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Sample records for hohlraums hlp1 hlp2

  1. Energy coupling in lined hohlraums (HLP1, HLP2, and HLP7)

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) uses high-Z cavities, or hohlraums, to confine x rays for compressing and igniting deuterium-tritium fuel contained in spherical capsules. For laser-driven ICF, the intense laser beams enter the hohlraum through small laser entrance holes (LEHs), heating the high-Z hohlraum walls. The laser-produced radiation heats the unirradiated high-Z walls producing a nearly isotropic radiation environment for spherically compressing the lCF capsule. The radiation flux on the capsule is not completely isotropic, however, because the laser-irradiated area is generally brighter than the surrounding x-ray heated walls and the LEHs do not radiate. Furthermore, the angular distribution of flux on the capsule is time dependent because the unilluminated walls become hotter and more emissive as a function of time, and plasma dynamics cause the laser-irradiated area to move. Symmetric implosions are obtained by dynamically balancing the effects of the LEHs, wall heating, and laser-spot motion.

  2. Laser spot movement inside spherical hohlraums and hohlraum energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenyi, Huo; Zhichao, Li; Ke, Lan; Jie, Liu

    2015-11-01

    According to the ignition experiments performed at the NIF, the radiation asymmetry is a serious problem to be solved in indirect drive ICF. Lan et al. proposed an octahedral spherical hohlraum in order to obtain good radiation symmetry. However, one potential problem of the spherical hohlraum is that the laser beams are close to the hohlraum wall. The wall blow-off may cause the LEH to close faster and result in strong laser absorption in the LEH region. Aimed at alleviating the problem, Lan and Zheng proposed a novel octahedral hohlraum with cylindrical LEHs. In this work, we report the experimental observation of laser spot movements inside the spherical hohlraums with plane LEHs and cylindrical LEHs on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. The experimental results indicate that the cylindrical LEH could dramatically improve the laser propagation inside spherical hohlraum. We also completed the hohlraum energetics experiment on the SGIII-prototype laser facilty. We obtained good reproducible shock velocities in Al and Ti. For the hohlraum used in the experiment, the hohlraum radiation temperature is about 200 eV according to the FXRD's results with the driven laser energy o 5.5 kJ.

  3. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Atherton, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Edwards, M. J.; Haynam, C. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Milovich, J. L.; Schneider, M. B.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J.; Warrick, A. L.; Weber, S. V.

    2010-05-15

    The first series of experiments of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition Hohlraum 'energetics', a term described by four broad goals: (1) measurement of laser absorption by the Hohlraum; (2) measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) determining whether initial Hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF Hohlraum energetics experiments. The Hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (<10%) for Hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF Hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes that have been used to design the Hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition Hohlraum experiments.

  4. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

    2009-11-16

    The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

  5. Study on Octahedral Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Zhichao; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Ren, Guoli; Chen, Yaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we report our recent study on octahedral spherical hohlraum which has six laser entrance holes (LEHs). First, our study shows that the octahedral hohlraums have robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion at hohlraum-to- capsule radius ratio larger than 3.7 and have potential superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. Second, we study the laser arrangement and constraints of the octahedral hohlraums and give their laser arrangement design for ignition facility. Third, we propose a novel octahedral hohlraum with LEH shields and cylindrical LEHs, in order to increase the laser coupling efficiency and improve the capsule symmetry and to mitigate the influence of the wall blowoff on laser transport. Fourth, we study the sensitivity of capsule symmetry inside the octahedral hohlraums to laser power balance, pointing accuracy, deviations from the optimal position and target fabrication accuracy, and compare the results with that of tradiational cylinders and rugby hohlraums. Finally, we present our recent experimental studies on the octahedral hohlraums on SGIII prototype laser facility.

  6. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  7. Reproducibility of NIF hohlraum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Casey, D. T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B. L.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Grim, G. P.; Hoover, M.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P. A.; Moore, A. S.; Pino, J. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy of experimentally ``tuning'' the implosion in a NIF hohlraum ignition target towards increasing hot-spot pressure, areal density of compressed fuel, and neutron yield relies on a level of experimental reproducibility. We examine the reproducibility of experimental measurements for a collection of 15 identical NIF hohlraum experiments. The measurements include incident laser power, backscattered optical power, x-ray measurements, hot-electron fraction and energy, and target characteristics. We use exact statistics to set 1-sigma confidence levels on the variations in each of the measurements. Of particular interest is the backscatter and laser-induced hot-spot locations on the hohlraum wall. Hohlraum implosion designs typically include variability specifications [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. We describe our findings and compare with the specifications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Gas-filled hohlraum fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.A.; Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Bush, H. Jr.; Gomez, V.M.; Moore, J.E.; Stone, G.F.

    1995-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have fabricated and fielded gas-filled hohlraums at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nova laser. Fill pressures of 1--5 atmospheres have been typical. We describe the production of the parts, their assembly and fielding. Emphasis is placed on the production of gas-tight polyimide windows and the fielding apparatus and procedure.

  9. Laser-plasma instability in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    A gas-filled hohlraum designed so as to approach plasma conditions expected in future ignition hohlraums has been fielded at the Nova laser. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of these Nova hohlraums predicts reasonably well the measured plasma parameters. The measured reflectivity of a probe beam by Stimulated Brillouin scattering is modest. Some observed dependencies of reflectivity on laser and plasma parameters are understood theoretically, while others are not.

  10. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  11. Hohlraum Modeling of Hybrid Shock Ignition Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock Ignition (HSI) combines a hohlraum driven capsule with a directly driven shock for heating. Unlike standard Shock Ignition, the capsule is imploded with X-rays from a laser driven hohlraum to compress the fuel, which is too cold to ignite. However, as in Shock Ignition, the compressed fuel is subsequently heated to ignition temperatures with a directly-driven shock. The use of indirect and direct drive in the same target necessitates complex beam geometry, and thus HSI is being pursued with spherical hohlraums. More importantly for the NIF, the beam repointing required for polar direct drive will not be needed for the implosion phase with this target. Spherical hohlraums have been fielded previously at the OMEGA laser as a part of the Tetrahedral Hohlraum Campaign. They were originally proposed as an alternative to cylindrical hohlraums to achieve highly symmetric radiation drive. The new HSI hohlraums will require six laser entrance holes in hexahedral symmetry to accommodate all beams. This presentation will show radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of the current hexahedral OMEGA hohlraum design, as well as benchmark calculations of the old tetrahedral targets. Supported under the US DOE by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-24945.

  12. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  13. Radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.J.; Kauffman, R.L.; Darrow, C.B.

    1995-11-03

    Nearly 10 years of Nova experiments and analysis have lead to a relatively detailed quantitative and qualitative understanding of radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums. Our most successful quantitative modelling tool is 2D Lasnex numerical simulations. Analysis of the simulations provides us with insight into the details of the hohlraum drive. In particular we find hohlraum radiation conversion efficiency becomes quite high with longer pulses as the accumulated, high Z blow-off plasma begins to radiate. Extensive Nova experiments corroborate our quantitative and qualitative understanding.

  14. Analysis of Reduced-Scale Nova Hohlraum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L. V.; Berger, R. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Langdon, A. B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Orzechowski, T. J.; Rosen, M. D.; Springer, P. T.; Still, C. H.; Suter, L. J.; Williams, E. A.; Blain, M. A.

    1996-11-01

    Establishing the practical limit on achievable radiation temperature in high-Z hohlraums is of interest both for ignition targets( S.M. Haan, et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2480 (1995).) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and for high energy density physics experiments( S.B. Libby, Energy and Technology Review, UCRL-52000-94-12, 23 (1994)). Two related efforts are underway to define the physics issues of high energy density hohlraum targets: 1) experiments on the Nova laser in reduced scale hohlraums, and 2) evaluation of high-temperature hohlraums designs for the NIF. Reduced scale Nova hohlraums approach conditions relevant to NIF high temperature designs, albeit at smaller scale. Analysis of reduced-scale experiments on Nova therefore provides valuable physics information for evaluating the capabilities of NIF for producing high energy density in hohlraums. Simulations of Nova reduced scale hohlraum experiments will be presented, and the relevance to a range of NIF hohlraum target designs will be discussed.

  15. Pulsed power driven hohlraum research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Allshouse, G.A.

    1996-06-01

    Three pulsed power driven hohlraum concepts are being investigated at Sandia for application to inertial fusion research. These hohlraums are driven by intense proton and Li ion beams as well as by two different types of z-pinch x-ray sources. Research on these hohlraum systems will continue on Sandia`s PBFA II-Z facility.

  16. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  17. State of Modeling Symmetry in Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    Modeling radiation drive asymmetry is challenging problem whose agreement with data depends on the hohlraum gas fill density. Modeling to date uses the HYDRA code with crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) calculated separately, and backscattered light removed from the input laser. For high fill hohlraums (~>1 mg/cc), matching symmetry requires ad hoc adjustments to CBET during picket and peak of drive. For near-vacuum hohlraums, there is little CBET or backscatter, and drive is more waist-high than predicted. For intermediate fill densities (~0.6 mg/cc) there appears to be a region of small CBET and backscatter where symmetry is reasonably well modeled. A new technique where backscatter and CBET are done “inline” appears it could bring high fill simulations closer to data.

  18. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  19. In Pursuit of a More Ideal Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; Thomas, Cliff; Baumann, Ted; Berger, Richard; Biener, Monika; Callahan, Debbie; Celliers, Peter; Elsner, Fred; Felker, Sean; Hamza, Alex; Hinkel, Denise; Huang, Haibo; Jones, Oggie; Landen, Nino; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Rick; Strozzi, David

    2015-11-01

    Current hohlraum designs have a number of issues which are detrimental to achieving ignition; including LPI, CBET, hot electrons, non-ideal spectral emission(gold M-Band) and wall motion leading to implosions with large symmetry swings. We are undertaking a campaign on the NIF to address many of these issues through the use of thin wall liners. We will present a comparison between three experiments, a gold hohlraum, a copper-lined hohlraum and a zinc oxide foam-lined hohlraum and discuss our future experimental plans which will utilize very low density foam liners, ~ 10 mg/cc, and low gas fill densities, <0.6 mg/cc. This combination is predicted in simulations to greatly reduce the expansion of the gold wall leading to reduced symmetry swings, result in large reductions in LPI(SBS, SRS and 2Wpe) and eliminate gold m-band emission. The removal of the gold m-band spectra reduces the ablator-fuel instability growth and allows the use of undoped or less doped capsules which in turn reduces the ablation front growth factors leading to a more stable implosion. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Improved hohlraums for high foot implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ralph, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Kline, J. L.; Turnbull, D. P.; Call, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent High Foot implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), where the laser power is high early in time, have resulted in record neutron yields. In these implosions, there is evidence of low mode radiation drive asymmetries impacting both in-flight and hot spot symmetry. Simulations suggest these asymmetries reduce neutron yield 2-4x, and thus improving the hohlraum should ameliorate implosion performance. To improve symmetry, a hohlraum 1.18x larger with a lower gas fill density has been designed and is being tested. This larger hohlraum with intermediate fill density has performed well for the shorter pulse lengths driving implosions with high-density carbon (HDC) ablators. The challenge here is to maintain the predictability shown by simulation at the longer pulse lengths necessary for plastic ablators. Upcoming shots provide the first tests of drive symmetry and deficit as well as laser backscatter in these larger hohlraums with an intermediate gas fill density using the longer High Foot pulse. Results will be presented and compared to design. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. The physics of radiation driven ICF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1995-08-07

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we have recently demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next proposed laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The target uses the recently declassified indirect drive (sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}radiation drive{close_quotes}) approach which converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray {open_quotes}oven{close_quotes} (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we`ve demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In this lecture we briefly review the fundamentals of ICF, and describe the capsule implosion symmetry advantages of the hohlraum approach. We then concentrate on a quantitative understanding of the scaling of radiation drive with hohlraum size and wall material, and with laser pulse length and power. We demonstrate that coupling efficiency of x-ray drive to the capsule increases as we proceed from Nova to the NIF and eventually to a reactor, thus increasing the gain of the system.

  3. Analytic Models of High-Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W.A.; Olson, R.E.; Spielman, R.B.; Leeper, R.J.

    2000-11-29

    A unified set of high-temperature-hohlraum models has been developed. For a simple hohlraum, P{sub s} = [A{sub s}+(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4} + (4V{sigma}/c)(dT{sub R}{sup r}/dt) where P{sub S} is the total power radiated by the source, A{sub s} is the source area, A{sub W} is the area of the cavity wall excluding the source and holes in the wall, A{sub H} is the area of the holes, {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, T{sub R} is the radiation brightness temperature, V is the hohlraum volume, and c is the speed of light. The wall albedo {alpha}{sub W} {triple_bond} (T{sub W}/T{sub R}){sup 4} where T{sub W} is the brightness temperature of area A{sub W}. The net power radiated by the source P{sub N} = P{sub S}-A{sub S}{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4}, which suggests that for laser-driven hohlraums the conversion efficiency {eta}{sub CE} be defined as P{sub N}/P{sub LASER}. The characteristic time required to change T{sub R}{sup 4} in response to a change in P{sub N} is 4V/C[(l{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]. Using this model, T{sub R}, {alpha}{sub W}, and {eta}{sub CE} can be expressed in terms of quantities directly measurable in a hohlraum experiment. For a steady-state hohlraum that encloses a convex capsule, P{sub N} = {l_brace}(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}+[(1{minus}{alpha}{sub C})(A{sub S}+A{sub W}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub C}/A{sub T}]{r_brace}{sigma}T{sub RC}{sup 4} where {alpha}{sub C} is the capsule albedo, A{sub C} is the capsule area, A{sub T} {triple_bond} (A{sub S}+A{sub W}+A{sub H}), and T{sub RC} is the brightness temperature of the radiation that drives the capsule. According to this relation, the capsule-coupling efficiency of the baseline National-Ignition-Facility (NIF) hohlraum is 15% higher than predicted by previous analytic expressions. A model of a hohlraum that encloses a z pinch is also presented.

  4. Status Update: Modeling Energy Balance in NIF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    We have developed a standardized methodology to model hohlraum drive in NIF experiments. We compare simulation results to experiments by 1) comparing hohlraum xray fluxes and 2) comparing capsule metrics, such as bang times. Long-pulse, high gas-fill hohlraums require a 20-28% reduction in simulated drive and inclusion of ~15% backscatter to match experiment through (1) and (2). Short-pulse, low fill or near-vacuum hohlraums require a 10% reduction in simulated drive to match experiment through (2); no reduction through (1). Ongoing work focuses on physical model modifications to improve these matches.

  5. Novel spherical hohlraum with cylindrical laser entrance holes and shields

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-09-15

    Our recent works [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 052704 (2014)] have shown that the octahedral spherical hohlraums are superior to the cylindrical hohlraums in both higher symmetry during the capsule implosion and lower backscatter without supplementary technology. However, both the coupling efficiency from the drive laser energy to the capsule and the capsule symmetry decrease remarkably when larger laser entrance holes (LEHs) are used. In addition, the laser beams injected at angles > 45° transport close to the hohlraum wall, thus the wall blowoff causes the LEH to close faster and results in strong laser plasma interactions inside the spherical hohlraums. In this letter, we propose a novel octahedral hohlraum with LEH shields and cylindrical LEHs to alleviate these problems. From our theoretical study, with the LEH shields, the laser coupling efficiency is significantly increased and the capsule symmetry is remarkably improved in the spherical hohlraums. The cylindrical LEHs take advantage of the cylindrical hohlraum near the LEH and mitigate the influence of the blowoff on laser transport inside a spherical hohlraum. The cylindrical LEHs can also be applied to the rugby and elliptical hohlraums.

  6. First Hohlraum Drives Studies on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald,E.; Landen, O.; Suter, L.; et al; .

    2006-01-01

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the first four laser beams have activated the indirect-drive experimental capabilities and tested radiation temperature limits imposed by hohlraum plasma filling. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 9 TW, 1 to 9 ns long square pulses and energies of up to 17 kJ to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed previously at other laser facilities. Furthermore, for a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of plasma filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with analytical modeling that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits on full NIF (1.8 MJ) that are significantly greater than required for ignition hohlraums.

  7. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  8. Exploring symmetry in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with near-vacuum hohlraums, which utilize a minimal but non-zero helium fill, have demonstrated performance improvements relative to conventional gas-filled (0.96 - 1.6 mg/cc helium) hohlraums: minimal backscatter, reduced capsule drive degradation, and minimal suprathermal electron generation. Because this is a low laser-plasma interaction platform, implosion symmetry is controlled via pulse-shaping adjustments to laser power balance. Extending this platform to high-yield designs with high-density carbon capsules requires achieving adequate symmetry control throughout the pulse. In simulations, laser propagation is degraded suddenly by hohlraum wall expansion interacting with ablated capsule material. Nominal radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have not yet proven predictive on symmetry of the final hotspot, and experiments show more prolate symmetry than preshot calculations. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the discrepancy between simulated and measured symmetry and on alternate designs for symmetry control through varying cone fraction, trade-offs between laser power and energy, and modifications to case-to-capsule ratio. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Progress in hohlraum physics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D. Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Amendt, P. A.; Baker, K. L.; Bradley, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D.; Hopkins, L. B.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Advances in hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were made this past year in hohlraum efficiency, dynamic shape control, and hot electron and x-ray preheat control. Recent experiments are exploring hohlraum behavior over a large landscape of parameters by changing the hohlraum shape, gas-fill, and laser pulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling, which uses measured backscatter, shows that gas-filled hohlraums utilize between 60% and 75% of the laser power to match the measured bang-time, whereas near-vacuum hohlraums utilize 98%. Experiments seem to be pointing to deficiencies in the hohlraum (instead of capsule) modeling to explain most of the inefficiency in gas-filled targets. Experiments have begun quantifying the Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) rate at several points in time for hohlraum experiments that utilize CBET for implosion symmetry. These measurements will allow better control of the dynamic implosion symmetry for these targets. New techniques are being developed to measure the hot electron energy and energy spectra generated at both early and late time. Rugby hohlraums offer a target which requires little to no CBET and may be less vulnerable to undesirable dynamic symmetry “swings.” A method for detecting the effect of the energetic electrons on the fuel offers a direct measure of the hot electron effects as well as a means to test energetic electron mitigation methods. At higher hohlraum radiation temperatures (including near vacuum hohlraums), the increased hard x-rays (1.8–4 keV) may pose an x-ray preheat problem. Future experiments will explore controlling these x-rays with advanced wall materials.

  10. Octahedral spherical hohlraum and its laser arrangement for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; He, Xian-Tu; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Wudi; Lai, Dongxian

    2014-05-15

    A recent publication [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014)] proposed a spherical hohlraum with six laser entrance holes of octahedral symmetry at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. This paper extends the previous one by studying the laser arrangement and constraints of octahedral hohlraum in detail. As a result, it has serious beam crossing at θ{sub L}≤45°, and θ{sub L}=50° to 60° is proposed as the optimum candidate range for the golden octahedral hohlraum, here θ{sub L} is the opening angle that the laser quad beam makes with the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) normal direction. In addition, the design of the LEH azimuthal angle should avoid laser spot overlapping on hohlraum wall and laser beam transferring outside hohlraum from a neighbor LEH. The octahedral hohlraums are flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches. This paper also applies the octahedral hohlraum to the recent proposed hybrid indirect-direct drive approach.

  11. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M -band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  12. Gas-filled hohlraum study on Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Huasen; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Experimental studies on gas-filled hohlraum were performed extensively in recent years on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. These experiments employed Au hohlraums within C5H12 gas fill heated by smoothing beams. In the first round of experiments, although the low-Z gas fill impeded the blow-off plasma ablated from hohlraum wall, the x-ray flux from the LEH decreased dramatically compared with the vacuum hohlraum. Further analysis of several ways of energy deposition including heating the gas-fill, extra scattered light and ablating the LEH membrane, revealed that too much laser energy were wasted in exploding the LEH membrane if we use a 1 ns square pulse. After we introduced a low power prepulse to intentionally exploding the membrane, the behavior of the x-ray flux from the gas-filled hohlraum is identical with the vacuum hohlraum. In subsequent studies, the motion of x-ray spot and corona plasma has also been studied using the gas-filled hohlraum. We obtained high quality data of the gas/wall interface and the boundary of the ablated wall near the LEH. The result agrees with that in simulation. However, there is a discrepancy between the experiment and the simulation in the spatial feature of the ablated wall near the LEH extracted from M-band x-ray image.

  13. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  14. Approach to Developing Predictive Capability for Hohlraum Drive and Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    Currently, we do not have the ability to predict the hohlraum drive and symmetry without requiring ad hoc adjustments to physics models. This document describes a plan for code improvements and focused physics validation experiments.

  15. Kinetic modeling of Nernst effect in magnetized hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, A. S.; Ridgers, C. P.; Kingham, R. J.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-04-01

    We present nanosecond time-scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of nonlocal behavior, we demonstrate that effects such as anomalous heat flow are induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. We show magnetic field amplification up to a factor of 3 from Nernst compression into the hohlraum wall. The magnetic field is also expelled towards the hohlraum axis due to Nernst advection faster than frozen-in flux would suggest. Nonlocality contributes to the heat flow towards the hohlraum axis and results in an augmented Nernst advection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling.

  16. Hohlraum Drive and Asymmetry in High Foot Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, D.; Hurricane, O.; Casey, D.; Dewald, E.; Dittrich, T.; Doeppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A.; Lepape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H.; Ross, S.; Salmonson, J.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy in the high foot campaign on NIF has been to take reasonably small steps away from a working design, which means that we have a very rich database to understand both capsule and hohlraum performance. Over the course of the campaign, we have changed the laser power and energy, used both gold and depleted uranium hohlraums, and varied the thickness of the ablator. Each of these changes has an impact on the hohlraum drive and drive asymmetry, as measured by the implosion shape. In this talk, we will discuss what we have learned about hohlraum performance and residual kinetic energy resulting from drive asymmetry in the high foot database. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  17. Hohlraum drive and implosion experiments on Nova. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1994-09-08

    Experiments on Nova have demonstrated hohlraum radiation temperatures up to 300 eV and in lower temperature experiments reproducible time integrated symmetry to 1--2%. Detailed 2-D LASNEX simulations satisfactorily reproduce Nova`s drive and symmetry scaling data bases. Hohlraums has been used for implosion experiments achieving convergence ratios (initial capsule radius/final fuel radius) up to 24 with high density glass surrounding a hot gas fill.

  18. Energetics of multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Berger, R. L.; Callahan, D.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; London, R. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P. A.; Ross, J. S.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas at conditions similar to those expected in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with electron densities of 5.5x10{sup 20} and 9x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} are heated by 14.3 kJ of laser energy (wavelength 351 nm) to electron temperatures of 3 keV and backscattered laser light is measured. Landau damping of the ion acoustic waves is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO{sub 2} or CF{sub 4} gas. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering of a 351 nm probe beam is found to decrease monotonically with increasing Landau damping, accompanied by a comparable increase in the transmission. More efficient energy coupling into the hohlraum by suppression of backscatter from the heater beams results in an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics. The reduction in backscatter is reproduced by linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in inertial confinement fusion relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. These findings have led to the inclusion of multiple-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  19. Hohlraum energetics study on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Zou, Shiyang; Zhang, Huasen; Zhao, Yiqing; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Xin; Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of the hohlraum drive needs to use a variety of methods resolving different photon ranges and multiple viewing areas. In recent years, hohlraum physics have been studied extensively on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. These experiments employed mainly Au hohlraums (vaccum or gas-filled, with capsule or not) heated by smoothing beams where scattering loss is less than 10%. With compact flat-response x-ray detector array and 14-channel soft x-ray spectrometer, the radiation flux from several specific regions inside the hohlraum is measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) or the diagnostic hole (DH) at different photon ranges and multiple lines of sight. The difference in radiation between the laser spot and the reemitting wall is quantitatively studied to interpret flux onto the capsule. The motion of laser ablated bubble and radiation ablated blow-off plasma is directly measured, and their effects on laser absorption and x-ray escaping LEH are evaluated. In addition, the radiation driven shock propagating in Al and Ti placed on the hohlraum wall, which is more representative of the drive inside the hohlraum, provide a unique information of radiation.

  20. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  1. Characterizing the hohlraum radiation via one-end driven experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang

    2014-07-15

    A new experiment is designed and performed on the Shenguang III laser facility with the first eight available beams to characterizing the hohlraum radiation, in which the hohlraum with laser entrance holes on both ends is driven through one-end only. The experiment enables us to identify the x-ray radiations originated from the hohlraum reemission wall and high-Z bubble plasmas utilizing their position and spectral characters, which provides a better test on the associated hohlraum models. The total and M-band x-ray radiation fluxes are measured with the flat response x-ray detectors and the filtered M-band x-ray detectors, respectively. Numerical simulations are conducted with the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-INTEGRATION using the multi-group radiation transfer and/or diffusion models. It is found that the experimentally measured temporal profiles and angular distributions of hohlraum radiation are in good agreement with the predictions of simulation using radiation transfer models, but differ significantly from the results obtained with the multi-group radiation diffusion calculations. We thus note that to accurately represent the hohlraum radiation, a true radiation transfer model is essential.

