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Sample records for hodgkin lymphoma concepts

  1. Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 8,500 % of All New Cancer Cases 0.5% Estimated Deaths in 2016 1,120 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 193,545 people living with Hodgkin lymphoma in ...

  2. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lymphoma? A lymphoma is a cancer of the lymphatic system . The lymphatic system is a part of the body's immune system. ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma, cancer cells form in the lymphatic system and start to grow. Most of the time, ...

  3. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists cancer ... in Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma Adcetris (Brentuximab Vedotin) Ambochlorin ( ...

  4. Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... following treatment. Occasionally, cancer may return, and follow-up appointments with your cancer specialist can help you catch it early if it does. Your doctor will also watch for any late side effects of your treatment. After Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  5. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... The cancer may be low grade (slow growing), intermediate grade, or high grade (fast growing). NHL is ... Accessed March 2, 2015. National Cancer Institute: PDQ Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer ...

  6. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Adult Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Unfavorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 72,580 % of All New Cancer Cases 4.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 20,150 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 569,536 people living with non-Hodgkin lymphoma ...

  8. Primary Pulmonary Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Tanveer, Shumaila; El Damati, Ahmed; El Baz, Ayman; Alsayyah, Ahmed; ElSharkawy, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Primary pulmonary Hodgkin lymphoma (PPHL) is a rare disease. Herein, we report a case of PPHL with diagnostic concerns encountered during initial evaluation which is of paramount importance to keep the differential diagnosis in cases with high index of suspicion for this rare entity. PMID:26788271

  9. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma This page lists ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Abitrexate (Methotrexate) Adcetris ( ...

  10. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; HIV Infection; Stage IIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIIB Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVA Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

  11. Lenalidomide and Temsirolimus in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    AIDS-Related Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  12. Implementation of contemporary radiation therapy planning concepts for pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma: Guidelines from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, David C; Dieckmann, Karin; Terezakis, Stephanie; Constine, Louis

    2015-01-01

    The optimal management of children with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) should limit the risk of treatment-related toxicity without compromising disease control. Consequently, increasing effort is being directed to retaining the demonstrated efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) in maximizing the cure of HL while reducing the radiation exposure of normal tissues. Historically, guidelines for RT volume definition used in pediatric HL trials have referenced 2-dimensional imaging and bony landmarks to define classical involved field RT. With recognition of the efficacy of chemotherapy, the data on the adverse late effects of radiation, and the evolution of advanced imaging techniques that reveal the location of both tumor and normal tissues, it is necessary that radiation techniques for children and adolescents be refined. The concepts described by the International Commission on Radiation Units provide a common approach for field definition using 3-dimensional computed tomographic--based RT planning and volumetric image guidance. Here we describe the application of these concepts in the planning of RT for pediatric HL. This will be increasingly important as current and upcoming pediatric HL trials will employ these concepts to deliver RT. PMID:25413415

  13. Iodine I 131 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Before Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  14. Clinical and Pathologic Studies in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients Receiving Antibody Treatment

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-05-31

    Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Cutaneous Lymphoma; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Diffuse Large B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Follicular / Indolent B-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Mantle Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Marginal Zone; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Peripheral T-Cell; Lymphomas: Non-Hodgkin Waldenstr Macroglobulinemia

  15. Combination Chemotherapy Followed by Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-21

    Childhood Favorable Prognosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  16. A Phase II Trial of Panobinostat and Lenalidomide in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Gemcitabine and Bendamustine in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-15

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  18. [Pulmonary alterations in Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Illés, Árpád; Szemes, Katalin; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2016-01-31

    Most of Hodgkin lymphoma patients survive due to combined chemo/radiotherapy. Improved survival brings long-term side effects to the front, which may determine the patients' subsequent quality of life and expected lifetime. This manuscript aims to analyze lung manifestations of Hodgkin lymphoma and treatment related pulmonary complications, demonstrated with own cases. The lung involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma is often secondary, and primary pulmonary involvement is very rare. The authors found 8-12% of lung involvement among their patients. Side effects of treatment consist of pulmonary infections in conjuction with immunosuppression, while on the other hand bleomycin and chest irradiation as part of current standard of care induced pneumonitis and fibrosis are reported. The pulmonary involvement in Hodgkin lymphoma may cause differential diagnostic difficulty. Lung involvement could modify stage and consequently treatment, and the development of side effects might determine later quality of life and expected lifetime. Therefore, identification of lung involvement is crucial. PMID:26801361

  19. Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Stage II-IV Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-07

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

  20. General Information about Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health Professional ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. [Pathological diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Tamaru, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    This lymphoma was recognized by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832. In 1865, Samuel Wilks named it Hodgkin disease. Now, the term Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is acceptable over Hodgkin disease. Since the neoplastic cells of the disease is well-recognized to be a lymphoid cell, especially B lymphocyte. In WHO classification published in 2008, HLs are divided into two entities: Classical HL and nodular lymphocyte predominat HL. The former is composed of four different subtypes: nodular sclerosis (NS), mixed cellularity (MC), lymphocyte rich (LR), and lymphocyte depletion (LD). HL is characterized by the morphological feature comprising a minority of neoplastic cells, Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells and popcorn (LP) cells and a majority of non-neoplastic reactive cells. Antigen receptor gene analyses by prevailing molecular methods and flow cytometry are not appropriate method for the diagnosis of HL, because of small number of neoplastic cells. They are, however, very useful in the differential diagnosis to rule out other lymphomas. Even the present when science progressed, pathological (morphological and immunohistochemical) examination is very worth for diagnosis of HL. PMID:24724402

  2. Drugs Approved for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for Hodgkin lymphoma. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  3. What Are the Key Statistics about Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... for non-Hodgkin lymphoma? What are the key statistics about non-Hodgkin lymphoma? Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) ... coming years. Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Last Medical Review: ...

  4. What's New in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic Additional resources for non-Hodgkin lymphoma What’s new in non-Hodgkin lymphoma research and treatment? Research ... non-Hodgkin lymphoma is focused on looking at new and better ways to treat this disease. Chemotherapy ...

  5. Current concepts and controversies in the management of early stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Lauren S.; Lee, Mark; Advani, Ranjana H.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past three decades, due to the recognition of late effects related to high-dose extended field radiotherapy and heavy alkylator chemotherapy, combined modality therapy with abbreviated chemotherapy and limited field radiotherapy has emerged as the standard of care for early stage Hodgkin lymphoma, with cure rates in excess of 80%. Currently, however, controversy remains over identifying the most appropriate criteria to risk-stratify patients with early stage disease, so that those with a favorable prognosis receive limited treatment without compromising cure rates and those with unfavorable risk receive more intensified therapy. The optimal risk stratification system remains unclear, with variable definitions of favorable and unfavorable disease used by research groups in North America and Europe. Thus, comparison of clinical trial results has been challenging, and additional controversies persist regarding optimal chemotherapy regimens, duration of therapy, and the role of radiotherapy. Investigations are ongoing to assess the potential of functional imaging and biomarkers as tools for risk stratification. The collective goal is to further refine current stratification strategies to allow for an individualized, risk-adapted treatment approach that minimizes long-term late effects without compromising high cure rates. PMID:21463118

  6. Bortezomib, Ifosfamide, and Vinorelbine Tartrate in Treating Young Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma That is Recurrent or Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent/Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  7. Study of ADCT-301 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-11

    Hodgkin Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinaemia; Lymphoma,T-cell Cutaneous; Lymphoma, T-Cell, Peripheral

  8. Association of HHV-6 with Hodgkin and non Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kiani, Hadis; Samarbafzadeh, Alireza; Teimoori, Ali; Nisi, Niloofar; Mehravaran, Hamide; Radmehr, Hashem; Hosseini, Zeinab; Haghi, Azadeh; Shahani, Toran; Varnaseri, Mehran; Ranjbari, Nastran

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Human Herpes 6 virus (HHV-6) could remain latent and chronic in the host cells after primary infection. HHV-6 genome encodes certain transactivation proteins which may results in development of malignant lymphoma. The association of human herpes six virus (HHV-6) infection and Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin lymphomas is strongly supported by epidemiological studies. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HHV-6 among the patients with Hodgkin, Non-Hodgkin‘s lymphoma. Materials and Methods: Overall 44 blocks of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded of the patients including 22(50%) Hodgkin and 22(50%) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma were collected. Initially the section of 5μm-thickness were prepared from the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks. Then the deparaphinazation was carried out for each sample. The DNA was extracted, followed by nested PCR for detection of HHV-6. Based on PCR product size and sequencing, the HHV-6 A or B subtypes were characterized. Results: 12/22(54.54%) cases of Hodgkin and 8/22 (36.36%) Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were shown as positive for HHV-6. Out of 12 positive HHV-6 in Hodgkin lymphoma, 10 patients (45.45%) belonged to variant A while 2 cases (9.09%) were found positive for both HHV-6A and HHV-6B. All the Non Hodgkin samples (n=8, 36.36%) showed positive for HHV-6 variant A. Conclusion: High prevalence of HHV-6 was found among the patients with Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Two patients with Hodgkin lymphoma had mixed HHV-6A and HHV-6B infections. It is recommended patients with Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin should be screened for HHV-6 detection before chemotherapy. PMID:27307982

  9. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: clinical governance issues.

    PubMed

    Fields, P A; Goldstone, A H

    2002-09-01

    Every patient in every part of the world has the right to expect the best possible quality of care from health care providers. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are an extremely heterogeneous group of conditions which require important decisions to be taken at many points along the treatment pathway. To get this right every time requires that high-quality standards are instituted and adhered to, so that the best possible outcome is achieved. In the past this has not always been the case because of the failure of clinicians sometimes to adhere to an optimal management plan. In 1995, the UK government commissioned an inquiry into the running of cancer services in the United Kingdom, which culminated in a series of recommendations to improve them. Subsequently, these recommendations were implemented as objectives of the NHS Cancer Plan which is the framework by which the UK government wishes to improve cancer services. Concurrently another general concept has emerged which is designed to ensure that the highest quality standards may be achieved for all patients across the whole National Health Service (NHS). This concept, termed 'clinical governance', brings together a corporate responsibility of all health care workers to deliver high quality standards, in the hope that this will translate into better long-term survival of patients with malignant disease. This chapter focuses on the issues surrounding clinical governance and how the principles of this concept relate to non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. PMID:12468407

  10. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Savage, Kerry J; Mottok, Anja; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-07-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a rare subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma with distinct clinicopathologic features. It is typified by the presence of lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells, which are CD20(+) but CD15(-) and CD30(-) and are found scattered amongst small B lymphocytes arranged in a nodular pattern. Despite frequent and often late or multiple relapses, the prognosis of NLPHL is very favorable. There is an inherent risk of secondary aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and studies support that risk is highest in those with splenic involvement at presentation. Given disease rarity, the optimal management is unclear and opinions differ as to whether treatment paradigms should be similar to or differ from those for classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL). This review provides an overview of the existing literature describing pathological subtypes, outcome and treatment approaches for NLPHL. PMID:27496311

  11. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the chest a computerized tomography (CT or CAT) scan , which rotates around the patient and creates ... ray (Video) Getting an MRI (Video) Getting a CAT Scan (Video) Chemotherapy Hodgkin Lymphoma Stem Cell Transplants ...

  12. Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With Previously Treated Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma: Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Montanari, Francesca; Diefenbach, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Although Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is largely curable with first-line therapy, approximately one-third of patients will not have a complete response to frontline treatment or will subsequently relapse. Only 50 % of these patients will be effectively salvaged with conventional therapies. The prognosis is particularly poor for those patients with chemotherapy refractory disease, who are unable to obtain even transient disease control, and for patients who relapse following high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant. In this review, we summarize the most recent updates on the management of patients with relapsed HL, the role of novel therapies such as brentuximab vedotin, and an overview of promising new agents currently under investigation. We also discuss the role of consolidation strategies such as high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplant, and reduced-intensity allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, and the need for new strategies in the elderly patient population. PMID:24942298

  14. Panobinostat and Everolimus in Treating Patients With Recurrent Multiple Myeloma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Central Nervous System Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. The molecular mechanisms of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Felberbaum, Rachael S.

    2005-01-01

    Classic Hodgkin's lymphoma is characterized by the appearance of giant abnormal cells called Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. HRS cells arise from germinal center B lymphocytes and in about 50 percent of patients, are infected with Epstein-Barr Virus. In addition, HRS cells show constitutive NF-kappaB activation and are resistant to apoptosis. This paper reviews several recent studies that for the first time implicate specific molecules in the pathogenesis of classic Hodgkin's lymphoma. Targeting these molecules could lead to the development of novel therapies for this disease. PMID:16720015

  16. General Information about Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  17. General Information about Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Go to Health ... the PDQ Pediatric Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  18. CPI-613 and Bendamustine Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    Adult Lymphocyte Depletion Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Mixed Cellularity Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Nodular Sclerosis Hodgkin Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia

  19. Primary Mediastinal Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piña-Oviedo, Sergio; Moran, Cesar A

    2016-09-01

    Primary mediastinal Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) is rare. Nodular sclerosis CHL (NS-CHL) is the most common subtype involving the anterior mediastinum and/or mediastinal lymph nodes. Primary thymic CHL is exceedingly rare. The disease typically affects young women and is asymptomatic in 30% to 50% of patients. Common symptoms include fatigue, chest pain, dyspnea and cough, but vary depending on the location and size of the tumor. B-symptoms develop in 30% of cases. By imaging, primary mediastinal CHL presents as mediastinal widening/mediastinal mass that does not invade adjacent organs but may compress vital structures as bulky disease. Histopathology is the gold standard for diagnosis. Primary mediastinal NS-CHL consists of nodules of polymorphous inflammatory cells surrounded by broad fibrous bands extending from a thickened lymph node capsule. The cellular nodules contain variable numbers of large Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg cells, required for diagnosis. Primary thymic CHL may exhibit prominent cystic changes. The histopathologic recognition of NS-CHL can be challenging in cases with prominent fibrosis, scant cellularity, artifactual cell distortion, or an exuberant granulomatous reaction. The differential diagnosis includes primary mediastinal non-HLs, mediastinal germ cell tumors, thymoma, and metastatic carcinoma or melanoma to the mediastinum. Distinction from primary mediastinal non-HLs is crucial for adequate therapeutic decisions. Approximately 95% of patients with primary mediastinal CHL will be alive and free of disease at 10 years after treatment with short courses of combined chemoradiotherapy. In this review, we discuss the history, classification, epidemiology, clinicoradiologic features, histopathology, immunohistochemistry, differential diagnosis, and treatment of primary mediastinal CHL. PMID:27441757

  20. Pembrolizumab in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Maly, Joseph; Alinari, Lapo

    2016-09-01

    Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody directed against programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1), a key immune-inhibitory molecule expressed on T cells and implicated in CD4+ T-cell exhaustion and tumor immune-escape mechanisms. Classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) is a unique B-cell malignancy in the sense that malignant Reed-Sternberg (RS) cells represent a small percentage of cells within an extensive immune cell infiltrate. PD-1 ligands are upregulated on RS cells as a consequence of both chromosome 9p24.1 amplification and Epstein-Barr virus infection and by interacting with PD-1 promote an immune-suppressive effect. By augmenting antitumor immune response, pembrolizumab and nivolumab, another monoclonal antibody against PD-1, have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed/refractory cHL as well as an acceptable toxicity profile with immune-related adverse events that are generally manageable. In this review, we explore the rationale for targeting PD-1 in cHL, review the clinical trial results supporting the use of checkpoint inhibitors in this disease, and present future directions for investigation in which this approach may be used. PMID:27147112

  1. Everolimus and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  2. Hodgkin Lymphoma, Version 2.2015

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Richard T.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Ai, Weiyun Z.; Ambinder, Richard F.; Aoun, Patricia; Bello, Celeste M.; Benitez, Cecil M.; Bierman, Philip J.; Blum, Kristie A.; Chen, Robert; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Forero, Andres; Gordon, Leo I.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Hochberg, Ephraim P.; Huang, Jiayi; Johnston, Patrick B.; Khan, Nadia; Maloney, David G.; Mauch, Peter M.; Metzger, Monika; Moore, Joseph O.; Morgan, David; Moskowitz, Craig H.; Mulroney, Carolyn; Poppe, Matthew; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Seropian, Stuart; Tsien, Christina; Winter, Jane N.; Yahalom, Joachim; Burns, Jennifer L.; Sundar, Hema

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon malignancy involving lymph nodes and the lymphatic system. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma are the 2 main types of HL. CHL accounts for most HL diagnosed in the Western countries. Chemotherapy or combined modality therapy, followed by restaging with PET/CT to assess treatment response using the Deauville criteria (5-point scale), is the standard initial treatment for patients with newly diagnosed CHL. Brentuximab vedotin, a CD30-directed antibody-drug conjugate, has produced encouraging results in the treatment of relapsed or refractory disease. The potential long-term effects of treatment remain an important consideration, and long-term follow-up is essential after completion of treatment. PMID:25964641

  3. Langerhans cell histiocytosis followed by Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Ik Soo; Park, In Keun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Shin; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Huh, Joo Ryung; Suh, Cheol Won

    2012-12-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred to our institution due to lower back pain and was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient achieved complete remission with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One year later, right cervical lymphadenopathy was observed and Hodgkin's lymphoma was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and experienced no further symptoms. Further, no evidence of recurrence was observed on follow-up imaging. This report discusses the association between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:23269889

  4. Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis Followed by Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Park, IK Soo; Park, In Keun; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Shin; Jeon, Sang Ryong; Huh, Joo Ryung

    2012-01-01

    A 22-year-old man was referred to our institution due to lower back pain and was diagnosed with Langerhans cell histiocytosis of the thoracic and lumbar spine. The patient achieved complete remission with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. One year later, right cervical lymphadenopathy was observed and Hodgkin's lymphoma was confirmed on biopsy. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and experienced no further symptoms. Further, no evidence of recurrence was observed on follow-up imaging. This report discusses the association between Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:23269889

  5. Obatoclax and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Aggressive Relapsed or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  6. Ibrutinib or Idelalisib in Treating Patients With Persistent or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  7. PULMONARY ARTERY ACCELERATED FLOW REVEALING HODGKIN'S LYMPHOMA.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Tony; Chehab, Ghassan; Saliba, Zakhia; Smayra, Tarek; Baz, Maria; Abdo, Lynn; Haddad, Fady; Abdel-Massih, Tony

    2016-01-01

    We present a case in which transthoracic echocardiography was the first diagnostic tool to suspect mediastinal Hodgkin's lymphoma by revealing a change in the hemodynamic of left pulmonary artery flow, and it was used as a follow-up method for monitoring treatment efficacy by demonstrating a normalization of pulmonary artery hemodynamics. PMID:27169170

  8. Can Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... HIV is spread among adults mostly through unprotected sex and by injection drug users sharing contaminated needles. Blood transfusions are now an extremely rare source of HIV infection. Curbing the spread of HIV would prevent many deaths from non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Treating HIV with anti- ...

  9. Vorinostat and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-12-08

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  10. [Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Paris, A; Dib, M; Rousselet, M-C; Urban, T; Tazi, A; Gagnadoux, F

    2011-09-01

    Pulmonary Langerhans histiocytosis (PLH) is a rare disease due to the accumulation of Langerhans cells at the level of the bronchioles. These dendritic immunocytes form granulomata and destroy the wall of the airway. We report a case of PLH developing at the same time as Hodgkin's lymphoma in a young woman who smoked tobacco and cannabis. We observed a complete remission of the PLH lesions parallel to the remission of the Hodgkin's lymphoma after chemotherapy, in the absence of any change in the consumption of tobacco and cannabis. This observation leads us to discuss the potential relationships between PLH on one hand, and smoking, the lymphoma and its treatment on the other. PMID:21943541

  11. Non-Hodgkins lymphoma of maxilla: A rare entity

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, M. G.; Agrawal, S. M.; Kambalimath, Deepashri H.

    2011-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a group of neoplasms that originate from the cells of the lymphoreticular system. Forty percent of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas arise from extra nodal sites. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas detected primarily in the bone are quite rare, but among jaw lesions, they are more frequently present in the maxilla than in the mandible. There are no classical characteristic clinical features of lymphomas involving the jaw bones. Swelling, ulcer or discomfort may be present in the region of the lymphoma, or it may mimic a periapical pathology or a benign condition. Extranodal non-Hodgkins lymphoma of the maxilla could present as one of the early manifestation of detrimental diseases. Clinically these types of lymphoma can mimic an inflammatory endo-periodontal lesion with symptoms of pain and local discomfort. The greater the delay in diagnosis subsequently worsens the prognosis. A case of maxillary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with an unusual presentation is discussed. PMID:22639517

  12. Genetically Modified Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Non-Hodgkin or Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-06

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Peripheral/Systemic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; HIV-associated Hodgkin Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage II AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage III AIDS-related Lymphoma; Stage IV AIDS-related Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  13. Lenalidomide and Blinatumomab in Treating Patients With Relapsed Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Mediastinal Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  14. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  15. Alisertib in Combination With Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma, B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Lymphomatous Involvement of Non-Cutaneous Extranodal Site; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides and Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-Cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  16. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Children.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, John T

    2015-09-01

    The non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) of childhood include high-grade mature B cell lymphoma [Burkitt lymphoma (BL), diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and primary mediastinal large B cell lymphoma (PMLBCL)], anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), and lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). The prognosis for children with NHL is generally excellent, although there are some higher risk groups. In this regard, PMLBCL is generally associated with a poorer outcome than BL or DLBCL of comparable stage. The long-term event-free survival for children with ALCL is approximately 70 %. Novel biological agents, including those that target CD-30 or ALK, may hold promise for improving treatment results. Children with LL are treated with regimens derived from those used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Recent biological study of LL may provide insights into revising treatment stratification. The challenge in pediatric NHL, a group that already has a relatively good prognosis, is to improve treatment outcome without increasing concerning late effects. PMID:26174528

  17. An unusual case of composite lymphoma involving chronic lymphocytic leukemia follicular lymphoma and Hodgkin disease.

    PubMed

    Copur, M Sitki; Ledakis, Peter; Novinski, Daniel; Fu, Kai; Hutchins, Mark; Frankforter, Scot; Mleczko, Kris; Sanger, Warren G; Chan, Wing C

    2004-05-01

    Composite lymphomas constitute the presence of two different types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma or Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the same anatomic site. We report an unusual case of a 73-year-old woman who initially presented with a composite lymphoma of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and follicular lymphoma. After 5 years of follow-up and intermittent treatment, she developed Hodgkin disease with diffuse liver involvement. Biopsy of the liver showed Reed-Sternberg cells with typical morphology and immunophenotype. While fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses for t(14;18) were positive in the lymph node tissue with follicular lymphoma, we were unable to show the same in the liver biopsy specimen. Here, we describe the clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features of this unusual composite lymphoma case involving CLL and follicular lymphoma, with the subsequent development of a Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:15291370

  18. PET-CT: reliable cornerstone for Hodgkin lymphoma treatment?

    PubMed

    Zijlstra, Josée M

    2016-03-24

    In this issue of Blood, Barrington et al present the analyses of centrally reviewed positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) used for staging and response monitoring after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine (ABVD) to guide treatment modification in a large prospective clinical trial in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) (Response-Adapted Therapy in Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma [RATHL]). PMID:27013209

  19. Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Plasma Cell Leukemia; Progression of Multiple Myeloma or Plasma Cell Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Plasma Cell Myeloma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  20. Fenretinide and Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-30

    Adult Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage I Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult

  1. Dose Monitoring of Busulfan and Combination Chemotherapy in Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Childhood Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Childhood Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Childhood Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult

  2. Simultaneous presentation of relapsing Hodgkin's disease and treatment-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Perri, R.T.; Allen, J.I.; Oken, M.M.; Limas, C.; Kay, N.E.

    1985-01-01

    A 55-year-old white man was diagnosed in 1975 with Hodgkin's disease stage IIA, mixed cellularity. He was treated with 4,500 rads to an inverted-Y field followed by six cycles of MOPP and remained in complete remission. In 1983 a right axillary lymph node biopsy showed recurrent Hodgkin's disease, mixed cellularity. While receiving his initial chemotherapy he developed persistent epigastric distress. Endoscopic gastric biopsy demonstrated a diffuse large-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Surface marker studies confirmed the separate identity of these two malignant lymphoproliferative processes. This represents the first reported simultaneous occurrence of relapsing Hodgkin's disease with treatment-related non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  3. Alisertib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-09

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma

  4. Fatal measles pneumonitis during Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wyplosz, Benjamin; Lafarge, Marion; Escaut, Lélia; Stern, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of measles pneumonitis in immunocompromised adults is not established. We describe a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed acute pneumonia during a measles infection. On day 13, intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulins were administrated. On day 18, the patient developed acute respiratory failure. An examination of transbronchial pulmonary biopsies showed Warthin-Finkeldey giant cells that are pathognomonic of measles pneumonitis. The patient died despite aggressive supportive care. Our case and a review of literature show that measles pneumonitis is routinely fatal in patients with cancer. We suggest that antiviral drugs should be considered as soon as the diagnosis has been established. PMID:24105383

  5. Fatal measles pneumonitis during Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Wyplosz, Benjamin; Lafarge, Marion; Escaut, Lélia; Stern, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of measles pneumonitis in immunocompromised adults is not established. We describe a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed acute pneumonia during a measles infection. On day 13, intravenous ribavirin and immunoglobulins were administrated. On day 18, the patient developed acute respiratory failure. An examination of transbronchial pulmonary biopsies showed Warthin-Finkeldey giant cells that are pathognomonic of measles pneumonitis. The patient died despite aggressive supportive care. Our case and a review of literature show that measles pneumonitis is routinely fatal in patients with cancer. We suggest that antiviral drugs should be considered as soon as the diagnosis has been established. PMID:24105383

  6. Vorinostat, Rituximab, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Previously Untreated T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Akhter, A; Saleheen, M S; Hussain, M; Majid, N; Rahman, M R; Shermin, S; Rajib, R C; Huda, M M; Haque, N

    2015-01-01

    Non Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) constitute a heterogeneous group of neoplasm of the lymphoid system. There are many histological subtype of NHL based on WHO classification of hematopoietic and lymphoid neoplasm. This cross-sectional study was carried out in the department of Pathology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka from January 2009 to December 2010 to observe the different subtypes of NHL using immunohistochemistry (IHC) with CD3. A total of 50 microscopically diagnosed case of NHL irrespective of age and sex were included in the study. The diagnostic morphologic criteria of each lymphoma subcategory were compiled and diagnosis was made. Mean age of the study subjects were 42.0±19.7 years with range 3-75 years and male female ratio was 1.8:1. Nodal NHL was 66% and extranodal cases were 34%. Maximum number of histolgic subtypes belonged to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and male was predominant in all histological subtypes, except peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL). DLBCL was predominant in all B-cell NHL whereas PTCL was predominant in all T-cell NHL. The most childhood patients belonged to lymphoblastic lymphoma. Regarding cell lineage B-cell NHL was more common than T-cell NHL (88% vs. 12%), but high grade pattern was more predominant in T-cell type (83.3% vs. 65.9%). Among 50 study subjects histological (H & E) diagnosis reveals 46 cases as B-cell NHL and 4 as T-cell NHL but IHC confirms 6 cases as T-cell NHL. PMID:25725676

  8. Non-Hodgkin's Malignant Lymphoma with Aggressive Development

    PubMed Central

    DANCIU, Cezara Elisabeta; HEROIU (CATALOIU), Adriana-Daniela; POPESCU, Cristian Radu

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma is a hematologic malignant disease which usually responds to the polychemotherapy. We present a clinical case report of a 50 years old patient who develops an aggressive type of lymphoma. Patient develops a nodal Non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma who present at hospital admission as a huge tumor at the right side of the neck. Any type of treatment was a failure, the patient having a particularly aggressive form of lymphoma, resistant to all three chemotherapy regimens tested. Death occurs quickly, about one year after diagnosis and initiation of therapy. PMID:25553129

  9. What Are the Risk Factors for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... suggested that chemicals such as benzene and certain herbicides and insecticides (weed- and insect-killing substances) may ... higher risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can also weaken the immune ...

  10. Study of ADCT-402 in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-cell Lineage Non Hodgkin Lymphoma (B-NHL)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Lymphoma, Follicular; Lymphoma, Mantle-Cell; Lymphoma, Marginal Zone; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Oblimersen Sodium and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Recurrent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  12. Concomitant nodal involvement by Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Geurten, Claire; Thiry, Albert; Jamblin, Paul; Demarche, Martine; Hoyoux, Claire

    2015-12-01

    A 10-year-old girl with a family history of Hodgkin's lymphoma presented with a 2 month history of cervical lymphadenopathy and weight loss. Biopsy indicated concomitant nodal involvement by Langerhans cell histiocytosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma. Such an association is rare, especially so in children, but is not an isolated phenomenon, thereby prompting the question of whether Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a reactive or a neoplastic process. PMID:26556799

  13. Second cancers following non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Travis, L.B.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Hankey, B.F.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1991-04-01

    The risk of second malignancies following non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was estimated in 29,153 patients diagnosed with NHL between 1973 and 1987 in one of nine areas participating in the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program. Compared with the general population, NHL patients were at a significantly increased risk of developing second cancers (observed/expected (O/E) = 1.18; O = 1231). The O/E ratio increased significantly with time to reach 1.77 in 10-year survivors. Significant excesses were noted for acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (O/E = 2.88), cancers of the bladder (O/E = 1.30), kidney (O/E = 1.47), and lung (O/E = 1.57), malignant melanoma (O/E = 2.44), and Hodgkin's disease (O/E = 4.16). Chemotherapy appeared related to subsequent acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) and bladder cancer. Radiation therapy was associated with ANLL and possibly cancers of the lung, bladder, and bone. Malignant melanoma was not clearly related to initial NHL treatment.

  14. Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in children.

    PubMed

    Magrath, I T

    1987-12-01

    The spectrum of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) that occurs in children differs markedly from that in adults. This is probably a consequence of differences in the proportions of precursor and mature lymphoid cells in the immune systems of children and adults, and the greater emphasis on the development of an immunologic repertoire in the child. Childhood NHL can be classified into three main types based on histology, all of them diffuse: lymphoblastic, small noncleaved cell, and large cell. The majority of lymphoblastic lymphomas are of immature T cell (thymocyte) origin, although a few have a B cell precursor phenotype. All express the enzyme terminal transferase. Small noncleaved lymphomas express B cell characteristics, as do the majority do the majority of large cell lymphomas, although a small proportion of the latter express T cell characteristics. Very few are of true histiocytic origin. Little is known of the epidemiology of lymphoblastic and large cell lymphomas. However, using histology as a diagnostic criterion, both occur throughout the world and occur primarily, as do all childhood NHL, in the first two decades of life. There appear to be at least two types of small noncleaved cell lymphomas, both of which are associated with specific chromosomal translocations. An endemic form occurs at high frequency in equatorial Africa, and a sporadic form occurs at low frequency throughout the world. The endemic tumor is associated with the Epstein-Barr virus, it has a high incidence of jaw tumors, and has a breakpoint on chromosome 8 that is usually some distance upstream of the c-myc oncogene. The sporadic tumor is only occasionally associated with EBV, it often involves the bone marrow, particularly at relapse, and has a breakpoint on chromosome 8 that is usually very close to or within the c-myc oncogene. Childhood NHL is rarely truly localized, and treatment regimens are always based on chemotherapy. There is no evidence that radiation is beneficial when modern

  15. T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after radiotherapy and chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenthal, R.M.; Harlow, R.W.H.; Mead, A.E.; Tuck, D.; Challis, D.R.

    1981-10-01

    A rapidly fatal T-cell lymphoma developed in a 25-year-old man who, over a period of seven years, had been treated with radiotherapy and combination chemotherapy for Hodgkin's disease (HD). Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is increasingly being recognized as a late sequel of therapy for HD, but this is the first case in which NHL of T-cell type has been identified in such circumstances.

  16. Cellular telephones and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Linet, Martha S; Taggart, Theresa; Severson, Richard K; Cerhan, James R; Cozen, Wendy; Hartge, Patricia; Colt, Joanne

    2006-11-15

    Dramatic increase in hand-held cellular telephone use since the 1980s and excess risk of lymphoproliferative malignancies associated with radio-frequency radiation (RFR) exposures in epidemiological and experimental studies motivated assessment of cellular telephones within a comprehensive US case-control investigation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A questionnaire ascertained cellular telephone use in 551 NHL cases and 462 frequency-matched population controls. Compared to persons who had never used cellular telephones, risks were not increased among individuals whose lifetime use was fewer than 10 (odds ratio (OR) = 0.9, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 0.6, 1.3), 10-100 (OR = 1.0, 95 % CI: 0.7, 1.5) or more than 100 times (e.g., regular users, OR = 0.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 1.4). Among regular users compared to those who had never used hand-held cellular telephones, risks of NHL were not significantly associated with minutes per week, duration, cumulative lifetime or year of first use, although NHL was non-significantly higher in men who used cellular telephones for more than 8 years. Little evidence linked use of cellular telephones with total, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or follicular NHL. These findings must be interpreted in the context of less than 5% of the population reporting duration of use of 6 or more years or lifetime cumulative use of 200 or more hours. PMID:16894556

  17. Nodular lymphocyte predominant hodgkin lymphoma: biology, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Goel, Anupama; Fan, Wen; Patel, Amit A; Devabhaktuni, Madhuri; Grossbard, Michael L

    2014-08-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is an uncommon variant of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. It is characterized histologically by presence of lymphohistiocytic cells which have B-cell phenotype, are positive for CD19, CD20, CD45, CD79a, BOB.1, Oct.2, and negative for CD15 and CD30. Patients often present with early stage of disease and do not have classical B symptoms. The clinical behavior appears to mimic that of an indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma more than that of classical Hodgkin disease. The purpose of the present report is to define the biology of NLPHL, review its clinical presentation, and summarize the available clinical data regarding treatment. PMID:24650975

  18. Clinical presentation and staging of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gallamini, Andrea; Hutchings, Martin; Ramadan, Safaa

    2016-07-01

    In the present chapter the authors present a brief overview of the diagnostic methods proposed over time for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) spread detection, moving from surgical procedures, through standard radiological and functional imaging techniques to the present state of the art for HL staging. The main body of the review will be dedicated to the recently published guidelines for lymphoma staging (including HL) agreed by the experts during the 12th International Congress for Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano. The recommendations of the panel on how to integrate flurodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scan in the armamentarium of staging procedures will be presented and commented, with a special emphasis on the utility of special procedures, such as bone marrow trephine biopsy, which is deemed no longer needed in the PET era. While the HL diagnosis is straightforward in most cases, sometimes HL is a subtle disease, difficult to diagnose for the paucity of symptoms, the absence of physical findings, or for concomitant immunologic disorders: a compete overview of the common and rare patterns of HL clinical presentation will be also offered. The future perspective of PET scan use will be based on a operator-independent, quantitative readings of the scan thanks to a plethora of sophisticated dedicated software, which are now available, able to quantify every voxel captured by the tumor to display the metabolically active tumor volume. Moreover, new tracers are now available able to track the new pathways of cellular metabolism beside glycolysis such as amino acids or purine-analogues or specific oncoproteins; the preliminary, promising results will be reported. Preliminary results from other imaging techniques, such as diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (DW-MRI) will be also reported. PMID:27496305

  19. Geldanamycin Analogue in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-13

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  20. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Tumors or Hodgkin's or Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-11

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. The evolving role of lenalidomide in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Galanina, Natalie; Petrich, Adam; Nabhan, Chadi

    2016-07-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma have driven a paradigm shift from standard chemotherapy to an ever-expanding choice of targeted agents and combinations. As an orally bioavailable immunomodulator with antineoplastic, immunologic, and antiproliferative activity in B-cell lymphoma, lenalidomide has emerged as one such option. Lenalidomide demonstrates clinically significant activity with a favorable safety profile as a single agent, as well as in combination therapy. Herein, we review accumulated clinical data on lenalidomide, with particular reference to patients with first-line and relapsed/refractory mantle cell lymphoma, indolent lymphoma, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26902680

  2. Potential benefits of therapeutic splenectomy for patients with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Schreiber, D.P.; Jacobs, C.; Rosenberg, S.A.; Cox, R.S.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    Thirty-four patients with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent therapeutic splenectomies to improve hematologic tolerance for chemotherapy. The mean age was 40 years; there were 16 males and 18 females. Fourteen had Hodgkin's disease, 19 had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 1 had malignant histocytosis. Nineteen had palpable splenomegaly, 19 had marrow involvement and 20 had splenic involvement by lymphoma. The following data were analyzed before and after splenectomy: mean white blood cell count (WBC) and platelet count on planned first day of cycle, delay ratio of chemotherapy delivery and percent maximal dose rate. Thirteen patients had non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, splenomegaly and positive bone marrow and showed significant benefit in all of the aforementioned parameters. Of the patients with prior irradiation, only those who completed their radiation greater than six months prior to splenectomy showed benefit. Ten patients had Hodgkin's disease, negative bone marrow and no splenomegaly. This group showed significant improvement in mean platelet count but more limited benefit in delay ratio and percent maximal dose rate. Thus, selected patients with lymphoma who are experiencing delays in chemotherapy because of poor count tolerance may benefit from splenectomy.

  3. Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of Idelalisib in Japanese Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-16

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Follicular Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma (With or Without Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia); Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  4. Agatolimod Sodium, Rituximab, and Yttrium Y 90 Ibritumomab Tiuxetan in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-04

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Evidence of Inbreeding in Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Thomsen, Hauke; Inacio da Silva Filho, Miguel; Fuchs, Michael; Ponader, Sabine; Pogge von Strandmann, Elke; Eisele, Lewin; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Engert, Andreas; Hemminki, Kari; Försti, Asta

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have identified several, mainly co-dominantly acting, single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We searched for recessively acting disease loci by performing an analysis of runs of homozygosity (ROH) based on windows of homozygous SNP-blocks and by calculating genomic inbreeding coefficients on a SNP-wise basis. We used data from a previous GWAS with 906 cases and 1217 controls from a population with a long history of no matings between relatives. Ten recurrent ROHs were identified among 25 055 ROHs across all individuals but their association with HL was not genome-wide significant. All recurrent ROHs showed significant evidence for natural selection. As a novel finding genomic inbreeding among cases was significantly higher than among controls (P = 2.11*10−14) even after correcting for covariates. Higher inbreeding among the cases was mainly based on a group of individuals with a higher average length of ROHs per person. This result suggests a correlation of higher levels of inbreeding with higher cancer incidence and might reflect the existence of recessive alleles causing HL. Genomic inbreeding may result in a higher expression of deleterious recessive genes within a population. PMID:27123581

  6. Treatment of advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros P; Johnson, Peter W M

    2016-07-01

    There is now good evidence that the escalated BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, adriamycin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) is more effective in controlling advanced-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) than the widely used ABVD regimen (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine), but the extra efficacy comes at the expense of both short- and long-term toxicity, and there is debate as to whether overall survival is affected. Baseline prognostic factors have proven of limited utility for determining which patients require more intensive therapy and recent studies have sought to use interim fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) evaluation as a means to guide the modulation of treatment, both upwards and downwards in intensity. These suggest that if treatment starts with ABVD then patients remaining PET-positive after 2 months can be salvaged with escalated BEACOPP in around 65% of cases, but those becoming PET-negative may still experience recurrences in 15%-20%, an event that is more common in those with more advanced disease at presentation. There are early data to suggest that starting with escalated BEACOPP may reduce the rate of recurrence after a negative interim PET to less than 10%. This may be an attractive approach for those with very high-risk features at presentation, but risks overtreating many patients if applied nonselectively. New regimens incorporating antibody-drug conjugates may shift the balance of efficacy and toxicity once again, and further studies are underway to evaluate this. PMID:27496308

  7. Treatment of relapsed and refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    von Tresckow, Bastian; Moskowitz, Craig H

    2016-07-01

    Despite the high first-line cure rates in patients with Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) still 10%-20% of patients suffer from relapsed or refractory disease. High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is standard of care for suitable patients with relapsed or refractory HL and allows for cure in approximately 50%. Due to the poor prognosis of high-risk patients even with HDCT and ASCT, consolidation strategies have been evaluated to improve the cure rates. For patients with recurrence after HDCT and ASCT, treatment is palliative in most cases. The anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin (BV) has been shown to induce high response rates in these patients; however, durable responses were reported in a small percentage of patients only. For carefully selected patients with multiple relapses, dose-reduced allogeneic transplant (RICallo) is a potentially curative option. The role of RICallo will have to be re-evaluated in the era of anti-programmed death-1 (PD1) antibodies. PMID:27496309

  8. Texture analysis on MRI images of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harrison, L; Dastidar, P; Eskola, H; Järvenpää, R; Pertovaara, H; Luukkaala, T; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, P-L; Soimakallio, S

    2008-04-01

    The aim here is to show that texture parameters of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data changes in lymphoma tissue during chemotherapy. Ten patients having non-Hodgkin lymphoma masses in the abdomen were imaged for chemotherapy response evaluation three consecutive times. The analysis was performed with MaZda texture analysis (TA) application. The best discrimination in lymphoma MRI texture was obtained within T2-weighted images between the pre-treatment and the second response evaluation stage. TA proved to be a promising quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during medication follow-up. PMID:18342845

  9. The management of adult aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Couderc, B; Dujols, J P; Mokhtari, F; Norkowski, J L; Slawinski, J C; Schlaifer, D

    2000-07-01

    Aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphona include diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphona, and different peripheral T-cell lymphomas. An international prognostic index has been developed including age, serum LDH, performance status, and extranodal involvement. For localized aggressive lymphoma, the preferred treatment is 3-4 CHOP and radiation therapy, with a cure rate of 70-80%. For disseminated aggressive lymphoma, current regimens have a cure rate of less than 40%. Innovative strategies, including dose escalation, autologus stem cell support, new drugs, and immunotherapy are being explored to improve these results. PMID:10863150

  10. Adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Jessica; El-Mallawany, Nader Kim; Abla, Oussama

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a heterogeneous group of lymphoid malignancies accounting for a significant portion of cancers occurring in children, adolescents and young adults with an increasing incidence with age. The adolescent and young adult (AYA) population presents a specific set of characteristics and challenges. The most common diseases occurring in adolescents and young adults include Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, anaplastic large cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma. There is also a higher incidence of primary central nervous system lymphoma in AYA patients. Cure rates largely depend on risk-stratification, and are generally superior to outcomes in comparison to older adult data but less than in younger children. Here, we review the unique clinical and biological characteristics of NHL occurring in the AYA population with a focus on how to achieve similar curative outcomes in AYA that have been established in younger cohorts. PMID:27071675

  11. Neutropenia and Neutropenic Complications in ABVD Chemotherapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Vakkalanka, Bhanu; Link, Brian K.

    2011-01-01

    A combination of Adriamycin (a.k.a. Doxorubicin), Bleomycin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine (ABVD) is the most commonly used chemotherapy regime for Hodgkin lymphoma. This highly effective treatment is associated with a significant risk of neutropenia. Various strategies are adopted to counter this commonly encountered problem, including dose modification, use of colony stimulating factors, and prophylactic or therapeutic use of antibiotics. Data to support these approaches is somewhat controversial, and in keeping with the paucity of definitive evidence, there is a wide disparity in the management of neutropenia in patients receiving ABVD chemotherapy. This paper summarizes the evidence for managing ABVD-related neutropenia during the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:21687649

  12. Paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma - perspectives in translational biology.

    PubMed

    Shiramizu, Bruce; Mussolin, Lara; Woessmann, Wilhelm; Klapper, Wolfram

    2016-05-01

    Exciting advances have been achieved for infants, children and adolescents diagnosed with, and treated for, non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In spite of these successes, new frontiers are being paved to improve the prognosis for those who relapse or have resistant disease. This review summarizes some of the novel approaches and ideas in NHL monitoring, diagnosis and treatment as discussed at the 5th International Symposium on Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma on October 22nd-24th 2015 in Varese, Italy. PMID:27009921

  13. Association between simian virus 40 and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilchez, Regis A.; Madden, Charles R.; Kozinetz, Claudia A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; White, Zoe S.; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L.; Finch, Chris J.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-Hodgkin lymphoma has increased in frequency over the past 30 years, and is a common cancer in HIV-1-infected patients. Although no definite risk factors have emerged, a viral cause has been postulated. Polyomaviruses are known to infect human beings and to induce tumours in laboratory animals. We aimed to identify which one of the three polyomaviruses able to infect human beings (simian virus 40 [SV40], JC virus, and BK virus) was associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. METHODS: We analysed systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma from 76 HIV-1-infected and 78 HIV-1-uninfected patients, and non-malignant lymphoid samples from 79 HIV-1-positive and 107 HIV-1-negative patients without tumours; 54 colon and breast carcinoma samples served as cancer controls. We used PCR followed by Southern blot hybridisation and DNA sequence analysis to detect DNAs of polyomaviruses and herpesviruses. FINDINGS: Polyomavirus T antigen sequences, all of which were SV40-specific, were detected in 64 (42%) of 154 non-Hodgkin lymphomas, none of 186 non-malignant lymphoid samples, and none of 54 control cancers. This difference was similar for HIV-1-infected patients and HIV-1-uninfected patients alike. Few tumours were positive for both SV40 and Epstein-Barr virus. Human herpesvirus type 8 was not detected. SV40 sequences were found most frequently in diffuse large B-cell and follicular-type lymphomas. INTERPRETATION: SV40 is significantly associated with some types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. These results add lymphomas to the types of human cancers associated with SV40.

  14. Novel Targeted Agents in Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Natalie S.; Park, Steven I.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a recent emergence of novel targeted agents for treatment of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. In particular, antibodies and antibody-drug conjugates directed against surface antigens, agents that block immune checkpoint pathways, and small molecule inhibitors directed against cell signaling pathways have shown significant promise in patients with relapsed and refractory disease and in the frontline setting. With the development of these new therapies, cytotoxic chemotherapy may be avoided entirely in some clinical settings. This review will present the latest information on these novel treatments in Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma and will discuss both recently approved agents as well as drugs currently being studied in clinical trials. PMID:26393619

  15. A Challenging Case of Primary Breast Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    ZARNESCU, Narcis Octavian; ILIESIU, Andreea; PROCOP, Alexandru; TAMPA, Mircea; MATEI, Clara; SAJIN, Maria; COSTACHE, Mariana; DUMITRU, Adrian; LAZAROIU, Anca Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    Primary breast lymphoma (PBL) is a rare entity accounting for less than 1% of all breast malignancies. Diagnostic criteria for primary Hodgkin's lymphoma of the breast are: the presence of sufficient tissue for diagnosis, close interaction between mammary tissue and lymphomatous infiltrate and no evidence or prior diagnosis of widespread lymphoma. Our case illustrates an unusual presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma of the breast: clinically as inflammatory breast cancer and core biopsy as granulomatous mastitis, the final diagnosis requiring surgical biopsy. Current information regarding this entity is scant, mainly build upon its rarity. In this paper we assess the clinical presentation, the step-by-step diagnosis, the treatment and the importance of immunohistochemistry in this uncommon condition. PMID:26225149

  16. Yttrium Y 90 Basiliximab and Combination Chemotherapy Before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Mature T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-29

    Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  17. Thyroid Malignancies in Survivors of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Michaelson, Evan M.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Silver, Barbara; Tishler, Roy B.; Marcus, Karen J.; Stevenson, Mary Ann; Ng, Andrea K.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To quantify the incidence of thyroid cancer after Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and determine disease characteristics, risk factors, and treatment outcomes. Methods and Materials: Thyroid cancer cases were retrospectively identified from a multi-institutional database of 1981 HL patients treated between 1969 and 2008. Thyroid cancer risk factors were evaluated by a Poisson regression model. Results: With a median follow-up duration of 14.3 years (range, 0-41.2 years), 28 patients (1.4%) developed a thyroid malignancy. The overall incidence rate (expressed as the number of cases per 10,000 person-years) and 10-year cumulative incidence of thyroid cancer were 9.6 and 0.26%, respectively. There were no observed cases of thyroid malignancy in patients who received neck irradiation for HL after age 35 years. Age <20 years at HL diagnosis and female sex were significantly associated with thyroid cancer. The incidence rates of females aged <20 at HL diagnosis in the first 10 years, ≥10 years, ≥15 years, and ≥20 years after treatment were 5, 31, 61, and 75 cases per 10,000 person-years of follow-up, respectively. At a median follow-up of 3.5 years after the thyroid cancer diagnosis, 26 patients (93%) were alive without disease, 1 (4%) was alive with metastatic disease, and 1 (4%) died of metastatic disease, at 6 and 3.6 years after the thyroid cancer diagnosis, respectively. Conclusions: Although HL survivors have an increased risk for thyroid cancer, the overall incidence is low. Routine thyroid cancer screening may benefit females treated at a young age and ≥10 years from HL treatment owing to their higher risk, which increases over time.

  18. Hodgkin lymphoma: A clinicopathological and immunophenotypic study

    PubMed Central

    Konkay, Kaumudi; Paul, Tara Roshni; Uppin, Shantveer G.; Rao, Digumarti Raghunadha

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is defined in terms of its microscopic appearance (histology) and the expression of cell surface markers (immunophenotype). Aims and objectives: This study aims to analyze the clinical features, histomorphology, and immunoprofile of over 200 patients of HL diagnosed over a period of 4 years at our institute and to determine relative frequency of various histological subtypes (based on WHO classification) in relation to age and sex distribution in this part of the country. Materials and Methods: All HL cases diagnosed between January 2006 and December 2009 were retrieved from hospital records. The histopathology of both lymph node and bone marrow biopsy (where ever available) along with immunohistochemistry (CD15, CD30, CD20, and ALK) were reviewed. Results: There was a bimodal age distribution. HL affected people a decade earlier than in the western population. The most common presenting complaint was cervical lymphadenopathy. Mixed cellularity was the most frequent subtype (67%), followed by nodular sclerosing subtype (23.5%). Group A (CD15+, CD30+, CD20−), which represents the archetypical immunophenotype of classical HL (CHL) was the most common type (60.6%). The number of CD15 negative CHL was 35.8% and CD20 positive CHL was 17.5%. CD15 negativity with CD20 positivity was seen in 5% CHL. One out of seven CD20 positive CHL patients showed relapse. Conclusion: In this paper, we have discussed in detail about various clinical and histopathological parameters of HL and their relative frequency in various histological subtypes. This paper is being presented as it is a rather large study from India taking into consideration the clinical, pathologic, and immunophenotypic profile of the patients. PMID:27051160

  19. Can pregnancy aggravate the course of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Giovannini, M; Saccucci, P; Cannone, D; Damiani, G; Pomini, P

    1989-01-01

    The Authors present three cases of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) in pregnancy and discuss about problem of diagnosis and management of NHL in this condition. They stress that the diagnosis of NHL in pregnancy is delayed and the clinical progression of lymphoma is probably influenced by hormonal and immunological changes occurring during pregnancy. On the other hand the management of NHL is problematic because radiotherapy is potentially teratogenic. (By editorial staff). PMID:2776787

  20. Rituximab and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-08-11

    Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  1. Radiation-induced splenic atrophy in patients with Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    SciTech Connect

    Dailey, M.O.; Coleman, C.N.; Kaplan, H.S.

    1980-01-24

    Effective treatment of Hodgkin's disease requires the determination of the extent of the disease. This usually involves staging laparotomy, which includes splenectomy and biopsies of the para-aortic lymph nodes, liver, and bone marrow. Absence of the spleen predisposes a person to fulminant septicemia from encapsulated bacteria, a risk even greater in patients undergoing treatment for Hodgkin's disease. For this reason, some investigators have suggested that spleens not be removed for diagnosis but, rather, that they be included within the fields of radiation, which would preserve normal splenic function. We present a case of fatal spontaneous pneumococcal sepsis in a patient with splenic atrophy; the sepsis occurred 12 years after successful treatment of Hodgkin's disease by total nodal and splenic irradiation. A retrospective study of patients treated for Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas indicated that atrophy and functional asplenia may be an important sequela of splenic irradiation.

  2. Risk and Outcome of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Among Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Ana C; Armeson, Kent E.; Hill, Elizabeth G; Costa, Luciano J

    2013-01-01

    Background Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) survivors are at increased risk to develop secondary non-Hodgkin lymphomas (sNHL). The outcome of patients with sNHL relative to their de novo counterparts (dnNHL) is unknown. Methods We utilized data of 26,826 HL cases from the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program diagnosed between 1992 and 2009 to obtain the risk of further development of different subtypes of sNHL. We then compared survival of sNHL with the survival of matched dnNHL patients. Results The estimated cumulative incidence of sNHL was 2.50% (95% C.I. 2.10-2.89) after 15 years from the diagnosis of cHL. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was 10.5 (95% C.I. 8.9-12.4) for aggressive B-cell NHL, 4.0 (95% C.I. 3.1-5.1) for indolent B-cell NHL and 14.6 (95% C.I. 10.3-20.1) for T cell NHL. Patients with indolent B-cell sNHL had worse OS than their dnNHL counterparts (HR of death 2.7, 95% CI 1.3-5.7). Survival was not significantly different between sNHL and dnNHL for aggressive B-cell NHL (HR 1.3, 95% C.I. 0.6-2.7) or T-cell NHL (HR 0.8, 95% C.I 0.3-1.8). Conclusions The risk of developing sNHL after cHL is substantial. While patients with indolent B-cell sNHL have inferior survival, patients with aggressive B-cell sNHL and T-cell sNHL have survival comparable to their de novo counterparts. PMID:23797978

  3. Radiation Plus Chemotherapy in Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Adding radiation therapy to chemotherapy may improve outcomes in patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, according to a paper published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in February 2011, but the long-term effects of this regimen are not

  4. CD10 positive thyroid marginal zone non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Millar, E K; Waldron, S; Spencer, A; Braye, S

    1999-01-01

    A 72 year old woman presented with swelling of the right lobe of her thyroid gland. Fine needle aspiration and flow cytometry showed a clonal population of B cells expressing CD10 and a diagnosis of follicle centre cell lymphoma was made. Subsequent excision of the thyroid showed the typical histological features of a marginal zone non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Polymerase chain reaction showed no evidence of t (14;18). Immunohistochemistry confirmed CD10 positivity and LN1 (CDw75) expression. This is only the second report of aberrant expression of CD 10 by a marginal zone lymphoma. Images PMID:10690178

  5. Etiologic heterogeneity among non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophia S.; Cozen, Wendy; Linet, Martha S.; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard K.; Colt, Joanne S.; Vasef, Mohammad A.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Blair, Aaron; Bernstein, Leslie; Cross, Amanda J.; De Roos, Anneclaire J.; Engels, Eric A.; Hein, David W.; Hill, Deirdre A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Lim, Unhee; Lynch, Charles F.; Schenk, Maryjean; Wacholder, Sholom; Ward, Mary H.; Hoar Zahm, Shelia; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cerhan, James R.; Hartge, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    Understanding patterns of etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for non-Hodgkin lymphomas may illuminate lymphomagenesis. We present the first systematic comparison of risks by lymphoma subtype for a broad range of putative risk factors in a population-based case-control study, including diffuse large B-cell (DLBCL; N = 416), follicular (N = 318), and marginal zone lymphomas (N = 106), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL; N = 133). We required at least 2 of 3 analyses to support differences in risk: (1) polytomous logistic regression, (2) homogeneity tests, or (3) dichotomous logistic regression, analyzing all 7 possible pairwise comparisons among the subtypes, corresponding to various groupings by clinical behavior, genetic features, and differentiation. Late birth order and high body mass index (≥ 35) kg/m2) increased risk for DLBCL alone. Autoimmune conditions increased risk for marginal zone lymphoma alone. The tumor necrosis factor G-308A polymorphism (rs1800629) increased risks for both DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma. Exposure to certain dietary heterocyclic amines from meat consumption increased risk for CLL/SLL alone. We observed no significant risk factors for follicular lymphoma alone. These data clearly support both etiologic commonality and heterogeneity for lymphoma subtypes, suggesting that immune dysfunction is of greater etiologic importance for DLBCL and marginal zone lymphoma than for CLL/SLL and follicular lymphoma. PMID:18796628

  6. Stages of Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  7. Treatment Options for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... with HIV infection. Age, gender, and a weakened immune system can affect the risk of adult non-Hodgkin ... the cancer cells to normal cells of the immune system. Other tests and procedures may be done depending ...

  8. Stages of Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... with HIV infection. Age, gender, and a weakened immune system can affect the risk of adult non-Hodgkin ... the cancer cells to normal cells of the immune system. Other tests and procedures may be done depending ...

  9. Radiotherapy Does Not Influence the Severe Pulmonary Toxicity Observed With the Administration of Gemcitabine and Bleomycin in Patients With Advanced-Stage Hodgkin's Lymphoma Treated With the BAGCOPP Regimen: A Report by the German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group

    SciTech Connect

    Macann, Andrew; Bredenfeld, Henning; Mueller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas; Eich, Hans Theodor

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of radiotherapy on the severe pulmonary toxicity observed in the pilot study of BAGCOPP (bleomycin, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone, and gemcitabine) for advanced-stage Hodgkin's lymphoma. Methods and Materials: Patients with Stage III or IV Hodgkin's lymphoma or Stage IIB with risk factors participated in this single-arm, multicenter pilot study. Results: Twenty-seven patients were enrolled on the study before its premature closure as a result of the development of serious pulmonary toxicity in 8 patients. The pulmonary toxicity occurred either during or immediately after the BAGCOPP chemotherapy course. Pulmonary toxicity contributed to one early fatality but resolved in the other 7 patients after cessation of gemcitabine and bleomycin, allowing continuation of therapy. Fifteen patients received consolidative radiotherapy, including 4 who previously had pulmonary toxicity. There were no reported cases of radiation pneumonitis and no exacerbation of pulmonary symptoms in the 4 patients who had had previous pulmonary toxicity. Conclusions: The severe pulmonary toxicity observed in this study has been attributed to an interaction between gemcitabine and bleomycin. Gemcitabine (when administered without bleomycin) remains of interest in Hodgkin's lymphoma and is being incorporated into a new German Hodgkin's Lymphoma Study Group protocol that also includes consolidative radiotherapy. This study supports the concept of the integration of radiotherapy in gemcitabine-containing regimens in Hodgkin's lymphoma if there is an interval of at least 4 weeks between the two modalities and with a schedule whereby radiotherapy follows the chemotherapy.

