Teresa; TOOKEY, Pat A; SABIN, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess whether pregnancy is associated with an increased risk of liver enzyme elevation (LEE) and severe LEE in HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy (ART). Design Two observational studies; the UK Collaborative HIV Cohort (UK CHIC) study and the UK and Ireland National Study of HIV in Pregnancy and Childhood (NSHPC). Methods Combined data from UK CHIC and NSHPC were used to identify factors associated with LEE (grade 1-4) and severe LEE (grade 3-4). Women starting ART in 2000-2012 were included irrespective of pregnancy status. Cox proportional hazards were used to assess fixed and time-dependent covariates including pregnancy status, CD4 count, drug regimen and hepatitis B/C (HBV/HCV) co-infection. Results One-quarter (25.7%, 982/3815) of women were pregnant during follow-up; 14.2% (n=541) when starting ART. The rate of LEE was 14.5/100 person-years (PY) in and 6.0/100 PY outside of pregnancy. The rate of severe LEE was 3.9/100 PY in and 0.6/100 PY outside of pregnancy. The risk of LEE and severe LEE was increased during pregnancy (LEE: aHR 1.66 [1.31-2.09]; severe LEE: aHR 3.57 [2.30-5.54]), including in secondary analyses excluding 541 women pregnant when starting ART. Other factors associated with LEE and severe LEE included lower CD4 count (<250 cells/mm3), HBV/HCV co-infection and calendar year. Conclusions Although few women developed severe LEE, this study provides further evidence that pregnancy is associated with increased risk of LEE and severe LEE, reinforcing the need for regular monitoring of liver biomarkers during pregnancy. PMID:25710412

  11. Functional analysis of 'a' determinant mutations associated with occult HBV in HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Powell, Eleanor A; Boyce, Ceejay L; Gededzha, Maemu P; Selabe, Selokela G; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey; Blackard, Jason T

    2016-07-01

    Occult hepatitis B is defined by the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA in the absence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Occult HBV is associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma, reactivation during immune suppression, and virus transmission. Viral mutations contribute significantly to the occult HBV phenotype. Mutations in the 'a' determinant of HBsAg are of particular interest, as these mutations are associated with immune escape, vaccine escape and diagnostic failure. We examined the effects of selected occult HBV-associated mutations identified in a population of HIV-positive South Africans on HBsAg production in vitro. Mutations were inserted into two different chronic HBV backbones and transfected into a hepatocyte-derived cell line. HBsAg levels were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), while the detectability of mutant HBsAg was determined using an HA-tagged HBsAg expression system. Of the seven mutations analysed, four (S132P, C138Y, N146D and C147Y) resulted in decreased HBsAg expression in one viral background but not in the second viral background. One mutation (N146D) led to a decrease in HBsAg detected as compared to HA-tag, indicating that this mutation compromises the ability of the ELISA to detect HBsAg. The contribution of occult-associated mutations to the HBsAg-negative phenotype of occult HBV cannot be determined adequately by testing the effect of the mutation in a single viral background, and rigorous analysis of these mutations is required. PMID:27031988

  12. Analysis of the Endogenous Deoxynucleoside Triphosphate Pool in HIV-Positive and -Negative Individuals Receiving Tenofovir-Emtricitabine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinhui; Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R; Seifert, Sharon M; McAllister, Kevin B; Zheng, Jia-Hua; Bushman, Lane R; MaWhinney, Samantha; Anderson, Peter L

    2016-09-01

    Tenofovir (TFV) disoproxil fumarate (TDF) and emtricitabine (FTC), two nucleos(t)ide analogs (NA), are coformulated as an anti-HIV combination tablet for treatment and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP). TDF/FTC may have effects on the deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP) pool due to their similar structures and similar metabolic pathways. We carried out a comprehensive clinical study to characterize the effects of TDF/FTC on the endogenous dNTP pool, from baseline to 30 days of TDF/FTC therapy, in both treatment-naive HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals. dATP, dCTP, dGTP, and TTP were quantified in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) with a validated liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methodology. Forty individuals (19 HIV-positive) were enrolled and underwent a baseline visit and then received TDF/FTC for at least 30 days. Longitudinal measurements were analyzed using mixed-model segmented linear regression analysis. The dNTPs were reduced by 14% to 37% relative to the baseline level within 3 days in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals (P ≤ 0.003). These reductions persisted to various degrees at day 30. These findings indicate that dNTP pools are influenced by TDF/FTC therapy. This may alter cellular homeostasis and could increase the antiviral effect through a more favorable analog/dNTP ratio. Further work is needed to elucidate mechanisms, to evaluate the clinical significance of these findings, and to further probe differences between HIV-negative and HIV-positive individuals. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT01040091.). PMID:27353267

  13. Dating, marriage, and parenthood for HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men: normalizing perspectives on everyday life with HIV.

    PubMed

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2015-03-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

  14. Changes in plasma viral load and penile viral shedding after circumcision among HIV-positive men in Kisumu, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    ODOYO-JUNE, Elijah; ROGERS, John H.; JAOKO, Walter; BAILEY, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background We conducted a prospective cohort study of HIV-positive men ages 18-35 years in Kisumu, Kenya to determine if medical circumcision of ART-naïve HIV-positive men leads to increased viral load and penile viral shedding. Methods From 108 HIV-positive men circumcised by forceps guided method and followed-up weekly for six weeks, 29 were evaluated for penile viral shedding. HIV-1 RNA was measured in plasma from 19 men and in penile lavage samples from 29 men. Samples were collected before circumcision and at weekly intervals for six weeks or until the circumcision wound was healed. CD4+ t-cell counts from 102 HIV-positive men were determined at baseline and at 2 weeks thereafter. Wounds with healthy scar, no scab or opening and no suture tracks were deemed healed. Results Among 65 ART-naive men, mean CD4+t-cell count increased from 417 cells/mm3 at baseline to 456 cells/ mm3 after 2 weeks (p= 0.04), but did not change in the 37 men on ART (p=0.81). There was no change in HIV plasma viral load (p=0.36), but penile viral shedding rose significantly within one week after circumcision then declined to undetectable levels by 6 weeks (MANOVA; p<0.001). In 28 of 29 men (96.6%), there was no detectable viral shedding after certification of wound healing. Conclusion Medical circumcision among ART-naïve HIV-infected men results in a transitory rise in penile viral shedding before complete wound healing, which should pose no additional risk of HIV transmission if men adhere to six weeks post-circumcision sexual abstinence and use condoms consistently. PMID:23933768

  15. Dating, Marriage, and Parenthood for HIV-Positive Heterosexual Puerto Rican Men: Normalizing Perspectives on Everyday Life With HIV

    PubMed Central

    Sastre, Francisco; Sheehan, Diana M.; Gonzalez, Arnaldo

    2014-01-01

    HIV-positive men are living long and healthier lives while managing HIV as a chronic illness. Although research has extensively documented the experiences of illness of people living with HIV, dating, marriage, and fatherhood among heterosexual Latino men has not been examined. To address this gap, this study used a qualitative study design to examine patterns and strategies for dating, marriage, and parenthood among 24 HIV-positive heterosexual Puerto Rican men living in Boston. The findings in our study indicate that an HIV diagnosis does not necessarily deter men from having an active sexual life, marrying, or having children. In fact, for some of the men, engaging in these social and life-changing events is part of moving on and normalizing life with HIV; these men planned for, achieved, and interpreted these events in the context of establishing normalcy with HIV. Although the HIV diagnosis discouraged some men from engaging in sexual relations, getting married, or having children, others fulfilled these desires with strategies aimed to reconciling their HIV status in their personal life, including dating or marrying HIV-positive women only. Additional important themes identified in this study include the decision to disclose HIV status to new sexual partners as well as the decision to accept the risk of HIV transmission to a child or partner in order to fulfill desires of fatherhood. Understanding the personal struggles, decision-making patterns, and needs of HIV-positive heterosexual men can aid in designing interventions that support healthy living with HIV. PMID:24794822

  16. The converging and diverging characteristics of HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men in the Australian Gay Community Periodic Surveys, 2000-2009.