  2. The Hohlraum Drive Campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, John D.

    2013-10-01

    The Hohlraum drive effort on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has three primary goals: 1) improve hohlraum performance by improving laser beam propagation, reducing backscatter from laser plasma interactions (LPI), controlling x-ray and electron preheat, and modifying the x-ray drive spectrum; 2) improve understanding of crossbeam energy transfer physics to better evaluate this as a symmetry tuning method; and 3) improve modeling in order to find optimum designs. Our experimental strategy for improving performance explores the impact of significant changes to the hohlraum shape, wall material, gasfill composition, and gasfill density on integrated implosion experiments. We are investigating the performance of a rugby-shaped design that has a significantly larger diameter (7 mm) at the waist than our standard 5.75 mm diameter cylindrical-shaped hohlraum but maintains approximately the same wall area. We are also exploring changes to the gasfill composition in cylindrical hohlraums by using neopentane at room temperature to compare with our standard helium gasfill. In addition, we are also investigating higher He gasfill density (1.6 mg/cc vs nominal 0.96 mg/cc) and increased x-ray drive very early in the pulse. Besides these integrated experiments, our strategy includes experiments testing separate aspects of the hohlraum physics. These include time-resolved and time-integrated measurements of cross-beam transfer rates and laser-beam spatial power distribution at early and late times using modified targets. Non-local thermal equilibrium modeling and heat transport relevant to ignition experiments are being studied using sphere targets on the Omega laser system. These simpler targets provide benchmarks for improving our modeling tools. This talk will summarize the results of the Hohlraum Drive campaign and discuss future directions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  3. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  4. Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-05

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Hohlraum Radiation Conditions: Spatial and Spectral Variations due to Sample Position, Beam Pointing, and Hohlraum Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D H; Landen, O L; MacFarlane, J J

    2005-01-25

    View-factor simulations are presented of the spatially varying radiation conditions inside double-ended gold hohlraums and single-ended gold hohlraums (''halfraums'') used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) physics experiments [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004); M. D. Rosen, Phys. Plasmas 3, 1803 (1996)]. It is shown that in many circumstances, the common assumption that the hohlraum ''drive'' can be characterized by a single temperature is too simplistic. Specifically, the radiation conditions seen by an experimental package can differ significantly from the wall reemission measured through diagnostic holes or laser entrance holes (LEHs) by absolutely calibrated detectors. Furthermore, even in situations where the radiation temperature is roughly the same for diagnostics and experimental packages, or for packages at different locations, the spectral energy distributions can vary significantly, due to the differing fractions of reemitting wall, laser hot spots, and LEHs seen from different locations. We find that the spatial variation of temperature, and especially the differences between what diagnostics looking in the LEH measure vs. the radiation temperature on wall-mounted experimental packages, is generally greater for double-ended hohlraums than it is for halfraums. View-factor simulations can also be used to explore experimental variables (halfraum length and geometry, sample position, and beam pointing) that can be adjusted in order to, for example, maximize the radiation flux onto a sample, or other package. In this vein, simulations of hohlraums and halfraums with LEH shields are also presented.

  6. Lead (Pb) hohlraum: target for inertial fusion energy.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Amendt, P; Atherton, L J; Dunne, M; Glenzer, S H; Lindl, J D; Meeker, D; Moses, E I; Nikroo, A; Wallace, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress towards demonstrating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has sparked wide interest in Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) for carbon-free large-scale power generation. A LIFE-based fleet of power plants promises clean energy generation with no greenhouse gas emissions and a virtually limitless, widely available thermonuclear fuel source. For the LIFE concept to be viable, target costs must be minimized while the target material efficiency or x-ray albedo is optimized. Current ICF targets on the NIF utilize a gold or depleted uranium cylindrical radiation cavity (hohlraum) with a plastic capsule at the center that contains the deuterium and tritium fuel. Here we show a direct comparison of gold and lead hohlraums in efficiently ablating deuterium-filled plastic capsules with soft x rays. We report on lead hohlraum performance that is indistinguishable from gold, yet costing only a small fraction. PMID:23486285

  7. New Advanced Hohlraums Utilizing Unique Geometries and Foam Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. S.; Tabak, M.; Amendt, P. A.; Hammer, J. H.; Afeyan, B.; Baker, K. L.; Biener, M. M.; Kim, S. H.; MacLaren, S. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    To date the indirect drive experiments on the NIF have principally utilized cylindrical gas-filled hohlraums that have been subject to a number of challenges, including generating inner cone SRS backscatter (up to 18 percent of total laser energy), producing hot electrons, and requiring cross beam energy transfer to inner beams to obtain adequate drive symmetry. Proposed new hohlraum concepts address the challenges facing standard cylindrical gas-filled hohlraums by having the beams traverse shorter, hotter plasmas to reduce backscatter, shielding the capsule from direct illumination from the laser spots, or avoiding cross-beam transfer altogether by not allowing crossing of the beams. These concepts also utilize high-Z and mid-Z foams to increase stability of the wall/fill interface, increase x-ray conversion efficiency, reduce backscatter, reduce symmetry swings, and allow smaller, more efficient, laser entrance holes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Lead (Pb) Hohlraum: Target for Inertial Fusion Energy

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Atherton, L. J.; Dunne, M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lindl, J. D.; Meeker, D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikroo, A.; Wallace, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress towards demonstrating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has sparked wide interest in Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) for carbon-free large-scale power generation. A LIFE-based fleet of power plants promises clean energy generation with no greenhouse gas emissions and a virtually limitless, widely available thermonuclear fuel source. For the LIFE concept to be viable, target costs must be minimized while the target material efficiency or x-ray albedo is optimized. Current ICF targets on the NIF utilize a gold or depleted uranium cylindrical radiation cavity (hohlraum) with a plastic capsule at the center that contains the deuterium and tritium fuel. Here we show a direct comparison of gold and lead hohlraums in efficiently ablating deuterium-filled plastic capsules with soft x rays. We report on lead hohlraum performance that is indistinguishable from gold, yet costing only a small fraction. PMID:23486285

  9. Radiosity Modeling of Radiation Transport in Z Hohlraum Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    1998-11-01

    Vacuum radiation transport in three-dimensional geometry has been modeled, with simple physics assumptions, using the Lightscape^TM commercial radiosity code. This code utilizes progressive, hierarchical radiosity techniques and adaptive mesh refinement to allow greater spatial resolution and unlimited geometric model complexity compared to traditional radiosity methods. Applications to current Z experiments at Sandia will be presented, including (a) uniformity of the radiation flux driving shock physics samples in offset and direct-viewing secondary hohlraums, (b) radiation temperature gradients and capsule illumination in on-axis secondaries driven by static-walled primary hohlraums, and (c) radiation loss from primary hohlraums into the Z anode-cathode gap and feed hardware.

  10. Scaling and optimization of the radiation temperature in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; LASH,JOEL S.; VESEY,ROGER A.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; NASH,THOMAS J.; DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-04-13

    The authors have constructed a quasi-analytic model of the dynamic hohlraum. Solutions only require a numerical root solve, which can be done very quickly. Results of the model are compared to both experiments and full numerical simulations with good agreement. The computational simplicity of the model allows one to find the behavior of the hohlraum temperature as a function the various parameters of the system and thus find optimum parameters as a function of the driving current. The model is used to investigate the benefits of ablative standoff and axial convergence.

  11. Insensitivity of the octahedral spherical hohlraum to power imbalance, pointing accuracy, and assemblage accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Wen Yi; Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2014-11-15

    The random radiation asymmetry in the octahedral spherical hohlraum [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 0 10704 (2014)] arising from the power imbalance, pointing accuracy of laser quads, and the assemblage accuracy of capsule is investigated by using the 3-dimensional view factor model. From our study, for the spherical hohlraum, the random radiation asymmetry arising from the power imbalance of the laser quads is about half of that in the cylindrical hohlraum; the random asymmetry arising from the pointing error is about one order lower than that in the cylindrical hohlraum; and the random asymmetry arising from the assemblage error of capsule is about one third of that in the cylindrical hohlraum. Moreover, the random radiation asymmetry in the spherical hohlraum is also less than the amount in the elliptical hohlraum. The results indicate that the spherical hohlraum is more insensitive to the random variations than the cylindrical hohlraum and the elliptical hohlraum. Hence, the spherical hohlraum can relax the requirements to the power imbalance and pointing accuracy of laser facility and the assemblage accuracy of capsule.

  12. High flux symmetry of the spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs at the hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; He, Xian-Tu; Lai, Dongxian; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-01-15

    We propose a spherical hohlraum with octahedral six laser entrance holes at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and low backscatter without supplementary technology. To produce an ignition radiation pulse of 300 eV, it needs 1.5 MJ absorbed laser energy in such a golden octahedral hohlraum, about 30% more than a traditional cylinder. Nevertheless, it is worth for a high symmetry and low backscatter. The proposed octahedral hohlraum is also flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches.

  13. Radiation Symmetry in Sandia Z Accelerator Dynamic Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Chandler, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hebron, D. E.; Lash, J. S.; Porter, J. L.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Slutz, S. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    Although the dynamic hohlraum has achieved the highest radiation temperatures generated by any z-pinch configuration, a number of critical issues remain before the high-yield ICF concept of an internally-located capsule can be considered credible. Of particular importance to the imploding capsule, embedded in foam, is the thermal radiation asymmetry in the hohlraum r-z plane, arising from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable z-pinch wire array forming the radiation cavity. Numerical simulation leads to an inadequate understanding of the RT instability growth and form, since, among other things, there is a discrepancy in the calculated and observed density variations between bubble and spikes. Likewise, by looking into the hohlraum open end for a direct observation, a wall emission uniformity measurement is precluded by the shallow viewing angle. However, to overcome this constraint, a semi-closed hohlraum configuration is described here, where a half W/half Al wire array permits a direct view through the low-opacity Al plasma and the optically thin foam. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a Lockheed Martin Company, for the USDOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Hohlraum Te Inferred from Au L-Shell Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Brown, G. V.; Callahan, D.; Doeppner, T.; Fournier, K. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kauffman, R.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Ross, J. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-ablation plasmas created at the inner wall of the hohlraum (Au bubble) and at the laser entrance hole (LEH) radiate L-shell emission from Ne-like to Co-like charge states of Au. A 1-D spatially resolved and time-integrated spectrum in the 6- to 16-keV range with E/d E = 100 to 300 is recorded along the axis of the hohlraum. The Au L-shell spectral line shapes of the 2p3 / 2 - 3 s , 2p3 / 2 - 3d5 / 2 , and 2p1 / 2 - 3d3 / 2 transitions are analyzed using an atomic physics code to infer the Te of the radiating plasma. Preliminary results indicate the Au LEH plasma of a near-vacuum hohlraum has an inferred Te of 5 to 6 keV, while a gas-filled hohlraum has a significantly lower Te. A comparison of the Au L-shell spectra and the Te sensitivity will be presented, along with the plan to measure the L-shell emission from the Au bubble. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  16. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-01

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (Te=3.5keV), dense (ne=5×1020cm-3), long-scale length (L˜2mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I <2×1015Wcm-2. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2keV to 3.5keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (ne=1021cm-3) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  17. Measurement of Radiation Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David L.

    2001-10-01

    The z-pinch driven hohlraum (ZPDH) is a promising approach to high yield inertial confinement fusion currently being characterized in experiments on the Sandia Z accelerator [1]. In this concept [2], x rays are produced by an axial z-pinch in a primary hohlraum at each end of a secondary hohlraum. A fusion capsule in the secondary is imploded by a symmetric x-ray flux distribution, effectively smoothed by wall reemission during transport to the capsule position. Capsule radiation symmetry, a critical issue in the design of such a system, is influenced by hohlraum geometry, wall motion and time-dependent albedo, as well as power balance and pinch timing between the two z-pinch x-ray sources. In initial symmetry studies on Z, we used solid low density burnthrough spheres to diagnose highly asymmetric, single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries. We then applied this technique to the more symmetric double z-pinch geometry [3]. As a result of design improvements, radiation flux symmetry in Z double-pinch wire array experiments now exceeds the measurement sensitivity of this self-backlit foam ball symmetry diagnostic (15% max-min flux asymmetry). To diagnose radiation symmetry at the 2 - 5% level attainable with our present ZPDH designs, we are using high-energy x rays produced by the recently-completed Z-Beamlet laser backlighter for point-projection imaging of thin-wall implosion and symmetry capsules. We will present the results of polar flux symmetry measuremets on Z for several ZPDH capsule geometries together with radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for comparison. [1] M. E. Cuneo et al., Phys. Plasmas 8,2257(2001); [2] J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6,2129(1999); [3] D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,360(2000).

  18. Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

    2010-11-22

    A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

  19. Capsule symmetry sensitivity and hohlraum symmetry calculations for the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, Roger; Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson Porter, D. L., Jr.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.

    2000-10-01

    Capsule radiation symmetry is a crucial issue in the design of the z-pinch driven hohlraum approach to high-yield inertial confinement fusion [1]. Capsule symmetry may be influenced by power imbalance of the two z-pinch x-ray sources, and by hohlraum effects (geometry, time-dependent albedo, wall motion). We have conducted two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to estimate the symmetry sensitivity of the 220 eV beryllium ablator capsule that nominally yields 400 MJ in this concept. These estimates then determine the symmetry requirements to be met by the hohlraum design (for even Legendre modes) and by the top-bottom pinch imbalance and mistiming (for odd Legendre modes). We have used a combination of 2- and 3-D radiosity ("viewfactor"), and 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to identify hohlraum geometries that meet these symmetry requirements for high-yield, and are testing these models against ongoing Z foam ball symmetry experiments. 1. J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6, 2129 (1999).

  20. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-05-06

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities.

  1. Radiation temperature measurements in laser-heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Goldman, S.R.; Bessarab, A.V.; Kunin, A.V.; Tokarev, V.A.

    1997-11-01

    Two x-ray spectrographs have been used on the Trident laser at LANL to monitor the radiation temperature of small Au hohlraums. The cylindrical targets are smaller than 1 mm. The x radiation produced by {approximately} 400 J of 0.53-{micro}m laser light is detected with a 7-channel VNIIEF soft-x-ray spectrometer. Each channel employs a multi-layer mirror and a filter to limit the channel bandwidth to 1--3% of the channel energy. X rays are detected with calibrated Al x-ray diodes. A second spectrometer is based on a free-standing Au transmission grating for spectral dispersion and a multi-channel diamond photo-conductive device detector. The small hohlraum results are consistent with radiation temperatures exceeding 100 eV. Simple computer modeling shows that late in the plasma discharge, radiation of this temperature is emitted from the target.

  2. Laser Machining For Fabrication Of Hohlraums And Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Shirk, M D; Kelly, B T; Haynes, S M; Stuart, B C; Sanchez, J J; Moody, J D; Cook, R C

    2005-06-24

    Laser machining technology has been used to demonstrate the ability to rapidly perform jobs on all aspects of ICF targets. Lasers are able to rapidly perform modifications and repairs to the gold metal parts on hohlraums, make cuts in the delicate polymer parts of the hohlraum, and drill holes in the capsules to enable them to be filled with fuel. Lasers investigated in this work include 193 nm ArF and 248 nm KrF excimers and 810 nm chirped-pulse amplification Ti:Sapphire lasers. The excimer lasers showed a definite advantage in drilling and machining of polymeric materials and the ultrashort infrared pulses of the Ti:Sapphire laser were far better for the gold structures.

  3. Symmetry control in subscale near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Ho, D. D.; Mackinnon, A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the symmetry of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions remains a key challenge. Increasing the ratio of the hohlraum diameter to the capsule diameter (case-to-capsule ratio, or CCR) facilitates symmetry tuning. By varying the balance of energy between the inner and outer cones as well as the incident laser pulse length, we demonstrate the ability to tune from oblate, through round, to prolate at a CCR of 3.2 in near-vacuum hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility, developing empirical playbooks along the way for cone fraction sensitivity of various laser pulse epochs. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with enhanced inner beam propagation reproduce most experimental observables, including hot spot shape, for a majority of implosions. Specular reflections are used to diagnose the limits of inner beam propagation as a function of pulse length.

  4. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22324691

  5. Optimization of Capsule Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M.; Hanson, D.; Porter, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Ruggles, L.; Simpson, W.; Vargas, M.; Hammer, J.; Landen, O.

    1999-11-01

    The uniformity of the radiation flux incident on the capsule is a critical issue for indirect drive fusion using the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept(J.H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6), 2129 (1999).. Experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia have demonstrated the ability to diagnose the uniformity of the flux striking a foam ball (surrogate capsule)(P.A. Amendt et al., Phys. Plas. 4), 1862 (1997); S.G. Glendinning et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 536 (1999).. These single-sided drive experiments have been modeled using radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics codes, yielding agreement with the measured ablation rate vs. angle on the foam ball. Flux uniformity at the 1-2% level needed for high-convergence capsule implosions requires a 2-sided drive (top and bottom z-pinch) configuration. Constrained optimization methods have identified hohlraum geometries with improved symmetry.

  6. Radiation-driven hydrodynamics of high- hohlraums on the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Dewald, E L; Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Holder, J P; Schein, J; Lee, F D; Campbell, K M; Weber, F A; Pellinen, D G; Schneider, M B; Celeste, J R; McDonald, J W; Foster, J M; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J; Glenzer, S H; Young, B K; Haynam, C A; Shaw, M J; Turner, R E; Froula, D; Kauffman, R L; Thomas, B R; Atherton, L J; Bonanno, R E; Dixit, S N; Eder, D C; Holtmeier, G; Kalantar, D H; Koniges, A E; Macgowan, B J; Manes, K R; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Parham, T G; Piston, K; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P K; Hammel, B A; Moses, E I

    2005-11-18

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the initial four laser beams tested radiation temperature limits imposed by plasma filling. For a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with an analytical model that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits with full NIF (1.8 MJ), greater, and of longer duration than required for ignition hohlraums. PMID:16384150

  7. Three-wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Town, R. P. J.; Rosen, M. D.; Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Schneider, M. B.; Moody, J. D.; Dewald, E. L.; Widmann, K.; Bond, E.; Thomas, C. A.; Dixit, S.; Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berger, R. L.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacGowan, B. J.; Lindl, J. D.

    2011-04-15

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large-scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry.

  8. A three wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Town, R; Rosen, M

    2010-12-16

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths, and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry.

  9. Three-wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Town, R P J; Rosen, M D; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Schneider, M B; Kyrala, G A; Moody, J D; Dewald, E L; Widmann, K; Bond, E; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Dixit, S; Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Haynam, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E

    2011-04-01

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large-scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry. PMID:21599318

  10. Radiation-driven hydrodynamics of long pulse hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, D L; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Schein, J; Holder, J; Campbell, K; Glenzer, S H; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J; Schneider, M S; Haynam, C; Hinkel, D; Hammel, B A

    2005-10-17

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the first four laser beams have activated the indirect drive experimental capabilities and tested radiation temperature limits imposed by hohlraum plasma filling. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1 ns to 9 ns long square pulses and energies of up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Furthermore, for a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of plasma filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with analytical modeling that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits on full NIF (1.8 MJ) that are significantly greater than required for ignition hohlraums.

  11. The effect of condensates and inner coatings on the performance of vacuum hohlraum targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T. R.; Seka, W.; Sangster, T. C.; Olson, R. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Landen, O. L.; Collins, G. W.; Suter, L. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-03-15

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using laser-driven vacuum hohlraum targets show distinct differences between cryogenic (<20 K) and warm targets. The cryogenic targets have 15% lower peak radiation temperatures, and the temporal profile of those temperatures is quite different than in warm targets. The cryogenic targets reflect significantly more (3%-7%) of the laser drive than the warm targets (<1%). The temporal and spectral features of the reflected light from the cryogenic targets show a significantly longer duration and more spectral features than the warm hohlraums. Warm hohlraum targets coated with 2 mum of CH replicate the behavior of cryogenic targets. This indicates that the cryogenic hohlraums are affected by the condensation of background gases on the cold hohlraum surface. The most important effect of low-Z material in the hohlraums is that they significantly reduce the x-ray conversion efficiency, resulting in lower hohlraum radiation temperature. The coatings (both CH and condensates) produce long-scale-length, low-Z plasmas that moderately reduce the absorption of laser light in the hohlraums. This causes higher reflectivity and produces hot electrons that generate hard x rays (hnu>20 keV), both of which are detrimental to the performance of hohlraum-driven inertial confinement fusion targets.

  12. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  13. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei; Huang, Yunbao; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-10-01

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  14. Modeling laser-plasma interactions in NIF vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J.

    2009-11-01

    In preparation for the NIF ignition campaign, a series of experiments are underway firing 96 and 192 beams of the NIF laser into empty gold hohlraums. The primary purpose of these experiments is to qualify the DANTE filtered x-ray diode radiation temerature diagnostic. We plan to have backscatter diagnostics available, giving us an opportunity to test our LPI modeling on the NIF scale. In addition to scaling with energy, we test the use of a gold-boron coating on the hohlraum wall to reduce SBS via increased ion Landau damping of the ion-acoustic waves. We use Lasnex to simulate the hydrodynamic evolution of the hohlraum plasma. Steady state gains were computed using our diagnostic NEWLIP. These were used to suggest appropriate backscatter simulations to be performed with pF3D, a massivel parallel code that couples paraxial light propagation with fluid models of the stimulated plasma ansd ion waves evolving on a background plasma. We describe the results of these simulations, pre- and post-shot, and compare them with experimental results.

  15. Increasing Z-pinch vacuum hohlraum capsule coupling efficiency.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debbie; Vesey, Roger Alan; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Nikroo, A.; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Porter, John L.; Streit, Jon; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Cuneo, Michael Edward

    2004-11-01

    Symmetric capsule implosions in the double-ended vacuum hohlraum (DEH) on Z have demonstrated convergence ratios of 14-21 for 2.15-mm plastic ablator capsules absorbing 5-7 kJ of x-rays, based on backlit images of the compressed ablator remaining at peak convergence [1]. Experiments with DD-filled 3.3-mm diameter capsules designed to absorb 14 kJ of x-rays have begun as an integrated test of drive temperature and symmetry, complementary to thin-shell symmetry diagnostic capsules. These capsule implosions are characterized by excellent control of symmetry (< 3% time-integrated), but low hohlraum efficiency (< 2%). Possible methods to increase the capsule absorbed energy in the DEH include mixed-component hohlraums, large diameter foam ablator capsules, transmissive shine shields between the z-pinch and capsule, higher spoke electrode x-ray transmission, a double-sided power feed, and smaller initial radius z-pinch wire arrays. Simulations will explore the potential for each of these modifications to increase the capsule coupling efficiency for near-term experiments on Z and ZR.

  16. Demonstration of Symmetry Control of Infrared Heated Deuterium Layers in Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Koziozieski, B J; London, R A; McEachern, R L; Bittner, D N

    2003-08-22

    Infrared smoothed deuterium ice layers inside capsules have been successfully demonstrated for capsules inside cylindrical hohlraums. Improved characterization methods and infrared illumination enables low mode control in both the axial and azimuthal directions. Experimental results agree well with computer models. Results of these experiments will be used to derive accuracy requirements for an infrared heating system for ice layers in hohlraums on NIF.

  17. Modeling of drive-symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums at Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L.; Magelssen, G.R.; Delamater, E.L.; Hauer, A.A.; Wilde, B.H.; Powers, L.V.; Murphy, T.J.; Pollaine, S.M.; Suter, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    Experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes are more oblate than predicted using modeling methods which agree well with experiments in evacuated hohlraums. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  18. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  19. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; et al

    2016-05-25

    Here, the near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out tomore » examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30 implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.« less

  20. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Nagel, S.; Biener, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Yeamans, C.; Michel, P.; Schneider, M.; Kozioziemski, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Haan, S.; Izumi, N.; Hatarik, R.; Sterne, P.; Celliers, P.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, R.; Strozzi, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Town, R.; Hurricane, O.; Nikroo, A.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30×). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out to examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30× implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.

  1. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-01

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  2. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  3. A unified free-form representation applied to the shape optimization of the hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Huang, Yunbao; Jing, Longfei; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-01-01

    The hohlraum is very crucial for indirect laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. Usually, its shape is designed as sphere, cylinder, or rugby with some kind of fixed functions, such as ellipse or parabola. Recently, a spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) has been presented with high flux symmetry [Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); 21, 052704 (2014)]. However, there is only one shape parameter, i.e., the hohlraum to capsule radius ratio, being optimized. In this paper, we build the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs with a unified free-form representation, in which, by varying additional shape parameters: (1) available hohlraum shapes can be uniformly and accurately represented, (2) it can be used to understand why the spherical hohlraum has higher flux symmetry, (3) it allows us to obtain a feasible shape design field satisfying flux symmetry constraints, and (4) a synthetically optimized hohlraum can be obtained with a tradeoff of flux symmetry and other hohlraum performance. Finally, the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs is modeled, analyzed, and then optimized based on the unified free-form representation. The results show that a feasible shape design field with flux asymmetry no more than 1% can be obtained, and over the feasible design field, the spherical hohlraum is validated to have the highest flux symmetry, and a synthetically optimal hohlraum can be found with closing flux symmetry but larger volume between laser spots and centrally located capsule.

  4. Measurements of laser-plasma instability relevant to ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Bauer, B.S.; Cobble, J.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Kyrala, G.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Watt, R.G.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Wood, W.M.; Failor, B.H.; Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1997-05-01

    The potential for laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce x-rays for imploding a fusion capsule symmetrically. The speckled nature of laser beams used in ICF is an important factor in laser-plasma instability processes. For example, models which calculate the spatial growth of convective instability by properly accounting for the laser speckles successfully predict the observed onsets of backscattering due to stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering instabilities (SBS and SRS). Assuming pump depletion as the only saturation mechanism in these models results in very large predicted levels of SBS and SRS backscattering from the long-scale plasmas expected in ignition hohlraums. However, in the long-scale plasmas studied in the Nova and Trident lasers [E. M. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 57}, 2101 (1986) and N. K. Moncur {ital et al.}, Appl. Opt. {bold 34}, 4274 (1995)], SRS and SBS are observed to saturate much below the levels expected from pump depletion. While the mechanism of SBS saturation is not understood at present, the observations of SRS saturation are qualitatively understood. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  6. Dynamic hohlraum and ICF pellet implosion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.