  10. Fusion Protein Cytokine Therapy After Rituximab in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  11. Perinatal and Family Risk Factors for Hodgkin Lymphoma in Childhood Through Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Kristina; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of Hodgkin lymphoma has increased among adolescents and young adults in recent decades, but the relevant risk factors in early life are still unknown. A national cohort study was conducted of 3,571,574 individuals born in Sweden in 1973–2008 and followed up for Hodgkin lymphoma incidence through 2009, to examine perinatal and family risk factors for Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood through young adulthood (ages 0–37 years). There were 943 Hodgkin lymphoma cases identified in 66.3 million person-years of follow-up. High fetal growth was associated with an increased risk of Hodgkin lymphoma after adjustment for gestational age at birth and other potential confounders (Ptrend = 0.005). Family history of Hodgkin lymphoma in a sibling or parent also was strongly associated with an increased risk, with adjusted hazard ratios = 8.83 (95% confidence interval: 3.67, 21.30) and 7.19 (95% confidence interval: 3.58, 14.44), respectively. No association was found between gestational age at birth, birth order, twinning, parental age, or parental education and Hodgkin lymphoma. These findings did not vary by age at Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis. Similar associations were found for nodular sclerosis and mixed cellularity subtypes. These findings suggest that perinatal factors including possible growth factor pathways may contribute to the risk of Hodgkin lymphoma in childhood through young adulthood. PMID:23171883

  12. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma response evaluation with MRI texture classification

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Lara CV; Luukkaala, Tiina; Pertovaara, Hannu; Saarinen, Tuomas O; Heinonen, Tomi T; Järvenpää, Ritva; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa I; Eskola, Hannu J; Dastidar, Prasun

    2009-01-01

    Background To show magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) texture appearance change in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) during treatment with response controlled by quantitative volume analysis. Methods A total of 19 patients having NHL with an evaluable lymphoma lesion were scanned at three imaging timepoints with 1.5T device during clinical treatment evaluation. Texture characteristics of images were analyzed and classified with MaZda application and statistical tests. Results NHL tissue MRI texture imaged before treatment and under chemotherapy was classified within several subgroups, showing best discrimination with 96% correct classification in non-linear discriminant analysis of T2-weighted images. Texture parameters of MRI data were successfully tested with statistical tests to assess the impact of the separability of the parameters in evaluating chemotherapy response in lymphoma tissue. Conclusion Texture characteristics of MRI data were classified successfully; this proved texture analysis to be potential quantitative means of representing lymphoma tissue changes during chemotherapy response monitoring. PMID:19545438

  13. Development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma following therapy for Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H.D.; Bedetti, C.D.; Boggs, D.R.

    1980-12-15

    Three patients developed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) 3 to 6 years after treatment for Hodgkin's disease (HD). In no instance was there evidence of recurrence of HD following the initial chemotherapy or radiotherapy. None of these patients had received both radiation therapy and chemotherapy. All patients responded well to conventional chemotherapy for NHL and are alive at 23 +, 37 +, and 65+ months after that secondary diagnosis. This report, when coupled with at least ten other such reported patients, suggests that NHL may be a relatively uncommon but significant complication of therapy for HD and must be distinguished for recurrence of HD.

  14. [A surgical case of Hodgkin's lymphoma originated from thymus].

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Y; Kobayashi, T; Nawata, S; Hirayama, T; Mori, F; Esato, K

    1990-01-01

    We experienced a surgical case of large Hodgkin's lymphoma of the thymus. An 18 year-old male who had been complaining of a persistent cough was admitted to our hospital. Chest X-ray film showed an anterosuperior mediastinal tumor. But there was no superficial lymphadenopathy and hepatosplenomegaly. He received a surgical extirpation of the tumor approached by median sternotomy. The tumor expanded to the whole antero superior mediastinal region, which was 18.5 X 15 X 5.5 cm in size, surrounding the trachea and main branch of aortic arch and veins. The tumor directly invaded the bilateral pleura and left innominate vein, so these regions were resected with the tumor. The left innominate vein was reconstructed with a PTFE graft. The pathological diagnosis was Hodgkin's lymphoma nodular sclerosis type by LSG classification. A post operative course was uneventful. PMID:2329291

  15. Concurrent Presentation of Hodgkin Lymphoma and Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Miklos; Spurgeon, Stephen E.

    2013-01-01

    The simultaneous presentation of the Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the absence of prior chemotherapy or radiation is very rare. Here, we discuss a 72-year-old patient who initially presented with generalized pruritis. Workup led to a diagnosis of multiple myeloma which progressed and required treatment. As part of his pretreatment workup, an MRI was performed to evaluate skeletal lesions. This revealed diffuse and bulky adenopathy which was confirmed by PET. A biopsy of an axillary node was consistent with the nodular sclerosing type Hodgkin lymphoma. He was treated with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy × 6 resulting in complete resolution of his adenopathy and pruritis as well as improvement in his myeloma. PMID:24027647

  16. Brentuximab vedotin desensitization in a patient with refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Arora, Anubha; Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Liewer, Susanne; Armitage, James O; Bociek, R Gregory

    2015-10-01

    Brentuximab vedotin has emerged as a useful treatment option for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma; however, uncommon cases of anaphylactic reactions may require its permanent discontinuation. We report a 29-yr-old woman with refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma, who developed an anaphylactic reaction during the second dose of brentuximab vedotin. A 12-step desensitization protocol was followed; after premedicating with antihistaminic agents, methylprednisolone and montelukast, a total dose of 156 mg of brentuximab vedotin (1.8 mg/kg) was given as three infusions with increasing rate and concentration. Such desensitization protocol can allow safe administration of brentuximab vedotin and may have a broader applicability in managing hypersensitivity reactions with other monoclonal antibodies. PMID:25892213

  17. Advanced-stage nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma compared with classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a matched pair outcome analysis.

    PubMed

    Xing, Katharine H; Connors, Joseph M; Lai, Anky; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Sehn, Laurie H; Villa, Diego; Klasa, Richard; Shenkier, Tamara; Gascoyne, Randy D; Skinnider, Brian; Savage, Kerry J

    2014-06-01

    Due to disease rarity, there is limited information regarding the optimal therapy and outcome for patients with advanced-stage nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL). Forty-two patients with NLPHL by the Revised European-American Lymphoma/World Health Organization classification with advanced-stage disease were identified and paired 1:2 with a matched control with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) matched by age, gender, stage, decade of diagnosis, and treatment received. The median follow-up was 11.3 years (range, 1.9 to 35.5 years) for NLPHL patients and 10.7 years (range, 1.6 to 26.3 years) for CHL patients. The majority received doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD)-like chemotherapy. Although the 10-year overall survival (OS) (P = .579) and HL freedom from treatment failure (HL-FFTF) were similar between NLPHL and CHL patients (75% vs 73%; P = .610), the time to progression (TTP), which also includes the development of secondary aggressive lymphoma, was inferior in NLPHL (10-year, 63% vs 73%; P = .040). Splenic involvement was associated with an inferior 10-year TTP in patients treated with ABVD (48% vs 71%; P = .049) and an increased cumulative incidence of secondary aggressive lymphoma (P = .014) providing a rationale for further evaluation of cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) with rituximab in NLPHL. PMID:24713929

  18. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  19. Laboratory Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  20. Involved-Node Radiotherapy and Modern Radiation Treatment Techniques in Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paumier, Amaury; Ghalibafian, Mithra; Beaudre, Anne; Ferreira, Ivaldo; Pichenot, Charlotte; Messai, Taha; Lessard, Nathalie Athalie; Lefkopoulos, Dimitri; Girinsky, Theodore

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To assess the clinical outcome of the involved-node radiotherapy (INRT) concept using modern radiation treatments (intensity-modulated radiotherapy [IMRT]or deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy [DIBH) in patients with localized supradiaphragmatic Hodgkin lymphoma. Methods and Materials: All but 2 patients had early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma, and they were treated with chemotherapy prior to irradiation. Radiation treatments were delivered using the INRT concept according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer guidelines. IMRT was performed with the patient free-breathing. For the adapted breath-hold technique, a spirometer dedicated to DIBH radiotherapy was used. Three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy was performed with those patients. Results: Fifty patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (48 patients with primary Hodgkin lymphoma, 1 patient with recurrent disease, and 1 patient with refractory disease) entered the study from January 2003 to August 2008. Thirty-two patients were treated with IMRT, and 18 patients were treated with the DIBH technique. The median age was 28 years (range, 17-62 years). Thirty-four (68%) patients had stage I - (I-IIA) IIA disease, and 16 (32%) patients had stage I - (I-IIB) IIB disease. All but 3 patients received three to six cycles of adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD). The median radiation doses to patients treated with IMRT and DIBH were, respectively, 40 Gy (range, 21.6-40 Gy) and 30.6 Gy (range, 19.8-40 Gy). Protection of various organs at risk was satisfactory. Median follow-up was 53.4 months (range, 19.1-93 months). The 5-year progression-free and overall survival rates for the whole population were 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 80%-97%) and 94% (95% CI, 75%-98%), respectively. Recurrences occurred in 4 patients: 2 patients had in-field relapses, and 2 patients had visceral recurrences. Grade 3 acute lung toxicity (transient pneumonitis) occurred in 1 case. Conclusions

  1. KLF4 is a tumor suppressor in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and in classic Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Guan, Hanfeng; Xie, Linka; Leithäuser, Frank; Flossbach, Lucia; Möller, Peter; Wirth, Thomas; Ushmorov, Alexey

    2010-09-01

    The transcription factor KLF4 may act both as an oncogene and a tumor suppressor in a tissue-depending manner. In T- and pre-B-cell lymphoma, KLF4 was found to act as tumor suppressor. We found the KLF4 promoter methylated in B-cell lymphoma cell lines and in primary cases of B-cell lymphomas, namely, follicular lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt lymphoma, and in classic Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) cases. Promoter hypermethylation was associated with silencing of KLF4 expression. Conditional overexpression of KLF4 in Burkitt lymphoma cell lines moderately retarded proliferation, via cell-cycle arrest in G(0)/G(1). In the cHL cell lines, KLF4 induced massive cell death that could partially be inhibited with Z-VAD.fmk. A quantitative reverse-transcribed polymerase chain reaction array revealed KLF4 target genes, including the proapoptotic gene BAK1. Using an shRNA-mediated knock-down approach, we found that BAK1 is largely responsible for KLF4-induced apoptosis. In addition, we found that KLF4 negatively regulates CXCL10, CD86, and MSC/ABF-1 genes. These genes are specifically up-regulated in HRS cells of cHL and known to be involved in establishing the cHL phenotype. We conclude that epigenetic silencing of KLF4 in B-cell lymphomas and particularly in cHL may favor lymphoma survival by loosening cell-cycle control and protecting from apoptosis. PMID:20519630

  2. Association between incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and solar ultraviolet radiation in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Bentham, G.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To examine whether the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in different areas of England and Wales is associated with levels of solar ultraviolet radiation. DESIGN--Geographically based study examining the association between incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and estimated levels of solar ultraviolet radiation, controlling for social class and employment in agriculture. SETTING--59 counties in England and Wales. SUBJECTS--All registered cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma during the period 1968-85. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Age and sex adjusted odds ratio for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in each county. RESULTS--Incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was significantly associated with solar ultraviolet radiation levels (P < 0.001), even after social class and employment in agriculture were controlled for (P = 0.004). In a comparison of counties in the highest and lowest quarters of solar ultraviolet radiation, the relative risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was 1.27 (95% confidence interval 1.24 to 1.29), rising to 1.34 (1.32 to 1.37) after adjustment for social class and employment in agriculture. CONCLUSIONS--The incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in different areas of England and Wales is positively associated with levels of solar ultraviolet radiation. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that exposure to solar ultraviolet radiation increases the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:8620128

  3. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at the medial clavicular head mimicking Tietze Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jeon, In-Ho; Jeong, Won-Ju; Yi, Jae-Hyuck; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Park, Il-Hyung

    2012-08-01

    We present a case of Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving medial clavicular head, which was initially diagnosed as Tietze syndrome. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma arising from medial clavicular head is extremely rare, and CT, MRI findings have not been reported. PMID:21140267

  4. Salvia Hispanica Seed in Reducing Risk of Disease Recurrence in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma; B Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Burkitt Leukemia; Central Nervous System Lymphoma; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy-Associated T-Cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Mediastinal (Thymic) Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Mycosis Fungoides; Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-Cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Primary Effusion Lymphoma; Sezary Syndrome; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma; Systemic Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Transformed Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  5. The immune microenvironment in Hodgkin lymphoma: T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints

    PubMed Central

    Vardhana, Santosha; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma is curable in the majority of cases with chemotherapy and/or radiation. However, 15–20% of patients ultimately relapse and succumb to their disease. Pathologically, classical Hodgkin lymphoma is characterized by rare tumor-initiating Reed-Sternberg cells surrounded by a dense immune microenvironment. However, the role of the immune microenvironment, particularly T and B cells, in either promoting or restricting Classical Hodgkin lymphoma growth remains undefined. Recent dramatic clinical responses seen using monoclonal antibodies against PD-1, a cell surface receptor whose primary function is to restrict T cell activation, have reignited questions regarding the function of the adaptive immune system in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. This review summarizes what is known regarding T cells, B cells, and immune checkpoints in classical Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27365459

  6. Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of classical Hodgkin lymphoma are highly dependent on oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Birkenmeier, Katrin; Dröse, Stefan; Wittig, Ilka; Winkelmann, Ria; Käfer, Viktoria; Döring, Claudia; Hartmann, Sylvia; Wenz, Tina; Reichert, Andreas S; Brandt, Ulrich; Hansmann, Martin-Leo

    2016-05-01

    The metabolic properties of lymphomas derived from germinal center (GC) B cells have important implications for therapeutic strategies. In this study, we have compared metabolic features of Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells, the tumor cells of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL), one of the most frequent (post-)GC-derived B-cell lymphomas, with their normal GC B cell counterparts. We found that the ratio of oxidative to nonoxidative energy conversion was clearly shifted toward oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS)-linked ATP synthesis in HRS cells as compared to GC B cells. Mitochondrial mass, the expression of numerous key proteins of oxidative metabolism and markers of mitochondrial biogenesis were markedly upregulated in cHL cell lines and in primary cHL cases. NFkappaB promoted this shift to OXPHOS. Functional analysis indicated that both cell growth and viability of HRS cells depended on OXPHOS. The high rates of OXPHOS correlated with an almost complete lack of lactate production in HRS cells not observed in other GC B-cell lymphoma cell lines. Overall, we conclude that OXPHOS dominates energy conversion in HRS cells, while nonoxidative ATP production plays a subordinate role. Our results suggest that OXPHOS could be a new therapeutic target and may provide an avenue toward new treatment strategies in cHL. PMID:26595876

  7. Expression of p63 in anaplastic large cell lymphoma but not in classical Hodgkin's lymphoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Weiss, Lawrence M.; Bacchi, Carlos E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Immunohistochemical determination of p63 protein is frequently used in the pathologic diagnosis of nonhematological solid tumors. In malignant hematological disease, p63 expression has been reported in 22% of follicular lymphoma, about 35% of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, 23% of chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and in some cases of blast crisis of chronic myelogenous leukemia. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare disease that accounts for less than 5% of all cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There is little information concerning p63 expression in this specific type of lymphoma. In some cases, the morphological and phenotypic features between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma are similar, making this differential diagnosis challenging. We studied p63 expression using a tissue microarray approach in 154 cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma, including 38% anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 62% anaplastic large cell kinase negative, and 58 Hodgkin's lymphoma cases. Sixty-eight cases of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (44%) showed p63 nuclear positivity (41% of anaplastic large cell kinase positive and 47% of anaplastic large cell kinase negative). Of 130 cases of systemic-anaplastic large cell lymphoma, 42% showed p63 positivity. The neoplastic cells expressed p63 in 38% of the cases of CD45-negative/anaplastic large cell kinase–negative null cell–type anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a subgroup that offers the most difficulties in the differential diagnosis with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. In contrast, none of the cases of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma demonstrated any p63 expression. These results demonstrate that p63 protein expression is frequently expressed in a subset of anaplastic large cell lymphoma cases and may be used as a potential tool in the differential diagnosis between anaplastic large cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:18620733

  8. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas in pregnancy: tackling therapeutic quandaries.

    PubMed

    Avivi, Irit; Farbstein, Dan; Brenner, Benjamin; Horowitz, Netanel A

    2014-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) often present with systemic symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath and night sweats, mimicking pregnancy-related features which may result in delayed disease diagnosis. Furthermore, the wish to avoid investigational imaging, aiming to protect the fetus from radiation exposure, may lead to a further delay, which does not often result in significant changes in HL clinical nature and patient outcome. In contrast, a more aggressive behavior (i.e., advanced disease stage and reproductive organ involvement) of most NHL types diagnosed in pregnancy may require urgent therapeutic intervention to prevent disease progression. Current management of pregnancy-associated NHL depends on histological subtype of the disease, gestational stage at diagnosis and the urgency of treatment for a specific patient. Patients diagnosed with indolent lymphoma may often be just followed, whereas those presenting with aggressive or highly aggressive disease need to be urgently treated with chemoimmunotherapy, either after undergoing an elective pregnancy termination if diagnosed at an early gestational stage, or with pregnancy preservation, if diagnosed later. Supportive care of NHL is also important; however, granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) which is commonly used outside of pregnancy, should be cautiously employed, considering its established teratogenicity in animals, though this is less proven in humans. In conclusion, given the paucity of studies prospectively evaluating the outcome of pregnant women with NHL, international efforts are warranted to elucidate critical issues and develop guidelines for the management of such patients. PMID:25108745

  9. Primary anorectal Hodgkin lymphoma: report of a case and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Maria Raffaella; Rocca, Bruno Jim; Barone, Aurora; Mastrogiulio, Maria Grazia; Costa, Aurelio; Bellan, Cristiana; Lazzi, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Primary colorectal lymphomas are very rare. They are mostly B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Only 2 cases of anorectal Hodgkin lymphoma have been described so far, both affecting HIV-infected males and showing Epstein-Barr virus infection. We report an unusual case of primary Hodgkin lymphoma of the anorectal region in an HIV-negative, Epstein-Barr virus-infected patient and in the absence of inflammatory bowel disease. The importance of distinguishing Hodgkin lymphoma from Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoproliferative disorders and from Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly is stressed in particular in non-immunocompromised patients and in the absence of history of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:24440095

  10. Current and future immunotherapeutic approaches in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bröckelmann, Paul J; Borchmann, Peter; Engert, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has become a highly curable malignancy even in advanced stages when treated adequately. However, relapsed or refractory disease and treatment-related toxicity constitute a significant clinical challenge. Innovative approaches are thus needed to improve treatment of these mainly young patients. In HL lesions, very few malignant Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells are embedded in an immunosuppressive microenvironment of reactive cells. Novel approaches such as bispecific antibodies, antibody-drug conjugates, immune-checkpoint inhibitors or adoptive cellular therapies are currently being investigated with promising results in relapsed or refractory patients. Encouraging response rates and a favorable toxicity profile have recently been reported in early phase clinical trials with antibodies blocking the programed-death receptor 1 (PD1). This review will summarize the current clinical knowledge on mechanism, safety and efficacy of the different agents and discuss potential future strategies, which are partly already investigated within clinical trials. PMID:27243940

  11. A case of concomitant Hodgkin's lymphoma with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Ramanjula C; Mathew, Meghena; Parameswaran, Ashok; Narasimhan, R

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) presenting with Hodgkin's Lymphoma is a rare and difficult clinical situation for any physician to identify and to manage because of very similar clinical presentation. Herein we report a case of 29 year old woman who presented with enlarged lymph nodes, diagnosed and initiated on therapy for TB, based on the cervical node biopsy that showed granulomatous lymphadenitis suggestive of TB. Despite being on regular isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide and ethambutol regimen, she did not improve but worsened clinically! After an extensive work up that included endobronchial ultrasound (EBUS) and mediastinoscopy, a diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease of nodular sclerosis type was made. She was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy along with her TB therapy. Patient showed significant improvement following therapy. PMID:24669086

  12. Three cases demonstrating the role of gallium scanning in relapsing Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Zollars, L.E.; Nagel, J.S.; Tumeh, S.S.

    1987-10-01

    Restaging of Hodgkin's disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma for chemotherapy traditionally requires chest radiograph and abdominal computerized tomogram (CT) for routine follow-up examination. Although gallium scanning has had a poor record in the past, recent studies suggest that improved techniques have given this method high sensitivity. We present three cases in which gallium correctly staged lymphoma that had been missed or misinterpreted by chest radiographs and abdominal CT. Gallium imaging is useful in follow-up of lymphoma patients especially when the CT scan is difficult to interpret.

  13. SNPs Array Karyotyping in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Etebari, Maryam; Navari, Mohsen; Piccaluga, Pier Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The traditional methods for detection of chromosomal aberrations, which included cytogenetic or gene candidate solutions, suffered from low sensitivity or the need for previous knowledge of the target regions of the genome. With the advent of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays, genome screening at global level in order to find chromosomal aberrations like copy number variants, DNA amplifications, deletions, and also loss of heterozygosity became feasible. In this review, we present an update of the knowledge, gained by SNPs arrays, of the genomic complexity of the most important subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

  14. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma originating in the spermatic cord.

    PubMed

    Lands, R H

    1996-03-01

    An otherwise healthy 57-year-old man was found to have an early stage, high-grade, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the spermatic cord. A plan of treatment involving surgery, radiation therapy, combination chemotherapy, and central nervous system prophylaxis was recommended. He did not complete the recommended treatment plan, and subsequently returned with recurrent tumor in his brain. This case highlights the similarity of spermatic cord NHL to primary NHL of the testicle, and the propensity of both to progress or relapse in nodal and extranodal patterns. PMID:8604473

  15. Unusual case of pulmonary rickettsiosis in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pugliese, C; Parigi, P C; Bamberga, M; Perani, V; Moioli, F; Delvecchio, G; Lorenzi, N; Cottini, M; Michetti, G

    1997-06-01

    A case report of boutonneuse fever with pulmonary complications in a patient with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is described. The patient was hospitalized for persistent hypertermia and marked dyspnea, with radiographic findings of bilateral involvement of the lungs. The confirmation of the diagnosis was obtained by means of serum analyses (Weil-Felix serodiagnosis and IFA); the patient responded to doxycycline with progressive improvement of her general health condition. In this case the occurrence of a NHL could justify the lower reactivity and the facilitated diffusion of rickettsiosis in the patient. PMID:9250284

  16. FPA micro spectral imaging of non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burattini, E.; Malvezzi-Campeggi, F.; Chilosi, M.; Conti, C.; Ferraris, P.; Monti, F.; Sabbatini, S.; Tosi, G.; Zamò, A.

    2007-05-01

    A FT-IR microspectroscopy study on reactive lymph nodes and non-Hodgkin lymphomas is reported. Mid infrared absorption spectra collected at diffraction limit spatial resolution from reactive and neoplastic lymph nodes resulted sufficiently different once analysed by multivariate pattern recognition analysis to distinguish tumoral from non tumoral samples. The potential of infrared spectroscopy as a post-operative screening is gained by the use of a multielement Focal Plane Array detector. Spectral differences between normal and malignant spectra were mainly in the methyl stretching and in the low frequency region.

  17. Orbital MALT lymphoma, abdominal hodgkin lymphoma, and systemic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma develop sequentially in one patient.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Toshihiko; Ichimura, Kouichi; Shinagawa, Katsuji

    2012-01-01

    In February 2002, a 42-year-old woman developed ocular adnexal extranodal marginal zone B-cell lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), MALT lymphoma, in the bilateral orbits involving lacrimal glands. She underwent 30 Gy external beam irradiation to the orbital lesions on both sides. She was well until November 2008 when she developed abdominal lymphadenopathy and transabdominal excisional biopsy showed mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma at stage II. She underwent standard combination chemotherapy. In July 2010, she developed systemic lymphadenopathy and was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) by cervical lymph node biopsy. She underwent rituximab monotherapy and finally allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in October 2010, but died of renal failure in February 2011. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction of the immunoglobulin heavy chain gene gave rise to dominant discrete fragments of the same size between the orbital lesion with MALT lymphoma in 2002 and the cervical lymph node lesion with DLBCL in 2010. The sequential development of MALT lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, and DLBCL in the long-term course of this patient suggests the common origin of the neoplastic cells, changing their pathological faces in response to irradiation and combination chemotherapy. PMID:22706530

  18. Cardiac Tamponade as Initial Presentation of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hajra, Adrija; Bandyopadhyay, Dhrubajyoti; Layek, Manas; Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac involvement in malignant lymphoma is one of the least investigated subjects. Pericardial effusion is rarely symptomatic in patients of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Few case reports are available in the literature. There are case reports of diagnosed HL patients presenting with pericardial effusion. HL patients who present with recurrent episodes of pericardial effusion have also been reported. Pericardial effusion has also been reported in cases of non HL. However, pericardial effusion leading to cardiac tamponade as an initial presentation of HL is extremely rare. Very few such cases are there in the literature. Here, we present a case of a 26-year-old male patient who presented with cardiac tamponade and in due course was found to be a case of classical type of HL. This case is interesting because of its presentation. PMID:26900491

  19. Advances in therapies for non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children.

    PubMed

    Kobos, Rachel; Terry, William

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric patients with newly diagnosed, non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) have an excellent overall survival. However, therapy regimens are associated with acute toxicity and late effects. Furthermore, patients with relapsed or refractory disease have relatively few options with proven clinical benefit. Both histologic and molecular differences exist between adult and pediatric NHL preventing simple translation of adult NHL successes into improvements in pediatric NHL treatment. This review summarizes the introduction of targeted therapies into frontline treatments for patients with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and CD20-positive tumors, with the goal of improving overall survival while limiting both short- and long-term toxicities. In addition, newer approaches that have limited data in children but may have a significant role in how we treat pediatric NHL in the future are reviewed, which include CD19 directed therapy, Notch inhibition, the tri-functional antibody, FBTA05, and EZH2 inhibition. PMID:26637768

  20. SEOM clinical guidelines for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rueda Domínguez, A; Alfaro Lizaso, J; de la Cruz Merino, L; Gumá I Padró, J; Quero Blanco, C; Gómez Codina, J; Llanos Muñoz, M; Martinez Banaclocha, N; Rodriguez Abreu, D; Provencio Pulla, M

    2015-12-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is an uncommon B cell lymphoid malignancy representing approximately 10-15 % of all lymphomas. HL is composed of two distinct disease entities; the more commonly diagnosed classical HL and the rare nodular lymphocyte-predominant HL. An accurate assessment of the stage of disease and prognostic factors that identify patients at low or high risk for recurrence are used to optimize therapy. Patients with early stage disease are treated with combined modality strategies using abbreviated courses of combination chemotherapy followed by involved-field radiation therapy, while those with advanced stage disease receive a longer course of chemotherapy often without radiation therapy. High-dose chemotherapy (HDCT) followed by an autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) is the standard of care for most patients who relapse following initial therapy. Brentuximab vedotin should be considered for patients who fail HDCT with ASCT. PMID:26497354

  1. Checkpoint Inhibitors for the Treatment of Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bennani-Baiti, Nabila; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Ansell, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma's (HL) tumor composition is characterized by a paucity of malignant cells and a preponderance of immune and stromal cells. Despite the rich immune milieu within the tumor microenvironment, malignant cells are able to effectively evade the immune system and use immune support to promote lymphoma cell growth and proliferation. Recognizing this has led to the identification of checkpoint inhibitory signals that enable immune evasion and to opening the door to therapeutic strategies on how to exploit the immune system in targeting tumor cells. We discuss herein some of the tumor evasion mechanisms in HL with a particular focus on the immune checkpoint pathways and focus on recent clinical data of checkpoint blockade in HL treatment. PMID:26818843

  2. Novel agents for the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Dumaswala, Komal; Mehta, Amitkumar

    2015-10-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is highly curable lymphoma with combined multiagent chemotherapy with or without radiation. In spite of higher cure rates, approximately 20-30% cases will be either refractory or relapse after first line therapy. For relapse/refractory HL, salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant remains the standard of care. Because of early and late toxicities of multiagent chemotherapy, there are ongoing efforts to find less toxic therapies to treat HL. Brentuximab vedotin is an antibody drug conjugate targeting CD30 with high response rates in HL. In the last decade, immune oncology has changed the treatment paradigm of cancers. Biologically, Reed-Sternberg cells evade immune system by exploiting checkpoint pathways. Inhibition of checkpoint pathway has shown promising activity in HL. Recently, phosphatidyl-inositide 3 kinase inhibitors and Janus kinase inhibitors have shown impressive responses in HL. In this article, we discuss novel agents in HL. PMID:26343891

  3. Sinonasal Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma with Skull Base Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Dare, Amos O.; Datta, Rajiv V.; Loree, Thom R.; Hicks, Wesley L.; Grand, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a rare tumor of the skull base. As the incidence of primary central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma has increased, atypical presentations involving the skull or cranial base exclusively have been reported. In immunocompetent patients with no previous history or predisposing factors, the diagnosis of primary NHL of the skull base may be delayed. We present four cases of nasal and paranasal sinus NHL with both skull base and intracranial involvement in immunocompetent patients. Clinicopathologic correlation suggests that cranial base and intracranial involvement with NHL represents advanced-stage primary sinonasal disease. Surgical biopsy before definitive treatment is recommended. Radiation therapy provides local control; adjuvant chemotherapy after primary radiation therapy may be required for recurrent disease. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3 PMID:17167612

  4. Stage I and II Waldeyer's ring and oral-sinonasal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Shibuya, H; Kamiyama, R; Watanabe, I; Horiuchi, J I; Suzuki, S

    1987-03-01

    Sixty-six patients with Ann Arbor Stage I and II Waldeyer's ring and oral-sinonasal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are presented. Ten-year survival was better for the 32 patients with Waldeyer's ring non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Stage I, 83%; Stage II, 75%) than for the 34 with oral-sinonasal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Stage I, 47%; Stage II, 50%). Diffuse large cell lymphomas were common in patients with Waldeyer's ring involvement (59%). In those affected in the oral-sinonasal region, 38% had high-grade lymphoma. There was a high incidence of extranodal relapses outside of the gastrointestinal tract in patients with oral-sinonasal lymphoma (10 cases). Gastrointestinal tract relapse occurred commonly in patients with Waldeyer's ring lymphoma and was found in five cases. PMID:3815273

  5. Morphologic changes in the thyroid after irradiation for Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.F.; LiVolsi, V.A.

    1989-08-15

    Four cases of thyroidectomy for suspected thyroid carcinoma after previous irradiation for Hodgkin's or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma are reviewed. The patients ranged in age from 18 to 33 years at the time of thyroid surgery with an average latency period of 12 years (range, 8-20 years) from radiation therapy to thyroidectomy. All patients had a clinically palpable thyroid nodule, and pathologically showed a pattern of multiple adenomatous nodules with cytologic atypia. The microscopic changes were sufficiently striking to cause the primary pathologist to request consultation to rule out thyroid carcinoma in each case. Fine-needle aspiration was performed in one case and suggested a thyroid neoplasm. The pathologic findings are reviewed and distinction of this lesion from thyroid carcinoma is discussed.

  6. Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Arising Adjacent to a Breast Implant.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Ciara; Ged, Yasser; Quinn, Fiona; Walker, Jan; Kennedy, John; Gillham, Charles; Pittaluga, Stefania; McDermott, Ronan; Vandenberghe, Elisabeth; Grant, Cliona; Flavin, Richard

    2016-08-01

    Breast implant-associated lymphoma has recently gained wide recognition. Anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) is the most frequently diagnosed subtype in this setting but the spectrum is broadening. A 66-year-old woman developed swelling and itch around her saline implant 6 years after its insertion. Imaging revealed a fluid collection surrounding the implant with an adjacent mass. Microscopy showed sclerotic tissue punctuated by discrete cellular nodules comprising small lymphocytes, eosinophils and interspersed large atypical Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS)-like cells. The HRS-like cells stained positively for CD30 and CD15 by immunohistochemistry. Small T-lymphocytes formed rosettes around HRS-like cells. Appearances were consistent with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Multiplex polymerase chain reaction demonstrated no clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin or T-cell receptor genes, however, a t(14;18)(q32;q21)BCL2-JH translocation involving the major breakpoint region of the bcl2 gene was present. Staging positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan revealed FDG-avid masses in the right axilla and pelvis. Subsequent pathological examination identified low-grade follicular lymphoma (FL) with a t(14;18) translocation at these sites. To our knowledge, this is the first case of HL arising adjacent to a breast implant. An awareness of this diagnosis is important as classical HL, with its prominent mixed inflammatory background, may be overlooked as a reactive process when histologically assessing capsulectomy specimens. It is also important in the differential diagnosis for implant-associated ALCL as both contain large atypical CD30-positive cells highlighting the need for full immunohistochemical and molecular workup in such cases. This case also adds to the large body of literature regarding the association between HL and FL. PMID:26888955

  7. [Role of radiotherapy in the management of non-Hodgkin lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Gastaud, L; Rossignol, B; Peyrade, F; Ré, D; Thariat, J; Thyss, A; Doyen, J

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this review was to summarize recent data about lastest retrospective and prospective studies dealing with radiotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, in order to precise the schedule and the role of this treatment. A systematic review was done by searching studies on the website http://www.pubmed.gov (Medline) using the following keywords: radiotherapy, radiation therapy, non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The management of non-Hodgkin lymphoma varies a lot according to the histological type and stage. The dose of radiotherapy has been studied in only one randomized trial, which concluded that there was no difference between the low dose and the high dose arms. Radiotherapy is a very good option in follicular, cutaneous, digestive or orbital non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A recent post hoc analysis of randomized trials on radiotherapy for high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma strongly suggested a benefit of additional radiotherapy after chemotherapy in some situations. Radiotherapy of low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a very good option, while its use on high-grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma is sometimes recommended but further randomized trials are ongoing to better understand its role. PMID:27133378

  8. Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphomas in children: utilization of radiological modalities

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, M.D.; Siddiqui, A.; Weetman, R.; Provisor, A.; Coates, T.

    1986-02-01

    If costs of medical care are to be reduced, the choice of which imaging modality to use must be made as carefully as possible. This study was done to show how radiological modalities were used to evaluate patients with Hodgkin disease and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. We kept a record of every radiological study performed on 66 children with both diseases seen in the past 6 1/3 years. The results of these studies were analyzed to see which areas of the body were studied, which imaging modality was used, how frequently the studies were repeated, and how frequently the studies gave abnormal results. Our findings disclosed that radiological studies have been appropriately performed in anatomic regions of the body in which disease is present. New imaging modalities have been introduced, and the use of some of the older modalities has been decreased. With some modalities, such as skeletal survey, liver/spleen scan, whole-lung tomography, contrast studies of the bowel, and excretory urography, utilization is higher than it ought to be in view of the fact that the yield of positive results is low and the information is obtainable in many cases from other more sensitive procedures. These studies should not be performed as a routine on initial evaluation or follow-up of all patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphomas. On initial presentation all patients should undergo chest radiography and CT scanning of both chest and abdomen. A problem area is that the timing of follow-up studies has been somewhat erratic, with some inappropriate studies particularly 3 or 4 years after diagnosis. Too many imaging procedures have probably been done in follow-up of our patients.

  9. Vaccine Therapy With or Without Cryosurgery in Treating Patients With Residual, Relapsed, or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia With Nodal Disease

  10. Borrelia infection and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Melbye, Mads; Munksgaard, Lars; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Rostgaard, Klaus; Glimelius, Bengt; Chang, Ellen T.; Roos, Göran; Hansen, Mads; Adami, Hans-Olov; Hjalgrim, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    Reports of the presence of Borrelia burgdorferi DNA in malignant lymphomas have raised the hypothesis that infection with B burgdorferi may be causally related to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) development. We conducted a Danish-Swedish case-control study including 3055 NHL patients and 3187 population controls. History of tick bite or Borrelia infection was ascertained through structured telephone interviews and through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serum analyses for antibodies against B burgdorferi in a subset of 1579 patients and 1358 controls. Statistical associations with risk of NHL, including histologic subtypes, were assessed by logistic regression. Overall risk of NHL was not associated with self-reported history of tick bite (odds ratio [OR] = 1.0; 95% confidence interval: 0.9-1.1), Borrelia infection (OR = 1.3 [0.96-1.8]) or the presence of anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 1.3 [0.9-2.0]). However, in analyses of NHL subtypes, self-reported history of B burgdorferi infection (OR = 2.5 [1.2-5.1]) and seropositivity for anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 3.6 [1.8-7.4]) were both associated with risk of mantle cell lymphoma. Notably, this specific association was also observed in persons who did not recall Borrelia infection yet tested positive for anti-Borrelia antibodies (OR = 4.2 [2.0-8.9]). Our observations suggest a previously unreported association between B burgdorferi infection and risk of mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:18424667

  11. Plasma Biomarkers for Detecting Hodgkin's Lymphoma in HIV Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Hessol, Nancey; Smith, Richard D.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-12-16

    The lifespan of AIDS patients has increased as a result of aggressive antiretroviral therapy, and the incidences of the AIDS-defining cancers, Hodgkin's lymphoma and Kaposi sarcoma, are declining, Still, the increased longevity of AIDS patients is now associated with increased incidence of other cancers, including Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). In order to determine if we could identify biomarkers for the early detection of HL, we undertook an accurate mass and elution time tag proteomics analysis of individual plasma samples from AIDS patients without HL (n=14) and with HL (n=22). This analysis identified 33 proteins, included C-reactive protein and three serum amyloid proteins, that were statistically (p<0.05) altered by at least 1.5-fold between the two groups. At least three of these proteins have previously been reported to be altered in the blood of HL patients. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software identified 'inflammatory response' and 'cancer' as the top two, biological functions commonly associated with these proteins. The clear association of these proteins with cancer and inflammation suggests that they are truly associated with HL and that they would be useful in the detection of this disease.

  12. Treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma: standard and experimental approaches.

    PubMed

    Engert, A; Wolf, J; Diehl, V

    1999-07-01

    The introduction of polychemotherapy and improved radiation techniques has transformed Hodgkin's lymphoma from an incurable disease to a malignancy with one of the highest cure rates. Milestones were the development of the MOPP (mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone) and ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine) regimens. Radiotherapy is commonly used, although its precise role has not been defined for patients with advanced-stage disease. More recently, dose-intensified schedules such as Stanford V (doxorubicin, vinblastine, mechlorethamine, vincristine, bleomycin, etoposide, and prednisone) were shown to be effective in this group of patients. In particular, the BEACOPP regimen (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone), in both standard and escalated doses, has produced impressive results in a randomized three-arm study when compared with COPP (cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, and prednisone)/ABVD. The significantly higher rates of complete remission (CR) and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) suggest that the new BEACOPP regimen improves efficacy, but definitive conclusions require further years of follow-up evaluation. Interestingly, BEACOPP abrogates the impact of the newly described seven-factor prognostic scoring system that was reported for patients treated with MOPP/ABVD or similar regimens. The prognostic index includes factors such as serum albumin, hemoglobin, male sex, stage IV disease, age more than 45 years, white blood cell count, and lymphocyte count. Whereas patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma have a good prognosis on first diagnosis, those with relapsed or refractory disease face a poor outcome. PMID:10462328

  13. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-07-21

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin's lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they seem to

  14. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Southern Africa: review of 487 cases from The International Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Classification Project.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anamarija M; Perner, Yvonne; Diebold, Jacques; Nathwani, Bharat N; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Bast, Martin; Boilesen, Eugene; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2016-03-01

    Comparative data on the distribution of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes in Southern Africa (SAF) is scarce. In this study, five expert haematopathologists classified 487 consecutive cases of NHL from SAF using the World Health Organization classification, and compared the results to North America (NA) and Western Europe (WEU). Southern Africa had a significantly lower proportion of low-grade (LG) B-NHL (34·3%) and a higher proportion of high-grade (HG) B-NHL (51·5%) compared to WEU (54·5% and 36·4%) and NA (56·1% and 34·3%). High-grade Burkitt-like lymphoma was significantly more common in SAF (8·2%) than in WEU (2·4%) and NA (2·5%), most likely due to human immunodeficiency virus infection. When SAF patients were divided by race, whites had a significantly higher frequency of LG B-NHL (60·4%) and a lower frequency of HG B-NHL (32·7%) compared to blacks (22·5% and 62·6%), whereas the other races were intermediate. Whites and other races had a significantly higher frequency of follicular lymphoma and a lower frequency of Burkitt-like lymphoma compared to blacks. The median ages of whites with LG B-NHL, HG B-NHL and T-NHL (64, 56 and 67 years) were significantly higher than those of blacks (55, 41 and 34 years). Epidemiological studies are needed to better understand these differences. PMID:26898194

  15. Oral Clofarabine for Relapsed/Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-16

    Follicular Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Low Grade B-cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large-cell Lymphoma

  16. Quality of Radiotherapy Reporting in Randomized Controlled Trials of Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Systematic Review

    SciTech Connect

    Bekelman, Justin E. Yahalom, Joachim

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: Standards for the reporting of radiotherapy details in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) are lacking. Although radiotherapy (RT) is an important component of curative therapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), we postulated that RT reporting may be inadequate in Phase III HL and NHL trials. Methods and Materials: We searched PubMed and the Cochrane registry for reports of RCTs involving RT and either HL or NHL published between 1998 and 2007. We screened 133 titles and abstracts to identify relevant studies. We included a total of 61 reports. We assessed these reports for the presence of six quality measures: target volume, radiation dose, fractionation, radiation prescription, quality assurance (QA) process use, and adherence to QA (i.e., reporting of major or minor deviations). Results: Of 61 reports, 23 (38%) described the target volume. Of the 42 reports involving involved-field RT alone, only 8 (19%) adequately described the target volume. The radiation dose and fractionation was described in most reports (54 reports [89%] and 39 reports [64%], respectively). Thirteen reports specified the RT prescription point (21%). Only 12 reports (20%) described using a RT QA process, and 7 reports (11%) described adherence to the QA process. Conclusion: Reporting of RT in HL and NHL RCTs is deficient. Because the interpretation, replication, and application of RCT results depend on adequate description and QA of therapeutic interventions, consensus standards for RT reporting should be developed and integrated into the peer-review process.

  17. The role of mitoxantrone in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James O

    2002-04-01

    The development of doxorubicin was an important advance in the treatment of patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Alternatives to doxorubicin, such as mitoxantrone (Novantrone), have less nonhematologic toxicity and could offer a therapeutic advantage in some situations if similar antilymphoma activity exists. Several combination regimens that include mitoxantrone have been shown to be active. These include mitoxantrone/ifosfamide (Ifex) and mitoxantrone/etoposide combinations as salvage therapy for aggressive lymphomas. Mitoxantrone in combination with fludarabine (Fludara) for the treatment of newly diagnosed follicular lymphomas and in combination with fludarabine and dexamethasone for relapsed/refractory follicular lymphomas has produced high complete response rates. Other evolving uses of mitoxantrone include combination therapy with cladribine (Leustatin) or rituximab (Rituxan), and as part of conditioning regimens for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In diffuse aggressive lymphoma, mitoxantrone, 10 mg/m2, substituted for doxorubicin, 50 mg/m2, results in a poorer response when CNOP (cyclophosphamide [Cytoxan, Neosar], mitoxantrone [Novantrone], vincristine [Oncovin], prednisone) is compared to CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin HCl vincristine, prednsione); however, increasing the mitoxantrone dose to 12 mg/m2 in either the CNOP or CMP-BOP (cyclophosphamide, mitoxantrone, procarbazine [Matulane], bleomycin [Blenoxane], vincristine, prednisone) regimens yields results comparable to those achieved with the doxorubicin-containing regimen. Comparable results have also been observed when 10 mg/M2 of mitoxantrone was substituted for 45 mg/M2 of doxorubicin in the m-BACOD (methorexate, bleomycin, doxorubicin [Adriamycin], cyclophosphamide, vincristine, dexamethasone) regimen. Mitoxantrone is active in NHL, and combinations including mitoxantrone can be used effectively and may provide an advantage in the elderly. PMID:12017536

  18. Etiologic Heterogeneity Among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes: The InterLymph Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Slager, Susan L.; Cerhan, James R.; Wang, Sophia S.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Skibola, Christine F.; Bracci, Paige M.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Smedby, Karin E.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Monnereau, Alain; Turner, Jennifer J.; Clavel, Jacqueline; Adami, Hans-Olov; Chang, Ellen T.; Glimelius, Bengt; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Melbye, Mads; Crosignani, Paolo; di Lollo, Simonetta; Miligi, Lucia; Nanni, Oriana; Ramazzotti, Valerio; Rodella, Stefania; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Stagnaro, Emanuele; Tumino, Rosario; Vindigni, Carla; Vineis, Paolo; Becker, Nikolaus; Benavente, Yolanda; Boffetta, Paolo; Brennan, Paul; Cocco, Pierluigi; Foretova, Lenka; Maynadié, Marc; Nieters, Alexandra; Staines, Anthony; Colt, Joanne S.; Cozen, Wendy; Davis, Scott; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Hartge, Patricia; Rothman, Nathaniel; Severson, Richard K.; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Call, Timothy G.; Feldman, Andrew L.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Liebow, Mark; Blair, Aaron; Cantor, Kenneth P.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Lightfoot, Tracy; Roman, Eve; Smith, Alex; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Connors, Joseph M.; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Spinelli, John J.; Armstrong, Bruce K.; Kricker, Anne; Holford, Theodore R.; Lan, Qing; Zheng, Tongzhang; Orsi, Laurent; Dal Maso, Luigino; Franceschi, Silvia; La Vecchia, Carlo; Negri, Eva; Serraino, Diego; Bernstein, Leslie; Levine, Alexandra; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Birmann, Brenda M.; Clarke, Christina A.; Flowers, Christopher R.; Foran, James M.; Kadin, Marshall E.; Paltiel, Ora; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Linet, Martha S.; Sampson, Joshua N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) comprises biologically and clinically heterogeneous subtypes. Previously, study size has limited the ability to compare and contrast the risk factor profiles among these heterogeneous subtypes. Methods We pooled individual-level data from 17 471 NHL cases and 23 096 controls in 20 case–control studies from the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph). We estimated the associations, measured as odds ratios, between each of 11 NHL subtypes and self-reported medical history, family history of hematologic malignancy, lifestyle factors, and occupation. We then assessed the heterogeneity of associations by evaluating the variability (Q value) of the estimated odds ratios for a given exposure among subtypes. Finally, we organized the subtypes into a hierarchical tree to identify groups that had similar risk factor profiles. Statistical significance of tree partitions was estimated by permutation-based P values (P NODE). Results Risks differed statistically significantly among NHL subtypes for medical history factors (autoimmune diseases, hepatitis C virus seropositivity, eczema, and blood transfusion), family history of leukemia and multiple myeloma, alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and certain occupations, whereas generally homogeneous risks among subtypes were observed for family history of NHL, recreational sun exposure, hay fever, allergy, and socioeconomic status. Overall, the greatest difference in risk factors occurred between T-cell and B-cell lymphomas (P NODE < 1.0×10−4), with increased risks generally restricted to T-cell lymphomas for eczema, T-cell-activating autoimmune diseases, family history of multiple myeloma, and occupation as a painter. We further observed substantial heterogeneity among B-cell lymphomas (P NODE < 1.0×10−4). Increased risks for B-cell-activating autoimmune disease and hepatitis C virus seropositivity and decreased risks for alcohol consumption and occupation as a

  19. Relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma: transplantation strategies and novel therapeutic options.

    PubMed

    David, Kevin A; Mauro, Lauren; Evens, Andrew M

    2007-10-01

    Many patients with Hodgkin lymphoma are cured with initial therapy, although a portion of patients will experience primary induction failure or disease relapse. Pathologic confirmation of refractory or relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma is important. Following two to four cycles of non-cross-resistant salvage chemotherapy, the standard of care is high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), which is associated with long-term event-free survival rates of 45-68%. Of note, survival rates for studies integrating total lymphoid irradiation into the autologous HSCT-conditioning regimen are among the highest reported for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma. Further treatment options are available for patients not fit to proceed to HSCT, for relapsed disease after autologous HSCT, and for 'high-risk' Hodgkin lymphoma including chemotherapy-resistant disease. Allogeneic HSCT is a valid treatment option, as a graft-vs.-Hodgkin-lymphoma effect has been demonstrated. In addition, novel targeted treatments are being investigated such as receptor-specific antibodies, radiolabeled antibodies, antiapoptotic agents including inhibitors of the nuclear factor-kappaB complex or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis proteins, transcription pathway modulators such as histone deacetylase and mTOR inhibitors, and Epstein-Barr virus-directed therapy. Continued translational and collaborative prospective clinical research efforts are needed in order to continue to increase the survival rates for Hodgkin lymphoma and to lessen the toxicities associated with lymphoma-related therapy. PMID:18214690

  20. The spectrum of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: a description of 10 cases.

    PubMed

    Gualco, Gabriela; Natkunam, Yasodha; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2012-05-01

    B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, is a diagnostic provisional category in the World Health Organization (WHO) 2008 classification of lymphomas. This category was designed as a measure to accommodate borderline cases that cannot be reliably classified into a single distinct disease entity after all available morphological, immunophenotypical and molecular studies have been performed. Typically, these cases share features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma, or include characteristics of both lymphomas. The rarity of such cases poses a tremendous challenge to both pathologists and oncologists because its differential diagnosis has direct implications for management strategies. In this study, we present 10 cases of B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma and have organized the criteria described by the WHO into four patterns along with detailed clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic characterization and outcome data. Our findings show a male preponderance, median age of 37 years and a mediastinal presentation in 80% of cases. All cases expressed at least two markers associated with B-cell lineage and good response to combination chemotherapy currently employed for non-Hodgkin lymphomas. PMID:22222636

  1. Testicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting in a young adult.

    PubMed

    Ratkal, Vishal; Chawla, Arun; Mishra, Dilip Kumar; Monappa, Vidya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 27-year-old man who presented with a slowly growing left testicular swelling associated with mild pain over a period of 3 months. He was evaluated by his family physician with scrotal ultrasound and testicular tumour markers. He was diagnosed and treated as epididymo-orchitis and managed with antibiotics. When he later presented to us, he had an enlarged left testis with normal spermatic cord. Scrotal Doppler evaluation showed a globally enlarged left testis and epididymis with increased vascularity in the left testis, with the right testis being normal. Testicular tumour markers were normal. Fine-needle aspiration cytology of the left testis was suggestive of lymphoma. Exploration through an inguinal approach was carried out and a Chevassu manoeuvre with frozen section study was performed, which was reported as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Left radical orchidectomy was performed. Histopathology reported diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, of a germinal centre type. Contrast CT of the abdomen, chest and brain were normal. Sperm cryopreservation was carried out. The patient was started on chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, oncovin, prednisone (CHOP) regime. PMID:25795748

  2. Idelalisib for the treatment of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Graf, Solomon A; Gopal, Ajay K

    2016-02-01

    Introduction B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (B-NHLs) include a number of disease subtypes, each defined by the tempo of disease progression and the identity of the cancerous cell. Idelalisib is a potent, selective inhibitor of the delta isoform of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), a lipid kinase whose over-activity in B-NHL drives disease progression. Idelalisib has demonstrated activity in indolent B-NHL (iB-NHL) and is approved for use as monotherapy in patients with follicular lymphoma and small lymphocytic lymphoma and in combination with rituximab in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Areas Covered Herein we review the development and pharmacology of idelalisib, its safety and efficacy in clinical studies of iB-NHL, and its potential for inclusion in future applications in iB-NHL and in combination with other therapies. Expert Opinion Idelalisib adds to the growing arsenal of iB-NHL pharmacotherapeutics and to the progression of the field toward precision agents with good efficacy and reduced toxicities. Nevertheless, idelalisib carries important risks that require careful patient counseling and monitoring. The appropriate sequencing of idelalisib with other proven treatment options in addition to its potential for combination with established or novel drugs will be borne out in ongoing and planned investigations. PMID:26818003

  3. Late Effects May Not Warrant Using Radiation to Treat Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma who were treated with multidrug chemotherapy alone were more likely to be alive 12 years later than patients who received treatment that included radiation therapy, according to findings from a clinical trial.

  4. Hodgkin Lymphoma Cells Have a Specific Long Noncoding RNA Expression Pattern.

    PubMed

    Anfossi, Simone; Calin, George A

    2016-09-01

    This commentary highlights the article by Tayari et al that suggests studying clinical implications of long noncoding RNAs as possible diagnostic and predictive biomarkers of Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27456130

  5. Ibrutinib in Treating Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Patients With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; HIV Infection; Intraocular Lymphoma; Multicentric Angiofollicular Lymphoid Hyperplasia; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Plasma Cell Myeloma; Small Intestinal Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  6. CPI-613, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-26

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. Recent Advances in the Pathobiology of Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Potential Impact on Diagnostic, Predictive, and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Diponkar

    2011-01-01

    From its first description by Thomas Hodgkin in 1832, Hodgkin's disease, now called Hodgkin's lymphoma, has continued to be a fascinating neoplasm even to this day. In this review, historical aspects, epidemiology, diagnosis, tumor biology, new observations related to host-microenvironment interactions, gene copy number variation, and gene expression profiling in this complex neoplasm are described, with an exploration of chemoresistance mechanisms and potential novel therapies for refractory disease. PMID:21318045

  8. EBV, HHV8 and HIV in B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma in Kampala, Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background B cell non Hodgkin lymphomas account for the majority of lymphomas in Uganda. The commonest is endemic Burkitt lymphoma, followed by diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). There has been an increase in incidence of malignant lymphoma since the onset of the HIV/AIDS pandemic. However, the possible linkages of HHV8 and EBV to the condition of impaired immunity present in AIDS are still not yet very clearly understood. Objectives 1. To describe the prevalence of Epstein-Barr virus, Human Herpes virus 8 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 in B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma biopsy specimens in Kampala, Uganda. 2. To describe the histopathology of non Hodgkin lymphoma by HIV serology test result in Kampala, Uganda Method Tumour biopsies specimens from 119 patients with B cell non Hodgkin lymphoma were classified according to the WHO classification. Immunohistochemistry was used for detection of HHV8 and in situ hybridization with Epstein Barr virus encoded RNA (EBER) for EBV. Real time and nested PCR were used for the detection of HIV. The patients from whom the 1991-2000 NHL biopsies had been taken did not have HIV serology results therefore 145 patients biopsies where serology results were available were used to describe the association of HIV with non Hodgkin lymphoma type during 2008-2009. Results In this study, the majority (92%) of the Burkitt lymphomas and only 34.8% of the diffuse large B cell lymphomas were EBV positive. None of the precursor B lymphoblastic lymphomas or the mantle cell lymphomas showed EBV integration in the lymphoma cells. None of the Burkitt lymphoma biopsies had HIV by PCR. Of the 121 non Hodgkin B cell lymphoma patients with HIV test results, 19% had HIV. However, only 1(0.04%) case of Burkitt lymphoma had HIV. All the tumours were HHV8 negative. Conclusions The majority of the Burkitt lymphomas and two fifths of the diffuse large B cell lymphomas had EBV. All the tumours were HHV8 negative. Generally, the relationship of NHL and HIV

  9. Cyclin Dl expression in B-cell non Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Aref, Salah; Mossad, Y; El-Khodary, T; Awad, M; El-Shahat, E

    2006-10-01

    Disorders of the cell cycle regulatory machinery play a key role in the pathogenesis of cancer. Over-expression of cyclin D1 protein has been reported in several solid tumors and certain lymphoid malignancies, but little is known about the effect of its expression on clinical behavior and outcome in B-cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In this study, we investigated the expression of cyclin Dl in group of patients with NHL and correlated the results with the clinical and laboratory data. The degree of expression of cyclin Dl protein was evaluated by flow cytometry in a group of NHL patients (n = 46) and in normal control group (n = 10). Cyclin Dl over expression was detected in 10 out of 46 (21.7%) patients; they were 5/5-mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) (100%) and 5/28 large B-cell lymphoma (17.8%). All other NHL subtypes showed normal cyclin D1 expression. The clinical signs (hepatomegaly, splenomegaly and B-symptoms, clinical staging) and laboratory data (hemoglobin, white cell count (WBCs), platelet count, and bone marrow infiltration) were not significantly different between NHL subgroup with cyclin Dl over expression and that with normal cyclin Dl expression. Serum lactic dehydrogenase (LDH) levels and lymphadenopathy were significantly higher in NHL group with cyclin D1 over expression as compared to those without. Also, cyclin D1 over expression is associated with poor outcome of NHL patients. Cyclin Dl over expression was evident among all cases of MCL and few cases of large B-cell lymphoma. Cyclin Dl over expression might be used as adjuvant tool for diagnosis of MCL; has role in NHL biology and is bad prognostic index in NHL. PMID:17607588

  10. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in children. II. Treatment.

    PubMed

    White, L; Siegel, S E; Quah, T C

    1992-07-01

    The prognosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in childhood has improved steadily in the last 2 decades. This is primarily the result of increasingly effective chemotherapy regimens tailored to defined and relatively homogeneous prognostic categories and tested in prospective clinical trials. Surgical excision remains of prognostic benefit only when near-total resection can be performed without delay of chemotherapy. The role of radiation therapy is now limited to the treatment of overt central nervous system (CNS) lymphoma, disease unresponsive to chemotherapy, and certain emergencies. Effective 'prophylactic' treatment of the CNS has been achieved in most series by intrathecal and systemic chemotherapy alone. The most relevant modality of treatment is chemotherapy and a very large number of protocols have been published. The origins of current multi-agent regimens stem both from early experience with cyclophosphamide in endemic Burkitt's lymphoma and from therapeutic studies of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Sub-stratification of non-localized NHL has produced protocols designed for either lymphoblastic (mostly T cell) or non-lymphoblastic (mostly B cell) categories. While the cure rate for lymphoblastic lymphoma now exceed 70%, the non-localized non-lymphoblastic disease remains a major obstacle to cure. These patients frequently present with large abdominal primaries and are prone to regional as well as hematogenous dissemination. In particular, involvement of the CNS is now considered to be the most adverse prognostic variable in this group. Recently, highly intensive regimens are addressing these obstacles. On the other hand, NHL defined as localized has been shown to be curable in up to 95% of children with the use of simple chemotherapy regimens as short as 6 months in duration. Salvage of patients who relapse during or after chemotherapy remains bleak but cures are possible with regimens incorporating bone marrow transplantation from either an autologous or

  11. Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma: a New Era of Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dann, Eldad J.