    PubMed

    Holt, Martin; Lee, Evelyn; Prestage, Garrett P; Zablotska, Iryna; de Wit, John; Mao, Limin

    2013-01-01

    To assess the changing health promotion needs of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive gay men in Australia, we analysed the social and behavioural characteristics of HIV-positive men in the Australian Gay Community Periodic Surveys. We looked at change over time in the characteristics of HIV-positive men (from 2000-2001 to 2008-2009) and compared HIV-positive men with their HIV-negative peers within each time period. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to assess independent changes over time within each HIV status group. A total of 21,620 responses were included in the analyses; 10,537 in 2000-2001 and 11,083 in 2008-2009. Between the two time periods, HIV-positive and HIV-negative men became more similar in the following areas: paid employment, sexual identity, number of male sex partners, the likelihood of having a regular male partner and having a seroconcordant regular male partner. The two groups diverged in these areas: age, ethnicity, educational level, social engagement with gay men, types of relationship with regular male partners, likelihood of unprotected anal intercourse with casual male partners and likelihood of HIV disclosure to casual male partners. Workforce participation and educational attainment have improved among HIV-positive gay men since 2000, but they still lag behind their HIV-negative peers in these areas. Because HIV-positive men are an ageing cohort, support services will need to increasingly address issues of HIV, sexuality and ageing with HIV-positive men. The increase in unprotected anal intercourse and HIV disclosure with casual partners means that education and support services will increasingly need to address effective HIV disclosure and non-condom-based risk reduction strategies with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative gay men. PMID:22639958

  17. HIV-Positive Men's Experiences with Integrated Family Planning and HIV Services in Western Kenya: Integration Fosters Male Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Sarah; Grossman, Daniel; Steinfeld, Rachel; Onono, Maricianah; Cohen, Craig; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Newmann, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A growing body of evidence indicates that integrating family planning (FP) services into HIV care is effective at improving contraceptive uptake among HIV-positive women in resource-poor settings, yet little research has examined HIV-positive men's experiences with such integration. We conducted in-depth interviews with 21 HIV-positive men seeking care at HIV clinics in Nyanza, Kenya. All clinics were intervention sites for a FP/HIV service integration cluster-randomized trial. Grounded theory was used to code and analyze the data. Our findings highlight men's motivations for FP, reasons why men prefer obtaining their FP services, which include education, counseling, and commodities, at HIV care clinics, and specific ways in which integrated FP/HIV services fostered male inclusion in FP decision-making. In conclusion, men appear invested in FP and their inclusion in FP decision-making may bolster both female and male agency. Men's positive attitudes towards FP being provided at HIV care clinics supports the programmatic push towards integrated delivery models for FP and HIV services. PMID:24927494

  18. HIV-positive men's experiences with integrated family planning and HIV services in western Kenya: integration fosters male involvement.

    PubMed

    Patel, Rena; Baum, Sarah; Grossman, Daniel; Steinfeld, Rachel; Onono, Maricianah; Cohen, Craig; Bukusi, Elizabeth; Newmann, Sara

    2014-08-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that integrating family planning (FP) services into HIV care is effective at improving contraceptive uptake among HIV-positive women in resource-poor settings, yet little research has examined HIV-positive men's experiences with such integration. We conducted in-depth interviews with 21 HIV-positive men seeking care at HIV clinics in Nyanza, Kenya. All clinics were intervention sites for a FP/HIV service integration cluster-randomized trial. Grounded theory was used to code and analyze the data. Our findings highlight men's motivations for FP, reasons why men prefer obtaining their FP services, which include education, counseling, and commodities, at HIV care clinics, and specific ways in which integrated FP/HIV services fostered male inclusion in FP decision-making. In conclusion, men appear invested in FP and their inclusion in FP decision-making may bolster both female and male agency. Men's positive attitudes towards FP being provided at HIV care clinics supports the programmatic push towards integrated delivery models for FP and HIV services. PMID:24927494

  19. Anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing among gay and bisexual men.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Omar; Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-12-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner's HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  20. Considering Care-Seeking Behaviors Reveals Important Differences Among HIV-Positive Women Not Engaged in Care: Implications for Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Jason J.; Verdecias, Niko; Cunningham, Chinazo O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We sought to examine characteristics of HIV-positive women with varying levels of engagement in care and care-seeking behaviors. From 2010 to 2013, in a multi-site US-based study of engagement in care among HIV-positive women, we conducted baseline interviews, which included socio-demographic, clinical, and risk behavior characteristics, and barriers to care. We used multinomial logistic regression to compare differences among three distinct categories of 748 women: engaged in care; not engaged in care, but seeking care (“seekers”); and not engaged in care and not seeking care (“non-seekers”). Compared with women in care, seekers were more likely to be uninsured and to report fair or poor health status. In contrast, non-seekers were not only more likely to be uninsured, but, also, to report current high-risk drug use and sexual behaviors, and less likely to report transportation as a barrier to care. Examining care-seeking behaviors among HIV-positive women not engaged in care revealed important differences in high-risk behaviors. Because non-seekers represent a particularly vulnerable population of women who are not engaged in care, interventions targeting this population likely need to address drug use and be community-based given their limited interaction with the health care system. PMID:25561307

  1. Considering care-seeking behaviors reveals important differences among HIV-positive women not engaged in care: implications for intervention.

    PubMed

    Blackstock, Oni J; Blank, Arthur E; Fletcher, Jason J; Verdecias, Niko; Cunningham, Chinazo O

    2015-01-01

    We sought to examine characteristics of HIV-positive women with varying levels of engagement in care and care-seeking behaviors. From 2010 to 2013, in a multi-site US-based study of engagement in care among HIV-positive women, we conducted baseline interviews, which included socio-demographic, clinical, and risk behavior characteristics, and barriers to care. We used multinomial logistic regression to compare differences among three distinct categories of 748 women: engaged in care; not engaged in care, but seeking care ("seekers"); and not engaged in care and not seeking care ("non-seekers"). Compared with women in care, seekers were more likely to be uninsured and to report fair or poor health status. In contrast, non-seekers were not only more likely to be uninsured, but, also, to report current high-risk drug use and sexual behaviors, and less likely to report transportation as a barrier to care. Examining care-seeking behaviors among HIV-positive women not engaged in care revealed important differences in high-risk behaviors. Because non-seekers represent a particularly vulnerable population of women who are not engaged in care, interventions targeting this population likely need to address drug use and be community-based given their limited interaction with the health care system. PMID:25561307

  2. Anticipated and Actual Reactions to Receiving HIV Positive Results Through Self-Testing Among Gay and Bisexual Men

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Ibitoye, Mobolaji; Frasca, Timothy; Brown, William; Balan, Iván

    2014-01-01

    We explored anticipated and actual reactions to receiving HIV positive results through self-testing with a diverse group of 84 gay and bisexual men in New York City. Grounded Theory was used to investigate these reactions in a two-phase study, one hypothetical, followed by a practical phase in which self-tests were distributed and used. Three major themes emerged when participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to an HIV positive self-test result: managing emotional distress, obtaining HIV medical care, and postponing sexual activity. When participants were asked about their anticipated reactions to a partner’s HIV positive self-test result, five themes emerged: provide emotional support; refrain from engaging in sex with casual partner; avoid high-risk sexual activity with both main and casual partners; seek medical services; and obtain a confirmatory test result. Although none of the participants tested positive, seven of their partners did. Participants provided emotional support and linked their partners to support services. The availability of HIV self-testing kits offers potential opportunities to tackle HIV infection among individuals with high-risk practices. PMID:24858480

  3. Infant feeding counselling in Uganda in a changing environment with focus on the general population and HIV-positive mothers - a mixed method approach

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Health workers' counselling practices are essential to improve infant feeding practices. This paper will assess how infant feeding counselling was done and experienced by counsellors and mothers in Eastern Uganda in the context of previous guidelines. This has implications for implementation of the new infant feeding guidelines from 2009. Methods This paper combines qualitative and quantitative data from Mbale District in Eastern Uganda. Data was collected from 2003 to 2005 in a mixed methods approach. This includes: key-informant interviews among eighteen health workers in the public hospital, health clinics and non-governmental organisations working with people living with HIV, fifteen focus group discussions in the general population and among clients from an HIV clinic, two cross-sectional surveys including 727 mothers from the general population and 235 HIV-positive mothers. Results The counselling sessions were often improvised. Health workers frequently had pragmatic approaches to infant feeding as many clients struggled with poverty, stigma and non-disclosure of HIV. The feasibility of the infant feeding recommendations was perceived as challenging among health workers, both for HIV-positive mothers and in the general population. Group counselling with large groups was common in the public health service. Some extra infant feeding teaching capacities were mobilised for care-takers of undernourished children. A tendency to simplify messages giving one-sided information was seen. Different health workers presented contradicting simplified perspectives in some cases. Outdated training was a common concern with many health workers not being given courses or seminars on infant feeding since professional graduation. Other problems were minimal staffing, lack of resources, and programs being started and subsequently stopped abruptly. Many of the HIV-counsellors in the non-governmental organisations got extended training in counselling which seemed to be