    1999-07-01

    By stabilizing an imploding z-pinch on Z (20 MA, 100 ns) with a solid current return can and a nested wire array the authors have achieved dynamic hohlraum radiation temperatures over 200 eV at a diameter of approximately 1 mm. The pinch configuration yielding this temperature is a nested tungsten wire array of 240 and 120 wires at 4 and 2 cm diameters weighing 2 and 1 mg, 1 cm long, imploding onto a 5 mm diameter, 14 mg/cc cylindrical CH foam, weighing 3 mg. They have used a single 4 cm diameter tungsten wire array to drive a 1.6 mm diameter ICF capsule mounted in a 6 mg/cc foam inside a 3 mg copper annulus at 5 mm diameter, and measured x-ray emissions indicative of the pellet implosion. Mounting the pellet in foam may have caused the hohlraum to become equator-hot. They will present results from upcoming pellet experiments in which the pellet is mounted by thread and driven by a larger diameter, 6 or 7 mm, copper annulus to improve radiation drive symmetry. They will also discuss designs for tapered foam annular targets that distort a cylindrical pinch into a quasi-sphere that will wrap around an ICF pellet to further improve drive symmetry.

  7. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablatorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Milovich, J. L.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Casey, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Pak, A.; Peterson, J. L.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] have explored driving high-density carbon ablators with near-vacuum hohlraums, which use a minimal amount of helium gas fill. These hohlraums show improved efficiency relative to conventional gas-filled hohlraums in terms of minimal backscatter, minimal generation of suprathermal electrons, and increased hohlraum-capsule coupling. Given these advantages, near-vacuum hohlraums are a promising choice for pursuing high neutron yield implosions. Long pulse symmetry control, though, remains a challenge, as the hohlraum volume fills with material. Two mitigation methodologies have been explored, dynamic beam phasing and increased case-to-capsule ratio (larger hohlraum size relative to capsule). Unexpectedly, experiments have demonstrated that the inner laser beam propagation is better than predicted by nominal simulations, and an enhanced beam propagation model is required to match measured hot spot symmetry. Ongoing work is focused on developing a physical model which captures this enhanced propagation and on utilizing the enhanced propagation to drive longer laser pulses than originally predicted in order to reach alpha-heating dominated neutron yields.

  8. Rugby-like hohlraum experimental designs for demonstrating x-ray drive enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Cerjan, C.; Hinkel, D. E.; Milovich, J. L.; Park, H.-S.; Robey, H. F.

    2008-01-15

    A suite of experimental designs for the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using rugby and cylindrical hohlraums is proposed to confirm the energetics benefits of rugby-shaped hohlraums over cylinders under optimal implosion symmetry conditions. Postprocessed Dante x-ray drive measurements predict a 12-17 eV (23%-36%) peak hohlraum temperature (x-ray flux) enhancement for a 1 ns flattop laser drive history. Simulated core self-emission x-ray histories also show earlier implosion times by 200-400 ps, depending on the hohlraum case-to-capsule ratio and laser-entrance-hole size. Capsules filled with 10 or 50 atm of deuterium (DD) are predicted to give in excess of 10{sup 10} neutrons in two-dimensional hohlraum simulations in the absence of mix, enabling DD burn history measurements for the first time in indirect-drive on Omega. Capsule designs with 50 atm of D{sup 3}He are also proposed to make use of proton slowing for independently verifying the drive benefits of rugby hohlraums. Scale-5/4 hohlraum designs are also introduced to provide further margin to potential laser-plasma-induced backscatter and hot-electron production.

  9. Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F.

    2011-02-25

    We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of T{sub RAD}=300 eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100 {mu}m diameter hot core.

  10. Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F.; Bardsley, G. W.; Barker, D. A.; Barnes, A. I.; Baron, A.; Beeler, R. G.; Beeman, B. V.; Belk, L. R.; Bell, J. C.; Bell, P. M.; Berger, R. L.; Bergonia, M. A.; Bernardez, L. J.; Berzins, L. V.; Bettenhausen, R. C.; Bezerides, L.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bishop, C. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bopp, D. R.; Borgman, J. A.; Bower, J. R.; Bowers, G. A.; Bowers, M. W.; Boyle, D. T.; Bradley, D. K.; Bragg, J. L.; Braucht, J.; Brinkerhoff, D. L.; Browning, D. F.; Brunton, G. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burns, S. R.; Burns, K. E.; Burr, B.; Burrows, L. M.; Butlin, R. K.; Cahayag, N. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Cardinale, P. S.; Carey, R. W.; Carlson, J. W.; Casey, A. D.; Castro, C.; Celeste, J. R.; Chakicherla, A. Y.; Chambers, F. W.; Chan, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Chang, C.; Chapman, R. F.; Charron, K.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, M. J.; Churby, A. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Cline, B. D.; Clowdus, L. C.; Cocherell, D. G.; Coffield, F. E.; Cohen, S. J.; Costa, R. L.; Cox, J. R.; Curnow, G. M.; Dailey, M. J.; Danforth, P. M.; Darbee, R.; Datte, P. S.; Davis, J. A.; Deis, G. A.; Demaret, R. D.; Dewald, E. L.; di Nicola, P.; di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Dobson, D. B.; Doppner, T.; Driscoll, J. D.; Dugorepec, J.; Duncan, J. J.; Dupuy, P. C.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Edson, S. L.; Edwards, G. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Edwards, O. D.; Edwards, P. W.; Ellefson, J. C.; Ellerbee, C. H.; Erbert, G. V.; Estes, C. M.; Fabyan, W. J.; Fallejo, R. N.; Fedorov, M.; Felker, B.; Fink, J. T.; Finney, M. D.; Finnie, L. F.; Fischer, M. J.; Fisher, J. M.; Fishler, B. T.; Florio, J. W.; Forsman, A.; Foxworthy, C. B.; Franks, R. M.; Frazier, T.; Frieder, G.; Fung, T.; Gawinski, G. N.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glenn, S. M.; Golick, B. P.; Gonzales, H.; Gonzales, S. A.; Gonzalez, M. J.; Griffin, K. L.; Grippen, J.; Gross, S. M.; Gschweng, P. H.; Gururangan, G.; Gu, K.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Haid, B. J.; Hamblen, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hardy, D. L.; Hart, D. R.; Hartley, R. G.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M. R.; Hermes, G. L.; Hey, D. S.; Hibbard, R. L.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hipple, D. L.; Hitchcock, J. D.; Hodtwalker, D. L.; Holder, J. P.; Hollis, J. D.; Holtmeier, G. M.; Huber, S. R.; Huey, A. W.; Hulsey, D. N.; Hunter, S. L.; Huppler, T. R.; Hutton, M. S.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, J. L.; Jackson, M. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, M. C.; Johnson, T.; Johnston, M. P.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Keating, G. A.; Kegelmeyer, L. M.; Kenitzer, S. L.; Kimbrough, J. R.; King, K.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J. L.; Knittel, K. M.; Kohut, T. R.; Koka, K. G.; Kramer, S. W.; Krammen, J. E.; Krauter, K. G.; Krauter, G. W.; Krieger, E. K.; Kroll, J. J.; La Fortune, K. N.; Lagin, L. J.; Lakamsani, V. K.; Landen, O. L.; Lane, S. W.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S. H.; Lao, N.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D.; Lau, G. T.; Le Pape, S.; Lechleiter, B. L.; Lee, Y.; Lee, T. L.; Li, J.; Liebman, J. A.; Lindl, J. D.; Locke, S. F.; Loey, H. K.; London, R. A.; Lopez, F. J.; Lord, D. M.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Lown, J. G.; Ludwigsen, A. P.; Lum, N. W.; Lyons, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Magat, M. D.; Maloy, D. T.; Malsbury, T. N.; Markham, G.; Marquez, R. M.; Marsh, A. A.; Marshall, C. D.; Marshall, S. R.; Maslennikov, I. L.; Mathisen, D. G.; Mauger, G. J.; Mauvais, M.-Y.; McBride, J. A.; McCarville, T.; McCloud, J. B.; McGrew, A.; McHale, B.; Macphee, A. G.; Meeker, J. F.; Merill, J. S.; Mertens, E. P.; Michel, P. A.; Miller, M. G.; Mills, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Miramontes, R.; Montesanti, R. C.; Montoya, M. M.; Moody, J.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K. A.; Morris, J.; Morriston, K. M.; Nelson, J. R.; Neto, M.; Neumann, J. D.; Ng, E.; Ngo, Q. M.; Olejniczak, B. L.; Olson, R. E.; Orsi, N. L.; Owens, M. W.; Padilla, E. H.; Pannell, T. M.; Parham, T. G.; Patterson, R. W., Jr.; Pavel, G.; Prasad, R. R.; Pendlton, D.; Penko, F. A.; Pepmeier, B. L.; Petersen, D. E.; Phillips, T. W.; Pigg, D.; Piston, K. W.; Pletcher, K. D.; Powell, C. L.; Radousky, H. B.; Raimondi, B. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Rampke, R. L.; Reed, R. K.; Reid, W. A.; Rekow, V. V.; Reynolds, J. L.; Rhodes, J. J.; Richardson, M. J.; Rinnert, R. J.; Riordan, B. P.; Rivenes, A. S.; Rivera, A. T.; Roberts, C. J.; Robinson, J. A.; Robinson, R. B.; Robison, S. R.; Rodriguez, O. R.; Rogers, S. P.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, G. F.; Runkel, M.; Runtal, A. S.; Sacks, R. A.; Sailors, S. F.; Salmon, J. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schaffer, J. R.; Schindler, T. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Segraves, K. S.; Shaw, M. J.; Sheldrick, M. E.; Shelton, R. T.; Shiflett, M. K.; Shiromizu, S. J.; Shor, M.; Silva, L. L.; Silva, S. A.; Skulina, K. M.; Smauley, D. A.; Smith, B. E.; Smith, L. K.; Solomon, A. L.; Sommer, S.; Soto, J. G.; Spafford, N. I.; Speck, D. E.; Springer, P. T.; Stadermann, M.; Stanley, F.; Stone, T. G.; Stout, E. A.; Stratton, P. L.; Strausser, R. J.; Suter, L. J.; Sweet, W.; Swisher, M. F.; Tappero, J. D.; Tassano, J. B.; Taylor, J. S.; Tekle, E. A.; Thai, C.; Thomas, C. A.; Thomas, A.; Throop, A. L.; Tietbohl, G. L.; Tillman, J. M.; Town, R. P. J.; Townsend, S. L.; Tribbey, K. L.; Trummer, D.; Truong, J.; Vaher, J.; Valadez, M.; van Arsdall, P.; van Prooyen, A. J.; Vergel de Dios, E. O.; Vergino, M. D.; Vernon, S. P.; Vickers, J. L.; Villanueva, G. T.; Vitalich, M. A.; Vonhof, S. A.; Wade, F. E.; Wallace, R. J.; Warren, C. T.; Warrick, A. L.; Watkins, J.; Weaver, S.; Wegner, P. J.; Weingart, M. A.; Wen, J.; White, K. S.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, W. H.; Willis, L.; Wilson, E. F.; Wilson, B. A.; Witte, M. C.; Work, K.; Yang, P. S.; Young, B. K.; Youngblood, K. P.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zaleski, T.; Zapata, P. G.; Zhang, H.; Zielinski, J. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Niemann, C.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of TRAD=300eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100μm diameter hot core.

  11. Stauts of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Hohlraum Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Dunne, M; Ho, D; Lasinski, B; Meeker, D; Ross, J S

    2012-04-10

    Progress on the hohlraum point design for the LIFE engine is described. New features in the original design [Amendt et al., Fus. Sci. Technol. 60, 49 (2011)] are incorporated that address the imperatives of low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, efficient and prompt material recycling, an ability for near-term testing of key target design uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility, and robustness to target chamber environment and injection insults. To this end, the novel use of Pb hohlraums and aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel loading within a high-density-carbon (HDC) ablator is implemented in the hohlraum point design.

  12. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2omega) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2omega laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2omega light is possible. PMID:18352288

  13. Simulation study of Hohlraum experiments on SGIII-prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Wenyi; Ren Guoli; Lan Ke; Li Xin; Wu Changshu; Li Yongsheng; Zhai Chuanlei; Qiao Xiumei; Meng Xujun; Lai Dongxian; Zheng Wudi; Gu Peijun; Pei Wenbing; Li Sanwei; Yi Rongqing; Song Tianming; Jiang Xiaohua; Yang Dong; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun

    2010-12-15

    The Hohlraum physics experiments performed on the SGIII-prototype laser facility are simulated by using our two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-H, and the influence of laser intensity on the two-dimensional Hohlraum simulations is studied. Both the temporal radiation temperature and the x-ray spectrum from the simulations agree well with the observations, except that the simulated M-band fraction (greater than 2 keV) is obviously smaller than the observation. According to our study, the coupling efficiency from laser to x-ray is around 70% for SGIII-prototype laser facility Hohlraums.

  14. Green Frequency-Doubled Laser-Beam Propagation in High-Temperature Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, C.; Berger, R. L.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Jones, O.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Meezan, N.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J.; Sorce, C.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2{omega}) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2{omega} laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2{omega} light is possible.

  15. Characteristics of ICF Relevant Hohlraums Driven by X-Rays from a Z-Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,R.L.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSKA,W.; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,RICHARD E.; PETERSON,D.L.; PETERSON,R.R.; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; RUIZ,CARLOS L.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-03

    Radiation environments characteristic of those encountered during the low-temperature foot pulse and subsequent higher-temperature early-step pulses (without the foot pulse) required for indirect-drive ICF ignition on the National ignition Facility have been produced in hohlraums driven by x-rays from a z-pinch. These environments provide a platform to better understand the dynamics of full-scale NIF hohlraums, ablator material, and capsules prior to NIF completion. Radiation temperature, plasma fill, and wall motion of these hohlraums are discussed.

  16. Study on optimal inertial-confinement-fusion hohlraum wall radial density and wall loss

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lu; Wu Shunchao; Ding Yongkun; Yang Jiamin; Jiang Shaoen

    2011-03-15

    Reducing hohlraum wall loss is one of the most important ways to improve hohlraum coupling efficiency in laser indirect drive inertial-confinement fusion. It is appeared that a high Z metallic foam as hohlraum wall material will reduce wall loss. By adjusting initial hohlraum wall density distribution along radial axes to {rho}{sub 0}(r)=kr, the numerical simulation results show that it can indeed bring best savings of {approx}40% general wall loss. We conclude that absorbed energy mainly decreases by restraining rarefactions, and a proper slope k can optimize internal energy loss of low density and increased kinetic loss by subsonic. Also saved energy ratio reduces with source temperature decreasing. This approach would cut the reactor driver that needs quite substantially if experiments demonstrate it.

  17. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S. Albright, B. J.; Kline, J. L.; Yin, L.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.

    2015-01-15

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with B{sub z} ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field B{sub z} = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. The experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  18. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Yin, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. The experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  19. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; et al

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled usingmore » the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.« less

  20. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Yin, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  1. Electron-density measurements in hohlraums using soft-x-ray deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; London, R.A.; Harte, J.A.; Powers, L.V.; Trebes, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents design calculations for experiments that measure electron densities of laser heated hohlraums with soft-x-ray moir{acute e} deflectometry. Hydrodynamical simulations of the hohlraums are analyzed to obtain deflection angles of the probing beam and x-ray emission from the hohlraum. The deflection angles and resulting moir{acute e} fringe shifts and fringe contrast are predicted to be sufficient to infer electron-density gradients from measurements. In addition, the self-emission is found to be much lower than that of the probing laser beam, giving a good signal-to-noise ratio. In conclusion, moir{acute e} deflectometry with soft-x-ray lasers has the potential to give valuable information about the electron density in laser driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  3. Experimental results and modeling of a dynamic hohlraum on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.O.; Deeney, C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    Experiments were performed at SATURN, a high current z-pinch, to explore the feasibility of creating a hohlraum by imploding a tungsten wire array onto a low-density foam. Emission measurements in the 200--280 eV energy band were consistent with a 110--135 eV Planckian before the target shock heated, or stagnated, on-axis. Peak pinch radiation temperatures of nominally 160 eV were obtained. Measured early time x-ray emission histories and temperature estimates agree well with modeled performance in the 200--280 eV band using a 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics code. However, significant differences are observed in comparisons of the x-ray images and 2D simulations.

  4. A new ignition hohlraum design for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wu, Chang-Shu; Dai, Zhen-Sheng; Zheng, Wu-Di; Gu, Jian-Fa; Gu, Pei-Jun; Zou, Shi-Yang; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Shao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a six-cylinder-port hohlraum is proposed to provide high symmetry flux on capsule. It is designed to ignite a capsule with 1.2-mm radius in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Flux symmetry and laser energy are calculated by using three-dimensional view factor method and laser energy balance in hohlraum. Plasma conditions are analyzed based on the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. There is no Y lm (l ⩽ 4) asymmetry in the six-cylinder-port hohlraum when the influences of laser entrance holes (LEHs) and laser spots cancel each other out with suitable target parameters. A radiation drive with 300 eV and good flux symmetry can be achieved by using a laser energy of 2.3 MJ and peak power of 500 TW. According to the simulations, the electron temperature and the electron density on the wall of laser cone are high and low, respectively, which are similar to those of outer cones in the hohlraums on National Ignition Facility (NIF). And the laser intensity is also as low as those of NIF outer cones. So the backscattering due to laser plasma interaction (LPI) is considered to be negligible. The six-cyliner-port hohlraum could be superior to the traditional cylindrical hohlraum and the octahedral hohlraum in both higher symmetry and lower backscattering without supplementary technology at an acceptable laser energy level. It is undoubted that the hohlraum will add to the diversity of ICF approaches. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11435011 and 11575034).

  5. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires reaching fast implosion velocities, which highlights the need for a highly efficient hohlraum to drive indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. Gas-filled hohlraums are typically utilized due to the pulse length (15-20 ns) needed to drive plastic (CH) capsules. With the recent use of 3× denser high-density carbon (HDC) capsules, ignition pulses can be less than 10 ns in duration, providing the opportunity to utilize near-vacuum hohlraums (NVH) to drive ignition-relevant implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with minimal laser-plasma instabilities which complicate standard gas-filled hohlraums. Initial NVH implosions on the NIF have demonstrated coupling efficiency significantly higher than observed in gas-filled hohlraums - backscatter losses less than 2% and virtually no suprathermal electron generation. A major design challenge for the NVH is symmetry control. Without tamping gas, the hohlraum wall quickly expands filling the volume with gold plasma. However, results to-date indicate that the inner-cone beams propagate freely to the hohlraum wall for at least 6.5 ns. With minimal predicted cross-beam power transfer, this propagation enables symmetry control via dynamic beam phasing - time-dependent direct adjustment of the inner- and outer-cone laser pulses. A series of experiments with an HDC ablator and NVH culminated in a 6 ns, 1.2 MJ cryogenic DT layered implosion yielding 1.8 × 1015 neutrons--significantly higher yield than any CH implosion at comparable energy. This implosion reached an ignition-relevant velocity -350 km/s - with no observed ablator mix in the hot spot. Recent experiments have explored two-shock designs in a larger, 6.72 mm hohlraum, and upcoming experiments will incrementally extend the pulse duration toward a 9 ns long, three-shock ignition design. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Correspondence between laser coupling and x-ray flux measurements in a NIF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Divol, L.; Landen, O.; Lepape, S.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a simple model relating measurements of the hohlraum x-ray emission (DANTE) to the coupled (incident less backscattered) laser power in NIF indirect drive hohlraum experiments. The model was motivated by observing that the measured x-ray emission showed a lag in rise corresponding to a measured reduction in laser coupling due to backscatter. Two adjustable scalar parameters (a coupling efficiency and a time-scale) in the model are determined for each experiment. Comparing these parameters for different hohlraum gas-fill, ablator, pulse-length, and laser power conditions provides insight into the hohlraum behavior and performance. In some cases, the model can be inverted to estimate the backscatter loss using the measured hohlraum x-ray emission time-history and delivered laser power. We will describe the model and compare the adjustable parameters between different hohlraum platforms. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. Lowering the risk of stimulated Brillouin backscatter from NIF hohlraums by re-pointing beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Baker, K. L.; Thomas, C. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Michel, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 64 beams that make a 50 degree angle with the hohlraum axis have been measured to reflect by Stimulated Brillouin Backscatter (SBS) enough laser light to cause optical damage and limit design parameter space. The amount of backscatter has been seen to depend on the initial plasma density filling the hohlraum, the hohlraum wall material, and the laser pulse length. The most important parameter causing SBS is the laser intensity on the hohlraum wall. In previous hohlraum designs, the intensity of the 50 degree beams has been controlled by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET). [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 025004 (2009)] Recent designs with reduced CBET have experienced an increase in SBS. Here we show that repointing beams can reduce the laser intensity at the wall and still maintain good beam smoothing. The reduction in intensity is achieved by separating the 44 and 50 degree cones of beams along the hohlraum axis and then repointing beams within each cone to reduce overlap while preserving polarization smoothing. PF3D simulations show dramatic reductions of SBS are possible. Experiments will determine whether increased laser entrance hole sizes will be required and whether this technique will open up new design options. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Stimulated Brillouin Scatter Reduction using Borated Gold Hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Joseph; Strozzi, David; Berger, Richard; Michel, Pierre; Callahan, Debra; Hinkel, Denise; Divol, Laurent; MacGowan, Brian; Albert, Felicie; Moody, John; NIF Hohlraum Team

    2014-10-01

    New target platforms for indirect drive ignition on NIF are being introduced to improve capsule and hohlraum performance. A number of these targets show increased Stimulated Brillioun Backscattering (SBS) late in the laser pulse on the outer cone beams. This scattering reduces the laser power available for x-ray drive in an ignition hohlraum as well as poses a damage risk to the laser optics. We observe a factor of 5 reduction in the SBS power from outer cone beams by doping the Au hohlraum wall with 1.5 μm layer of 40% Boron in Au. The experiment used a room temperature Neopentane-filled ignition scale hohlraum and a 1 MJ, 370 TW laser pulse. The measured SBS backscatter from the outer cone beams on NIF is quantified temporally and spectrally. Comparing the measurements between a pure Au and a AuB hohlraum show approximately a 5× reduction in SBS power. Simulations show that the reduction is in the hohlraum wall plasma. A continuation of this study will extend the duration of the laser pulse to measure the time-dependence of the outer beam SBS. Experimental results from these experiments and detailed simulation results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Comparative properties of the interior and blowoff plasmas in a dynamic hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Davis, J.; Sanford, T. W. L.; Nash, T. J.; Mock, R. C.; Peterson, D. L.

    2007-04-15

    A Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) is formed when arrays of tungsten wires driven by a high-current pulse implode and compress a cylindrical foam target. The resulting radiation is confined by the wire plasma and forms an intense, {approx}200-250 eV Planckian x-ray source. The internal radiation can be used for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. The radiation emitted from the ends can be employed for radiation flow and material interaction studies. This external radiation is accompanied by an expanding blowoff plasma. We have diagnosed this blowoff plasma using K-shell spectra of Mg tracer layers placed at the ends of some of the Dynamic Hohlraum targets. A similar diagnosis of the interior hohlraum has been carried out using Al and Mg tracers placed at 2 mm depth from the ends. It is found that the blowoff plasma is about 20-25% as dense as that of the interior hohlraum, and that its presence does not significantly affect the outward flow of the nearly Planckian radiation field generated in the hohlraum interior. However, the electron temperature of the blowoff region, at {approx}120 eV, is only about half that of the interior hohlraum plasma.

  10. Soft x-ray images of the Laser Entrance Hole of NIC Hohlraums (paper, HTPD2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B

    2012-04-30

    Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes the capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer that views the hohlraum's laser entrance hole (LEH) at 37{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the area and fraction of the measured x-radiation which comes from the region inside the hohlraum must be known. The size of the LEH is measured with the time integrated Static X-ray Imager (SXI) which view the LEH at 18{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. A soft x-ray image has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation inside the LEH's Clear Aperture in order to correct the measured radiation. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the x-ray energy peak of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed.

  11. Development of a Z-pinch-driven ICF hohlraum concept on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.E.; Porter, J.L. Jr.; Vesey, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Recent development of high power z-pinches (> 150 MW) on the Z driver has permitted the study of high-temperature, radiation-driven hohlraums. Three complementary, Z-pinch source-hohlraum-ICF capsule configurations are being developed to harness the x-ray output of these Z-pinch's. These are the dynamic-hohlraum, static-wall hohlraum, and Z-pinch-driven hohlraum concepts. Each has different potential strengths and concerns. In this paper, the authors report on the first experiments with the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum (ZPDH) concept. A high-yield ICF capsule design for this concept appears feasible, when driven by z-pinches from a 60 MA-class driver. Initial experiments characterize the behavior of the spoke array on Z-pinch performance and x-ray transmission, and the uniformity of radiation flux incident on a foam capsule in the secondary, for a single-sided drive. Measurements of x-ray wall re-emission power and spectrum, radiation temperatures, spoke-plasma location, and drive uniformity will be presented and compared with 0-D energetics, 2-D Lasnex rad-hydro, and 3-D radiosity calculations of energy transport and drive uniformity.