    2014-01-01

    Therapy of advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rapidly changing field due to a lot of currently emerging data. Treatment approaches are presently based on either the Kairos principle of giving aggressive therapy upfront and considering de-escalation of therapy if the interim PET/CT is negative or the Chronos principle of starting with ABVD followed by escalation of therapy for patients with positive interim PET/CT. The International Prognostic Score (IPS) is still valid for decision-making regarding the type of initial therapy, since patients with a high score do have an inferior progression free survival (PFS) with ABVD compared to those with a low score. Escalated BEACOPP administered upfront improves PFS; however, increase in the overall survival (OS) has not been confirmed yet, and this therapy is accompanied by elevated toxicity and fertility impairment. Completion of ongoing and currently initiated trials could elucidate multiple issues related to the management of HL patients. PMID:25237476

  12. Recent advances in the management of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Villasboas, Jose C.; Ansell, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare cancer of the immune system that typically affects lymph nodes and sometimes other organs. Although the majority of patients can be potentially cured with the use of multi-agent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, a proportion of them will relapse or develop resistant disease for which treatment options are limited. In recent years, new agents have been developed and tested in HL with encouraging results. Two classes of drugs stand out as highly active in advanced HL based on recent study results: antibody-drug conjugates and programmed death 1 inhibitors. Clinical trials in HL with these agents have been completed in the past several years and the results have recently become available. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the management of HL with a focus on strategies to decrease toxicity and a review of the two drug classes that have the potential to change the landscape of treatment of this disease. PMID:27158471

  13. Recent advances in the management of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Villasboas, Jose C; Ansell, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare cancer of the immune system that typically affects lymph nodes and sometimes other organs. Although the majority of patients can be potentially cured with the use of multi-agent chemotherapy and radiotherapy, a proportion of them will relapse or develop resistant disease for which treatment options are limited. In recent years, new agents have been developed and tested in HL with encouraging results. Two classes of drugs stand out as highly active in advanced HL based on recent study results: antibody-drug conjugates and programmed death 1 inhibitors. Clinical trials in HL with these agents have been completed in the past several years and the results have recently become available. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the management of HL with a focus on strategies to decrease toxicity and a review of the two drug classes that have the potential to change the landscape of treatment of this disease. PMID:27158471

  14. Novel treatment strategies for patients with relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Jona, Adam; Younes, Anas

    2011-01-01

    The treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), especially those who relapse after autologous stem cell transplantation, remains challenging. Patients with HL whose disease relapses after stem cell transplantation are rarely cured with current treatment modalities, and have a median survival is less than 3 years. With no new drugs have been approved by the FDA for HL in more than three decades, there is a clear unmet medical need for drug development for this patients population. New treatment strategies that are based on targeting oncogenic signaling pathways are currently explored. This review will focus on emerging new treatment modalities that are currently under investigation for patients with relapsed classical HL. PMID:20828898

  15. Hodgkin lymphoma: MOPP chemotherapy to PD-1 blockade and beyond.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare lymphoid malignancy affecting ∼9,200 new patients in the United States annually. Progress in the management of this disease over the past 50 years has been remarkable and the prognosis of this malignancy has changed from a uniformly fatal process to one in which the vast majority of patients are expected to be cured. This remarkable progress has been due to the use of combination approaches incorporating chemotherapy and radiation therapy, and now more recently antibody-drug conjugates and immune checkpoint inhibitors. The goal for the future is to develop treatment combinations that successfully treat all patients and markedly decrease the long-term side effects. PMID:26505486

  16. Differences between younger and older patients with childhood hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pourtsidis, Apostolos; Doganis, Dimitrios; Baka, Margarita; Bouhoutsou, Despina; Varvoutsi, Maria; Synodinou, Maria; Strantzia, Katerina; Kosmidis, Helen

    2013-09-01

    From 1979 to 2006, 74 children with Hodgkin's lymphoma were treated at our center. Among them, 15 (14 boys and 1 girl) and 59 (33 boys and 26 girls) patients were younger and older than 8 years, respectively. Six (40%) children among younger patients and 26 (44%) among older patients had advanced stage disease. We detected 3 (20%) relapses among younger patients and 5 (8.5%) among the older patients. All of younger patients are alive whereas three of the older patients have died. Second malignancy developed in one and three children among younger and older patients, respectively. The only difference that was detected concerning the age was a male predominance among the younger patients. PMID:23941743

  17. Current insight on trends, causes, and mechanisms of Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caporaso, Neil E; Goldin, Lynn R; Anderson, William F; Landgren, Ola

    2009-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) has a unique and distinct history, epidemiology, treatment, and biology. A viral agent or infectious agent has long been considered as the etiologic agent and Epstein-Barr virus is the main candidate for the infectious agent causing HL; however, Epstein-Barr virus genome is found within the tumor in only about 20% to 40% of HL cases with a prior diagnosis of infectious mononucleosis. Recently, autoimmune and related conditions have drawn attention to a potential role for immune-related and inflammatory conditions in the etiology and pathogenesis of the malignancy. Evidence from multiply-affected families, a twin study, a case-control study, and population-based registry studies implicate genetic factors. Data from Eastern Asia and among Chinese immigrants in North America indicate increasing incidence trends for HL being associated with westernization. These results emphasize an interaction between environmental and genetic risk factors in HL. PMID:19390306

  18. The Management of Classical Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, S. E.; McNamara, C.

    2011-01-01

    The management of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL) is a success story of modern multi-agent haemato-oncology. Prior to the middle of the twentieth century CHL was fatal in the majority of cases. Introduction of single agent radiotherapy (RT) demonstrated for the first time that these patients could be cured. Developments in chemotherapy including the mechlorethamine, vincristine, procarbazine and prednisolone (MOPP) and Adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) regimens have resulted in cure rates of over 80%. Even in relapse, CHL patients can be salvaged with high dose chemotherapy and autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Challenges remain, however, in finding new strategies to manage the small number of patients who continue to relapse or progress. In addition, the young age of many Hodgkin's patients forces difficult decisions in balancing the benefit of early disease control against the survival disadvantage of late toxicity. In this article we aim to summarise past trials, define the current standard of care and appraise future developments in the management of CHL. PMID:21687653

  19. Comparative proteomic profiling of Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vergara, D; Simeone, P; De Matteis, S; Carloni, S; Lanuti, P; Marchisio, M; Miscia, S; Rizzello, A; Napolitano, R; Agostinelli, C; Maffia, M

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) is a malignancy with complex pathogenesis. The hallmark of the disease is the presence of large mononucleated Hodgkin and bi- or multinucleated Reed/Sternberg (H/RS) cells. The origin of HRS cells in cHL is controversial as these cells show the coexpression of markers of several lineages. Using a proteomic approach, we compared the protein expression profile of cHL models of T- and B-cell derivation to find proteins differentially expressed in these cell lines. A total of 67 proteins were found differentially expressed between the two cell lines including metabolic proteins and proteins involved in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and/or cell migration, which were further validated by western blotting. Additionally, the expression of selected B- and T-cell antigens was also assessed by flow cytometry to reveal significant differences in the expression of different surface markers. Bioinformatics analysis was then applied to our dataset to find enriched pathways and networks, and to identify possible key regulators. In the present study, a proteomic approach was used to compare the protein expression profiles of two cHL cell lines. The identified proteins and/or networks, many of which not previously related to cHL, may be important to better define the pathogenesis of the disease, to identify novel diagnostic markers, and to design new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26588820

  20. Ipilimumab and Local Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Melanoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Colon, or Rectal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-19

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Etoposide, Filgrastim, and Plerixafor in Improving Stem Cell Mobilization in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-02

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  2. Burkitt-type lymphoma in France among non-Hodgkin malignant lymphomas in Caucasian children.

    PubMed

    Philip, T; Lenoir, G M; Bryon, P A; Gerard-Marchant, R; Souillet, G; Philippe, N; Freycon, F; Brunat-Mentigny, M

    1982-05-01

    In a retrospective analysis of 87 cases of Caucasian childhood non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma (NHML) from Lyon, France, all the case were diffuse lymphomas, but 47 were diagnosed as monomorphic small non-cleaved NHML, pathologically indistinguishable from Burkitt's lymphoma (BL). BL could then be the most frequent childhood lymphoma in France. This homogeneous series allows better definition of the characteristics of BL within NHML. Age distribution is similar to that of endemic BL, with a sex ratio of 3.7/1. Abdominal masses are initially present in 68% of the cases, whereas jaw is involved in only 4%. The disease is characterized by its overwhelming evolution in the absence of therapy. However, complete remission (CR) is usually obtained after the first chemtherapy regimen. Most relapses occur at 3-8 months. Death could be related to cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) involvement, local recurrence or secondary marrow involvement. Ninety per cent of the patients alive with no evidence of disease (NED) 8 months after CR can be considered as definitely cured. Our study on Caucasian children with NHML indicates that, from histological and clinical criteria, nearly half the cases are very similar to African BL. Even though EBV rarely associated with our cases, BL could be a worldwide lymphoma. PMID:7082553

  3. [Gastric non-Hodgkin lymphoma associated with heavy metal exposures].

    PubMed

    Garavito Rentería, Jorge; Araujo Banchón, William Javier; Quesada Ríos, María Pía; Ponce de León, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Primary extranodal Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is a non epithelial tumours that accounts for 40% of cases of NHL. Spread of nodal lymphomas to the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is the most common location. Within the GIT is the stomach the most affected organ (60%). We report the case of 52-year- old man , mining company worker for over 10 years, which is derived to the Service of Gastroenterology with history of epigastric pain, nausea, vomiting and weight loss. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examination revealed an ulcerated lesion on greater curve of stomach and histopathological examination and subsequent immunohistochemical analysis showed diffuse large B cell gastric NHL. Also, the patient had multiple organ involvement in relation to chronic exposure to heavy metals, which was found in the mineralograma, with the highest concentration of uranium, thallium, arsenic, lead and mercury. The literature has described the association of chronic occupational exposure to uranium and arsenic with NHL presenting gastrointestinal involvement. Therefore, gastric commitment can not be considered as an isolated injury, but rather part of systemic involvement associated with elevated concentrations of metals. Mining is a key driver of income for Peru; however, there are no reports to date of the association of gastrointestinal NHL commitment regarding occupational exposure to heavy metals. PMID:23307094

  4. ATM alterations in childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Gumy-Pause, Fabienne; Wacker, Pierre; Maillet, Philippe; Betts, David R; Sappino, André-Pascal

    2006-04-15

    ATM gene alterations and impaired ATM protein expression have been described in various adult lymphoproliferative malignancies, suggesting that ATM contributes to lymphomagenesis. The present study investigated the prevalence of ATM gene and ATM protein expression alterations in sporadic childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Twenty-seven cases of NHL were screened for ATM mutations by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC). Direct and indirect criteria, including in silico tools, were used to classify the gene alterations. The methylation status of the ATM promoter CpG island was determined in 25 samples; ATM protein expression was assessed by Western blot in 9 lymphomas. ATM alterations were detected in 12 NHLs (44%). Ten different heterozygous base substitutions were identified in 10 NHLs (37%). Five samples (19%) were found to harbor a gene alteration considered to be a mutation or a rare variant potentially pathogenic. In one case, an ATM mutation was found in the germline. Four NHLs (44%) showed reduced or absent ATM protein expression. Except for one sample, no definite genetic or epigenetic alteration was identified to account for impaired ATM protein expression. These observations document a high prevalence of ATM gene and protein expression alterations, suggesting that ATM is involved in childhood NHL. PMID:16631465

  5. [Orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: description of a case diagnosed with magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    Macarini, Luca; Cotroneo, Antonio Raffaele; Zeppa, Pio; Briganti, Francesco; Genovese, Eugenio Annibale

    2012-11-01

    Orbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is a rare tumor. Correct diagnosis and accurate staging are of paramount importance for timely treatment and better outcome. We report the case of a female patient with bilateral orbital lymphoma, and describe the clinical-pathological aspects of the disease and its neuroradiological features. PMID:23096746

  6. SEASON OF BIRTH AND RISK OF HODGKIN AND NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A.; Sundquist, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and NHL) in early life, but findings to date for specific lymphomas and periods of susceptibility are conflicting. We conducted the first national cohort study to examine whether season of birth, a proxy for infectious exposures in the first few months of life, is associated with HL or NHL in childhood through young adulthood. A total of 3,571,574 persons born in Sweden in 1973–2008 were followed up through 2009 to examine the association between season of birth and incidence of HL (943 cases) or NHL (936 cases). We found a sinusoidal pattern in NHL risk by season of birth (P=0.04), with peak risk occurring among birthdates in April. Relative to persons born in fall (September-November), odds ratios for NHL by season of birth were 1.25 (95% CI, 1.04–1.50; P=0.02) for spring (March-May), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01–1.48; P=0.04) for summer (June-August), and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.91–1.35; P=0.29) for winter (December-February). These findings did not vary by sex, age at diagnosis, or major subtypes. In contrast, there was no seasonal association between birthdate and risk of HL (P=0.78). In this large cohort study, birth in spring or summer was associated with increased risk of NHL (but not HL) in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of delayed infectious exposures compared with fall or winter birth. These findings suggest that immunologic responses in early infancy may play an important role in the development of NHL. PMID:24752499

  7. Season of birth and risk of Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2014-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (HL and NHL) in early life, but findings to date for specific lymphomas and periods of susceptibility are conflicting. We conducted the first national cohort study to examine whether season of birth, a proxy for infectious exposures in the first few months of life, is associated with HL or NHL in childhood through young adulthood. A total of 3,571,574 persons born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up through 2009 to examine the association between season of birth and incidence of HL (943 cases) or NHL (936 cases). We found a sinusoidal pattern in NHL risk by season of birth (p = 0.04), with peak risk occurring among birthdates in April. Relative to persons born in fall (September-November), odds ratios for NHL by season of birth were 1.25 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.50; p = 0.02] for spring (March-May), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.01-1.48; p = 0.04) for summer (June-August) and 1.11 (95% CI, 0.91-1.35; p = 0.29) for winter (December-February). These findings did not vary by sex, age at diagnosis or major subtypes. In contrast, there was no seasonal association between birthdate and risk of HL (p = 0.78). In this large cohort study, birth in spring or summer was associated with increased risk of NHL (but not HL) in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of delayed infectious exposures compared with fall or winter birth. These findings suggest that immunologic responses in early infancy may play an important role in the development of NHL. PMID:24752499

  8. Whole-body FDG-PET imaging for staging of Hodgkin`s disease and lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoh, C.K.; Glaspy, J.; Rosen, P.

    1997-03-01

    Accurate staging of Hodgkin`s disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL) is important for treatment management. In this study, the utility of 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) wholebody PET was evaluated as an imaging modality for initial staging or restaging of 7 HD and 11 NHL patients. Whole-body PET-based staging results were compared to the patient`s clinical stage based on conventional staging studies, which included combinations of CT of the chest, abdomen and pelvis, MRI scans, gallium scans, lymphangiograms, staging laparatomies and bone scans. Accurate staging was performed in 17 of 18 patients using a whole-body PET-based staging algorithm compared to the conventional staging algorithm in 15 of 18 patients. In 5 of 18 patients, whole-body PET-based staging showed additional lesions not detected by conventional staging modalities, whereas conventional staging demonstrated additional lesions in 4 of 18 patients not detected by whole-body PET. The total cost of conventional staging was $66,292 for 16 CT chest scans, 16 CT abdominal/pelvis scans, three limited MRI scans, four bone scans, give gallium scans, two laparotomies and one lymphangiogram. In contrast, scans cost $36,250 for 18 whole-body PET studies and additional selected correlative studies: one plain film radiograph, one limited CT, one bone marrow san, one upper GI and one endoscopy. A whole-body FDG-PET-based staging algorithm may be an accurate and cost-effective method for staging or restaging HD and NHL. 10 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with marrow transplantation in identical twins

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, F.R.; Fefer, A.; Cheever, M.A.; Buckner, C.D.; Greenberg, P.D.; Kaplan, H.G.; Storb, R.; Thomas, E.D.

    1981-09-01

    Eight patients with disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who failed conventional combination chemotherapy were treated with high-dose chemotherapy, a supralethal dose of total-body irradiation, and a bone marrow transplant from a normal identical twin. Seven patients experienced complete remission. Four of the seven patients (two with diffuse poorly differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma, one with composite lymphoma, and one with diffuse moderately well differentiated lymphocytic lymphoma) remain in complete unmaintained remission 12-126 mo from transplantation. One patient relapsed after 10 mo but was retreated and is alive in unmaintained complete remission 73 mo from transplantation. One patient died of Pseudomonas pneumonia while in complete remission and one patient relapsed and died of progressive lymphoma. These results demonstrate that intensive chemoradiotherapy and twin marrow transplantation can induce frequent and enduring remissions in patients with disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who have failed conventional therapy.

  10. Leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and residential proximity to industrial plants

    SciTech Connect

    Linos, A.; Blair, A.; Gibson, R.W.; Everett, G.; Van Lier, S.; Cantor, K.P.; Schuman, L.; Burmeister, L. )

    1991-03-01

    The risks of developing leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma from living near industrial facilities were evaluated among men from Iowa and Minnesota in a population-based, case-control study. We found a statistically significant increase in the risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR = 1.4) and a slight, nonsignificant excess for leukemia (RR = 1.2) among individuals who lived .8-3.2 km (1/2-2 miles) from a factory. Risks were greater for certain histologic types: follicular lymphoma (RR = 1.5), acute lymphocytic leukemia (RR = 5.4), and acute myelocytic leukemia (RR = 2.2). For non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (but not for leukemia), the relative risks for those living within .8 km (1/2 mile) of a factory were similar or slightly larger than for those living .8-3.2 km (1/2-2 miles) from a factory. Risks did not increase with duration of residence near a factory. The elevated risks of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were particularly associated with residing near stone, clay, or glass industry facilities. The risk of developing leukemia was greater among persons who resided near chemical and petroleum plants. These preliminary findings raise the possibility that general environmental exposure associated with certain industrial activities may elevate the risk of developing leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Evaluation of data on proximity to industrial plants from studies in other geographic locations is needed to determine whether our results represent a meaningful association.

  11. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the larynx in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Simo, R; Hartley, C; Malik, T; Wilson, G E; Taylor, P H; Mandal, B K

    1998-01-01

    A case of primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the larynx in an AIDS patient is presented with a review of the literature. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in AIDS patients are common but the primary laryngeal presentation is very rare. The symptoms usually include dysphonia and progressive airway obstruction requiring tracheostomy. As with laryngeal non-Hodgkin's laryngeal lymphomas in non-HIV positive patients the majority are of B cell lineage and respond well to radiotherapy. Our patient had a high grade lymphoma of B cell lineage which showed a good response to radiotherapy. The role of chemotherapy and surgery is not yet established. We suggest that the diagnosis of AIDS should not influence the management of these patients unless the individual is in the terminal disease stage. PMID:9538453

  12. Immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barth, Matthew J; Chu, Yaya; Hanley, Patrick J; Cairo, Mitchell S

    2016-05-01

    With the introduction of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab, B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma was the first malignancy successfully treated with an immunotherapeutic agent. Since then, numerous advances have expanded the repertoire of immunotherapeutic agents available for the treatment of a variety of malignancies, including many lymphoma subtypes. These include the introduction of monoclonal antibodies targeting a variety of cell surface proteins, including the successful targeting of immunoregulatory checkpoint receptors present on T-cells or tumour cells. Additionally, cellular immunotherapeutic approaches utilize T- or Natural Killer-cells generated with chimeric antigen receptors against cell surface proteins or Epstein-Barr virus-associated latent membrane proteins. The following review describes the current state of immunotherapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma including a summary of currently available data and promising agents currently in clinical development with future promise in the treatment of childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27062282

  13. Lenalidomide And Rituximab as Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-11-25

    Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent

  14. Iodine I 131 Tositumomab, Etoposide and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Autologous Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  15. Economic burden of follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Foster, Talia; Miller, Jeffrey D; Boye, Mark E; Russell, Mason W

    2009-01-01

    Follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (FNHL), a slow-growing cancer of the immune system, constitutes about 15-30% of all incident non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in developed countries. Its incidence is rising worldwide. Patients can live many years, but FNHL is considered incurable. We systematically reviewed the English-language MEDLINE-indexed and non-indexed economic literature published in the past 10 years on FNHL, identifying 23 primary economic studies. The economic burden of FNHL is significant, but available data are generally limited to retrospective considerations of hospital-based direct treatment costs, with little information available regarding societal cost of illness. Most direct cost information originates from the US, with one estimate of $US36 000 for the per-patient incremental cost of FNHL care during the first year following diagnosis. The most studied treatment is rituximab, which may offer similar overall costs to fludarabine considering higher resource use with fludarabine complications. Nearly all cost-effectiveness models identified by this review evaluated rituximab for relapsed/refractory FNHL responding to chemotherapy induction. Rituximab is supported as a cost-effective addition to standard chemotherapy by two models in the UK and one in the US, as maintenance therapy instead of stem-cell transplant by one UK model, and as maintenance therapy instead of observation alone by one model each in France, Spain and Canada. The UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence updated guidance on rituximab in February 2008, concluding that it is cost effective when added to induction chemotherapy, and when used as maintenance therapy. No studies of per-patient or national indirect costs of illness were identified, with the only study of indirect costs a Canadian survey documenting lost work productivity. Across all study types identified by our review, the most common focus was on the direct costs of rituximab. As new treatments for FNHL come

  16. Radiographic enlargement of mandibular canal as first feature of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Buric, N; Jovanovic, G; Radovanovic, Z; Buric, M; Tijanic, M

    2010-09-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma has the propensity to affect non-lymphoid tissue including oral tissue. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the mandible mistreated as chronic periodontitis with diffuse enlargement of the mandibular canal and ice-cold numbness is very rarely described in English medical literature. A 57-year-old patient presented with a painful swelling on the left side of the mandible with a clinically chronic periodontitis associated with ice-cold numbness. A panoramic radiograph showed a diffuse uniform enlargement of the mandibular canal. Histological examination showed that the lesion was a primary intraosseous non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the mandible. Immunohistochemical examination showed a positive reaction for CD20+, Ki-67+. Seven months after chemotherapy the patient was observed for possible life-threatening propagation of the disease. In conclusion, primary (extra-nodal) non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the mandible usually clinically presents with bone swelling, teeth mobility and neurological disturbance. Radiographic features presenting as diffuse enlargement of the mandibular canal could be considered as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:20729189

  17. A single slide multiplex assay for the evaluation of classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hollman-Hewgley, Denise; Lazare, Michael; Bordwell, Alex; Zebadua, Emily; Tripathi, Pinky; Ross, Alexander S; Fisher, Deanna; Adams, Alisha; Bouman, Derek; O'Malley, Dennis P; Weiss, Lawrence M

    2014-09-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma can be diagnosed with confidence in the majority of cases, but there is a significant subset that remains a diagnostic challenge. The authors have investigated the utility of a novel hyperplexing technology, MultiOmyx™, which may be applied to stain with >60 antibodies on single tissue sections from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue as an aid to the diagnosis of classical Hodgkin lymphoma. The multiplexing protocol included CD30, CD15, PAX-5, CD20, CD79a, CD45, BOB.1, OCT-2, and CD3 antibodies. The technology showed a high degree of sensitivity, specificity, and precision. Comparison studies with routine hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemical assessment of hematopathology cases in which classical Hodgkin lymphoma was included in the differential diagnosis showed concordance in 54 of 56 cases, with the 2 discordant cases illustrating the potential of this multiplexed immunofluorescence technology to improve on traditional immunohistochemistry for classical Hodgkin lymphoma diagnosis. This technology is practical for routine diagnosis and may be particularly useful in cases in which the sample size is limited, few Hodgkin-like cells are present, or in CD30-positive lymphoma cases with difficult morphology. MultiOmyx may potentially benefit other areas of research and diagnostic pathology. PMID:24854113

  18. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    SciTech Connect

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  19. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors don't know why a person gets non-Hodgkin lymphoma. You are at increased risk if you have ... immune system or have certain types of infections. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma can cause many symptoms, such as Swollen, painless ...

  20. [Non Hodgkin's lymphoma and chronic hepatitis C virus infection: a non-fortuitous association. Two case reports].

    PubMed

    Kallel, Sana; Essid, Mejda; Boujelbene, Salah; Ben Brahim, Ihsen; Chatty, Samia; Sassi, Sadok; Azzouz, Moussadek

    2007-08-01

    Many authors suggest the role of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in the pathology of B-cell non Hodgkin's lymphomas; this is based on epidemiological, physiopathological and therapeutic arguments. The frequency of the association with hepatitis C virus infection is variable in the different study (1 to 30%). We report two cases of hepatitis C virus infection in association with non Hodgkin's lymphomas. The first case presented a low grad splenic and nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with hepatitis C virus infection and complicated by hepato-cellular carcinoma. The second case presented a high grad nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with HCV infection. Our cases report confirms the hypothesis of a key role of hepatitis C virus in the pathogenesis of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders and in particular the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although of several hypothesis concerning the ethiopathogenic mechanisms of this association, new studies will necessary to improve the real mechanism of this association PMID:18254295

  1. Hodgkin's lymphoma in adolescents treated with adult protocols: a report from the German Hodgkin study group.

    PubMed

    Eichenauer, Dennis A; Bredenfeld, Henning; Haverkamp, Heinz; Müller, Horst; Franklin, Jeremy; Fuchs, Michael; Borchmann, Peter; Müller-Hermelink, Hans-Konrad; Eich, Hans T; Müller, Rolf-Peter; Diehl, Volker; Engert, Andreas

    2009-12-20

    PURPOSE The standard of care for adolescent patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is undefined, particularly the choice between pediatric and adult protocols. Thus, we compared risk factors and outcome of adolescents and young adults treated within study protocols of the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG). PATIENTS AND METHODS Three thousand seven hundred eighty-five patients treated within the GHSG studies HD4 to HD9 were analyzed; 557 patients were adolescents age 15 to 20 years, and 3,228 patients were young adults age 21 to 45 years. Results Large mediastinal mass and involvement of three or more lymph node areas were more frequent in adolescents (P < .001). The incidence of other risk factors did not differ significantly between age groups. With a median observation time of 81 months for freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) and 85 months for overall survival (OS), log-rank test showed no significant differences between age groups regarding FFTF (P = .305) and a superior OS (P = .008) for adolescents. Six-year estimates for FFTF and OS were 80% and 94%, respectively, for adolescents and 80% and 91%, respectively, for young adults. After adjustment for other predictive factors, Cox regression analysis revealed age as a significant predictor for OS (P = .004), with a higher mortality risk for young adults. Secondary malignancies were more common in young adults (P = .037). CONCLUSION Outcome of adolescent and young adult patients treated within GHSG study protocols is comparable. These data suggest that adult treatment protocols exhibit a safe and effective treatment option for adolescent patients with HL. However, longer follow-up, including assessment of late toxicity, is necessary for final conclusions. PMID:19901121

  2. Cystic Odontoma in a Patient with Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Victor; Caris, Adriana Rocha; León, Jorge Esquiche; Ramos, Carolina Judica; Jardini, Vaneska; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Cystic odontoma is a rare entity, which is characterized by the association of a cyst with complex/compound odontoma. The aim of this study was to report the case of a 5-year-old male patient diagnosed previously with Hodgkin's lymphoma and treated successfully with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, who developed a mandibular odontogenic lesion. Physical examination revealed a swelling on the right side of the mandible. Radiographically, a well-defined radiolucent area surrounded by radiopaque material was observed. An incisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis showed a cystic lesion consisting of an atrophic epithelium comprising 2-3 cell layers and the absence of inflammation in the cystic capsule. The cyst was decompressed and the lesion was removed after 3 months of follow-up. Microscopic analysis of the surgical specimen showed a cystic hyperplastic epithelium surrounded by an intense chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, which was in close contact with mineralized tissue resembling dentin and cementum. The final diagnosis was cystic odontoma. Since chemotherapy can affect the growth and development of infant teeth, a relationship between chemotherapy-associated adverse events and cystic odontoma is suggested in the present case. PMID:26618008

  3. Hodgkin lymphoma in the elderly, pregnant, and HIV-infected.

    PubMed

    Bachanova, Veronika; Connors, Joseph M

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) presenting in patients with co-incidental advanced age, pregnancy, or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is uniquely challenging to manage. In this article we integrate recent evidence and clinical expertise to present recommendations for diagnosis and therapeutic management. Older patients with HL need to be carefully evaluated for comorbidies after which judicious choice of chemotherapy should minimize functional compromise. A pregnant patient with concurrent HL should be staged with minimal use of imaging requiring ionizing radiation and treated in an individualized manner optimally combining the strategies of treatment deferral when appropriate, use of single-agent vinblastine for symptomatic disease and reservation of multi-agent chemotherapy for the small minority of patients with aggressive clinical presentation. Treatment of HL coincident with HIV infection requires a combination of highly active anti-retroviral agents (HAART), standard multi-agent chemotherapy with meticulous attention to drug-drug interactions, and vigorous supportive care to ensure the best chance of cure. PMID:27496312

  4. Genome-wide homozygosity signature and risk of Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sud, Amit; Cooke, Rosie; Swerdlow, Anthony J.; Houlston, Richard S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have reported that regions of homozygosity (ROH) in the genome are detectable in outbred populations and can be associated with an increased risk of malignancy. To examine whether homozygosity is associated with an increased risk of developing Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we analysed 589 HL cases and 5,199 controls genotyped for 484,072 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Across the genome the cumulative distribution of ROH was not significantly different between cases and controls. Seven ROH at 4q22.3, 4q32.2, 7p12.3–14.1, 7p22.2, 10p11.22–23, 19q13.12-2 and 19p13.2 were associated with HL risk at P < 0.01. Intriguingly 4q22.3 harbours an ROH to which the nuclear factor NF-kappa-B p105 subunit (NFKB1) maps (P = 0.002). The ROH at 19q13.12-2 has previously been implicated in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Aside from these observations which require validation, it is unlikely that levels of measured homozygosity caused by autozygosity, uniparental isodisomy or hemizygosity play a major role in defining HL risk in predominantly outbred populations. PMID:26391888

  5. Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents: improving the therapeutic index.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kara M

    2015-11-26

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a highly curable form of childhood cancer, with estimated 5 year survival rates exceeding 98%. However, the establishment of a "standard of care" approach to its management is complicated by the recognition that long-term overall survival declines in part from delayed effects of therapy and that there continue to be subgroups of patients at risk for relapse for which prognostic criteria cannot adequately define. This challenge has resulted in the development of various strategies aimed at identifying the optimal balance between maintaining overall survival and avoidance of long-term morbidity of therapy, often representing strategies quite different from those used for adults with HL. More precise risk stratification and methods for assessing the chemosensitivity of HL through imaging studies and biomarkers are in evolution. Recent advances in the understanding of the biology of HL have led to the introduction of targeted therapies in both the frontline and relapsed settings. However, significant barriers exist in the development of new combination therapies, necessitating collaborative studies across pediatric HL research consortia and in conjunction with adult groups for the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population with HL. PMID:26582374

  6. Pharmacogenetic analysis in the treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Altés, Albert; Paré, Laia; Esquirol, Albert; Xicoy, Blanca; Rámila, Elena; Vicente, Laura; López, Rosario; Orriols, Jaume; Vall-llovera, Ferran; Sánchez-González, Blanca; del Río, Elisabeth; Sureda, Anna; Páez, David; Baiget, Montserrat

    2013-08-01

    About 15-20% of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine (ABVD) chemotherapy ± radiotherapy still die following relapse or progressive disease. The outcome might be influenced by gene polymorphisms influencing chemotherapy metabolism. We studied 126 patients with HL treated with the ABVD regimen. We analyzed glutathione S-transferases (GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1), cytochromes P450 (CYP3A4 and CYP2D6), UGT1A1 and BLMH gene polymorphisms and their association with clinical and outcome variables. Patients with a GSTM1 genotype associated with extensive or ultrahigh activity had a probability of 93.8% to achieve a complete response, while the remainder of the patients had a probability of 82.3% (p = 0.04). This variable maintained its statistical significance in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio 3.7, 95% confidence interval 1-13, p = 0.05). Patients with an extensive or ultrahigh GSTM1 genotype had better prognostic factors than those with poor or intermediate genotypes (hemoglobin level, p = 0.003; serum albumin, p = 0.05; and International Prognostic Score, p = 0.038). Thus, in the treatment of HL, clinical determinants might be more relevant than the pharmacogenetic parameters analyzed to date. PMID:23323945

  7. Aberrant expression of homeobox gene SIX1 in Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nagel, Stefan; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Drexler, Hans G.; MacLeod, Roderick A.F.

    2015-01-01

    In Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) we recently identified deregulated expression of homeobox genes MSX1 and OTX2 which are physiologically involved in development of the embryonal neural plate border region. Here, we examined in HL homeobox gene SIX1 an additional regulator of this embryonal region mediating differentiation of placodal precursors. SIX1 was aberrantly activated in 12 % of HL patient samples in silico, indicating a pathological role in a subset of this B-cell malignancy. In addition, SIX1 expression was detected in HL cell lines which were used as models to reveal upstream factors and target genes of this basic developmental regulator. We detected increased copy numbers of the SIX1 locus at chromosome 14q23 correlating with enhanced expression while chromosomal translocations were absent. Moreover, comparative expression profiling data and pertinent gene modulation experiments indicated that the WNT-signalling pathway and transcription factor MEF2C regulate SIX1 expression. Genes encoding the transcription factors GATA2, GATA3, MSX1 and SPIB – all basic lymphoid regulators - were identified as targets of SIX1 in HL. In addition, cofactors EYA1 and TLE4, respectively, contrastingly mediated activation and suppression of SIX1 target gene expression. Thus, the protein domain interfaces may represent therapeutic targets in SIX1-positive HL subsets. Collectively, our data reveal a gene regulatory network with SIX1 centrally deregulating lymphoid differentiation and support concordance of lymphopoiesis/lymphomagenesis and developmental processes in the neural plate border region. PMID:26473286

  8. Cystic Odontoma in a Patient with Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Costa, Victor; Caris, Adriana Rocha; León, Jorge Esquiche; Ramos, Carolina Judica; Jardini, Vaneska; Kaminagakura, Estela

    2015-01-01

    Cystic odontoma is a rare entity, which is characterized by the association of a cyst with complex/compound odontoma. The aim of this study was to report the case of a 5-year-old male patient diagnosed previously with Hodgkin's lymphoma and treated successfully with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, who developed a mandibular odontogenic lesion. Physical examination revealed a swelling on the right side of the mandible. Radiographically, a well-defined radiolucent area surrounded by radiopaque material was observed. An incisional biopsy was performed and microscopic analysis showed a cystic lesion consisting of an atrophic epithelium comprising 2-3 cell layers and the absence of inflammation in the cystic capsule. The cyst was decompressed and the lesion was removed after 3 months of follow-up. Microscopic analysis of the surgical specimen showed a cystic hyperplastic epithelium surrounded by an intense chronic inflammatory cell infiltrate, which was in close contact with mineralized tissue resembling dentin and cementum. The final diagnosis was cystic odontoma. Since chemotherapy can affect the growth and development of infant teeth, a relationship between chemotherapy-associated adverse events and cystic odontoma is suggested in the present case. PMID:26618008

  9. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma with relapses in the lacrimal glands

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, Rita; Proença, Helena; Pinto, Filomena; Fonseca, Ana; Monteiro-Grillo, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report an unusual case of systemic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) with repeated relapse in the lacrimal glands, in spite of complete remission for several years after treatment. Methods: A 78-year-old male with small lymphocytic B cell NHL, stage IV disease (lung invasion), was submitted to surgery and chemotherapy in 2001, with complete remission of the disease. In 2003 he developed a nodular lesion in the right lacrimal fossa. Pathology results revealed a local relapse of NHL. Radiation and chemotherapy were initiated and complete remission was again achieved. In 2012 the patient developed a new nodular lesion located in the left lacrimal fossa, resulting in diplopia, ptosis and proptosis of the left eye. Orbital computerized tomography (CT), ocular ultrasound and incisional biopsy were performed. Results: Orbital CT revealed a lesion infiltrating the left lacrimal gland and encircling the globe. Biopsy results confirmed a local relapse of B cell NHL. The patient was submitted to local radiation therapy with progressive resolution of ptosis, proptosis and diplopia. Response to treatment was monitored with ocular ultrasound. Conclusions: Patients with NHL diagnosis should be immediately investigated if ophthalmic or orbital symptoms develop. NHL extension to the orbit and adnexa is infrequent (5% of NHL cases) but may occur at any stage of the disease, including as a relapse site. In such cases, radiation and chemotherapy achieve good results, inducing long periods of remission.

  10. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies indicate a similar or higher probability of disease control, higher risk of non-relapse mortality (NRM), and similar overall survival (OS) with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), compared to autologous SCT, in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Careful patient selection and utilization of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) alloSCT may allow reduction in NRM. The optimal conditioning regimen and the roles of radioimmunotherapy, T cell depletion, and tandem SCT continue to be explored. Recent studies highlight comparable results with haploidentical SCT and cord blood SCT, thus providing alternate donor sources. Disease relapse and late effects continue to be major problems. Optimization of SCT techniques (e.g., improved graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis), post-transplant monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance, or pre-emptive therapy (e.g., with novel therapies) are emerging strategies to reduce the risk of relapse. Survivorship management using a multidisciplinary care approach, adoption of healthy lifestyle, and socioeconomic counseling are integral parts of a high-quality transplant program. PMID:26983957

  11. Health Practice in Long-Term Survivors of Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Andrea K. Li Sigui; Recklitis, Christopher; Diller, Lisa R.; Neuberg, Donna; Silver, Barbara; Mauch, Peter M.

    2008-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the health practice of Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) survivors and their siblings, and to assess the impact of socioeconomic status and disease history on health practice of HL survivors. Methods and Materials: We conducted a questionnaire study on long-term HL survivors and their siblings on health care utilization, health habits, and screening behavior. Results: A total of 511 HL survivors (response rate of 50%, including survivors lost to contact) and 224 siblings (response rate, 58%) participated. Median time from HL diagnosis was 15 years. Significantly more survivors than siblings had a physical examination in the past year (63% vs. 49%, p = 0.0001). Male survivors were significantly more likely than siblings to perform monthly self-testicular examinations (19% vs. 9%, p = 0.02). Among survivors, higher household income (p = 0.01) independently predicted for having had a physical examination in the past year. Lower educational level (p = 0.0004) and history of relapsed HL (p = 0.03) were independent predictors for smoking, moderate/heavy alcohol use, and/or physical inactivity. Conclusions: Compared with siblings, long-term HL survivors have a higher level of health care utilization and better screening practice. Survivors from lower socioeconomic background had lower adherence to routine health care and greater report of unhealthy habits. Survivors with history of relapsed HL were also more likely to engage in unhealthy habits.

  12. Treatment of relapsed classical Hodgkin lymphoma in the brentuximab vedotin era

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Solomon A.; Gopal, Ajay K.

    2015-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) relapses after or is refractory to upfront multiagent chemotherapy in 20%–30% of patients. Effective salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory HL is limited, and advancements are needed. Brentuximab vedotin (BV), an anti-CD30 antibody–drug conjugate, has demonstrated significant activity and manageable toxicities in advanced HL. Currently approved as a monotherapy for patients with HL that is relapsed or refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy or autologous stem cell transplantation, BV is now being evaluated earlier in the course of disease and in combination with other therapies. This review discusses the successful translation of BV from its conception to the clinical setting and highlights ongoing trials that may ultimately expand its role in relapsed or refractory HL and improve outcomes for patients. PMID:25696848

  13. Cellular Immunotherapy Following Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma

  14. An unusual case of spinal cord compression from concomitant spinal epidural lipomatosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzai, Hasib; Khalil, Ali; Mitchell, Ruth A.; Kwok, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) results from an abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated fat within the epidural space and is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which needs to be considered with a high index of suspicion. It most commonly occurs secondary to chronic corticosteroid use and endocrinopathies. Idiopathic cases are highly associated with obesity. We report an unusual case of idiopathic thoracic SEL in a 69-year-old male, with an adjacent infiltrative Hodgkin's lymphoma and associated vertebral crush fracture, which resulted in ataxia and sensory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging scans displayed extensive SEL and an infiltrative disease process causing thoracic cord compression. Surgical decompression confirmed the presence of extensive epidural lipomatosis and Hodgkin's lymphoma and subsequently led to improvement in neurological symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of concomitant SEL with an adjacent Hodgkin's lymphoma resulting in cord compression. PMID:26962199

  15. Recommendations for Initial Evaluation, Staging, and Response Assessment of Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: The Lugano Classification

    PubMed Central

    Cheson, Bruce D.; Fisher, Richard I.; Barrington, Sally F.; Cavalli, Franco; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Zucca, Emanuele; Lister, T. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to modernize recommendations for evaluation, staging, and response assessment of patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). A workshop was held at the 11th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma in Lugano, Switzerland, in June 2011, that included leading hematologists, oncologists, radiation oncologists, pathologists, radiologists, and nuclear medicine physicians, representing major international lymphoma clinical trials groups and cancer centers. Clinical and imaging subcommittees presented their conclusions at a subsequent workshop at the 12th International Conference on Malignant Lymphoma, leading to revised criteria for staging and of the International Working Group Guidelines of 2007 for response. As a result, fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)–computed tomography (CT) was formally incorporated into standard staging for FDG-avid lymphomas. A modification of the Ann Arbor descriptive terminology will be used for anatomic distribution of disease extent, but the suffixes A or B for symptoms will only be included for HL. A bone marrow biopsy is no longer indicated for the routine staging of HL and most diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. However, regardless of stage, general practice is to treat patients based on limited (stages I and II, nonbulky) or advanced (stage III or IV) disease, with stage II bulky disease considered as limited or advanced disease based on histology and a number of prognostic factors. PET-CT will be used to assess response in FDG-avid histologies using the 5-point scale. The product of the perpendicular diameters of a single node can be used to identify progressive disease. Routine surveillance scans are discouraged. These recommendations should improve evaluation of patients with lymphoma and enhance the ability to compare outcomes of clinical trials. PMID:25113753

  16. Frequent mutation of histone-modifying genes in non-Hodgkin lymphoma | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a recent Nature article, Morin et al. uncovered a novel role for chromatin modification in driving the progression of two non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs), follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Through DNA and RNA sequencing of 117 tumor samples and 10 assorted cell lines, the authors identified and validated 109 genes with multiple mutations in these B-cell NHLs. Of the 109 genes, several genes not previously linked to lymphoma demonstrated positive selection for mutation including two genes involved in histone modification, MLL2 and MEF2B.

  17. A rare cytological diagnosis of primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the parotid gland

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Biswajit; Goyal, Vasudha; Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Mahajan, Nidhi; Jain, Shyama

    2016-01-01

    Primary lymphoma of the parotid gland is relatively rare and constitutes about 4-5% of extranodal lymphomas. The majority of them is non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is B cell in nature. We report a case of primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) of the parotid gland in an elderly male. The case was diagnosed on fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) of the right parotid gland as high grade B-cell NHL and confirmed on histopathology as DLBCL. In correlation with the clinicoradiological findings, the case was diagnosed as primary parotid DLBCL. The case highlights the role of FNAC as a timely and useful diagnostic tool. PMID:27279690

  18. Utility of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 protein expression in the distinction between nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Olga; Maeda, Takahiro; Filatov, Alexander; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2014-02-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) are considered separate entities with different prognosis and treatment. However, morphologic features can be similar and immunohistochemical studies are essential in the distinction; thus, determination of additional biomarkers is of utmost importance. LRF/Pokemon is a proto-oncogene, an interacting partner co-expressed with BCL6 in germinal centers and highly expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Conversely, loss of the LRF gene in mouse hematopoietic stem cells results in complete block of early B cell development with concomitant Notch de-repression, indicating its critical role in B versus T cell fate decision at the hematopoietic stem cell stage. For the first time, we show that LRF/Pokemon is predominantly expressed in NLPHL cases as is BCL6 with low to absent NOTCH1 protein expression; while Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in CHL show low to absent BCL6 and LRF/Pokemon expression with higher NOTCH1 expression. We illustrate a potential functional interaction between LRF and BCL6 in NLPHL pathogenesis, and differential expression of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 proteins in CHL thus showing differential expression, making for an additional diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:24326827

  19. Utility of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 Protein Expression in the Distinction of Nodular Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma and Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Olga; Maeda, Takahiro; Filatov, Alexander; Lunardi, Andrea; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL) and nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) are considered separate entities with different prognosis and treatment. However, morphologic features can be similar and immunohistochemical studies are essential in the distinction; thus, determination of additional biomarkers is of utmost importance. LRF/Pokemon is a protooncogene, an interacting partner co-expressed with BCL6 in germinal centers and highly expressed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma. Conversely, loss of the LRF gene in mouse hematopoietic stem cells results in complete block of early B cell development with concomitant Notch derepression, indicating its critical role in B versus T cell fate decision at the hematopoietic stem cell stage. For the first time, we show that LRF/Pokemon is predominantly expressed in NLPHL cases as is BCL6 with low to absent NOTCH1 protein expression; while Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in CHL show low to absent BCL6 and LRF/Pokemon expression with higher NOTCH1 expression. We illustrate a potential functional interaction between LRF and BCL6 in NLPHL pathogenesis, and differential expression of LRF/Pokemon and NOTCH1 proteins in CHL thus showing differential expression, making for an additional diagnostic marker and therapeutic target. PMID:24326827

  20. Role of modern radiation therapy in early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: A young radiation oncologists’ perspective

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Ciammella, Patrizia

    2012-01-01

    The role of radiotherapy is well established in combined modality programs for early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma, but still debated with regards to late toxicity issues. Modern radiotherapy prescribing attitudes include lower doses and smaller fields, together with the implementation of sophisticated and dedicated delivery techniques. Aim of this review is to briefly discuss the current role of radiotherapy in this field and the potential future developments. Major trials conducted in recent years in early stage Hodgkin's lymphoma are critically reviewed and discussed with a focus on radiotherapy-related issues and with an attention to current treatment options by a “young” radiation oncologists’ perspective. PMID:24669302

  1. Hodgkin's lymphoma in an adolescent previously treated with surgical resection of third ventricular juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dillon Y; Crawford, John Ross

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of a 19-year-old man with cervical lymphadenopathy diagnosed with classical Hodgkin's lymphoma 9 years after gross total resection of a third ventricular juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA). Chemotherapy or radiation therapy was not a part of his initial JPA treatment. Owing to his two primary neoplasms, genetic testing was performed, which revealed heterozygous polymorphisms of unknown significance for CDH1 and p53, and negative BRAF mutation analysis. Our case reports development of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma after JPA in the absence of antecedent radiation and/or chemotherapy, and identifiable genetic predisposition. PMID:26113587

  2. Using Haplotype Analysis to Elucidate Significant Associations between Genes and Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Amelio, Anthony M.; Monroy, Claudia; El-Zein, Randa; Etzel, Carol J.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we estimated the association between the inferred haplotypes in the inflammation, DNA repair, and folate pathways, and developed risk models for Hodgkin Lymphoma. The study population consisted of 200 Hodgkin Lymphoma cases and 220 controls. A susceptible association was observed on the XPC gene with Haplotype CT (rs2228001 and rs2228000), and a protective association was observed on the IL4R gene with Haplotype TCA (rs1805012, rs1805015, and rs1801275). These results can provide the necessary tools to identify high-risk individuals after validation in large data sets. PMID:22902050

  3. Bone involvement in young patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: efficacy of chemotherapy without local radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Haddy, T B; Keenan, A M; Jaffe, E S; Magrath, I T

    1988-10-01

    Of 95 young non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients entered consecutively on the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Protocol 7704, 26 (27.4%) had involvement of one or more bones. The mean age of these 26 patients was 16.6 years, and the male to female ratio was 3.3:1. Tumor histology included undifferentiated Burkitt's lymphoma in 12, undifferentiated non-Burkitt's lymphoma in two, undifferentiated, unspecified lymphoma in one, diffuse large cell lymphoma in three, and lymphoblastic lymphoma in eight patients. Most had extensive disease; two patients had isolated bone lesions, one had lesions of two bones without involvement of other tissues, and 23 had either multiple bone lesions or single bone lesions with involvement of other tissues. Eight of the 26 patients had bone marrow involvement. Of a subgroup of 12 patients with jaw disease, 11 had undifferentiated lymphoma and one had diffuse large cell lymphoma. Only one had primary a jaw tumor, with two quadrants of the jaw involved. All 26 patients were treated with chemotherapy; only two received radiotherapy initially for bone lesions. Predicted survival of the 26 patients at 5 years is 53.2%. The 12 patients who remain disease free have a mean survival of 62.1 months (range, 22 to 100 months). Our results call into question the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of bone lesions in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:3167201

  4. Fludarabine: a review of its use in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Vanessa R; Perry, Caroline M

    2007-01-01

    Fludarabine (Fludara), a purine nucleoside analogue, has been extensively evaluated in the treatment of a number of lymphoproliferative malignancies, including various types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Clinical studies have shown that fludarabine (alone, and particularly as a component of combination therapy) can result in high overall and complete response in adults with various types of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, including follicular lymphoma. As mono- or combination therapy, intravenous fludarabine is as effective as several other standard treatment regimens in treatment-naive patients and is also effective in patients with recurrent or refractory disease. The efficacy of fludarabine therapy is improved with the use of rituximab, as part of the initial therapeutic regimen or as maintenance therapy, and deserves consideration. The once-daily oral formulation was effective in the treatment of patients with relapsed indolent B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; however, further studies are required to confirm its role and establish its efficacy relative to that of standard treatment in this patient population. Fludarabine has generally acceptable tolerability; however, it is associated with haematological adverse events, including myelosuppression. Fludarabine, therefore, provides a highly effective first- or second-line option in the treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:17661532

  5. Autoantibody-Mediated Sensory Polyneuropathy Associated with Indolent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Abnormalities of the peripheral nervous system occur in 5% of patients with lymphoma. Polyneuropathy has not been described in patients with mantle-cell and marginal-zone B-cell lymphomas. Case Report Two elderly patients with indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphoma developed a progressive sensory polyneuropathy that was associated with serum autoantibodies directed against asialosyl/sialosyl gangliosides and myelin-associated glycoprotein/sulfated glucuronyl paragloboside, respectively, which are peripheral-nerve antigens. The oligoclonal pattern of these antibodies hinted at a lymphoma-induced immune dysregulation. The neuropathy stabilized clinically during treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin G. B-cell lymphoma was managed with a "watchful waiting" approach. Conclusions The concept of antigen-specific, immune-mediated neuropathy associated with slow-growing lymphoma of mature B-cells may be underrecognized. The principle of treating the illness underlying neuropathy may not be always indicated or necessary if risk-benefit and cost-benefit analyses are taken into account. PMID:25749823

  6. Stage IE nonHodgkin's lymphoma of the testis: a need for a brief aggressive chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Roche, H.; Suc, E.; Pons, A.; Woodman, F.; Huguet-Rigal, F.; Caveriviere, P.; Carton, M.

    1989-03-01

    Primary nonHodgkin's lymphoma of the testis is a localized disease in 50 per cent of the cases. Clinical records and pathological material from 9 stage IE cancer patients treated at our institutions were reviewed. All but 1 patient had B cell type lymphomas of intermediate (6) or high (3) grade according to the Working Formulation. Mean survival was 49 months and actuarial survival was 74 per cent at 5 years. Chemotherapy differed with time and frequently was associated with subdiaphragmatic involved field and prophylactic contralateral testis radiotherapy. In view of the good prognosis of patients receiving doxorubicin-based chemotherapy and recent reports on low stage nonHodgkin's lymphoma we recommend an aggressive brief therapy for stage IE lymphoma of the testis after orchiectomy.

  7. Diagnostic issues in a case of hodgkin lymphoma with castleman like features.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Suganya K; Rekha, Jinkala Sree; Jacob, Sajini Elizabeth; Basu, Debdatta

    2014-09-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is a benign heterogenous lymphoproliferative disorder presenting with varied clinical manifestations. Histomorphologically, two distinct variants are known, hyaline vascular type and plasma cell type. CD is reported to be associated with lymphomas. Though Non Hodgkin lymphoma is more commonly associated with CD, its association with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is also well known and documented. Many a times, CD obscures or masks the underlying lymphomas thus delaying the diagnosis. There are also reports of HL showing Castleman like features. We report a case of HL with Castleman like features which posed diagnostic difficulty owing to the fragmented nature and tiny size of the initial lymph node biopsy. Striking peripheral blood rouleaux formation which was seen in our case along with bone marrow plasmacytosis has not been described in the previously diagnosed cases. PMID:25332627

  8. ESHAP as salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Labrador, Jorge; Cabrero-Calvo, Mónica; Pérez-López, Estefanía; Mateos, María Victoria; Vázquez, Lourdes; Caballero, María Dolores; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2014-10-01

    The management of relapsed or refractory Hodgkin's lymphoma (RR-HL) remains a challenge for hematologists and oncologists. Salvage chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) is the standard of care for RR-HL. However, one of the most controversial aspects is which the best salvage protocol could be. We retrospectively analyzed 82 consecutive RR-HL who received etoposide, steroids, ara-C, and cisplatin (ESHAP) as salvage therapy followed by ASCT. Fifty percent of patients were refractory and 23 % early relapses. Overall response rate (ORR) was 67 % (50 % complete remission (CR)). Ninety one percent of patients (75/82) were transplanted. With a mean follow-up of 87 ± 53 months, the median progression-free survival (PFS) and time to tumor progression (TTP) for the whole population were 52 and 56 months, respectively, and the 5-year overall survival was 72.6 %. Achieving CR after ESHAP was associated with a longer PFS (78 vs 16 % 5-year PFS, respectively, P < 0.01) and TTP (80 vs 19 % 5-year TTP, respectively, P < 0.01). However, there were no differences for overall survival (OS) when comparing CR and partial response (PR) after ESHAP. Toxicity was low and <10 % of patients developed neutropenic fever, with no toxic deaths. Mobilization was possible in 94 % of patients. ESHAP is a safe and efficient therapeutic option for patients with RR-HL who are candidates for ASCT, since it combines a high response rate and mobilizing potential with a low toxicity profile. PMID:24863692

  9. Impact of Cardiovascular Counseling and Screening in Hodgkin Lymphoma Survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Daniëls, Laurien A.; Krol, Stijn D.G.; Graaf, Michiel A. de; Scholte, Arthur J.H.A.; Veer, Mars B. van 't; Putter, Hein; Roos, Albert de; Schalij, Martin J.; Poll-Franse, Lonneke V. van de; Creutzberg, Carien L.