  4. A rapid assessment of post-disclosure experiences of urban HIV-positive and HIV-negative school-aged children in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited involvement of HIV-negative children in HIV disclosure studies; most studies conducted on the effects of disclosure on children have been with HIV-positive children and HIV-positive mother-child dyads. Seven HIV-positive and five HIV-negative children participated in a larger study conducted to understand the lived experiences of HIV-positive parents and their children during the disclosure process in Kenya. In this study, the experiences of these 12 children after receiving disclosure of their own and their parents’ illnesses respectively are presented. Each child underwent an in-depth qualitative semi-structured digitally recorded interview. The recorded interviews were transcribed and loaded into NVivo8 for phenomenological data analysis. Five themes emerged from the data, indicating that HIV-positive and negative children appear to have differing post-disclosure experiences revolving around acceptance of illness, stigma and discrimination, medication consumption, sexual awareness, and use of coping mechanisms. Following disclosure, HIV-negative children accepted their parents’ illnesses within a few hours to a few weeks; HIV-positive children took weeks to months to accept their own illnesses. HIV-negative children knew of high levels of stigma and discrimination within the community; HIV-positive children reported experiencing indirect incidences of stigma and discrimination. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to take their medications, stay healthy, and pay their school fees so they could have a better life in the future; HIV-positive children viewed medication consumption as an ordeal necessary to keep them healthy. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to speak to them about sexual-related matters; HIV-positive children had lingering questions about relationships, use of condoms, marriage, and childbearing options. All but one preadolescent HIV-positive child had self-identified a person to speak with for social

  5. A rapid assessment of post-disclosure experiences of urban HIV-positive and HIV-negative school-aged children in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Gachanja, Grace

    2015-01-01

    There has been limited involvement of HIV-negative children in HIV disclosure studies; most studies conducted on the effects of disclosure on children have been with HIV-positive children and HIV-positive mother-child dyads. Seven HIV-positive and five HIV-negative children participated in a larger study conducted to understand the lived experiences of HIV-positive parents and their children during the disclosure process in Kenya. In this study, the experiences of these 12 children after receiving disclosure of their own and their parents' illnesses respectively are presented. Each child underwent an in-depth qualitative semi-structured digitally recorded interview. The recorded interviews were transcribed and loaded into NVivo8 for phenomenological data analysis. Five themes emerged from the data, indicating that HIV-positive and negative children appear to have differing post-disclosure experiences revolving around acceptance of illness, stigma and discrimination, medication consumption, sexual awareness, and use of coping mechanisms. Following disclosure, HIV-negative children accepted their parents' illnesses within a few hours to a few weeks; HIV-positive children took weeks to months to accept their own illnesses. HIV-negative children knew of high levels of stigma and discrimination within the community; HIV-positive children reported experiencing indirect incidences of stigma and discrimination. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to take their medications, stay healthy, and pay their school fees so they could have a better life in the future; HIV-positive children viewed medication consumption as an ordeal necessary to keep them healthy. HIV-negative children wanted their parents to speak to them about sexual-related matters; HIV-positive children had lingering questions about relationships, use of condoms, marriage, and childbearing options. All but one preadolescent HIV-positive child had self-identified a person to speak with for social support

  6. Overall and cause-specific excess mortality in HIV-positive persons compared with the general population: Role of HCV coinfection.

    PubMed

    Alejos, Belén; Hernando, Victoria; Iribarren, Jose; Gonzalez-García, Juan; Hernando, Asuncion; Santos, Jesus; Asensi, Victor; Gomez-Berrocal, Ana; Del Amo, Julia; Jarrin, Inma

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to estimate overall and cause-specific excess mortality of HIV-positive patients compared with the general population, and to assess the effect of risk factors.We included patients aged >19 years, recruited from January 1, 2004 to May 31, 2014 in Cohort of the Spanish Network on HIV/AIDS Research. We used generalized linear models with Poisson error structure to model excess mortality rates.In 10,340 patients, 368 deaths occurred. Excess mortality was 0.82 deaths per 100 person-years for all-cause mortality, 0.11 for liver, 0.08 for non-AIDS-defining malignancies (NADMs), 0.08 for non-AIDS infections, and 0.02 for cardiovascular-related causes. Lower CD4 count and higher HIV viral load, lower education, being male, and over 50 years were predictors of overall excess mortality. Short-term (first year follow-up) overall excess hazard ratio (eHR) for subjects with AIDS at entry was 3.71 (95% confidence interval [CI] 2.66, 5.19) and 1.37 (95% CI 0.87, 2.15) for hepatitis C virus (HCV)-coinfected; medium/long-term eHR for AIDS at entry was 0.90 (95% CI 0.58, 1.39) and 3.83 (95% CI 2.37, 6.19) for HCV coinfection. Liver excess mortality was associated with low CD4 counts and HCV coinfection. Patients aged ≥50 years and HCV-coinfected showed higher NADM excess mortality, and HCV-coinfected patients showed increased non-AIDS infections excess mortality.Overall, liver, NADM, non-AIDS infections, and cardiovascular excesses of mortality associated with being HIV-positive were found, and HCV coinfection and immunodeficiency played significant roles. Differential short and medium/long-term effects of AIDS at entry and HCV coinfection were found for overall excess mortality. PMID:27603368

  7. Determinants of hospital admission among HIV-positive people in British Columbia

    PubMed Central

    Weber, A E; Yip, B; O'Shaughnessy, M V; Montaner, J S; Hogg, R S

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was initiated to evaluate the demographic and clinical determinants of admission to hospital among HIV-positive men and women receiving antiretroviral therapy in British Columbia. METHODS: The analysis was restricted to participants enrolled in the HIV/AIDS Drug Treatment Program between September 1992 and March 1997 who had completed an annual participant survey, had a viral load determination and had signed a consent form allowing electronic access to their inpatient hospital records. A record linkage was conducted with the BC Ministry of Health to obtain all records of hospital admissions from April 1991 to March 1997. Statistical analyses were carried out using parametric and nonparametric methods and multivariate logistic analyses. RESULTS: The study sample comprised 947 participants (859 men, 88 women). Of these, 165 (17%) were admitted to hospital during the study period from May 1, 1996, to Mar. 31, 1997. The median number of admissions was 1 (interquartile range [IQR] 1-2 admissions), and the median length of stay per admission was 3 days (IQR 1-8 days). Admission to hospital was associated with being unemployed (82% of those admitted v. 58% of those not admitted), being an injection drug user (24% v. 17%), reporting a fair or poor health status (46% v. 29%) and having a physician experienced in the management of HIV/AIDS (31% v. 24%). Examination of clinical determinants demonstrated that hospital admission was associated with a previous admission (72% v. 46%), a high viral load (median 74,000 v. 14,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL), a low CD4 count (median 0.16 v. 0.27 x 10(9)/L) and an AIDS diagnosis (44% v. 24%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that being admitted to hospital was independently associated with being unemployed (odds ratio [OR] 2.64, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.66-4.20), having been previously admitted to hospital (OR 2.30, 95% CI 1.53-3.46), having a high viral load at baseline (OR 1.45, 95% CI 1

  8. HIV-positive pregnant and postpartum women's perspectives about Option B+ in Malawi: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Katirayi, Leila; Namadingo, Hazel; Phiri, Mafayo; Bobrow, Emily A; Ahimbisibwe, Allan; Berhan, Aida Yemane; Buono, Nicole; Moland, Karen Marie; Tylleskär, Thorkild

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The implementation of lifelong antiretroviral treatment (ART) for all pregnant women (Option B+) in Malawi has resulted in a significant increase in the number of HIV-positive pregnant women initiating treatment. However, research has highlighted the challenge of retaining newly initiated women in care. This study explores barriers and facilitators that affect a woman's decision to initiate and to adhere to Option B+. Methods A total of 39 in-depth interviews and 16 focus group discussions were conducted. Eligible women were ≥18 years old, living with HIV and either pregnant and receiving antenatal care from a study site or had delivered a child within the last 18 months, breastfed their child and received services at one of the study sites. Eligible women were identified by healthcare workers (HCWs) in the antenatal clinic and ART unit. Focus groups were also conducted with HCWs employed in these departments. Qualitative data were analyzed using Maxqda version 10 (VERBI Software, Berlin, Germany). Results The general perception towards the drug regimen used in Option B+ was positive; women reported fewer side effects and acknowledged the positive benefits of ART. Women felt hopeful about prolonging their life and having an HIV-uninfected baby, yet grappled with the fact that ART is a lifelong commitment. Women and HCWs discussed challenges with the counselling services for prevention of mother-to-child HIV transmission under the new Option B+ guidelines, and many women struggled with initiating ART on the same day as learning their HIV status. Women wanted to discuss their circumstances with their husbands first, receive a CD4 count and obtain an HIV test at another facility to confirm their HIV status. HCWs expressed concern that women might just agree to take the drugs to please them. HCWs also discussed concerns around loss to follow-up and drug resistance. Conclusions Although Option B+ has significantly increased the number of women initiating