  12. Development and characterization of a Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion target concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, Michael E.; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Fehl, David L.; Gilliland, Terrance L.; Hanson, David L.; McGurn, John S.; Reynolds, Paul G.; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Seamen, Hans; Spielman, Rick B.; Struve, Ken W.; Stygar, William A.; Simpson, Walter W.; Torres, Jose A.; Wenger, David F.; Hammer, James H.; Rambo, Peter W.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Idzorek, George C.

    2001-05-01

    Initial experiments to study the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concept of Hammer, Tabak, and Porter [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] are described. The relationship between measured pinch power, hohlraum temperature, and secondary hohlraum coupling ("hohlraum energetics") is well understood from zero-dimensional semianalytic, and two-dimensional view factor and radiation magnetohydrodynamics models. These experiments have shown the highest x-ray powers coupled to any Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum (26±5 TW), indicating the concept could scale to fusion yields of >200 MJ. A novel, single-sided power feed, double-pinch driven secondary that meets the pinch simultaneity requirements for polar radiation symmetry has also been developed. This source will permit investigation of the pinch power balance and hohlraum geometry requirements for ICF relevant secondary radiation symmetry, leading to a capsule implosion capability on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)].

  13. Observation of High Soft X-Ray Drive in Large-Scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Widmann, K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Thomas, C. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Williams, E. A.; Celeste, J.; Dewald, E.; Hsing, W. W.; Warrick, A.; Atherton, J.; Azevedo, S.; Beeler, R.; Berger, R.; Conder, A.; Divol, L.

    2011-02-25

    The first soft x-ray radiation flux measurements from hohlraums using both a 96 and a 192 beam configuration at the National Ignition Facility have shown high x-ray conversion efficiencies of {approx}85%-90%. These experiments employed gold vacuum hohlraums, 6.4 mm long and 3.55 mm in diameter, heated with laser energies between 150-635 kJ. The hohlraums reached radiation temperatures of up to 340 eV. These hohlraums for the first time reached coronal plasma conditions sufficient for two-electron processes and coronal heat conduction to be important for determining the radiation drive.

  14. Enchanced hohlraum radiation drive through reduction of wall losses with high-Z mixture "cocktail" wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, J; Jones, O; Rosen, M; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Gunther, J; Hammel, B; Landen, O; Suter, L; Wallace, R

    2006-05-17

    We present results from experiments, numerical simulations and analytic modeling, demonstrating enhanced hohlraum performance. Care in the fabrication and handling of hohlraums with walls consisting of high-Z mixtures (cocktails) has led to our demonstration, for the first time, of a significant increase in radiation temperature (up to +7eV at 300 eV) compared to a pure Au hohlraum, in agreement with predictions and ascribable to reduced wall losses. The data extrapolated to full NIF suggest we can expect an 18% reduction in wall loss for the current ignition design by switching to cocktail hohlraums, consistent with requirements for ignition with 1MJ laser energy.

  15. 3D Simulations of the ``Keyhole'' Hohlraum for Shock Timing on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Jones, O. S.

    2007-11-01

    Ignition implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require a pulse shape with a carefully designed series of steps, which launch a series of shocks through the ablator and DT fuel. The relative timing of these shocks must be tuned to better than +/- 100ps to maintain the DT fuel on a sufficiently low adiabat. To meet these requirements, pre-ignition tuning experiments using a modified hohlraum geometry are being planned. This modified geometry, known as the ``keyhole'' hohlraum, adds a re-entrant gold cone, which passes through the hohlraum and capsule walls, to provide an optical line-of-sight to directly measure the shocks as they break out of the ablator. In order to assess the surrogacy of this modified geometry, 3D simulations using HYDRA [1] have been performed. The drive conditions and the resulting effect on shock timing in the keyhole hohlraum will be compared with the corresponding results for the standard ignition hohlraum. [1] M.M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).

  16. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.  J.; Ho, D.  D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.  S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.  L.; et al

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated inmore » a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.« less

  17. Non-destructive analysis of DU content in the NIF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Gharibyan, Narek; Moody, Ken J.; Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2015-12-16

    The advantage of using depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums in high-yield deuterium-tritium (DT) shots at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is addressed by Döppner, et al., in great detail [1]. This DU based hohlraum incorporates a thin layer of DU, ~7 μm thick, on the inner surface along with a thin layer of a gold coating, ~0.7 μm thick, while the outer layer is ~22 μm thick gold. A thickness measurement of the DU layer can be performed using an optical microscope where the total DU weight can be computed provided a uniform DU layer. However, the uniformity of the thickness is not constant throughout the hohlraum since CAD drawing calculations of the DU weight do not agree with the computed values from optical measurements [2]. Therefore, a non-destructive method for quantifying the DU content in hohlraums has been established by utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy. The details of this method, along with results from several hohlraums, are presented in this report.

  18. Controlling Laser-Driven Hohlraums-Clues from Experiments with Earlier Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruer, William; Thomas, Cliff

    2015-11-01

    Better characterized and controlled hohlraums are very important for both implosion and science experiments on NIF. A brief review of some hohlraum and related experiments with earlier lasers is given to search for lessons learned and clues for better understanding NIF hohlraums. For example, surprises associated with heat transport inhibition and improved models for radiation generation have been a recurring theme in indirect drive experiments. In Shiva experiments, the hohlraum filling with plasma with density near quarter-critical was only calculated after inhibited heat transport and improved radiation models were adopted in the design code. Early NIF experiments also led to a change in the heat transport and radiation models. In this case, the heat transport model was changed from one with modest inhibition (which had been used to model Nova experiments) to near classical transport. Most recently, a design model invoking very inhibited transport (at various times and locations) has been proposed by C. Thomas for NIF hohlraums. Other recurring themes will also be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. First High-Convergence Cryogenic Implosion in a Near-Vacuum Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ˜3.5 ) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 ×1015 neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ˜27 × .

  20. Optimizing the hohlraum gas density for better symmetry control of indirect drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Hall, G. N.; Nagel, S. R.; Khan, S.; Rygg, R. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O. S.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.

    2014-10-01

    To achieve a spherically symmetric implosion, control of drive uniformity is essential. Both the ablation pressure and the mass ablation rate on the capsule surface should be made as uniform as possible for the duration of the drive. For an indirect drive implosion, the drive uniformity changes during the pulse because of: (1) the dynamic movement of the laser spots due to blow-off of the hohlraum wall, and (2) cross-beam energy transfer caused by laser-plasma interaction in the hohlraum. To tamp the wall blow-off, we use gas filled hohlraums. The cross-beam energy transfer can be controlled by applying a wave length separation between the cones of the laser beams. However, both of those dynamic effects are sensitive to the initial density of the hohlraum gas fill. To assess this, we performed implosion experiments with different hohlraum gas densities and tested the effect on drive asymmetry. The uniformity of the acceleration was measured by in-flight x-ray backlit imaging of the capsule. The uniformity of the core assembly was observed by imaging the self emission x-ray from the core. We will report on the experimental results and compare them to hydrodynamic simulations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-626372.

  1. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Le Pape, S; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Ho, D D; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Benedetti, L R; Biener, J; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D; Caggiano, J; Callahan, D; Cerjan, C; Church, J; Clark, D; Döppner, T; Dylla-Spears, R; Eckart, M; Edgell, D; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Haan, S; Hamza, A; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hinkel, D; Hoover, D; Huang, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kozioziemski, B; Kroll, J; Ma, T; MacPhee, A; McNaney, J; Merrill, F; Moody, J; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Robey, H F; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Sepke, S; Stadermann, M; Stoeffl, W; Thomas, C; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wild, C; Wilde, C; Woerner, E; Yeamans, C; Yoxall, B; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O L; Hsing, W; Edwards, M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α∼3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8×10(15) neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ∼27×. PMID:25978240

  2. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.  J.; Ho, D.  D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.  S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.  L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.  E.; Ross, J.  S.; Benedetti, L.  R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D.  N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E.  P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.  W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.  F.; Rygg, J.  R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R.  P. J.; Volegov, P.  L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.  L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.  J.

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.

  3. Laser-generated magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, David; Ross, Steven; Hazi, Andrew; Ralph, Joseph; Lepape, Sebastian; Froula, Dustin; Haberberger, Dan; Moody, John

    2014-10-01

    Laser-generated magnetic fields of 10--40 T have been produced with 100--4000 J laser drives at Omega EP and Titan. The fields are generated using the technique described by Daido et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 846 (1986)], which works by directing a laser through a hole in one plate to strike a second plate. Hot electrons generated in the laser-produced plasma on the second plate collect on the first plate. A strap connects the two plates allowing a current of 10 s of kA to flow and generate a solenoidal magnetic field. The magnetic field is characterized using Faraday rotation, b-dot probes, and proton radiography. Further experiments to study the effect of the magnetic field on hohlraum performance are currently scheduled for Omega. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA-27344.

  4. A photon-photon collider in a vacuum hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Mackenroth, F.; Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to create matter from light is amongst the most striking predictions of quantum electrodynamics. Experimental signatures of this have been reported in the scattering of ultra-relativistic electron beams with laser beams, intense laser-plasma interactions and laser-driven solid target scattering. However, all such routes involve massive particles. The simplest mechanism by which pure light can be transformed into matter, Breit-Wheeler pair production (γγ' --> e+e-), has never been observed in the laboratory. Here, we present the design of a new class of photon-photon collider in which a gamma-ray beam is fired into the high-temperature radiation field of a laser-heated hohlraum. Matching experimental parameters to current-generation facilities, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that this scheme is capable of producing of the order of 105 Breit-Wheeler pairs in a single shot. This would provide the first realization of a pure photon-photon collider, representing the advent of a new type of high-energy physics experiment.

  5. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics. PMID:21034047

  6. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E. D.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Maddox, B. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Prasad, R. R.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  7. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  8. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  9. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S. Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  10. Observations of electromagnetic fields and plasma flow in hohlraums with proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Town, R P J; Landen, O L; Rygg, J R; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Back, C A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2009-05-22

    We report on the first proton radiography of laser-irradiated hohlraums. This experiment, with vacuum gold (Au) hohlraums, resulted in observations of self-generated magnetic fields with peak values approximately 10;{6} G. Time-gated radiographs of monoenergetic protons with discrete energies (15.0 and 3.3 MeV) reveal dynamic pictures of field structures and plasma flow. Near the end of the 1-ns laser drive, a stagnating Au plasma (approximately 10 mg cm;{-3}) forms at the center of the hohlraum. This is a consequence of supersonic, radially directed Au jets (approximately 1000 microm ns;{-1}, approximately Mach 4) that arise from the interaction of laser-driven plasma bubbles expanding into one another. PMID:19519034

  11. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  12. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  13. High-Performance Layered DT Capsule Implosions in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Benedetti, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Izumi, N.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.; Remington, B.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P.; Widmann, K.; Merrill, F.; Wilde, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first layered DT capsule implosions in depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums driven with a high-foot pulse shape. High-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities. [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. DU hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to 25 TW extra laser power at the peak of the drive compared to Au hohlraums. Additionally, we observe an improved implosion shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. As a result, these first high-foot DU experiments achieved total neutron yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Target design for high fusion yield with the double Z-pinch-driven hohlraum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, Roger

    2006-10-01

    A key demonstration on the path to inertial fusion energy is the achievement of high fusion yield (hundreds of MJ) and high target gain. An indirect-drive high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target involving two z-pinch x-ray sources heating a central secondary hohlraum is described by Hammer, Tabak, Wilks, et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. In subsequent research at Sandia National Laboratories, we have developed theoretical/computational models and performed an extensive series of validation experiments to study hohlraum energetics, capsule coupling, and capsule implosion symmetry. We are using these models to design a 0.5 GJ yield z-pinch-driven ICF target that incorporates the latest experience in capsule design, hohlraum symmetry control, and x-ray production by z-pinches. An x-ray energy output of 8-9 MJ per pinch, suitably pulse-shaped, is sufficient for this concept to drive 0.3-0.5 GJ capsules. Integrated 2D hohlraum/capsule LASNEX radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have demonstrated adequate hohlraum coupling, radiation symmetry control, and the successful implosion, ignition and burn of a 0.5 GJ ICF capsule. An important new feature of this target design is mode-selective symmetry control: the use of burnthrough shields offset from the capsule that selectively tune certain low-order asymmetry modes (P2, P4) without significantly perturbing higher-order modes. This talk will describe the capsule and hohlraum design that have produced 0.5 GJ yields in 2D simulations, as well as provide a preliminary design of the z-pinch load and accelerator requirements necessary to drive the system. In collaboration with M. C. Herrmann, R. W. Lemke, G. R. Bennett, R. B. Campbell, P. J. Christenson, M. E. Cuneo, M. P. Desjarlais, T. A. Mehlhorn, J. L. Porter, D. B. Sinars, S. A. Slutz, W. A. Stygar, E. P. Yu, and J. H. Hammer (LLNL).

  15. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multi-pinhole X-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Thomas, C A

    2010-05-11

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside hohlraums is important to the ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with the target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes, with four independent filter combinations, to image entire hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 30 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser plasma interactions rather than from hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  16. Simulation of laser-plasma interaction experiments with gas-filled hohlraums on the LIL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Teychenné, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Tran, G.; Huser, G.; Rousseaux, C.; Hüller, S.; Héron, A.; Pesme, D.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-plasma interaction is a major issue for achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion schemes, and still a major concern for the upcoming french laser mégajoule (LMJ) program. In order to mitigate the deleterious effects due to laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), clearly evidenced during the recent US National Ignition Campaign conducted on the National Ignition Facility, we use the LIL facility as a demonstrator for LPI studies. In this article, we focus on preliminary results regarding the propagation of a typical LMJ quadruplet through gas-filled hohlraums. Results on hohlraum energetics will then be discussed.

  17. Demonstration of Radiation Symmetry Control for Inertial Confinement Fusion in Double Z-Pinch Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Bennett, G. R.; Porter, J. L.; Adams, R. G.; Aragon, R. A.; Rambo, P. K.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Smith, I. C.

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of a double Z-pinch hohlraum, relevant to the high-yield inertial-confinement-fusion concept, predict that through geometry design the time-integrated P2 Legendre mode drive asymmetry can be systematically controlled from positive to negative coefficient values. Studying capsule elonga­tion, recent experiments on Z confirm such control by varying the secondary hohlraum length. Since the experimental trend and optimum length are correctly modeled, confidence is gained in the simu­lation tools; the same tools predict capsule drive uniformity sufficient for high-yield fusion ignition.

  18. Evidence for high-efficiency laser-heated hohlraum performance at 527 nm.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R M; Oades, K; Thomas, B R; Schneider, M; Slark, G E; Suter, L J; Kauffman, R; Hinkel, D; Miller, M C

    2005-02-11

    A series of experiments conducted on the HELEN laser system [M. J. Norman, Appl. Opt.4120023497], into thermal x-ray generation from hohlraum targets using 527 nm (2omega) wavelength laser light, has shown that it is possible to exceed radiation temperatures previously thought limited by high levels of superthermal or hot electron production or stimulated backscatter. This Letter questions whether the assumptions traditionally applied to hohlraum design with respect to hot plasma filling and the use of 2omega light are too conservative. PMID:15783658

  19. Suppression of stimulated brillouin scattering by increased landau damping in multiple-ion-species hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; London, R A; Macgowan, B J; Meezan, N B; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-03-14

    We demonstrate that multiple-ion-species plasmas greatly reduce stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in high-electron temperature inertial confinement fusion hohlraums. Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO(2) gas filled hohlraum. We find that the SBS reflectivity decreases monotonically with increasing hydrogen fraction from 18% to 3% with a simultaneous increase of laser beam transmission. Detailed simulations with a 3D laser-plasma interaction code are in agreement with the experimentally observed reduction in backscattered light. PMID:18352195

  20. The design and characterization of toroidal-shaped Nova hohlraums that simulate National Ignition Facility plasma conditions for plasma instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, B.H.; Fernandez, J.C.; Hsing, W.W.; Cobble, J.A.; Delamater, N.D.; Krauser, W.J.; Lindman, E.L.; Failor, B.H.

    1995-07-01

    Special Nova hohlraums have been designed to simulate the plasma conditions calculated for various NIF hohlraum point designs. These hohlraums attempt to maximize the laser pathlength for parametric instability measurements. A toroidal-shaped hohlraum with a diameter of 3200 microns and a length of 1600 microns allows a laser pathlength of about 2 mm. Filling the hohlraum with 1 atmosphere of neopentane gas gives an electron temperature of 3 keV and electron density near 0.1 of critical. Detailed LASNEX calculations for these hohlraums and comparisons to the NIF point design will be presented. Comparisons between data and calculations that characterize the plasma conditions (electron, radiation, and ion temperatures, electron density, etc) in these Nova hohlraums will also be shown.

  1. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Jacquet, L.; Babonneau, D.; Fournier, K. B.

    2009-05-01

    As multi-keV x-ray radiators, hohlraums and halfraums with inner walls coated with metallic materials (called liner) have been tested for the first time with laser as the energy drive. For titanium, conversion efficiencies (CEs) are up to ˜14% for emission into 4π, integrating between 4.6 and 6.5 keV when a large diameter hohlraum is used. Germanium CE is ˜0.8% into 4π between 9 and 13 keV. The highest CEs have been obtained with a 1 ns squared pulse and phase plates giving laser absorption near 99%. These high CEs are due to long-lasting, good plasma conditions for multi-keV x-ray production maintained by plasma confinement inside the plastic cylinder and plasma collision leading to a burst of x rays at a time that depends on target size. As photon emitters at 4.7 keV, titanium-lined hohlraums are the most efficient solid targets and data are close to CEs for gas targets, which are considered as the upper limit for x-ray yields since their low density allows good laser absorption and low kinetics losses. As 10.3 keV x-ray emitters, exploded germanium foils give best results one order of magnitude more efficient than thick targets; doped aerogels and lined hohlraums give similar yields, about three times lower than those from exploded foils.

  2. Effects of plasma physics on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L.; Delamater, N.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Hauer, A.

    1994-10-01

    Initial experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes from preliminary experiments are more oblate than predicted. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  3. Multi-keV X-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, L.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Primout, M.

    2013-11-01

    In 2009 a series of metal-lined hohlraums were tested on the Omega laser facility. The main aims of the campaign were to improve our understanding of the multi-keV energy production and our capability to numerically reproduce the measured conversion efficiencies (CE's). Two studies have been primarily planned: the effect of the metallic plasma mean ionization states and that of hydrodynamics. Six targets were experimented for which the metallic materials (titanium, copper, germanium), the cavity diameter, and the irradiation energy were varied. Here we compare experimental and calculated results. The numerical simulations are performed with the 2D hydro-radiative code FCI2. For all the cavities, the measured multi-keV x-ray powers versus time are qualitatively well reproduced by the simulations, indicating that hohlraum hydrodynamics seems to be well calculated. But we have an underestimation by a factor of ˜2 for the calculated CEs versus experimental values for titanium and copper hohlraums. By contrast there is a good agreement between measurements and calculations for the germanium hohlraum. To explain these results, we have calculated off-line integrated emissivities for couples of (ρ, Te) values contributing to the multi-keV production with several non-local-thermal-equilibrium (NLTE) atomic physics models.

  4. Soft x-ray images of the laser entrance hole of ignition hohlraums.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B; Alvarez, S S; Alameda, J; Baker, S; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celeste, J R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Fernandez-Perea, M; Gullikson, E; Haugh, M J; Hau-Riege, S; Hsing, W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; London, R A; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; McCarville, T J; Milovich, J L; Mirkarimi, P; Moody, J D; Moore, A S; Myers, M D; Palma, E A; Palmer, N; Pivovaroff, M J; Ralph, J E; Robinson, J; Soufli, R; Suter, L J; Teruya, A T; Thomas, C A; Town, R P; Vernon, S P; Widmann, K; Young, B K

    2012-10-01

    Hohlraums are employed at the national ignition facility to convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes a fusion capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low spectral resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, which views the region around the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the size of the hohlraum's opening ("clear aperture") and fraction of the measured x-radiation, which comes from this opening, must be known. The size of the clear aperture is measured with the time integrated static x-ray imager (SXI). A soft x-ray imaging channel has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation emitted from inside the clear aperture. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the peak of the x-ray spectrum of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed. PMID:23127032

  5. Effect of NLTE emissivity models on NIF ignition hohlraum power requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, L.; Hansen, S.; Rosen, M.; Springer, P.; Callahan, D.

    2008-11-01

    It's well known that the NLTE atomic physics model can significantly affect the power requirements and plasma conditions in ignition hohlraums. This is because the emissivity(Te,ne) is a significant factor in determining the time dependent coronal temperature of the hot blow-off plasma filling ignition hohlraums which, in turn, determines the total energy stored in that coronal plasma at any instant. In this talk we present best estimates of NLTE emissivity using the SCRAM model, including the range of uncertainty, and compare them with the emissivity of the model used to design NIF ignition hohlraums and set the NIF pulse shape. We then present pulse shapes derived from hohlraum simulations using an atomic physics model that approximates the SCRAM emissivities. We discuss the differences in coronal energetics and show how this affects the pulse shape and decreases the peak power requirement. Finally, we present design simulations of potential NIF-commissioning scaling experiments that could distinguish among emissivity models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. A simple model of hohlraum power balance and mitigation of SRS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Albright, Brian J.; Montgomery, David S.; Yin, Lin; Kline, John L.

    2016-01-01

    A simple energy balance model has been obtained for laser-plasma heating in indirect drive hohlraum plasma that allows rapid temperature scaling and evolution with parameters such as plasma density and composition. Furthermore, this model enables assessment of the effects on plasma temperature of, e.g., adding high-Z dopant to the gas fill or magnetic fields.

  7. A new symmetry model for hohlraum-driven capsule implosion experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O.; Rygg, R.; Tomasini, R.; Eder, D.; Kritcher, A.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, L.; Thomas, C.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Doeppner, T.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S.; Pak, A.; Field, J.; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Town, R.; Bradley, D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new model for predicting the time-dependent radiation drive asymmetry in laser-heated hohlraums. The model consists of integrated Hydra capsule-hohlraum calculations coupled to a separate model for calculating the crossbeam energy transfer between the inner and outer cones of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) indirect drive configuration. The time- dependent crossbeam transfer model parameters were adjusted in order to best match the P2 component of the shape of the inflight shell inferred from backlit radiographs of the capsule taken when the shell was at a radius of 150-250 μm. The adjusted model correctly predicts the observed inflight P2 and P4 components of the shape of the inflight shell, and also the P2 component of the shape of the hotspot inferred from x-ray self-emission images at the time of peak emission. It also correctly captures the scaling of the inflight P4 as the hohlraum length is varied. We then applied the newly benchmarked model to quantify the improved symmetry of the N130331 layered deuterium- tritium (DT) experiment in a re-optimized longer hohlraum.

  8. X-ray conversion efficiency in vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Suter, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Dixit, S. N.; Landen, O. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Warrick, A.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kline, J. L.

    2012-05-15

    X-ray fluxes measured in the first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were significantly higher than predicted by computational simulations employing XSN average atom atomic physics and highly flux-limited electron heat conduction. For agreement with experimental data, it was found that the coronal plasma emissivity must be simulated with a detailed configuration accounting model that accounts for x-ray emission involving all of the significant ionization states. It was also found that an electron heat conduction flux limit of f= 0.05 is too restrictive, and that a flux limit of f= 0.15 results in a much better match with the NIF vacuum hohlraum experimental data. The combination of increased plasma emissivity and increased electron heat conduction in this new high flux hohlraum model results in a reduction in coronal plasma energy and, hence, an explanation for the high ({approx}85%-90%) x-ray conversion efficiencies observed in the 235 < T{sub r} < 345 eV NIF vacuum hohlraum experiments.

  9. Electron heat conduction under non-Maxwellian distribution in hohlraum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Yihuo; Ke Lan; Pei Jungu; Heng Yong; Qing Hongzeng

    2012-01-15

    An electron transport model based on the non-Maxwellian distribution f{sub 0}{proportional_to}e{sup -{nu}{sup m}} (NM model), caused by the inverse bremsstrahlung heating, is used in 1-D plane target and 2-D hohlraum simulations. In the NM model, the electron heat flux depends not only on the gradient of electron temperature T{sub e} but also on the gradients of electron number density and the index m. From 1-D simulations, the spatial distribution of T{sub e} is dune-like and T{sub e} decreases obviously in the flux-heated region, which is very different from the flat profile obtained by using the flux limit model (FL model) but similar to the experimental observations [Gregori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 205006 (2004)] and the nonlocal results [Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)]. The reason which causes the dune-like profile of T{sub e} is discussed in the paper. From 2-D hohlraum simulations, the NM results of the plasma status, the emission peak and profile inside hohlraum are very different from the FL model results. Finally, it is hard to use an average flux limiter in the FL model to obtain the same hohlraum plasma status and emission with those under the NM model.