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of death in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors, especially after mediastinal irradiation. The role of screening for CVD in HL survivors is unclear, but confrontation with risks of CVD may have a negative influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL). As part of a phase 2 screening study using computed tomography angiography (CTA) among HL survivors, an HRQL analysis was done to evaluate the emotional and practical burden and perceived benefits of screening and the effect of CVD-specific counseling on patient satisfaction. Methods and Materials: Patients who participated in the screening study also took part in the HRQL study. The impact of undergoing screening was evaluated with a 9-item questionnaire, and impact on HRQL with the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Core Questionnaire C30, version 3.0. The effect of counseling of CVD on perceived provision of information was evaluated with EORTC INFO-25. All questionnaires were completed at baseline and after screening. Results: Baseline questionnaires were received from 48 participants, and 43 completed questionnaires after screening. Mean age was 47 years, and mean time since diagnosis was 21 years. Of the total, 93% of subjects were content with participating, and 80% did not find the emphasis placed on late effects burdensome, although screening did have a small impact on social functioning and global quality of life. Perceived information on disease, medical tests, and treatment increased significantly after screening (P<.01). Differences were clinically relevant. There were no differences in perceived information between patients with and without screen-detected CVD. Conclusions: Screening was evaluated favorably, whether CTA showed abnormalities or not. Extensive counseling resulted in substantially increased provision of information and improved information satisfaction. Screening by

  10. Treatment results in advanced stage Hodgkin's lymphoma: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Jain, H; Sengar, M; Nair, R; Menon, H; Laskar, S; Shet, T; Gujral, S; Sridhar, E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hodgkin's lymphoma displays distinct epidemiological attributes in Asian population thus making it relevant to study whether there are any differences in treatment outcomes too when treated with current standard of care. Aim: To evaluate the treatment outcomes of de-novo advanced stage HL in adults. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study included de-novo advanced stage HL patients (≥15 years) registered at our center from January 2004 to December 2007. Treatment outcomes were measured in terms of response rates, overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). Overall and PFS were calculated with Kaplan-Meier methodology and Cox-proportional hazards model was used for multivariate analysis to identify prognostic factors. Results: There were 125 patients (males 77%) who received minimum one cycle of chemotherapy with median age of 32 years (Range 15-65 years). Stage IV disease was seen in (46 patients) 37%; 75% (94 patients) patients had B symptoms. International prognostic score (IPS) ≤4 was seen in 95/112 (85%) patients. ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy was given to 94%. Radiation to residual/bulky sites was given to 36% (45 patients). Response data was available for 112 patients; complete response in 76%; partial response in 10 % and progressive disease in 3 patients. Nineteen deaths (progressive disease-7, toxicity-8, unrelated cause-4) were observed. At median follow-up of 28 months, estimated 5-year OS and PFS were 60% and 58%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, IPS and response to treatment were significant factors for both OS and PFS. Conclusions: The treatment outcomes in this study are comparable with the published literature with limited follow-up data. PMID:25766339

  11. Late radiation toxicity in Hodgkin lymphoma patients: proton therapy's potential.

    PubMed

    Toltz, Allison; Shin, Naomi; Mitrou, Ellis; Laude, Cecile; Freeman, Carolyn R; Seuntjens, Jan; Parker, William; Roberge, David

    2015-01-01

    In 2010, all young patients treated for intrathoracic Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) at one of 10 radiotherapy centers in the province of Quebec received 3D conformal photon therapy. These patients may now be at risk for late effects of their treatment, notably secondary malignancies and cardiac toxicity. We hypothesized that more complex radiotherapy, including intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT) and possibly IMRT (in the form of helical tomotherapy (HT)), could benefit these patients. With institutional review board approval at 10 institutions, all treatment plans for patients under the age of 30 treated for HL during a six-month consecutive period of 2010 were retrieved. Twenty-six patients were identified, and after excluding patients with extrathoracic radiation or treatment of recurrence, 20 patients were replanned for HT and IMPT. Neutron dose for IMPT plans was estimated from published measurements. The relative seriality model was used to predict excess risk of cardiac mortality. A modified linear quadratic model was used to predict the excess absolute risk for induction of lung cancer and, in female patients, breast cancer. Model parameters were derived from published data. Predicted risk for cardiac mortality was similar among the three treatment techniques (absolute excess risk of cardiac mortality was not reduced for HT or IMPT (p > 0.05, p > 0.05) as compared to 3D CRT). Predicted risks were increased for HT and reduced for IMPT for secondary lung cancer (p < 0.001, p < 0.001) and breast cancers (p< 0.001, p< 0.001) as compared to 3D CRT. PMID:26699298

  12. Immunologic Autograft Engineering and Survival in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Porrata, Luis F; Burgstaler, Edwin A; Winters, Jeffrey L; Jacob, Eapen K; Gastineau, Dennis A; Suman, Vera J; Inwards, David J; Ansell, Stephen M; Micallef, Ivana N; Johnston, Patrick B; Nevala, Wendy; Markovic, Svetomir N

    2016-06-01

    Retrospective studies have reported that the collected and infused autograft absolute lymphocyte count (A-ALC) affects clinical outcomes after autologous peripheral hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (APHSCT). We hypothesized that manipulation of the apheresis machine to target a higher A-ALC dose would translate into prolonged progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) undergoing APHSCT. Between December 2007 and October 2010, we performed a double-blind, phase III, randomized study randomly assigning 122 patients with NHL to undergo collection with the Fenwal Amicus Apheresis system with our standard settings (mononuclear cells offset of 1.5 and RBC offset of 5.0) or at modified settings (mononuclear cells offset of 1.5 and RBC of 6.0). The primary endpoint was PFS. Neither PFS (hazard ratio [HR] of modified to standard, 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], .62 to 2.08; P = .70) nor overall survival (OS) (HR modified to standard, .85; 95% CI, .39 to 1.86; P = .68) were found to differ by collection method. Collection of A-ALC between both methods was similar. Both PFS (P = .0025; HR, 2.77; 95% CI, 1.39 to 5.52) and OS (P = .004; HR, 3.38; 95% CI, 1.27 to 9.01) were inferior in patients infused with an A-ALC < .5 × 10(9) lymphocytes/kg compared with patients infused with an A-ALC ≥ .5 × 10(9) lymphocytes/kg, regardless of the method of collection. We did not detect significant differences in clinical outcomes or in the A-ALC collection between the modified and the standard Fenwal Amicus settings; however, despite physician discretion on primary number of collections and range of cells infused, higher A-ALC infused dose were associated with better survival after APHSCT. PMID:26826432

  13. Epidemiological Overview of Hodgkin Lymphoma across the Mediterranean Basin.

    PubMed

    Salati, Massimiliano; Cesaretti, Marina; Macchia, Matteo; Mistiri, Mufid El; Federico, Massimo

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiology of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) has always been a source of fascination to researchers due to its heterogeneous characteristics of presentation. HL is an uncommon neoplasm of B-cell origin with an incidence that varies significantly by age, sex, ethnicity, geographic location and socioeconomic status. This complex pattern was also found to be replicated among Mediterranean basin populations. HL incidence rates progressively decreased from industrialized European countries such as France (ASR=2.61) and Italy (ASR=2.39) to less developed nations such as Albania (ASR=1.34) and Bosnia Herzegovina (ASR=1.1). Regarding HL mortality we have found that countries with the lowest incidence rates show the highest number of deaths from this cancer and viceversa. Finally, a wide gap in terms of survival was showed across the Mediterranean basin with survival rates ranged from 82.3% and 85.1% among Italian men and women, to 53.3 % and 59.3% among Libyan men and women, respectively. Factors such as the degree of socio-economic development, the exposure to risk factors westernization-related, the availability of diagnostic practices along with different genetic susceptibilities to HL may explain its variation across Mediterranean countries. Furthermore, the lack of health resources decisively contribute to the poor prognosis recorded in less developed region. In the future, the introduction of appropriate and accessible treatment facilities along with an adequate number of clinical specialists in the treatment of HL and other cancers are warranted in order to improve the outcomes of affected patients and treat a largely curable type of cancer in disadvantaged regions. PMID:25045456

  14. Chemotherapy With or Without Additional Chemotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy in Treating Children With Newly Diagnosed Hodgkin's Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-27

    Childhood Lymphocyte-Depleted Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Mixed Cellularity Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Lymphocyte Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma; Childhood Nodular Sclerosis Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma

  15. FDG-PET/CT predicts outcome in patients with aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Querellou, Solène; Valette, Frédéric; Bodet-Milin, Caroline; Oudoux, Aurore; Carlier, Thomas; Harousseau, Jean-Luc; Chatal, Jean-François; Couturier, Olivier

    2006-11-01

    Early therapy response assessment with metabolic imaging is potentially useful to determine prognosis in aggressive lymphoma and, thus, can guide first-line therapy. Forty-eight patients with aggressive lymphoma [24 Hodgkin's disease (HD); 24 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)] underwent fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) before chemotherapy (PET1) and at mid-treatment (PET2). Therapeutic response was evaluated using conventional methods at mid-treatment. PET2 results were related to event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) using Kaplan-Meier analyses. PET1 was positive in all patients. PET2 was negative in 38 patients (18 NHL-20 HD) and positive in 10 (6 NHL-4 HD). Of the PET-negative patients, 61 and 65% achieved complete remission, and only 50 and 25% of PET-positive patients, respectively, for NHL and HD, achieved complete remission. Significant associations were found between PET2 and EFS (p = 0.0006) and OS (p = 0.04) for NHL, and EFS (p < 0.0001) for HD (but not for OS, because no HD patient died). FDG-PET at mid-treatment can predict the outcome of patients with aggressive lymphoma and should be a useful tool to modify an ineffective therapy. PMID:16871391

  16. Increased risk of lung cancer, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and leukemia following Hodgkin's disease

    SciTech Connect

    van Leeuwen, F.E.; Somers, R.; Taal, B.G.; van Heerde, P.; Coster, B.; Dozeman, T.; Huisman, S.J.; Hart, A.A.

    1989-08-01

    The risk of second cancers (SCs) was assessed in 744 patients with Hodgkin's disease (HD) admitted to The Netherlands Cancer Institute from 1966 to 1983. Sixty-nine SCs were observed one month or more after start of first treatment. These included 14 cases of lung cancer, nine cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), 16 cases of leukemia, and six cases of the myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). The median interval between the diagnosis of HD and that of second lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia was 8.1, 13.3, and 5.7 years, respectively. The overall relative risks (RR) (observed/expected (O/E) ratios) of developing lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 4.9 (95% confidence limit (CL), 2.7 to 8.2), 31.0 (95% CL, 14.2 to 58.9) and 45.7 (95% CL, 26.1 to 74.2), respectively. At 15 years the cumulative risk of developing an SC amounted to 20.6% +/- 2.9%. The 15-year estimates of lung cancer, NHL, and leukemia were 6.2% +/- 1.9%, 5.9% +/- 2.1% and 6.3% +/- 1.7%, respectively. Increased lung cancer risk following HD has not frequently been clearly demonstrated before; that we were able to demonstrate such risk may be due to the completeness of follow-up over long periods that could be achieved in this study. Excess lung cancer risk was only noted in treatment regimens with radiotherapy (RT); also, all lung cancers arose in irradiation fields. Excess risk of leukemia was only found in treatment regimens involving chemotherapy (CT). For NHL, combined modality treatment was shown to be the most important risk factor. Risk of lung cancer and NHL increased with time since diagnosis. A time-dependent covariate analysis (Cox model) performed on leukemia and MDS showed an increasing risk with intensity of CT, age (greater than 40 years), and a splenectomy.

  17. Primary Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Breast: Ultrasonography, Elastography, Digital Mammography, Contrast-Enhanced Digital Mammography, and Pathology Findings.

    PubMed

    Gkali, Christina An; Chalazonitis, Athanasios N; Feida, Eleni; Giannos, Aris; Sotiropoulou, Maria; Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Loutradis, Dimitrios

    2015-12-01

    Lymphomas constitute approximately 0.15% of malignant mammary neoplasms. Less than 0.5% of all malignant lymphomas involve the breast primarily. Primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma is usually right sided. The combined therapy approach, with chemotherapy and radiotherapy, is the most successful treatment. Mastectomy offers no benefit in the treatment of primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma. To the author's knowledge, this is the first published case of primary non-Hodgkin breast lymphoma reported with conventional ultrasonography, elastography (both freehand and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging), digital mammography, contrast-enhanced digital mammography, and pathology findings. A 45-year-old woman presented with a lump in the right breast for 2 months. There was no evidence of systemic lymphoma or leukemia when the breast lesion was detected. Imaging findings were negative for lymphoma. Ipsilateral lymph nodes were not palpable. The mass was resected, and histopathology findings were diagnostic of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunohistochemistry was confirmatory of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, diffuse large cell type of B-cell lineage. Although primary and secondary lymphomas of the breast are rare entities, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of breast malignancies. PMID:25831151

  18. Excessive chemotherapy-related granulocytopenia in a child with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and a congenital abnormality of purine salvage.

    PubMed

    Blatt, J

    1990-01-01

    A girl with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and immunodeficiency based on absence of the purine salvage pathway enzyme purine nucleoside phosphorylase experienced profound neutropenia while receiving combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, methotrexate, and prednisone (COMP). Neutropenia was most severe following courses that included either systemic or intrathecal methotrexate, even in the face of major dose reductions. Delays in the development of neutropenia-during periods of leucovorin administration also implicate methotrexate as the primary responsible agent. This case suggests that certain immunodeficiency states predispose patients to extensive chemotherapy-induced myelosuppression and supports the concept that purine salvage is a clinically important mechanism for modulating methotrexate toxicity. PMID:2113161

  19. Residential and occupational exposure to sunlight and mortality from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: composite (threefold) case-control study.

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, D. M.; Zahm, S. H.; Dosemeci, M.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality is associated with sunlight exposure. DESIGN: Three case-control studies based on death certificates of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and skin cancer mortality examining associations with potential sunlight exposure from residence and occupation. SETTING: 24 states in the United States. SUBJECTS: All cases were deaths from non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and non-melanotic skin cancer between 1984 and 1991. Two age, sex, and race frequency matched controls per case were selected from non-cancer deaths. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Odds ratios for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, melanoma, and skin cancer from residential and occupational sunlight exposure adjusted for age, sex, race, socioeconomic status, and farming occupation. RESULTS: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality was not positively associated with sunlight exposure based on residence. Both melanoma and skin cancer were positively associated with residential sunlight exposure. Adjusted odds ratios for residing in states with the highest sunlight exposure were 0.83 (95% confidence interval 0.81 to 0.86) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 1.12 (1.06 to 1.19) for melanoma, and 1.30 (1.18 to 1.43) for skin cancer. In addition, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality was not positively associated with occupational sunlight exposure (odds ratio 0.88; 0.81 to 0.96). Skin cancer was slightly positively associated with occupational sunlight exposure (1.14; 0.96 to 1.36). CONCLUSIONS: Unlike skin cancer and to some extent melanoma, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma mortality was not positively associated with exposure to sunlight. The findings do not therefore support the hypothesis that sunlight exposure contributes to the rising rates of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:9167561

  20. Predominance and characteristics of Burkitt lymphoma among children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Sandlund, J T; Fonseca, T; Leimig, T; Verissimo, L; Ribeiro, R; Lira, V; Berard, C W; Sixbey, J; Crist, W M; Mao, L; Chen, G; Pui, C H; Heim, M; Pedrosa, F

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to define the histologic distribution, clinical features, and treatment response of childhood non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in northeastern Brazil. We reviewed medical records and histopathologic studies of 98 children treated for NHL from 1980 to 1987 at a major pediatric cancer center in Recife, Brazil. Treatment outcome was evaluated in relation to tumor burden (stage and serum LDH) and type of therapy (LSA2L2 vs other multiagent chemotherapy). There was a striking predominance of the small noncleaved cell (Burkitt) subtype, which occurred in 92 of the 98 children and adolescents diagnosed with NHL. Subsequent analyses focused on these patients. The majority (n = 84) had advanced (stage III/IV) disease at diagnosis. The abdomen was the most common site of disease (84 cases); jaw involvement was rare (three cases). Five-year event-free survival (excluding treatment refusals) was significantly better for patients with limited vs advanced stage disease (75 +/- 14% vs 42 +/- 6%; P < 0.04). Elevated serum LDH (>500 U/l) was associated with a poorer outcome (P = 0.008). The type of chemotherapy did not affect EFS (P = 0.95). Only 39% of patients are long-term survivors, reflecting the high rate of septic deaths (25% of patients) and parental refusal/abandonment of therapy (10%). Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was detected in tumor cells from eight of the 11 cases studied. In clinical presentation, these cases resemble sporadic Burkitt lymphoma, yet in their apparent responsiveness to LSA2L2 therapy and association with EBV, they do not. Childhood NHL in northeastern Brazil is predominantly of the Burkitt subtype, and is associated with clinical features that appear to distinguish it from the endemic and sporadic forms of this tumor. These cases may represent a third or intermediate subtype of Burkitt lymphoma. PMID:9180301

  1. Phenoxy herbicides and chlorophenols as risk factors for soft tissue sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woods, J.; Polissar, L.; Severson, R.; Heuser, L.

    1986-09-01

    A population-based case-control study evaluated the relationship between soft tissue sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and past exposure to phenoxy herbicides and chlorophenols in western Washington state. A major purpose of the study was to determine if the risk of cancer was elevated in relation to chemicals potentially contaminated with 2,3,7,8-tetra-chlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). A total of 160 men with soft tissue sarcoma and 581 men with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were group-matched with 694 randomly selected controls and were interviewed in person. Among the general population, no increased risks for either cancer were seen in relation to intensity or duration of past exposure to phenoxy herbicides or chlorophenols. Preliminary risk estimates for specific occupations that involve phenoxy herbicide or chlorophenol exposure included: farmer, herbicide formulator, applicator, forest sprayer, farmland sprayer, work in sprayed area, and work with or manufacture chlorophenyls. In addition, the risks of both soft tissue sarcoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma were elevated among men with past exposure to various insecticides, organic solvents and metals, and among those with preexisting compromise of the immune system. Multivariate studies are in progress to ascertain the contribution of diverse factors to the risks of soft tissue sarcoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in association with phenoxy herbicides, chlorophenols, and/or TCDD.

  2. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma risk and insecticide, fungicide and fumigant use in the Agricultural Health Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL an...

  3. Burkitt lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... lymphoma is a very fast growing form of non-Hodgkin lymphoma . Causes Burkitt lymphoma was first discovered in children ... CT scan References National Cancer Institute: PDQ Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date last ...

  4. Prognostic risk factors in advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma. Report of the German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, M; Pfreundschuh, M; Hasenclever, D; Hiller, E; Gerhartz, H; Wilmanns, W; Rohloff, R; Rühl, U; Kühn, G; Fuchs, R

    1988-06-01

    In a national multicentre trial in the FRG patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma in stages CS/PS III B/IV were entered into the HD 3 protocol and received induction chemotherapy with 3 x (COPP + ABVD). Patients in complete remission (CR) received consolidation therapy by either radiotherapy (20 Gy IF) or chemotherapy (COPP + ABVD). Patients not in CR received salvage therapy (40 Gy in case of persisting nodal disease, else 4 x CEVD chemotherapy). Between July 1983 and May 1987 230 untreated patients aged 15 to 60 qualified for this HD 3 protocol. This analysis is based on the first 137 patients evaluable for response. Of these, 86 (63%) achieved CR after induction chemotherapy. Including salvage therapy a total of 104 patients (76%) achieved CR. Univariate and multivariate prognostic risk factor analyses were performed using freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) as endpoint. Sex, age, splenectomy, bone marrow, liver and bone involvement had no prognostic impact nor had stage according to the Ann Arbor classification. In contrast, a pretreatment erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) above 80 mm/h and a serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) above 230 IU/ml appeared as significant risk factors (p less than 0.01, relative risk 2.3). The two parameters were not independent. Comparing a group A (ESR less than or equal to 80 and AP less than or equal to 230) versus a pooled group B (ESR greater than 80 and/or AP greater than 230) increased the difference (p less than 0.001, relative risk of 2.8) which was also significant for survival (p less than 0.04). PMID:2454691

  5. A case of primary pancreatic non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Anderloni, Andrea; Genco, Chiara; Ballarè, Marco; Carmagnola, Stefania; Battista, Serena; Repici, Alessandro

    2015-06-01

    Non Hodgkin lymphoma frequently involves the gastrointestinal tract, in particular the stomach and the small bowel. Rarely, it can also be a cause of pancreatic masses. Clinical presentation is often non-specific and may overlap with other pancreatic conditions such as carcinoma, neuroendocrine tumours and autoimmune pancreatitis. We report a case of primary pancreatic lymphoma in a young woman with jaundice, fever and abdominal pain mimicking autoimmune pancreatitis. Clinical evaluation included the abdominal Computed Tomography scan, Magnetic Resonance Imaging and an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy that revealed a large duodenal mass. Endoscopic biopsies were performed and eventually histological examination was coherent with a diagnosis of primary pancreatic lymphoma. PMID:26114186

  6. Catalog of genetic progression of human cancers: non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bödör, Csaba; Reiniger, Lilla

    2016-03-01

    The recent application of next-generation sequencing technologies lead to significant improvements in our understanding of genetic underpinnings of non-Hodgkin lymphomas with identification of an unexpectedly high number of novel mutation targets across the different B-cell lymphoma entities. These recently discovered molecular lesions are expected to have a major impact on development of novel biomarkers and targeted therapies as well as patient stratification based on the underlying genetic profile. This review will cover the major discoveries in B-cell lymphomas using next-generation sequencing technologies over the last few years, highlighting alterations associated with relapse and progression of these diseases. PMID:26957091

  7. New insights into the epidemiology of non-Hodgkin lymphoma and implications for therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Dai; Nastoupil, Loretta J.; Williams, Jessica N.; Lee, Paul; Koff, Jean L.; Flowers, Christopher R.

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) comprises numerous biologically and clinically heterogeneous subtypes, with limited data examining risk factors for these distinct disease entities. Many limitations exist when studying lymphoma epidemiology, therefore until recently little was known regarding the etiology of NHL subtypes. This review highlights the results of recent pooled analyses examining risk factors for NHL subtypes. We outline heterogeneity and commonality among risk factors for NHL subtypes, with proposed subtype-specific as well as shared etiologic mechanisms. In addition, we describe how the study of lymphoma epidemiology may translate into prevention or therapeutic targeting as we continue to explore the complexities of lifestyle and genetic factors that impact lymphomagenesis. PMID:25864967

  8. Rationale and Design of the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium (InterLymph) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Subtypes Project

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Sampson, Joshua N.; Cerhan, James R.; Turner, Jennifer J.; Vajdic, Claire M.; Wang, Sophia S.; Smedby, Karin E.; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Monnereau, Alain; Benavente, Yolanda; Bracci, Paige M.; Chiu, Brian C. H.; Skibola, Christine F.; Zhang, Yawei; Mbulaiteye, Sam M.; Spriggs, Michael; Robinson, Dennis; Norman, Aaron D.; Kane, Eleanor V.; Spinelli, John J.; Kelly, Jennifer L.; Vecchia, Carlo La; Dal Maso, Luigino; Maynadié, Marc; Kadin, Marshall E.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Clarke, Christina A.; Roman, Eve; Miligi, Lucia; Colt, Joanne S.; Berndt, Sonja I.; Mannetje, Andrea; de Roos, Anneclaire J.; Kricker, Anne; Nieters, Alexandra; Franceschi, Silvia; Melbye, Mads; Boffetta, Paolo; Clavel, Jacqueline; Linet, Martha S.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Slager, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), the most common hematologic malignancy, consists of numerous subtypes. The etiology of NHL is incompletely understood, and increasing evidence suggests that risk factors may vary by NHL subtype. However, small numbers of cases have made investigation of subtype-specific risks challenging. The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium therefore undertook the NHL Subtypes Project, an international collaborative effort to investigate the etiologies of NHL subtypes. This article describes in detail the project rationale and design. Methods We pooled individual-level data from 20 case-control studies (17471 NHL cases, 23096 controls) from North America, Europe, and Australia. Centralized data harmonization and analysis ensured standardized definitions and approaches, with rigorous quality control. Results The pooled study population included 11 specified NHL subtypes with more than 100 cases: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (N = 4667), follicular lymphoma (N = 3530), chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (N = 2440), marginal zone lymphoma (N = 1052), peripheral T-cell lymphoma (N = 584), mantle cell lymphoma (N = 557), lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström macroglobulinemia (N = 374), mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome (N = 324), Burkitt/Burkitt-like lymphoma/leukemia (N = 295), hairy cell leukemia (N = 154), and acute lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma (N = 152). Associations with medical history, family history, lifestyle factors, and occupation for each of these 11 subtypes are presented in separate articles in this issue, with a final article quantitatively comparing risk factor patterns among subtypes. Conclusions The International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium NHL Subtypes Project provides the largest and most comprehensive investigation of potential risk factors for a broad range of common and rare NHL subtypes to date. The analyses contribute to our understanding of the multifactorial nature of NHL

  9. Cranio-maxillofacial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical and histological presentation.

    PubMed

    Scherfler, Sebastian; Freier, Kolja; Seeberger, Robin; Bacon, Claire; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Thiele, Oliver C

    2012-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma represents about 5% of all malignant lesions of the head and neck. In this study we retrospectively evaluated clinical presentation, histological subtype and long-term prognosis of 42 patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the craniofacial area. The mean age at diagnosis was 64 years. More than half of the patients presented with disseminated disease at multiple sites (55%, n=23). In 62% (n=26) the first manifestation was extranodal. The most common affected region was the oral cavity (65%, n=17). Treatment consisted of local therapy, including surgical resection and radiation, as well as chemotherapy with or without local therapy. Recurrence occurred in 31% (n=13) of the treated patients. Mean survival after first diagnosis varied from 17 months in patients presenting with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), to 8.5 years in patients with follicular lymphoma. The most common histological subtype is DLBCL. Standard treatment for DLBCL consists of chemotherapy combined with CD 20 monoclonal antibody, even after total resection of the tumour. There is high risk of systemic disease in patients presenting with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and high risk of post therapy recurrence. PMID:22093243

  10. Molecular Monitoring of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Melani, Christopher; Roschewski, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The ability to precisely monitor the effectiveness of therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma has important clinical implications. In patients with curable lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the eradication of all disease is necessary for cure. In patients with incurable lymphomas, such as follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, deep and durable remissions are associated with improvements in survival. Radiographic imaging modalities such as computed tomography and positron emission tomography are the current gold standard for monitoring therapy, but they are fundamentally limited by radiation risks, costs, lack of tumor specificity, and inability to detect disease at the molecular level. Novel sequencing-based methods can detect circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the peripheral blood with great sensitivity, which opens new opportunities for molecular monitoring before, during, and after therapy. Beyond monitoring, ctDNA can also be used as a "liquid biopsy" to assess for molecular changes after therapy that may identify treatment-resistant clones. ctDNA is an emerging tool that may transform our ability to offer precision therapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27539624

  11. Risk factor adapted treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma: strategies and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, M; Pfreundschuh, M; Rühl, U; Hiller, E; Gerhartz, H; Roloff, R; Adler, M; Schoppe, W; Hagen-Aukamp, U; Schmitt, G

    1989-01-01

    In a national multicenter trial in the Federal Republic of Germany, patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma in stages I, II and IIIA presenting with large mediastinal tumor (MT), extranodal (E), or massive spleen (S) involvement received a combined modality treatment with 2x (COPP + ABVD) followed by 20 or 40 Gy EF radiation (HD1 protocol). By October 1987, 89 patients aged 15-60 years had finished therapy and were evaluable for response. Of these 74 (83%) achieved complete remission (CR). After 3 years freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) is 80% (+/- 8%, 95% confidence interval) and survival (SV) 92% (+/- 6%, 95% confidence interval). In a univariate and multivariate analysis using FFTF as endpoint we could not identify any particularly prominent prognostic risk factor among the following examined: stage, constitutional symptoms, MT, E stage, S involvement, age, sex, histology, laparotomy, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), leukocytes, lymphocytes, and alkaline phosphatase (AP). These data suggest that the inclusion criteria have selected a fairly homogeneous group of patients with respect to prognosis. In a separate trial (HD3 protocol) patients in stages IIIB/IV received induction chemotherapy with 3x (COPP + ABVD). Patients in complete remission (CR) received consolidation therapy by either radiotherapy (20 Gy IF) or further chemotherapy (COPP + ABVD). Patients not in CR received salvage therapy (40Gy in the case of persisting nodal disease, or else 4x CEVD chemotherapy). By October 1987, 137 patients had finished therapy and were evaluable for response. Of these 86 (63%) achieved CR after induction chemotherapy. Including salvage therapy a total of 104 patients (76%) achieved CR. After 3 years FFTF is 56% (+/- 10%, 95% confidence interval) and SV 84% (+/- 8%, 95% confidence interval). Univariate and multivariate prognostic risk factor analyses were performed using FFTF as endpoint. Sex, age, stage, splenectomy, bone marrow, and liver and bone involvement had no

  12. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F.; Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, Alma; Ahmed, Sairah; Nieto, Yago; Dabaja, Bouthaina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ2 test and logistic multivariate regression. Results Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grade 1–3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation (10%, P=0.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose (MLD) >13.5 Gy, V20 >30%, V15 >35%, V10 >40% and V5>55%. The likelihood ratio (LR) χ2 value was highest for V5< 55% (LR χ2=19.37). Conclusions In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma who received salvage chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell

  13. Treatment Options for Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  14. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Past treatment for cancer and having a weakened immune system affect the risk of having childhood non-Hodgkin ... or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Having a weakened immune system after a transplant or from medicines given after ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with HIV infection. Age, gender, and a weakened immune system can affect the risk of adult non-Hodgkin ... the cancer cells to normal cells of the immune system. Other tests and procedures may be done depending ...

  16. Patient-reported outcomes of brentuximab vedotin in Hodgkin lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Robert; Allibone, Suzanne; Bartlett, Nancy L; Brice, Pauline; Chen, Andy; Pose, Katrina; Rich, Lynn; Bonthapally, Vijay; Garfin, Phillip M; Fanale, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) or R/R systemic anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (sALCL) treated with brentuximab vedotin (BV) experienced high remission rates in two Phase II trials. With increased response rates and survival times, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are becoming increasingly important and can help inform treatment decisions to enhance care of cancer patients. Objective The objective was to qualitatively assess HRQoL in long-term survivors treated with BV. Methods An eight-question survey assessing PRO-related aspects was developed and fielded to a subset of patients with HL or sALCL who remained in long-term follow-up after completing BV treatment in the two pivotal studies. Results The survey was completed by 25 of 38 patients (12 with HL, 13 with sALCL). The majority of patients reported that their energy level, outlook on life, difficulties with daily activities, ability to participate in physical activities, and overall HRQoL improved compared to those before BV treatment. Limitations Small sample size and lack of a baseline questionnaire or validated assessment instrument limit broad applicability of these findings to large populations of patients with HL or sALCL. Conclusion This is the first report of BV PRO data in R/R HL and sALCL. Given the patients’ poor prognostic outcomes before stem cell transplant, these encouraging results warrant formal evaluation of PRO end points in BV trials. PMID:27103829

  17. Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... group of blood cancers that develop in the lymphatic system. The two main types are Hodgkin lymphoma and ... Is a type of cancer that affects the lymphatic system Generally develops in the lymph nodes and lymphatic ...

  18. Rapidly Progressing Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Case Report and a Possible Explanation

    PubMed Central

    Irsai, Gábor; Barna, Sándor; Méhes, Gábor; Illés, Árpád; Váróczy, László

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hodgkin lymphoma is a highly curable lymphoid malignancy; however treatment of a significant number of patients remains challenging. Case Report. The authors present an unusually rapidly progressing case of refractory advanced stage classical nodular sclerosis subtype Hodgkin lymphoma with unfavorable prognosis. A 66-year-old male patient was refractory for first-line doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastin, dacarbazine (ABVD) treatment with persistent disease; therefore physicians changed treatment for dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin (DHAP) and later ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine (IGEV) regimen. Unfortunately the patient developed acute kidney and respiratory failure and died after 6 months of treatment. Current and retrospective histological examination of the patient's lymph node biopsy, skin lesion, and autopsy revealed the same aberrantly expressing CD4 positive nodular sclerosis subtype Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusion. Aberrant expression of T-cell antigens on the Hodgkin and Reed/Sternberg cells could be associated with inferior outcome. T-cell associated antigens should be investigated more often in patients not responding sufficiently to treatment and hence treatment should be intensified or targeted therapy (brentuximab vedotin) should be considered. PMID:27429620

  19. Rapidly Progressing Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Case Report and a Possible Explanation.

    PubMed

    Jóna, Ádám; Irsai, Gábor; Barna, Sándor; Méhes, Gábor; Illés, Árpád; Váróczy, László

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Hodgkin lymphoma is a highly curable lymphoid malignancy; however treatment of a significant number of patients remains challenging. Case Report. The authors present an unusually rapidly progressing case of refractory advanced stage classical nodular sclerosis subtype Hodgkin lymphoma with unfavorable prognosis. A 66-year-old male patient was refractory for first-line doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastin, dacarbazine (ABVD) treatment with persistent disease; therefore physicians changed treatment for dexamethasone, cytarabine, and cisplatin (DHAP) and later ifosfamide, gemcitabine, and vinorelbine (IGEV) regimen. Unfortunately the patient developed acute kidney and respiratory failure and died after 6 months of treatment. Current and retrospective histological examination of the patient's lymph node biopsy, skin lesion, and autopsy revealed the same aberrantly expressing CD4 positive nodular sclerosis subtype Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusion. Aberrant expression of T-cell antigens on the Hodgkin and Reed/Sternberg cells could be associated with inferior outcome. T-cell associated antigens should be investigated more often in patients not responding sufficiently to treatment and hence treatment should be intensified or targeted therapy (brentuximab vedotin) should be considered. PMID:27429620

  20. Genetically Modified T-cell Infusion Following Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Recurrent or High-Risk Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-29

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  1. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma involving the parotid gland: CT and MR imaging findings

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, L; Wang, P; Yang, J; Yu, Q

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: As an uncommon neoplasm, parotid non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) comprises mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) and non-MALT lymphomas. Both types of lymphoma vary in prognosis and treatment. The aim of this study was to explore CT and MRI characteristics of these two types of lymphoma. Methods: 61 cases of parotid NHL, 34 MALT and 27 non-MALT lymphomas with histopathological confirmation were examined with routine CT and MR scans prior to treatment, and retrospectively reviewed. Results: On CT and MRI, 34 MALT lymphomas presented with 11 solid and 23 solid-cystic forms, whereas 27 non-MALT lymphomas presented with 25 solid and 2 solid-cystic forms (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Parotid MALT lymphoma is characterized mainly by the solid-cystic form, whereas non-MALT lymphoma is characterized mainly by the solid form. The differences on CT and MRI can offer helpful information for differentiation of both types of parotid NHL. PMID:23975113

  2. [Lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Lohri, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Although malignant lymphoma is split in over 60 distinct entities, four of them, diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular-, Hodgkin's- and mantle cell lymphoma constitute more than half of all new cases. A recent major revision of the Ann Arbor staging system restricts the suffix “A” and “B” just to Hodgkin's lymphoma. Bone marrow exams are abandonned in Hodgkin's and restricted in DLBCL. PET exams at different time points are crucial. PET guided therapy will lead to a reduction of the use of chemo- and radiation therapy. Many new targeted drugs have been introduced. Their therapeutic index is impressive as is their price tag. The radiation and chemotherapy free treatment of malignant lymphoma is within reach. PMID:26732717

  3. Breast ductal carcinoma and metastatic lymphoma to the contralateral breast in patient with cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Di Nubila, B; Meroni, S; Bonello, L; Peccatori, F; Cassano, E; Bellomi, M

    2011-01-01

    Breast lymphoma is a rare condition, both as a primary and a metastatic manifestation. The primary form has an incidence ranging from 0.04% to 0.5% of all breast neoplasms, whereas the metastatic form has an incidence of 0.07%. We hereby report a clinical case of a patient who presented with cutaneous non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the left scapulohumeral region treated with surgery followed by radiotherapy (40 Gy total). Three years following radiotherapy, the patient was diagnosed with a left breast infiltrating ductal carcinoma, treated with conservative surgery and adjuvant therapy. The following year, i.e. four years after the initial diagnosis of NHL, two lymphoproliferative relapses occurred: in the left cutaneous scapulohumeral region at the original site of disease, and in the right breast. The aim of this paper is to highlight an uncommon oncologic disorder such as breast lymphoma, highlighting its clinical and radiological manifestations. Some studies reported a possible aetiological role of radiotherapy in the development of breast cancer following treatment of NHL, and in the development of breast cancer following treatment of Hodgkin lymphoma, which could potentially explain our findings. PMID:21607043

  4. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of the Knee: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ryan Ka-Lok; Griffith, James Francis; Ng, Alex Wing-Hung; Ying Tam, Hillary Ka; Chan, Anthony Wing-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Primary musculoskeletal lymphoma presenting as monoarthritis is very rare. Less than 20 cases have been reported. The ultrasound appearances have not been reported to date. We present a young female of primary knee lymphoma with synovial involvement presenting as monoarthritis. The ultrasound and MRI features are discussed. PMID:25901263

  5. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma primary refractory to brentuximab vedotin, with transformation to CD30-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shinichi; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Suzuki, Tatsuya; Maruyama, Dai; Kobayashi, Yukio; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-09-01

    Brentuximab vedotin (BV) is an antibody-drug conjugate that targets CD30. It is highly effective for relapsed/refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma (CHL), and has become a promising treatment option for these patients; however, approximately 25 % of patients are refractory to BV. Until now, the clinicopathologic features of CHL refractory to BV have not been well understood. Here, we report a patient with relapsed CHL with an unfavorable outcome, whose disease was primary refractory to BV and was histologically diagnosed as a transformation from mixed cellularity CHL to CD30-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). The transformation to DLBCL showing high tumor density and high proliferative activity (Ki67 index >90 %) was possibly related to the primary refractory to BV and an aggressive clinical course, although the lymphoma was diffusely and strongly positive for CD30. PMID:27169615

  6. Lenalidomide With or Without Rituximab in Treating Patients With Progressive or Relapsed Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Prolymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Previously Treated With Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; T-cell Large Granular Lymphocyte Leukemia; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  7. HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Lymphoma With HIV Infection

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-06

    HIV Infection; Stage I Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage II Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  8. Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the jaws: a review of 16 cases.

    PubMed

    Djavanmardi, Leva; Oprean, Nicoleta; Alantar, Alp; Bousetta, Kilani; Princ, Guy

    2008-10-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is rarely found in the jaw. We present 16 cases and the purpose of this study was to analyze the clinical signs and symptoms. The treatment and the progression evolution are also mentioned. The diagnosis was usually difficult and was often misleading and so delays before the first bone biopsy were frequent. The therapy of this rare, diffuse, large cell lymphoma was very variable from one case to another but the majority of the patients were treated with a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. PMID:18562205

  9. Nephrotic syndrome and Hodgkin lymphoma in children. Report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Pourtsidis, A; Doganis, D; Baka, M; Varvoutsi, M; Kosmidis, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: The association of nephrotic syndrome (NS) and Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL), although rare, is well recognised. In the majority of cases of HL, minimal change NS is detected. Description of Cases: This report presents the occurrence of NS in two children with HL. In the first case, NS preceded the diagnosis of lymphoma by 3 months, while in the other child, the two disorders occurred simultaneously. In both cases, clinical manifestations and laboratory parameters (proteinuria) of NS resolved after effective treatment for active HL. Conclusion: Prolonged proteinuria may be a paraneoplastic syndrome and HL should be considered in the diagnosis as it is crucial for the management of both entities. PMID:26052211

  10. Two Uncommon Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes in a Child With Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Arathi; Satish, Gayathri; Scott, Julius X; Madhavan, Ramprakash; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi

    2016-08-01

    Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) are rare, remote effects of cancer that are usually caused by an altered immune response to the tumor and not due to the tumor mass, metastasis, infection, ischemia, or metabolic derangements. PNSs can affect any area of the central, the peripheral, and the autonomic nervous systems. These are rare in lymphomas compared with solid tumors attributed to their presentation even in late stages and the absence of onconeural antibodies. We present a child with stage IIB Hodgkin lymphoma who presented with dual PNS, achalasia cardia, and Holmes Adie pupil occurring synchronously with the cancer. PMID:27164530

  11. Cerebellar Degeneration as a Rare Paraneoplastic Syndrome in a Child With Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Avramova, Boryana E; Hristova, Tanya; Yordanova, Maya; Vlahova, Irena; Muchinova, Albena; Bojinova, Veneta; Konstantinov, Dobrin

    2016-08-01

    We report a rare case of cerebellar degeneration as a paraneoplastic syndrome in an 8-year-old boy with Hodgkin lymphoma that presented during first-line treatment. Antibodies against Purkinje cells (anti-Tr antibodies) were detected in the serum of the patient. After successful treatment of the lymphoma, the cerebellar symptoms resolved partially. Childhood presentation of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration is extremely rare, with only a few reports in the literature. For this reason, the description of all such cases contributes to the enrichment of the medical knowledge and will improve the diagnosis and the treatment of this complication. PMID:26599987

  12. [Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. Classification, treatment and survival in a 10-year material].

    PubMed

    Jordhøy, M S; Jaeger, S; Hammerstrøm, J

    1995-10-30

    Over a ten year period, 71 cases of malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas were treated at the Department of Internal Medicine, Nordland Central Hospital. Of these cases, 41 were low grade malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, while 28 were high grade. 41% presented localized disease. 30% had primary extranodal manifestations. Median age was 68 years. 5-years disease-specific survival was 57%. The results of treatment are judged to be satisfactory when compared with the results from other unselected materials. Improvements can be made on some points. The study revealed possibly too extensive use of surgery in patients with extranodal manifestations, and too extensive use of aggressive chemotherapy in patients with low grade malignancy. PMID:7482450

  13. Primary dural non-hodgkin's lymphoma mimicking meningioma: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Kudrimoti, Jyoti K; Gaikwad, Manish J; Puranik, Shaila C; Chugh, Ashish P

    2015-01-01

    A 42-year-old immunocompetent female presented with headache, vomiting and diminished unilateral vision. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were suggestive of high-grade meningioma. Neurological examination and routine hematological parameters were within normal limits. Craniotomy was performed; the tumor was arising from the dura mater, which was completely resected. Hematoxylin and eosin showed lesion comprising a tumor mass with monomorphic population of tumor cells arranged in sheets and small follicles. The tumor cells were immunoreactive for leukocyte common antigen and CD20 and immunonegative for glial fibrillary acid protein, epithelial membrane antigen, cytokeratin, CD3 and CD30. Rest of the body scan was normal. A diagnosis of primary dural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. We report this exceedingly rare case of primary dural non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which mimicked clinically and radiologically as meningioma. PMID:26458614

  14. Serum Lactate Dehydrogenase in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: A Prognostic Indicator.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Charu; Ahmad, Afzal; D'Souza, Benedicta; Agarwal, Ashish; Nandini, M; Ashok Prabhu, K; D'Souza, Vivian

    2016-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma constitutes a group of disorders originating from the malignant transformation of lymphocytes and involving either the lymph nodes or extranodal sites. NHL commonly presents in the sixth to seventh decade of life with a male preponderance (50-75 %). Recent studies have shown importance of serum LDH in prognosis of NHL. Authors report a case of a 63 year old male presenting with complaints of fever and backache for past 4 months. General and systemic examination revealed bilateral axillary lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly respectively. Serum LDH level was highly elevated (3441 U/l). Excisional axillary and bone marrow biopsy were done before oncology referral. Complete workup revealed diffuse Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with bone marrow infiltration. Patient died because of acute renal failure due to NHL and DM 2 (Type 2 diabetes mellitus). PMID:27069334

  15. non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and occupation in Sweden: a registry based analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Linet, M S; Malker, H S; McLaughlin, J K; Weiner, J A; Blot, W J; Ericsson, J L; Fraumeni, J F

    1993-01-01

    Incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in different employment categories was evaluated from the Swedish Cancer-Environment Registry, which links cancer incidence during 1961 to 1979 with occupational information from the 1960 census. New associations were found for men employed in shoemaking and shoe repair, porcelain and earthenware industries, education, and other white collar occupations. Several findings supported associations found in other countries, including excesses among woodworkers, furniture makers, electric power plant workers, farmers, dairy workers, lorry drivers, and other land transport workers. Risks were not increased among chemists, chemical or rubber manufacturing workers, or petrochemical refinery workers. Caution must be used in drawing causal inferences from these linked registry data because information on exposure and duration of employment is not available. Nevertheless, this study has suggested new clues to possible occupational determinants of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:8431395

  16. Osteosarcoma of the mandible--second cancer in a case of Hodgkin's lymphoma post-chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    De, Sumitava; Ghosh, Suparna; Mondal, Dodul; Sur, Prabir K

    2010-01-01

    Osteosarcoma as a second cancer occurring in an adolescent male previously treated with only chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma is rare. A 14 year old male presented with gradual swelling of right jaw and numbness of lip and chin for last three months. He was treated with only chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma four years back. Incisional biopsy was taken from mandibular swelling, histopathology suggesting osteosarcoma. Right hemimandibulectomy and reconstruction with metallic implant were done along with excision of right parotid lymph node. Chemotherapy was started with cisplatin and doxorubicin regimen. Absence of radiation as a risk factor and very young age of the patient presenting with a second cancer made this case a rarity and hence the case is being reported. PMID:21119269

  17. Ileocecal Obstruction Due to B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Negrean, Vasile; Graur, Florin; Moiş, Emil; Al-Hajjar, Nadim

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of non-Hodgkin lymphoma presented as an ileocecal mass. The patient was a 77-year-old man with history of symptoms of partial bowel obstruction, intermittent right iliac fossa pain, loss of weight, vomiting and fatigue. Clinical signs included moderate abdominal tenderness with a palpable mass in the right iliac fossa at the physical examination. Colonoscopy revealed an intussusception of the right colon causing a complete stenosis. The patient developed complete bowel obstruction during hospitalization that required emergent surgical intervention. Intraoperatively an ileocecal mass was found measuring 10-12 cm in diameter, causing complete stenosis at its level and bowel dilatation proximally. Multiple nodules were found in the liver and the parietal peritoneum as well. An ileotransverso-anastomosis was performed and biopsies of the nodules were taken. Pathological evaluation revealed a diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin'™s lymphoma of the ileocecum and the parietal peritoneum. PMID:26988544

  18. Radiation-induced breast cancer: the question of early breast cancer screening in Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors

    PubMed Central

    Hilal, Talal; Rudy, David W.

    2016-01-01

    Chest irradiation is associated with numerous early and late complications that arise from ionizing radiation-induced damage to cellular structures within the field of therapy. In patients exposed to chest irradiation at an early age as part of the treatment of childhood cancer, specifically Hodgkin's lymphoma, the increased risk of breast cancer in the long run should be considered. A case of a 35-year-old woman who exposed to chest irradiation as part of the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma at the age of 20 years is presented here and serves as a reminder of this somewhat overlooked complication. The article presents the evidence available for and against breast cancer screening in this particular patient population. PMID:26949536

  19. Low-Dose Involved-Field Radiotherapy as Alternative Treatment of Nodular Lymphocyte Predominance Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Rick L.M. Girinsky, Theo; Aleman, Berthe; Henry-Amar, Michel; Boer, Jan-Paul de; Jong, Daphne de

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma is a very rare disease, characterized by an indolent clinical course, with sometimes very late relapses occurring in a minority of all patients. Considerable discussion is ongoing on the treatment of primary and relapsed disease. Patients and Methods: A group of 9 patients were irradiated to a dose of 4 Gy on involved areas only. Results: After a median follow-up of 37 months (range, 6-66), the overall response rate was 89%. Six patients had complete remission (67%), two had partial remission (22%), and one had stable disease (11%). Of 8 patients, 5 developed local relapse 9-57 months after radiotherapy. No toxicity was noted. Conclusion: In nodular lymphocyte predominance Hodgkin's lymphoma, low-dose radiotherapy provided excellent response rates and lasting remissions without significant toxicity.

  20. Radiation-induced breast cancer: the question of early breast cancer screening in Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors.

    PubMed

    Hilal, Talal; Rudy, David W

    2016-02-01

    Chest irradiation is associated with numerous early and late complications that arise from ionizing radiation-induced damage to cellular structures within the field of therapy. In patients exposed to chest irradiation at an early age as part of the treatment of childhood cancer, specifically Hodgkin's lymphoma, the increased risk of breast cancer in the long run should be considered. A case of a 35-year-old woman who exposed to chest irradiation as part of the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma at the age of 20 years is presented here and serves as a reminder of this somewhat overlooked complication. The article presents the evidence available for and against breast cancer screening in this particular patient population. PMID:26949536

  1. A rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma in a very young child, with involvement of the appendix

    PubMed Central

    Ghosal, Anirban; Acharyya, Saugata

    2014-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the appendix in young children is an exceptionally rare disease. We report a case of a child less than 3 years who presented to us with gradual weight loss, progressive pallor and diffuse abdominal pain. The symptoms were preceded by a history of varicella infection about 6 months ago. The clinical progression was marked by intermittent episodes of acute abdominal pain and fever, mimicking acute intra-abdominal inflammatory process such as appendicitis. Investigations revealed that the child had direct Coomb's test positive haemolytic anaemia, raised platelet counts, lymphopenia and hypergammaglobulinaemia. The CT of the abdomen showed the presence of significant lymph nodes. Abdominal laparoscopy and biopsy of the lymph nodes showed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma that also involved the appendix. Subsequent staging detected an advanced stage IV disease. The child was referred immediately to a specialised oncology centre for further management. Unfortunately he was lost in follow-up. PMID:25015165

  2. [National guidelines of diagnosis and treatment of the non-Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Candelaria, Myrna; Cervera-Ceballos, Eduardo; Meneses-García, Abelardo; Avilés-Salas, Alejandro; Lome-Maldonado, Carmen; Zárate-Osorno, Alejandra; Ortiz-Hidalgo, Carlos; Rodríguez-Moguel, Leticia; Quiñónez-Urrego, Enoe Enedina; Ramos-Salazar, Patricia; Romero-Guadarrama, Mónica Belinda; Lara-Torres, César; Ramírez-Aceves, Rocío; López-Navarro, Omar; Rivas-Vera, Silvia; Díaz-Meneses, Iván Eudaldo; Estrada-Lobato, Enrique; Cervera-Ceballos, José; Rojas-Marín, Carlos Enrique; Hernández-Rodriguez, José Mario; Pérez-López, Berenice; Gómez-Almaguer, David; Altamirano-Ley, Javier; Baz, Patricia; Valero-Saldaña, Luis Manuel; Navarrete-Herrera, José René; Torres-Salgado, Francisco Gerardo; Solano-Murillo, Pedro; Nambo-Lucio, María de Jesús; Rivas-Llamas, Ramón; Aquino-Salgado, Jorge Luis; Avila-Arreguín, Elsa Verónica; Cortês-Esteban, Patricia; Chongo-Alfaro, Martha Lilia; Pérez-Ramírez, Oscar de Jesús; Toledano-Cuevas, Diana Vanesa; Lobato-Mendizábal, Eduardo; Martínez-Ramírez, Mario Alberto; Morales-Maravilla, Adrián; Sosa-Camas, Rosa Elena; Agreda-Vásquez, Gladys P; Camacho-Hernández, Alejandro; Aguayo-González, Alvaro; Espinoza-Zamora, José Ramiro; Sánchez-Guerrero, Sergio A; Lozano-Zavaleta, Valentín; Selva-Pallares, Julio Edgar; Hernádez-Rodríguez, Juan Manuel; Cardiel-Silva, Mariela; Castillo-Rivera, Manuel Héctor; Villela, Luis; Loarca-Piña, Luis Martín; Zurita-Martínez, Hugo; Graham-Casassus, Juan; Azaola-Espinosa, Patricio; Silva-López, Salvador; Armenta-San Sebastián, Jorge Antonio; Mijangos-Huesca, Francisco; Pérez-Osorio, Jorge Eduardo; Aldaco-Sarvide, Fernando; Castellanos, Guillermo; Ramírez-Ibarguen, Ana Florencia; Zapata-Canto, Nidia; Labardini-Méndez, Juan Rafael

    2013-06-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma comprises a heterogeneous group of haematological malignancies, classified according to their clinic, anatomic-pathological features and, lately, to their molecular biomarkers. Despite the therapeutic advances, nearly half of the patients will die because of this disease. The new diagnostic tools have been the cornerstone to design recent therapy targets, which must be included in the current treatment guidelines of this sort of neoplasms by means of clinical trials and evidence-based medicine. In the face of poor diagnoses devices in most of the Mexican hospitals, we recommend the present diagnose stratification, and treatment guidelines for non-Hodgkin lymphoma, based on evidence. They include the latest and most innovative therapeutic approaches, as well as specific recommendations for hospitals with limited framework and therapy resources. PMID:24459777

  3. Primary pulmonary Hodgkin's lymphoma and a review of the literature since 2006

    PubMed Central

    Cooksley, Nathania; Judge, Daniel James; Brown, James

    2014-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman of Laotian origin presented with dry cough, fevers, night sweats and weight loss over the preceding 6 weeks. Radiological investigations revealed large complex cavitary lesions in the middle and lower lobes of the right lung, with no mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Bronchoscopic investigations did not yield a diagnosis. CT-guided fine-needle aspiration raised the possibility of Langerhans cell histiocytosis. Open lung biopsy initially supported this, but eventually a microscopic and immunohistochemical diagnosis of Hodgkin's lymphoma was made. The final diagnosis was primary pulmonary Hodgkin's lymphoma. We present a new case as well as a literature review of reported cases published since 2006. PMID:24711477

  4. Paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma in low and middle income countries.

    PubMed

    Gross, Thomas G; Biondi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    Great advances have been made in the treatment of paediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In high-income countries (HIC), cure rates now exceed 85%. However, in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC), cure rates remain less than 50%. It is estimated that over 90% of paediatric NHL worldwide occur in LMIC; therefore, even modest improvements in outcome would have significant impact in reducing the burden of paediatric NHL globally. This article will discuss some of the issues required to improve the outcome of paediatric NHL in LMIC using data presented at the Fifth International Symposium on Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma held in Varese, Italy, 2015 to illustrate these issues. Additionally, potential bi-directional benefits for patients in both LMIC and HIC from future collaborations will be discussed. PMID:27098084

  5. B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma linked to Coxiella burnetii.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Million, Matthieu; Audoly, Gilles; Gorse, Audrey; Dutronc, Hervé; Roland, Gauthier; Dekel, Michal; Moreno, Asuncion; Cammilleri, Serge; Carrieri, Maria Patrizia; Protopopescu, Camelia; Ruminy, Philippe; Lepidi, Hubert; Nadel, Bertrand; Mege, Jean-Louis; Xerri, Luc; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria can induce human lymphomas, whereas lymphoproliferative disorders have been described in patients with Q fever. We observed a lymphoma in a patient with Q fever that prompted us to investigate the association between the 2 diseases. We screened 1468 consecutive patients of the 2004 to 2014 French National Referral Center for Q fever database. The standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) were calculated comparatively to the 2012 Francim Registry. The presence of Coxiella burnetii was tested using immunofluorescence and fluorescence in situ hybridization using a specific 16S ribosomal RNA probe and genomic DNA probe. Seven patients (0.48%) presented mature B-cell lymphoma consisting of 6 DLBCL and 1 FL. An excess risk of DLBCL and FL was found in Q fever patients compared with the general population (SIR [95% confidence interval], 25.4 [11.4-56.4] and 6.7 [0.9-47.9], respectively). C burnetii was detected in CD68(+) macrophages within both lymphoma and lymphadenitis tissues but localization in CD123(+) plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) was found only in lymphoma tissues. Q fever patients with persistent focalized infection were found more at risk of lymphoma (hazard ratio, 9.35 [1.10-79.4]). Interleukin-10 (IL10) overproduction (P = .0003) was found in patients developing lymphoma. These results suggest that C burnetii should be added to the list of bacteria that promote human B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, possibly by the infection of pDCs and IL10 overproduction. Screening for early lymphoma diagnosis should be considered in the management of patients with Q fever, especially those with persistent focalized infections. PMID:26463422

  6. Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-09

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  7. Point/counterpoint: early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma and the role of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Ralph M.

    2012-01-01

    The results of recent clinical trials for the management of limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma have led to considerable debate, especially regarding the role of radiation therapy. This review highlights those recent trials and provides perspectives regarding their interpretation from a radiation oncologist and a hematologist. The trial protocol is available at http://www.nejm.org/doi/suppl/10.1056/NEJMoa1111961/suppl_file/nejmoa1111961_protocol.pdf. PMID:22821764

  8. Incidence, risk factors, and pathogenesis of second malignancies in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tward, Jonathan; Glenn, Martha; Pulsipher, Michael; Barnette, Phillip; Gaffney, David

    2007-08-01

    Most Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma patients will survive their diagnosis. High dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation, and radiation therapy have all been implicated as risk factors to secondary cancer development. Herein, we will review the molecular biology, examine the epidemiologic findings, discuss the impact of both chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and focus on the special populations of pediatrics and high dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation with regard to secondary cancer development. PMID:17701578

  9. Buschke-Fischer-Brauer Keratoderma: Linear Variety Associated with Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Podder, Indrashis; Das, Anupam; Bhattacharya, Sabari; Shome, Kaushik; Chowdhury, Satyendra N

    2015-01-01

    Palmo-plantar keratodermas (PPKD) are a diverse group of acquired and hereditary disorders, characterized by excessive thickening of the skin of palms and soles. Here, we report a case of Type I or Buschke-Fischer-Brauer variant of punctate palmo-plantar keratoderma, in a 66-year-old gentleman. The association of our case with Hodgkin's lymphoma along with linear configuration of lesions on the palms evoked the current report. PMID:26120180

  10. Point/counterpoint: early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma and the role of radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Ralph M; Hoppe, Richard T

    2012-11-29

    The results of recent clinical trials for the management of limited-stage Hodgkin lymphoma have led to considerable debate, especially regarding the role of radiation therapy. This review highlights those recent trials and provides perspectives regarding their interpretation from a radiation oncologist and a hematologist. The trial protocol is available at http://www.nejm.org/doi/suppl/10.1056/NEJMoa1111961/suppl_file/nejmoa1111961_protocol.pdf. PMID:22821764

  11. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the bladder: case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Mahfoud, Tarik; Tanz, Rachid; Mesmoudi, Mohamed; Khmamouche, Mohamed Réda; El Khannoussi, Basma; Ichou, Mohamed; Errihani, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of the bladder is a very rare entity. The clinical, radiological and endoscopic signs are not specifics. The diagnosis is exclusively histological. Chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery are the different therapeutic options used either alone or in combination. We report a 57 years old patient treated with chemotherapy (6 cycles of R-CHOP) for primary NHL of the bladder with a complete response while discussing the different specificities of this disease. PMID:24319526

  12. Primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the oral cavity. An analysis of 34 cases.

    PubMed

    Wolvius, E B; van der Valk, P; van der Wal, J E; van Diest, P J; Huijgens, P C; van der Waal, I; Snow, G B

    1994-01-01

    34 patients with primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (PE-NHL) of the oral cavity have been studied with reference to age, sex, clinical symptoms, location of primary tumour, histological subtype, grade of malignancy according to the Working Formulation, stage of disease, treatment and follow-up. The clinicopathological features of these oral PE-NHL correspond with those of PE-NHL in general. Survival was influenced by stage of disease and grade of malignancy. PMID:8032301

  13. Primary splenic B-cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and classical Hodgkin lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Feng; Zhou, Quan; Gao, Ying; Cui, Xiang-Qing; Chang, Hong

    2016-01-01

    B-cell lymphoma (BCL), unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large BCL (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (CHL), is a novel entity to the World Health Organization classification system. These tumors are rare aggressive lymphomas that have a poor prognosis. The present study reports the case of a patient with one such lymphoma that occurred in the spleen, which expressed cluster of differentiation (CD)20, CD79α, melanoma associated antigen (mutated) 1, BCL6, CD15 and CD30. Polymerase chain reaction analysis demonstrated a clonal rearrangement of the genes coding for immunoglobulin heavy chains. The tumor cells demonstrated a negative reaction in the Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small RNA assay. Following the diagnosis of unclassifiable BCL, with intermediate features between DLBCL and CHL, the patient received 7 cycles of the CHOP regimen, and so far, has been in good general condition and tumor-free for 17 months. PMID:27602118

  14. Expert Radiation Oncologist Interpretations of Involved-Site Radiation Therapy Guidelines in the Management of Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hoppe, Bradford S.; Hoppe, Richard T.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Recently, involved-site radiation therapy (ISRT) guidelines have been developed and published to replace the previous concept of involved-field radiation therapy for patients with lymphoma. However, these ISRT guidelines may be interpreted in different ways, posing difficulties for prospective clinical trials. This study reports survey results regarding interpretation of the ISRT guidelines. Methods and Materials: Forty-four expert lymphoma radiation oncologists were asked to participate in a survey that included 7 different cases associated with 9 questions. The questions pertained to ISRT contouring and asked respondents to choose between 2 different answers (no “correct” answer) and a third write-in option allowed. Results: Fifty-two percent of those surveyed responded to the questionnaire. Among those who responded, 72% have practiced for >10 years, 46% have treated >20 Hodgkin lymphoma cases annually, and 100% were familiar with the ISRT concept. Among the 9 questions associated with the 7 cases, 3 had concordance among the expert radiation oncologists of greater than 70%. Six of the questions had less than 70% concordance (range, 56%-67%). Conclusions: Even among expert radiation oncologists, interpretation of ISRT guidelines is variable. Further guidance for ISRT field design will be needed to reduce variability among practicing physicians.