  9. Diversity and Antibiograms of Bacterial Organisms Isolated from Samples of Household Drinking-water Consumed by HIV-positive Individuals in Rural Settings, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mashao, M.B.; Bessong, P.O.; NKgau, T.F.; Momba, M.N.B.; Obi, C.L.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a hallmark of HIV infections in developing countries, and many diarrhoea-causing agents are often transmitted through water. The objective of the study was to determine the diversity and antibiotic susceptibility profiles of bacterial organisms isolated from samples of household drinking-water consumed by HIV-infected and AIDS patients. In the present study, household water stored for use by HIV-positive patients was tested for microbial quality, and isolated bacterial organisms were analyzed for their susceptibility profiles against 25 different antibiotics. The microbial quality of water was generally poor, and about 58% of water samples (n=270) were contaminated with faecal coliforms, with counts varying from 2 colony-forming unit (CFU)/100 mL to 2.4×104 CFU/100 mL. Values of total coliform counts ranged from 17 CFU/100 mL to 7.9×105/100 mL. In total, 37 different bacterial species were isolated, and the major isolates included Acinetobacter lwoffii (7.5%), Enterobacter cloacae (7.5%), Shigella spp. (14.2%), Yersinia enterocolitica (6.7%), and Pseudomonas spp. (16.3%). No Vibrio cholerae could be isolated; however, V. fluvialis was isolated from three water samples. The isolated organisms were highly resistant to cefazolin (83.5%), cefoxitin (69.2%), ampicillin (66.4%), and cefuroxime (66.2%). Intermediate resistance was observed against gentamicin (10.6%), cefepime (13.4%), ceftriaxone (27.6%), and cefotaxime (29.9%). Levofloxacin (0.7%), ceftazidime (2.2%), meropenem (3%), and ciprofloxacin (3.7%) were the most active antibiotics against all the microorganisms, with all recording less than 5% resistance. Multiple drug resistance was very common, and 78% of the organisms were resistant to three or more antibiotics. Education on treatment of household water is advised for HIV-positive patients, and measures should be taken to improve point-of-use water treatment as immunosuppressed individuals would be more susceptible to opportunistic infections

  10. Contraceptive practices amongst HIV-positive women on antiretroviral therapy attending an ART clinic in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Andrew; van der Linde, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective contraceptive practices amongst HIV-positive women of reproductive age have been shown to reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV by preventing unplanned pregnancies. However, most antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes focus on treatment, neglecting comprehensive contraceptive services. This results in a high frequency of pregnancies amongst HIV-positive women attending the ART clinic of a regional hospital north of Durban. Objectives This research aimed to explore contraceptive use amongst HIV-positive women attending an ART clinic by determining, (1) prevalence of contraceptive use, (2) pregnancy rate, (3) contraceptive preferences and (4) factors associated with contraceptive use. Methods In this observational, analytical, cross-sectional study of 420 women, aged 15 to 49 years, participants were selected by systematic random sampling. They completed standardised questionnaires. Results Of all participants, 95% of the participants used contraception. Factors associated with contraceptive practice were knowledge of HIV status 292 (72.8%), health worker advice 84 (20.9%), and spousal insistence 33 (8.2%). Of the 130 women (31%) who had fallen pregnant whilst on ART, 73 (56.2%) said that the pregnancy had been unplanned, whilst 57 (43.8%) had wanted to fall pregnant because of: partner's insistence (45.6%), desire for a child (36.8%), desire to conceal HIV status (15.8%), not wanting to die childless (5.3%), and death of a previous child (1.8%). Conclusion Contraceptive use amongst these women was high but the number of pregnancies is a cause for concern. Information regarding contraceptive use should therefore be provided at all ART clinics.

  11. Experiences of breastfeeding and vulnerability among a group of HIV-positive women in Durban, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Seidel, G; Sewpaul, V; Dano, B

    2000-03-01

    While international guidelines are currently being drawn up about HIV and infant feeding practices, and national and regional guidelines are under discussion in South Africa, there have been remarkably few studies that have sought to elicit HIV-positive mothers' experiences of breastfeeding and of paediatric infection. There is an urgent need to document this 'grass roots' knowledge in different sites, and for this data to be used to inform policy development, and for advocacy and counselling purposes. This qualitative investigation reports on the experiences and decisions taken around breastfeeding by a peer support group of 13 HIV-positive mothers meeting at King Edward VIII Hospital, Durban. In this study, the particular focus of information-giving and decision-making as to breast or formula feed is concerned with the impact on individual HIV-positive women and their babies. The most significant finding is that at no stage during their pregnancy were any of these mothers given information about the risks of HIV transmission through breastmilk. The study data were elicited in an in-depth group discussion, and individual women were invited to re-enact their stories in a follow-up discussion for clarification purposes. The women also discussed how they dealt with problems surrounding confidentiality in cases where few have been able to disclose their status to the extended family. There have been renewed calls for further investment in counsellors, with an enhanced role for community activists as peer educators. While there are severe resource constraints and low morale among many overworked nurses, one of the general problems in hospital settings remains the vertical health paradigm. This does not accommodate women's experiences, preferences, social networks and lay knowledge, and inhibits many women from becoming full participants in decisions affecting their own and their family's health. PMID:10731232

  12. Women want Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis but are Advised Against it by Their HIV-positive Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Goparaju, Lakshmi; Experton, Laure S; Praschan, Nathan C; Warren-Jeanpiere, Lari; Young, Mary A; Kassaye, Seble

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The latest advancement in HIV prevention, Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), could reduce incidence among women. However, PrEP uptake has remained low among US women since its approval in 2012, while use has increased among men who have sex with men. This study addresses women’s knowledge, attitudes and potential behaviors regarding PrEP. While HIV-negative women are the potential users of antiretroviral (ARV) medications for PrEP, HIV-positive women who have used ARVs could contribute immensely to our understanding of the complexities related to taking such medications. This study is the first to synthesize the opinions of both groups of women. Methods We conducted eight focus group discussions, segregated by sero-status; four with at-risk HIV-negative (20) and four with HIV-positive (19) women in Washington DC during 2014. Topics discussed include PrEP awareness, likelihood of use, barriers and target populations. Results PrEP awareness was almost non-existent and the HIV-negative women urged publicity. They expressed much enthusiasm about PrEP and wanted to use and recommend it to others despite recognizing potential complexities related to taking PrEP, such as side effects, access, duration and frequency of use. HIV-positive women were less supportive of PrEP for those same reasons based on their experience with taking ARVs. They preferred condoms over PrEP given relative efficacy, affordability, accessibility, and prevention of other STIs. Conclusions There is an urgent need for PrEP public health campaigns catered to the needs and concerns of women, most importantly bolster their awareness of PrEP. PMID:27019765

  13. "They give us hope": HIV-positive caregivers' perspectives on the role of social support for health.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa; Wild, Lauren; Kuo, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    A number of studies indicate that social support is associated with better health outcomes among HIV-positive caregivers of children, suggesting its potential importance for interventions aimed at safeguarding the well-being of this population. However, there is very little published literature assessing the support-health relationship or evaluating applied social support interventions with HIV-positive populations in HIV-endemic contexts of the developing world. The global literature on social support and health suggests that, in order to refine theory and improve interventions, greater attention should be paid to specific dimensions of support, such as types and sources, as well as the processes through which support may be affecting health outcomes. This article presents and discusses data from in-depth interviews with 12 HIV-positive primary caregivers of children living in an HIV-endemic, low-resourced, urban South African community. The primary aim of this qualitative work was to provide further insight into survey findings of a positive relationship between social support and self-reported general health and functioning, by exploring caregivers' personal experiences of being supported within their community, and their perceptions on how this "informal" support may be influencing their health. Our qualitative data highlight the importance of instrumental and emotional support for this population, the relevance of support provider characteristics and some of the processes or pathways that are likely explaining the support-health link. These processes include psychological factors such as mastery and hope, coping strategies and positive health behaviours. We provide recommendations for future research to further this work, and discuss implications for health interventions. PMID:23356672