  10. The Near Vacuum Hohlraum Campaign at the NIF: A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Sebastien

    2015-11-01

    Hohlraums filled with helium >1 mg/cc have been used with some success on the National Ignition Facility. However challenges remain due to significant backscatter level, supra-thermal electron production and difficulties in modeling implosion symmetry via Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET). Near Vacuum Hohlraum (NVH, filled with <0.1 mg/cc of helium) may provide a viable alternative with negligible laser plasma instabilities and high laser-to-hohlraum coupling. In this reduced laser-plasma interaction system, implosion symmetry is controlled through direct adjustment of the laser beam power balance rather than through CBET. A significant challenge in extending this platform to higher convergence designs is achieving adequate symmetry control of the drive throughout the pulse. This talk will summarize experimental campaigns exploring laser pulse duration and power limits in three hohlraum size scales and two capsule size scales. Experiments with small capsules have shown good symmetry control using laser cone fraction tuning at convergence ratio (CR) of 18x and 7ns pulses. Results from higher convergence (CR ~ 25x) cryogenic DT layered capsule implosions with ~ 9 ns pulses will be presented and implications for achieving conditions required for robust alpha heating with NVH driven implosions will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. A Simple Model of Hohlraum Power Balance and Mitigation of SRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Montgomery, David S.; Yin, L.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    A simple energy balance model has been obtained for laser-plasma heating in indirect drive hohlraum plasma that allows rapid temperature scaling and evolution with parameters such as plasma density and composition. This model enables assessment of the effects on plasma temperature of, e.g., adding high-Z dopant to the gas fill or magnetic fields.

  12. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-15

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  13. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources - planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  14. Towards a more universal understanding of radiation drive in gas-filled hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Amendt, P. A.; Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Chen, H.; Dewald, E. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Patel, M. V.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Sepke, S. M.; Strozzi, DJ; Turnbull, D. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have found that radiation-hydrodynamic calculations that use the high flux model assumptions [1] can accurately predict the radiation drive produced by a laser-heated hohlraum under certain conditions, but can not predict drive over a broad range of parameters (pulse energy, hohlraum gas fill density, hohlraum case-to-capsule ratio). In particular, the model is accurate for ∼7 ns long laser pulses used to implode capsules with high density carbon (HDC) ablators in hohlraums with helium fill gas densities of 0-0.6 mg/cc. By systematically varying the gas fill density from 0 to 1.6 mg/cc we found that the agreement with drive begins to diverge for fills > 0.85 mg/cc. This divergence from the model coincides with the onset of measureable SRS backscatter. In this same set of experiments the radiation drive symmetry inferred from the imploded shape of a gas-filled capsule is not predicted with this model. Finally, several possible fixes to the model to reduce the observed discrepancies are considered.

  15. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or "shimmed," so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  16. High performance capsule implosions on the OMEGA Laser facility with rugby hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.-S.; Town, R. P. J.; Milovich, J. L.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Sorce, C.; Strozzi, D. J.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Liberatore, S.; Monteil, M.-C.; Seguin, F.; Rosenberg, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.

    2010-05-15

    Rugby-shaped hohlraums have been proposed as a method for x-ray drive enhancement for indirectly driven capsule implosions. This concept has recently been tested in a series of shots on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. In this paper, experimental results are presented comparing the performance of D{sub 2}-filled capsules between standard cylindrical Au hohlraums and rugby-shaped hohlraums. The rugby hohlraums demonstrated 18% more x-ray drive energy as compared with the cylinders, and the high-performance design of these implosions (both cylinder and rugby) also provided {approx_equal}20x more deuterium (DD) neutrons than any previous indirectly driven campaign on OMEGA and {approx_equal}3x more than ever achieved on NOVA [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] implosions driven with nearly twice the laser energy. This increase in performance enables, for the first time, a measurement of the neutron burn history and imaging of the neutron core shapes in an indirectly driven implosion. Previous DD neutron yields had been too low to register this key measurement of capsule performance and the effects of dynamic mix. A wealth of additional data on the fuel areal density from the suite of charged particle diagnostics was obtained on a subset of the shots that used D {sup 3}He rather than D{sub 2} fuel. Comparisons of the experimental results with numerical simulations are shown to be in very good agreement. The design techniques employed in this campaign, e.g., smaller laser entrance holes and hohlraum case-to-capsule ratios, provide added confidence in the pursuit of ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)].

  17. Dynamics of a Z Pinch X Ray Source for Heating ICF Relevant Hohlraums to 120-160eV

    SciTech Connect

    SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; OLSON,RICHARD E.; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; NASH,THOMAS J.; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; PETERSON,D.L.; BOWERS,R.L.; MATUSKA,W.

    2000-07-10

    A z-pinch radiation source has been developed that generates 60 {+-} 20 KJ of x-rays with a peak power of 13 {+-} 4 TW through a 4-mm diameter axial aperture on the Z facility. The source has heated NIF (National Ignition Facility)-scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm high) hohlraums to 122 {+-} 6 eV and reduced-scale (4-mm diameter by 4-mm high) hohlraums to 155 {+-} 8 eV -- providing environments suitable for indirect-drive ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) studies. Eulerian-RMHC (radiation-hydrodynamics code) simulations that take into account the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane provide integrated calculations of the implosion, x-ray generation, and hohlraum heating, as well as estimates of wall motion and plasma fill within the hohlraums. Lagrangian-RMHC simulations suggest that the addition of a 6 mg/cm{sup 3} CH{sub 2} fill in the reduced-scale hohlraum decreases hohlraum inner-wall velocity by {approximately}40% with only a 3--5% decrease in peak temperature, in agreement with measurements.

  18. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  19. Expectations for hohlraum environment driven by spatially compressed flying radiation case at intermediate currents

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Rogers, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The radiation environment produced by the magnetic implosion of a hot, low density plasma and its stagnation on an axial cushion (a Flying Radiation Case) is modeled using a two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic code and drive parameters for the PFZA-Z machine pulsed power machine. The authors consider the effects of instability growth in the plasma during the implosion, its reassembly on the cushion, and plasma interactions with shaped electrodes. The radiation environment within the pinch and in an axial side hohlraum are modeled. They also consider effects of the pinch on the side hohlraum. The computational approach has been successful in modeling the implosion and radiation output of Z-pinches on the Pegasus facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and on the Saturn and PFZA-Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories.

  20. A cylinder-to-sphere Fourier view factor model for azimuthal asymmetry studies in cylindrical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorla, J.; Poggi, F.; Paillard, D.

    2002-01-01

    This work addresses the analytical calculation of the irradiation coming from a cylindrical surface to a spherical one. This exact solution of the x-ray transport equation allows one to connect the emitted and the received fluxes, expanded as Fourier modes, by coefficients called Fourier view factors. Such a calculation is well suited to a symmetry study in the Laser Megajoule configuration [P.-A. Holstein, M. André, M. Casanova et al., C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 1, 693 (2000)] where a cylindrical hohlraum and a spherical capsule are irradiated. Indeed, this 60 quad laser system induces an azimuthal asymmetry of the hohlraum lighting depending on the laser focal spot size. Thus, the Fourier view factors allow one to express the modes of the capsule irradiation as functions of the elliptic spot dimensions.

  1. Observed Dependence of Stimulated Raman Scattering on Ion-Acoustic Damping in Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; DuBois, D.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Chrien, R.E. ||

    1996-09-01

    The reflectivity of a laser due to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from long scale-length hohlraum plasmas is shown to depend on the damping of ion-acoustic waves. This dependence is observed in plasmas with either low or high ionization states. Since the SRS process itself is unrelated to acoustic waves, these data are evidence of a nonlinear coupling of SRS to other parametric processes involving daughter acoustic waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  2. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, F.; Villette, B.; Michel, P.; Petrasso, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Giraldez, E.; Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  3. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Villette, B.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; Michel, P.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E.

    2014-07-25

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  4. Instability analysis of pointing accuracy and power imbalance of spherical hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hao; Wu, Changshu; Pei, Wenbing; Zou, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    An analytic model to describe the statistic behavior of flux asymmetry on the capsule shell under the influence of random fluctuation of laser spots' position and laser energy is developed. Based on our previous work [Duan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 092704 (2015)] and a diagram technique, the expectation, variance, and probability density function of flux asymmetry raised by laser pointing accuracy and laser power imbalance of 4, 6, and 8 laser entrance holes (LEHs) spherical hohlraums are shown. For spherical hohlraums with different numbers of LEHs, it is found that the random part of flux asymmetry is proportional to the ratio between laser energy and square root of total spots' number ELaser/√{Nt } , and angle-of-incidence θ0, which indicates that a choice of small θ0 and a great number of Nt can reduce the random flux asymmetry. In order to achieve a cumulative probability in which each l-order flux asymmetry can meet corresponding requirements [Gu et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 012704 (2014)] beyond 90% in the condition of a 1000 μm capsule and 4000 μm hohlraum, the power imbalance, i.e., the ratio between standard derivation and expectation of laser spots power ΔF/Fspot for 4, 6, and 8 LEHs spherical hohlraums must not exceed 8.1%, 9.1%, and 8.5%, corresponding pointing accuracy rHΔθ must not exceed 79 μm , 102 μm , and 96 μm along the ê θ direction, and rH sin 2 θ0Δϕ must not exceed 77 μm , 99 μm , and 94 μm along the ê ϕ direction, respectively.

  5. Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-04-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

  6. Convergent ablation measurements with gas-filled rugby hohlraum on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Galmiche, D.

    2016-03-01

    Convergent ablation experiments with gas-filled rugby hohlraum were performed for the first time on the OMEGA laser facility. A time resolved 1D streaked radiography of capsule implosion is acquired in the direction perpendicular to hohlraum axis, whereas a 2D gated radiography is acquired at the same time along the hohlraum axis on a x-ray framing camera. The implosion trajectory has been measured for various kinds of uniformly doped ablators, including germanium-doped and silicon-doped polymers (CH), at two different doping fraction (2% and 4% at.). Our experiments aimed also at measuring the implosion performance of laminated capsules. A laminated ablator is constituted by thin alternate layers of un-doped and doped CH. It has been previously shown in planar geometry that laminated ablators could mitigate Rayleigh Taylor growth at ablation front. Our results confirm that the implosion of a capsule constituted with a uniform or laminated ablator behaves similarly, in accordance with post-shot simulations performed with the CEA hydrocode FCI2.

  7. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Simulating hohlraum dynamics and radiation flow for Pleiades experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Devolder, B. G.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Lanier, N.; Magelssen, G. R.; Peterson, R. R.; Taccetti, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Pleiades campaign is developing and validating an experimental platform on NIF to produce a high-quality radiation drive to study super-, trans- and subsonic radiation flow. Platform requirements include 5% shot-to-shot repeatability, a minimum radiation drive of 300 eV, and the ability to provide supersonic radiation. Here we discuss the ongoing series of experiments, focusing on simulations of the hohlraum and package. We assess the platform's ability to provide the required drive and reproducibility, the effectiveness of spectral tailoring with M-band absorbing foam, and the ability of our models to simulate the hohlraum drive and radiation flow. Early shots in the campaign have met or surpassed requirements. The first shot produced a 340 eV drive, exceeding the minimum drive requirement. The Dante-measured flux from the second shot demonstrated success in meeting the repeatability requirement. Simulated Dante temperatures match both shots well, indicating that simulations successfully model the laser energy deposition and hohlraum dynamics.

  9. Evaluation of laser light specularly reflected by the hohlraum surface on OMEGA indirect implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Turner, R. E.; Landen, O. L.; Wallace, R. J.; Koch, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Due to the cylindrical shape of hohlraums typically used in indirect implosion experiments, the laser beams specularly reflected by the inner hohlraum surface are focused onto the capsule surface. This effect, which is known as the glint light effect, is important during the early stages of laser irradiation ( ˜200 ps), and might seed undesirable hydrodynamic instabilities which could grow during the implosion. We performed ray-trace calculations to evaluate this effect, and found that with a typical laser configuration the peak intensity of glint light can be up to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. We also performed experiments to measure of glint light effect at Omega using a time resolved x-ray re-emission technique, and evaluated the effect of rough hohlraum walls on the glint light intensity and spatial distribution. The results of the calculations and experiments will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  10. Neutron reactions in the hohlraum at the LLNL National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Hale, G. M.; Korzekwa, R. C.

    2012-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser energy captured in a hohlraum. The projected yields at NIF suggest that interactions of neutrons with the hohlraum can directly probe the neutron spectrum. Different physical parameters of the burning capsule can be probed by different neutron reactions. We suggest a variety of neutron reactions on the gold and uranium present in National Ignition Campaign hohlraums that will be useful for both neutron diagnostics and dosimetry at the NIF. The radiochemical daughter products may then be used to infer the neutron spectrum from the capsule. The downscattered neutrons may be studied by the (n,γ) and (n,n') reactions to infer the areal density of the capsule. The 14 MeV neutron fluence may be measured by (n,2n) daughter products for comparison to neutron spectrometer data. The hydrodynamical mix in the capsule can be studied with RIF neutrons, which are probed by (n,3n) reactions.

  11. Hohlraum target alignment from x-ray detector images using starburst design patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R., Jr.; Conder, Alan; Edwards, Oliver; Kroll, Jeremy; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Mapoles, Evan; McGuigan, Dave; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2011-03-01

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  12. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Hartemann, F.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Divol, L.; Robey, H. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Döppner, T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10 × higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma.

  13. The application of quasi-steady approximation in atomic kinetics in simulation of hohlraum radiation drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guoli; Pei, Wenbing; Lan, Ke; Gu, Peijun; Li, Xin; Institute of Applied Physics; Computional Mathematics Team

    2011-10-01

    In current routine 2D simulation of hohlraum physics, we adopt the principal-quantum- number(n-level) average atom model(AAM). However, the experimental frequency-dependant radiative drive differs from our n-level simulated drive, which reminds us the need of a more detailed atomic kinetics description. The orbital-quantum-number(nl-level) AAM is a natural consideration but the in-line calculation consumes much more resources. We use a new method to built up a nl-level bound electron distribution using in-line n-level calculated plasma condition (such as temperature, density, average ionization degree). We name this method ``quasi-steady approximation.'' Using the re-built nl-level bound electron distribution (Pnl) , we acquire a new hohlraum radiative drive by post-processing. Comparison with the n-level post-processed hohlraum drive shows that we get an almost identical radiation flux but with more-detailed frequency-dependant structures.

  14. The application of quasi-steady approximation in atomic kinetics in simulation of hohlraum radiation drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guoli; Pei, Wenbing; Lan, Ke; Li, Xin; Hohlraum Physics Team

    2014-10-01

    In current routine 2D simulation of hohlraum physics, we adopt the principal-quantum-number (n-level) average atom model (AAM) in NLTE plasma description. The more sophisticated atomic kinetics description is better choice, but the in-line calculation consumes much more resource. By distinguishing the much more fast bound-bound atomic processes from the relative slow bound-free atomic processes, we found a method to built up a bound electron distribution (n-level or nl-level) using in-line n-level calculated plasma condition (such as temperature, density, average ionization degree). We name this method ``quasi-steady approximation.'' Using this method and the plasma condition calculated under n-level, we re-build the nl-level bound electron distribution (Pnl), and acquire a new hohlraum radiative drive by post-processing. Comparison with the n-level post-processed hohlraum drive shows that we get an almost identical radiation flux but with more-detailed frequency-dependant structures. Also we use this method in the benchmark gold sphere experiment, the constructed nl-level radiation drive resembles the experimental results and DCA results, while the n-level raditation does not.

  15. Development of short pulse laser driven micro-hohlraums as a source of EUV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Batson, Thomas; McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Thomas, Alec; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at large scale laser facilities such as NIF allow the radiativ properties of dens, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regime, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled system using a short laser pulses and delivering energy to much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a much smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavit. The laser is tightl focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall. Experiments were performe using the Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser system at Michiga. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser power, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricate target. Spectral characteristics were measured using a soft X-ray spectromete, K-alpha x-ray imaging system and a filtered photo cathode array. Scalings of the radiation temperature were made for variations in the hohlraum cavit, the pulse duration as well as the focusing conditions. Proof of principle time resolved absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performe. These sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma an radiation temperatures comparable to much larger hohlraums, but with much higher repetition rate and in a university scale laboratory. We acknowledge funding from DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0066.

  16. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums.

    PubMed

    Dewald, E L; Hartemann, F; Michel, P; Milovich, J; Hohenberger, M; Pak, A; Landen, O L; Divol, L; Robey, H F; Hurricane, O A; Döppner, T; Albert, F; Bachmann, B; Meezan, N B; MacKinnon, A J; Callahan, D; Edwards, M J

    2016-02-19

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10× higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma. PMID:26943541

  17. The Evolution of the Gold Bubble in NIF Ignition Gas-Filled Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Marilyn; MacLaren, Steve; Widmann, Klaus; Meezan, Nathan; Hammer, James; Bell, Perry; Benedetti, Robin; Bradley, David; Callahan, Deborah; Dewald, Eduard; Doeppner, Tilo; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Oggie; Landen, O. L.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Moore, Alastair

    2015-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the energy from 192 laser beams is converted to an x-ray drive in a gas-filled gold hohlraum. The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The ViewFactor platform uses a truncated hohlraum to measure the x-ray drive from the capsule point-of-view. This platform also affords excellent diagnostic views of the hohlraum interior, in particular, of the region in which the outer beams deposit their energy (the ``gold bubble'') Time-resolved and time-integrated images in the hard x-ray range (>3 keV) reveal an 8-fold symmetry in the gold bubble. The Au plasma in the bubble from the eight 50 degree quads expands faster than that from the interleaved 44.5 degree quads. The variation in this structure with laser intensity, with pulse shape and cross beam energy transfer, and comparison to models, will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  19. Laser{endash}plasma interactions in ignition-scale hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.J.; Afeyan, B.B.; Back, C.A.; Berger, R.L.; Bonnaud, G.; Casanova, M.; Cohen, B.I.; Desenne, D.E.; DuBois, D.F.; Dulieu, A.G.; Estabrook, K.G.; Fernandez, J.C.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kaiser, T.B.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Powers, L.V.; Rose, H.A.; Rousseaux, C.; Turner, R.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilks, S.C.; Williams, E.A.

    1996-05-01

    Scattering of laser light by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a concern for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The hohlraum designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) raise particular concerns due to the large scale and homogeneity of the plasmas within them. Experiments at Nova have studied laser{endash}plasma interactions within large scale length plasmas that mimic many of the characteristics of the NIF hohlraum plasmas. Filamentation and scattering of laser light by SBS and SRS have been investigated as a function of beam smoothing and plasma conditions. Narrowly collimated SRS backscatter has been observed from low density, low-{ital Z}, plasmas, which are representative of the plasma filling most of the NIF hohlraum. SBS backscatter is found to occur in the high-{ital Z} plasma of gold ablated from the wall. Both SBS and SRS are observed to be at acceptable levels in experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Guymer, T. M.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Thomas, C. A.; Wan, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a "hohlraum." The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3-5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum ("ViewFactor hohlraum") is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%-20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  1. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the national ignition facility using DANTE

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Glenzer, S H; Olson, Rick; Suter, Larry J; Widmann, K; Callahan, D A; Dixit, S N; Thomas, C A; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Moore, A; Celeste, J; Dewald, E; Hsing, W W; Warrick, A; Atherton, J; Azevedo, S; Beeler, R; Berger, R; Conder, A; Divol, L; Haynam, C A; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R; Kilkenny, J; Liebman, J; Larson, D; Meezan, N B; Michel, P; Moody, J; Rosen, M D; Schneider, M B; Van Wontergheman, B; Wallace, R J; Young, B K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Berzins, L; Tran, Vu; Torres, P., III

    2010-01-01

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr representing a 20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale hohlraums. The vacuum hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square pulses with energies between 150 - 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30 {+-} 10% more flux than predicted by the current radiation hydrodynamic simulations after careful verification of all component calibrations (which included an {approx} 10% downward correction to Center X-Ray Optics opacities just below the Cu L edge at 50-750 eV), cable deconvolution, and analysis software routines. To corroborate these results, first a half hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns-long axial quad with an irradiance of {approx} 1-2 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. Second, we completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for non-local heat conduction and non-linear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to {+-}5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we concluded the 30 {+-} 10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics when we transitioned to large hot hohlraums. Specifically, using variants in the atomic physics models and electron heat conduction, newer simulations show that nonlocalization of energy deposition leads to less energy being stored in the coronal plasma leading to

  2. Observation of reduced beam deflection using smoothed beams in gas-filled hohlraum symmetry experiments at Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N. D.; Lindman, E. L.; Magelssen, G. R.; Failor, B. H.; Murphy, T. J.; Hauer, A. A.; Gobby, P.; Moore, J. B.; Gomez, V.; Gifford, K.

    2000-05-01

    Execution and modeling of drive symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums have been pursued to provide both a better understanding of radiation symmetry in such hohlraums and to verify the accuracy of the design tools which are used to predict target performance for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. In this paper, the results of a series of drive symmetry experiments using gas-filled hohlraums at the Nova laser facility [C. Bibeau et al., Appl. Opt. 31, 5799 (1992)] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. A very important element of these experiments was the use of kineform phase plates (KPP) to smooth the Nova beams. The effect of smoothing the ten Nova beams with KPP phase plates is to remove most of the beam bending which had been observed previously, leaving a residual bending of only 1.5 degree sign , equivalent to a 35 {mu}m pointing offset at the hohlraum wall. The results show that the symmetry variation with pointing of implosions in gas-filled hohlraums is consistent with time integrated modeling. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  5. Crystal spectroscopy of silicon aero-gel end-caps driven by a dynamic hohlraum on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Gilliland, Terrance Leo; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Lake, Patrick Wayne; Nash, Thomas J.; Idzorek, George C.; Apruzese, John P.; Moore, Tracy Croft; McKenney, John Lee; Torres, Jose A.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Jobe, Daniel Olarry; Chrien, Robert E.; Nielsen, Daniel Scott; Mock, Raymond Cecil; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Peterson, Darrell L.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Lucas, Joshua M.; Watt, Robert G.; Russell, Christopher Owen; Seamen, Johann Franz

    2003-07-01

    We present results from crystal spectroscopic analysis of silicon aero-gel foams heated by dynamic hohlraums on Z. The dynamic hohlraum on Z creates a radiation source with a 230-eV average temperature over a 2.4-mm diameter. In these experiments silicon aero-gel foams with 10-mg/cm{sup 3} densities and 1.7-mm lengths were placed on both ends of the dynamic hohlraum. Several crystal spectrometers were placed both above and below the z-pinch to diagnose the temperature of the silicon aero-gel foam using the K-shell lines of silicon. The crystal spectrometers were (1) temporally integrated and spatially resolved, (2) temporally resolved and spatially integrated, and (3) both temporally and spatially resolved. The results indicate that the dynamic hohlraum heats the silicon aero-gel to approximately 150-eV at peak power. As the dynamic hohlraum source cools after peak power the silicon aero-gel continues to heat and jets axially at an average velocity of approximately 50-cm/{micro}s. The spectroscopy has also shown that the reason for the up/down asymmetry in radiated power on Z is that tungsten enters the line-of-sight on the bottom of the machine much more than on the top.

  6. The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-03-15

    Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

  7. The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-03-01

    Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%-3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

  8. Scattered and Reflected Light Polarimetry as a Diagnostic of Multibeam Hohlraum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, David

    2015-11-01

    Scattered light provides a window into the complex laser-plasma interactions and hydrodynamics occurring within indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums. Understanding hohlraum physics is an important part of developing improved targets and increasing the likelihood of ignition. Measurements of the scattered light power and spectrum are routinely made on each cone of beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in order to correct for coupling losses due to laser-plasma instabilities. The additional ability to probe scattered light polarization on a 30° incidence beam was recently added, which has produced a number of discoveries regarding multibeam hohlraum physics. One particularly important insight is that the polarizations of an incident beam and its backscatter are affected by amplitude and phase modulations induced by crossing laser beams. The revised theory describing this optical wave mixing has recently been validated by conducting a two beam pump-probe experiment under carefully controlled conditions. This effect could be utilized more generally to produce ultrafast, damage-resistant, and tunable laser-plasma wave plates, polarizers, or other photonic devices. It also enables remote polarimetry-based probing of plasma conditions such as electron temperature. To extract more quantitative feedback about crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) from the polarimetry data in ICF experiments at the NIF, the diagnostic has been upgraded to measure the complete Stokes vector with temporal resolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering on laser intensity, laser {ital f} number, and ion species in hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; Hsing, W.W.; Rose, H.A.; Wilde, B.H.; Bradley, K.S.; Gobby, P.L.; Kirkwood, R.; Kornblum, H.N.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D. ||

    1996-03-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering has been studied in plasma conditions approaching those expected within laser-driven cavities (hohlraums) capable of driving a fusion capsule to ignition with x rays. These conditions are achieved using a gas-filled hohlraum design that was fielded at the Nova laser. As the intensity of an interaction beam (351 nm in wavelength) is increased above an onset value {ital I}{sub {ital c}}, the measured Brillouin backscatter into the lens rises sharply and saturates. {ital I}{sub {ital c}} decreases as the optic {ital f} number increases. The saturation level depends on the gas ion species. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  11. Continued Study on Hohlraum Radiation Source with Approximately Constant Radiation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo; Li, Zhichao; Huang, Chengwu

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was performed on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility to continue the study on hohlraum radiation source with approximately constant radiation temperature using a continuously shaped laser pulse. A radiation source with a flattop temperature of about 130 eV that lasted about 5 ns was obtained. The previous analytical iteration method based on power balance and self-similar solution of ablation was modified taking into account the plasma movements and it was used to design the laser pulse shape for experiment. A comparison between experimental results and simulation is presented and better agreement was achieved using the modified method. Further improvements are discussed.