  15. Periorbital non-Hodgkin's lymphoma after blunt trauma.

    PubMed

    Kriwalsky, Marcus Stephan; Schroers, Roland; Stricker, Ingo; Hollstein, Stefan; Kunkel, Martin

    2010-06-01

    The head and neck region is the second most common site for the development of extranodal lymphomas. Richter's syndrome (RS) involves the transformation of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) to an aggressive lymphoma, most commonly, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We report the case of a 62-year-old man who developed DLBCL in the periorbital region 2 months after blunt trauma to the site. The patient lacked other physical symptoms at the time of presentation. Bone marrow biopsy and immunophenotypic analysis revealed a Richter transformation of unknown B-CLL. RS frequently arises in lymph nodes or bone marrow and rarely presents with extranodal involvement. Chemotherapy resulted in total remission of the lymphoma and no relapse was observed in the 6-month follow-up period. This case demonstrates that the clinician must recognize that unresolved soft tissue swelling after a trauma may be caused by NHL. PMID:20451833

  16. Biology, clinical course and management of nodular lymphocyte-predominant hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nogová, Lucia; Rudiger, Thomas; Engert, Andreas

    2006-01-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) differs in histological and clinical presentation from classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). The typical morphologic signs of NLPHL are atypical "lymphocytic and histiocytic" (L&H) cells, which are surrounded by a non-neoplastic nodular background of small lymphocytes of B-cell origin. The NLPHL cells are positive for CD45, CD19, CD20, CD22 and CD79a, but lack expression of CD15 and CD30, the typical markers for cHL. NLPHL patients are predominantly of male gender with a median age of 37 years. Patients often present in early stages (63%) and rarely have B-symptoms (9%). Treatment of NLPHL patients using standard Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) protocols leads to complete remission (CR) in more than 95% of patients. Survival and freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) are worse in advanced-stage patients than in early-stage patients. Thus, patients in advanced and in early stages with unfavorable risk factors are treated similarly to cHL patients. In contrast, patients with early-stage NLPHL without risk factors can be sufficiently treated with reduced intensity programs having less severe adverse effects. As a result, treatment of early NLPHL is less clearly defined, including radiotherapy in extended field (EF) or involved field (IF) technique, combined modality treatment, and, more recently, monoclonal antibody rituximab. Watch and wait strategy plays an important role in pediatric oncology to avoid adverse effects associated with therapy. PMID:17124071

  17. No involvement of bovine leukemia virus in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, A.P.; Robison, L.L.; Kashmiri, S.V.; McClain, K.L.; Woods, W.G.; Smithson, W.A.; Heyn, R.; Finlay, J.; Schuman, L.M.; Renier, C.

    1988-05-15

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) is the causative agent of enzootic bovine lymphosarcoma. Much speculation continues to be directed at the role of BLV in human leukemia. To test this hypothesis rigorously, a case-control study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was conducted between December 1983 and February 1986. Cases (less than or equal to 16 years at diagnosis) derived from patients diagnosed at the primary institutions and affiliated hospitals were matched (age, sex, and race) with regional population controls. DNA samples from bone marrow or peripheral blood from 157 cases (131 acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 26 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) and peripheral blood from 136 controls were analyzed by Southern blot technique, under highly stringent conditions, using cloned BLV DNA as a probe. None of the 157 case or 136 control DNA samples hybridized with the probe. The high statistical power and specificity of this study provide the best evidence to date that genomic integration of BLV is not a factor in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia/non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

  18. Rare Occurrence of 3 "H": Hypercalcemia, Hemolytic Anemia and Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jain, Ankur; Malhotra, Pankaj; Prakash, Gaurav; Varma, Subhash; Kumar, Narender; Das, Asim

    2016-06-01

    Clinicians in hematology practice commonly encounter anemia, hypercalcemia and renal failure, which when present in combination evoke a diagnostic workup for multiple myeloma. We report a 71-years old lady who presented to our hematology clinic with fever and easy fatiguability of 3 months duration and on investigations was found to have anemia and hypercalcemia. Direct Coomb's test characterized the anemia as complement mediated (anti-C3d) hemolysis. Biochemical investigations revealed normal 25(OH) Vitamin D3 and suppressed Parathormone levels and a negative workup for plasma cell dyscrasias, sarcoidosis and autoimmune disorders. CT scan revealed a paravertebral mass with cervical, supraclavicular and abdominal lymphadenopathy along with splenomegaly and left pleural effusion. Biopsy from the paravertebral mass confirmed the diagnosis of Hodgkin's disease (nodular sclerosis) using immunohistochemistry. Bone marrow examination suggested infiltration by lymphoma. Hypercalcemia was managed with saline and zoledronic acid. Administration of prednisolone (1 mg/kg/day) along with chemotherapy (ABVD regimen) led to normalization of calcium and hemoglobin levels. However, hemolysis recurred 2 weeks later and hence, Rituximab (375 mg/m(2)) was administered on a weekly schedule for 4 doses and ABVD (2 weekly) was continued, which brought hemolysis under control. Co-occurrence of two paraneoplastic manifestations (complement mediated hemolytic anemia and hypercalcemia) in Hodgkin's lymphoma is very unusual. Present report aims not only to highlight a rare presentation of Hodgkin's lymphoma but also focus on the role of Rituximab in controlling hemolysis associated with this disease. PMID:27408382

  19. Autologous Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-23

    Prolymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Childhood Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; T-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; T-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia

  20. Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia in a patient with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma case report

    PubMed Central

    Abaroa-Salvatierra, Ana; Shaikh, Bilal; Deshmukh, Mrunalini; Alweis, Richard; Patel, Arti

    2016-01-01

    Calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia is a frequent manifestation of hematological malignancies. However, there are a few reports of cases presenting with increased angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) level, which suggests a possible mechanism similar to that of granulomatous diseases. We present a patient with hypercalcemia, normal parathyroid hormone, and parathyroid hormone-related protein levels but high calcitriol and ACE levels that, after further investigation, was diagnosed with bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma. Primary adrenal lymphoma represents only 1% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and is usually asymptomatic but should be considered by clinicians among the malignancies that cause calcitriol-mediated hypercalcemia. PMID:27124160

  1. Oral clofarabine for relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphomas: Results of a phase 1 study

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, J.S.; Takvorian, R.W.; Fisher, D.C.; Feng, Y.; Jacobsen, E.D.; Brown, J.R.; Barnes, J.A.; Neuberg, D.S.; Hochberg, E.P.

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a phase 1 trial evaluating the oral nucleoside analogue clofarabine in patients with relapsed/refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients were treated once daily on days 1 through 21 of a 28 day cycle for a maximum of 6 cycles. The study was conducted with a 3+3 design with ten additional patients treated at the recommended phase 2 dose. Thirty patients were enrolled including indolent B-cell lymphomas (21), mantle cell (6), and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (3). The primary toxicities were hematologic including grade 3–4 neutropenia (53%) and thrombocytopenia (27%). Three mg was determined to be the recommended phase 2 dose. Tumor volume was reduced in 70% of patients, and the overall response rate was 47% including 27% complete remissions. Responses were seen in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphoma. At a median follow-up of 17 months, 68% of responding patients remain in ongoing remission. Oral clofarabine was well tolerated with encouraging efficacy in indolent B-cell lymphomas and mantle cell lymphomas, warranting further investigation. PMID:23289359

  2. BCL-1 Gene Rearrangements in Iranian Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tohidirad, Manoush; Estiar, Mehrdad Asghari; Rezamand, Azim; Ghorbian, Saeid; Andalib, Sasan; Jahanzad, Issa; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Sakhinia, Ebrahim

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, our aim was to assess the incidence of BCL-1 gene rearrangements in formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) tissue in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). The BIOMED-2 protocol was applied to assess the BCL-1 gene rearrangements in NHL patients. PCR amplification was carried out on FFPE in 100 patients with B-cell lymphoma including 89 cases with diffused large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) (15 cases under 18 years old) and 11 cases with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). Out of the 100 patients, 19 cases (19%) were identified to have concurrent translocation involving BCL-1. The significant association was seen between BCL-1 gene rearrangements and the lymphomas in patients older than 55 years (P<0.05). Out of 100 cases, 80 cases were positive and 20 cases were negative regarding CD20. No significant association was found between DLBCL lymphoma in patients under 18 years old and BCL-1 gene rearrangements (P>0.05). In addition, the positive and negative expressions of LCA/CD45 marker were 76% (76/100) and 26% (26/100), respectively. Our findings revealed that BCL-1 gene rearrangement assays using BIOMED-2 protocol can be considered as a valuable approach in detection of the lymphomas. PMID:27045402

  3. Predictors of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients Receiving Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Pinnix, Chelsea C.; Smith, Grace L.; Milgrom, Sarah; Osborne, Eleanor M.; Reddy, Jay P.; Akhtari, Mani; Reed, Valerie; Arzu, Isidora; Allen, Pamela K.; Wogan, Christine F.; Fanale, Michele A.; Oki, Yasuhiro; Turturro, Francesco; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Fowler, Nathan; Westin, Jason; Nastoupil, Loretta; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.; Rodriguez, M. Alma [Department of Lymphoma and others

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Few studies to date have evaluated factors associated with the development of radiation pneumonitis (RP) in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in patients treated with contemporary radiation techniques. These patients represent a unique group owing to the often large radiation target volumes within the mediastinum and to the potential to receive several lines of chemotherapy that add to pulmonary toxicity for relapsed or refractory disease. Our objective was to determine the incidence and clinical and dosimetric risk factors associated with RP in lymphoma patients treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) at a single institution. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed clinical charts and radiation records of 150 consecutive patients who received mediastinal IMRT for HL and NHL from 2009 through 2013. Clinical and dosimetric predictors associated with RP according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) acute toxicity criteria were identified in univariate analysis using the Pearson χ{sup 2} test and logistic multivariate regression. Results: Mediastinal radiation was administered as consolidation therapy in 110 patients with newly diagnosed HL or NHL and in 40 patients with relapsed or refractory disease. The overall incidence of RP (RTOG grades 1-3) was 14% in the entire cohort. Risk of RP was increased for patients who received radiation for relapsed or refractory disease (25%) versus those who received consolidation therapy (10%, P=.019). Several dosimetric parameters predicted RP, including mean lung dose of >13.5 Gy, V{sub 20} of >30%, V{sub 15} of >35%, V{sub 10} of >40%, and V{sub 5} of >55%. The likelihood ratio χ{sup 2} value was highest for V{sub 5} >55% (χ{sup 2} = 19.37). Conclusions: In using IMRT to treat mediastinal lymphoma, all dosimetric parameters predicted RP, although small doses to large volumes of lung had the greatest influence. Patients with relapsed

  4. Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the head and neck: clinical, pathologic, and imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alfred L; Rahemtullah, Aliyah; Ferry, Judith A

    2003-08-01

    Lymphomas are subdivided into HL and NHL and are more specifically classified into subtypes of HL or NHL according to the WHO classification. HLs involve the lymph nodes predominantly and only approximately 5% arise in extranodal sites, whereas 30% of NHLs present in extranodal sites. Imaging studies, including CT and MR imaging, cannot distinguish [figure: see text] HL from NHL, and cannot differentiate their various subtypes, necessitating a pathologic diagnosis. Clinical parameters, however, can be helpful in differentiating the two broad categories of lymphomas, and subtypes of lymphomas have predilections for different sites within the head and neck. HL is most commonly located in the lymph nodes of the neck and mediastinum. Marginal-zone lymphoma has an affinity for the ocular adnexa, salivary glands, larynx, and the thyroid gland. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma is commonly encountered in the paranasal sinuses, mandible, maxilla, and Waldeyer ring. Burkitt lymphoma occurs more frequently in children and young adults and frequently affects the maxilla and mandible, with a greater distribution of involvement at a lower frequency. On imaging studies, the lymph nodes of HL and NHL are homogeneous and variable in size, with an average diameter from 2 to 10 cm. They may enhance slightly to moderately, display necrosis before and after treatment, and display calcification post-treatment. NHL in extranodal sites in the head and neck (nasopharynx, Waldeyer ring, oral cavity, and larynx) manifests frequently as a submucosal mass accompanied [figure: see text] by polypoid, bulky masses with a smooth mucosal surface. Clinically aggressive lymphomas, such as Burkitt lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and NK-/T-cell lymphomas are characterized by destruction of the maxilla, mandible, and bones around the paranasal sinuses, which is indistinguishable from bony destruction in other malignant tumors, such as SCC. Contrast CT is indicated for evaluation of cervical lymph

  5. Highly recurrent mutations of SGK1, DUSP2 and JUNB in nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, S; Schuhmacher, B; Rausch, T; Fuller, L; Döring, C; Weniger, M; Lollies, A; Weiser, C; Thurner, L; Rengstl, B; Brunnberg, U; Vornanen, M; Pfreundschuh, M; Benes, V; Küppers, R; Newrzela, S; Hansmann, M-L

    2016-04-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL)-a subtype of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL)-is characterized by a low content of tumor cells, the lymphocyte predominant (LP) cells. Transformation into diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) occurs in about 10% of patients. We performed whole-genome mutation analysis of the DLBCL components from two composite lymphomas consisting of clonally related NLPHL and DLBCL as a means to identify candidate tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in NLPHL. The analysis of LP cells for selected mutations of the DLBCL revealed that most mutations are also present in the LP cells, indicating a close relationship between the two components. The analysis of 62 selected genes in NLPHL by targeted ultra-deep sequencing revealed three novel highly recurrently mutated genes (each mutated in ~50% of cases), that is, DUSP2, SGK1 and JUNB. SGK1 was expressed in the LP cells of primary NLPHL cases and in the NLPHL cell line DEV. Administration of an SGK1 inhibitor induced apoptosis in the NLPHL cell line DEV and the DLBCL cell line Farage, suggesting a pathogenetic role of SGK1 in the LP and DLBCL cells. In summary, the present study identifies SGK1, DUSP2 and JUNB as novel key players in the pathogenesis of NLPHL. PMID:26658840

  6. Combined modality treatment for stage I-II non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: CVP versus BACOP chemotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bajetta, E.; Valagussa, P.; Bonadonna, G.; Lattuada, A.; Buzzoni, R.; Rilke, F.; Banfi, A.

    1988-07-01

    This paper reports the 5-year results of a prospective randomized study beginning in 1976 on 177 evaluable patients with pathologic Stage I-IE and II-IIE non-Hodgkin's lymphomas with diffuse histology according to the Rappaport classification. Treatment consisted of either CVP or BACOP chemotherapy (3 cycles) followed by regional radiotherapy (40 to 50 Gy) and further cycles of either combination. In both arms, complete remission at the end of combined treatment was high (CVP 93%, BACOP 98%) regardless of age, stage or bulky disease. At 5 years, the comparative freedom from first progression was 62% for CVP vs 78% for BACOP (p = 0.02), respectively. Clinically relevant differences favoring BACOP chemotherapy were essentially documented in patients with large cell lymphomas (International Working Formulation), those with Stage II having more than three involved anatomical sites, bulky disease and age over 60 years. Recurrence within radiation fields was documented in only 5% of complete responders. Combined treatment was, in general, well tolerated particularly when BACOP was used. In only 2 patients given CVP post radiation cutaneous fibrosis was documented. Second solid tumors were detected in 4 patients. One patient started on CVP died because of brain stem necrosis after 45 Gy. We conclude that in Stage I-II patients with nodal and extranodal diffuse non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, particularly large cell lymphomas, combined modality approach with primary Adriamycin and bleomycin containing regimen, such as BACOP, followed by adjuvant radiotherapy offers high chances of cure with minimal toxicity.

  7. Proteasomal Inhibition by Ixazomib Induces CHK1 and MYC-Dependent Cell Death in T-cell and Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Dashnamoorthy; Beheshti, Afshin; Abermil, Nasséra; Passero, Frank; Sharma, Jaya; Coyle, Michael; Kritharis, Athena; Kandela, Irawati; Hlatky, Lynn; Sitkovsky, Michail V; Mazar, Andrew; Gartenhaus, Ronald B; Evens, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Proteasome-regulated NF-κB has been shown to be important for cell survival in T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma models. Several new small-molecule proteasome inhibitors are under various stages of active preclinical and clinical development. We completed a comprehensive preclinical examination of the efficacy and associated biologic effects of a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, ixazomib, in T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma cells and in vivo SCID mouse models. We demonstrated that ixazomib induced potent cell death in all cell lines at clinically achievable concentrations. In addition, it significantly inhibited tumor growth and improved survival in T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma human lymphoma xenograft models. Through global transcriptome analyses, proteasomal inhibition showed conserved overlap in downregulation of cell cycle, chromatin modification, and DNA repair processes in ixazomib-sensitive lymphoma cells. The predicted activity for tumor suppressors and oncogenes, the impact on "hallmarks of cancer," and the analysis of key significant genes from global transcriptome analysis for ixazomib strongly favored tumor inhibition via downregulation of MYC and CHK1, its target genes. Furthermore, in ixazomib-treated lymphoma cells, we identified that CHK1 was involved in the regulation of MYC expression through chromatin modification involving histone H3 acetylation via chromatin immunoprecipitation. Finally, using pharmacologic and RNA silencing of CHK1 or the associated MYC-related mechanism, we demonstrated synergistic cell death in combination with antiproteasome therapy. Altogether, ixazomib significantly downregulates MYC and induces potent cell death in T-cell lymphoma and Hodgkin lymphoma, and we identified that combinatorial therapy with anti-CHK1 treatment represents a rational and novel therapeutic approach. Cancer Res; 76(11); 3319-31. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26988986

  8. Primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the orbit presenting with massive bilateral periorbital tumors

    PubMed Central

    TŐRŐK-VISTAI, TÜNDE; BOJAN, ANCA; CUCUIANU, ANDREI; ZSOLDOS, ANDREA

    2013-01-01

    Extranodal onset can be seen in approximately 25–40% of the cases of non- Hodgkin lymphomas and diagnosis is often difficult due to nonspecific symptoms. Orbital lymphomas represent approximately 50% of the orbital malignancies. Common symptoms and signs at presentation are: palpable tumor, exophtalmia, dyplopia and decreased vision. Diagnosis can be made only by biopsy and early treatment is important in order to increase the chance of cure. We present the case of a patient whose diagnosis and treatment were delayed due to refusal of biopsy and, although complete remission of lymphoma was obtained, the vision loss was permanent because of prolonged compression on the optic nerves. A particularity of this case is the presence of massive periorbital tumors on admission to the hospital, incorporating the eye globes completely and causing impressive facial deformity. PMID:26527983

  9. Maintenance and consolidation strategies in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A review of the data.

    PubMed

    Hagemeister, Fredrick B

    2010-11-01

    Results of treatment for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas have significantly improved over the last decade, especially following the discovery that anti-CD20 antibody therapy can significantly change the outlook for patients with both aggressive and indolent lymphomas. Although investigators have previously attempted to prevent relapses by intensifying chemotherapy programs for patients with poor-risk disease, further improvements in treatment will require development of biologic agents that can be added to current programs and exploitation of currently available drugs that can prevent recurrence of these diseases with good tolerability. This review analyzes currently available plans that can be used to maintain responses or "consolidate" initial responses to therapy, programs that may prevent relapse and potentially cure more patients with lymphomas, with a review of current ongoing trials designed along these lines. PMID:20820960

  10. Extranodal oral non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. A retrospective study of 40 cases in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Keszler, Alicia; Piloni, María J; Paparella, María L; Soler, Marcela de Dios; Ron, Patricia Cabrera; Narbaitz, Marina

    2008-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted of extranodal oral Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas diagnosed at the Surgical Pathology Laboratory of the School of Dentistry at Buenos Aires University, Argentina, between 1985 and 2004. The 40 cases found represent 0.2% of the oral biopsies diagnosed during that time and 4.6% of malignant neoplasias. Overall mean age of patients was 49.4 years, and frequency was greater in males. 80% affected soft tissues. Prevalent location was gingival, followed by palate. Intraosseous cases were more frequent in mandible (75%) than in upper maxilla. 100% of the cases were phenotype B, with a higher frequency of high-grade aggressiveness. The most common histological type was Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma. 60% of the Plasmablastic Lymphomas in the series came from HIV+ patients. Evolution time prior to consultation was 1 to 3 months in 57.7% of the cases. PMID:18841745

  11. Childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma: state of the science.

    PubMed

    Cairo, Mitchell S; Pinkerton, Ross

    2016-05-01

    The 5th International Symposium on Childhood, Adolescent and Young Adult (CAYA) Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) was held in Varese, Italy, from 21-25 October 2015. This review represents a summary of the scientific sessions of this international symposium including childhood, adolescent and young adult (AYA) NHL in countries with limited socio-economic resources, AYA NHL, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, B-cell NHL, lymphoblastic lymphoma, T/natural killer cell NHL and immunological therapies in NHL. Most importantly, the new International Paediatric NHL Staging System (IPNHLSS) and International Paediatric NHL Response Criteria (IPNHLRC) were introduced during the symposium. The symposium brought together a multinational and multidisciplinary group of clinicians and basic scientists focused in this field of haematological malignancies. PMID:27133800

  12. Adult non Hodgkin's lymphoma patients: experience from a tertiary care cancer centre in north east India.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Munlima; Iqbal, Asif; Krishnatreya, Manigreeva; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Bhuyan, Chidananda; Saikia, Bhargab Jyoti; Roy, Partha Sarathi; Das, Rashmi; Nandy, Pintu; Kataki, Amal Chandra

    2015-01-01

    There is paucity of data on non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) from our population in North-East India. In this retrospective study, patients were consecutively followed-up to see the clinic-pathological pattern of NHL, various responses, and pattern of relapses to first line treatment with chemotherapy. All patients in the present study received standard regimen of cyclophosphamde, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisolone (CHOP) with or without rituximab (R-CHOP) as per our institutional protocol as first line therapy. Our study has shown that, in our adult population, the majority of NHL cases present with stage II and stage III disease and extra nodal involvement, B-cell lymphomas and diffuse large cell lymphomas being the most common subtypes. International prognostic index was a significant factor for varied responses to treatment. The majority of relapses after complete remission occurred in the first year. PMID:25854376

  13. Primary Bilateral Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of the Adrenal Gland Presenting as Incidental Adrenal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christopher; Camilleri, David James; Gatt, Andre'

    2015-01-01

    Although lymphoma may occasionally involve the adrenal glands as part of a generalized disease process, primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) is a rare disease. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild/moderate hereditary spherocytosis with a well-compensated baseline haemoglobin, who presented with rapidly progressive symptomatic anaemia. During the diagnostic workup, imaging revealed bilateral large adrenal masses and she was later diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (DLBCL), with the adrenal glands being the dominant site of the disease. The patient was started on systemic chemotherapy, but her disease progressed with neurological involvement which responded to second-line therapy. Her adrenal disease however was refractory to further therapy. PMID:26681947

  14. Acute renal failure and bilateral kidney infiltration as the first presentation of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Monfared, Ali; Orangpoor, Reza Orangpoor; Fakheri, Tabassom Fakheri; Falahatkar, Siavash

    2009-01-01

    Diffuse bilateral infiltration of the kidneys by lymphoma is probably the rarest cause of renal insufficiency. Moreover, acute renal failure as the initial manifestation of the lymphoma is reported only in a few cases. A 44-year-old man complaining of bilateral flank pain and weakness for 2 months was admitted with acute renal failure. Ultraonography revealed hyperechoic bilaterally enlarged kidneys and an enlarged spleen. Fat pad aspiration was negative for amyloidosis and serum protein electrophoresis was normal. Needle biopsy of the kidney and pathologic examination showed diffuse infiltration of the interstitium with lymphocytes and atypical cells. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy were negative for malignant cells. Open kidney biopsy was performed and infiltrated cells positive for CD20 and negative for CD3 markers were observed based upon which diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell type non-Hodgkin lymphoma was made. PMID:19377260

  15. Enterovesical fistula caused by regressive change of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YU-TING; CHEN, YING-YUAN; WU, CHIA-YUN; CHEN, HUNG-MING; TZENG, CHENG-HWAI; CHIOU, TZEON-JYE

    2016-01-01

    Enterovesical fistula (EVF) is a rare complication of diverticulitis, as well as Crohn's disease, intestinal malignancy, radiotherapy and trauma. EVF formation is associated with inflammation of the involved bowel segments. The current study presents the case of a 35-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who developed pneumaturia, fecaluria and recurrent urinary tract infections following chemotherapy, accompanied by regressive change of the lymphoma. Abdominal computed tomography scans revealed that the terminal ileum had adhered to the bladder wall. The patient underwent exploratory laparotomy and partial resection of the terminal ileum, and EVF was confirmed. Histological examination revealed an inflammatory response but no evidence of residual lymphoma. The diagnosis of EVF is occasionally difficult and requires appropriate radiographic examination. Surgical treatment is recommended. PMID:27347146

  16. Lenalidomide as Maintenance Therapy After Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Rituximab and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma That is Resistant to Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-02

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  17. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation as Curative Therapy for Patients with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Increasingly Successful Application to Older Patients.

    PubMed

    Fenske, Timothy S; Hamadani, Mehdi; Cohen, Jonathon B; Costa, Luciano J; Kahl, Brad S; Evens, Andrew M; Hamlin, Paul A; Lazarus, Hillard M; Petersdorf, Effie; Bredeson, Christopher

    2016-09-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) constitutes a collection of lymphoproliferative disorders with widely varying biological, histological, and clinical features. For the B cell NHLs, great progress has been made due to the addition of monoclonal antibodies and, more recently, other novel agents including B cell receptor signaling inhibitors, immunomodulatory agents, and proteasome inhibitors. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) offers the promise of cure or prolonged remission in some NHL patients. For some patients, however, auto-HCT may never be a viable option, whereas in others, the disease may progress despite auto-HCT. In those settings, allogeneic HCT (allo-HCT) offers the potential for cure. Over the past 10 to 15 years, considerable progress has been made in the implementation of allo-HCT, such that this approach now is a highly effective therapy for patients up to (and even beyond) age 75 years. Recent advances in conventional lymphoma therapy, peritransplantation supportive care, patient selection, and donor selection (including the use of alternative hematopoietic cell donors), has allowed broader application of allo-HCT to patients with NHL. As a result, an ever-increasing number of NHL patients over age 60 to 65 years stand to benefit from allo-HCT. In this review, we present data in support of the use of allo-HCT for patients with diffuse large B cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma, and mantle cell lymphoma. These histologies account for a large majority of allo-HCTs performed for patients over age 60 in the United States. Where possible, we highlight available data in older patients. This body of literature strongly supports the concept that allo-HCT should be offered to fit patients well beyond age 65 and, accordingly, that this treatment should be covered by their insurance carriers. PMID:27131863

  18. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the Far East: review of 730 cases from the international non-Hodgkin lymphoma classification project.

    PubMed

    Perry, Anamarija M; Diebold, Jacques; Nathwani, Bharat N; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Bast, Martin; Boilesen, Eugene; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2016-01-01

    Large and systematic studies of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in the Far East (FE) with good comparative data are scarce in the literature. In this study, five expert hematopathologists classified 730 consecutive cases of newly-diagnosed NHL from four sites in the FE (excluding Japan) using the World Health Organization classification. The results were compared to 399 cases from North America (NA). We found a significantly higher male to female ratio in the FE compared to NA (1.7 versus 1.1; p < 0.05). The median ages of patients with low-grade (LG) and high-grade (HG) B-NHL in the FE (58 and 51 years, respectively) were significantly lower than in NA (64 and 68 years, respectively). The FE had a significantly lower relative frequency of B-NHL and a higher frequency of T-NHL (82 vs. 18 %) compared to NA (90.5 vs. 9.5 %). Among mature B cell lymphomas, the FE had a significantly higher relative frequency of HG B-NHL (54.8 %) and a lower frequency of LG B-NHL (27.2 %) than NA (34.3 and 56.1 %, respectively). Diffuse large B cell lymphoma was more common in the FE (49.4 %) compared to NA (29.3 %), whereas the relative frequency of follicular lymphoma was lower in the FE (9.4 %) compared to NA (33.6 %). Among T-NHL, nasal NK/T cell NHL was more frequent in the FE (5.2 %) compared to NA (0 %). Peripheral T cell lymphoma was also more common in the FE (9.1 %) than in NA (5.3 %). Further epidemiologic studies are needed to better understand the pathobiology of these differences. PMID:26537613

  19. Genetic variation in metabolic genes, occupational solvent exposure, and risk of non-hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Barry, Kathryn Hughes; Zhang, Yawei; Lan, Qing; Zahm, Shelia Hoar; Holford, Theodore R; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Hosgood, H Dean; Chanock, Stephen; Yeager, Meredith; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zheng, Tongzhang

    2011-02-15

    Using 1996-2000 data among Connecticut women, the authors evaluated whether genetic variation in 4 metabolic genes modifies organic solvent associations with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and 5 major histologic subtypes. P(interaction) values were determined from cross-product terms between dichotomous (ever/never) solvent variables and genotypes at examined loci in unconditional logistic regression models. The false discovery rate method was used to account for multiple comparisons. Overall associations between the chlorinated solvents dichloromethane (odds ratio (OR) = 1.69, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 2.69), carbon tetrachloride (OR = 2.33, 95% CI: 1.23, 4.40), and methyl chloride (OR = 1.44, 95% CI: 0.94, 2.20) and total non-Hodgkin lymphoma were increased among women TT for rs2070673 in the cytochrome P4502E1 gene, CYP2E1 (dichloromethane: OR = 4.42, 95% CI: 2.03, 9.62; P(interaction) < 0.01; carbon tetrachloride: OR = 5.08, 95% CI: 1.82, 14.15; P(interaction) = 0.04; and methyl chloride: OR = 2.37, 95% CI: 1.24, 4.51; P(interaction) = 0.03). In contrast, no effects of these solvents were observed among TA/AA women. Similar patterns were observed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and follicular lymphoma, as well as marginal zone lymphoma for dichloromethane. The weak, nonsignificant overall association between benzene and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (OR = 1.29, 95% CI: 0.84, 1.98) was increased among women AA for rs2234922 in the microsomal epoxide hydrolase gene, EPHX1 (OR = 1.77, 95% CI: 1.06, 2.97; P(interaction) = 0.06). In contrast, no effect was observed among AG/GG women. Additional studies with larger sample size are needed to replicate these findings. PMID:21228414

  20. [Malignant pleural mesothelioma after radiation treatment for Hodgkin lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Figueredo, M; Dumon-Gubeno, M-C; Nicolle, I; Tarhini, A; Butori, C; Mouroux, J

    2013-10-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is a relatively uncommon malignancy. Although the pathogenesis is primarily related to asbestos, the role of ionizing radiation is more controversial. We report the case of a 41-year-old male who developed pleural mesothelioma. He had both, a prior short asbestos exposure and a thoracic radiotherapy for Hodgkin's disease 26years before. The evidence for radiotherapy as cause for mesothelioma is expanding and the diagnosis of mesothelioma in patients who had previous irradiation should be kept in mind. PMID:23796498

  1. Clinical features and treatment outcomes of Hodgkin's lymphoma in Hong Kong Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Ting Ying; Chan, Hay Nun; Lai, Ho Kei; Ha, Chung Yin; Leung, Charlotte; Ng, Celia; Yeung, Yiu Ming; Yip, Sze Fai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Little information is available on the outcomes of Hodgkin's lymphoma in Chinese patients. We analyzed the clinical and histopathological characteristics, treatment types, clinical course and treatment outcomes of Hong Kong Chinese patients. Material and methods Patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma diagnosed from January 1991 to December 2010 were recruited. A retrospective analysis of these patients was performed. Results Sixty-seven Chinese patients (38 males and 29 females) were identified and the median age was 36 (range 16–80). Nodular sclerosis was the most common histology (54%), followed by mixed cellularity (36%). Twenty-four patients had early favorable, 20 patients had early unfavorable and 23 patients had advanced-stage diseases. The most common presentation was palpable lymph node or mass (85%) followed by fever, weight loss, night sweating and mediastinal mass. Ninety percent of patients received chemotherapy and 40% received radiotherapy as consolidation. Seven patients with stage I lymphoma received radiotherapy alone. ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine and dacarbazine) was the most commonly used chemotherapeutic regimen. Following treatment, 87% of patients achieved complete remission. Six patients relapsed after first remission and 3 achieved second remission after re-induction therapy. The 5-year overall survival of the entire cohort was 89% and the freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) at 5 years was 82%. The 5-year overall survival rate for early favorable, early unfavorable and advanced stages was 95.7%, 95.0% and 74.7%, respectively. Conclusions Despite the relatively low incidence of Hodgkin's lymphoma in Hong Kong Chinese, the treatment outcomes are comparable to Caucasian patients. PMID:25097580

  2. Impact of centralized diagnostic review on quality of initial staging in Hodgkin lymphoma: experience of the German Hodgkin Study Group.

    PubMed

    Bröckelmann, Paul J; Goergen, Helen; Fuchs, Michael; Kriz, Jan; Semrau, Robert; Baues, Christian; Kobe, Carsten; Behringer, Karolin; Eichenauer, Dennis A; von Tresckow, Bastian; Klimm, Beate; Halbsguth, Teresa; Wongso, Diana; Plütschow, Annette; Haverkamp, Heinz; Dietlein, Markus; Eich, Hans T; Stein, Harald; Diehl, Volker; Borchmann, Peter; Engert, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Accurate clinical staging is crucial for adequate risk-adapted treatment in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) to prevent patients from under- or over-treatment. Within the latest German Hodgkin Study Group trial generation, diagnostic findings such as histopathology, computerized tomography imaging and clinical risk factors were re-evaluated by expert panels. Here, we retrospectively analysed 5965 patients and identified 399 in who major discordant findings changed their first-line treatment allocation. Histopathology review did not confirm the initial diagnosis of HL in 87 patients. Treatment allocation was revised in 312 of the remaining 5878 patients: 176 were assigned to a higher and 128 to a lower risk group, respectively; the correct treatment group remained unclear in 8 patients. Cases of revised treatment allocation accounted for 9·8%, 6·0%, 0·8%, and 14·8% of patients initially assigned to the HD13, HD14, HD15 trials and stage IA lymphocyte-predominant HL project, respectively. Most revisions were due to wrong application of clinical stage (20·5% of 312 patients with revised treatment group), histological subtype (9·0%) or the risk factors ≥3 involved areas (46·8%) or large mediastinal mass (9·3%). In conclusion, centralized review by experienced experts changed risk-adapted first-line treatment in a relevant proportion of HL patients. Quality control measures clearly improve the accuracy of treatment and should be implemented in clinical practice. PMID:26310520

  3. Hodgkin's lymphoma: biology and treatment strategies for primary, refractory, and relapsed disease.

    PubMed

    Diehl, Volker; Stein, Harald; Hummel, Michael; Zollinger, Raphael; Connors, Joseph M

    2003-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphomas belong to the most curable tumor diseases in adults. About 80% of patients in all anatomical stages and of all histological subtypes can be cured with modern treatment strategies. In spite of the great clinical progress, the pathogenesis of this peculiar lymphoproliferative entity has not been elucidated completely up until now. In Section I Drs. Stein, Hummel, and Zollinger describe the different pro-proliferative and antiapoptotic pathways and molecules involved in the transformation of the germinal center B-lymphocyte to the malignant Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg cell. They use a comprehensive gene expression profiling (Affymetrix gene chip U133A) on B- and T-Hodgkin cell lines and state that the cell of origin is not the dominant determinant of the Hodgkin cell phenotype, but the transforming event. H-RS cells lack specific functional markers (B-T-cell receptors) and physiologically should undergo apoptosis. Why they do not is unclear and a matter of intensive ongoing research. In Section II Dr. Diehl summarizes the commonly used primary treatment strategies adapted to prognostic strata in early, intermediate and advanced anatomical stages using increasing intensities of chemotherapy (two, four, eight courses of chemotherapy such as ABVD) and additive radiation with decreased doses and field size. ABVD is without doubt the gold standard for early and intermediate stages, but its role as the standard regimen for advanced stages is challenged by recent data with time- and dose-intensified regimens such as the escalated BEACOPP, demonstrating superiority over COPP/ABVD (equivalent to ABVD) for FFTF and OS in all risk strata according to the International Prognostic Score. In Section III, Dr. Connors states that fortunately there is a considerably decreased need for salvage strategies in Hodgkin's lymphomas since primary treatment results in a more than 80% tumor control. Nevertheless, a significant number of patients experience either a tumor

  4. Hepatitis C virus - associated B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Mihăilă, Romeo-Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infected patients are prone to develop bone marrow or various tissue infiltrates with monoclonal B cells, monoclonal B lymphocytosis or different types of B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (BCNHL), of which the most common are splenic marginal zone BCNHL, diffuse large BCNHL and follicular lymphoma. The association between chronic HCV infection and non Hodgkin’s lymphoma has been observed especially in areas with high prevalence of this viral infection. Outside the limitations of some studies that have been conducted, there are also geographic, environmental, and genetic factors that contribute to the epidemiological differences. Various microenvironmental signals, such as cytokines, viral antigenic external stimulation of lymphocyte receptors by HCV antigens, and intercellular interactions contribute to B cell proliferation. HCV lymphotropism and chronic antigenic stimulation are involved in B-lymphocyte expansion, as mixted cryoglobulinemia or monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance, which can progress to BCNHL. HCV replication in B lymphocytes has oncogenic effect mediated by intracellular HCV proteins. It is also involved in an important induction of reactive oxygen species that can lead to permanent B lymphocyte damage, as DNA mutations, after binding to surface B-cell receptors. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder could appear and it has a multiclonal potentiality that may develop into different types of lymphomas. The hematopoietic stem cell transplant made for lymphoma in HCV-infected patients can increase the risk of earlier progression to liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. HCV infected patients with indolent BCNHL who receive antiviral therapy can be potentially cured. Viral clearance was related to lymphoma response, fact that highlights the probable involvement of HCV in lymphomagenesis. Direct acting antiviral drugs could be a solution for the patients who did not tolerate or respond to interferon, as they

  5. Bortezomib and Filgrastim in Promoting Stem Cell Mobilization in Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Contiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Progressive Hairy Cell Leukemia, Initial Treatment; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular

  6. Guillain-Barré Syndrome as First Presentation of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ertiaei, Abolhassan; Ghajarzadeh, Mahsa; Javdan, Azizollah; Taffakhori, Abbas; Siroos, Bahaaddin; Esfandbod, Mohsen; Saberi, Hooshang

    2016-07-01

    We present a woman referred with underlying non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) masquerading clinically with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) like syndrome. At first evaluation, chest CT-Scan along with brain and whole spine MRI were normal. Electrodiagnostic studies were in favor of acute generalized polyradiculoneuropathy. Laboratory evaluation revealed hypoglycorrhachia. She treated with plasmapheresis after two weeks; she was discharged from hospital, but neurological recovery was not complete. After 6 months, she came back with acute onset of weakness in lower limbs, back pain, fever and urinary incontinence. Pinprick and light touch complete sensory loss was found beneath umbilicus. Thoracic MRI with contrast revealed a dorsal epidural mass extending smoothly from T8 to T12 (10 cm) with spinal cord compression. She underwent urgent laminectomy for spinal cord decompression. Histological examination revealed small round cell tumor suggestive of malignant T-cell type lymphoma. In cases with Guillain-Barré syndrome presentation, systemic hematologic disorders such as non-Hodgkin's lymphoma should be considered as one of the differential diagnosis of underlying disease. PMID:27424020

  7. Outcome of lower-intensity allogeneic transplantation in non-Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous transplantation failure.

    PubMed

    Freytes, César O; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Burns, Linda J; Gale, Robert Peter; Isola, Luis; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Seftel, Matthew; Vose, Julie M; Miller, Alan M; Gibson, John; Gross, Thomas G; Rowlings, Philip A; Inwards, David J; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Martino, Rodrigo; Marks, David I; Hale, Gregory A; Smith, Sonali M; Schouten, Harry C; Slavin, Simon; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; van Besien, Koen; Hari, Parameswaran N

    2012-08-01

    We studied the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning regimens (reduced-intensity conditioning and nonmyeloablative) in patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma who relapsed after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Nonrelapse mortality, lymphoma progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival were analyzed in 263 patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. All 263 patients had relapsed after a previous autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and then had undergone allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from a related (n = 26) or unrelated (n = 237) donor after reduced-intensity conditioning (n = 128) or nonmyeloablative (n = 135) and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research between 1996 and 2006. The median follow-up of survivors was 68 months (range, 3-111 months). Three-year nonrelapse mortality was 44% (95% confidence interval [CI], 37%-50%). Lymphoma progression/relapse at 3 years was 35% (95% CI, 29%-41%). Three-year probabilities of PFS and overall survival were 21% (95% CI, 16%-27%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%-38%), respectively. Superior Karnofsky Performance Score, longer interval between transplantations, total body irradiation-based conditioning regimen, and lymphoma remission at transplantation were correlated with improved PFS. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning is associated with significant nonrelapse mortality but can result in long-term PFS. We describe a quantitative risk model based on pretransplantation risk factors to identify those patients likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:22198543

  8. ONC201 induces cell death in pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Mala K; Allen, Joshua E; Dicker, David T; El-Deiry, Wafik S

    2015-08-01

    ONC201/TIC10 is a small molecule initially discovered by its ability to coordinately induce and activate the TRAIL pathway selectively in tumor cells and has recently entered clinical trials in adult advanced cancers. The anti-tumor activity of ONC201 has previously been demonstrated in several preclinical models of cancer, including refractory solid tumors and a transgenic lymphoma mouse model. Based on the need for new safe and effective therapies in pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and the non-toxic preclinical profile of ONC201, we investigated the in vitro efficacy of ONC201 in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cell lines to evaluate its therapeutic potential for this disease. ONC201 caused a dose-dependent reduction in the cell viability of NHL cell lines that resulted from induction of apoptosis. As expected from prior observations, induction of TRAIL and its receptor DR5 was also observed in these cell lines. Furthermore, dual induction of TRAIL and DR5 appeared to drive the observed apoptosis and TRAIL expression was correlated linearly with sub-G1 DNA content, suggesting its potential role as a biomarker of tumor response to ONC201-treated lymphoma cells. We further investigated combinations of ONC201 with approved chemotherapeutic agents used to treat lymphoma. ONC201 exhibited synergy in combination with the anti-metabolic agent cytarabine in vitro, in addition to cooperating with other therapies. Together these findings indicate that ONC201 is an effective TRAIL pathway-inducer as a monoagent that can be combined with chemotherapy to enhance therapeutic responses in pediatric NHL. PMID:26030065

  9. Human non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphomas serially transplanted in nude mice conditioned with whole-body irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, T.; Oka, K.; Miyamoto, T.

    1989-01-01

    Direct transplantation of non-Hodgkin's malignant lymphoma into athymic nude mice was successfully achieved after whole-body irradiation (5 Gy). Twenty-seven per cent (6/22) of transplanted lymphomas were established as nude mouse lines. The successful lines were derived solely from the patients with diffuse lymphoma who showed advanced clinical stage, high LDH value, large mass and poor prognosis. The histological, immunophenotypic and chromosomal characteristics of the nude mouse lines were compared with those of the original lymphomas, and the proliferative characteristics of the lines were examined. The transplanted lymphomas substantially retained the characteristics of the original lymphomas, and could be useful in biological, oncological and therapeutic studies of human malignant lymphoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:2649134

  10. A Review of the Role of Radiation Therapy in the Treatment of Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mansfield, Carl M.; Hartman, Gerald V.; Reddy, Eashwer K.

    1978-01-01

    Until recently, non-Hodgkin lymphoma has been difficult to understand. This was due to a lack of appreciation for histologic types, their sub-classifications, modes of spread, and sites of recurrence. The treatment of choice for stage I-II disease is radiation therapy. The value of irradiating adjacent uninvolved node areas or the more extensive Hodgkin-type mantle or inverted “Y” fields is uncertain. Most patients already have reached stage III or IV when first seen. Stage III cases should be treated by a combination of radiation therapy and chemotherapy. There are protocol studies evaluating the role of chemotherapy alone in stage III disease. The primary treatment of stage IV disease probably should be chemotherapy followed by radiation therapy to involved areas or to residual bulky disease. PMID:581296

  11. Clinical Significance of TIPE2 Protein Upregulation in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chunyan; Zhang, Na; Geng, Minghong; Ren, Qing; Li, Yan; Wang, Yan; Chen, Youhai H; Liu, Suxia

    2016-09-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), which includes diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and peripheral T-cell lymphoma, is a refractory malignant tumor originated from the lymphatic system. TNFAIP8L2 (TIPE2 or tumor necrosis-alpha-induced protein-8 like 2) is a negative regulator for inflammation and an inhibitor for carcinogenesis. However, whether TIPE2 plays a role in lymphomagenesis is unknown. In this study, we determined TIPE2 expression in NHL by immunohistochemistry and investigated its clinicopathological significance in DLBCL. We found that TIPE2 expression was upregulated in both DLBCL and peripheral T-cell lymphoma. But the expression of TIPE2 in T lymphomas was weaker than that in DLBCL. Interestingly, among DLBCL, TIPE2 expression was significantly stronger in the germinal center B-cell (GCB) type than in the non-GCB type. These results suggest that the expression of TIPE2 protein could be a predictor of better prognosis for DLBCL. PMID:27578327

  12. Disparities in conditional net survival among non-Hodgkin lymphoma survivors: a population-based analysis.

    PubMed

    Migdady, Yazan; Salhab, Mohammed; Dang, Nam H; Markham, Merry J; Olszewski, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated the association of baseline prognostic factors with conditional net survival among survivors of six subtypes non-Hodgkin lymphoma using the SEER program data from 2000-2012. Among 2-year survivors, further prognosis markedly improved in Burkitt's (BL) and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), and became the same as for follicular lymphoma (5-year net survival ≥ 85%). Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) demonstrated the worst prognosis of all studied histologies up to 5 years of survivorship. Age and stage lost prognostic significance in BL within 2 years from diagnosis. Racial disparities in net survival disappeared within 2 years for all subtypes, except in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, where black patients had persistently worse prognosis, and in MCL, where they had unexpectedly better prognosis than other races after 2 years. Many baseline factors may lose their initial prognostic value for lymphoma survivors, which should be considered when counseling patients about their prognosis and long-term surveillance. PMID:26428541

  13. AUTOLOGOUS HAEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR NON-HODGKIN LYMPHOMA WITH SECONDARY CNS INVOLVEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Maziarz, Richard T.; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Bolwell, Brian J.; Chen, Andy I.; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon M.; Holmberg, Leona; Inwards, David J.; Isola, Luis M.; Khoury, H. Jean; Lewis, Victor A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Munker, Reinhold; Phillips, Gordon L.; Rizzieri, David A.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Saber, Wael; Satwani, Prakash; Waller, Edmund K.; Maloney, David G.; Montoto, Silvia; Laport, Ginna G.; Vose, Julie M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Pre-existing central nervous system (CNS) involvement may influence referral for autologous haematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) for patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). The outcomes of 151 adult patients with NHL with prior secondary CNS involvement (CNS+) receiving an AHCT were compared to 4688 patients without prior CNS lymphoma (CNS−). There were significant baseline differences between the cohorts. CNS+ patients were more likely to be younger, have lower performance scores, higher age-adjusted international prognostic index scores, more advanced disease stage at diagnosis, more aggressive histology, more sites of extranodal disease, and a shorter interval between diagnosis and AHCT. However, no statistically significant differences were identified between the two groups by analysis of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5 years. A matched pair comparison of the CNS+ group with a subset of CNS− patients matched on propensity score also showed no differences in outcomes. Patients with active CNS lymphoma at the time of AHCT (n=55) had a higher relapse rate and diminished PFS and OS compared with patients whose CNS lymphoma was in remission (n=96) at the time of AHCT. CNS+ patients can achieve excellent long-term outcomes with AHCT. Active CNS lymphoma at transplant confers a worse prognosis. PMID:23829536

  14. Classification of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in Algeria according to the World Health Organization classification.

    PubMed

    Boudjerra, Nadia; Perry, Anamarija M; Audouin, Josée; Diebold, Jacques; Nathwani, Bharat N; MacLennan, Kenneth A; Müller-Hermelink, Hans K; Bast, Martin; Boilesen, Eugene; Armitage, James O; Weisenburger, Dennis D

    2015-04-01

    The relative distribution of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) subtypes differs markedly around the world. The aim of this study was to report this distribution in Algeria. A panel of four hematopathologists classified 197 consecutive cases according to the World Health Organization classification, including 87.3% B-cell and 12.7% T- or natural killer (NK)-cell NHLs. This series was compared with similar cohorts from Western Europe (WEU) and North America (NA). Algeria had a significantly higher frequency of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL: 52.8%) and a lower frequency of follicular lymphoma (FL: 13.2%) compared with WEU (DLBCL: 32.2%; FL: 20.0%) and NA (DLBCL: 29.3%; FL: 33.6%). The frequency of mantle cell lymphoma was lower in Algeria (2.5%) compared with WEU (8.3%). Smaller differences were also found among the NK/T-cell lymphomas. In conclusion, we found important differences between Algeria and Western countries, and further epidemiologic studies are needed to explain these differences. PMID:25012941

  15. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma “masquerading” as Pott's disease in a 13-year old boy

    PubMed Central

    Adegboye, Olasunkanmi Abdulrasheed

    2011-01-01

    Lymphomas are malignant neoplasms of the lymphoid lineage. They are broadly classified as either Hodgkin disease or as non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Burkitt's lymphoma, a variety of NHL, is significantly most common in sub-Saharan Africa, where it accounts for approximately one half of childhood cancers. Lymphoblastic lymphoma is less common. A case of paravertebral high grade non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (lymphoblastic lymphoma) “masquerading” as Pott's disease in a 13-year-old child is reported. The present report was informed by the unusual presentation of this case and the intent of increasing the index of diagnostic suspicion. A brief appraisal is provided of the clinical parameters, management strategies and challenges. AT was a 13-year boy that presented on account of a slowly evolving and progressively increasing hunch on the back and inability to walk over 4 and 8 months duration, respectively. There was subsequent inability to control defecation and urination. There was no history of cough. He and his twin brother lived with their paternal grandfather who had chronic cough with associated weight loss. The grandfather died shortly before the child's admission. The child had no BCG immunization. The essential findings on examination were in keeping with lower motor neurons (LMN) paralysis of the lower limbs. The upper limbs appeared normal. There was loss of cutaneous sensation from the umbilicus (T10) downward. There was a firm, (rather tense), non-tender non-pulsatile, smooth swelling over the mid-third of the back (T6-L1) the mass had no differential warmth. It measures about 20×12 cm. Chest radiograph showed no active focal lung lesion, but the thoraco-lumbar spine showed a vertebral planner at L1 and a wedged collapse of T11-T12 vertebrae. There was sclerosis of the end plates of all the vertebral bodies with associated reduction in the bone density. He had an excision biopsy on the 90th day on admission, following which his clinical state rapidly

  16. Detection of Leptomeningeal Involvement by 18F-FDG-PET/CT in a Patient With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fonti, Rosa; Salvatore, Barbara; De Renzo, Amalia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Del Vecchio, Silvana

    2016-02-01

    Leptomeningeal infiltration of the brain or spinal cord by neoplastic cells may occur as complication of solid or hematopoietic tumors such as non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Previously rare, this event is becoming increasingly common as newer therapies can prolong survival but may not achieve therapeutic concentration in the central nervous system. Although prognosis is poor, early diagnosis and aggressive treatment may lead to prolonged survival and/or improvement of quality of life. We report a case of a 69-year-old man with leptomeningeal infiltration by non-Hodgkin lymphoma revealed by F-FDG-PET/CT and confirmed by subsequent spinal MRI and cerebrospinal fluid cytology. PMID:26545028

  17. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma in the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Syed, Ali Z; Singer, Steven R; Mupparapu, Mel

    2016-04-01

    We report a case of a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the maxilla. A patient presented with diffuse swelling of the right maxillary region following the extraction of an upper right maxillary tooth. The patient was referred for cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) to visualize the area in question in three dimensions. A massive destructive maxillary lesion was noted on CBCT examination suggestive of an aggressive lesion highly suspicious for a malignancy. A subsequent biopsy and immunochemistry were useful in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:27263143

  18. Distribution of childhood leukaemias and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas near nuclear installations in England and Wales.

    PubMed Central

    Bithell, J. F.; Dutton, S. J.; Draper, G. J.; Neary, N. M.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the relation between the risk of childhood leukaemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and proximity of residence to nuclear installations in England and Wales. DESIGN--Observed and expected numbers of cases were calculated and analysed by standard methods based on ratios of observed to expected counts and by a new statistical test, the linear risk score test, based on ranks and designed to be sensitive to excess incidence in close proximity to a putative source of risk. SETTING--Electoral wards within 25 km of 23 nuclear installations and six control sites that had been investigated for suitability for generating stations but never used. SUBJECTS--Children below age 15 in England and Wales, 1966-87. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Registration of any leukaemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. RESULTS--In none of the 25 km circles around the installations was the incidence ratio significantly greater than 1.0. The only significant results for the linear risk score test were for Sellafield (P = 0.00002) and Burghfield (P = 0.031). The circles for Aldermaston and Burghfield overlap; the incidence ratio was 1.10 in each. One of the control sites gave a significant linear risk score test result (P = 0.020). All the tests carried out were one sided with P values estimated by simulation. CONCLUSION--There is no evidence of a general increase of childhood leukaemia or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma around nuclear installations. Apart from Sellafield, the evidence for distance related risk is very weak. PMID:8086902

  19. High-Dose Busulfan and High-Dose Cyclophosphamide Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Multiple Myeloma, or Recurrent Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-08-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With T(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Burkitt Lymphoma; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; De Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent

  20. [Phase II trial of peplomycin in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Sampi, K; Kumai, R; Hattori, M; Kaneko, Y; Sakurai, M

    1985-05-01

    Seventeen patients with malignant lymphoma were entered into a phase II study of peplomycin (PEP) to determine the efficacy of the drug. There were 8 males and 9 females with a median age of 64 yrs (range 3-74 yrs) and a median PS 3 (range 2-4). Three of these were children. At first PEP was given intermittently and intramuscularly (8 cases) at a dose of 10 mg every one (3 cases) or two (5 cases) weeks, and then intravenously by 22-hr continuous infusion (9 cases) at a dose of 5 mg per day for 5 days. Mean cumulative dose was 78 mg. Objective responses were obtained in 6 patient (35%). CR lasting 4 weeks was obtained in one patient with diffuse mixed-type lymphoma. Five patients, one with diffuse medium-sized cell type and 3 with diffuse large cell type, had PR, lasting 6, 7, 7, 9, and 50+ weeks, respectively. Pulmonary fibrosis was found in two patients on autopsy and interstitial pneumonia in two patients clinically. Temporary high fever occurred in 7 patients, stomatitis in 3 patients and anorexia in 3 patients. PMID:2581513

  1. Recent advances in post autologous transplantation maintenance therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Epperla, Narendranath; Fenske, Timothy S; Hari, Parameswaran N; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Lymphomas constitute the second most common indication for high dose therapy (HDT) followed by autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT). The intent of administering HDT in these heterogeneous disorders varies from cure (e.g., in relapsed aggressive lymphomas) to disease control (e.g., most indolent lymphomas). Regardless of the underlying histology or remission status at transplantation, disease relapse remains the number one cause of post auto-HCT therapy failure and mortality. The last decade has seen a proliferation of clinical studies looking at prevention of post auto-HCT therapy failure with various maintenance strategies. The benefit of such therapies is in turn dependent on disease histology and timing of transplantation. In relapsed, chemosensitive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL), although post auto-HCT maintenance rituximab seems to be safe and feasible, it does not provide improved survival outcomes and is not recommended. The preliminary results with anti- programmed death -1 (PD-1) antibody therapy as post auto-HCT maintenance in DLBCL is promising but requires randomized validation. Similarly in follicular lymphoma, maintenance therapies including rituximab following auto-HCT should be considered investigational and offered only on a clinical trial. Rituximab maintenance results in improved progression-free survival but has not yet shown to improve overall survival in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), but given the poor prognosis with post auto-HCT failure in MCL, maintenance rituximab can be considered on a case-by-case basis. Ongoing trials evaluating the efficacy of post auto-HCT maintenance with novel compounds (e.g., immunomodulators, PD-1 inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors and bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitors) will likely change the practice landscape in the near future for B cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas patients following HDT and auto-HCT. PMID:26421260

  2. Vitamin D and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in Adults: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Jennifer L.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Calvi, Laura M.; van Wijngaarden, Edwin; Fisher, Susan G.

    2010-01-01

    Animal and human studies support a protective effect of Vitamin D sufficiency related to malignancy by uncovering paracrine and autocrine effects of extra-renal 25(OH)D activation including: regulation of cell cycle proliferation, apoptosis induction, and increased cell differentiation signaling. Recent epidemiologic studies demonstrate a reduction in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk with increased sunlight exposure. As sunlight is a major vitamin D source, it has been suggested that vitamin D status may mediate this observed association. This review provides a comprehensive discussion of the current epidemiologic evidence with regard to the investigation of an association between vitamin D status and NHL risk. PMID:19832043

  3. Serendipitous Detection of Hodgkin Lymphoma by 18F-NaF PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Shao, Fuqiang; Wu, Jingbo; Huang, Zhanwen; Zhou, Fan; Chen, Yue

    2016-10-01

    A 17-year-old girl underwent F-NaF PET/CT to evaluate bone pain after an accident. The images did not identify any osseous lesion. However, there was a focally increased activity in the left upper chest, which corresponded to a partially calcified soft tissue mass in the mediastinum, suggestive of malignancy. The result led to subsequent F-FDG PET/CT imaging, which demonstrated intense activity in the mediastinal mass and in multiple cervical, supraclavicular, and mediastinal lymph nodes. Hodgkin lymphoma was diagnosed histopathologically following the biopsy. PMID:27556800

  4. Impaired dentofacial development after radiotherapy of a non-Hodgkin lymphoma: report of case.

    PubMed

    Folwaczny, M; Hickel, R

    2000-01-01

    Since the advances in therapy of childhood malignancies have improved life expectancy attention is now increasingly focused on the long-term effects of antineoplastic therapy. Developmental abnormalities due to antineoplastic therapy have been claimed to preferentially occur in children treated before the age of six years. This report of a case demonstrates severe developmental disturbances following radiotherapy of a cervical non-Hodgkin lymphoma at the age of eight years. The morphological changes included microdontia, root shortening, blunting and thinning as well as mandibular hypoplasia. PMID:11204069

  5. CE: Cardiotoxicity and Breast Cancer as Late Effects of Pediatric and Adolescent Hodgkin Lymphoma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee Candela, Joanne

    2016-04-01

    : The American Cancer Society estimates that in 2014 nearly 16,000 U.S. children and adolescents developed cancer, and in roughly 1,200 of these cases the cancer was Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). The great majority of these patients will survive, joining the thousands who have been diagnosed and treated successfully in decades past. Nurses' familiarity with and attention to the late effects of the chemotherapy and radiation therapy used to treat HL, which include breast cancer as well as cardiotoxicity and its sequelae, are essential in helping these patients maintain their overall health. PMID:26974745

  6. Severe Acute Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Brentuximab in a Patient with Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Sabet, Yasmin; Ramirez, Saul; Rosell Cespedes, Elizabeth; Rensoli Velasquez, Marimer; Porres-Muñoz, Mateo; Gaur, Sumit; Figueroa-Casas, Juan B.; Porres-Aguilar, Mateo

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary toxicity associated with brentuximab appears to be a rare but serious adverse effect that can be potentially fatal. We report the case of a twenty-nine-year-old female with Hodgkin's lymphoma who was treated with brentuximab and later presented with severe acute pulmonary toxicity; she improved after the discontinuation of brentuximab and administration of antibiotics and glucocorticoid therapy. Currently there is very little data in the literature in regard to the clinical manifestations and characteristics of patients taking brentuximab and the potential development of acute severe pulmonary toxicity, as well as the appropriate therapeutic approach, making this particular case of successful treatment and resolution unique. PMID:27190667

  7. Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas: Present and Future

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Caryn E.; McDaniel, Jenny K.; Xavier, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas (NHL) are a diverse group of malignancies and as such treatment can vary based on the different biological characteristics of each malignancy. Significant advancements are being made in the treatment and outcomes of this group of malignancies. This is in large part due to novel targeted drug therapies that are being used in combination with traditional chemotherapy. Here, we discuss several new lines of therapy that are being developed or are in current use for pediatric patients with NHL. PMID:27213405

  8. Primary extra nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the oral cavity in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Vinoth, Ponnurangam N.; Selvan, Sathyamoorthi Muthamil; Sahni, Latika; Krishnaratnam, Kannan; Rajendiran, Swaminathan; Anand, Chidambaram Vishwanath; Scott, Julius X.