  14. Punitive policing and associated substance use risks among HIV-positive people in Russia who inject drugs

    PubMed Central

    Lunze, Karsten; Raj, Anita; Cheng, Debbie M.; Quinn, Emily K.; Bridden, Carly; Blokhina, Elena; Walley, Alexander Y.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Samet, Jeffrey H.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Drug law enforcement is part of the HIV risk environment among people who inject drugs (PWID). Punitive policing practices such as extrajudicial arrests for needle possession and police planting of drugs have been described anecdotally in Russia, but these experiences and their associations with risky drug behaviours have not been quantified. This study aims to quantify the burden of extrajudicial police arrests among a cohort of HIV-positive PWID in Russia and to explore its links to drug-related health outcomes. Methods In a cross-sectional study of 582 HIV-positive people with lifetime injection drug use (IDU) in St. Petersburg, Russia, we estimated the prevalence of self-reported extrajudicial police arrests. We used multiple logistic regression to evaluate associations between arrests and the following outcomes: overdose, recent IDU and receptive needle sharing. Findings This cohort's mean age was 29.8 years, 60.8% were male; 75.3% reported non-fatal drug overdose, 50.3% recent IDU and 47.3% receptive needle sharing. Extrajudicial arrests were reported by more than half (60.5%, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 56.5–64.5) and were associated with higher odds of non-fatal drug overdose (AOR 1.52, 95% CI: 1.02–2.25) but not with recent IDU (AOR 1.17, arrests were associated with receptive needle sharing (AOR 1.84, 95% CI: 1.09–3.09). Conclusions Extrajudicial police arrests were common among this cohort of Russian HIV-positive PWID and associated with non-fatal overdose and, among those with recent IDU, receptive needle sharing. As a part of the HIV risk environment of PWIDs, these practices might contribute to HIV transmission and overdose mortality. Further research is needed to relate these findings to the operational environment of law enforcement and to better understand how police interventions among PWIDs can improve the HIV risk environment. PMID:25014321

  15. Social Support and HIV-Status Disclosure to Friends and Family: Implications for HIV-Positive Youth

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sonia; Yamazaki, Michiyo; Harris, D. Robert; Harper, Gary W.; Ellen, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The fear of negative reactions from friends and family members affects many HIV-positive adolescents’ decisions regarding disclosure of their HIV status. The complex relationships and interplay among social support, fear of stigma, and disclosure of HIV status needs to be better understood among youth living with HIV. Methods Social support from friends and family members, and HIV status disclosure were examined among 402 youth, aged 12 to 24 years, living with HIV. Results In separate analyses, 1) HIV positive youth who reported more than one close friend, as well as 2) HIV positive youth who reported that friends and family members continued to socialize with them after disclosure of their HIV diagnosis, had higher levels of perceived social support overall (both p<0.05). Furthermore, perceived social support did not differ significantly between those participants for whom no family member knew their HIV status and those for whom at least one family member knew their status (p=0.13). Race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, education level, and current living situation were not associated with family's knowledge of the participants’ HIV infection status (p>0.07). Conclusion This investigation adds important information concerning youth living with HIV, whose early disclosure experiences may influence their resilience and future coping mechanisms regarding experienced stigma, and thus influence the length of time they conceal their HIV status, their decision to disclose their status, and potentially their decisions regarding treatment. Interventions and support systems to assist youth living with HIV with disclosure, as well as medical care, may improve their overall quality of life. PMID:25940217

  16. The impact of gender norms on condom use among HIV-positive adults in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Fladseth, Kristin; Gafos, Mitzy; Newell, Marie Louise; McGrath, Nuala

    2015-01-01

    Critical to preventing the spread of HIV is promoting condom use among HIV-positive individuals. Previous studies suggest that gender norms (social and cultural constructions of the ways that women and men are expected to behave) may be an important determinant of condom use. However, the relationship has not been evaluated among HIV-positive women and men in South Africa. We examined gender norms and condom use at last sex among 550 partnerships reported by 530 sexually-active HIV-positive women (372) and men (158) who had sought care, but not yet initiated antiretroviral therapy in a high HIV-prevalence rural setting in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa between January 2009 and March 2011. Participants enrolled in the cohort study completed a baseline questionnaire that detailed their socio-demographic characteristics, socio-economic circumstances, religion, HIV testing history and disclosure of HIV status, stigma, social capital, gender norms and self-efficacy. Gender norms did not statistically differ between women and men (p = 0.18). Overall, condoms were used at last sex in 58% of partnerships. Although participants disclosed their HIV status in 66% of the partnerships, 60% did not have knowledge of their partner's HIV status. In multivariable logistic regression, run separately for each sex, women younger than 26 years with more equitable gender norms were significantly more likely to have used a condom at last sex than those of the same age group with inequitable gender norms (OR = 8.88, 95% CI 2.95-26.75); the association between condom use and gender norms among women aged 26+ years and men of all ages was not statistically significant. Strategies to address gender inequity should be integrated into positive prevention interventions, particularly for younger women, and supported by efforts at a societal level to decrease gender inequality. PMID:25853870

  17. Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) in Clinical Trials: Is ‘In-Trial’ Guidance Lacking? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Kyte, Derek G.; Draper, Heather; Ives, Jonathan; Liles, Clive; Gheorghe, Adrian; Calvert, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient reported outcomes (PROs) are increasingly assessed in clinical trials, and guidelines are available to inform the design and reporting of such trials. However, researchers involved in PRO data collection report that specific guidance on ‘in-trial’ activity (recruitment, data collection and data inputting) and the management of ‘concerning’ PRO data (i.e., data which raises concern for the well-being of the trial participant) appears to be lacking. The purpose of this review was to determine the extent and nature of published guidelines addressing these areas. Methods and Findings Systematic review of 1,362 articles identified 18 eligible papers containing ‘in-trial’ guidelines. Two independent authors undertook a qualitative content analysis of the selected papers. Guidelines presented in each of the articles were coded according to an a priori defined coding frame, which demonstrated reliability (pooled Kappa 0.86–0.97), and validity (<2% residual category coding). The majority of guidelines present were concerned with ‘pre-trial’ activities (72%), for example, outcome measure selection and study design issues, or ‘post-trial’ activities (16%) such as data analysis, reporting and interpretation. ‘In-trial’ guidelines represented 9.2% of all guidance across the papers reviewed, with content primarily focused on compliance, quality control, proxy assessment and reporting of data collection. There were no guidelines surrounding the management of concerning PRO data. Conclusions The findings highlight there are minimal in-trial guidelines in publication regarding PRO data collection and management in clinical trials. No guidance appears to exist for researchers involved with the handling of concerning PRO data. Guidelines are needed, which support researchers to manage all PRO data appropriately and which facilitate unbiased data collection. PMID:23560103

  18. Pharmacokinetics of Antituberculosis Drugs in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Adults in Malawi.

    PubMed

    van Oosterhout, J J; Dzinjalamala, F K; Dimba, A; Waterhouse, D; Davies, G; Zijlstra, E E; Molyneux, M E; Molyneux, E M; Ward, S

    2015-10-01

    Limited data address the impact of HIV coinfection on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of antituberculosis drugs in sub-Saharan Africa. A total of 47 Malawian adults underwent rich pharmacokinetic sampling at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, and 24 h postdose. Of the subjects, 51% were male, their mean age was 34 years, and 65% were HIV-positive with a mean CD4 count of 268 cells/μl. Antituberculosis drugs were administered as fixed-dose combinations (150 mg rifampin, 75 mg isoniazid, 400 mg pyrazinamide, and 275 mg ethambutol) according to recommended weight bands. Plasma drug concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (rifampin and pyrazinamide) or liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (isoniazid and ethambutol). Data were analyzed by noncompartmental methods and analysis of variance of log-transformed summary parameters. The pharmacokinetic parameters were as follows (median [interquartile range]): for rifampin, maximum concentration of drug in plasma (Cmax) of 4.129 μg/ml (2.474 to 5.596 μg/ml), area under the curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-∞) of 21.32 μg/ml · h (13.57 to 28.60 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 2.45 h (1.86 to 3.08 h); for isoniazid, Cmax of 3.97 μg/ml (2.979 to 4.544 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 22.5 (14.75 to 34.59 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 3.93 h (3.18 to 4.73 h); for pyrazinamide, Cmax of 34.21 μg/ml (30.00 to 41.60 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 386.6 μg/ml · h (320.0 to 463.7 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 6.821 h (5.71 to 8.042 h); and for ethambutol, Cmax of 2.278 μg/ml (1.694 to 3.098 μg/ml), AUC0-24 of 20.41 μg/ml · h (16.18 to 26.27 μg/ml · h), and half-life of 7.507 (6.517 to 8.696 h). The isoniazid PK data analysis suggested that around two-thirds of the participants were slow acetylators. Dose, weight, and weight-adjusted dose were not significant predictors of PK exposure, probably due to weight-banded dosing. In this first pharmacokinetic study of antituberculosis drugs in Malawian adults, measures of