  12. X-ray imaging measurements of capsule implosions driven by a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Slutz, S A; Bennett, G R; Cooper, G; Lash, J S; Lazier, S; Lemke, R; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Moore, T C; Ruiz, C L; Schroen, D G; Smelser, R; Torres, J; Vesey, R A

    2002-08-26

    The radiation and shock generated by impact of an annular tungsten Z-pinch plasma on a 10-mm diam 5-mg/cc CH(2) foam are diagnosed with x-ray imaging and power measurements. The radiative shock was virtually unaffected by Z-pinch plasma instabilities. The 5-ns-duration approximately 135-eV radiation field imploded a 2.1-mm-diam CH capsule. The measured radiation temperature, shock radius, and capsule radius agreed well with computer simulations, indicating understanding of the main features of a Z-pinch dynamic-hohlraum-driven capsule implosion. PMID:12190409

  13. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  14. Inline Modeling of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer and Raman Scattering in NIF Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, David; Bailey, D. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Jones, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    Inline models of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) have been added to the radiation-hydrodynamics codes Hydra and Lasnex. Both processes are important in hohlraums with high gas fill density, particularly for implosion symmetry. Coupled-mode equations are solved along laser ray paths for both models. The inline model shows the SRS gain rate exceeds that of SRS light absorption along most of the laser ray path, and most SRS light escapes the target. Most SRS-driven Langmuir wave power is deposited slightly inside the laser entrance hole (LEH), which reduces how much inner-beam power reaches the equator. This also makes the LEH hotter, which affects CBET. Compared to removing SRS power from the incident laser, the inline SRS model does not change total x-ray drive but makes the drive stronger from the poles than the equatorial waist. This reduces the need to artificially clamp CBET in order to match implosion shape data, which has historically been needed for high gas fill hohlraums. We are applying the models to a set of NIF shots with varying gas fill densities. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. A novel double hohlraum target to create a moderately coupled plasma for ion stopping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, A.; Faik, S.; Schumacher, D.; Basko, M. M.; Blazevic, A.; Busold, S.; Bedacht, S.; Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Rienecker, T.; Schaumann, G.; Tauschwitz, An.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new double hohlraum target for the creation of a moderately coupled (0.1 < Γ < 1) carbon plasma for energy loss and charge state measurements of projectile ions interacting with this plasma. A spherical cavity of 600 μm in diameter is heated with a 150-J laser pulse (λL = 527nm) within 1.2ns to produce a quasi-Planckian X-ray source with a radiation temperature of Tr ≈ 100eV . These X-rays are then used to heat volumetrically two thin carbon foils in a secondary cylindrical hohlraum to a dense plasma state. An axi-symmetric plasma column with a free-electron density of up to 8 ×1021cm-3, a temperature of T ≈ 10 eV, and an average ionization degree of Z ≈ 3 is generated. This plasma stays in a dense and an almost uniform state for about 5ns . Ultimately, such targets are supposed to be used in experiments where a heavy ion beam is launched through the sample plasma, and the ion energy losses as well as the charge distributions are to be measured. The present paper is in a certain sense a symbiotic one, where the theoretical analysis and the experimental results are combined to investigate the basic properties and the prospects of this type of plasma targets.

  16. Inline Modeling of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer and Backscatter in Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Michel, P.; Marinak, M. M.; Jones, O. S.

    2014-10-01

    NIF Ignition experiments with gas-filled hohlraums use significant cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) to control implosion symmetry. They also display substantial stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) from inner laser beams, and associated ``hot'' electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA has been extended to include inline models for CBET and SRS. Coupled-mode equations in the strong damping limit (with linear, kinetic gain rates) are solved along the entire path of incident laser rays. Driven ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves, and inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption, are treated. The inline model includes heating by CBET-driven ion waves, which reduces subsequent CBET. SRS developing inside the target leads to more heating of the underdense fill - and more depletion of the inner beams reaching the hohlraum wall - than removing the escaping SRS light from the incident laser. Thus, SRS also modifies the plasma conditions so as to limit CBET. We compare inline results with post-processing CBET calculations on plasma conditions from simulations that do not include CBET or SRS. Prepared by LLNSL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. The structure of the Laser Entrance Hole in NIF Ignition gas-filled hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; Doeppner, T.; Thomas, C. A.; Widmann, K.; MacLaren, S. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Eder, D.; Hammer, J. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. J.; Park, H. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Town, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the energy from 192 laser beams is converted to an x-ray drive in a gas-filled hohlraum. The drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH size decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma in the laser deposition region pushing radially outward. Compared to models, the LEH size is larger than predicted. In addition, the plasma in the LEH region is hotter than predicted. Instead of being at the radiation temperature of about 300 eV, it is at an electron temperature of 1 to a few keV. The experimental measurements for this conclusion are discussed. Data on the LEH as a function of laser pulse shape, gas fill, and energy transfer are presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  18. Characterization of ultrashort pulse laser-produced miniature hohlraum XUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Zulick, Calvin; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Chvykov, Vladimir; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) allow the radiative properties of dense, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regimes, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled down system using ultra-short laser pulses and delivering energy to a much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a significantly smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavity. The laser is tightly focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall with an intensity closer to that of a long pulse laser. Experiments were performed on a number of short-pulse Ti:sapphire tabletop laser systems. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser powers, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricated targets. Spectral characteristics were measured using a flat-field soft X-ray spectrometer and a seven channel filtered photo cathode array. These broadband EUV sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma and radiation temperatures comparable to NIF type hohlraums, but with a significantly higher repetition rate and in a university scale system.

  19. The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wenyi; Yang, Dong; Lan, Ke; Li, Sanwei; Li, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction are determined by a shock-wave technique and measured by a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer. The peak radiation temperature TR and M-band fraction fm are simultaneously determined by using the observed shock velocities in Al and Ti. For the vacuum Au hohlraum used in the experiments, TR is about 160 eV and fm is between 4.3-6.3% under 1ns laser pulse of 2 k. And TR is about 202 eV and fm is about 9% with laser energy 6 kJ. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases TR to 207 eV while has almost no influence on fm. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that TR from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether CPP is applied or not. However, fm from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP.

  20. Experimental demonstration of early time, hohlraum radiation symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J.; Thomas, C.; Kline, J.; Sorce, C.; Glenn, S.; Landen, O. L.

    2011-09-01

    Early time radiation symmetry at the capsule for indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] will be inferred from the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern of a high-Z sphere replacing the ignition capsule. This technique was tested on the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, T. Boehly et al., Laser Part. Beams 11, 317 (1991)] in near full ignition scale vacuum hohlraums using an equivalent experimental setup to the one planned for NIF. Two laser cones entering each laser entrance hole heat the hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 100 eV, mimicking the NIF ignition pulse foot drive. The experiments have demonstrated accuracies of ±1.5% (±2%) in inferred P2/P0 (P4/P0) Legendre mode incident flux asymmetry and consistency between 900 eV and 1200 eV re-emission patterns. We have also demonstrated the expected tuning capability of P2/P0, from positive (pole hot) to negative (waist hot), decreasing linearly with the inner/outer beams power fraction. P4/P0 on the other hand shows very little variation with power fraction. We developed a simple analytical viewfactor model that is in good agreement with both measured P2/P0 and P4/P0 and their dependence on inner beam power fraction.

  1. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  2. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. PMID:26274424

  3. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  4. Study of implosion dynamics of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum on the Angara-5-1 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Faqiang; Xu, Rongkun; Xu, Zeping; Yang, Jianlun; Li, Zhenghong; Xia, Guangxin; Ning, Jiamin; Li, Linbo; Chen, Dingyang; Chen, Jinchuan

    2015-02-01

    The Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH) is one of high-power X-ray sources that has been used in a variety of high energy-density experiments including inertial confinement fusion (ICF) studies. Dynamic hohlraums driven by a 12-mm and a 18-mm-diameter single tungsten wire arrays embedded with a C16H20O6 foam, respectively, exhibit no visible differences in radiation from the axial exit, although the radial radiation is a little higher in a large array. The analysis of the images suggests that the implosion of a large array is quasi-continuous and has a faster imploding velocity, indicating that the large array is matched to the embedded foam and, oppositely, the small array is mismatched. The analysis also shows that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability develops much harder in implosions of a large array, and this leads to a lower hohlraum temperature. The conclusion was drawn that, for the purpose of enhancing the hohlraum temperature, increasing the conversion efficiency of kinetic energy into thermal energy is more important than increasing the kinetic energy from wire plasma.

  5. pF3D Simulations of Large Outer-Beam Brillouin Scattering from NIF Rugby Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Steven; Strozzi, David; Chapman, Thomas; Amendt, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We assess the cause of large outer-beam stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a NIF shot with a rugby-shaped hohlraum, which has less wall surface loss and thus higher x-ray drive than a cylindrical hohlraum of the same radius. This shot differed from a prior rugby shot with low SBS in three ways: outer beam pointing, split-pointing of the four beams within each outer-beam quadruplet, and a small amount of neon added to the hohlraum helium fill gas. We use pF3D, a massively-parallel, paraxial-envelope laser plasma interaction code, with plasma profiles from the radiation-hydrodynamics code Lasnex. We determine which change between the two shots increased the SBS by adding them one at a time to the simulations. We compare the simulations to experimental data for total SBS power, its spatial distribution at the lens, and the SBS spectrum. For each shot, we use profiles from Lasnex simulations with and without a model for mix at the hohlraum wall-gas interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-674893.

  6. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  7. Polar Radiation-Flux Symmetry Measurements in Z-Pinch-Driven Hohlraums with Symmetric Double-Pinch Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo Porter, M. E., Jr.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Seamen, H.; Primm, P.; Torres, J.; McGurn, J.; Gilliland, T. L.; Reynolds, P.; Hebron, D. E.; Dropinski, S. C.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.; Koch, J.

    2000-10-01

    We are currently exploring symmetry requirements of the z-pinch-driven hohlraum concept [1] for high-yield inertial confinement fusion. In experiments on the Z accelerator, the burnthrough of a low-density self-backlit foam ball has been used to diagnose the large time-dependent flux asymmetry of several single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries [2]. We are currently applying this technique to study polar radiation flux symmetry in a symmetric double z-pinch geometry. Wire arrays on opposite ends of the hohlraum, connected in series to a single current drive of 18 MA, implode and stagnate on axis, efficiently radiating about 100 TW of x rays which heat the secondary to 75 eV. Comparisons with 3-D radiosity and 2-D rad-hydro models of hohlraum symmetry performance will be presented. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1 J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999). 2 D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 40 (1999).

  8. Compact hohlraum configuration with parallel planar-wire-array x-ray sources at the 1.7-MA Zebra generator.

    PubMed

    Kantsyrev, V L; Chuvatin, A S; Rudakov, L I; Velikovich, A L; Shrestha, I K; Esaulov, A A; Safronova, A S; Shlyaptseva, V V; Osborne, G C; Astanovitsky, A L; Weller, M E; Stafford, A; Schultz, K A; Cooper, M C; Cuneo, M E; Jones, B; Vesey, R A

    2014-12-01

    A compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources is experimentally demonstrated in a configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields at a 1.7-MA Zebra generator. Driving in parallel two magnetically decoupled compact double-planar-wire Z pinches has demonstrated the generation of synchronized x-ray bursts that correlated well in time with x-ray emission from a central reemission target. Good agreement between simulated and measured hohlraum radiation temperature of the central target is shown. The advantages of compact hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities are discussed. PMID:25615200

  9. Compact hohlraum configuration with parallel planar-wire-array x-ray sources at the 1.7-MA Zebra generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources is experimentally demonstrated in a configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields at a 1.7-MA Zebra generator. Driving in parallel two magnetically decoupled compact double-planar-wire Z pinches has demonstrated the generation of synchronized x-ray bursts that correlated well in time with x-ray emission from a central reemission target. Good agreement between simulated and measured hohlraum radiation temperature of the central target is shown. The advantages of compact hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities are discussed.

  10. Planar Wire-Array Z-Pinch Implosion Dynamics and X-Ray Scaling at Multiple-MA Drive Currents for a Compact Multisource Hohlraum Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Coverdale, C. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Jones, M. C.; Fowler, W. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Serrano, J. D.; Vigil, M. P.; Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2010-03-26

    An indirect drive configuration is proposed wherein multiple compact Z-pinch x-ray sources surround a secondary hohlraum. Planar compact wire arrays allow reduced primary hohlraum surface area compared to cylindrical loads. Implosions of planar arrays are studied at up to 15 TW x-ray power on Saturn with radiated yields exceeding the calculated kinetic energy, suggesting other heating paths. X-ray power and yield scaling studied from 1-6 MA motivates viewfactor modeling of four 6-MA planar arrays producing 90 eV radiation temperature in a secondary hohlraum.

  11. X-ray conversion efficiency and radiation non-uniformity in the hohlraum experiments at Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huasen; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Pei, Wenbing; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Wei, Huiyue; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-11-15

    The hohlraum radiation properties are studied experimentally by the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility and numerically by the two-dimensional code LARED with the multi-group radiation transfer model. The measured radiation temperature is consistent with the prediction of the simulations in a wide laser energy range, suggesting that the x-ray conversion efficiency is around 75% at the peak radiation temperature. The delicate hohlraum experiments further show that the radiation intensity inside the hohlraum is significantly non-uniform. The measured radiation flux of the hot spot region is over twice higher than that of the re-emitted wall region. Good agreements between the experiments and simulations further demonstrate the validity of the LARED code to study the hohlraum radiation properties.

  12. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C.; Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Chrien, Robert E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Peterson, Darrell L.; Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Watt, Robert G.

    2004-06-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  13. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  14. Modeling of NIC Symcap and THD Experiments Using High Resolution Integrated Hohlraum-Capsule Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ogden; Milovich, Jose; Marinak, Marty; Sepke, Scott; Patel, Mehul; Meezan, Nathan; Callahan, Deborah; Town, Richard; Glenzer, Siegfried; Schneider, Marilyn; Langer, Steve; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Springer, Paul; Edwards, John; Wilson, Doug; Kyrala, George; Kline, John

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a capability to do very high spatial resolution 2D integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations using the Hydra code. Surface perturbations for all ablator layer surfaces and the DT ice layer are calculated explicitly up to mode 30 or 100. The effects of the fill tube, grooves in the ice layer, and surface defects on the ablator are included via models extracted from higher resolution calculations. High wave number mix is included through a mix model. Measured backscatter and a model for crossbeam energy transfer are included to enable a best estimate of the drive asymmetry for each shot. We have applied this model to National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments from the fall of 2009 and more recent symmetry capsule and cryogenic layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) experiments. We compare the measured x-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures to the simulated diagnostic signatures extracted from the model.

  15. Target diagnostics for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the diagnostics used at Sandia National Laboratories to measure the parameters of intense lithium ion-beam hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target temperature and x-ray output. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved I-D streaked imaging, diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing, incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrograph, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven-element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven-element PIN diode detector array. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density can be measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line emission and neutron emission.

  16. Radial electric field 3D modeling for wire arrays driving dynamic hohlraums on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil

    2007-06-01

    The anode-cathode structure of the Z-machine wire array results in a higher negative radial electric field (Er) on the wires near the cathode relative to the anode. The magnitude of this field has been shown to anti-correlate with the axial radiation top/bottom symmetry in the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum). Using 3D modeling, the structure of this field is revealed for different wire-array configurations and for progressive mechanical alterations, providing insight for minimizing the negative Er on the wire array in the anode-to-cathode region of the DH. Also, the 3D model is compared to Sasorov's approximation, which describes Er at the surface of the wire in terms of wire-array parameters.

  17. Considerations of stimulated sideward scattering in NIF ignition-scale hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruer, William

    2009-11-01

    It's prudent to consider the possibility of stimulated Raman and Brillouin sideward scattering in NIF ignition-scale hohlraums. NIF beam spots are quite large (with diameter >1mm), and the gradient threshold intensities for these instabilities are rather low. Some simple calculations are given for the convective gain of sideward scattering assuming heavily-damped electrostatic waves. A possible enhancement of sideward scattering in the azimuthal direction is examined. Various ways to detect sideward scattering and its effects are discussed. For seeded angular scattering in the region where the laser beams overlap, see recent calculations by P. Michel et. al.footnotetextP. Michel et. al., 39^th Anomalous Absorption Conference, Bodega Bay, CA (June 14-19, 2009)

  18. Design and experimental study of a secondary hohlraum radiation source with laser focal spots blocked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tianming; Zhu, Tuo; Yang, Jiamin; Huang, Chengwu; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Zhichao; Zhang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    A design of secondary hohlraum radiation source with laser focal spots blocked is introduced. The hard x-ray radiation such as the gold M-band emission and hot electrons from the coronal plasma were designed to be shielded using a cylindrical shield. Three-dimensional view factor analysis was carried out to optimize the shield structure to achieve higher radiation temperature. An experiment was performed at Shenguang III prototype laser facility to verify the design. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector was used to measure the shock wave speed in a three-stepped Al sample driven by this radiation source and the peak radiation temperature of the radiation source was estimated to be about 90 eV.

  19. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  20. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation.

    PubMed

    Hessling, T; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Kraus, D; Roth, M; Schaumann, G; Schumacher, D; Stöhlker, T; Hoffmann, D H H

    2011-07-01

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 μm were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved. PMID:21867327

  1. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  2. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic fieldmore » $$B_{z0}$$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $$B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.« less

  3. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic field $B_{z0}$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.

  4. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M. B. MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  5. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Jorge J.; Giedt, Warren H.

    2004-03-15

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx}2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  6. Radiative heating of plastic-tamped aluminum foil by x rays from a foam-buffered hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyan; Yang, Jiamin; Xu, Yan; Yang, Guohong; Ding, Yaonan; Yan, Jun; Yuan, Jianmin; Ding, Yongkun; Zheng, Zhijian; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin

    2009-01-01

    The time dependence of the x-ray absorption of aluminum samples heated with intense radiation sources from a foam-buffered gold hohlraum has been studied in this work. Hydrodynamic simulations were used to illustrate the plasma conditions in the plastic-tamped aluminum foils contained in this type of hohlraum. Experiments were conducted to measure the K -shell x-ray absorption spectra of the aluminum sample. With densities taken from the hydrodynamic simulations, electron temperatures were then inferred by fitting the measured absorption spectra with detailed-term-accounting calculations. The inferred temperatures have a maximum of about 93eV and were found to agree within 25% with the simulated results at times after 1ns , indicating that the use of foam shields, together with a compact cavity, has created a clean and high-temperature radiation source preferable to opacity measurements. PMID:19257142

  7. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J J; Giedt, W H

    2003-09-02

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx} 2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  8. Calculations for NIF first quad gas-filled hohlraum experiments testing beryllium microstructure growth and laser plasma interaction physics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S. R.; Fernández, J. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kindel, J. M.; Langdon, A. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The first quad of the NIF provides four nearly collinear f/20 laser beams, which can be treated as a single f/8 beam of maximum energy 16 kJ. We are designing experiments on halfraums in which the composite beam is focused in the plane of the (single) halfraum laser entry hole (LEH) with its symmetry axis collinear with the halfiaum symmetry axis. For most of the calculations, the halfraum diameter is 1.6mm, the LEH is 1.2mm, and axial length is 3.0mm. The incident laser power consists of an early foot followed by a final peak. Peak radiation temperatures for this relatively narrow hohlraum are greater than for wider hohlraums of the same length. Plasma conditions within the halfraum are calculated with Lasnex using azimuthally symmetric, (r,z) geometry, taking into account a polyimide membrane which contains the fill gas (CH{sub 2}) within the halfraum. Estimates for microstructure growth due to the volume crystalline structure within a beryllium slab mounted in the halfraum sidewall are obtained by a post-processor, which applies plasma conditions within the halfraum to an ablatively accelerated, two-dimensional beryllium slab. We present a detailed simulation of the hohlraum conditions resulting from a laser spot of diameter 500 {mu}m, with peak intensity at 3.5 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a comparison with a simulation with the same power-time profile at an intensity about 1/4 as great, and a comparison with a simulation with more detailed attention to hydro coupling between the gold and gas-fill regions of the hohlraum. We are currently attempting to model the consequences of possible beam filamentation during the pulse.

  9. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  10. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Dixit, S.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D.; Bradley, D.; Izumi, N.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Callahan, D.; Weber, S. V.; Holder, J. P.; Glenn, S.; Edwards, M. J.; Bell, P.; Kimbrough, J.; Koch, J.; Prasad, R.; Suter, L.; Kilkenny, J.

    2010-10-15

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 {mu}m and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  11. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited).

    PubMed

    Kyrala, G A; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D; Bradley, D; Izumi, N; Meezan, N; Landen, O L; Callahan, D; Weber, S V; Holder, J P; Glenn, S; Edwards, M J; Bell, P; Kimbrough, J; Koch, J; Prasad, R; Suter, L; Kline, J L; Kilkenny, J

    2010-10-01

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules. PMID:21034014

  12. Sensitivity study of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jianfa; Zou Shiyang; Li Yongsheng; Dai Zhensheng; Ye Wenhua

    2012-12-15

    The paper investigates theoretically the sensitivities of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum. In the simulation, the hohlraum radiation is represented by a Planckian spectrum for the main drive plus a gaussian bump centered at energy E{sub c} for preheating x-rays. Simulation results show that with the increasing of center energy E{sub c}, the Atwood number at the fuel-ablator interface increases rapidly due to the preheating and expanding of the inner undoped CH layer. The growing of Atwood number indicates the hydrodynamic instability (HI) growth and mixing at this interface. On the other hand, the increasing of E{sub c} results in a large density gradient scale length of ablation front and stabilizes the HI growth at ablation front. The changes of the hard x-ray spectrum have significant influences on other important implosion parameters including the ablator mass remaining, shock timing, implosion velocity, and yield as well. High-precision results on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum are thus critical for optimizing the ignition capsule design to limit the HI growth.

  13. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility using DANTE (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Widmann, K.; Warrick, A.; Olson, R. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Moore, A. S.; Suter, L. J.; Landen, O.; Callahan, D.; Azevedo, S.; Liebman, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Conder, A.; Dixit, S. N.; Torres, P.; Tran, V.; Dewald, E. L.; Kamperschroer, J.; Atherton, L. J.; Beeler, R.; Berzins, L.; Celeste, J.; Haynam, C.; Hsing, W.; Larson, D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Hinkel, D.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J.; Meezan, N.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M.; Williams, E. A.; Vernon, S.; Wallace, R. J.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Young, B. K.

    2010-10-01

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraum target experiments have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr as viewed by DANTE representing an ˜20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale Hohlraums. The vacuum Hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square laser pulses with energies between 150 and 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30±10% more flux than predicted by the preshot radiation hydrodynamic simulations. To validate these results, careful verification of all component calibrations, cable deconvolution, and software analysis routines has been conducted. In addition, a half Hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns long axial quad with an irradiance of ˜2×1015 W/cm2 for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. We have also completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1×1014 W/cm2 over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for nonlocal heat conduction and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-Hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere, and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to ±5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we conclude that the 30±10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics of the larger Hohlraums.

  14. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,RICHARD; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSLKA,WALTER; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,BOB; PETERSON,DARRELL; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-01

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch magnet on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {approx}85 eV for a duration of {approx}10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approx}122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approx}150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation T{approx}(P/A){sup 1/4}. P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  15. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sandord, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Mock, R.C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Simpson, W.W.; Struve, K.W.; Vesey, R.A.; Bowers, R.L.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; Peterson, R.R.

    1999-08-25

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch target on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {minus}85 eV for a duration of {approximately} 10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approximately} 122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approximately} 150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation (T-(P/A){sup 1/4}). P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  16. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility using DANTE (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Widmann, K.; Warrick, A.; Thomas, C. A.; Suter, L. J.; Landen, O.; Callahan, D.; Azevedo, S.; Liebman, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Conder, A.; Dixit, S. N.; Dewald, E. L.; Kamperschroer, J.; Atherton, L. J.; Beeler, R. Jr.; Berzins, L.; Celeste, J.; Haynam, C.; Hsing, W.; and others

    2010-10-15

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraum target experiments have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr as viewed by DANTE representing an {approx}20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale Hohlraums. The vacuum Hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square laser pulses with energies between 150 and 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30{+-}10% more flux than predicted by the preshot radiation hydrodynamic simulations. To validate these results, careful verification of all component calibrations, cable deconvolution, and software analysis routines has been conducted. In addition, a half Hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns long axial quad with an irradiance of {approx}2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. We have also completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for nonlocal heat conduction and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-Hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere, and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to {+-}5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we conclude that the 30{+-}10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics of the larger Hohlraums.

  17. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-15

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum.

  18. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Ding, Yongkun; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum. PMID:26520945

  19. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Ding, Yongkun; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum.

  20. Assessing the two plasmon decay instability in ignition-scale hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W L; Meezan, N; Town, R; Strozzi, D; Wilks, S; Williams, E; Meeker, D; Suter, L; Regan, S

    2009-10-08

    In recent experiments Sean Regan, et. al. for the first time observed the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability from window plasma in hohlraum targets. This instability can also operate at peak power near the edge of the inner beams in the ablator plasma and near the edge of the outer beams in the liner plasma. Fortunately, only a small fraction of the laser energy was estimated to be at risk. A more quantitative assessment of the energy at risk at peak power and its sensitivity to variations in target design and to details of the instability threshold model will here be given. They also explore how strong collisionality restricts this instability in the Au wall plasma. They show that the instability threshold can be significantly reduced for laser beams with an angle of incidence of about 60 degrees due to the swelling of the laser field near its turning point. A simple model is given. It is also shown that for frequently cited plasma conditions, the SRS-scattered light wave can itself drive the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability. This effect is relevant for the nonlinear saturation of SRS and the resulting heated electron generation. Some estimates are given. Finally, several important issues concerning the high-energy electron distributions due to the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability and other laser plasma processes are discussed.