    2012-01-01

    Primary Non Hodgkin s Lymphoma (NHL) usually arises within the lymphnodes, but 20-30% account for extra nodal sites. Oral cavity, as a primary extra nodal site for NHL, is relatively rare and diverse in presentation, response to therapy and prognosis. We report a 14 year old adolescent girl who presented with multiple gingival swellings, the most prominent one being in the right anterior maxilla. Gingival biopsy showed NHL- diffuse large B cell type. Child was completely cured with chemotherapy and now she is in complete remission and under regular follow up. PMID:23833495

  9. Clinical Options in Relapsed or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Fedele, Roberta; Martino, Massimo; Recchia, Anna Grazia; Irrera, Giuseppe; Gentile, Massimo; Morabito, Fortunato

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a potentially curable lymphoma, and modern therapy is expected to successfully cure more than 80% of the patients. Second-line salvage high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) have an established role in the management of refractory and relapsed HL, leading to long-lasting responses in approximately 50% of relapsed patients and a minority of refractory patients. Patients progressing after intensive treatments, such as auto-SCT, have a very poor outcome. Allogeneic SCT represents the only strategy with a curative potential for these patients; however, its role is controversial. Based on recent knowledge of HL pathology, biology, and immunology, antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30, small molecule inhibitors of cell signaling, and antibodies that inhibit immune checkpoints are currently explored. This review will discuss the clinical results regarding auto-SCT and allo-SCT as well as the current role of emerging new treatment strategies. PMID:26788526

  10. [Acute monoarthritis and laryngeal obstruction as extralymphatic manifestations of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Stemmelin, G R; Venditti, J; Ricardo, A; Ceresetto, J M; Shanley, C M; Bullorsky, E O

    1992-02-01

    Joints and larynx are uncommonly involved by non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Synovial involvement has been reported in only 7 cases, mainly located in the knees. When this is the first location of NHL it is usually misdiagnosed. The treatment of choice is local radiotherapy followed by systemic chemotherapy. Laryngeal lymphoma can be either primary or forming part of multifocal disease. The prognosis of the primary form is usually good only with radiotherapy, whereas the prognosis of the laryngeal location of advanced disease is rather poor. The symptoms include dysphonia and slowly progressive dyspnea. A case of NHL is presented who showed initial arthritis of the knee, later evolving into severe laryngeal obstruction, an association not previously reported. PMID:1585240

  11. Recent molecular and therapeutic advances in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in children.

    PubMed

    Giulino-Roth, Lisa; Goldman, Stanton

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) compromises a heterogeneous group of histological entities of which Burkitt lymphoma is the most common. In resource-rich countries, the expected cure rate is in excess of 85% with application of risk-adapted short intensive chemotherapy. In recent years, large paediatric cooperative group trials have sought to improve upon outcomes by decreasing the intensity of cytotoxic treatment as well as introducing targeted therapies, such as rituximab. These efforts have resulted in excellent outcomes, however there remains a group of high-risk patients for whom novel treatment approaches are needed. In this review, we will summarize the recent paediatric clinical trials in B-NHL as well as compare treatment approaches across the major cooperative groups. We will also highlight our current understanding of the molecular biology of paediatric B-NHL with a focus on how this may help guide future rational targeted therapy. PMID:26996160

  12. Primary follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the ureter: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    DAI, ZHIHONG; LIU, ZHIYU; GAO, YUREN; WANG, LIANG

    2016-01-01

    Ureteral cancer is a rare type of neoplasm, with the most prevalent forms including squamous cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. Ureteral lymphoma is particularly uncommon, and forming a pre-operative diagnosis of the disease is often difficult. The current study describes the case of a 31-year-old man presenting with a space-occupying lesion located in the left lower ureter. Follicular non-Hodgkin's lymphoma was diagnosed via intraoperative frozen section and post-operative pathological analysis. The affected ureteric segment was excised, and the ureter was repaired by end-to-end anastomosis with insertion of a double-J tube for internal drainage. The patient was followed up for 10 months and presented with no signs of recurrence. The current study affirms the importance of pathological examination in the differential diagnosis of ureteral neoplasms and the selection of an appropriate treatment. PMID:27313721

  13. Strongyloides stercoralis induced bilateral blood stained pleural effusion in patient with recurrent Non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Win, T T; Sitiasma, H; Zeehaida, M

    2011-04-01

    Infections and malignancies are common causes of pleural effusion. Among infectious causes, hyperinfection syndrome of Strongyloides stercoralis may occur in immunosuppressive patient. A 62-year-old man, known case of Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was presented with recurrent NHL stage IV and had undergone salvage chemotherapy. Patient subsequently developed pneumonia with bilateral pleural effusion and ascites. We reported rhabditiform larvae of S. stercoralis in pleural fluid of both lungs without infiltration by lymphoma cells. Stool for microscopic examination also revealed rhabditiform larvae of S. stercoralis. This patient was a known case of NHL receiving chemotherapy resulting in immunosuppression state. Although S. stercoralis infection is not very common compared to other parasitic infections, it is common in immunosuppressive patients and may present with hyperinfection. Therefore, awareness of this parasite should be kept in mind in immunosuppressive patients. PMID:21602770

  14. NCCN Guidelines Insights: Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas, Version 3.2016.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, Steven M; Zelenetz, Andrew D; Gordon, Leo I; Wierda, William G; Abramson, Jeremy S; Advani, Ranjana H; Andreadis, C Babis; Bartlett, Nancy; Byrd, John C; Fayad, Luis E; Fisher, Richard I; Glenn, Martha J; Habermann, Thomas M; Lee Harris, Nancy; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Hoppe, Richard T; Kaminski, Mark S; Kelsey, Christopher R; Kim, Youn H; Krivacic, Susan; LaCasce, Ann S; Lunning, Matthew; Nademanee, Auayporn; Press, Oliver; Rabinovitch, Rachel; Reddy, Nishitha; Reid, Erin; Roberts, Kenneth; Saad, Ayman A; Sokol, Lubomir; Swinnen, Lode J; Vose, Julie M; Yahalom, Joachim; Zafar, Nadeem; Dwyer, Mary; Sundar, Hema; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-09-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) represent a relatively uncommon heterogeneous group of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHLs) with an aggressive clinical course and poor prognosis. Anthracycline-based multiagent chemotherapy with or without radiation therapy followed by first-line consolidation with high-dose therapy followed by autologous stem cell rescue (HDT/ASCR) is the standard approach to most of the patients with newly diagnosed PTCL. Relapsed or refractory disease is managed with second-line systemic therapy followed by HDT/ASCR or allogeneic stem cell transplant, based on the patient's eligibility for transplant. In recent years, several newer agents have shown significant activity in patients with relapsed or refractory disease across all 4 subtypes of PTCL. These NCCN Guideline Insights highlight the important updates to the NCCN Guidelines for NHL, specific to the management of patients with relapsed or refractory PTCL. PMID:27587620

  15. Primary non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of gingiva in a 28-year-old HIV-positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Basavaraj, K. F.; Ramalingam, Karthikeyan; Sarkar, Amitabha; Muddaiah, Savitha

    2012-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is seldom seen in the oral cavity, and has been reported with some frequency in HIV-positive patients. Oral HIV-related lymphomas exhibit an aggressive course and can mimic other oral tumors and infections that make early recognition and diagnosis difficult. This paper presents a case of NHL on the gingiva of a 28-year-old HIV-positive male patient. PMID:23225984

  16. Breakthrough therapies in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, C Y; Fowler, N H; Wang, M L

    2016-05-01

    The last 5 years have seen significant advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas. This has led to the emergence of a large number of new therapeutic agents exploiting precise aspects of the tumor cell's signaling pathways, surface antigens or microenvironment. The purpose of this comprehensive review is to provide a detailed analysis of the breakthrough agents in the field, with a focus on recent clinical data. We describe agents targeting the B-cell receptor pathway, Bcl-2 inhibitors, emerging epigenetic therapies, new monoclonal antibodies and antibody drug conjugates, selective inhibitors of nuclear export, agents targeting the programmed cell death axis and chimeric antigen receptor T cells. PMID:26802148

  17. 506U78 in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma or T-cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  18. Frequency of CD43 expression in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A survey of 742 cases and further characterization of rare CD43+ follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Lai, R; Weiss, L M; Chang, K L; Arber, D A

    1999-04-01

    CD43 expression on B cells is an immunophenotypic feature suggestive of malignancy. In the light of its diagnostic importance, we performed a comprehensive survey of CD43 expression in various types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and determined the frequency of its expression in routinely fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Tissue sections in 742 cases of NHL, pretreated by the heat-induced epitope retrieval technique, were immunostained using an anti-CD43 antibody. Three categories of CD43 positivity were found: (1) more than 90% of T-cell lymphoma, mantle cell lymphoma, B-cell small lymphocytic lymphoma, and Burkitt lymphoma cases were positive; (2) 20% to 40% of nodal and extranodal marginal zone lymphoma (MZL), diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, Burkitt-like B-cell lymphoma, and lymphoplasmacytoid lymphoma cases were positive; and (3) 0% to 6% of primary splenic MZL and various types of follicular lymphoma cases were positive. Most CD43+ follicular lymphomas were predominantly large cell type with focally diffuse areas; their follicular center cell origin in 4 of 8 cases was supported by the presence of CD10 immunoreactivity and/or t(14;18) fusion gene product. CD43 is frequently detectable in a subset of B-NHL, and, thus, it seems to be a highly sensitive marker for these tumors. CD43 also may be a useful marker for classifying B-cell NHLs by virtue of its differential expression in these tumors. PMID:10191768

  19. A Case Report of Primary Extranodal Non-hodgkin Lymphoma First Presentation as a Soft Tissue Swelling Around the Wrist

    PubMed Central

    Sopu, Alexandra; Green, Connor; McHugh, Gavin; Quinlan, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Primary musculoskeletal extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare presentation and account for 5% of all primary extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Treatment uses a combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy with good prognosis in unifocal manifestation. We report an unusual case of primary musculoskeletal extranodal lymphoma presenting as a soft tissue swelling around the wrist. Case Report: A 75 year old lady was referred to the Orthopaedic Outpatients Department with a painless, slowly growing mass on the dorsum of the right wrist. Clinical examination revealed a 6 X 9 cm round painless mass on the dorsum of the distal radius adherent to both the underlying structures and skin. MRI of the wrist showed a large mass causing extensive osteolysis of the distal radius and extending proximally with abnormal replacement of the marrow. The patient was brought to theatre for biopsy and subsequent histopathological examination confirmed a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The patient was referred to the Haematology Service for further treatment and follow-up. She received chemotherapy and radiotherapy with satisfactory results. Conclusion: Lymphoma presenting as a soft tissue mass is relatively uncommon and can easily be confused with a wide variety of inflammatory conditions, more common neoplasias as well as infectious diseases (tuberculosis). Though rare, extranodal lymphoma should be regularly included in the differential diagnosis of mass lesions. PMID:27299029

  20. Comparison between submucosal (extra-nodal) and nodal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in the oral and maxillofacial region.

    PubMed

    Shindoh, M; Takami, T; Arisue, M; Yamashita, T; Saito, T; Kohgo, T; Notani, K; Totsuka, Y; Amemiya, A

    1997-07-01

    Fifty-two cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in the oral and maxillofacial region, comprising 31 submucosal (extra-nodal) and 21 cervical node NHLs, were investigated. The patients' ages ranged from 5 to 86 years, with a bimodal age distribution among young people below 12 years of age (average 8 years) and in those aged 30 years or older (average 60.3 years). The male-to-female gender difference ratio was 1.3:1. Patients presented with swelling as the major symptom. Histologically, diffuse, large cell malignant lymphoma was the most frequent type and 67.9% of lymphomas were of intermediate malignancy as defined by the Working Formulation for Clinical Usage. All submucosal lymphomas showed diffuse proliferation patterns, although follicular proliferation was identified in 5 of the 21 nodal lymphomas. Immunohistochemistry showed that the B-cell type was predominant, especially in nodal lymphomas. PMID:9234189

  1. [In situ lymphoma and other early stage malignant non-Hodgkin lymphomas].

    PubMed

    Quintanilla-Martínez, L; Adam, P; Fend, F

    2013-05-01

    The increasing use of immunohistochemical and molecular investigations of lymphatic tissues results in more frequent detection of early lymphoid proliferations. These show some but not all features of malignant lymphomas without fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for the diagnosis of lymphoid malignancy. In addition to well-known premalignant B-cell proliferations, such as monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) and monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL), so-called in situ lymphomas have recently been described with minimal infiltrates of clonal B-cells in morphologically reactive lymphoid tissues which show the phenotypic and genetic features of specific B-cell lymphoma subtypes and often show a characteristic topographical distribution. This article addresses a group of clonal lymphoproliferations with usually localized disease and excellent clinical prognosis, such as pediatric follicular lymphoma and nodal marginal zone lymphoma. Another group of early lesions not addressed in this review are virally induced lymphoproliferations which represent a grey zone between purely reactive lesions and malignant lymphomas and may pose significant diagnostic as well as clinical problems. In this review diagnostic criteria for early or in situ lesions and their distinction from partial infiltration by malignant lymphoma are described. PMID:23459785

  2. Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Low-Grade Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-10

    Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  3. Study of Alisertib (MLN8237) in Adults With Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-15

    Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Burkitt's Lymphoma; Precursor B-lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; T-cell Lymphoma, Excluding Primary Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma; Transformed Follicular Lymphoma With ≥ 50% Diffuse Large Cell Component

  4. Ixazomib Citrate and Rituximab in Treating Patients With Indolent B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-01

    Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Follicular Lymphoma; Lymphoplasmacytic Lymphoma; Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Refractory Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue; Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  5. Genetic and epigenetic variants in the MTHFR gene are not associated with non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, Gabrielle; Sutherland, Heidi G.; Camilleri, Emily T.; Lea, Rodney A.; Haupt, Larisa M.; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2015-01-01

    The methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene codes for the MTHFR enzyme which plays a key role in the pathway of folate and methionine metabolism. Polymorphisms of genes in this pathway affect its regulation and have been linked to lymphoma. In this study we examined whether we could detect an association between two common non-synonymous MTHFR polymorphisms, 677C > T (rs1801133) and 1298A > C (rs1801131), and susceptibility to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in an Australian case–control cohort. We found no significant differences between genotype or allele frequencies for either polymorphisms between lymphoma cases and controls. We also explored whether epigenetic modification of MTHFR, specifically DNA methylation of a CpG island in the MTHFR promoter region, is associated with NHL using blood samples from patients. No difference in methylation levels was detected between the case and control samples suggesting that although hypermethylation of MTHFR has been reported in tumour tissues, particularly in the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma subtype of NHL, methylation of this MTHFR promoter CpG island is not a suitable epigenetic biomarker for NHL diagnosis or prognosis in peripheral blood samples. Further studies into epigenetic variants could focus on genes that are robustly associated with NHL susceptibility. PMID:26629414

  6. Secondary Bilateral Orbital Involvement from Primary Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma of the Cheek.

    PubMed

    Furudoi, Shungo; Yoshii, Takashi; Komori, Takahide

    2016-01-01

    We describe a patient with oculomotor nerve palsy due to secondary orbital infiltration from the primary malignant lymphoma of the cheek. The patient was a 78-year-old female who had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (diffuse large B cell lymphoma [DLBCL]) of the cheek. The patient received chemotherapy and local radiation therapy. The combined treatment brought about complete remission. About 6 months after the last treatment the patient began to have left blepharoptosis and impaired vision. Findings from ophthalmological and neurosurgical examinations suggested no intraorbital or intracranial lesions. Repeated MRI and CT scans also showed no such lesions. One month later, the patient suddenly had a left oculomotor disturbance, diplopia and exophthalmus, followed by right oculomotor nerve palsy. An MRI revealed bilateral intraorbital tumors. Recurrence at the orbital tissue of malignant lymphoma originated from the left cheek appeared to cause the ophthalmological symptoms. Salvage chemotherapy was performed and her ocular symptoms were recovered. However, the patient died approximately 10 months after recurrent orbital tumor onset. PMID:27604535

  7. Pediatric non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical and biologic prognostic factors and risk allocation.

    PubMed

    Weitzman, Sheila; Suryanarayan, Kaveri; Weinstein, Howard J

    2002-03-01

    The use of effective combination chemotherapy for all stages and subtypes of non-Hodgkin"s lymphoma (NHL) in children has resulted in a striking improvement in cure rates. Event-free survival now ranges from 70% to 90%, depending on the stage of disease and the NHL subtype. Risk-adapted therapy has resulted in a dramatic improvement in outcome for high-risk patients, at the cost of significantly increased short-term toxicity, and a reduction of therapy and toxicity for the lower-risk patient, while maintaining the excellent cure rate. Successful risk allocation of patients is dependent on the identification and continual validation of prognostic factors. The specific treatment protocol is the single most important factor predicting outcome today. Traditional prognostic factors such as stage and tumor burden are useful in selecting the intensity and length of therapy, rather than as a major indicator of likelihood of survival. In order to further improve cure rates and decrease toxicity, new biologic prognosticators need to be found and validated. Some promising avenues for study appear to be the presence or absence of adhesion molecules and of aberrant proteins that are specific to subtypes of lymphomas, such as soluble CD30 and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), the molecular classification of lymphomas on the basis of gene expression, and the evaluation of biologic markers for measuring early response to therapy. PMID:11822982

  8. Outcome of Lower-Intensity Allogeneic Transplantation in non-Hodgkin Lymphoma After Autologous Transplant Failure

    PubMed Central

    Freytes, César O.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Carreras, Jeanette; Burns, Linda J.; Gale, Robert Peter; Isola, Luis; Perales, Miguel-Angel; Seftel, Matthew; Vose, Julie M.; Miller, Alan M.; Gibson, John; Gross, Thomas G.; Rowlings, Philip A.; Inwards, David J.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Martino, Rodrigo; Marks, David I.; Hale, Gregory A.; Smith, Sonali M.; Schouten, Harry C.; Slavin, Simon; Klumpp, Thomas R.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; van Besien, Koen; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the outcome of allogeneic transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning regimens (reduced-intensity [RIC] and non-myeloablative [NST]) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) relapsing after autologous transplantation. Non-relapse mortality (NRM), lymphoma progression/relapse, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed in 263 NHL patients. All had relapsed after a prior autologous transplant and then received allogeneic transplantation from related (n = 26) or unrelated donors (n= 237) after RIC (n = 128) or NST (n = 135), and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) between 1996 and 2006. Median follow-up of survivors was 68 months (range, 3–111). Three-year NRM was 44% (95% CI, 37%–50%). Lymphoma progression/relapse at three years was 35% (95% CI, 29%–41%). Three-year probabilities of PFS and OS were 21% (95% CI, 16%–27%) and 32% (95% CI, 27%–38%) respectively. Superior performance score, longer interval between transplants, total-body irradiation-based conditioning regimen and lymphoma remission at transplantation correlated with improved PFS. Allogeneic transplantation after lower-intensity conditioning is associated with significant NRM, but can result in long-term PFS. We describe a quantitative risk model based on pretransplant risk factors in order to identify those likely to benefit from this approach. PMID:22198543

  9. Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Long-term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    van Besien, Koen; Carreras, Jeanette; Bierman, Philip J.; Logan, Brent R.; Molina, Arturo; King, Roberta; Nelson, Gene; Fay, Joseph W.; Champlin, Richard E.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Vose, Julie M.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the outcomes of 283 patients receiving unrelated donor allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) facilitated by the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research /National Marrow Donor Program (CIBMTR/NMDP) between 1991 and 2004. All patients received myeloablative conditioning regimens. The median follow-up of survivors is 5 years. Seventy-three (26%) patients are alive. The day 100 probability of death from all causes is estimated at 39%. The cumulative incidence of developing grade III-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day 100 is 25%. The estimated five-year survival and failure free survival are 24% (95% CI; 19–30) and 22% (95% CI; 17–28) respectively. Factors adversely associated with overall survival included increasing age, decreased performance status, and refractory disease. Follicular lymphoma and Peripheral T-cell lymphoma had improved survival compared to aggressive B-cell lymphomas. Factors adversely associated with progression free-survival included performance status, histology and disease status at transplant. Long-term failure-free survival is possible following unrelated donor transplantation for NHL, although early mortality was high in this large cohort. PMID:19361747

  10. A comprehensive review of lenalidomide in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Mili; Gowda, Sonia; Tuscano, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Lenalidomide, an immunomodulatory drug that the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma, 5q- myelodysplasia and mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL), has encouraging efficacy in other B-cell malignancies. Its unique mechanism of action is in part due to altering the tumor microenvironment and potentiating the activity of T and natural-killer (NK) cells. Impressive clinical activity and excellent tolerability allows broad applicability. Lenalidomide has been used in a wide range of B-cell malignancies for years, but in 2013, the FDA marked its approval as a single agent only in relapsed/refractory mantle-cell lymphoma. Perhaps most impressive is the efficacy of lenalidomide when combined with monoclonal antibodies. Impressive efficacy and toxicity profiles with the combination of lenalidomide and rituximab in B-cell lymphomas in both the upfront and relapsed/refractory setting may allow a shift in our current treatment paradigm in both indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). This review will summarize the current data in the relapsed/refractory and front-line setting of NHL with single-agent lenalidomide as well as its use in combination with other agents. PMID:27493711

  11. Composite B-cell and T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma of the tibia.

    PubMed

    Kaleem, Zahid; McGuire, Michael H; Caracioni, Adrian C; Leonard, Ronald L; Pathan, M Hanif; Lessmann, Ellen A; Chan, Wing C

    2005-02-01

    We report a unique case of de novo composite lymphoma in the tibia of a 35-year-old man who presented with increasingly frequent and intense pain in the right upper leg. He was otherwise healthy without significant medical history. A plain radiograph of the right leg showed a permeative lesion with alternating areas of radiolucency and radiodensity in the upper third of the tibia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a large, heterogeneous enhancing lesion involving the medullary and cortical bone of the proximal tibia with cortical disruption and extension into the adjacent soft tissue. A biopsy showed sheets and clusters of large cells, punctuated by clusters of small, irregular lymphocytes. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analysis showed composite lymphoma: diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with predominantly small cell morphologic features. The DLBCL expressed CD19, CD20, CD79a, CD5, CD10, CD23, CD38, CD117, bcl-2, and bcl-6, with monotypic expression of immunoglobulin kappa light chain. The T cells expressed CD2, CD3, CD5, CD7, and CD8, with partial loss of CD4. Clonal rearrangement of T-cell receptor gamma chain gene was found. Neither the large B cells nor the small T cells expressed Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA. Physical examination and radiologic studies showed no evidence of lymphadenopathy, organomegaly, or other mass lesions in the body. No peripheral lymphocytosis or bone marrow involvement was present. PMID:15842045

  12. Hodgkin's lymphoma as a rare variant of Richter's transformation in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    JANJETOVIC, SNJEZANA; BERND, HEINZ-WOLFRAM; BOKEMEYER, CARSTEN; FIEDLER, WALTER

    2016-01-01

    Richter's transformation induces an aggressive clinical course in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). In the majority of cases, Richter's transformation manifests itself as a high-grade B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). However, other histological types, such as classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), lymphoblastic lymphoma, hairy cell leukemia and high-grade T-cell NHL have been described previously. The present study reports a rare case of CLL with transformation into classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL). The common clonal origin of CLL and cHL was documented by immunoglobulin gene rearrangement analysis performed using multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Following a review of the literature, treatment of secondary Hodgkin's lymphoma is discussed, and prognosis is often poor. PMID:26998289

  13. Male gonadal function in survivors of childhood Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ben Arush, M W; Solt, I; Lightman, A; Linn, S; Kuten, A

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of therapy on long-term gonadal function of young people cured of childhood lymphomas and to assess whether a prepubertal state during the treatment protects the gonads from chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy late effects. Clinical evaluation, semen analysis, and endocrine status were studied in 20 survivors of childhood lymphomas. Five patients received Inverted Y radiotherapy, 2320 cGy (1550-4000); all 20 received chemotherapy as follows: MOPP/ABVD protocol, 9 patients; COMP protocol, 5 patients; MOPP protocol, 3 patients; other protocols, 3 patients. Semen analysis results were as follows: normal values, 4/20 patients; oligospermia, 8/20 patients; azoospermia, 8/20 patients; FSH above normal level, 10/20 patients; 4/5 who received Inverted Y irradiation were azoospermic and 1 was severely oligospermic. Treatment damage to the testis involves tubular germinal elements. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy combinations that included nitrogen mustard or cyclophosphamide were associated with high rates of oligospermia and azoospermia. MOPP/ABVD combination did not have a significant better outcome of sperm counts compared to MOPP alone. Age at chemotherapy did not correlate with the sperm count; hence a prepubertal state did not protect the gonad from the late effects of treatment. PMID:10779990

  14. [The effectiveness and toxicity of therapy in primary Hodgkin's lymphoma with extranodal lesions].

    PubMed

    Filatova, L V

    2015-01-01

    Using of radiochemotherapy improves short-term and long-term results of treatment in patients with primary Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) comparing with treatment by chemotherapy alone. The rates of 5-year, 10-year OS and DFS are 88%, 83% and 90%, 86% in case of radiochemotherapy, versus 73%, 66% and 72%, 68% using chemotherapy alone. The 5-year and 10-year OS, DFS estimates in treatment with ABVD are 84% and 83%, 75% and 74%; BEACOPP-baseline--83% and 82%, 82% and 81% (p < 0.05). At the same time ABVD chemotherapy develops less toxicity (p < 0.001). The treatment with 6 cycles of ABVD is considered as the most appropriate in primary Hodgkin's lymphoma patients with extranodal lesions. Using more than 6 cycles doesn't seem to improve OS and DFS (the 5-year and 10-year DFS, OS estimates are 79% and 72%, 80% and 77% versus 88% and 87%, 90% and 89% (p < 0.05). Comparison of complications rate during chemotherapy with MOPP (919 cycles), ABVD (1300 cycles), BEACOPP-baseline (584 cycles), BEACOPP-escalated (140 cycles) reveals major hematologic toxicity and infectious complications rate in BEACOPP-escalated program (p < 0.05). PMID:26087601

  15. Prognostic factors and treatment results of pediatric Hodgkin's lymphoma: A single center experience.

    PubMed

    Büyükkapu-Bay, Sema; Çorapçıoğlu, Funda; Aksu, Görkem; Anık, Yonca; Demir, Hakan; Erçin, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the demographic, clinic data, prognostic factors and treatment/follow-up results of children who were diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma and followed in our center of Pediatric Oncology, Kocaeli University Medical Faculty, Kocaeli, Turkey, for 10 years. This retrospective study evaluated 41 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma who were younger than 18 years-old. All patients were treated with risked adapted ABVD (Adriamycin, Bleomycin, Vincristine, Dacarbazine) chemotherapy and also received involved field radiotherapy. Thirty-two patients (78%) were males and 9 (22%) were females, with a mean age of 10.7±4.0 years. The histopathological diagnosis was mixed cellular type in 51.2% of the patients. B symptoms (unexplained fever, unexplained weight loss, drenching night sweats) were present in 53.7% of the patients and 36.6% of the patients were at advanced stage at the time of the diagnosis. The 3-year overall and event-free survival rates were 88% and 5-year overall and event-free survival rates were 88%, 78%. Age, stage, treatment risk groups, presence of B symptoms and hematological parameters had no significant effect on overall and event-free survival in univariate analysis while bulky disease was the only significant factor on overall survival. Our treatment policy was succesful regarding the similar survival rates in the treatment risk groups, however novel treatment strategies adopting the early response with the reduction of adverse effects are planned in the near future. PMID:27186698

  16. Selective loss of B-cell phenotype in lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Tedoldi, S; Mottok, A; Ying, J; Paterson, J C; Cui, Y; Facchetti, F; van Krieken, J H J M; Ponzoni, M; Ozkal, S; Masir, N; Natkunam, Y; Pileri, Sa; Hansmann, M-L; Mason, Dy; Tao, Q; Marafioti, T

    2007-12-01

    The neoplastic Reed-Sternberg cells characteristic of classical Hodgkin's lymphoma (cHL) are of B-cell origin but they almost always show striking loss of a range of B-cell-associated molecules. In contrast, the neoplastic cells found in lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin's lymphoma (LPHL) (L&H cells) are traditionally thought of as possessing the full repertoire of features associated with germinal centre B cells (eg BCL-6 expression, 'ongoing' Ig gene mutation). In the present paper, we report an extensive phenotypic analysis of L&H cells which revealed down-regulation of a number of markers associated with the B-cell lineage (eg CD19, CD37) and with the germinal centre maturation stage (eg PAG, LCK). The promoter methylation status of three of these down-regulated genes (CD10, CD19, and LCK) was further studied in microdissected L&H cells, and this revealed that their promoters were unmethylated. In contrast, these genes showed promoter methylation in cell lines derived from CHL. Further investigation of the mechanisms responsible for the deregulation of these molecules in L&H cells may provide new insights into the genetic abnormalities underlying LPHL. PMID:17935142

  17. Hepatitis B Reactivation with Novel Agents in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma and Prevention Strategies.

    PubMed

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O; Sokol, Lubomir; Dalia, Samir

    2016-06-28

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains an endemic disease in most parts of the world despite available prophylactic vaccines. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is the most common hematological malignancy, and certain patients undergoing therapy are at increased risk of HBV reactivation. Rituximab, a monoclonal antibody, is well studied in HBV reactivation, but newer agents have been implicated as well. Here, we review novel agents suspected in HBV reactivation and effective strategies to prevent HBV reactivation. Fifteen years of literature were reviewed in order to better understand the reactivation rates of hepatitis B in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Anti-CD20 antibodies continue to be the main medications that can lead to HBV reactivation, and HBV reactivation rates have decreased with increased awareness. HBV reactivation is uncommon when using other novel agents. Entecavir and lamivudine remain the agents of choice to prevent HBV reactivation in high risk patients. In conclusion, the immunosuppressive effect of NHL and its therapy provide a pathway for HBV reactivation, especially in patients treated with anti-CD20 antibody. Since many HBV positive patients are often excluded from clinical trials of novel agents in NHL, more aggressive post-market surveillance of new agents, well-designed best practice advisories, and timely case reports are needed to reduce the incidence of HBV reactivation. Lastly, large prospective investigations coupled with well-utilized best practice advisories need to be conducted to understand the impact of more potent novel NHL therapy on HBV reactivation. PMID:27350944

  18. Multiple sclerosis and risk of young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Hajiebrahimi, Mohammadhossein; Burkill, Sarah; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Bahmanyar, Shahram

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is an association between multiple sclerosis (MS) and young-adult-onset Hodgkin lymphoma (YAHL) as this will signal etiologic similarities relevant both to inherited characteristics and environmental exposures in childhood. Methods: Swedish general population registers identified a cohort of 29,617 with an MS diagnosis between 1968 and 2012, matched with a cohort of 296,164 without MS. Cox regression was used to assess the association of MS with subsequent YAHL (defined as onset between ages 15 and 39 years; n = 20), with adjustment, for age/period, sex, county of residence, and level of education. Results: The adjusted hazard ratio (and 95% confidence interval) for the association of MS with YAHL is 3.30 (1.01–10.73), resulting from 4 and 16 events in the MS and non-MS cohorts, respectively. All 4 of the YAHL diagnoses in MS occurred in women, and the association of MS with YAHL has a hazard ratio of 4.04 (1.17–13.94) among women. There was no notable association of MS with older-onset Hodgkin lymphoma. Conclusion: There may be common risks for YAHL and MS, consistent with an etiologic role in MS for early-life exposures, such as to infectious agents. PMID:27144218

  19. Whole-Body Diffusion-weighted Imaging in Hodgkin Lymphoma and Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Toledano-Massiah, Sarah; Luciani, Alain; Itti, Emmanuel; Zerbib, Pierre; Vignaud, Alexandre; Belhadj, Karim; Baranes, Laurence; Haioun, Corinne; Lin, Chieh; Rahmouni, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Whole-body imaging, in particular molecular imaging with fluorine 18 ((18)F)-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), is essential to management of lymphoma. The assessment of disease extent provided by use of whole-body imaging is mandatory for planning appropriate treatment and determining patient prognosis. Assessment of treatment response allows clinicians to tailor the treatment strategy during therapy if necessary and to document complete remission at the end of treatment. Because of rapid technical developments, such as echo-planar sequences, parallel imaging, multichannel phased-array surface coils, respiratory gating, and moving examination tables, whole-body diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging that reflects cell density is now feasible in routine clinical practice. Whole-body DW MR imaging allows anatomic assessment as well as functional and quantitative evaluation of tumor sites by calculation of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). Because of their high cellularity and high nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, lymphomatous lesions have low ADC values and appear hypointense on ADC maps. As a result, whole-body DW MR imaging with ADC mapping has become a promising tool for lymphoma staging and treatment response assessment. The authors review their 4 years of experience with 1.5-T and 3-T whole-body DW MR imaging used with (18)F-FDG PET/computed tomography at baseline, interim, and end of treatment in patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and discuss the spectrum of imaging findings and potential pitfalls, limitations, and challenges associated with whole-body DW MR imaging in these patients. PMID:25815803

  20. Placental involvement by non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a Crohn disease patient on long-term thiopurine therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Crispin, P; Cherian, M; Dahlstrom, J E; Sethna, F F; Kaye, G; Pavli, P; Subramaniam, K

    2016-01-01

    We report the first published case of aggressive diffuse large B-cell (non-Hodgkin) lymphoma in a 35-year-old pregnant woman who had Crohn disease and was taking long-term thiopurine therapy: the patient developed placental insufficiency, and there was intrauterine fetal death. PMID:26813900

  1. Alisertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory B-Cell or T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-15

    Recurrent B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mature T- and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma; Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Follicular Lymphoma; Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma; Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Refractory Mature T-Cell and NK-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

  2. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Systemic Mature T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sonali M.; Burns, Linda J.; van Besien, Koen; LeRademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Fenske, Timothy S.; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Hsu, Jack W.; Schouten, Harry C.; Hale, Gregory A.; Holmberg, Leona A.; Sureda, Anna; Freytes, Cesar O.; Maziarz, Richard Thomas; Inwards, David J.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gross, Thomas G.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Costa, Luciano J.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Laport, Ginna G.; Montoto, Silvia; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To analyze outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Patients and Methods Outcomes of 241 patients (112 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, 102 peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified, 27 angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma) undergoing autologous HCT (autoHCT; n = 115; median age, 43 years) or allogeneic HCT (alloHCT; n = 126; median age, 38 years) were analyzed. Primary outcomes were nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse/progression, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Patient, disease, and HCT-related variables were analyzed in multivariate Cox proportional hazard models to determine association with outcomes. Results AutoHCT recipients were more likely in first complete remission (CR1; 35% v 14%; P = .001) and with chemotherapy-sensitive disease (86% v 60%; P < .001), anaplastic large-cell histology (53% v 40%; P = .04), and two or fewer lines of prior therapy (65% v 44%; P < .001) compared with alloHCT recipients. Three-year PFS and OS of autoHCT recipients beyond CR1 were 42% and 53%, respectively. Among alloHCT recipients who received transplantations beyond CR1, 31% remained progression-free at 3 years, despite being more heavily pretreated and with more refractory disease. NRM was 3.5-fold higher (95% CI, 1.80 to 6.99; P < .001) for alloHCT. In multivariate analysis, chemotherapy sensitivity (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; 95% CI, 1.16 to 2.87) and two or fewer lines of pretransplantation therapy (HR, 5.02; 95% CI, 2.15 to 11.72) were prognostic of survival. Conclusion These data describe the roles of autoHCT and alloHCT in T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and suggest greater effectiveness earlier in the disease course, and limited utility in multiply relapsed disease. Notably, autoHCT at relapse may be a potential option for select patients, particularly those with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma histology. PMID:23897963

  3. Panobinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Post-transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  4. A comparative study of nuclear form factor, area and diameter in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and reactive lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, J; Jones, E L; Curran, R C

    1983-01-01

    The mean nuclear area, maximum nuclear diameter (Dmax) and form factor (FF) have been measured in 30 specimens of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and 10 reactive lymph nodes, using the Reichert-Jung (Kontron) MOP-AMO3 image analyzer. Nuclear area and Dmax were found to be greater in high-grade NHL than in low-grade lymphomas and reactive nodes. In addition, there was close correlation between nuclear area and Dmax, especially for low-grade NHL and reactive specimens. As a means of distinguishing between high- and low-grade lymphomas, however, the FF appears to be of little value. PMID:6338055

  5. Characteristics and Outcomes of Patients With Nodular Lymphocyte-Predominant Hodgkin Lymphoma Versus Those With Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Population-Based Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Naamit K.; Atoria, Coral L.; Elkin, Elena B.; Yahalom, Joachim

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is rare, comprising approximately 5% of all Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) cases. Patients with NLPHL tend to have better prognoses than those with classical HL (CHL). Our goal was to assess differences in survival between NLPHL and CHL patients, controlling for differences in patient and disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: Using data from the population-based Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) cancer registry program, we identified patients diagnosed with pathologically confirmed HL between 1988 and 2010. Results: We identified 1,162 patients with NLPHL and 29,083 patients with CHL. With a median follow-up of 7 years, 5- and 10-year overall survival (OS) rates were 91% and 83% for NLPHL, respectively, and 81% and 74% for CHL, respectively. After adjusting for all available characteristics, NLPHL (vs CHL) was associated with higher OS (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.62, P<.01) and disease-specific survival (DSS; HR: 0.48, P<.01). The male predominance of NLPHL, compared to CHL, as well as the more favorable prognostic features in NLPHL patients are most pronounced in NLPHL patients <20 years old. Among all NLPHL patients, younger patients were less likely to receive radiation, and radiation use has declined by 40% for all patients from 1988 to 2010. Receipt of radiation was associated with better OS (HR: 0.64, P=.03) and DSS (HR: 0.45, P=.01) in NLPHL patients after controlling for available baseline characteristics. Other factors associated with OS and DSS in NLPHL patients are younger age and early stage. Conclusions: Our results in a large population dataset demonstrated that NLPHL patients have improved prognosis compared to CHL patients, even after accounting for stage and baseline characteristics. Use of radiation is declining among NLPHL patients despite an association in this series between radiation and better DSS and OS. Unique treatment strategies for NLPHL are warranted in both

  6. Large-scale microarray profiling reveals four stages of immune escape in non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Tosolini, Marie; Algans, Christelle; Pont, Frédéric; Ycart, Bernard; Fournié, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma (B-NHL) are aggressive lymphoid malignancies that develop in patients due to oncogenic activation, chemo-resistance, and immune evasion. Tumor biopsies show that B-NHL frequently uses several immune escape strategies, which has hindered the development of checkpoint blockade immunotherapies in these diseases. To gain a better understanding of B-NHL immune editing, we hypothesized that the transcriptional hallmarks of immune escape associated with these diseases could be identified from the meta-analysis of large series of microarrays from B-NHL biopsies. Thus, 1446 transcriptome microarrays from seven types of B-NHL were downloaded and assembled from 33 public Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) datasets, and a method for scoring the transcriptional hallmarks in single samples was developed. This approach was validated by matching scores to phenotypic hallmarks of B-NHL such as proliferation, signaling, metabolic activity, and leucocyte infiltration. Through this method, we observed a significant enrichment of 33 immune escape genes in most diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and follicular lymphoma (FL) samples, with fewer in mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) samples. Comparing these gene expression patterns with overall survival data evidenced four stages of cancer immune editing in B-NHL: non-immunogenic tumors (stage 1), immunogenic tumors without immune escape (stage 2), immunogenic tumors with immune escape (stage 3), and fully immuno-edited tumors (stage 4). This model complements the standard international prognostic indices for B-NHL and proposes that immune escape stages 3 and 4 (76% of the FL and DLBCL samples in this data set) identify patients relevant for checkpoint blockade immunotherapies. PMID:27622044

  7. Treatment of primary CNS lymphoma (PCNSL) following successful treatment of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL): a case series.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Marc C

    2013-05-01

    Management of PCNSL occurring after successful treatment of systemic non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is poorly defined. Illustrate a treatment approach for PCNSL following prior treatment of a systemic NHL. A retrospective case series of 6 patients (mean age 60 years; range 46-65) diagnosed with a diffuse large B cell lymphoma of the CNS following prior successful treatment of a systemic NHL (low-grade in 2; high-grade in 4). Mean interval to diagnosis of PCNSL after diagnosis of systemic NHL was 12 months (range 7-18). In 4/6 patients in whom genetic analysis could be performed, the PCNSL and NHL differed. Treatment utilized high-dose methotrexate and rituximab (immunochemotherapy) followed in patients with a radiographic complete response by autologous peripheral stem cell transplant (ASCT) with total body irradiation (TBI) and multi-agent conditioning chemotherapy (BEAM: carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan). 5/6 patients had a radiographic complete response to immunochemotherapy and were treated with ASCT. 4/5 patients were free of disease following ASCT with a mean follow-up of 3 years (range 0.5-4 years). There were no toxic deaths and all patients transplanted successfully engrafted within 28 days (mean 18). Using a treatment paradigm similar to that utilized for recurrent systemic NHL (induction chemotherapy followed by ASCT) for PCNSL occurring metachronously after successful treatment of systemic NHL appears safe and effective. PMID:23456654

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Peripheral Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Contiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage I Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage I Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage I Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2

  9. Ixabepilone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-07

    Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma

  10. Combination Chemotherapy, Rituximab, and Ixazomib Citrate in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-19

    Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; B-Cell Lymphoma, Unclassifiable, With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt Lymphoma; Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma; MYC Gene Mutation; Plasmablastic Lymphoma

  11. Canine Lymphoma as a Comparative Model for Human Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: Recent Progress and Applications

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Daisuke; Frantz, Aric M.; Modiano, Jaime F.

    2016-01-01

    The term “lymphoma” describes a heterogeneous group of disorders involving monoclonal proliferation of malignant lymphocytes. As a group, lymphomas are among the most common tumors of dogs. Yet our enumeration and understanding of the many subtypes of lymphoma have been relatively slow, perhaps in part because for many years lymphoma was treated as a singular entity rather than a group of distinct diseases. The recognition that the full spectrum of lymphoid malignancies seen in humans also occurs in dogs, and that these tumors retain not only morphologic similarities and biological behavior but also synonymous driver molecular abnormalities, sets an ideal stage for dual-purpose research that can accelerate progress for these diseases in both species. Specifically, dogs represent exceptional models for defining causality, understanding progression, and developing new treatments for lymphoma in comparatively brief windows of time. Unique advantages of canine models include (1) spontaneous disease occurring without an isogenic background or genetic engineering; (2) chronology of disease adapted to lifespan, (3) shared environment and societal status that allows dogs to be treated as “patients,” while at the same time being able to ethically explore translational innovations that are not possible in human subjects; and (4) organization of dogs into breeds with relatively homogeneous genetic backgrounds and distinct predisposition for lymphomas. Here, we will review recent studies describing intrinsic and extrinsic factors that contribute to the pathogenesis of canine and human lymphomas, as well as newly developed tools that will enhance the fidelity of these models to improve diagnosis and develop new treatments. PMID:24642290

  12. Ongoing trials with yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Micallef, Ivana N M

    2004-10-01

    Targeted radiation therapy or radioimmunotherapy has been an important recent advance in the treatment of patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Yttrium 90-labeled ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) comprises the murine monoclonal antibody ibritumomab, the linker chelator tiuxetan, and the radiolabeled isotope yttrium 90. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of B-cell NHL. Initial phase I/II trials established the therapeutic dose of ibritumomab tiuxetan for low-grade NHL to be 0.4 mCi/kg, or 0.3 mCi/kg for patients with mild thrombocytopenia. Currently, there are many ongoing trials of ibritumomab tiuxetan with different dose schedules and dose intensities in combination with chemotherapy and autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation in an attempt to improve response rate and duration and to study its effectiveness in other B-cell lymphomas including mantle cell lymphoma, and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This article reviews the ongoing trials with 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan. Radioimmunotherapy has great promise, and the safe incorporation of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan into treatment will hopefully result in improved survival for patients with NHL. PMID:15498147

  13. Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of Multiple Skeletal Muscles Involvement Seen on FDG PET/CT Scans

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yue; Sowjanya, Medapati; You, Jia; Xu, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As normal healthy skeletal muscle does not contain lymphoid tissue, extra nodal lymphoma involving multiple muscles is rare, as well. This study reports a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) of multiple skeletal muscles involvement and a review of differential diagnosis of it. A 37-year-old female presented to our hospital after being diagnosed with NHL for 7 months. She had received six courses of cyclophosphamide hydroxydaunorubicin oncovin prednisolone etoposide (CHOPE) chemotherapy. Then she felt pain and noticed swelling on her left calf. The fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) image showed abnormal focal FDG uptake in hypo-pharynx, which was the primary NHL and also in multiple groups of muscles in whole body. As the patient has history NHL, lymphoma of multiple muscle involvement was suspected. Finally, an ultrasound-guided tissue biopsy was performed on the left calf and histological examination yielded lymphomatous cells infiltration in the left gastrocnemius. Through this report, we emphasize that a multidisciplinary team approach with clinician, radiologist, and pathologist is essential for proper diagnosis, staging, and management of such rare lesions. PMID:25950693

  14. Idelalisib for the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a review of its clinical potential

    PubMed Central

    Barrientos, Jacqueline C

    2016-01-01

    Idelalisib is a first-in-class, oral, selective phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ inhibitor that offers a chemotherapy-free option for patients with relapsed or refractory (R/R) indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (iNHL). Clinical trials in iNHL have evaluated idelalisib as monotherapy and as combination therapy with rituximab, bendamustine, and rituximab + bendamustine. When administered to heavily pretreated patients with R/R iNHL, idelalisib monotherapy or combination therapy showed durable antitumor activity accompanied by sustained or improved quality-of-life outcomes. Idelalisib has an acceptable safety profile; however, serious or fatal diarrhea/colitis, hepatoxicity, pneumonitis, and intestinal perforation have occurred in treated patients. Selective inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase δ with idelalisib is a valuable addition to available treatment options for patients with iNHL, many of whom do not respond to or cannot tolerate chemoimmunotherapy. Two Phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of idelalisib as combination therapy with rituximab or bendamustine + rituximab and a Phase I trial of idelalisib in combination with the Bruton’s tyrosine kinase inhibitor ONO/GS-4059 in R/R B-cell malignancies are currently ongoing. A Phase III monotherapy trial in previously treated follicular lymphoma or small lymphocytic lymphoma is planned. The development of other kinase inhibitors for the treatment of iNHL raises the potential for new treatment combinations. Additional research is needed to determine optimal therapy (monotherapy vs combination regimens), treatment sequencing, and long-term management. PMID:27274288

  15. Correlations Between Apoptotic and Proliferative Indices in Malignant Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Leoncini, Lorenzo; Del Vecchio, Maria Teresa; Megha, Tiziana; Barbini, Paolo; Galieni, Piero; Pileri, Stefano; Sabattini, Elena; Gherlinzoni, Filippo; Tosi, Piero; Kraft, Rainer; Cottier, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Cell Production versus cell loss rates were estimated, across the boundaries of histological classification, in 50 cases of malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphomas by use of mitotic indices, percentage of Ki-67+ cells and percentage of PC10+ cells as proliferative indices, and the relative number of apoptotic bodies (apoptotic indices, AIs) as parameters. Regression analysis revealed significant (P < 0.01) positive correlations between the AIs and the proliferative indices; among the immunohistochemically assessed proliferative indices; and between these, the mitotic indices and the AIs on the one band and histological malignancy grades on the other band. The Cellular protein BCL-2, which counteracts apoptosis, was significantly (p < 0.01) more often expressed in lymphomas with low than in those with high AIs. Multivariate analysis of data showed that of all parameters tested in this series, only the AIs correlated significantly (P < 0.05) with overall lethality. The correlation between BCL-2 positivity of lymphoma cells and overall survival did not quite attain significance (P = 0.08). Results of the present study suggest that high AIs and lack of BCL-2 expression may be adverse prognostic factors, independent of histological grade. ImagesFigure 1 PMID:7681257

  16. [Exposure to animals and non-Hodgkin lymphomas: pilot analysis about 261 cases].

    PubMed

    Jeanne, Aurélie; Aras, Myriam; Eisinger, François; Bellagamba, Gauthier; Garciaz, Sylvain; Lehucher-Michel, Marie-Pascale; Bouabdallah, Réda

    2014-03-01

    This study investigated a possible link between the occupational or domestic exposure to animals and a histological subgroup of non-Hodgkin lymphomas (LNH) (diffuse large B-cell lymphomas [LDGCB], follicular lymphomas [LF], indolent non-follicular LNH [LNHINF] and T-cell LNH). This retrospective, descriptive study was carried out over one year in a regional cancer research center. Data on occupational and domestic exposures to animals, from patients treated for a LNH, was collected via a questionnaire. Among the 261 participants, 73.9% reported they had been exposed to animals, 5% were exposed at work, whereas 72.4% were exposed in a domestic setting. The occupational exposure tended to be more frequent in the subgroup of patients with a LF (P = 0.06). The domestic exposure was less frequent (P = 0.04) in patients with LDGCB (63.0%) than in patients with a small cell LNH B (LF and LNHINF) (76.0%). Although there was no obvious link between occupational or domestic exposure to animals and one of the four histological subgroups of LNH, domestic exposure seemed less common among LDGCB patients. These results need to be confirmed by further studies. PMID:24691187

  17. Atrazine and Nitrate in Public Drinking Water Supplies and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma in Nebraska, USA

    PubMed Central

    Rhoades, Martha G.; Meza, Jane L.; Beseler, Cheryl L.; Shea, Patrick J.; Kahle, Andy; Vose, Julie M.; Eskridge, Kent M.; Spalding, Roy F.

    2013-01-01

    A secondary analysis of 1999–2002 Nebraska case-control data was conducted to assess the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) associated with exposure to nitrate- and atrazine-contaminated drinking water. Water chemistry data were collected and weighted by well contribution and proximity of residence to water supply, followed by logistic regression to determine odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). We found no association between NHL risk and exposure to drinking water containing atrazine or nitrate alone. Risk associated with the interaction of nitrate and atrazine in drinking water was elevated (OR, 2.5; CI, 1.0–6.2). Risk of indolent B-cell lymphoma was higher than risk of aggressive B-cell lymphoma (indolent: OR, 3.5; CI, 1.0–11.6 vs. aggressive: OR, 1.9; CI, 0.6–5.58). This increased risk may be due to in vivo formation and subsequent metabolism of N-nitrosoatrazine. A larger study is warranted to confirm our findings. PMID:23515852

  18. Primary extranodal head and neck classical Hodgkin lymphoma: A rare clinical case report

    PubMed Central

    Men, Yongzhi; Sun, Xuemei; Wei, Daolin; Yu, Ziwei

    2016-01-01

    The subcutaneous soft tissue of the forehead is a rare anatomic site for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), and no such case has previously been reported in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. HLs commonly present in the nodal regions in the majority of patients, rarely occurring in extranodal sites, whereas primary extranodal lymphoma is less common and is more typical in cases of non-HL. The present study reports a novel case of extranodal head and neck classical HL (cHL), initially diagnosed as frontal fibroma. The present study describes an unusual case of subcutaneous soft tissue involvement of HL, aiming to enhance current levels of awareness for patients with extranodal symptoms. A 25-year-old male, who inadvertently detected a hard painless mass above the right superciliary arch 2 months prior to admission in April 2013 was eventually diagnosed with mixed cellularity cHL. Subsequent to six cycles of doxorubicin (Adriamycin), bleomycin, vindesine and dacarbazine chemotherapy, followed by four cycles of ifosfamide, gemcitabine, vinorelbine and prednisone chemotherapy, a satisfactory curative effect was obtained. In conclusion, it is proposed that lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a mass involving the subcutaneous soft tissue. PMID:27446312

  19. Polymorphisms in DNA Repair Pathway Genes, Body Mass Index, and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yingtai; Zheng, Tongzhang; Lan, Qing; Kim, Christopher; Qin, Qin; Foss, Francine; Chen, Xuezhong; Holford, Theodore; Leaderer, Brian; Boyle, Peter; Wang, Chengfeng; Dai, Min; Liu, Zhenjiang; Ma, Shuangge; Chanock, Stephen J.; Rothman, Nathaniel; Zhang, Yawei

    2013-01-01

    We conducted a population-based case-control study in Connecticut women to test the hypothesis that genetic variations in DNA repair pathway genes may modify the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Compared to those with BMI < 25, women with BMI ≥ 25 had significantly increased risk of NHL among women who carried BRCA1 (rs799917) CT/TT, ERCC2 (rs13181) AA, XRCC1 (rs1799782) CC, and WRN (rs1801195) GG genotypes, but no increase in NHL risk among women who carried BRCA1 CC, ERCC2 AC/CC, XRCC1 CT/TT, and WRN GT/TT genotypes. A significant interaction with BMI was only observed for WRN (rs1801195, P=0.004) for T-cell lymphoma and ERCC2 (rs13181, P=0.002) for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The results suggest that common genetic variation in DNA repair pathway genes may modify the association between BMI and NHL risk. PMID:23619945

  20. Variant Guillain-Barré Syndrome in a Patient with Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bishay, R. H.; Paton, J.; Abraham, V.

    2015-01-01

    We report a 72-year-old female patient with diffuse large B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with previous treatment with standard chemotherapy presenting as an acute, ascending, sensorimotor polyneuropathy. Nerve conduction studies and lumbar puncture supported a rare, but ominous, axonal variant of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) known as acute motor and sensory axonal neuropathy (AMSAN), which is distinguished from the more common, acute demyelinating forms of GBS. Previous reports have largely focused on toxicities secondary to chemo- or radiotherapy as a major contributor to the development of acute neuropathies in malignancy. Clinicians should also be mindful of direct neoplastic invasion or, less commonly, paraneoplastic phenomenon, as alternative mechanisms, the latter possibly reflecting immune dysregulation in particularly aggressive lymphomas. At the time of writing, this is the first report in the literature of an axonal variant of GBS in a patient with diffuse large B cell NHL. A discussion regarding common and uncommon neuropathies in haematological malignancies is made, with a brief review of the anecdotal evidence supporting a paraneoplastic association with GBS or its variant forms in the setting of lymphoma. PMID:26347834

  1. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Dabaja, Bouthaina S.; Filippi, Andrea R.; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A.; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  2. Rituxan/Bendamustine/PCI-32765 in Relapsed DLBCL, MCL, or Indolent Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Waldenstrom Macroglobulinemia

  3. Advanced Stage T-Cell Non-Hodgkin lymphoma in an 11-Month-Old Infant and Related Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: Importance of Transthoracic Echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Osman; Karabag, Kezban; Keskin Yildirim, Zuhal; Calik, Muhammet; Kilic, Omer

    2014-01-01

    Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is rare in infants. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma is the most common cause of SVCS in children. Swelling in the face and neck are the most common clinical symptoms associated with this syndrome. However, these clinical findings are also observed in allergic diseases, which therefore often leads to misdiagnosis. Here, we reported the importance of echocardiography in diagnosing SVCS in an infant with advanced stage non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:24639614

  4. B cell lymphoma, unclassifiable, with features intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma and classical hodgkin lymphoma: diagnosis by fine-needle aspiration cytology.