  19. The effect of perceived and actual social support on the mental health of HIV-positive persons

    PubMed Central

    MCDOWELL, T. L.; SEROVICH, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to compare the ways in which perceived and actual social support affect the mental health of gay men, straight or bisexual men, and women living with HIV/AIDS. Participants included 125 women and 232 men with an HIV-positive or AIDS diagnosis involved in three larger investigations of HIV, disclosure and mental health. Results suggest each sub-group experienced perceived social support as significantly predictive of better mental health while the effect of actual social support was minimal. PMID:18071966

  20. The associations between resilience, social capital and self-rated health among HIV-positive South Africans.

    PubMed

    Dageid, Wenche; Grønlie, Anette A

    2015-11-01

    This study examined the relationship between resilience, social capital and self-rated health among 263 HIV-positive South Africans living in poverty, using questionnaires. Self-rated good health was predicted by younger age, trust in community-based organizations and having contacts of different religions. The findings highlight the importance of community-based networks and resources for care and support for persons living with HIV/AIDS in poor, rural areas. Furthermore, resilience, which also related positively to education and income, contributed positively to self-rated health, drawing attention to the interplay between resources at individual and community levels. PMID:24345683

  1. Perceptions of HIV-related health services in Zambia for people with disabilities who are HIV-positive

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Stephanie A; Cameron, Cathy; Hanass-Hancock, Jill; Simwaba, Phillimon; Solomon, Patricia E; Bond, Virginia A; Menon, Anitha; Richardson, Emma; Stevens, Marianne; Zack, Elisse

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Despite the emerging body of literature on increased vulnerability to HIV among people with disabilities (PWDs), there is a dearth of evidence related to experiences of PWDs who have become HIV-positive. This priority was identified by a disability advocacy organization in Lusaka, Zambia, where the prevalence of HIV and of disability is each approximately 15%. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of HIV-related health services for PWDs who are also living with HIV in Lusaka, Zambia. Methods This qualitative, interpretive study involved in-depth, semi-structured, one-on-one interviews with two groups of participants in Lusaka, Zambia: 21 PWDs who had become HIV-positive, and 11 people working in HIV and/or disability. PWDs had physical, hearing, visual and/or intellectual impairments. Interviews were conducted in English, Nyanja, Bemba or Zambian sign language. Descriptive and thematic analyses were conducted by a multidisciplinary, international research team. Results Participants described their experiences with HIV-related health services in terms of the challenges they faced. In particular, they encountered three main challenges while seeking care and treatment: (1) disability-related discrimination heightened when seeking HIV services, (2) communication barriers and related concerns with confidentiality, and (3) movement and mobility challenges related to seeking care and collecting antiretroviral therapy. These experiences were further shaped by participants’ profound concerns about poverty and unmet basic needs. Discussion This study demonstrates how PWDs who are HIV-positive have the same HIV care, treatment and support needs as able-bodied counterparts, but face avoidable barriers to care. Many challenges mirror concerns identified with HIV prevention, suggesting that efforts to promote inclusion and reduce stigma could have widespread benefits. Conclusions Despite the growing body of literature on increased

  2. Sexual health and socioeconomic-related factors among HIV-positive men who have sex with men in Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Carlos E; Jovet-Toledo, Gerardo G; Ortiz-Sánchez, Edgardo J; Rodríguez-Santiago, Edda I; Vargas-Molina, Ricardo L

    2015-10-01

    Most of the research among HIV-positive populations has been approached from behavioral risk models. This is particularly true for those otherwise socially vulnerable groups like men who have sex with men (MSM). As a response to this pattern, we examined data from an ongoing health promotion research being conducted in Puerto Rico (PR). The study is limited to HIV-positive MSM and consists of the participation in a survey interview that includes domains used to assess indicators of socio-economic-related factors (age, educational level, employment, religion, and partnership status) and sexual health (sexual satisfaction, condom use, and sexual health knowledge(SHK)). Participants reported a relatively high level (75 %) of sexual satisfaction and inconsistent condom use (50.9 % reported always using a condom). A deficient (61 %) SHK was also reported. In multivariate analyses, a higher educational level was associated with higher sexual satisfaction (aβ = 3.223; 95 % CI 0.291-6.156) and higher levels of SHK (aβ = 1.328; 95 % CI 0.358-2.297), while unemployment was associated with less condom use (aOR 0.314; 95 % CI 0.122-0.810). Not having a primary sexual partner was associated with less sexual satisfaction (aβ = -3.871; 95 % CI -7.534-0.208) and more condom use (aOR 4.292; 95 % CI 1.310-14.068). Findings support the notion that men of a disadvantaged socioeconomic position may have a poorer sexual health status; with a lower level of education and unemployment leading this disparity. Findings also evidence that partnership status may have a role in the sexual health of HIV-positive MSM. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive analysis of sexual health and socioeconomic indicators among Hispanic/Latino HIV-positive MSM in PR and in the Caribbean. Findings provide valuable information to address the sexual health needs of an underserved population. PMID:26123066

  3. Differential Predictors of Medication Adherence in HIV: Findings from a Sample of African American and Caucasian HIV-Positive Drug-Using Adults

    PubMed Central

    Moizel, Jennifer; Panos, Stella E.; Patel, Sapna M.; Byrd, Desiree A.; Myers, Hector F.; Wyatt, Gail E.; Hinkin, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modest or even occasional nonadherence to combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) can result in adverse clinical outcomes. African Americans demonstrate lower rates of adherence than Caucasians or Latinos. Identifying factors that influence medication adherence among African Americans is a critical step toward reducing HIV/AIDS disease progression and mortality. In a sample of 181 African American (n=144) and Caucasian (n=37) HIV-positive drug-using individuals [age (M=42.31; SD=6.6) education (M=13.41; SD=2.1)], we examined the influence of baseline drug use, literacy, neurocognition, depression, treatment-specific social support, and patient satisfaction with health care provider on medication adherence averaged over the course of 6 months (study dates 2002–2006). Our findings suggest differential baseline predictors of medication adherence for African Americans and Caucasians, such that patient satisfaction with provider was the strongest predictor of follow-up medication adherence for African Americans whereas for Caucasians depressive symptoms and treatment-specific social support were predictive of medication adherence (after controlling for duration of drug use). PMID:22889235

  4. The Impact of Alcohol Use on the Sexual Scripts of HIV-Positive Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Vicioso, Kalil J.; Punzalan, Joseph C.; Halkitis, Perry N.; Kutnick, Alexandra; Velasquez, Mary M.

    2007-01-01

    The literature has failed to form a consensus on the association between alcohol use and unsafe sex among samples of men who have sex with men (MSM). Although drinking behavior may not be causally related to unsafe sex, it is possible that alcohol use plays a role in sexual scripts. In this paper, we assessed the role that alcohol use plays in the sexual experiences of HIV-seropositive MSM in terms of sexual script theory. An ethnically diverse sample (81% men of color) of HIV-positive MSM with alcohol use disorders from the New York City metropolitan area was recruited from a variety of settings frequented by such men. A critical incident measure was used to qualitatively assess contextual issues regarding participants’ most recent incident of unsafe sex while under the influence of alcohol. Qualitative analysis revealed three basic sexual scripts involving alcohol: routine, spontaneous, and taboo. Each script had its own sources of risk for unsafe sex. Interventions targeting alcohol use and unsafe sex should be sensitive to the role that alcohol plays in the sexual scripts of HIV-positive MSM. PMID:15326541

  5. Motivational Interviewing Targeting Risky Sex in HIV-Positive Young Thai Men Who Have Sex with Men

    PubMed Central

    Rongkavilit, Chokechai; Wang, Bo; Naar-King, Sylvie; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Parsons, Jeffrey T.; Panthong, Apirudee; Koken, Juline A.; Saengcharnchai, Pichai; Phanuphak, Praphan