  1. Design of dynamic hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, Gregory Alan; Nash, Thomas J.; Bailey, James E.

    2010-03-01

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9 x 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3{micro}m of magnesium and 0.078{micro}m of iron sandwiched between 10{micro}m layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing.

  2. Design of dynamic Hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.

    2010-10-15

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9x10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3 {mu}m of magnesium and 0.078 {mu}m of iron sandwiched between 10 {mu}m layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing.

  3. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  4. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  5. Design of dynamic Hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z.

    PubMed

    Nash, T J; Rochau, G A; Bailey, J E

    2010-10-01

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9×10(22)/cm(3) electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3 μm of magnesium and 0.078 μm of iron sandwiched between 10 μm layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing. PMID:21034046

  6. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    > . The field's main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or `hot', electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium-tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. The effect of the field on deuterium-tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.

  7. Simulations of the 3-Shock HDC gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Ross, J. S.; Ho, D.; Weber, C.; Sepke, S.; Khan, S.; Cerjan, C.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.

    2015-11-01

    We describe simulation efforts to design and field a series of high-density-carbon (HDC) capsule tuning experiments in 1.6 mg/cc gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), culminating in two DT-layered shots. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA coupled to an off-line power transfer model was employed to ascertain the optimal laser pulse that minimizes radiation asymmetries and implosion adiabat for a given stability margin. We found that these HDC targets have similar sensitivity as their CH ``high-foot'' counterparts when laser cone-fraction and power as well as ablator thickness are varied, leading to comparable implosions. A point of divergence, however, is the measured neutron down-scatter-ratio (DSR) that typically gauges the degree of compression obtained in a DT implosion, with HDC targets having approximately half the CH value. Concerted efforts are underway to understand and ascertain the causes of this discrepancy. Simulations and comparisons with data will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Determining the hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction by using shock wave technique on SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke; Li, Yongsheng; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been conducted on SGIII-prototype laser facility using tow materials Al and Ti as shock wave witness plates. The radiation temperature ^TR and M-band fraction fM inside a hohlraum are determined by using the observed shock velocities in Al and Ti. This is the first experimental demonstration of the proposal that ^TR and fM can be simultaneously determined by using shock wave technique [Y. S. Li, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 022701 (2011)]. For the Au hohlraum used in the experiments, TR is about 160 eV and ^fM is around 4.3% under a 1 ns laser pulse of 2 kJ. The results from this technique are complementary to those from the broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS), and the technique can be used to determine ^TR and fM inside an ignition hohlraum.

  9. Direct measurements of an increased threshold for stimulated brillouin scattering with polarization smoothing in ignition hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Berger, R L; London, R A; Meezan, N B; Strozzi, D J; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Stagnitto, S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-09-12

    We demonstrate a significant reduction of stimulated Brillouin scattering by polarization smoothing in large-scale high-temperature hohlraum plasma conditions where filamentation is measured to be negligible. The stimulated Brillouin scattering experimental threshold (defined as the intensity at which 5% of the incident light is backscattered) is measured to increase by a factor of 1.7+/-0.2 when polarization smoothing is applied. An analytical model relevant to inertial confinement fusion plasma conditions shows that the measured reduction in backscatter with polarization smoothing results from the random spatial variation in polarization of the laser beam, not from the reduction in beam contrast. PMID:18851289

  10. Inertial confinement fusion using hohlraum radiation generated by heavy-ion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahir, N. A.; Lutz, K.-J.; Geb, O.; Maruhn, J. A.; Deutsch, C.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    1997-03-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of employing heavy-ion cluster beams to generate thermal radiation that can be used to drive inertial fusion capsules. The low charge-to-mass ratio of a cluster may allow the driver beam to be focused to a very small spot size with a radius of the order of 100 μm, while the low energy per nucleon (of the order of 10 keV) may lead to a very short range of the driver particles in the converter material. This would result in high specific power deposition that may lead to a very high conversion efficiency. The problem of cluster stopping in cold matter, as well as in hot dense plasmas has been thoroughly investigated. The conversion efficiency of cluster ions using a low-density gold converter has also been calculated over a wide range of parameters including converter density, converter geometry, and specific power deposition. These calculations have been carried out using a one-dimensional hydrodynamic computer code that includes a multigroup radiation transport scheme [Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475 (1988)]. The problem of symmetrization of this radiation field in a hohlraum with solid gold walls has also been thoroughly investigated using a three-dimensional view factor code. The characteristics of the radiation field obtained by this study are used as input to capsule implosion calculations that are done with a three-temperature radiation-hydrodynamic computer code MEDUSA-KAT [Tahir et al., J. Appl. Phys. 60, 898 (1986)]. A reactor-size capsule which contains 5 mg deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel is used in these calculations. The problem of using a fuel mixture with a substantially reduced tritium content has also been discussed.

  11. NIF Target Capsule Wall And Hohlraum Transfer Gas Effects On Deuterium-Tritium Redistribution Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Giedt, W H; Sanchez, J J

    2005-06-27

    The effects of temperature and age on the times required for beta-heating-induced redistribution of a 50-50 mole percent mixture of deuterium and tritium (DT) in a spherical capsule are investigated analytically and numerically. The derivation of an analytical solution for the redistribution time in a one-dimensional binary diffusion model, which includes the capsule thermal resistance, is first described. This result shows that the redistribution time for a high conductivity capsule wall is approximately doubled after 8 days of {sup 3}He formation. In contrast, with a low thermal conductivity capsule wall (e.g., polyimide), the redistribution time would increase by less than 10%. The substantial effect of the capsule wall resistance suggested that the resistance to heat transfer from the capsule through the surrounding transfer gas to the hohlraum wall would also influence the redistribution process. This was investigated with a spherical model, which was based on accounting for energy transfer by diffusion with a conduction heat transfer approximation. This made it possible to solve for the continuous temperature distribution throughout the capsule and surrounding gas. As with the capsule the redistribution times depended on the relative values of the thermal resistances of the vapor, the capsule, and the transfer gas. With increasing thermal resistance of the vapor (increased concentration of {sup 3}He) redistributions times for hydrocarbon capsules were significantly less than predicted by the one-dimensional model, which included the capsule wall resistance. In particular for low {sup 3}He concentrations the time constant was approximately 10% less than the minimum one-dimensional value of 27 minutes. Further analytical and experimental investigation focused on defining the relations between the thermal resistances under which the one-dimensional model analysis applies is recommended.

  12. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-09-15

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MegaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength {lambda}=35, 50, and 70 {mu}m) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength {lambda}=35 and 70 {mu}m, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.

  13. Sensitivity of capsule implosion symmetry due to laser beam imbalance in a scale 0.2 hot hohlraum at Omega

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delamater, N. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Seifter, A.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2010-08-01

    Results are shown from recent experiments at the Omega laser facility, using 40 Omega beams driving the hohlraum with 3 cones from each side and up to 19.5 kJ of laser energy. Beam phasing is achieved by decreasing the energy separately in each of the three cones, by 3 kJ, for a total drive energy of 16.5 kJ. This results in a more asymmetric drive, which will vary the shape of the imploded symmetry capsule core from round to oblate or prolate in a systematic and controlled manner. These results show the sensitivity of capsule implosion symmetry for implosions in "high temperature" (275 eV) hohlraums at Omega. Dante measurements confirmed the predicted peak drive temperatures of 275 eV. Implosion core time dependent x-ray images were obtained from framing camera data which show the expected change in symmetry due to beam imbalance and which also agree well with post processed hydro code calculations.

  14. Fast ignition in system Dynamic Hohlraum with Monte-Carlo simulations of fusion kinetic and radiation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, Alexander A.; Platonov, Konstantin Y.; Zacharov, Sergey V.; Gus'kov, Sergei Y.; Rozanov, Vladimir B.; Il'in, Dmitrii V.; Levkovskii, Aleksey A.; Sherman, Vladimir E.

    2004-06-01

    The scheme of fast ignition by super-intense laser of DT target placed at a cavity of the radiate plasma liner, created in a "dynamic-hohlraum" system is considered. It is shown that this scheme can supply effective TN fusion. The process of compression and preheating of DT fuel of shell target by X-ray radiation of Dynamic Hohlraum is simulated by the code TRITON with parameters of Z-generator of Sandia National Laboratory. The optimum parameters of target are obtained. The mechanism of ignitor creation by protons, accelerated by ultra-shot laser radiation is considered and corresponding laser parameters are evaluated. The mathematical simulation of the following thermonuclear (TN) burn wave propagation in DT target is carried out with the use of TERA code based upon the direct statistical simulation of kinetics of fast charged particles and quantum of thermal radiation on each time step of hydrodynamics. The released TN energy is obtained as a function of ignition energy. The theoretical explanations of obtained dependencies are presented. The laser parameters necessary to produce G>>1 are determined.

  15. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside hohlraum on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Huo, Wen; Lan, Ke; Li, Yongsheng; Li, Xin; Wu, Changshu; Ren, Guoli; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Min; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Jiang, Xiaohua; Song, Tianming; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Liu, Yonggang; Zhan, Xiayu; and others

    2014-02-15

    The radiation temperature T{sub R} and M-band fraction f{sub M} inside the vacuum Au hohlraum have been experimentally determined by a shock wave technique and a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. From the results of the shock wave technique, T{sub R} is about 202 eV, and f{sub M} is about 9% for the hohlraums driven by a 1 ns flattop pulse of 6 kJ laser energy. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases T{sub R} to 207 eV while has almost no influence on f{sub M}. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that T{sub R} from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether with CPP or not. However, f{sub M} from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP. The preheat effect on exterior surface of witness plate is reduced by thicker thickness of witness plate designed for higher laser driven energy.

  16. Compression and Cavitation of Externally Applied Magnetic Field on a Hohlraum due to Non-Local Heat Flow Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alec; Ridgers, Chris; Kingham, Rob

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we present full-scale 2D kinetic modeling of externally imposed magnetic fields on hohlraums with laser heating. We observe magnetic field cavitation and compression due to thermal energy transport. Self-consistent modeling of the electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's Law. A complete Ohm's Law contains magnetic field advection through the Nernst mechanism that arises due to the heat flow. Magnetic field amplification by a factor of 3 occurs due to magnetic flux pile-up from Nernst convection. The magnetic field cavitates towards the hohlraum axis over a 0.5 ns time scale due to Nernst convection. This results in significantly different magnetic field profiles and slower cavitation than can be expected due to the plasma bulk flow. Non-local electrons contribute to the heat flow down the density gradient resulting in an augmented Nernst convection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling. In addition to showing the prevalence of non-local heat flows, we show effects such as anomalous heat flow up the density gradient induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. This research was supported by the DOE through Grant No. DE SC0010621 and in part through computational resources and services provided by Advanced Research Computing at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

  17. Symmetry control using beam phasing in ~0.2 NIF scale high temperature Hohlraum experiment on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, Norman D; Wilson, Goug C; Kyrala, George A; Seifter, Achim; Hoffman, N M; Dodd, E; Glebov, V

    2009-01-01

    Results are shown from recent experiments at the Omega laser facility, using 40 Omega beams driving the hohlraum with 3 cones from each side and up to 19.5 kJ of laser energy. Beam phasing is achieved by decreasing the energy separately in each of the three cones, by 3 kJ, for a total drive energy of 16.5kJ. This results in a more asymmetric drive, which will vary the shape of the imploded symmetry capsule core from round to oblate or prolate in a systematic and controlled manner. These results would be the first demonstration of beam phasing for implosions in such 'high temperature' (275 eV) hohlraums at Omega. Dante measurements confirmed the predicted peak drive temperatures of 275 eV. Implosion core time dependent x-ray images were obtained from framing camera data which show the expected change in symmetry due to beam phasing and which also agree well with post processed hydro code calculations. Time resolved hard x-ray data has been obtained and it was found that the hard x-rays are correlated mainly with the low angle 21{sup o} degree cone.

  18. Compressive asymmetry evaluation for M-Band Radiation generated from the interaction of high energy laser and the hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Huang, Yunbao; Li, Liling; Jing, Longfei; Lin, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    In indirect drive inertial confinement fusion, intense laser interacts with high-Z materials in the hohlraum and X-rays are generated to heat and drive the centrally located capsule. Most of these X-rays emitted from the wall of hohlraum are soft x-rays, but also a comparable fraction of them are high-energy X-rays (mainly from M band of wall material, >2keV for Au), which may lead to preheat and compressive asymmetry on the capsule, and affect final ignition result. Therefore, such preheat and compressive asymmetry needs to be characterized and evaluated, to enable it restrained or controlled. In this paper, by using one-dimensional multi-group radiation hydrodynamic codes and view-factor based radiation transport codes, we evaluate the compressive asymmetry on the centrally located capsule for various fractions of M-band X-rays. The result shows that: 1) The M-band X-rays may lead to significant compressive asymmetry when the thermal flux is symmetric,2) More fractions of M-band X-rays tends to result in more compressing asymmetry, and 3) 15% of M-band X-rays may result in 50% compressive asymmetry. Base on the above analysis, such significant compressive asymmetry due to M-band radiation may decrease the compressibility of the fuel or the capsule performance. Therefore, it motivates us to validate and measure such quantity of compressive asymmetry occurred on the capsule in recent experiments.

  19. The radiation temperature and M-band fraction inside hohlraum on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi Huo, Wen; Yang, Dong; Lan, Ke; Li, Sanwei; Li, Yongsheng; Li, Xin; Wu, Changshu; Ren, Guoli; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Wang, Min; Yi, Rongqing; Jiang, Xiaohua; Song, Tianming; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Liu, Yonggang; Zhan, Xiayu; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Zhang, Huan; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-02-01

    The radiation temperature TR and M-band fraction fM inside the vacuum Au hohlraum have been experimentally determined by a shock wave technique and a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS) on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. From the results of the shock wave technique, TR is about 202 eV, and fM is about 9% for the hohlraums driven by a 1 ns flattop pulse of 6 kJ laser energy. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases TR to 207 eV while has almost no influence on fM. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that TR from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether with CPP or not. However, fM from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP. The preheat effect on exterior surface of witness plate is reduced by thicker thickness of witness plate designed for higher laser driven energy.

  20. Uranium hohlraum with an ultrathin uranium-nitride coating layer for low hard x-ray emission and high radiation temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Liang; Ding, Yongkun; Xing, Pifeng; Li, Sanwei; Kuang, Longyu; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Taimin; Ren, Guoli; Wu, Zeqing; Jing, Longfei; Zhang, Wenhai; Zhan, Xiayu; Yang, Dong; Jiang, Baibin; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke

    2015-11-01

    An ultrathin layer of uranium nitrides (UN) has been coated on the inner surface of depleted uranium hohlraum (DUH), which has been proven by our experiment to prevent the oxidization of uranium (U) effectively. Comparative experiments between the novel depleted uranium hohlraum and pure golden (Au) hohlraum are implemented on an SGIII-prototype laser facility. Under a laser intensity of 6 × 1014 W cm-2, we observe that the hard x-ray (hν \\gt 1.8 keV) fraction of the uranium hohlraum decreases by 61% and the peak intensity of the total x-ray flux (0.1 keV˜5.0 keV) increases by 5%. Radiation hydrodynamic code LARED is used to interpret the above observations. Our result for the first time indicates the advantages of the UN-coated DUH in generating a uniform x-ray source with a quasi-Planckian spectrum, which should have important applications in high energy density physics.

  1. Low-foot rugby hohlraum experiments on the NIF: Wall-gas mix and a connection with missing x-ray drive energy?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Schneider, Marilyn; Jones, Oggie; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John

    2014-10-01

    Rugby-shaped hohlraums on the NIF have shown strong symmetry anomalies when simulated with the high-flux model. The wall-gas interface is Rayleigh-Taylor unstable and may lead to the formation of a late-time mix layer that impedes inner- cone propagation, resulting in a drive asymmetry on the capsule. Due to the rugby curvature near the laser entrance hole, the effect of mix may be more pronounced than in cylinders. At the same time a persistent pattern of 15--25% missing energy has been inferred in gas-filled hohlraums (ρ >= 0 . 96 mg/cc). A possible physical connection between formation of a mix layer and the plasma adiabatic lapse rate, where a temperature-gradient reversal is predicted to occur, is explored. Such a profile reversal, in turn, hinders electron conduction to the dense (ρ > 0 . 2 g/cc) Au region responsible for ~900 eV drive x-ray emission, leading to a hotter coronal plasma and reduced hohlraum efficiency. Remedial measures for recovering the loss in hohlraum efficiency through the use of higher-Z gas fills are explored. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-11-01

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and -resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold-helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to hindered

  3. Low-adiabat rugby hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility: Comparison with high-flux modeling and the potential for gas-wall interpenetration

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter Ross, J. Steven; Milovich, Jose L.; Schneider, Marilyn; Storm, Erik; Callahan, Debra A.; Hinkel, Denise; Lasinski, Barbara; Meeker, Don; Michel, Pierre; Moody, John; Strozzi, David

    2014-11-15

    Rugby-shaped gold hohlraums driven by a nominal low-adiabat laser pulse shape have been tested on the National Ignition Facility. The rugby affords a higher coupling efficiency than a comparably sized cylinder hohlraum or, alternatively, improved drive symmetry and laser beam clearances for a larger hohlraum with similar cylinder wall area and laser energy. A first (large rugby hohlraum) shot at low energy (0.75 MJ) to test laser backscatter resulted in a moderately oblate CH capsule implosion, followed by a high energy shot (1.3 MJ) that gave a highly oblate compressed core according to both time-integrated and –resolved x-ray images. These implosions used low wavelength separation (1.0 Å) between the outer and inner cones to provide an alternative platform free of significant cross-beam energy transfer for simplified hohlraum dynamics. Post-shot 2- and 3-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using the high-flux model [M. D. Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)], however, give nearly round implosions for both shots, in striking contrast with observations. An analytic assessment of Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instability growth on the gold–helium gas-fill interface shows the potential for significant linear growth, saturation and transition to a highly nonlinear state. Candidate seeds for instability growth include laser speckle during the early-time laser picket episode in the presence of only partial temporal beam smoothing (1-D smoothing by spectral dispersion and polarization smoothing) and intensity modulations from quad-to-quad and beam overlap. Radiation-hydrodynamic 2-D simulations adapted to include a dynamic fall-line mix model across the unstable Au-He interface show good agreement with the observed implosion symmetry for both shots using an interface-to-fall-line penetration fraction of 100%. Physically, the potential development of an instability layer in a rugby hohlraum is tantamount to an enhanced wall motion leading to

  4. Impact of acute stress on antimicrobial polypeptides mRNA copy number in several tissues of marine sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In comparison to higher vertebrates, fish are thought to rely heavily on innate immune system for initial protection against pathogen invasion because their acquired immune system displays a considerably poor immunological memory, and short-lived secondary response. The endogenous antimicrobial polypeptides (AMPPs) directly and rapidly killing pathogens such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses are included within the realm of innate defenses. In addition to piscidins, AMPPs that in recent years have been shown to be commonly linked to innate defense, are histones and their polypeptide fragments, and peptides derived from the respiratory protein hemoglobin. There is evidence that a number of stresses lead to significant regulation of AMPPs and thus their monitoring could be a highly sensitive measure of health status and risk of an infectious disease outbreak, which is a major impediment to the continued success of virtually all aquaculture enterprises and is often the most significant cause of economic losses. Results We firstly isolated and deposited in Genbank database the cDNA sequences encoding for hemoglobin-β-like protein (Hb-LP) [GeneBank: JN410659], H2B histone-like protein 1 (HLP1) GenBank: JN410660], and HLP2 [GenBank: JN410661]. The "de novo" prediction of the three-dimensional structures for each protein is presented. Phylogenetic trees were constructed on Hb-LP, HLP1, and HLP2 sequences of sea bass and those of other teleost, avian, reptiles, amphibian and mammalian species. We then used real time RT-PCR technology to monitor for the first time in sea bass, dynamic changes in mRNA copy number of Hb-LP, HLP1, HLP2, and dicentracin in gills, skin, eyes, stomach and proximal intestine in response to acute crowding/confinement stress. We showed that acute crowding stress induces an increase in the expression levels of the aforementioned genes, in gills and skin of sea bass, but not in other tissues, and that this expression patterns are

  5. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Cerjan, C.; Hamza, A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2007-05-15

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)] has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) targets as a complementary path to the cryogenic baseline approach. Expected benefits of DS ignition targets include noncryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma-mediated laser backscatter, low threshold-ignition temperatures ({approx_equal}4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances, and minimal (two-) shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several formidable challenges, encompassing room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT ({approx_equal}790 atm) in the inner shell, strict concentricity requirements on the two shells (<3 {mu}m), development of nanoporous (<100 nm cell size) low-density (<100 mg/cc) metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation, and effective control of hydrodynamic instabilities on the high-Atwood-number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition designs and required materials science advances at the nanoscale are described herein. Two new ignition designs that use rugby-shaped vacuum hohlraums are presented that utilize either 1 or 2 MJ of laser energy at 3{omega}. The capability of the National Ignition Facility to generate the requested 2 MJ reverse-ramp pulse shape for DS ignition is expected to be comparable to the planned high-contrast ({approx_equal}100) pulse shape at 1.8 MJ for the baseline cryogenic target. Nanocrystalline, high-strength, Au-Cu alloy inner shells are under development using electrochemical deposition over a glass mandrel, exhibiting tensile strengths well in excess of 790 atm. Novel, low-density (85 mg/cc) copper foams have recently been demonstrated using 10 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} nanoporous aerogels with suspended Cu particles. A prototype demonstration of an ignition DS is planned

  6. Assessing the prospects for achieving double-shell ignition on the National Ignition Facility using vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Cerjan, C; Hamza, A; Hinkel, D; Milovich, J L; Robey, H F

    2006-10-26

    The goal of demonstrating ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has motivated a revisit of double-shell (DS) targets as a complementary path to the cryogenic baseline approach. Expected benefits of DS ignition targets include non-cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel preparation, minimal hohlraum-plasma mediated laser backscatter, low threshold ignition temperatures ({approx} 4 keV) for relaxed hohlraum x-ray flux asymmetry tolerances, and minimal (two-) shock timing requirements. On the other hand, DS ignition presents several formidable challenges, encompassing room-temperature containment of high-pressure DT ({approx} 790 atm) in the inner shell, strict concentricity requirements on the two shells (< 3 {micro}m), development of nano-porous (<100 nm) low-density (<100 mg/cc) metallic foams for structural support of the inner shell and hydrodynamic instability mitigation, and effective control of hydrodynamic instabilities on the high-Atwood number interface between the DT fuel and the high-Z inner shell. Recent progress in DS ignition designs and required materials-science advances at the nanoscale are described herein. Two new ignition designs that use rugby-shaped vacuum hohlraums are presented which utilize either 1 MJ or 2 MJ of laser energy at 3{omega}. The capability of the NIF to generate the requested reverse-ramp pulse shape for DS ignition is expected to be comparable to the planned high-contrast ({approx}100) pulse-shape at 1.8 MJ for the baseline cryogenic target. Nano-crystalline, high-strength, Au-Cu alloy inner shells are under development using electrochemical deposition over a glass mandrel, exhibiting tensile strengths well in excess of 790 atm. Novel, low-density (85 mg/cc) copper foams have recently been demonstrated using 10 mg/cc SiO{sub 2} nano-porous aerogels with suspended Cu particles. A prototype demonstration of an ignition DS is planned for 2008, incorporating the needed novel nano-materials science developments and the

  7. Assessing the existence of non-LTE behavior in aluminum K-shell diagnostic lines from dynamic hohlraum driven experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherrill, M. E.

    2015-11-01

    We describe in this work a study designed to obtain insight into the sensitivity of foil targets driven out of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) by an idealized dynamic hohlraum during its brightest phase. This work is motivated by a perceived over-prediction of the plasma temperature by current LTE spectral modeling of opacity experiments performed by Bailey et al at the Sandia Z facility. Although several aspects of this modeling study parallel the SNL/LANL opacity experiments, this work is primarily intended to gain insight into radiatively over-driven systems. The results from this idealized study suggest that a non-LTE population distribution with qualities similar to an LTE distribution at higher material temperatures are possible, and therefore support a further theoretical investigation with experimental parameters.

  8. Observation of the density threshold behavior for the onset of stimulated Raman scattering in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Döppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Sorce, C; Glenzer, S H

    2009-07-24

    We show that the measured stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a large-scale high-temperature plasma scales strongly with the plasma density, increasing by an order of magnitude when the electron density is increased by 20%. This is consistent with linear theory, including pump depletion, in a uniform plasma and, as the density is typically constrained by other processes, this effect will set a limit on drive laser beam intensity for forthcoming ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. Control of SRS at laser intensities consistent with 285 eV ignition hohlraums is achieved by using polarization smoothing which increases the intensity threshold for the onset of SRS by 1.6 +/- 0.2. These results were quantitatively predicted by full beam three-dimensional numerical laser-plasma interaction simulations. PMID:19659366

  9. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le}100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time{endash}history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li{sup +} ion beam-driven hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fehl, D.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R.J.; Moats, A.R.; Leeper, R.J.

    1996-07-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for Inertial Confinement Fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li{sup +} ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The UFO unfold code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time- resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies ({le} 100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  11. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in National Ignition Facility hohlraums as a source of gold-gas mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenboomgaerde, M.; Bonnefille, M.; Gauthier, P.