    PubMed

    Lynnhtun, Kyaw; Varikatt, Winny; Pathmanathan, Nirmala

    2014-08-01

    A 58-year-old lady presented with mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A thoracoscopic ultrasound-guided fine-needle aspiration showed large atypical epithelioid cells arranged in cohesive sheets and dispersed as single cells with intact cytoplasm amid a background of lymphocytes and histiocytes. A cytological diagnosis of "a malignant neoplasm" was made, raising a broad list of differential diagnoses. A broad panel of immunocytochemical stains performed on the cell block was indicative of a lymphoproliferative disorder, but the immunophenotype was intermediate between diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) and classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Diffuse and strong reactivity to CD20, CD79a, and PAX-5, and weak reactivity to CD30, was in favor of a DLBCL, or more precisely mediastinal (thymic) large B cell lymphoma (MLBL). However, there were negative staining for LCA, OCT-2, and BOB-1 as well as positive staining for EBV-encoded RNA, which were against a diagnosis of MLBL and raised the possibility of cHL. The absence of RS cells and the typical mileu, the negativity for CD15 and the strong positivity of CD20 and PAX-5 were against a diagnosis of cHL. On this basis, the diagnosis of "B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder with features intermediate between DLBCL and cHL" was rendered. The diagnosis was subsequently confirmed on excisional biopsy. This case report demonstrates broad differential diagnoses raised by this diagnostic entity and the importance of an adequate cell block for accurate designation. PMID:23630122

  5. Low-Dose Total Body Irradiation and Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Lymphocyte Infusion in Treating Patients With Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Multiple Myeloma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-30

    Adult Nasal Type Extranodal NK/T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Cutaneous B-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Hepatosplenic T-cell Lymphoma; Intraocular Lymphoma; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncutaneous Extranodal Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Grade III Lymphomatoid Granulomatosis; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia; Refractory Multiple Myeloma; Small Intestine Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage II Multiple Myeloma; Stage III Multiple Myeloma; Testicular Lymphoma; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Obesity: a pooled analysis from the InterLymph consortium

    PubMed Central

    Willett, Eleanor V.; Morton, Lindsay M.; Hartge, Patricia; Becker, Nikolaus; Bernstein, Leslie; Boffetta, Paolo; Bracci, Paige; Cerhan, James; Chiu, Brian C.-H.; Cocco, Pierluigi; Maso, Luigino Dal; Davis, Scott; De Sanjose, Silvia; Smedby, Karin Ekstrom; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Foretova, Lenka; Holly, Elizabeth A.; La Vecchia, Carlo; Matsuo, Keitaro; Maynadie, Marc; Melbye, Mads; Negri, Eva; Nieters, Alexandra; Severson, Richard; Slager, Susan L.; Spinelli, John J.; Staines, Anthony; Talamini, Renato; Vornanen, Martine; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Roman, Eve

    2014-01-01

    Nutritional status is known to alter immune function, a suspected risk factor for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). To investigate whether long-term over, or under, nutrition is associated with NHL self-reported anthropometric data on weight and height from over 10000 cases of NHL and 16000 controls were pooled across 18 case-control studies identified through the International Lymphoma Epidemiology Consortium. Study-specific odds ratios (OR) were estimated using logistic regression and combined using a random-effects model. Severe obesity, defined as BMI of 40 kg m−2 or more, was not associated with NHL overall (pooled OR=1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70–1.41) or the majority of NHL subtypes. An excess was however observed for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (pooled OR=1.80, 95% CI 1.24–2.62), although not all study-specific ORs were raised. Among the overweight (BMI 25–29.9 kg m−2) and obese (BMI 30–39.9 kg m−2), associations were elevated in some studies and decreased in others, while no association was observed among the underweight (BMI<18.5 kg m−2). There was little suggestion of increasing ORs for NHL or its subtypes with every 5 kg m−2 rise in BMI above 18.5 kg m−2. BMI components height and weight were also examined, and the tallest men, but not women, were at marginally increased risk (pooled OR=1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.34). In summary, whilst we conclude that there is no evidence to support the hypothesis that obesity is a determinant of all types of NHL combined, the association between severe obesity and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma may warrant further investigation. PMID:18167059

  7. Atopic disease and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma: an InterLymph pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Vajdic, Claire M.; Falster, Michael O.; Sanjose, Silvia de; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Becker, Nikolaus; Bracci, Paige M.; Melbye, Mads; Smedby, Karin Ekström; Engels, Eric A.; Turner, Jennifer; Vineis, Paolo; Costantini, Adele Seniori; Holly, Elizabeth A.; Kane, Eleanor; Spinelli, John J.; Vecchia, Carlo La; Zheng, Tongzhang; Chiu, Brian C.-H.; Maso, Luigino Dal; Cocco, Pierluigi; Maynadié, Marc; Foretova, Lenka; Staines, Anthony; Brennan, Paul; Davis, Scott; Severson, Richard; Cerhan, James R.; Breen, Elizabeth C.; Birmann, Brenda; Cozen, Wendy; Grulich, Andrew E.

    2009-01-01

    We performed a pooled analysis of data on atopic disease and risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) from 13 case-control studies, including13,535 NHL cases and 16,388 controls. Self-reported atopic diseases diagnosed two or more years before NHL diagnosis (cases) or interview (controls) were analyzed. Pooled odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals were computed in two-stage random-effects or joint fixed-effects models, adjusted for age, sex, and study center. When modeled individually, lifetime history of asthma, hay fever, a specific allergy (excluding hay fever, asthma and eczema), and food allergy were associated with a significant reduction in NHL risk, and there was no association for eczema. When each atopic condition was included in the same model, reduced NHL risk was only associated with history of allergy (OR 0.80, 95% CI 0.68–0.94), and reduced B-cell NHL risk was associated with history of hay fever (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.77–0.95) and allergy (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.76–0.93). Significant reductions in B-cell NHL risk were also observed in individuals who were likely to be truly or highly atopic - those with hay fever, allergy or asthma and at least one other atopic condition over their lifetime. The inverse associations were consistent for the diffuse large B-cell and follicular subtypes. Eczema was positively associated with lymphomas of the skin; misdiagnosis of lymphoma as eczema is likely, but progression of eczema to cutaneous lymphoma cannot be excluded. This pooled study demonstrates evidence of a modest but consistent reduction in the risk of B-cell NHL associated with atopy. PMID:19654312

  8. Radioimmunodetection of non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma with radiolabelled LL2 monoclonal antibody. Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect

    Gasparini, M.; Buraggi, G.L.; Tondini, C.

    1994-05-01

    Radioimmunodetection (RAID) with 99m technetium labelled B cell lymphoma monoclonal antibody (MAb) (IMMU-LL2 Fab`, Immunomedics, Inc., Morris Plains, N.J.) was investigated in 8 patients (5 female and 3 male; age range 20-72 years) with histologically proven non-Hodgkin`s lymphoma (NHL). Of the 8 lymphomas, 5 were intermediate grade and 3 low grade. Whole body images with multiple planar views were obtained at 30 min, 4-6 and 24 hours after the I.V. injection of 1 mg LL2-Fab` labelled with 20-25 mCi (740-925 MBq) {sup 99}Tc. SPECT of chest or abdomen was performed at 5-8 hours after injection in all patients. No adverse reactions were observed in any patient after MAb infusion and no appreciable changes were seen in the blood counts, renal and liver function tests. A total of 17 of 18 (94.4%) lymphoma lesions were detected by RAID. All the tumor localizations were confirmed by clinical examination and with other imaging techniques, such as CT scan, MRI or gallium scan. In this series of patients no false positive results were noted and only 1 false negative resulted in a patient who had a mediastinal bulky disease. As regard the biodistribution of the immunoreagent we can make the following conclusions: (1) no appreciable bone marrow activity was seen, (2) splenic targeting was demonstrated in all patients, (3) tumor-to-non tumor ratios ranged from 1.2 to 2.8 as measured by ROI technique, (4) no difference of uptake was noted for different tumor grades. The images performed 24 hours after injection did not detect new lesions, but areas of doubtful uptake were seen as positive focal areas in the delayed scan. In these preliminary results the LL2-Fab` MAb seems to be useful for detection, staging and follow up of NHL patients.

  9. Residential exposure to traffic noise and risk for non-hodgkin lymphoma among adults.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Mette; Harbo Poulsen, Aslak; Ketzel, Matthias; Oksbjerg Dalton, Susanne; Friis, Søren; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole

    2015-10-01

    Exposure to traffic noise may result in stress and sleep disturbances, which have been associated with impairment of the immune system. People with weakened immune systems are known to have a higher risk for non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We aimed to determine whether traffic noise was associated with risk for NHL in a nationwide case-control study. We identified 2753 cases aged 30-84 years with a primary diagnosis of NHL in Denmark between 1992 and 2010. For each case we selected two random population controls, matched on sex and year of birth. Road traffic and railway noise were calculated, and airport noise was estimated for all present and historical residential addresses of cases and controls from 1987 to 2010. Associations between traffic noise and risk for NHL were estimated using conditional logistic regression, adjusted for disposable income, education, cohabiting status and comorbidity. We found that a 5-year time-weighted mean of road traffic noise above 65 dB was associated with an 18% higher risk for NHL (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.37) when compared to road traffic noise below 55 dB, whereas for exposure between 55 and 65 dB no association was found (odds ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.88-1.08). In analyzes of NHL subtypes, we found no association between road traffic noise and risk for T-cell lymphoma, whereas increased risks for B-cell lymphoma and unspecified lymphomas were observed at exposures above 65 dB. In conclusion, our nationwide study may indicate that high exposure to traffic noise is associated with higher NHL risk. PMID:26113038

  10. Palliation by Low-Dose Local Radiation Therapy for Indolent Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Elisa K.; Fung, Sharon; Gospodarowicz, Mary; Hodgson, David; Wells, Woodrow; Sun, Alexander; Pintile, Melania; Tsang, Richard W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy (total dose, 4 Gy) palliative radiation therapy (RT) regimen for treating patients with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in terms of response rate, response duration, and symptom relief. Methods and Materials: A retrospective chart review was conducted. Between 2003 and 2007, 54 patients with NHL were treated to 85 anatomical sites with a 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy palliative regimen. Local response was assessed by clinical and/or radiographic data. Symptoms before and after treatment for each site treated were obtained from clinical notes in patient medical records. Median follow-up time was 1.3 years. Results: For the 54 patients, the median age at time of treatment was 71.1 years old, and 57% of them were male. Of the 85 disease sites treated, 56% of sites had indolent histology, 28% of sites were diagnosed with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), 13% of sites had aggressive histology, and 2% of sites were shown to have other histology. Overall response rate (ORR) was 81% (49% complete response [CR], 32% partial response [PR]). The 2-year rate for freedom from local progression was 50% (95% CI, 37%-61%). The ORR for follicular lymphoma, Mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT), and marginal zone lymphoma (MZL) histology was 88%, compared with a 59% rate for CLL histology (p = 0.005). While the ORR was similar for tumors of different sizes, the CR rate for patients with tumors <5 cm tended to be higher than those with tumors >10 cm (CR rate of 57% vs. 27%, respectively; p = 0.06). For the 48 sites with clearly documented symptoms at pretreatment, 92% of sites improved after low-dose RT. Conclusions: Short-course low-dose palliative radiotherapy (2 Multiplication-Sign 2 Gy) is an effective treatment that results in high response rates for indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma. This treatment regimen provides effective symptomatic relief for tumor bulk of all sizes.

  11. Update on Salvage Options in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma after Autotransplant

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Lalit; Iqbal, Naveed

    2014-01-01

    Despite a high clinical success, relapse in Hodgkin lymphoma occurs in 10–30% of cases and 5–10% patients are nonresponsive to initial chemotherapy. The standard management of these patients includes high-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous stem cell transplant. However, 50% of patients ultimately relapse after autotransplant which poses a big challenge. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation offers the only chance of cure in these patients. For patients who are not candidates for allogeneic stem cell transplantation, achieving cure with other possible options is highly unlikely, and thus the treatment plan becomes noncurative. Various novel agents have shown promising results but the duration of response is short lived. A standard approach to deliver the most effective treatment for these patients is still lacking. This review focuses on the treatment options currently available for relapsed and refractory disease after autotransplant. PMID:25006506

  12. Immunotherapy of hematological cancers: PD-1 blockade for the treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    The blockade of immunological checkpoints has been successfully employed for the treatment of various solid neoplasms including melanoma, mesothelioma, non-small cell lung carcinoma, and renal cell carcinoma. A recent study indicates that the vast majority of patients with advanced, heavily pretreated Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) also respond to a monoclonal antibody targeting programmed cell death 1 (PDCD1, best known as PD-1). Thus, checkpoint blockers may soon become part of our therapeutic armamentarium against hematological tumors. This would be particularly important as it would spare (at least some) patients the deleterious toxic effects of combinatorial chemotherapies and bone marrow transplantation. We anticipate that the realm of immunotherapy will eventually conquer vast portions of the territory that now belongs to hematological malignancies. PMID:26155425

  13. Current approaches in the management of low risk Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Giulino-Roth, Lisa; Keller, Frank G; Hodgson, David C; Kelly, Kara M

    2015-06-01

    The outcome for children and adolescents with low risk Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is excellent, with event-free survival >85% and overall survival >95%. Historically, however, treatment has come at the cost of significant long-term toxicity from chemotherapy, radiation or a combination of these. Recent treatment strategies have focused on maintaining high event-free and overall survival while minimizing the use of therapy associated with late effects. The strategies used to achieve this vary greatly among paediatric cooperative groups and there is no one standard treatment for children with low risk HL. This review summaries recent clinical trials in paediatric low risk HL and addresses some of the important considerations when comparing trials, including differences in the definition of low risk HL, differences in outcome among histological subtypes and varying approaches to reduce or eliminate radiation therapy. Recommendations are provided for the treatment of children with low risk HL outside the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:25824371

  14. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  15. New Strategies in Hodgkin Lymphoma: Better Risk Profiling and Novel Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Catherine; Steidl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) research are expected to prelude a promising new treatment era for patients and their treating physicians. Scientific investigations over the last few years have provided new insights into risk stratification, and simultaneously, a plethora of novel targeted therapies are emerging for patients with relapsed and refractory disease. These novel therapies will be tested primarily in high risk patients, since 75% of patients are cured with conventional therapies. The challenges, as HL therapy moves forward, will be using these biologic insights to identify the patients who may benefit earlier in treatment from these novel agents, and tailoring the therapy to the patient’s tumor biology. These dual aims are intertwined; as our therapeutic arsenal increases, these biologic determinants of risk may themselves inform the design of therapies and the choice of treatments for high risk patients. PMID:23447000

  16. The prognostic value of interim positron emission tomography scan in patients with classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Oki, Yasuhiro; Chuang, Hubert; Chasen, Beth; Jessop, Aaron; Pan, Tinsu; Fanale, Michelle; Dabaja, Bouthaina; Fowler, Nathan; Romaguera, Jorge; Fayad, Luis; Hagemeister, Fredrick; Rodriguez, Maria Alma; Neelapu, Sattva; Samaniego, Felipe; Kwak, Larry; Younes, Anas

    2014-04-01

    The prognostic value of interim positron emission tomography (PET) was evaluated after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastin and dacarbazine in classical Hodgkin lymphoma patients (n = 229), based on Deauville criteria. In early stage non-bulky disease, bulky stage II disease, advanced stage low International Prognostic Score (IPS ≤2) and advanced stage (IPS ≥3), 3-year progression-free survival rates in PET2-negative vs. PET2-positive groups were 95·9% vs. 76·9% (P < 0·0018), 83·3% vs. 20·0% (P = 0·017), 77·0% vs. 30·0% (P < 0·001) and 71·0% vs. 44·4%(P = 0·155), respectively. The outcome after positive PET2 was better than previously reported. The results from non-randomized studies of PET2-guided therapy would be valuable with careful interpretation. PMID:24386943

  17. Effect of Bleomycin Hydrolase Gene Polymorphism on Late Pulmonary Complications of Treatment for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Miltényi, Zsófia; Póliska, Szilárd; Bálint, Bálint László; Illés, Árpád

    2016-01-01

    Background Bleomycin hydrolase (BLMH), an enzyme that inactivates bleomycin, may be a potential candidate that could influence pulmonary function in ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastin, dacarbasine)–treated Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) patients. Patients and Methods We hypothesized that the BLMH gene SNP A1450G (rs1050565) influences BLMH activity and late pulmonary toxicity. St. George Respiratory Questionnaire, lung scintigraphy and spirometry were used to determine lung function. TaqMan genotyping assay was used to determine genotype distribution of 131 previously treated HL patients. Results Significantly more favorable results were seen in the wild-type A/A genotype group than those in the group containing the mutated allele: A/G+G/G in retrospective pulmonary tests of ABVD treated patients. Conclusion Besides limitations of the current study, bleomycin pharmacokinetics should be further evaluated in patients with BLMH variations, hence identify those cases even in the frontline setting, where bleomycin should be omitted and replaced with targeted therapy. PMID:27327270

  18. [Acute vincristine neurotoxicity in a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patient with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease].

    PubMed

    Uno, S; Katayama, K; Dobashi, N; Hirano, A; Ogihara, A; Yamazaki, H; Usui, N; Kobayashi, T; Inoue, K; Kuraishi, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 44-year-old, previously healthy man with a diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL, diffuse large B-cell type, stage IIA) was treated with combination chemotherapy including vincristine (VCR). After receiving a cumulative dose of VCR, he experienced rapid and marked weakening which progressed to quadriplegia and bulbar palsy. Prior to this therapy, the patient had no neurological problems, and his siblings were asymptomatic. Physical examination identified pes cavus (hollow foot), and electrodiagnostic studies showed markedly slower nerve conduction velocity of myelinated fibers, with abundant "onion bulb" formations. Chromosomal analysis detected 17p11.2-12 duplication, thus yielding a diagnosis of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) 1A. CMT disease is a familial neuromuscular disorder, and the incidence is approximately 1 in 2,500. We concluded that if CMT disease is diagnosed, vincristine should be avoided due to the potential severity of neurotoxicity to small doses. PMID:10390891

  19. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  20. Retroperitoneal fibrosis due to B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma: Responding to rituximab!

    PubMed

    Alvarez Argote, Juliana; Bauer, Frank A; Posteraro, Anthony F; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2016-02-01

    Retroperitoneal fibrosis is a rare disease manifesting as chronic soft tissue fibrosis in the retroperitoneum, with potential anatomic and/or functional compromise of adjacent organs. It can be primary (idiopathic) or secondary to other conditions such as cancers, autoimmune disorders, or drugs. We report herein a 66-year-old patient with symptomatic retroperitoneal fibrosis leading to bilateral hydronephrosis and renal failure, in whom, after a complex diagnostic work-up and protracted clinical course, a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the retroperitoneal space and several vertebral bodies was identified. The patient was treated with radiation therapy and weekly rituximab infusions, with resolution of hydronephrosis and lower back pain. We include a thorough literature review on etiopathogenesis, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of retroperitoneal fibrosis. A meticulous search for malignancy is necessary in this rare condition that, if positive, may have significant therapeutic and prognostic implications. PMID:25013186

  1. The Role of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Relapsed/Refractory Hodgkin's Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Klyuchnikov, Evgeny; Bacher, Ulrike; Kröger, Nicolaus; Kazantsev, Ilya; Zabelina, Tatjana; Ayuk, Francis; Zander, Axel Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Despite the favorable prognosis of most patients with Hodgkin's Lymphoma (HL), 15–20% of patients remain refractory to chemoradiotherapy, and 20–40% experience relapses following autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) being used as salvage approach in this situation. Long-term survival of only 20% was reported for patients who failed this option. As some authors suggested the presence of a graft versus HL effect, allogeneic SCT was introduced as a further option. Myeloablative strategies were reported to be able to achieve cure in some younger patients, but high nonrelapse mortality remains a problem. Reduced intensity conditioning, in turn, was found to be associated with high posttransplant relapse rates. As there is currently no standard in the management of HL patients who failed autologous SCT, we here review the literature on allogeneic stem cell transplantation in HL patients with a special focus on the outcomes and risk factors being reported in the largest studies. PMID:20981158

  2. Appropriate surveillance for late complications in patients in remission from Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Darrington, Deborah L; Vose, Julie M

    2012-09-01

    Once considered to be incurable, now most patients with the diagnosis of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survive and are cured of their disease. Although HL survivors are out living their disease, they continue to have increased morbidity and mortality compared to their age-matched and sex-matched peers in the general population. Late complications of their treatment are well documented and include cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary diseases, endocrine dysfunction and second malignancy. Research exploring appropriate surveillance for these complications is lacking. However, evidence to support surveillance is mounting and many are publishing consensus-based guidelines recommending surveillance for these anticipated complications. This review will summarize the most recent literature addressing the appropriate surveillance for late complications in patients in remission from HL. PMID:22743837

  3. Clinical development of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors for non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is extensively explored in cancers. It functions as an important regulator of cell growth, survival and metabolism. Activation of this pathway also predicts poor prognosis in numerous human malignancies. Drugs targeting this signaling pathway have been developed and have shown preliminary clinical activity. Accumulating evidence has highlighted the important role of PI3K in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), especially in the disease initiation and progression. Therapeutic functions of PI3K inhibitors in NHL have been demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. This review will summarize recent advances in the activation of PI3K signaling in different types of NHL and the applications of PI3K inhibitors in NHL treatment. PMID:24252186

  4. Acute respiratory failure caused by organizing pneumonia secondary to antineoplastic therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Adriell Ramalho; Amorim, Fábio Ferreira; Soares, Paulo Henrique Alves; de Moura, Edmilson Bastos; Maia, Marcelo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Interstitial lung diseases belong to a group of diseases that typically exhibit a subacute or chronic progression but that may cause acute respiratory failure. The male patient, who was 37 years of age and undergoing therapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, was admitted with cough, fever, dyspnea and acute hypoxemic respiratory failure. Mechanical ventilation and antibiotic therapy were initiated but were associated with unfavorable progression. Thoracic computed tomography showed bilateral pulmonary "ground glass" opacities. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy was initiated with satisfactory response because the patient had used three drugs related to organizing pneumonia (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and rituximab), and the clinical and radiological symptoms were suggestive. Organizing pneumonia may be idiopathic or linked to collagen diseases, drugs and cancer and usually responds to corticosteroid therapy. The diagnosis was anatomopathological, but the patient's clinical condition precluded performing a lung biopsy. Organizing pneumonia should be a differential diagnosis in patients with apparent pneumonia and a progression that is unfavorable to antimicrobial treatment. PMID:23917942

  5. Motility and trafficking in B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Review).

    PubMed

    Till, Kathleen J; Coupland, Sarah E; Pettitt, Andrew R

    2014-07-01

    B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (B-NHLs) consist of a wide spectrum of entities and consequently have varied clinical courses. Like many other malignancies, each of the B-NHL depend on their microenvironment for growth and survival; therefore, understanding the factors involved in their tissue localisation is likely to have implications for therapies designed to treat B-NHL. This review summarises the chemokines, integrins and sphingosine-1 phosphate receptors involved in normal B cell location and distribution within the lymphoid tissues (lymph nodes, spleen and bone marrow). It also provides a précis of what is known about these factors in the disease state: i.e., in some subtypes of B-NHL. PMID:24788871

  6. Disseminated non-Hodgkin's lymphoma presenting as bilateral salivary gland enlargement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Sattur, Atul P.; Naikmasur, Venkatesh G.; Thakur, Arpita Rai

    2013-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) constitutes a group of malignancies those arises from cellular components of lymphoid or extranodal tissues. The head and neck is the most common area for the presentation of these lymphoproliferative disorders. Primary involvement of salivary glands is uncommon. This report described a case of a 73-year-old female patient who presented with involvement of both nodal and extranodal sites, with predominant involvement of salivary glands. The tumor staging worked up along with imaging, histopathological, and immunohistochemical findings were discussed. Computed tomographic images showed the involvement of Waldeyer's ring, larynx, orbit, and spleen. This report described imaging and prognostic tumor markers in diagnosing, treatment planning, and prognosis. PMID:23525854

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: clinical development of the Zevalin regimen.

    PubMed

    Theuer, Charles P; Leigh, Bryan R; Multani, Pratik S; Allen, Roberta S; Liang, Bertrand C

    2004-01-01

    Zevalin (ibritumomab tiuxetan; IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA) was approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration on February 19, 2002, following 9 years of clinical development. Six clinical studies supported the Zevalin Biologics License Application. The Zevalin regimen is indicated for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), and for those with follicular NHL refractory to Rituxan (rituximab, MabThera; IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corporation, San Diego, CA and Genentech, South San Francisco, CA). In the year following FDA approval, approximately 1300 patients were treated in clinical trials or with the commercially available product. PMID:15504711

  8. [Malignant non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the bony cavity of the face. Apropos of 17 cases].

    PubMed

    Demard, F; Santini, J; Ettore, F; Camuzard, J F; Serra, C; Bruneton, J N; Vallicioni, J

    1989-01-01

    Malignant non Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are fairly frequent, but involvement of the bony cavities of the face is less common than invasion of the cervical lymph nodes and the lymphoid components of Waldeyer's ring. In connection with a series of 17 personal observations, the authors discuss the main features of NHL and review the diagnostic problems and therapeutic alternatives. Two histologic-clinical entities can be defined: orbital NHL: generally stage I, with a low or intermediate histoprognostic grade and a good prognosis; naso-sinusal NHL: often locally advanced, these lesions are often associated with other visceral disease sites; the prognosis for these intermediate or high histo-prognostic grade lesions is much more somber. PMID:2781188

  9. [Malignant maxillofacial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Apropos of 15 cases involving the naso-sinus cavities].

    PubMed

    Santini, J; Serra, C; Thyss, A; Camuzard, J F; Dassonville, O; Lagrange, J L; Favot, C; Demard, F

    1990-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas include malignant conditions developing within lymphoid tissue, both lymph nodes and extranodal lymphoid tissue. Due to its rich lymphatic supply, the cervico-facial region is frequently involved: 10 to 15% of all NHL (1, 2, 8, 15), i.e. a similar incidence to primary GI involvement (4). The cervical glands and lymphatic structures of the Waldeyer ring are most often and most classically involved. The nasosinusal cavities may be involved, producing diagnostic problems which have to be resolved by the specialist (6). Between 1972 and 1989, 20 cases of NHL involving the bony cavities of the face were seen at the Centre Antoine-Lacassagne. These include the 15 cases reported below involving the naso-sinusal cavities. PMID:2130452

  10. Whole exome sequencing in families at high risk for Hodgkin lymphoma: identification of a predisposing mutation in the KDR gene.

    PubMed

    Rotunno, Melissa; McMaster, Mary L; Boland, Joseph; Bass, Sara; Zhang, Xijun; Burdett, Laurie; Hicks, Belynda; Ravichandran, Sarangan; Luke, Brian T; Yeager, Meredith; Fontaine, Laura; Hyland, Paula L; Goldstein, Alisa M; Chanock, Stephen J; Caporaso, Neil E; Tucker, Margaret A; Goldin, Lynn R

    2016-07-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma shows strong familial aggregation but no major susceptibility genes have been identified to date. The goal of this study was to identify high-penetrance variants using whole exome sequencing in 17 Hodgkin lymphoma prone families with three or more affected cases or obligate carriers (69 individuals), followed by targeted sequencing in an additional 48 smaller HL families (80 individuals). Alignment and variant calling were performed using standard methods. Dominantly segregating, rare, coding or potentially functional variants were further prioritized based on predicted deleteriousness, conservation, and potential importance in lymphoid malignancy pathways. We selected 23 genes for targeted sequencing. Only the p.A1065T variant in KDR (kinase insert domain receptor) also known as VEGFR2 (vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2) was replicated in two independent Hodgkin lymphoma families. KDR is a type III receptor tyrosine kinase, the main mediator of vascular endothelial growth factor induced proliferation, survival, and migration. Its activity is associated with several diseases including lymphoma. Functional experiments have shown that p.A1065T, located in the activation loop, can promote constitutive autophosphorylation on tyrosine in the absence of vascular endothelial growth factor and that the kinase activity was abrogated after exposure to kinase inhibitors. A few other promising mutations were identified but appear to be "private". In conclusion, in the largest sequenced cohort of Hodgkin lymphoma families to date, we identified a causal mutation in the KDR gene. While independent validation is needed, this mutation may increase downstream tumor cell proliferation activity and might be a candidate for targeted therapy. PMID:27365461

  11. Diagnosis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma intracerebral mass lesions. Usefulness of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate and /sup 67/Ga citrate brain scans

    SciTech Connect

    Zidar, B.L.; Adatepe, M.; Hryschko, F.; Hartsock, R.J.; Kessler, L.; Lyons, T.A.

    1982-11-01

    This paper summarizes the clinical and diagnostic features of five reports of patients with intracerebral, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In three patients the brain lesion was the only evidence of lymphoma, while two patients also had concomitant systemic involvement. Four patients had diffuse histiocytic lymphoma and one had a mixed type of malignant lymphoma. In all patients, /sup 99m/Tc and /sup 67/Ga brain scans disclosed discrete areas of increased radionuclide uptake consistent with a mass. In each case, brain blood perfusion studies were normal and brain computerized tomographic (CT) scans and cerebral angiograms produced variable nondiagnostic patterns. Craniotomies in four patients provided histologic confirmation of the non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the areas of abnormality. The remaining patient had systemic histiocytic lymphoma with concomitant brain lesions that responded to irradiation. The combined use of the above noninvasive modalities in correlation with clinical findings may result in more accurate prebiopsy diagnoses of intracerebral lymphoma.

  12. MiR-SNPs as Markers of Toxicity and Clinical Outcome in Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Alfons; Muñoz, Carmen; Gaya, Anna; Díaz-Beyá, Marina; Gel, Bernat; Tejero, Rut; Díaz, Tania; Martinez, Antonio; Monzó, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years, microRNA (miRNA) pathways have emerged as a crucial system for the regulation of tumorogenesis. miR-SNPs are a novel class of single nucleotide polymorphisms that can affect miRNA pathways. Design and Methods We analyzed eight miR-SNPs by allelic discrimination in 141 patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and correlated the results with treatment-related toxicity, response, disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The KRT81 (rs3660) GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of neurological toxicity (P = 0.016), while patients with XPO5 (rs11077) AA or CC genotypes had a higher rate of bleomycin-associated pulmonary toxicity (P = 0.048). Both miR-SNPs emerged as independent factors in the multivariate analysis. The XPO5 AA and CC genotypes were also associated with a lower response rate (P = 0.036). XPO5 (P = 0.039) and TRBP (rs784567) (P = 0.022) genotypes emerged as prognostic markers for DFS, and XPO5 was also associated with OS (P = 0.033). In the multivariate analysis, only XPO5 emerged as an independent prognostic factor for DFS (HR: 2.622; 95%CI 1.039–6.620; P = 0.041). Given the influence of XPO5 and TRBP as individual markers, we then investigated the combined effect of these miR-SNPs. Patients with both the XPO5 AA/CC and TRBP TT/TC genotypes had the shortest DFS (P = 0.008) and OS (P = 0.008). Conclusion miR-SNPs can add useful prognostic information on treatment-related toxicity and clinical outcome in Hodgkin lymphoma and can be used to identify patients likely to be chemoresistant or to relapse. PMID:23705004

  13. ABVE-PC and modified BEACOPP regimen in Indian children with Hodgkin lymphoma: Feasibility and efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Jayabose, Somasundaram; Viswanathan, Kasi; Kumar, Vignesh; Annamalai, Annapoorani; Srinivasan, Arathi; Scott, Julius Xavier; Rathnam, Krishnakumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To study the toxicity of ABVE-PC (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone and cyclophosphamide) and modified-BEACOPP (bleomycin, etoposide, doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, procarbazine, prednisone) in intermediate-risk and high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma patients. Methods: High-risk patients received 4 cycles of modified-BEACOPP (m-BEACOPP) plus 4 cycles of ABVD. Intermediate-risk patients received 4 cycles of ABVE-PC plus 2 cycles of ABVD. Results: From 2010 to 2014, 17 patients received 66 cycles of m-BEACOPP and 9 patients received 40 cycles of ABVE-PC. In the m-BEACOPP and ABVE-PC courses, respectively, significant thrombocytopenia (<50,000/mm3) occurred in 10.6% vs 0% of courses; anemia (Hb. <8 gm/dl) in 27.3% vs 15%; neutropenia (ANC<500/mm3) in 46.9% vs 32.5%; and febrile neutropenia in 33.3% vs. 22.5%. Only episode of documented infection (hepatic abscess) occurred in ABVE-PC. There were no episodes of sepsis, typhlitis or pneumonia in either group. All 26 patients are in remission with a median follow-up of 35 months (range, 17-61); and there have been no relapses. Two of 26 (7.7%) patients failed to achieve rapid early response after 2 cycles and complete remission after 4 cycles of chemotherapy; both achieved remission with more intensive regimens followed by radiation. The remaining 24 patients did not receive radiation therapy. Conclusions: Both m-BEACOPP and ABVE-PC regimens have acceptable toxicity; and thus can be used in most centres with optimum supportive care facilities. They offer promising response rate and relapse free survival without the need for radiation therapy in most patients; and thus may be considered for children with high-risk and intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27168709

  14. ENGAGE- 501: phase II study of entinostat (SNDX-275) in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Kasamon, Yvette; Bociek, R. Gregory; Lee, Peter; Gore, Lia; Copeland, Amanda; Sorensen, Rachel; Ordentlich, Peter; Cruickshank, Scott; Kunkel, Lori; Buglio, Daniela; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Younes, Anas

    2016-01-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma treatment is evolving rapidly with high response rates from antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30 and immune checkpoint antibodies. However, most patients do not achieve a complete response, therefore development of novel therapies is warranted to improve patient outcomes. In this phase II study, patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma were treated with entinostat, an isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor. Forty-nine patients were enrolled: 33 patients on Schedule A (10 or 15 mg oral entinostat once every other week); 16 patients on Schedule B (15 mg oral entinostat once weekly in 3 of 4 weeks). Patients received a median of 3 prior treatments (range 1–10), with 80% of the patients receiving a prior stem cell transplant and 8% of patients receiving prior brentuximab vedotin. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 12% while the disease control rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease beyond 6 months) was 24%. Seven patients did not complete the first cycle due to progression of disease. Tumor reduction was observed in 24 of 38 (58%) evaluable patients. Median progression-free survival and overall survival was 5.5 and 25.1 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (63%), anemia (47%), neutropenia (41%), leukopenia (10%), hypokalemia (8%), and hypophosphatemia (6%). Twenty-five (51%) patients required dose reductions or delays. Pericarditis/pericardial effusion occurred in one patient after 12 cycles of therapy. Future studies are warranted to identify predictive biomarkers for treatment response and to develop mechanism-based combination strategies. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00866333) PMID:27151994

  15. ENGAGE- 501: phase II study of entinostat (SNDX-275) in relapsed and refractory Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Batlevi, Connie Lee; Kasamon, Yvette; Bociek, R Gregory; Lee, Peter; Gore, Lia; Copeland, Amanda; Sorensen, Rachel; Ordentlich, Peter; Cruickshank, Scott; Kunkel, Lori; Buglio, Daniela; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco; Younes, Anas

    2016-08-01

    Classical Hodgkin lymphoma treatment is evolving rapidly with high response rates from antibody-drug conjugates targeting CD30 and immune checkpoint antibodies. However, most patients do not achieve a complete response, therefore development of novel therapies is warranted to improve patient outcomes. In this phase II study, patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin lymphoma were treated with entinostat, an isoform selective histone deacetylase inhibitor. Forty-nine patients were enrolled: 33 patients on Schedule A (10 or 15 mg oral entinostat once every other week); 16 patients on Schedule B (15 mg oral entinostat once weekly in 3 of 4 weeks). Patients received a median of 3 prior treatments (range 1-10), with 80% of the patients receiving a prior stem cell transplant and 8% of patients receiving prior brentuximab vedotin. In the intention-to-treat analysis, the overall response rate was 12% while the disease control rate (complete response, partial response, and stable disease beyond 6 months) was 24%. Seven patients did not complete the first cycle due to progression of disease. Tumor reduction was observed in 24 of 38 (58%) evaluable patients. Median progression-free survival and overall survival was 5.5 and 25.1 months, respectively. The most frequent grade 3 or 4 adverse events were thrombocytopenia (63%), anemia (47%), neutropenia (41%), leukopenia (10%), hypokalemia (8%), and hypophosphatemia (6%). Twenty-five (51%) patients required dose reductions or delays. Pericarditis/pericardial effusion occurred in one patient after 12 cycles of therapy. Future studies are warranted to identify predictive biomarkers for treatment response and to develop mechanism-based combination strategies. (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: 00866333). PMID:27151994

  16. The JAK inhibitor AZD1480 regulates proliferation and immunity in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Derenzini, E; Lemoine, M; Buglio, D; Katayama, H; Ji, Y; Davis, R E; Sen, S; Younes, A

    2011-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the Janus kinase (JAK)/signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) pathway has been reported to promote proliferation and survival of Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg cells of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). We investigated the activity of the JAK inhibitor AZD1480 in HL-derived cell lines and determined its mechanisms of action. AZD1480 at low doses (0.1-1 μ) potently inhibited STATs phosphorylation, but did not predictably result in antiproliferative effects, as it activated a negative-feedback loop causing phosphorylation of JAK2 and extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2), and increased IP-10, RANTES and interleukin (IL)-8 concentrations in the supernatants. Inhibition of the ERK activity by mitogen-activated extracellular signal regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitors (UO126 and PD98059) enhanced the cytotoxic activity of AZD1480. Interestingly, submicromolar concentrations of AZD1480 demonstrated significant immunoregulatory effects by downregulating T-helper 2 cytokines and chemokines, including IL-13 and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine, and the surface expression of the immunosuppressive programmed death ligands 1 and 2. Higher concentrations of AZD1480 (5 μ) induced G2/M arrest and cell death by inhibiting Aurora kinases. Our study demonstrates that AZD1480 regulates proliferation and immunity in HL cell lines and provides mechanistic rationale for evaluating AZD1480 alone or in combination with MEK inhibitors in HL. PMID:22829094

  17. Phosphorylated STAT5 represents a new possible prognostic marker in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Martini, Maurizio; Hohaus, Stefan; Petrucci, Giovanna; Cenci, Tonia; Pierconti, Francesco; Massini, Giuseppina; Teofili, Luciana; Leone, Giuseppe; Larocca, Luigi M

    2008-03-01

    An important pathogenetic mechanism in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is the interaction between the neoplastic and reactive cells mediated by a complex network of cytokines with activation of cytokine signal transduction (STAT) pathways. We studied the prognostic impact of the phosphorylation status of STAT5 in HL. By using immunohistochemical analysis, we found phosphorylated STAT5 (pSTAT5) in 35 (38%) of 93 lymph node biopsy specimens of patients with HL. The detection of pSTAT5 in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in classical HL (cHL) was not associated with any clinical and biologic features evaluated, including Epstein-Barr virus status. The primary end point for analysis of clinical outcome was freedom from treatment failure (FFTF). At a median follow-up of 5 years, pSTAT5+ patients with cHL had a better FFTF than pSTAT5-patients (77% vs 56%; P = .03), which translated into a reduced risk for failure for pSTAT5+ patients with a hazard ratio of 0.2 (95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.73; P = .015). Our data suggest that the phosphorylation status of STAT5 of HRS cells in cHL could be a prognostic marker in HL. PMID:18285272

  18. HLA-G Expression and Role in Advanced-Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Caocci, G.; Greco, M.; Fanni, D.; Senes, G.; Littera, R.; Lai, S.; Risso, P.; Carcassi, C.; Faa, G.; La Nasa, G.

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  19. Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 gene mutation status as a prognostic biomarker in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bubolz, Anna-Maria; Lessel, Davor; Welke, Claudia; Rüther, Nele; Viardot, Andreas; Möller, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS1) mutations are among the most frequent somatic mutations in classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), yet their prognostic relevance in cHL is unexplored. Here, we performed laser-capture microdissection of Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells from tumor samples in a cohort of 105 cHL patients. Full-length SOCS1 gene sequencing showed mutations in 61% of all cases (n = 64/105). Affected DNA-motifs and mutation pattern suggest that many of these SOCS1 mutations are the result of aberrant somatic hypermutation and we confirmed expression of mutant alleles at the RNA level. Contingency analysis showed no significant differences of patient-characteristics with HRS-cells containing mutant vs. wild-type SOCS1. By predicted mutational consequence, mutations can be separated into those with non-truncating point mutations (‘minor’ n = 49/64 = 77%) and those with length alteration (‘major’; n = 15/64 = 23%). Subgroups did not differ in clinicopathological characteristics; however, patients with HRS-cells that contained SOCS1 major mutations suffered from early relapse and significantly shorter overall survival (P = 0.03). The SOCS1 major status retained prognostic significance in uni-(P = 0.016) and multivariate analyses (P = 0.005). Together, our data indicate that the SOCS1 mutation type qualifies as a single-gene prognostic biomarker in cHL. PMID:26336985

  20. European data on stem cell mobilization with plerixafor in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma patients. A subgroup analysis of the European Consortium of stem cell mobilization.

    PubMed

    Hübel, K; Fresen, M M; Apperley, J F; Basak, G W; Douglas, K W; Gabriel, I H; Geraldes, C; Jaksic, O; Koristek, Z; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Lemoli, R M; Mikala, G; Selleslag, D; Worel, N; Mohty, M; Duarte, R F

    2012-08-01

    The effectiveness of the novel hematopoietic stem cell mobilizing agent plerixafor was evaluated in nationwide compassionate use programs in 13 European countries. A total of 580 poor mobilizers with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and multiple myeloma (MM) were enrolled. All patients received plerixafor plus granulocyte CSF with or without chemotherapy. Overall, the collection yield was significantly higher in MM patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 81.6%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 32.0%) than in NHL patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 64.8%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 12.6%; P<0.0001) and also significantly higher in HL patients (>2.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 81.5%; >5.0 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg: 22.2%) than in NHL patients (P=0.013). In a subgroup analysis, there were no significant differences in mobilization success comparing patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma. Our data emphasize the role of plerixafor in poor mobilizers, but further strategies to improve the apheresis yield especially in patients with NHL are required. PMID:22080971

  1. Nodular lymphocyte-predominant hodgkin lymphoma with atypical T cells: a morphologic variant mimicking peripheral T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sohani, Aliyah R; Jaffe, Elaine S; Harris, Nancy Lee; Ferry, Judith A; Pittaluga, Stefania; Hasserjian, Robert P

    2011-11-01

    Nodular lymphocyte-predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (NLPHL) is a distinct Hodgkin lymphoma subtype composed of few neoplastic lymphocyte-predominant (LP) cells in a background of reactive small B and T cells. We have seen occasional NLPHL cases that contain background T cells with prominent cytologic atypia, raising the differential diagnosis of peripheral T-cell lymphoma not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) or a composite lymphoma. We sought to characterize the clinicopathologic features of such cases. Eleven NLPHL cases with atypical T cells diagnosed from 1977 to 2010 were identified at 2 institutions and compared with 24 control NLPHL cases lacking atypical T cells. All 9 male patients and 2 female patients presented with localized peripheral lymphadenopathy. In comparison with control patients, they were younger (median age, 13.8 vs. 36.1 y; P=0.015), with more frequent cervical lymph node involvement (54.5% vs. 8.3%, P=0.015). In all 11 cases, areas of NLPHL with typical B-cell-rich nodules containing LP cells were present. Nine cases contained sheets of atypical T cells surrounding primary and secondary follicles in a pattern mimicking the T-zone pattern of PTCL-NOS; the remaining 2 cases contained atypical T cells presented as large clusters at the periphery of B-cell-rich nodules. In all cases, the atypical T-cell-rich areas contained rare scattered LP cells, which were IgD in 5 of 7 cases (71.4%). The atypical T cells showed no pan-T-cell antigen loss or aberrant T-cell antigen expression in any case, and polymerase chain reaction or Southern blot analysis showed no evidence of T-cell clonality in 6 cases tested. The atypical T cells exhibited a variable immunophenotype with respect to germinal center, follicular T-helper, T-regulatory, and cytotoxic T-cell markers. Among 8 patients with clinical follow-up (median follow-up: 6.4 y), 5 patients had recurrent NLPHL at 6 months to 12 years after diagnosis and 6 patients are alive without disease at 9 months to 18

  2. Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... have nausea and vomiting Update Date 2/1/2016 Updated by: Todd Gersten, MD, Hematology/Oncology, Florida ... constitute endorsements of those other sites. Copyright 1997-2016, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial ...

  3. Hodgkin lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... old. Past infection with the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ) is thought to contribute to some cases. People ... up. The following procedures will usually be done: Blood chemistry tests including protein levels, liver function tests, ...

  4. Simultaneous occurrence of Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    HUANG, CHEN; ZHAO, GUIMIN; WANG, LIANJING; ZHANG, HUICHAO; WU, XIAOLIN; ZHANG, MINGZENG; MA, RUIJUAN; WANG, LING; LIU, YUEPING; LIU, LIHONG

    2016-01-01

    Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) is a type of hematological neoplasm that generally appears alone, with a low incidence. The majority of cases histopathologically present as B-cell lymphoma. Multiple myeloma (MM) is defined as the neoplastic proliferation of a single clone of plasma cells producing a monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig). The coexistence of HL and MM is rare, however, the present study reports such a case. On May 31, 2012, a 45-year-old man was diagnosed with HL, stage III, 31 months ago. At the same time, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed osteolytic lesions, a significant increase in IgA λ chains, and multiple myeloma cells on bone marrow aspiration. Following 8 cycles of chemotherapy, the patient received maintenance treatment with thalidomide and dexamethasone. During 2 years of follow-up, the patient has maintained a complete response for HL and a stable disease state for MM. The coexistence of HL and MM is rare. Further study of such cases may explain the associations between these two tumors and aid the production of effective treatment options. PMID:27313755

  5. Risk of Developing Cardiovascular Disease After Involved Node Radiotherapy Versus Mantle Field for Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Maraldo, Maja V.; Brodin, Nils Patrik; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Aznar, Marianne C.; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per; Petersen, Peter M.; Specht, Lena

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) survivors are known to have increased cardiac mortality and morbidity. The risk of developing cardiovascular disease after involved node radiotherapy (INRT) is currently unresolved, inasmuch as present clinical data are derived from patients treated with the outdated mantle field (MF) technique. Methods and Materials: We included all adolescents and young adults with supradiaphragmatic, clinical Stage I-II HL treated at our institution from 2006 to 2010 (29 patients). All patients were treated with chemotherapy and INRT to 30 to 36 Gy. We then simulated a MF plan for each patient with a prescribed dose of 36 Gy. A logistic dose-response curve for the 25-year absolute excess risk of cardiovascular disease was derived and applied to each patient using the individual dose-volume histograms. Results: The mean doses to the heart, four heart valves, and coronary arteries were significantly lower for INRT than for MF treatment. However, the range in doses with INRT treatment was substantial, and for a subgroup of patients, with lymphoma below the fourth thoracic vertebrae, we estimated a 25-year absolute excess risk of any cardiac event of as much as 5.1%. Conclusions: Our study demonstrates a potential for individualizing treatment by selecting the patients for whom INRT provides sufficient cardiac protection for current technology; and a subgroup of patients, who still receive high cardiac doses, who would benefit from more advanced radiation technique.

  6. ESHAP salvage therapy for relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chul Won; Paek, Chang Won; Seo, Jae Hong; Kim, Byung Soo; Shin, Sang Won; Kim, Yeul Hong; Kim, Jun Suk

    2002-10-01

    The ESHAP regimen, a combination of the chemotherapeutic drugs etoposide, methylprednisolone (solumedrol), high-dose cytarabine (ara-C), and cisplatin, has been shown to be active against refractory or relapsed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) in therapeutic trials. We undertook this study to determine whether this regimen would be effective and tolerable in Korean patients. A total of 40 patients with refractory or relapsed NHL (8 indolent and 32 aggressive) were enrolled in this study. The overall response rate was 70% (95% confidence interval; 59.8-89.7%); 22.5% of patients achieved a complete response and 47.5% a partial response. The median survival duration was 12 months (95% confidence interval; 5.9-18.1 months) and the median duration of progression-free survival was 9 months (95% confidence interval; 1.1-16.9 months). The median survival duration of patients with relapsed NHL was longer than that of patients with refractory lymphoma (15 months vs 4 months, p=0.02). Myelosuppression was the most frequent complication and treatment-related mortality was noted in two patients. These results suggest that the ESHAP regimen is effective in patients with relapsed NHL who have a sensitive disease. The role of ESHAP chemotherapy in discriminating patients who are more likely to benefit from a subsequent transplant should be evaluated in the future. PMID:12378012

  7. Risk assessment of second primary cancer according to histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Cédric; Jégu, Jérémie; Mounier, Morgane; Dandoit, Mylène; Colonna, Marc; Daubisse-Marliac, Laetitia; Trétarre, Brigitte; Ganry, Olivier; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bara, Simona; Bouvier, Véronique; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Monnereau, Alain; Casasnovas, Olivier; Velten, Michel; Troussard, Xavier; Maynadié, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases that are known to carry a considerable risk of second primary cancer (SPC). However, little attention has been paid to SPC risk assessment according to NHL subtypes. Data from 10 French population-based cancer registries were used to establish a cohort of 7546 patients with a first diagnosis of NHL (eight subtypes) between 1989 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of metachronous SPC were estimated. Among the 7546 patients diagnosed with a NHL, the overall SPC risk was 25% higher than that in the reference population (SIR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.36). In univariate analysis, the SPC risk differed by lymphoma subtype. Interestingly, multivariate analysis showed that SPC risk did not differ significantly across NHL subtypes after adjustment for the other covariates (p = 0.786). Patients with NHL have an increased risk of SPC that is not influenced by the histological NHL subtype. PMID:25641432

  8. Evaluation of neuropathy during intensive vincristine chemotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorchin, M; Masoumi Dehshiri, R; Soleiman, S; Manashi, M

    2013-01-01

    Back ground: Vincristine (VCR), is a chemotherapy drug, useful in the treatment of leukemia, lymphoma and solid tumor and it is a potent neurotoxin and sensory neuropathy drug which a common behavioral toxicity of this drug. Neuropathy is common squeal of intensive chemotherapy protocols that contain vincristine and corticosteroids. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective and descriptive study of neuropathy during in chemotherapy program with vincristine for patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). Data was analyzed by spss Version16 software. Results: From total of 51 cases, 23 patients had vincristine neuropathy (45%). Patients with visceral neuropathy have shown ileus, constipation in 13 patients (25%), occasionally severe diarrhea 11 (21%), mild diarrhea 7 (13.7%) and transient diarrhea in 16 patients (31%). Motor neuropathy were found in one patient with Bell, s palsy (1.9%) and one patient with Hoarseness. 12 patients (23.5%) had some type of complication together with sensory peripheral neuropathy. Conclusion: Almost half of patients with vincristin chemotherapy had neuropathy and the mean age of patients with neuropathy was 12.3 years. PMID:24575286

  9. Primary oral non-Hodgkin's lymphoma – A clinicopathologic study with immunohistochemical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Augustine, Dominic; Sekar, Bala; Thiruneervannan, R.; Sundhar, Murali; Reddy, Donga Vijay Kumar; Patil, Shankar Gouda

    2014-01-01

    Context: Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) is a group of highly diverse malignancies whose prognosis depends on the histologic type and associated factors like HIV positivity. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate eight cases of NHL for their histologic type and HIV positivity, since both are major prognostic factors for NHL. Settings and Design: Eight cases of primary NHL of the oral cavity were evaluated for age, sex, clinical presentation, and the histologic type, along with immunohistochemistry. These cases were also evaluated for HIV positivity. Materials and Methods: NHL cases which were diagnosed through the dental OPD and subsequent biopsy procedure were chosen. The patient data, including age, sex, location, clinical presentation, radiographic presentation, metastasis, and histologic subtype, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification were tabulated. Immunohistochemical markers were used to confirm the cell type. CD20 and CD3 were used for B cell and T cell, respectively. Subsequent western blot analysis was carried out for HIV detection. Results: 75% of the NHL was of B-cell type; of this, 83% was found to be diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, which is an aggressive variant. 62.5% of cases were found to be HIV positive. Conclusions: This study emphasizes the need for HIV investigation in NHL cases and the need to determine the histologic type, both of which significantly affect the treatment outcome and prognosis. PMID:25452932

  10. Recreational amphetamine use and risk of HIV-related non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Chun; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Tashkin, Donald; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Roth, Michael D.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Chmiel, Joan S.; Holloway, Marcy N.; Detels, Roger

    2010-01-01

    The results of many laboratory studies suggest that amphetamine use may lead to altered immune function and cytokine expression, both of which are implicated in HIV-related lymphomagenesis. We examined the hypothesis that use of amphetamines modifies risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected men in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study. Data on amphetamine use were collected every six months during the follow-up period between 1984 and 2002. A total of 171 NHL cases were diagnosed from the 19,250 person-years accrued. Multivariable Cox models were used to estimate the effects of baseline exposures, time-varying recent exposures, and three years lagged exposures on risk of NHL adjusting for potential confounders such as demographics, use of other substances, and risky sexual behaviors. We found that weekly or more frequent use of amphetamines was associated with an increased risk of NHL, with hazard ratios of 1.75 (95% CI = 0.81–3.77) for use at baseline, 4.73 (1.41–15.81) for recent use, and 3.05 (1.19–7.82) for three years prior use. Similar associations were observed when we separately examined systemic NHL and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Given these observations, the impact of amphetamines on lymphomagenesis among HIV-infected populations should be assessed more thoroughly. PMID:19011979

  11. Clinical features and outcomes of 139 Japanese patients with Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Makita, Shinichi; Maruyama, Dai; Maeshima, Akiko Miyagi; Taniguchi, Hirokazu; Miyamoto, Ken-Ichi; Kitahara, Hideaki; Fukuhara, Suguru; Munakata, Wataru; Kobayashi, Yukio; Itami, Jun; Tobinai, Kensei

    2016-08-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare subtype of malignant lymphoma in Japan, and there are few reports of HL in Japan in recent years. We retrospectively analyzed the clinical features of 139 patients with HL who were diagnosed and treated at our institution between 1997 and 2011. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years with 83 male. Of these patients, 83 (60 %) were early stage and 56 (40 %) were advanced-stage. Seventy-three patients (88 %) with early stage disease received ABVd followed by irradiation. All of the 56 advanced-stage patients received chemotherapy, mainly ABVd. The 5-year progression-free survival (PFS) rates and overall survival rates were 90 and 94 % in patients with early stage disease, and 71 and 90 % in those with advanced-stage disease. The PFS of patients with advanced-stage disease was significantly lower than those with early stage (p = 0.014). In conclusion, the outcomes of Japanese patients with HL in recent years were not improved as compared with the results of previous reports. We confirmed that patients with advanced-stage disease have lower PFS than those with early stage disease. Prospective studies are needed to establish novel treatment strategies to improve the outcome of HL patients, especially those with advanced disease. PMID:27086350

  12. Outcomes of Autologous or Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nishitha M.; Oluwole, Olalekan; Greer, John P.; Engelhardt, Brian G.; Jagasia, Madan H.; Savani, Bipin N.

    2016-01-01

    Transplant outcomes of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have not been elucidated as a single cohort in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We analyzed the outcomes of 270 adult recipients receiving auto (n=198) or allo-SCT (n=72) for NHL between year 2000 and 2010. Five-year overall survival for B-cell and T-cell NHL were 58% and 50%, respectively (allo-SCT 51% vs. 54% for B and T-cell NHL, and auto-SCT 60% vs. 47% for B and T-cell lymphoma, respectively) (p=NS). In multivariate analysis, number of chemotherapy regimens and disease status pre-SCT were independently associated with long-term outcome after SCT (for both auto and allo-SCT). We conclude that based on patient selection and disease related factors, the type of transplantation offered to patients can achieve long term survival highlighting the importance of further improvement in disease control and reducing procedure related mortality. The role of transplantation needs to be reevaluated in the era of targeted therapy. PMID:24096123

  13. Systemic AL amyloidosis due to non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: an unusual clinicopathologic association.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A D; Zhou, P; Xiao, Q; Fleisher, M; Kalakonda, N; Akhurst, T; Chitale, D A; Moscowitz, C; Dhodapkar, M V; Teruya-Feldstein, J; Filippa, D; Comenzo, R L

    2004-02-01

    Systemic AL amyloidosis (AL) is a disorder in which light chains form fibrillar deposits, leading to organ dysfunction and death. Rarely, AL has been associated with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), although this association has not been well characterized. We report a series of six patients with AL associated with NHL, primarily lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma. Organ involvement was variable, with frequent bulky lymphadenopathy and visceral cavity deposits, but no cardiac involvement. Positron emission tomography scans were negative. Bone marrow and lymph node biopsies showed a mixed population of CD20+ lymphoid and CD138+ plasma cells. Serum free light chains were elevated, and correlated with response to therapy. Immunoglobulin light chain variable region (Ig VL) germline gene use was typical for AL, reflecting previously observed correlations between germline gene use and organ tropism. Five patients received rituximab-based therapies with two responses. Two patients underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with one complete haematological response. Four patients survive at 10-132 months from diagnosis. AL with NHL has distinctive clinical features but employs the same Ig VL gene repertoire as AL with clonal plasma cell dyscrasias. Serial serum free light chain levels are useful for tracking response to therapy. Treatments aimed at both lymphoid and plasma cell components appear warranted. PMID:14717777

  14. Quality of Life is Similar between Long-term Survivors of Indolent and Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Beaven, Anne W; Samsa, Greg; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Smith, Sophia K

    2016-07-01

    Differences in quality of life (QOL) of long-term survivors of aggressive or indolent subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have not been frequently evaluated. We assessed these differences by analyzing results of a large QOL survey of long-term NHL survivors. We hypothesized that the incurable nature of indolent NHL would relate to worse QOL in long-term survivors while the potentially cured long-term survivors of aggressive lymphoma would have better QOL. We found that QOL was similar between the two groups. Results suggest that patients with indolent NHL are coping well with their disease, yet experience some overall feelings of life threat. PMID:27379565

  15. Standard Operating Procedure for In-house Preparation of (131)I-rituximab for Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Pickford, Matthew D; Turner, J Harvey

    2012-09-01

    A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been formulated for in-house preparation, quality control, dispensing and administration of (131)I-rituximab appropriate for the safe, effective, radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A decade of experience of semi-automated radioiodination of rituximab in our hospital radiopharmaceutical laboratory was analysed. The methodology was then refined for safe, practical, affordable application to radioimmunotherapy of lymphoma in departments of nuclear medicine in developing countries. This SOP has the potential to be incorporated into good laboratory practice conditions appropriate for local regulatory agency requirements. PMID:23372447

  16. Severe high-density lipoprotein deficiency associated with autoantibodies against lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase in non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Simonelli, Sara; Gianazza, Elisabetta; Mombelli, Giuliana; Bondioli, Alighiero; Ferraro, Giovanni; Penco, Silvana; Sirtori, Cesare R; Franceschini, Guido; Calabresi, Laura

    2012-01-23

    An antibody against the lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) enzyme, which negates cholesterol esterification in plasma, causing severe high-density lipoprotein deficiency (HD), was identified in a woman with a large-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Successful treatment of the lymphoma resulted in clearance of the antibody and complete correction of the defective cholesterol esterification and HD. To our knowledge, an acquired LCAT deficiency leading to severe HD has not been reported previously in association with a malignant disease, and this patient represents the first such documented case. PMID:22271127

  17. Bleomycin-induced flagellate erythema in a patient with Hodgkin's lymphoma - A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Vennepureddy, A; Siddique, M N; Odaimi, M; Terjanian, T

    2016-06-01

    Bleomycin is a glycopeptide used as a chemotherapeutic agent for lymphomas, germ cell tumors, and pleurodesis of malignant pleural effusions. The pulmonary toxicity of bleomycin is well known while the cutaneous side effects are uncommon and varies from generalized hyperpigmentation, sclerodermoid changes, erythema multiformae, and gangrene to flagellate dermatosis. Here we report a characteristic but rare side effect of flagellate erythema, which developed secondary to bleomycin in a 27-year old woman with Hodgkin's lymphoma after two cycles of treatment with adriamycin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine regimen. The rash subsided after discontinuation of bleomycin and treatment with steroids. PMID:25855241

  18. Standard Operating Procedure for In-house Preparation of 131I-rituximab for Radioimmunotherapy of Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Pickford, Matthew D.; Turner, J. Harvey

    2012-01-01

    A Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) has been formulated for in-house preparation, quality control, dispensing and administration of 131I-rituximab appropriate for the safe, effective, radioimmunotherapy of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. A decade of experience of semi-automated radioiodination of rituximab in our hospital radiopharmaceutical laboratory was analysed. The methodology was then refined for safe, practical, affordable application to radioimmunotherapy of lymphoma in departments of nuclear medicine in developing countries. This SOP has the potential to be incorporated into good laboratory practice conditions appropriate for local regulatory agency requirements. PMID:23372447

  19. Secondary Neoplasms in Children with Hodgkin's Lymphoma Receiving C-MOPP and Radiotherapy: Presentation of Four Cases.