    2014-01-01

    Motivational interviewing (MI) has been shown to reduce sexual risks among HIV-positive men who have sex with men (HMSM) in the U.S. We conducted a randomized trial of Healthy Choices, a 4-session MI intervention, targeting sexual risks among 110 HIV-positive youth ages 16–25 years in Thailand. Risk assessments were conducted at baseline, 1 month, and 6 months post-intervention. This report presents the analysis of 74 HMSM in the study. There were 37 HMSM in the Intervention group and 37 in the control group. The proportions of participants having anal sex and having sex with either HIV-uninfected or unknown partners in past 30 days were significantly lower in Intervention group than in control group at 6 months post-intervention (38% vs. 65%, p = .04; and 27% vs. 62%, p < .01, respectively). There were no significant differences in general mental health scores and HIV stigma scores between the two groups at any study visit. Thirty-five (95%) HMSM in the Intervention group vs. 31 (84%) in control group attended ≥3 sessions. Loss to follow-up was 8% and 30%, respectively (p = .04). Healthy Choices for young Thai HMSM was associated with sexual risk reduction. Improvements in mental health and HIV stigma were noted in Intervention group. Healthy Choices is a promising behavioral intervention and should be further developed to serve the needs of young HMSM in resource-limited countries. PMID:24668304

  6. Perceptions of food-insecure HIV-positive adults participating in a food supplementation program in central Kenya.

    PubMed

    Ndirangu, Murugi; Sztam, Kevin; Sheriff, Muhsin; Hawken, Mark; Arpadi, Stephen; Rashid, Juma; Deckelbaum, Richard; El-Sadr, Wafaa

    2014-11-01

    Malnutrition coexists with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa. Food supplementation is recommended for food-insecure, HIV-positive individuals. This study was part of a larger six-month food supplementation program for adults initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in central Kenya. We conducted 10 focus group interviews with program participants to examine the perceptions of participants regarding the food supplementation program. Focus group transcripts were analyzed for themes and six were identified. These were perception of food insecurity and the health of the participants, the benefits of participating, use of the food, coping strategies after the program ended, suggestions for improving the program, and sustainability of the benefits. Participants perceived that the food improved their health and ART adherence, and reduced stigma. The improvements were not always sustained. Sharing with people beyond the immediate family was very common, depleting the food available to the participants. Interventions with sustainable effects for food-insecure, HIV-positive individuals and their families are needed. PMID:25418241

  7. Status of prevention of parent to child transmission services among HIV-positive mothers from rural South India

    PubMed Central

    Subramaniyan, Anbarasi; Sarkar, Sonali; Roy, Gautam; Lakshminarayanan, Subitha

    2014-01-01

    Background: Tamil Nadu comes under group I high-prevalence state, with <1% prevalence of HIV infection in ante-natal women but above 5% prevalence in high-risk group. One of the ways to control HIV/AIDS in India is through prevention of parent to child transmission (PPTCT), the success of which lies in the utilization of services. Materials and Methods: A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore the status of utilization of PPTCT services by rural HIV-positive mothers, in the Gingee Block of Villupuram district, Tamil Nadu. All the mothers who tested positive between June 2006 and May 2010 were interviewed in-depth using an interview guide. Results: There were 21 HIV-positive mothers during this period, 19 of whom gave consent for the study. Thirteen out of 19 mothers (68%) received Nevirapine prophylaxis, while 15 out of 20 infants born to these mothers (75%) received Nevirapine syrup. During the study period, it was found that 61% of the mothers were not compliant to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Conclusion: Poor access to the ART centers was reflected in majority of the cases (79%). There is a pressing need to improve access to quality PPTCT services especially during the intranatal period. PMID:26396443

  8. Epidemiology of HPV in HIV-Positive and HIV-Negative Fertile Women in Cameroon, West Africa

    PubMed Central

    Desruisseau, Andrew J.; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf; Welty, Edith

    2009-01-01

    Background. HPV types vary by country and HIV status. There are no data on the prevalent HPV genotypes from Cameroon. Methods. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study on 65 Cameroonian women. Samples were sent for HPV genotyping and Thin Prep analyses. Results. 41 out of 61 samples tested (67.2%) had HPV subtypes detected. The most common high risk types encountered were: 45 (24.6%) and 58 (21.5%). HIV-positive women were more likely to test positive for any HPV (P = .014), have more than one HPV subtype (P = .003), and to test positive for the high risk subtypes (P = .007). Of those with high risk HPV, HIV-positive women were more likely to have Thin Prep abnormalities than HIV-negative women (P = .013). Conclusions. Oncogenic HPV subtypes 45 and 58 were more prevalent than those subtypes carried in the quadrivalent vaccine. Further studies are needed to assess whether the current vaccine will be effective in this region. PMID:20169094

  9. Transition to Adulthood and Antiretroviral Adherence Among HIV-Positive Young Black Men Who Have Sex With Men

    PubMed Central

    Andes, Karen; Gilliard, Danielle; Chakraborty, Rana; del Rio, Carlos; Malebranche, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We conducted a qualitative study of HIV-positive young Black men who have sex with men (YBMSM) to explore their experiences of living with HIV and adhering to antiretroviral medications (ARVs) within the developmental context of their transition to adulthood. Methods. We conducted life history interviews with 20 HIV-positive YBMSM in Atlanta, Georgia, engaged in outpatient HIV care. We addressed these questions: (1) How do YBMSM living with HIV experience the transition to adulthood? and (2) What are the important sociocontextual influences on ARV adherence for YBMSM? Results. Successful transition to adulthood and optimal ARV adherence were inextricably linked. HIV’s detrimental impact on development was moderated by the degree of physical illness at diagnosis. Many participants described resilient trajectories while coping with HIV. Adherence problems occurred primarily among participants who were not meeting their developmental goals. Conclusions. Our findings support the need for early diagnosis and linkage to care, as well as the need to develop holistic, resilience-based interventions focusing on transition to adulthood. These findings have implications for individual clinical outcomes as well as ARV-based prevention efforts among YBMSM. PMID:24922167

  10. Health-information needs of HIV-positive adults in Latin America and the Caribbean: an integrative review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Stonbraker, Samantha; Larson, Elaine

    2016-10-01

    An assessment of information needs is essential for care planning for patients living with chronic diseases such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The extent to which these assessments have been conducted in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is unknown. The purpose of this study was, therefore, to identify, evaluate, and summarize what research has been conducted to examine patient perceptions of their health-information needs among adults living with HIV in LAC. Using an integrative review methodology, a literature search of six databases was conducted in April and May 2015. Inclusion criteria were peer-reviewed articles published in English or Spanish that assessed the information needs of HIV-positive patients living in LAC. The quality of included articles was assessed and relevant characteristics of each article were extracted, compared, and presented. Searches returned 1885 citations, 11 of which met inclusion criteria. Studies included were conducted in 8 of 33 countries, used multiple research designs, demonstrated varying needs between populations, and found numerous unmet information needs. Information about HIV in general, methods of infection transmission, antiretroviral medications, other sexually transmitted diseases, and effective coping mechanisms were the most commonly mentioned needs. Healthcare providers were the largest and most reliable source of health information for many participants and it was emphasized that in order for health education to be effective, programs should include both individual and group components. Patients indicated that they may have difficulty processing and using information through an incorrect understanding of medications, not changing risk behaviors, and by stating that information can be overwhelming or poorly communicated. Further research on information needs is warranted so that healthcare providers and organizations may provide the information patients need to appropriately manage their health. PMID

  11. ALCOHOL USE PREDICTS SEXUAL RISK BEHAVIOR WITH HIV-NEGATIVE OR PARTNERS OF UNKNOWN STATUS AMONG YOUNG HIV-POSITIVE MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Douglas; Kahana, Shoshana; Harper, Gary W.; Fernández, M. Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Although the relationship between substance use and heightened sexual risk behaviors have been documented in samples of young men who have sex with men (YMSM) and HIV-positive adult MSM, there is a dearth of research on the role of substance use in the sexual risk behaviors of HIV-positive YMSM. We examined associations between alcohol and other drug use with sexual risk behaviors among a sample of HIV-positive YMSM (N=200). There were no significant predictors of either receptive or insertive unprotected anal intercourse (UAI) with HIV-positive partners among the substance use variables. Failure to use a condom after drinking alcohol (β=2.00, p <.01) was significantly associated with insertive UAI with HIV-negative partners or partners of unknown status. Failure to use a condom after drinking alcohol (β=1.36, p <.05) and age (β=0.35, p <.05) were significantly associated with receptive UAI with HIV-negative partners or partners of unknown status. Findings from this paper underscore the role of alcohol in facilitating unprotected anal intercourse among HIV-positive YMSM and their HIV-negative and status-unknown partners. PMID:22971018

  12. Self-Efficacy for Sexual Risk Reduction and Partner HIV Status as Correlates of Sexual Risk Behavior Among HIV-Positive Adolescent Girls and Women

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Melissa R.; Cherenack, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the correlates of sexual risk behavior among HIV-positive adolescent girls and women in the United States. This study investigates two potential factors related to unprotected vaginal and anal intercourse (UVAI) that have yet to be thoroughly studied in this group: self-efficacy for sexual risk reduction and partner HIV status. Data was analyzed from 331 HIV-positive adolescent girls and women between 12 and 24 years old who reported vaginal and/or anal intercourse with a male partner in the past 3 months at fifteen sites across the United States. Results show that overall self-efficacy (B = −0.15, p=0.01), self-efficacy to discuss safe sex with one's partner (B = −0.14, p=0.01), and self-efficacy to refuse unsafe sex (B = −0.21, p=0.01) are related to UVAI episodes. Participants with only HIV-positive partners or with both HIV-positive and HIV-negative partners showed a trend towards higher percentages of UVAI episodes compared to participants with only HIV-negative partners (F(2, 319)=2.80, p=0.06). These findings point to the importance of including self-efficacy and partner HIV status in risk-reduction research and interventions developed for HIV-positive adolescent girls and young women. PMID:25856632

  13. Early uptake of HIV clinical care after testing HIV-positive during home-based testing and counseling in western Kenya.