    PubMed

    Gözdaşoğlu, Sevgi; Pamir, Ali; Ünal, Emel; Gökçora, İsmail Haluk; Uluoğlu, Ömer; Ceyhan, Koray; Deda, Haluk; Işıkman, Erdoğan; Yavuz, Gülsan; Taçyıldız, Nurdan; Çavdar, Ayhan

    2016-03-01

    Patients who survive Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are at increased risk of secondary neoplasms (SNs). A wide variety of SNs have been reported, including leukemias, non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, and solid tumors, specifically breast and thyroid cancers. Herein we report subsequent neoplasms in four patients with HL receiving chemoradiotherapy. It is interesting that three SNs, fibrosarcoma, thyroid carcinoma, and retrobulbar meningioma, were observed in the radiation area in one of our patients. A hypopharyngeal epithelioid malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor as an unusual secondary malignant neoplasm developed in another patient, while a benign thyroid nodule and invasive ductal breast carcinoma were observed at different times in the female patient. Follicular adenoma of the thyroid gland developed in one of our patients. PMID:26377258

  20. Hodgkin lymphoma variant of Richter transformation: morphology, Epstein-Barr virus status, clonality, and survival analysis-with comparison to Hodgkin-like lesion.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenbin; Chen, Wayne W; Sorbara, Lynn; Davies-Hill, Theresa; Pittaluga, Stefania; Raffeld, Mark; Jaffe, Elaine S

    2016-09-01

    Hodgkin/Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells in the setting of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) exist in 2 forms: type I with isolated HRS cells in a CLL background (Hodgkin-like lesion) and type II with typical classic Hodgkin lymphoma, a variant of Richter transformation (CHL-RT). The clinical significance of the 2 morphological patterns is unclear, and their biological features have not been compared. We retrospectively reviewed 77 cases: 26 of type I and 51 of type II CHL-RT; 3 cases progressed from type I to type II. We examined clinical features, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) status, and clonal relatedness after microdissection. Median age for type I was 62 years versus 73 years for type II (P=.01); 27% (type I) versus 73% (type II) had a history of CLL. HRS cells were positive for EBV in 71% (55/77), similar in types I and II. Clonality analysis was performed in 33 cases (type I and type II combined): HRS cells were clonally related to the underlying CLL in 14 and unrelated in 19. ZAP-70 expression of the CLL cells but not EBV status or morphological pattern was correlated with clonal relatedness: all 14 clonally related cases were ZAP-70 negative, whereas 74% (14/19) of clonally unrelated cases were ZAP-70 positive. Overall median survival (types I and II) after diagnosis was 44 months. Advanced age was an adverse risk factor for survival, but not histologic pattern, type I versus type II. HRS-like cells in a background of CLL carries a similar clinical risk to that of CHL-RT and may progress to classic Hodgkin lymphoma in some cases. PMID:27184478

  1. Hodgkin-Reed-Sternberg Cells in Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Show Alterations of Genes Encoding the NADPH Oxidase Complex and Impaired Reactive Oxygen Species Synthesis Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Sosna, Justyna; Döring, Claudia; Klapper, Wolfram; Küppers, Ralf; Böttcher, Sebastian; Adam, Dieter; Siebert, Reiner; Schütze, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The membrane bound NADPH oxidase involved in the synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a multi-protein enzyme encoded by CYBA, CYBB, NCF1, NCF2 and NCF4 genes. Growing evidence suggests a role of ROS in the modulation of signaling pathways of non-phagocytic cells, including differentiation and proliferation of B-cell progenitors. Transcriptional downregulation of the CYBB gene has been previously reported in cell lines of the B-cell derived classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL). Thus, we explored functional consequences of CYBB downregulation on the NADPH complex. Using flow cytometry to detect and quantify superoxide anion synthesis in cHL cell lines we identified recurrent loss of superoxide anion production in all stimulated cHL cell lines in contrast to stimulated non-Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines. As CYBB loss proved to exert a deleterious effect on the NADPH oxidase complex in cHL cell lines, we analyzed the CYBB locus in Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells of primary cHL biopsies by in situ hybridisation and identified recurrent deletions of the gene in 8/18 cases. Immunohistochemical analysis to 14 of these cases revealed a complete lack of detectable CYBB protein expression in all HRS cells in all cases studied. Moreover, by microarray profiling of cHL cell lines we identified additional alterations of NADPH oxidase genes including CYBA copy number loss in 3/7 cell lines and a significant downregulation of the NCF1 transcription (p=0.006) compared to normal B-cell subsets. Besides, NCF1 protein was significantly downregulated (p<0.005) in cHL compared to other lymphoma cell lines. Together this findings show recurrent alterations of the NADPH oxidase encoding genes that result in functional inactivation of the enzyme and reduced production of superoxide anion in cHL. PMID:24376854

  2. A study to investigate dose escalation of doxorubicin in ABVD chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma incorporating biomarkers of response and toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gibb, A; Greystoke, A; Ranson, M; Linton, K; Neeson, S; Hampson, G; Illidge, T; Smith, E; Dive, C; Pettitt, A; Lister, A; Johnson, P; Radford, J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Myelotoxicity during initial cycles of chemotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with better outcome, supporting the concept of individualised dosing based on pharmacodynamic end points to optimise results. This study was performed to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of doxorubicin within cycles 1–3 ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine). Circulating biomarkers of response (nucleosomal DNA, nDNA) and epithelial toxicity (Cytokeratin 18, CK18) were also measured. Methods: Dose escalation of doxorubicin in cycles 1–3 ABVD supported by pegfilgrastim was performed on a six-patient cohort basis (35, 45 and 55 mg m–2) with doxorubicin reduced to 25 mg m–2 or omitted in cycles 4–6 to maintain cumulative exposure of 103–130% standard ABVD. BVD was given at standard doses throughout. Six additional subjects were recruited at the MTD. Results: Twenty-four subjects were recruited. Dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of grade 3 neuropathy, pneumonitis, palmar-plantar erythema and neutropenic infection were observed at 55 mg m–2, so 45 mg m–2 was declared the MTD. In patients who subsequently experienced DLT at any time, large increases in CK18 were seen on day 3 of cycle 1 ABVD. Conclusion: Escalated ABVD incorporating doxorubicin at 45 mg m–2 in cycles 1–3 can be delivered safely with pegfilgrastim support. Circulating cell death biomarkers may assist in the development of future individualised dosing strategies. PMID:24136151

  3. Immunophenotyping of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Lack of correlation between immunophenotype and cell morphology.

    PubMed Central

    Schuurman, H. J.; van Baarlen, J.; Huppes, W.; Lam, B. W.; Verdonck, L. F.; van Unnik, J. A.

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of Clusters of Differentiation for T- and B-lymphoid cells during International Workshops on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens prompted the authors to evaluate the immunophenotypes in 160 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In this group, 130 were of B-lymphocyte lineage (117 by monotypic immunoglobulin expression), and 30 of T-cell lineage. In the B-NHL series the expression of immunoglobulin isotypes, B-cell maturation/differentiation antigens of CD9, CD10, CD19-24, CD37, and CD38 (OKT10), HLA-DR and peanut agglutinin binding showed no significant relationship with histopathologic diagnosis as defined by the Kiel classification. Of the T-cell markers, CD5, CD6, and CD7 showed lineage promiscuity by their presence on some B-NHL. Conversely, the authors grouped the cases according to phenotypes (either CD antigens or immunoglobulin isotypes) which occur in distinct stages of (physiologic) B-cell maturation/differentiation. Eighty-six of the 130 cases could be fitted according to CD phenotype expression. This approach did not yield a significant relationship between phenotype and individual histopathologic categories either. The staging by CD phenotype and by immunoglobulin isotype yielded different results in this respect. Most B-NHL had an intermediate stage of B-cell maturation/differentiation. In the T-NHL series most cases showed a phenotype (CD1-CD8, CD38, TdT, and peanut agglutinin binding capacity) compatible with mature T-lymphocyte characteristics. The exceptions were lymphoblastic convoluted lymphomas, which exhibited an immature immunophenotype. It is concluded that NHL in distinct histopathologic categories are heterogeneous in immunologic phenotypes, and that the immunophenotype of lymphoma cells has no evident association with that of their presumed counterparts in physiologic cell maturation/differentiation. PMID:3310650

  4. Does Gender Matter in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma? Differences in Epidemiology, Clinical Behavior, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Horesh, Nurit; Horowitz, Netanel A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is one of the most common hematologic malignancies worldwide. The incidence of NHL has been rising for several decades; however, in the last 20 years, it reached a plateau. NHL incidence among males is significantly higher than in females. In addition to gender itself, gravidity has a protective role against NHL occurrence. Gender also matters in terms of NHL clinical characteristics. For example, female predominance was found in three extra-nodal sites (the breast, thyroid, and the respiratory system) occasionally involved in NHL. The diagnosis of NHL during pregnancy is associated with a unique clinical behavior. It is usually diagnosed in the second or third trimester and in advanced stage. Furthermore, the histological subtype is highly aggressive, and reproductive organ involvement is common. The reduced rate of NHL among females may be explained by direct effects of estrogens on lymphoma cell proliferation or by its effect on anti-tumor immune response. Gender has an important role in responsiveness to standard B cell NHL treatment. Among older adults, women benefited more from the addition of the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab to standard chemotherapy regimens. This phenomenon can be explained by the difference in clearance rate of rituximab that was found to be significantly lower among older females than older males. In mantle cell lymphoma, women receiving lenalidomide have higher rates of response. An understanding of the mechanisms responsible for gender-associated NHL differences will ultimately improve the clinical approach, allowing for a more accurate assessment of prognosis and patient-tailored treatment. PMID:25386354

  5. Use of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Marcus, Robert

    2005-02-01

    The increase in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) that has occurred over recent decades is expected to continue. Therapeutic options for patients with NHL have improved over the past 20 years, but almost all patients with low-grade lymphoma and approximately 50% of patients with high-grade lymphoma eventually die of their disease, regardless of the regimen used. Thus, there is a continuing need for novel therapeutic options. One such strategy is targeted radioimmunotherapy, which is an attractive approach because lymphoma cells are inherently sensitive to radiation. 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin; Biogen Idec Inc, San Diego, CA, and Schering AG, Berlin, Germany) was the first radioimmunotherapy agent to be approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of patients with relapsed, low-grade B-cell NHL. 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan comprises the murine IgG1 anti-CD20 antibody ibritumomab, covalently linked to the beta-emitter 90 Y by a chelator tiuxetan. A prospective trial comparing 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan with single-agent rituximab showed an overall response rate (ORR) to 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan of 80% (34% complete response [CR]/unconfirmed CR [CRu]) compared with 56% (20% CR/CRu) with rituximab (P = .002). Of patients achieving a CR/CRu, 32% were still in remission at 3 to 4 years of follow-up. Similar efficacy (83% ORR, 43% CR/CRu) has been reported with 90 Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan in patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade NHL with mild thrombocytopenia (platelet counts 100,000 to 149,000/mm3 ), and in patients with rituximab-refractory NHL (ORR 74% [CR 15%] compared with an ORR 32% to last rituximab treatment). Safety data compiled from patients entered into five studies have confirmed initial observations that the toxicities encountered with 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan therapy are mainly hematologic and transient. As part of a consolidated clinical approach to the ongoing development of 90Y-ibritumomab tiuxetan, studies are

  6. Disease patterns of pediatric non-Hodgkin lymphoma: A study from a developing area in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    SHERIEF, LAILA M.; ELSAFY, USAMA R.; ABDELKHALEK, ELHAMY R.; KAMAL, NAGLAA M.; YOUSSEF, DOAA M.; ELBEHEDY, RABAB

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for 8–10% of all childhood cancers. NHL collectively represents various lymphoid malignancies with diverse clinicopathological and biological characteristics. In this study, we aimed to describe the epidemiological and clinicopathological characteristics and treatment outcomes of pediatric NHL patients treated at the Pediatric Oncology Unit of Zagazig University Hospital and the Benha Specialized Pediatric Hospital. We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective study by reviewing the medical records of 142 patients admitted with a diagnosis of NHL over a period of 8 years (February, 2004 to February, 2012) in these two Oncology Units. The age at presentation ranged between 2 and 15 years, with a mean ± standard deviation (SD) of 6.1±2.8 years and a male:female ratio of 1.7:1. Abdominal involvement was the most common presentation (73.2%). Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) was the most common NHL subtype (69%), followed by lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, accounting for 18.3, 10.6 and 2.1% of the cases, respectively. The majority of the patients (88.7%) had been diagnosed with advanced disease (Murphy stage III/IV). Complete remission was achieved in 120 cases (84.5%). A total of 16 patients (11.3%) succumbed to the disease during the first few months and 6 patients (4.2%) remained alive following relapse. The mean follow-up duration ± SD was 34.6±25.1 months (range, 3–84 months). The 5-year overall survival (OS) and event-free survival (EFS) rates were 88.7 and 85.1%, respectively. None of the clinical, epidemiological or pathological variables exhibited a statistically significant association with the OS or EFS. In conclusion, NHL occurs at a younger age, with a higher incidence of BL and advanced-stage disease. The outcome of NHL in our two centers was satisfactory, approaching the international rates. PMID:25469284

  7. The anti-lymphoma activity of antiviral therapy in HCV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Peveling-Oberhag, J; Arcaini, L; Bankov, K; Zeuzem, S; Herrmann, E

    2016-07-01

    Many epidemiological studies provide solid evidence for an association of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL). However, the most convincing evidence for a causal relationship between HCV infection and lymphoma development is the observation of B-NHL regression after HCV eradication by antiviral therapy (AVT). We conducted a literature search to identify studies that included patients with HCV-associated B-NHL (HCV-NHL) who received AVT, with the intention to treat lymphoma and viral disease at the same time. The primary end point was the correlation of sustained virological response (SVR) under AVT with lymphoma response. Secondary end points were overall lymphoma response rates and HCV-NHL response in correlation with lymphoma subtypes. We included 20 studies that evaluated the efficacy of AVT in HCV-NHL (n = 254 patients). Overall lymphoma response rate through AVT was 73% [95%>confidence interval, (CI) 67-78%]. Throughout studies there was a strong association between SVR and lymphoma response (83% response rate, 95%>CI, 76-88%) compared to a failure in achieving SVR (53% response rate, 95%>CI, 39-67%, P = 0.0002). There was a trend towards favourable response for AVT in HCV-associated marginal zone lymphomas (response rate 81%, 95%>CI, 74-87%) compared to nonmarginal zone origin (response rate 71%, 95%>CI, 61-79%, P = 0.07). In conclusion, in the current meta-analysis, the overall response rate of HCV-NHL under AVT justifies the recommendation for AVT as first-line treatment in patients who do not need immediate conventional treatment. The strong correlation of SVR and lymphoma regression supports the hypothesis of a causal relationship of HCV and lymphomagenesis. PMID:26924533

  8. Rituximab and Interleukin-12 in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-23

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  9. Methylation of miR-155-3p in mantle cell lymphoma and other non-Hodgkin's lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Rita Lh; Wong, Kwan Yeung; Kwong, Yok Lam; Loong, Florence; Leung, Chung Ying; Chu, Raymond; Lam, William Wai Lung; Hui, Pak Kwan; Lai, Raymond; Chim, Chor Sang

    2014-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). In cancers, tumor suppressive microRNAs may be silenced by DNA hypermethylation. By microRNA profiling of representative EBV-negative MCL cell lines before and after demethylation treatment, miR-155-3p was found significantly restored. Methylation-specific PCR, verified by pyrosequencing, showed complete methylation of miR-155-3p in one MCL cell line (REC-1). 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine treatment of REC-1 led to demethylation and re-expression of miR-155-3p. Over-expression of miR-155-3p led to increased sub-G1 apoptotic cells and reduced cellular viability, demonstrating its tumor suppressive properties. By luciferase assay, lymphotoxin-beta (LT-β) was validated as a miR-155-3p target. In 31 primary MCL, miR-155-3p was found hypermethylated in 6(19%) cases. To test if methylation of miR-155-3p was MCL-specific, miR-155-3p methylation was tested in an additional 191 B-cell, T-cell and NK-cell NHLs, yielding miR-155-3p methylation in 66(34.6%) including 36(27%) non-MCL B-cell, 24(53%) T-cell and 6(46%) of NK-cell lymphoma. Moreover, in 72 primary NHL samples with RNA, miR-155-3p methylation correlated with miR-155-3p downregulation (p = 0.024), and LT-β upregulation (p = 0.043). Collectively, miR-155-3p is a potential tumor suppressive microRNA hypermethylated in MCL and other NHL subtypes. As miR-155-3p targets LT-β, which is an upstream activator of the non-canonical NF-kB signaling, miR-155-3p methylation is potentially important in lymphomagenesis. PMID:25211095

  10. Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma Presenting with Atypical Cutaneous Involvement and Diagnosis of ZZ Phenotype Alpha-1 Antitrypsin Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Khawandanah, Mohamad; Kraus, Teresa; Cherry, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous Hodgkin lymphoma is a rare condition. Specific neoplastic involvement can be primary (confined to the skin) or secondary to systemic involvement (metastatic). Cutaneous involvement by HL usually occurs late in the course and is associated with poor prognosis; however in some cases it can exhibit indolent behavior. Skin involvement with nonspecific cutaneous findings may represent a paraneoplastic syndrome. We describe a case of 46-year-old white male patient presented with rash and lymphadenopathy which led to the diagnosis of stage IVE mixed cellularity classical Hodgkin lymphoma with skin involvement. His disease was refractory to multiple lines of chemotherapy including (1) AVD (doxorubicin/bleomycin/dacarbazine), (2) brentuximab, and (3) bendamustine, he later achieved complete remission with (4) GCD (gemcitabine/carboplatin/dexamethasone) salvage regimen. Bleomycin was not given secondary to poor pulmonary function tests. His treatment was complicated after AVD with multiple pneumothoraces which unmasked the diagnosis of ZZ phenotype alpha-1 antitrypsin (ATT) deficiency. Simultaneous existence of Hodgkin lymphoma and ATT is rarely reported. PMID:24955265

  11. Epstein Barr virus-positive mucocutaneous ulcer of the colon associated Hodgkin lymphoma in Crohn’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Neil R; Webster, Bradley; Lee, Kenneth M; Trotman, Judith; Kwan, Yiu-Lam; Napoli, John; Leong, Rupert W

    2015-01-01

    Epstein Barr virus (EBV) positive mucocutaneous ulcers (EBVMCU) form part of a spectrum of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease. They have been reported in the setting of immunosenescence and iatrogenic immunosuppression, affecting the oropharyngeal mucosa, skin and gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Case reports and series to date suggest a benign natural history responding to conservative management, particularly in the GIT. We report an unusual case of EBVMCU in the colon, arising in the setting of immunosuppression in the treatment of Crohn’s disease, with progression to Hodgkin lymphoma 18 mo after cessation of infliximab. The patient presented with multiple areas of segmental colonic ulceration, histologically showing a polymorphous infiltrate with EBV positive Reed-Sternberg-like cells. A diagnosis of EBVMCU was made. The ulcers failed to regress upon cessation of infliximab and methotrexate for 18 mo. Following commencement of prednisolone for her Crohn’s disease, the patient developed widespread Hodgkin lymphoma which ultimately presented as a life-threatening lower GIT bleed requiring emergency colectomy. This is the first report of progression of EBVMCU to Hodgkin lymphoma, in the setting of ongoing iatrogenic immunosuppression and inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:26019475

  12. Hodgkin lymphoma post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following pediatric renal transplant: serial imaging with F-18 FDG PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Makis, William; Lisbona, Robert; Derbekyan, Vilma

    2010-09-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) occurs in 1.2% of pediatric renal transplant patients, and is frequently Epstein-Barr Virus mediated. Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD is the rarest of the 4 types of PTLDs recognized by the World Health Organization, with an incidence of <4% of all PTLD patients. It has a distinct clinical course and treatment from all other types of PTLD. This is a case of a 16-year-old girl who had a renal transplant in 2000 due to Moya Moya disease. Her first F-18 FDG PET/CT done in 2006 showed mildly FDG-avid mediastinal adenopathy (histologically nonspecific reactive nodes), however in 2009, after presenting with fevers, a repeat PET/CT showed extensive intensely FDG-avid disease. Biopsy of a supraclavicular node identified Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD. The patient was treated with chemotherapy and reimaged, showing excellent response to therapy. In contrast, classic PTLD is treated by withdrawal of immunosuppression and administration of Rituximab. F-18 FDG PET/CT is known to be very useful in the staging and monitoring of response to therapy in the setting of classic PTLD. In this case, serial F-18 FDG PET/CT scans proved very useful in the evaluation and follow-up of the rare and distinct Hodgkin Lymphoma PTLD subtype. PMID:20706047

  13. Preclinical Evaluation of the Novel BTK Inhibitor Acalabrutinib in Canine Models of B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Heather L.; Izumi, Raquel; Hamdy, Ahmed; Rothbaum, Wayne; Coombes, Kevin R.; Covey, Todd; Kaptein, Allard; Gulrajani, Michael; Van Lith, Bart; Krejsa, Cecile; Coss, Christopher C.; Russell, Duncan S.; Zhang, Xiaoli; Urie, Bridget K.; London, Cheryl A.; Byrd, John C.; Johnson, Amy J.; Kisseberth, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Acalabrutinib (ACP-196) is a second-generation inhibitor of Bruton agammaglobulinemia tyrosine kinase (BTK) with increased target selectivity and potency compared to ibrutinib. In this study, we evaluated acalabrutinib in spontaneously occurring canine lymphoma, a model of B-cell malignancy similar to human diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). First, we demonstrated that acalabrutinib potently inhibited BTK activity and downstream effectors in CLBL1, a canine B-cell lymphoma cell line, and primary canine lymphoma cells. Acalabrutinib also inhibited proliferation in CLBL1 cells. Twenty dogs were enrolled in the clinical trial and treated with acalabrutinib at dosages of 2.5 to 20mg/kg every 12 or 24 hours. Acalabrutinib was generally well tolerated, with adverse events consisting primarily of grade 1 or 2 anorexia, weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea and lethargy. Overall response rate (ORR) was 25% (5/20) with a median progression free survival (PFS) of 22.5 days. Clinical benefit was observed in 30% (6/20) of dogs. These findings suggest that acalabrutinib is safe and exhibits activity in canine B-cell lymphoma patients and support the use of canine lymphoma as a relevant model for human non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). PMID:27434128

  14. HLA-G expression and role in advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Caocci, G; Greco, M; Fanni, D; Senes, G; Littera, R; Lai, S; Risso, P; Carcassi, C; Faa, G; La Nasa, G

    2016-01-01

    Non-classical human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-G class I molecules have an important role in tumor immune escape mechanisms. We investigated HLA-G expression in lymphonode biopsies taken from 8 controls and 20 patients with advanced-stage classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL), in relationship to clinical outcomes and the HLA-G 14-basepair (14-bp) deletion-insertion (del-ins) polymorphism. Lymphnode tissue sections were stained using a specific murine monoclonal HLA-G antibody. HLA-G protein expression was higher in cHL patients than controls. In the group of PET-2 positive (positron emission tomography carried out after 2 cycles of standard chemotherapy) patients with a 2-year progression-free survival rate (PFS) of 40%, we observed high HLA-G protein expression within the tumor microenvironment with low expression on Hodgkin and Reed-Sternberg (HRS) cells. Conversely, PET-2 negative patients with a PFS of 86% had higher HLA-G protein expression levels on HRS cells compared to the microenvironment. Lower expression on HRS cells was significantly associated with the HLA-G 14-bp ins/ins genotype. These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2.These preliminary data suggest that the immunohistochemical pattern of HLA-G protein expression may represent a useful tool for a tailored therapy in patients with cHL, based on the modulation of HLA-G expression in relation to achievement of negative PET-2. PMID:27349312

  15. Could BEACOPP be the new standard for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma?

    PubMed

    Diehl, V; Behringer, K

    2006-01-01

    In 1992, the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) developed the BEACOPP regimen for further improving the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Since then, BEACOPP has been introduced in 3 different prospective randomized clinical trials of the GHSG to find an equilibrium between maximal efficacy and least toxicity with the BEACOPP principle for the treatment of advanced stage HL. In the HD9 trial of the GHSG, with 1,186 patients, after a median observation time of 7 years, the rates for FFTF are 85 percent and for overall survival 90 percent for dose-escalated BEACOPP, and for COPP/ABVD (C/ABVD comparable to ABVD) the rate for FFTF is 67 percent and for overall survival it is 79 percent. These superior BEACOPP results are obtained inspite of a higher rate of secondary AML/MDS in the escalated BEACOPP arm. The number of toxic deaths during treatment, however, was lower for escalated BEACOPP (1.6 percent) than for C/ABVD (1.8 percent). The majority of patients were treated in an outpatient setting, in a multicenter study with more than 400 centers, including 120 private doctors, located in Germany and 9 other European countries. To reduce acute and long-term toxicity, the GHSG started in the consecutive studies HD12 and HD15 for advanced stage HL to de-escalate BEACOPP by reducing the number of escalated BEACOPP cycles and by applying the baseline dose BEACOPP, a time dense regimen, called BEACOPP-14. The excellent results obtained with the BEACOPP principle challenge the seemingly global consensus that ABVD is the gold standard treatment strategy for advanced stage HL. PMID:16777701

  16. Could BEACOPP be the new standard for the treatment of advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL)?

    PubMed

    Diehl, V; Behringer, K

    2006-11-01

    In 1992, the German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) developed the BEACOPP regimen for further improving the outcome of patients with advanced Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL). Since then, BEACOPP has been introduced in 3 different prospective randomized clinical trials of the GHSG to find an equilibrium between maximal efficacy and least toxicity with the BEACOPP principle for the treatment of advanced stage HL. In the HD9 trial of the GHSG, with 1,186 patients, after a median observation time (mot) of 7 years, the rates for freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) are 85 percent, and for overall survival (OS) 90 percent for dose-escalated BEACOPP, and for COPP/ABVD (C/ABVD comparable to ABVD) the rate for FFTF is 67 percent, and for OS it is 79 percent. These superior BEACOPP results are obtained inspite of a higher rate of secondary AML/MDS in the esc. BEACOPP arm. The number of toxic deaths during treatment, however, was lower for esc. BEACOPP (1.6 percent) than for C/ABVD (1.8 percent). The majority of patients were treated in outpatient setting, in a multicenter study with more than 400 centers, including 120 private doctors, in Germany and 9 other European countries. The reduce acute and longterm toxicity, the GHSG started in the consecutive studies HD12 and HD15 for advanced stage HL to de-escalate BEACOPP by reducing the number of escalated BEACOPP cycles and by applying the baseline-dose BEACOPP, a time-dense regimen, called BEACOPP-14. The excellent results obtained with the BEACOPP principle challenge the seemingly global consensus that ABVD is the gold standard treatment strategy for advanced stage HL. PMID:17118782

  17. Low-Dose Consolidation Radiation Therapy for Early Stage Unfavorable Hodgkin Lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Jordan A.; Wu, Yuan; Prosnitz, Leonard R.; Kim, Grace J.; Beaven, Anne W.; Diehl, Louis F.; Kelsey, Chris R.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The German Hodgkin Study Group (GHSG) trial HD11 established 4 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) and 30 Gy of radiation therapy (RT) as a standard for early stage (I, II), unfavorable Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Additional cycles of ABVD may allow for a reduction in RT dose and improved toxicity profile. Methods and Materials: Patients treated with combined modality therapy at the Duke Cancer Institute for early stage, unfavorable HL by GHSG criteria from 1994 to 2012 were included. Patients who did not undergo post-chemotherapy functional imaging (positron emission tomography or gallium imaging) or who failed to achieve a complete response were excluded. Clinical outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Late effects were also evaluated. Results: A total of 90 patients met inclusion criteria for analysis. Median follow-up was 5 years. Chemotherapy consisted primarily of ABVD (88%) with a median number of 6 cycles. The median dose of consolidation RT was 23.4 Gy. Four patients had relapses, 2 of which were in-field. Ten-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 93% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.82-0.97) and 98% (95% CI: 0.92-0.99), respectively. For the subset of patients (n=46) who received 5 to 6 cycles of chemotherapy and ≤24 Gy, the 10-year PFS and OS values were 88% (95% CI: 70%-96%) and 98% (95% CI: 85% - 99%), respectively. The most common late effect was hypothyroidism (20%) with no cardiac complications. Seven secondary malignancies were diagnosed, with only 1 arising within the RT field. Conclusions: Lower doses of RT may be sufficient when combined with more than 4 cycles of ABVD for early stage, unfavorable HL and may result in a more favorable toxicity profile than 4 cycles of ABVD and 30 Gy of RT.

  18. Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk and Insecticide, Fungicide and Fumigant Use in the Agricultural Health Study

    PubMed Central

    Alavanja, Michael C. R.; Hofmann, Jonathan N.; Lynch, Charles F.; Hines, Cynthia J.; Barry, Kathryn H.; Barker, Joseph; Buckman, Dennis W.; Thomas, Kent; Sandler, Dale P.; Hoppin, Jane A.; Koutros, Stella; Andreotti, Gabriella; Lubin, Jay H.; Blair, Aaron; Beane Freeman, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Farming and pesticide use have previously been linked to non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and multiple myeloma (MM). We evaluated agricultural use of specific insecticides, fungicides, and fumigants and risk of NHL and NHL-subtypes (including CLL and MM) in a U.S.-based prospective cohort of farmers and commercial pesticide applicators. A total of 523 cases occurred among 54,306 pesticide applicators from enrollment (1993–97) through December 31, 2011 in Iowa, and December 31, 2010 in North Carolina. Information on pesticide use, other agricultural exposures and other factors was obtained from questionnaires at enrollment and at follow-up approximately five years later (1999–2005). Information from questionnaires, monitoring, and the literature were used to create lifetime-days and intensity-weighted lifetime days of pesticide use, taking into account exposure-modifying factors. Poisson and polytomous models were used to calculate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) to evaluate associations between 26 pesticides and NHL and five NHL-subtypes, while adjusting for potential confounding factors. For total NHL, statistically significant positive exposure-response trends were seen with lindane and DDT. Terbufos was associated with total NHL in ever/never comparisons only. In subtype analyses, terbufos and DDT were associated with small cell lymphoma/chronic lymphocytic leukemia/marginal cell lymphoma, lindane and diazinon with follicular lymphoma, and permethrin with MM. However, tests of homogeneity did not show significant differences in exposure-response among NHL-subtypes for any pesticide. Because 26 pesticides were evaluated for their association with NHL and its subtypes, some chance finding could have occurred. Our results showed pesticides from different chemical and functional classes were associated with an excess risk of NHL and NHL subtypes, but not all members of any single class of pesticides were

  19. Gene Therapy After Frontline Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With AIDS-Related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-14

    AIDS-related Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; AIDS-related Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; AIDS-related Small Noncleaved Cell Lymphoma; HIV Infection

  20. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. METHODS We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. RESULTS Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. Cancer 2014;120:2507–2513. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. Screening female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma for breast cancer with MRI and mammography detected tumors at an earlier stage than prior studies of mammography alone, although a substantial proportion of

  1. The impact of treatment, socio-demographic and clinical characteristics on health-related quality of life among Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma survivors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Oerlemans, Simone; Mols, Floortje; Nijziel, Marten R; Lybeert, Marnix; van de Poll-Franse, Lonneke V

    2011-09-01

    Cancer survivors are at risk of experiencing adverse physical and psychosocial effects of their cancer and its treatment. Both Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) survivors face problems that can affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The authors systematically reviewed the literature on HRQoL among HL and NHL survivors. A PubMed and PsychINFO literature search for original articles published until May 2011 was performed. Twenty-four articles, which met the predefined inclusion criteria, were subjected to a quality checklist. HL survivors showed the most problems in (role) physical, social and cognitive functioning, general health, fatigue and financial problems. In addition, HL survivors treated with a combination of therapies, with older age and female sex reported worse HRQoL. NHL survivors showed the most problems in physical functioning, appetite loss, vitality and financial problems. Having had chemotherapy was negatively associated with HRQoL, but no differences in chemotherapy regimens were found. Furthermore, in NHL survivors not meeting public exercise guidelines, HRQoL is low but can be improved with more exercise. More research on the longitudinal comparison between HL and NHL survivors and healthy controls should be performed in order to better understand the long-term (side) effects of treatment on HRQoL and possibilities to alleviate these. PMID:21670973

  2. Erythema nodosum associated with diffuse, large B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma detected by FDG PET.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Kerry A; Rodgers, Nicholas G; Kirkwood, Ian D

    2003-08-01

    A patient is described with non-Hodgkin lymphoma and erythematous skin nodules suspected to be erythema nodosum. The patient underwent serial fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), which demonstrated normalization of FDG uptake by the lymphoma after 2 cycles of chemotherapy, but there was new abnormal uptake involving the subcutaneous tissues of the lower extremities. A typical skin lesion was sampled and showed the appearance of erythema nodosum with no evidence of lymphoma. The FDG uptake gradually diminished on serial PET imaging after treatment with nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs. In view of the recognized association of erythema nodosum with malignancy and the differential rate of response to chemotherapy, the lesions of erythema nodosum may be a source of a false-positive PET interpretation, and histologic assessment should be considered. PMID:12897650

  3. Risk Factors for Melanoma Among Survivors of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Clara J.K.; Curtis, Rochelle E.; Dores, Graça M.; Engels, Eric A.; Caporaso, Neil E.; Polliack, Aaron; Warren, Joan L.; Young, Heather A.; Levine, Paul H.; Elmi, Angelo F.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Tucker, Margaret A.; Morton, Lindsay M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Previous studies have reported that survivors of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) have an increased risk of developing cutaneous melanoma; however, risks associated with specific treatments and immune-related risk factors have not been quantified. Patients and Methods We evaluated second melanoma risk among 44,870 1-year survivors of first primary NHL diagnosed at age 66 to 83 years from 1992 to 2009 and included in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare database. Information on NHL treatments, autoimmune diseases, and infections was derived from Medicare claims. Results A total of 202 second melanoma cases occurred among survivors of NHL, including 91 after chronic lymphocytic leukemia/small lymphocytic lymphoma (CLL/SLL) and 111 after other NHL subtypes (cumulative incidence by age 85 years: CLL/SLL, 1.37%; other NHL subtypes, 0.78%). Melanoma risk after CLL/SLL was significantly increased among patients who received infused fludarabine-containing chemotherapy with or without rituximab (n = 18: hazard ratio [HR], 1.92; 95% CI, 1.09 to 3.40; n = 10: HR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.42 to 6.01, respectively). Significantly elevated risks also were associated with T-cell activating autoimmune diseases diagnosed before CLL/SLL (n = 36: HR, 2.27; 95% CI, 1.34 to 3.84) or after CLL/SLL (n = 49: HR, 2.92; 95% CI, 1.66 to 5.12). In contrast, among patients with other NHL subtypes, melanoma risk was not associated with specific treatments or with T-cell/B-cell immune conditions. Generally, infections were not associated with melanoma risk, except for urinary tract infections (CLL/SLL), localized scleroderma, pneumonia, and gastrohepatic infections (other NHLs). Conclusion Our findings suggest immune perturbation may contribute to the development of melanoma after CLL/SLL. Increased vigilance is warranted among survivors of NHL to maximize opportunities for early detection of melanoma. PMID:26240221

  4. Clinical significance of interleukin-4 and interleukin-18 levels in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Soydinc, H O; Guney, N; Basaran, M; Duranyildiz, D; Yasasever, V

    2016-01-01

    Strong evidence indicates that tumor growth can be actively controlled by the immune system, and interleukins (ILs) are known to play an influential role in immune response regulation. Moreover, inflammatory cytokines are significantly involved in lymphoma pathogenesis. We aimed to investigate serum levels of IL-4 and IL-18 in aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (A-NHL) patients and their relationship with prognostic parameters and therapy outcome. These serum factors were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 46 patients with pathologically verified A-NHL before and after chemotherapy, and in 20 healthy controls. No significant difference in serum IL-4 (P = 0.11) and IL-18 (P = 0.261) levels was observed between the A-NHL and controls groups. None of the prognostic parameters analyzed significantly correlated with serum IL-4 concentration, while only lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) measurements were associated with IL-18 values. Serum IL-18 was elevated in the patients with high LDH levels compared to those exhibiting normal values (P = 0.045). In addition, no correlation was found between the concentrations of serum IL-4 and IL-18 in A-NHL patients (r = 0.188, P = 0.187). While IL-18 values did not change, serum IL-4 levels decreased following chemotherapy, independently from treatment response (P = 0.002). Our study is the first to report the response of serum IL-4 levels to chemotherapy. In conclusion, although IL-4 serum concentration has no diagnostic role, it is sensitivite to standard chemotherapy in A-NHL. However, serum IL-18 measurements have no diagnostic or prognostic role in this disease. PMID:27525895

  5. Blood levels of organochlorines before and after chemotherapy among non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients.

    PubMed

    Baris, D; Kwak, L W; Rothman, N; Wilson, W; Manns, A; Tarone, R E; Hartge, P

    2000-02-01

    Several small studies suggest a link between environmental exposure to organochlorine compounds and risk of non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). Because NHL is uncommon, studies of the topic often use a population-based case-control design, in which cases generally are enrolled after treatment has begun. If chemotherapy affects blood levels of organochlorines, exposure will be misclassified and findings distorted. To determine whether chemotherapy alters serum levels of organochlorines in NHL cases, we compared serum samples before and after treatment in 22 cases diagnosed with NHL between March 1994 and August 1995 and enrolled in a clinical trial at the United States National Cancer Institute's Clinical Center. The time difference between pretreatment and posttreatment samples ranged from 15 to 27 months with an average of 20 months. Laboratory analyses were conducted in blinded pretreatment and posttreatment pairs of the subjects. Pretreatment and posttreatment organochlorine serum levels were compared using Pearson correlation coefficient (r) and paired t test. The pretreatment and posttreatment serum levels were highly correlated for 1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene (DDE) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) PCB-138, PCB-153, PCB-156, and total PCBs (ranging from 0.78 to 0.93). Serum levels of all of these organochlorines significantly decreased between initiation and completion of chemotherapy, 25% for total PCB (P = 0.0044), 28% for DDE (P = 0.0014), 25% for PCB-138 (P = 0.0053), 27% for PCB-153 (P = 0.0031), and 29% for PCB-156 (P = 0.045). Neither weight change nor lipid change was correlated with changes in chemical levels. There was no association between the length of time between blood draws and changes in chemical levels. Our data raise the possibility that lymphoma treatment depresses serum organochlorine levels. PMID:10698481

  6. Intensified ChlVPP/ABVVP chemotherapy regimen and pegfilgrastim support in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Cocorocchio, E; Vanazzi, A; Bassi, S; Peccatori, F; Antoniotti, P; Gigli, F; Travaini, L; Piperno, G; Pruneri, G; Preda, L; Biffi, R; Botteri, E; Negri, M; Martinelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We present feasibility, toxicity and efficacy results of an intensified six-cycle ChlVPP/ABVVP regimen in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). From February 2004 to August 2007, 82 consecutive eligible patients were enrolled. According to the Hasenclever index, 64 patients (78%) were considered at low risk, 15 (18%) at intermediate and 3 (4%) at high risk. The most relevant toxicity was haematological: grade 3–4 neutropenia occurred in 32% of patients, grade 3–4 anaemia in 26% of patients. Severe infections and febrile neutropenia were observed in 8% of patients. With a median follow-up of 35 months (range 12–55), the three-year freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) and overall survival (OS) were 75% (95% CI 65%–86%) and 94% (95% CI 87%–99%), respectively. The intensified ChlVPP/ABVVP regimen in advanced HL is effective, does not seem to differ from standard regimens in terms of FFTF and OS and showed a favourable toxicity profile. PMID:22276036

  7. Intensified ChlVPP/ABVVP chemotherapy regimen and pegfilgrastim support in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cocorocchio, E; Vanazzi, A; Bassi, S; Peccatori, F; Antoniotti, P; Gigli, F; Travaini, L; Piperno, G; Pruneri, G; Preda, L; Biffi, R; Botteri, E; Negri, M; Martinelli, G

    2010-01-01

    We present feasibility, toxicity and efficacy results of an intensified six-cycle ChlVPP/ABVVP regimen in advanced Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). From February 2004 to August 2007, 82 consecutive eligible patients were enrolled. According to the Hasenclever index, 64 patients (78%) were considered at low risk, 15 (18%) at intermediate and 3 (4%) at high risk. The most relevant toxicity was haematological: grade 3-4 neutropenia occurred in 32% of patients, grade 3-4 anaemia in 26% of patients. Severe infections and febrile neutropenia were observed in 8% of patients. With a median follow-up of 35 months (range 12-55), the three-year freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) and overall survival (OS) were 75% (95% CI 65%-86%) and 94% (95% CI 87%-99%), respectively. The intensified ChlVPP/ABVVP regimen in advanced HL is effective, does not seem to differ from standard regimens in terms of FFTF and OS and showed a favourable toxicity profile. PMID:22276036

  8. Onco-exaptation of an endogenous retroviral LTR drives IRF5 expression in Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Babaian, A; Romanish, M T; Gagnier, L; Kuo, L Y; Karimi, M M; Steidl, C; Mager, D L

    2016-05-12

    The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) is upregulated in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and is a key regulator of the aberrant transcriptome characteristic of this disease. Here we show that IRF5 upregulation in HL is driven by transcriptional activation of a normally dormant endogenous retroviral LOR1a long terminal repeat (LTR) upstream of IRF5. Specifically, through screening of RNA-sequencing libraries, we detected LTR-IRF5 chimeric transcripts in multiple HL cell lines but not in normal B-cell controls. In HL, the LTR was in an open and hypomethylated epigenetic state, and we further show the LTR is the site of transcriptional initiation. Among HL cell lines, usage of the LTR promoter strongly correlates with overall levels of IRF5 mRNA and protein, indicating that LTR transcriptional awakening is a major contributor to IRF5 upregulation in HL. Taken together, oncogenic IRF5 overexpression in HL is the result of a specific LTR transcriptional activation. We propose that such LTR derepression is a distinct mechanism of oncogene activation ('onco-exaptation'), and that such a mechanism warrants further investigation in molecular and cancer research. PMID:26279299

  9. Efficacy and safety of 90Y ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin) radioimmunotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Witzig, Thomas E

    2003-12-01

    Radioimmunotherapy, an emerging treatment option for certain patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL), enables the targeting of cytotoxic radiation to tumor cells with minimal irradiation of normal cells. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin; Biogen Idec Inc, Cambridge, MA) was approved in February 2002 for the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory low-grade, follicular, or transformed B-cell NHL, including patients with rituximab-refractory NHL. Yttrium 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan is an effective treatment with a consistent overall response rate of 73% to 83%. It has a good safety profile and is generally well tolerated in the indicated population. The results of clinical trials show that (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan can be used effectively and safely in many patients with NHL, including those with mild thrombocytopenia and those with disease that is refractory to rituximab, without the adverse events associated with conventional chemotherapy and external beam radiation therapy. The use of (90)Y ibritumomab tiuxetan does not preclude subsequent therapy with other conventional treatment options. PMID:14710398

  10. Correlation between increased circulating endothelial progenitor cells and stage of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dan-dan; Liu, Hong-li; Bai, Yun-lin; Wu, Bian; Chen, Wei-hong; Ren, Jing-hua; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Kun-yu; Wu, Gang

    2013-04-01

    This study aims to examine the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (cEPCs) in the peripheral blood of patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and their correlation with the tumor stage. Forty-one patients with biopsy-proven NHL and 16 healthy individuals were recruited. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated by density gradient centrifugation, and cEPCs were characterized by triple staining using antibodies against CD133, CD34 and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2, CD309) and quantified by flow cytometry. In NHL patients, the number of cEPCs was significantly greater than in control group (P=0.000). The cEPCs counts in patients with NHL of stage III-IV were significantly greater than in stage I-II (P=0.010). FACS analysis revealed that the number of cEPCs in NHL patients had no correlation with the gender (P=0.401) or the pathological category (P=0.852). It was suggested that the over-expression of cEPCs in NHL patients may serve as a novel biomarker for disease progression in NHL. PMID:23592145

  11. Markers of B-Cell Activation in Relation to Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    De Roos, Anneclaire J; Mirick, Dana K; Edlefsen, Kerstin L; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Kopecky, Kenneth J; Madeleine, Margaret; Magpantay, Larry; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel

    2012-01-01

    B-cell activation biomarkers have been associated with increased risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) in HIV-infected populations. However, whether a similar association may exist in general populations has not been established. We conducted a case-control study within the Women’s Health Initiative Observational Study cohort to measure the B-cell activation biomarkers sCD23, sCD27, sCD30, sCD44, and CXCL13 in serum samples collected an average of 6 years before NHL diagnosis, in 491 cases and 491 controls. Using logistic regression to estimate odds ratios, we observed strong associations between NHL and markers, for all B-cell NHL and for major subtypes. Women with marker levels in the highest-versus-lowest quartile categories of CD23, CD27, CD30, or CXCL13 were at 2.8 to 5.5-fold increased risk of B-NHL. Additionally, there were significant trends of risk with increasing levels of these markers present. Associations were strongest for cases with shortest lag times between blood draw and diagnosis (<3 years). However, there were also significant associations for cases with the longest prediagnostic lag (9–13 years). Taken together, our findings indicate a prominent role for B-cell activation among postmenopausal women in the etiology of B-cell NHL and/or in processes reflective of early disease development, as early as 9 years before diagnosis. PMID:22846913

  12. Exposure to organochlorine pesticides and non-Hodgkin lymphoma: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Dan; Zhou, Tingting; Tao, Yun; Feng, Yaqian; Shen, Xiaoli; Mei, Surong

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence indicates that exposure to organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) could increase non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) risk. However, results from epidemiological studies investigating this association remain controversial. We thus conducted a meta-analysis to quantitatively evaluate the association between OCP exposure and NHL risk. Relevant publications were searched in PubMed, Web of Science, and Embase and identified according to the inclusion criteria. Thirteen studies (6 nested case-control, 1 case-cohort, and 6 case-control) were selected for this meta-analysis. We used odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to estimate the relationship between OCPs exposure and NHL risk. The summary OR for included studies was 1.40 (95% CI 1.27 to 1.56). No overall significant heterogeneity in the OR was observed (Ph = 0.253, I2 = 12.6%). Furthermore, OR estimates in subgroup analyses were discussed, and strong associations were observed for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE, OR = 1.38, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.66), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH, OR = 1.42, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.87), chlordane (OR = 1.93, 95% CI 1.51 to 2.48), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB, OR = 1.54, 95% CI 1.20 to 1.99). This meta-analysis had suggested that total OCPs of interest was significantly positively associated with NHL risk. PMID:27185567

  13. Targeting childhood, adolescent and young adult non-Hodgkin lymphoma: therapeutic horizons.

    PubMed

    Galardy, Paul J; Bedekovics, Tibor; Hermiston, Michelle L

    2016-05-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) is the third most common malignancy in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA). NHL is a diverse set of diseases that arise at key regulatory checkpoints during B or T cell development in the bone marrow, germinal centre or thymus. While advances in the use of conventional cytotoxic agents have led to dramatic improvements in survival, these cures are associated with significant acute and long-term toxicities. Moreover, the prognosis for CAYA patients with relapsed or refractory NHL remains dismal, with the vast majority dying of their disease. Thanks to a large number of candidate-based biological studies, together with large-scale sequencing efforts, there has been an explosion of knowledge regarding the molecular pathophysiology of B- and T-NHL. This has ushered development of a flurry of novel therapeutic approaches that may simultaneously provide new hope for relapsed patients and an opportunity to reduce the therapeutic burden in newly diagnosed CAYA. Here we review a selection of the most promising new therapeutic approaches to these diseases. While the vast majority of these agents are untested in children, on-going work from many cooperative groups will soon explore their use in paediatric disease, in hope of further improving outcomes while maximizing quality of life. PMID:27019108

  14. Occupational exposures and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: Canadian case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Karunanayake, Chandima P; McDuffie, Helen H; Dosman, James A; Spinelli, John J; Pahwa, Punam

    2008-01-01

    Background The objective was to study the association between Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma (NHL) and occupational exposures related to long held occupations among males in six provinces of Canada. Methods A population based case-control study was conducted from 1991 to 1994. Males with newly diagnosed NHL (ICD-10) were stratified by province of residence and age group. A total of 513 incident cases and 1506 population based controls were included in the analysis. Conditional logistic regression was conducted to fit statistical models. Results Based on conditional logistic regression modeling, the following factors independently increased the risk of NHL: farmer and machinist as long held occupations; constant exposure to diesel exhaust fumes; constant exposure to ionizing radiation (radium); and personal history of another cancer. Men who had worked for 20 years or more as farmer and machinist were the most likely to develop NHL. Conclusion An increased risk of developing NHL is associated with the following: long held occupations of faer and machinist; exposure to diesel fumes; and exposure to ionizing radiation (radium). The risk of NHL increased with the duration of employment as a farmer or machinist. PMID:18687133

  15. Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk: Role of Genetic Polymorphisms and Gene-Gene Interactions in DNA repair pathways

    PubMed Central

    Monroy, Claudia M.; Cortes, Andrea C.; Lopez, Mirtha; Rourke, Elizabeth; Etzel, Carol J.; Younes, Anas; Strom, Sara S.; El-Zein, Randa

    2011-01-01

    DNA repair variants may play a potentially important role in an individual’s susceptibility to developing cancer. Numerous studies have reported the association between genetic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in DNA repair genes and different types of hematologic cancers. However, to date, the effects of such SNPs on modulating Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL) risk have not yet been investigated. We hypothesized that gene-gene interaction between candidate genes in Direct Reversal, Nucleotide excision repair (NER), Base excision repair (BER) and Double strand break (DSB) pathways may contribute to susceptibility to HL. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a study on 200 HL cases and 220 controls to assess associations between HL risk and 21 functional SNPs in DNA repair genes. We evaluated potential gene-gene interactions and the association of multiple polymorphisms in a chromosome region using a multi-analytic strategy combining logistic regression, multi-factor dimensionality reduction and classification and regression tree approaches. We observed that, in combination, allelic variants in the XPC Ala499Val, NBN Glu185Gln, XRCC3 Thr241Me, XRCC1 Arg194Trp and XRCC1 399Gln polymorphisms modify the risk for developing HL. Moreover, the cumulative genetic risk score revealed a significant trend where the risk for developing HL increases as the number of adverse alleles in BER and DSB genes increase. These findings suggest that DNA repair variants in BER and DSB pathways may play an important role in the development of HL. PMID:21374732

  16. Widespread Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) among Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Osian, S. Rausch; Leal, A.D.; Allmer, C.; Maurer, M.J.; Nowakowski, G.; Inwards, D.J.; Macon, W.R.; Ehlers, S.L.; Weiner, G.J.; Habermann, T.M.; Cerhan, J.R.; Thompson, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    There are few studies examining complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use and beliefs among non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) survivors. 719 NHL patients from the University of Iowa/Mayo Clinic Molecular Epidemiology Resource who completed the 3-year post-diagnosis questionnaire were included in this study. 636 (89%) reported ever using CAM, with 78% utilizing vitamins, 54% alternative therapies and 45% herbals. Female gender was associated with increased overall CAM use (P<.0001) as well as use of vitamins (P<.0001), herbals (P=.006) and alternative therapy (P=.0002) for cancer. Older age (>60) was associated with increased vitamin use (P=.005) and decreased herbal use (P=.008). Among users, 143 (20%) believe CAM assists healing, 123 (17%) believe CAM relieves symptoms, 122 (17%) believe CAM gives a feeling of control, 110 (15%) believe CAM assists other treatments, 108 (15%) believe CAM boosts immunity, 26 (4%) believe CAM cures cancer, and 36 (5%) believe CAM prevents the spread of cancer. PMID:24745936

  17. Interim FDG-PET Scan in Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Hopes and Caveats

    PubMed Central

    André, M.; Vander Borght, T.; Bosly, A.

    2011-01-01

    FDG-PET has recently emerged as an important tool for the management of Hodgkins lymphoma. Although its use for initial staging and response evaluation at the end of treatment is well established, the place of interim PET for response assessment and subsequent treatment tailoring is still quite controversial. The use of interim PET after a few cycles of chemotherapy may allow treatment reduction for good responders, leading to lesser treatment toxicities as well as early treatment adaptation for bad responders with a potential higher chance for cure. Interpretation of interim PET is a rapidly moving field. Actually, visual interpretation is preferred over quantitative interpretation in this situation. The notion of minimal residual uptake emerged for faint persisting FDG uptake, but has evolved during the recent years. Guidelines using mediastinum and liver as references have been proposed at the expert meeting in Deauville 2009. Actually, several trials are ongoing both for localised and advanced disease to evaluate the FDG-PET potential for early treatment monitoring and tailoring. Until the results of these prospective randomized trials become available, treatment changes according to the interim PET results should remain inappropriate and limited to well-conducted clinical trials. PMID:21234093

  18. Risk-Adapted Treatment of Advanced Hodgkin Lymphoma With PET-CT.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Ryan C; Advani, Ranjana H

    2016-01-01

    Although patients with advanced-stage classic Hodgkin lymphoma have excellent outcomes with contemporary therapy, the outcomes of patients with refractory disease is suboptimal. Identification of these high-risk patients at diagnosis is challenging as the differences in outcomes using clinical criteria are less marked using current modern therapy. Data suggest that an interim PET-CT may be a powerful tool in risk-stratifying patients. Retrospective studies show that a negative interim PET-CT after two to four cycles of ABVD (doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, dacarbazine) is predictive of favorable outcome independent of IPS score. Currently, there are several ongoing trials that aim to determine whether early-response assessment can be used to select patients who might benefit from modifications of subsequent therapy, either by intensifying or abbreviating regimens and/or omitting radiotherapy with promising early results. Longer follow-up is required to assess whether this strategy impacts overall survival (OS). Herein, we review the results of recent trials using interim PET-CT-based adaptive design in the treatment of advanced HL. PMID:27249744

  19. A Prognostic Model Predicting Autologous Transplantation Outcomes in Children, Adolescents and Young Adults with Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Satwani, Prakash; Ahn, Kwang Woo; Carreras, Jeanette; Abdel-Azim, Hisham; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Cashen, Amanda; Chen, Andy I.; Cohen, Jonathon B.; Costa, Luciano J.; Dandoy, Christopher; Fenske, Timothy S.; Freytes, César O.; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Gale, Robert Peter; Ghosh, Nilanjan; Hertzberg, Mark S.; Hayashi, Robert J.; Kamble, Rummurti T.; Kanate, Abraham S.; Keating, Armand; Kharfan-Dabaja, Mohamed A.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Nishihori, Taiga; Olsson, Richard F.; Prestidge, Tim D.; Rolon, Juliana Martinez; Savani, Bipin N.; Vose, Julie M.; Wood, William A.; Inwards, David J.; Bachanova, Veronika; Smith, Sonali M.; Maloney, David G.; Sureda, Anna; Hamadani, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (AutoHCT) is a potentially curative treatment modality for relapsed/refractory Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). However, no large studies have evaluated pre-transplant factors predictive of outcomes of AutoHCT in children, adolescents and young adults (CAYA, age <30 years). In a retrospective study, we analyzed 606 CAYA patients (median age 23 years) with relapsed/refractory HL who underwent AutoHCT between 1995–2010. The probabilities of progression free survival (PFS) at 1, 5 and 10 years were 66% (95% CI: 62–70), 52% (95% CI: 48–57) and 47% (95% CI: 42–51), respectively. Multivariate analysis for PFS demonstrated that at the time of AutoHCT patients with Karnofsky/Lansky score ≥90, no extranodal involvement and chemosensitive disease had significantly improved PFS. Patients with time from diagnosis to first relapse of <1 year had a significantly inferior PFS. A prognostic model for PFS was developed that stratified patients into low, intermediate and high-risk groups, predicting for 5-year PFS probabilities of 72% (95% CI: 64–80), 53% (95% CI: 47–59) and 23% (95% CI: 9–36), respectively. This large study identifies a group of CAYA patients with relapsed/refractory HL who are at high risk for progression after AutoHCT. Such patients should be targeted for novel therapeutic and/or maintenance approaches post-AutoHCT. PMID:26237164

  20. UNRELATED DONOR REDUCED INTENSITY ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR RELAPSED AND REFRACTORY HODGKIN LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Devetten, Marcel P.; Hari, Parameswaran N.; Carreras, Jeanette; Logan, Brent R.; van Besien, Koen; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Freytes, César O.; Peter Gale, Robert; Gibson, John; Giralt, Sergio A.; Goldstein, Steven C.; Gupta, Vikas; Marks, David I.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Vose, Julie M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Anderlini, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may cure patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL), but is associated with a high treatment-related mortality (TRM). Reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative (RIC/NST) conditioning regimens aim to lower TRM. We analyzed the outcomes of 143 patients undergoing unrelated donor RIC/NST HCT for relapsed and refractory HL between 1999 and 2004 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). Patients were heavily pretreated, including autologous HCT in 89%. With a median follow-up of 25 months, the probability of TRM at day 100 and 2 years was 15% (95% CI 10-21%) and 33% (95% CI 25-41%) respectively. The probabilities of progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 30% and 56% at 1 year and 20% and 37% at 2 years. The presence of extranodal disease and KPS < 90 were significant risk factors for TRM, PFS and OS, whereas chemosensitivity at transplantation was not. Dose intensity of the conditioning regimen (RIC vs NST) did not impact outcomes. Unrelated donor HCT with RIC/NST can salvage some patients with relapsed/refractory HL, but relapse remains a common reason for treatment failure. Clinical studies should be aimed at reducing the incidence of acute Graft-versus-Host Disease and relapse. PMID:19135949