    PubMed

    Medley, Amy; Ackers, Marta; Amolloh, Manase; Owuor, Patrick; Muttai, Helen; Audi, Beryl; Sewe, Manquins; Laserson, Kayla

    2013-01-01

    Home-based HIV testing and counseling (HBTC) has the potential to increase access to HIV testing. However, the extent to which HBTC programs successfully link HIV-positive individuals into clinical care remains unclear. To determine factors associated with early enrollment in HIV clinical care, adult residents (aged ≥13 years) in the Health and Demographic Surveillance System in Kisumu, Kenya were offered HBTC. All HIV-positive residents were referred to nearby HIV clinical care centers. Two to four months after HBTC, peer educators conducted home visits to consenting HIV-positive residents. Overall, 9,895 (82 %) of 12,035 residents accepted HBTC; 1,087 (11 %) were HIV-positive; and 737 (68 %) received home visits. Of those receiving home visits, 42 % reported HIV care attendance. Factors associated with care attendance included: having disclosed, living with someone attending HIV care, and wanting to seek care after diagnosis. Residents who reported their current health as excellent or who doubted their HBTC result were less likely to report care attendance. While findings indicate that HBTC was well-received in this setting, less than half of HIV-positive individuals reported current care attendance. Identification of effective strategies to increase early enrollment and retention in HIV clinical care is critical and will require coordination between testing and treatment program staff and systems. PMID:23076720

  14. ‘I did not feel like a mother’: The success and remaining challenges to exclusive formula feeding among HIV-positive women in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    MacCarthy, Sarah; Rasanathan, Jennifer J.K.; Nunn, Amy; Dourado, Ines

    2013-01-01

    Exclusive and safe formula feeding can eliminate the risk of vertical HIV transmission due to breastfeeding. Therefore many countries advise all HIV-positive women to avoid breastfeeding their infants. However, little research explores the experiences of women attempting to exclusively formula feed (EFF) in countries with free and universal access to HAART. This article examines the success of Brazil in supporting HIV-positive women as they EFF their infants. We conducted in-depth interviews with 30 HIV-positive women receiving care at the primary facility for HIV/AIDS in Salvador, Brazil about their attitudes and practices related to EFF as well as challenges with adhering to EFF. All interviews were recorded, professionally transcribed and translated, and then analyzed. Our results showed that one woman reported both breastfeeding and formula feeding her infant; all others reported EFF. Postpartum counseling regarding the risk of HIV transmission through breastfeeding was the primary motivation for EFF. Challenges included difficulty reconciling their perceptions that breastfeeding is an important maternal responsibility, trouble accepting that breastfeeding can cause potential to harm their infants, confronting HIV-related stigma associated with EFF, and unexpected financial burdens due to EFF. We conclude that HIV-positive women adhered to national guidelines recommending EFF; this phenomenon has likely contributed to declining rates of vertical transmission in Brazil. Despite this success, many women experienced challenges with EFF. Greater support services may enhance Brazil’s success in empowering HIV-positive women and eliminating vertical HIV transmission via breastfeeding. PMID:23711175

  15. Association of high viral load and abnormal liver function with high aflatoxin B1–albumin adduct levels in HIV-positive Ghanaians: preliminary observations

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, P.E.; Shuaib, F.M.; Jiang, Y.; Preko, P.; Baidoo, J.; Stiles, J.K.; Wang, J.-S.; Phillips, T.D.; Williams, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the association between certain clinical factors and aflatoxin B1–albumin adduct (AF-ALB) levels in HIV-positive people. Plasma samples collected from 314 (155 HIV-positive and 159 HIV-negative) people were tested for AF-ALB levels, viral load, CD4+ T-cell count, liver function profile, malaria parasitaemia, and hepatitis B and C virus infections. HIV-positive participants were divided into high and low groups based on their median AF-ALB of 0.93 pmol mg−1 albumin and multivariable logistic and linear regression methods used to assess relationships between clinical conditions and AF-ALB levels. Multivariable logistic regression showed statistically significant increased odds of having higher HIV viral loads (OR=2.84; 95% CI=1.17–7.78) and higher direct bilirubin levels (OR=5.47; 95% CI=1.03–22.85) among HIV-positive participants in the high AF-ALB group. There were also higher levels of total bilirubin and lower levels of albumin in association with high AF-ALB. Thus, aflatoxin exposure may contribute to high viral loads and abnormal liver function in HIV-positive people and so promote disease progression. PMID:21749228

  16. The influence of personality disorder indication, social support, and grief on alcohol and cocaine use among HIV-positive adults coping with AIDS-related bereavement.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Nathan B; Cavanaugh, Courtenay E; Vaughan, Ellen L; Connell, Christian M; Tate, David C; Sikkema, Kathleen J

    2009-04-01

    Substance use is prevalent among HIV-positive adults and linked to a number of adverse health consequences; however little is known about risk and protective factors that influence substance use among HIV-positive adults coping with AIDS-related bereavement. Using structural equation modeling (SEM), male gender, diagnostic indications of antisocial and borderline personality disorders (PD), and grief severity were tested as risk factors, and social support as a protective factor, for alcohol and cocaine use among a diverse sample of 268 HIV-positive adults enrolled in an intervention for AIDS-related bereavement. Results indicated that the hypothesized model fit the study data. Male gender, PD indication, and social support had direct effects on substance use. PD had significant indirect effects on both alcohol and cocaine use, mediated by social support, but not by grief. Finally, both PD and social support had significant, but opposite, effects on grief. Implications for intervention and prevention efforts are discussed. PMID:17846878

  17. Lack of cardiovascular risk assessment in inflammatory arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus patients at a tertiary care center.

    PubMed

    Keeling, Stephanie O; Teo, Michelle; Fung, Daisy

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate cardiovascular risk assessment at a Canadian rheumatology center and describe the cardiovascular risk of inflammatory arthritis (IA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients using the Framingham risk score. A retrospective chart review of 504 patients attending nine rheumatology practices at the University of Alberta Hospital was performed. A pre-specified case report form detailed patient demographics, cardiac risk factors, variables for the Framingham 2008 score, disease activity, and medication use. In this group of 504 patients, 64 (12.7%) had SLE (male (M) to female (F) ratio = 60:4) and 440 (87.3%) had an IA (M to F ratio = 117:323). Of the SLE patients, 31 (48.4%) met four or more American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria, 33 (51.6%) had less than four ACR criteria. Of the IA patients, 156 (35.5%) were CCP positive and 257 (58.4%) were RF positive. Utilizing the chart data, retrospective Framingham risk scores were calculable for one (1.6%) SLE patient and three (0.68%) IA patients. The most common cardiac risk factors not documented in the medical records of both the SLE and IA patients included: (1) positive family history of MI, (2) diabetes, and (3) lipid status. The blood pressure was more frequently documented in the SLE patients (93.8%) compared to the IA patients (56.1%). While traditional cardiac risk factors only partially contribute to the increased cardiovascular risk in these patients, cardiovascular risk assessment was suboptimally performed amongst a large group of rheumatologists. A dedicated cardiovascular risk reduction clinic for inflammatory rheumatic diseases has been established at this site to fulfill this need and evaluate treatment strategies. PMID:21503617

  18. Social media use and HIV transmission risk behavior among ethnically diverse HIV-positive gay men: results of an online study in three U.S. states.

    PubMed

    Hirshfield, Sabina; Grov, Christian; Parsons, Jeffrey T; Anderson, Ian; Chiasson, Mary Ann

    2015-10-01

    Though Black and Hispanic men who have sex with men (MSM) are at an increased risk for HIV, few HIV risk reduction interventions that target HIV-positive MSM, and even fewer that use technology, have been designed to target these groups. Despite similar rates