    2016-05-01

    Highly resolved radiation-hydrodynamics FCI2 simulations have been performed to model laser experiments on the National Ignition Facility. In these experiments, cylindrical gas-filled hohlraums with gold walls are driven by a 20 ns laser pulse. For the first time, simulations show the appearance of Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) vortices at the interface between the expanding wall material and the gas fill. In this paper, we determine the mechanisms which generate this instability: the increase of the gas pressure around the expanding gold plasma leads to the aggregation of an over-dense gold layer simultaneously with shear flows. At the surface of this layer, all the conditions are met for a KH instability to grow. Later on, as the interface decelerates, the Rayleigh-Taylor instability also comes into play. A potential scenario for the generation of a mixing zone at the gold-gas interface due to the KH instability is presented. Our estimates of the Reynolds number and the plasma diffusion width at the interface support the possibility of such a mix. The key role of the first nanosecond of the laser pulse in the instability occurrence is also underlined.

  12. Electron temperature measurements inside the ablating plasma of gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Liedahl, D. A.; Schneider, M. B.; Jones, O.; Brown, G. V.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Moore, A. S.; Ross, J. S.; Landen, O.; Kauffman, R. L.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J.; Jaquez, J.; Huang, H.; Hansen, S. B.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Bradley, D.; Moody, J. D.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurement of the electron temperature (Te) inside a National Ignition Facility hohlraum is obtained using temporally resolved K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of a mid-Z tracer dot. Both isoelectronic- and interstage-line ratios are used to calculate the local Te via the collisional-radiative atomic physics code SCRAM [Hansen et al., High Energy Density Phys 3, 109 (2007)]. The trajectory of the mid-Z dot as it is ablated from the capsule surface and moves toward the laser entrance hole (LEH) is measured using side-on x-ray imaging, characterizing the plasma flow of the ablating capsule. Data show that the measured dot location is farther away from the LEH in comparison to the radiation-hydrodynamics simulation prediction using HYDRA [Marinak et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)]. To account for this discrepancy, the predicted simulation Te is evaluated at the measured dot trajectory. The peak Te, measured to be 4.2 keV ± 0.2 keV, is ˜0.5 keV hotter than the simulation prediction.

  13. Modeling of Ablative Standoff in ICF Hohlraums(Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Kyle; Stephen, Slutz; Mehlhorn, Thomas

    2004-11-01

    Dynamic hohlraum inertial fusion capsules are generally designed to implode before cylindrical shocks, created by the impact of the z-pinch plasma and foam converter material, hit the capsule. Under the appropriate conditions however, the ram pressure from capsule ablation can be sufficient to isolate the capsule from the incoming shock. This condition, called ablative standoff, preserves capsule symmetry and allows more optimal capsule designs. A semi-analytical dynamic hohlraum model is used to investigate ablative standoff as a function of drive energy, foam converter and capsule initial conditions, etc. The parameter space for achieving ablative standoff throughout the capsule implosion will be presented as well as high yield capsule scaling and design requirements in dynamic hohlraum configurations.

  14. On a statistical scattering model to explain capsule implosion symmetry in vacuum Hohlraums with radiation temperatures of order 100 eV

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, Sanford R; Kyrala, George A; Dodd, Evan S; Grondalski, John P; Hoffman, Nelson M; Rose, Harvey A; Seifter, Achim

    2009-01-01

    We apply a statistical scattering model of laser ray propagation to obtain improved agreement with measurements for capsule emission symmetry in one of three sets of experiments. Linearized post-processing of the simulations for amplification of a variety of plasma instabilities, coupled with an accounting for intensity seed perturbations in the laser beams suggests that thermal filamentation can cause the density fluctuations. Although this mechanism does not appear to be significant in the remaining two series, its identification adds to the knowledge base in the use of symmetry capsules to measure hohlraum drive asymmetry.

  15. Sensitivity of ignition scale backlit thin-shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the drive pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkwood, R. K.; Milovich, J.; Bradley, D. K.; Schmitt, M.; Goldman, S. R.; Kalantar, D. H.; Meeker, D.; Jones, O. S.; Pollaine, S. M.; Amendt, P. A.; Dewald, E.; Edwards, J.; Landen, O. L.; Nikroo, A.

    2009-01-01

    A necessary condition for igniting indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with <10%/ns swings during the pulse [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)]. While drive symmetry during the first 2ns of the pulse can be inferred by using the re-emission pattern from a surrogate high Z sphere and symmetry during the last 5ns inferred from the shape of fully imploded capsules, the midportion (≈2-10ns ) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin-shell capsules. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser [J. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] of the thin-shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials: Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7keV radiographs of thin 1.4mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged by a factor of ≈0.5 in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few micrometers, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first four asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

  16. The effect of hohlraum drive asymmetry on the observed in-flight momentum and hot spot emission non-uniformity in ICF implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, Arthur; Field, J. E.; Kritcher, A.; Nora, R.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D.; Hinkel, D.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; MacLaren, S. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. P. J.; Edwards, M. J.; LLNL Team

    2015-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments are being conducted. In order to maximize the efficiency at which kinetic energy of the capsule ablator and fuel is converted to internal hot spot energy, asymmetries in the shape of the ablator and fuel momentum must be minimized. In this work an overview across different implosion experiments detailing the observed relationship between the in-flight ablator momentum symmetry and factors that modify the hohlraum radiation flux symmetry such as the density of the hohlraum gas fill, laser wavelength separation, and case to capsule ratio will be given. A measurement of the ablator momentum asymmetry at peak velocity can be made using the two-dimensional radiographs of the capsule ablator taken in-flight, at radii of 300 to 200 _m. Additionally the relationship between the morphology of the observed in-flight ablator and the x-ray self emission at stagnation will be examined. This work was performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  17. Efficient X-ray emission from laser-irradiated low-density lead target: a substitute for gold in hohlraum design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazeli, R.

    2015-10-01

    Numerical experiments are carried out to calculate continuum emissivity and opacity of plasmas produced from laser-irradiated Au and Pb targets as hohlraum wall materials. Targets are considered to be solid or porous with different initial densities. Simulation results show a good agreement compared with the measured data. The results show that under identical conditions, X-ray emission is higher for Au plasma; however, by decreasing initial densities, X-ray yield enhancement is greater for Pb plasma. By using a Pb target with initial density of about 1.14 g cm-3 instead of solid Au target, the same X-ray yield even more can be obtained. Calculations also show that in the conditions of solid density targets, Pb plasma offers a little lower opacity in soft X-ray region. Decreasing initial density of Pb causes its opacity to increase and get closer to the opacity of solid Au which in turn reduces energy losses in hohlraum wall.

  18. Use of d-{sup 3}He proton spectroscopy as a diagnostic of shell {rho}r in capsule implosion experiments with {approx}0.2 NIF scale high temperature Hohlraums at Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N. D.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Seifter, A.; Hoffman, N. M.; Dodd, E.; Singleton, R.; Glebov, V.; Stoeckl, C.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Frenje, J.

    2008-10-15

    We present the calculations and preliminary results from experiments on the Omega laser facility using d-{sup 3}He filled plastic capsule implosions in gold Hohlraums. These experiments aim to develop a technique to measure shell {rho}r and capsule unablated mass with proton spectroscopy and will be applied to future National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments with ignition scale capsules. The Omega Hohlraums are 1900 {mu}m lengthx1200 {mu}m diameter and have a 70% laser entrance hole. This is approximately a 0.2 NIF scale ignition Hohlraum and reaches temperatures of 265-275 eV similar to those during the peak of the NIF drive. These capsules can be used as a diagnostic of shell {rho}r, since the d-{sup 3}He gas fill produces 14.7 MeV protons in the implosion, which escape through the shell and produce a proton spectrum that depends on the integrated {rho}r of the remaining shell mass. The neutron yield, proton yield, and spectra change with capsule shell thickness as the unablated mass or remaining capsule {rho}r changes. Proton stopping models are used to infer shell unablated mass and shell {rho}r from the proton spectra measured with different filter thicknesses. The experiment is well modeled with respect to Hohlraum energetics, neutron yields, and x-ray imploded core image size, but there are discrepancies between the observed and simulated proton spectra.

  19. Early-time radiation flux symmetry optimization and its effect on gas-filled hohlraum ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, J. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Pak, A.; Michel, P.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is tied to our ability to control and minimize deviations from sphericity of the capsule implosion. Low-mode asymmetries of the hot spot result from the combined effect of radiation drive asymmetries throughout the laser pulse and initial roughness on the capsule surface. In this paper, we report on simulations and experiments designed to assess, measure, and correct the drive asymmetries produced by the early-time (≈first 2 ns or "picket") period of the laser pulse. The drive asymmetry during the picket is commonly thought to introduce distortions in the hot-spot shape at ignition time. However, a more subtle effect not previously considered is that it also leads to an asymmetry in shock velocity and timing, thereby increasing the fuel adiabat and reducing the margin for ignition. It is shown via hydrodynamic simulations that minimizing this effect requires that the early-time asymmetry be kept below 7.5% in the second Legendre mode (P2), thus keeping the loss of performance margin below ≈10% for a layered implosion. Asymmetries during the picket of the laser pulse are measured using the instantaneous self-emission of a high-Z re-emission sphere in place of an ignition capsule in a hohlraum with large azimuthal diagnostic windows. Three dimensional simulations using the code HYDRA (to capture the effect of non-azimuthal hohlraum features) coupled to a cross-beam energy transfer model [Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010)] are used to establish the surrogacy of the re-emit target and to assess the early-time drive symmetry. Calculations using this model exhibit the same sensitivity to variations in the relative input powers between the different cones of NIF beams as measured for the "Rev5" CH target [Haan et al., Phys Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)] and reported by Dewald et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235001 (2013)]. The same methodology applied to recently improved implosions using different

  20. Hohlraum-Driven Mid-Z (SiO{sub 2}) Double-Shell Implosions on the Omega Laser Facility and Their Scaling to NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Park, H.-S.; Hamza, A. V.; Bono, M. J.

    2009-10-02

    High-convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions of double-shell capsules using mid-Z (SiO{sub 2}) inner shells have been performed on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. These experiments provide an essential extension of the results of previous low-Z (CH) double-shell implosions [P. A. Amendt et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 065004 (2005)] to materials of higher density and atomic number. Analytic modeling, supported by highly resolved 2D numerical simulations, is used to account for the yield degradation due to interfacial atomic mixing. This extended experimental database from OMEGA enables a validation of the mix model, and provides a means for quantitatively assessing the prospects for high-Z double-shell implosions on the National Ignition Facility [Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)].

  1. A novel experimental setup for energy loss and charge state measurements in dense moderately coupled plasma using laser-heated hohlraum targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, A.; Schumacher, D.; Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Basko, M. M.; Bedacht, S.; Blazevic, A.; Faik, S.; Kraus, D.; Rienecker, T.; Schaumann, G.; Tauschwitz, An.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2016-03-01

    We report on a new experimental setup for ion energy loss measurements in dense moderately coupled plasma which has recently been developed and tested at GSI Darmstadt. A partially ionized, moderately coupled carbon plasma (ne ≤ 0.8• 1022 cm-3, Te = 15 eV, z = 2.5, Γ = 0.5) is generated by volumetrical heating of two thin carbon foils with soft X-rays. This plasma is then probed by a bunched heavy ion beam. For that purpose, a special double gold hohlraum target of sub-millimeter size has been developed which efficiently converts intense laser light into thermal radiation and guarantees a gold-free interaction path for the ion beam traversing the carbon plasma. This setup allows to do precise energy loss measurements in non-ideal plasma at the level of 10 percent solid-state density.

  2. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 1015 neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  3. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  4. Numerical analysis of radiation dynamics in a combined hohlraum in the X-ray opacity experiments on the 'Iskra-5' laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Bondarenko, S V; Novikova, E A; Dolgoleva, G V

    2014-03-28

    We report the results of numerical analysis of radiation dynamics (laser absorption and X-ray generation) by using SNDLIRA code in a combined box used in the X-ray opacity measurements on the 'Iskra-5' facility (laser radiation wavelength, λ = 0.66 μm; laser pulse duration, τ{sub 0.5} ≈ 0.6 ns; and energy, 900 J). Combined boxes used in these experiments comprised three sections: two illuminators delivering laser radiation and a central diagnostic section with a test sample. We have proposed a scheme for step-by-step calculation of the heating dynamics of the sample under study in a three-section hohlraum. Two designs of a combined box, which differ in the ways the laser radiation is injected, are discussed. It is shown that the axial injection of the beams results in intense secondary laser irradiation of the illuminator edge which leads to its partial disruption and penetration of laser radiation into the central diagnostic section. In this case the sample under study is exposed to additional uncontrolled action of scattered laser radiation. Such an undesirable action may be avoided by using the lateral injection of the beams through four holes on the lateral side of the illuminators. For the latter case we have calculated the heating dynamics for the sample and found an optimal time delay for an X-ray probe pulse. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  5. Direct Comparison of Full-Scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck and Classical Modeling of Megagauss Magnetic Field Generation in Plasma Near Hohlraum Walls From Nanosecond Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Archis; Thomas, Alexander; Read, Martin; Kingham, Robert

    2014-10-01

    Here, we present 2D numerical modeling of near critical density plasma using a fully implicit Vlasov-Fokker-Planck (VFP) code, IMPACTA, with the addition of a ray tracing package. In certain situations, such as those at the critical surface at the walls of a hohlraum, magnetic fields are generated through the crossed temperature and electron density gradients. Modeling shows 0.3 MG fields and the strong heating also results in magnetization of the plasma up to ωτ ~ 5 . In the case without magnetic field generation, the heat flows from the laser heating region are isotropic. Including magnetic fields causes the heat flow to form jets along the wall due to the Righi-Leduc effect. The heating of the wall region causes steeper temperature gradients. This serves as a positive feedback mechanism for the field generation rate resulting in nearly twice the amount of field generated in comparison to the case without magnetic fields over 1 ns. The heat conduction, field generation, and the calculation of other transport quantities, is performed ab-initio due to the nature of the VFP equation set. In order to determine the importance of the kinetic effects from IMPACTA, we perform direct comparison with a classical (Braginskii) transport code with hydrodynamic motion (CTC+). The authors would like to acknowledge DOE Grant #DESC0010621 and Advanced Research Computing, UM-AA.

  6. Effects of the P2 M-band flux asymmetry of laser-driven gold Hohlraums on the implosion of ICF ignition capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Gu, Jianfa; Wu, Changshu; Song, Peng; Dai, Zhensheng; Li, Shuanggui; Li, Xin; Kang, Dongguo; Gu, Peijun; Zheng, Wudi; Zou, Shiyang; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Ye, Wenhua; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    Low-mode asymmetries in the laser-indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] are deemed the main obstacles hindering further improvement of the nuclear performance of deuterium-tritium-layered capsules. The dominant seeds of these asymmetries include the P2 and P4 asymmetries of x-ray drives and P2 asymmetry introduced by the supporting "tent." Here, we explore the effects of another possible seed that can lead to low-mode asymmetric implosions, i.e., the M-band flux asymmetry (MFA) in laser-driven cylindrical gold Hohlraums. It is shown that the M-band flux facilitates the ablation and acceleration of the shell, and that positive P2 MFAs can result in negative P2 asymmetries of hot spots and positive P2 asymmetries of shell's ρR. An oblate or toroidal hot spot, depending on the P2 amplitude of MFA, forms at stagnation. The energy loss of such a hot spot via electron thermal conduction is seriously aggravated not only due to the enlarged hot spot surface but also due to the vortices that develop and help transferring thermal energy from the hotter center to the colder margin of such a hot spot. The cliffs of nuclear performance for the two methodologies of applying MFA (i.e., symmetric flux in the presence of MFA and MFA added for symmetric soft x-ray flux) are obtained locating at 9.5% and 5.0% of P2/P0 amplitudes, respectively.

  7. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-01

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C5H12) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 1014 W/cm2, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  8. Laser parametric instability experiments of a 3ω, 15 kJ, 6-ns laser pulse in gas-filled hohlraums at the Ligne d'Intégration Laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Rousseaux, C.; Huser, G.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.; Alozy, E.; Villette, B.; Wrobel, R.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.

    2015-02-15

    Experimental investigation of stimulated Raman (SRS) and Brillouin (SBS) scattering have been obtained at the Ligne-d'Intégration-Laser facility (LIL, CEA-Cesta, France). The parametric instabilities (LPI) are driven by firing four laser beamlets (one quad) into millimeter size, gas-filled hohlraum targets. A quad delivers energy on target of 15 kJ at 3ω in a 6-ns shaped laser pulse. The quad is focused by means of 3ω gratings and is optically smoothed with a kinoform phase plate and with smoothing by spectral dispersion-like 2 GHz and/or 14 GHz laser bandwidth. Open- and closed-geometry hohlraums have been used, all being filled with 1-atm, neo-pentane (C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) gas. For SRS and SBS studies, the light backscattered into the focusing optics is analyzed with spectral and time resolutions. Near-backscattered light at 3ω and transmitted light at 3ω are also monitored in the open geometry case. Depending on the target geometry (plasma length and hydrodynamic evolution of the plasma), it is shown that, at maximum laser intensity about 9 × 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}, Raman reflectivity noticeably increases up to 30% in 4-mm long plasmas while SBS stays below 10%. Consequently, laser transmission through long plasmas drops to about 10% of incident energy. Adding 14 GHz bandwidth to the laser always reduces LPI reflectivities, although this reduction is not dramatic.

  9. Dynamic Hohlraum Experiments on SATURN*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, T. J.; Derzon, M. S.; Allshouse, G. O.; Deeney, C.; Seamen, J. F.; McGurn, J. S.; Jobe, D.; Gilliland, T. L.; Macfarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.

    1996-11-01

    We have imploded a 17.5 mm diameter 120 tungsten wire array weighing 450 microgram/cm onto a 4 mm diameter silicon aerogel foam weighing 650 microgram/ cm, using the pulsed power driver SATURN. A peak current of 7.5 MA drove a 50 nsec implosion. The tungten strikes the foam with a 50 cm/microsecond implosion velocity. Radiation temperatures were measured from the side and along the axis with filtered x-ray diode arrays and evidence of radiation trapping by the optically thick tungsten will be presented. The pinch is stable and uniform to less than a 1 mm diameter as measured by time-resolved x-ray framing cameras. Radiation temperature in the foam reaches 140 eV before the main radiation burst or stagnation. *This work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000.

  10. Dynamic hohlraum experiments on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.

    1997-08-01

    The authors have imploded a 17.5 mm diameter 120-tungsten-wire array weighing 450 {mu}g/cm onto a 4 mm diameter silicon aerogel foam weighing 650 {mu}g/cm, using the pulsed power driver SATURN. A peak current of 7.0 MA drives a 48 ns implosion to strike time followed by 8 ns of foam compression until stagnation. The tungsten strikes the foam with a 50 cm/{mu}s implosion velocity. Radiation temperatures were measured from the side and along the axis with filtered x-ray diode arrays. There is evidence of radiation trapping by the optically thick tungsten from crystal spectroscopy. The pinch is open to less than a 1 mm diameter as measured by time-resolved x-ray framing cameras. The radiation brightness temperature in the foam reaches 150 eV before the main radiation burst or stagnation.

  11. Dynamic hohlraum experiments on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T. J.; Derzon, M. S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Seaman, J. F.; McGurn, J.; Jobe, D.; Gilliland, T.; MacFarlane, J. J.; Wang, P.; Petersen, D. L.

    1997-05-05

    We have imploded a 17.5 mm diameter 120-tungsten-wire array weighing 450 {mu}g/cm onto a 4 mm diameter silicon aerogel foam weighing 650 {mu}g/cm, using the pulsed power driver SATURN. A peak current of 7.0 MA drives a 48 ns implosion to strike time followed by 8 ns of foam compression until stagnation. The tungsten strikes the foam with a 50 cm/{mu}s implosion velocity. Radiation temperatures were measured from the side and along the axis with filtered x-ray diode arrays. There is evidence of radiation trapping by the optically thick tungsten from crystal spectroscopy. The pinch is open to less than a 1 mm diameter as measured by time-resolved x-ray framing cameras. The radiation brightness temperature in the foam reaches 150 eV before the main radiation burst or stagnation.

  12. Dynamic hohlraum experiments on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.; Deeney, C.; Seaman, J.F.; McGurn, J.; Jobe, D.; Gilliland, T.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Wang, P.; Petersen, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    We have imploded a 17.5 mm diameter 120-tungsten-wire array weighing 450 {mu}g/cm onto a 4 mm diameter silicon aerogel foam weighing 650 {mu}g/cm, using the pulsed power driver SATURN. A peak current of 7.0 MA drives a 48 ns implosion to strike time followed by 8 ns of foam compression until stagnation. The tungsten strikes the foam with a 50 cm/{mu}s implosion velocity. Radiation temperatures were measured from the side and along the axis with filtered x-ray diode arrays. There is evidence of radiation trapping by the optically thick tungsten from crystal spectroscopy. The pinch is open to less than a 1 mm diameter as measured by time-resolved x-ray framing cameras. The radiation brightness temperature in the foam reaches 150 eV before the main radiation burst or stagnation. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Control of laser plasma instabilities in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.L.

    1996-12-01

    Laser plasma instabilities are an important constraint on the operating regime for inertial fusion. Many techniques have been developed to control the various laser-driven instabilities. Experiments with long scale length plasmas are testing these instability levels, the nonlinear regimes, and the control mechanisms.

  14. Energy transfer between laser beams crossing in ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Williams, E A; Thomas, C A; Callahan, D A; Weber, S; Haan, S W; Salmonson, J D; Dixit, S; Hinkel, D E; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J

    2008-10-03

    The full scale modeling of power transfer between laser beams crossing in plasmas is presented. A new model was developed, allowing calculation of the propagation and coupling of pairs of laser beams with their associated plasma wave in three dimensions. The full laser beam smoothing techniques used in ignition experiments are modeled, and their effects on crossed-beam energy transfer is investigated. A shift in wavelength between the beams can move the instability off resonance and reduce the transfer, hence preserving the symmetry of the capsule implosion.

  15. Light ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II and Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Barber, T.L.; Carlson, A.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Cook, D.L.; Derzon, M.S.; Dukart, R.J.; Hebron, D.E.; Johnson, D.J.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Moats, A.R.; Nash, T.J.; Noack, D.D.; Olsen, R.W.; Olson, R.E.; Porter, J.L.; Quintenz, J.P.; Ruiz, C.L.; Stark, M.A.; Torres, J.A.; Wenger, D.F.

    1996-05-01

    The goal of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program in the United States is a target yield in the range of 200 to 1000 MJ. To address this goal, the near-term emphasis in the Light Ion Target Physics program is to design a credible high-gain target driven by ion beams. Based on this target design, we have identified ion beam spatial parameters, ion beam energy and power deposition, the conversion of ion-beam energy into soft x-ray thermal radiation, the conversion of ion-beam energy into hydrodynamic motion, radiation smoothing in low-density foams, and internal pulse shaping as the critical physics issues. These issues are currently being addressed in both ion- and laser-driven experiments. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Light ion hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II and Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Barber, T.L.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of the National Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program in the United States is a target yield in the range of 200 to 1000 MJ. To address this goal, the near-term emphasis in the Light Ion Target Physics program is to design a credible high-gain target driven by ion beams. Based on this target design, we have identified ion beam spatial parameters, ion beam energy and power deposition, the conversion of ion-beam energy into soft x-ray thermal radiation, the conversion of ion-beam energy into hydrodynamic motion, radiation smoothing in low-density foams, and internal pulse shaping as the critical physics issues. These issues are currently being addressed in both ion- and laser-driven experiments.

  17. Demonstration of implosion symmetry in NIF scale 0.7 Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Seifter, Achim; Kyrala, George A; Goldman, S Robert; Hoffman, Nelson M

    2008-01-01

    Implosions using inertial confinement fusion must be highly symmetric to achieve ignition on the National Ignition Facility. This requires precise control of the drive symmetry from the radiation incident on the ignition capsule. For indirect drive implosions, low mode residual perturbations in the drive are generated by the laser-heated hohlraurn geometry. To diagnose the drive symmetry, previous experiments used simulated capsules by which the selfemission x-rays from gas in the center of capsule during the implosion are used to infer the shape of the drive. However, those experiments used hohlraurn radiation temperatures higher than 200 eV (Hauer et al., 2007, Murphy et aI., 1998a, Murphy et al., 1998b) with small NOVA scale hohlraurns under which conditions the symcaps produced large x-ray signals. During the foot of the NIF ignition pulse where controlling the symmetry has been shown to be crucial for obtaining a symmetric implosion (Clark et aI., 2008), the radiation drive is much smaller, reducing the x-ray emission from the imploded capsule. For the first time, the feasibility of using symcaps to diagnose the radiation drive for low radiation temperatures, < 120 eV and large 0.7 linear scale NIF Rev3.1 (Haan et al., 2008) vacuum hohlraurns is demonstrated. Here we used experiments at the Omega laser facility to demonstrate and develop the symcap technique for tuning the symmetry of the NIF ignition capsule in the foot of the drive pulse.

  18. Measurements of laser-driven magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, D.; Goyon, C.; Ross, S.; Farmer, W.; Hazi, A.; Tubman, E.; Woolsey, N.; Law, K.; Fujioka, S.; Moody, J.

    2015-11-01

    Magnetic fields of 10-100 T have been produced with a laser-driven scheme using a parallel-plate target geometry, where a laser is directed through a hole in the front plate and irradiates the plate behind it. Hot electrons generated from the rear plate collect on the front plate, creating a voltage difference (~ 10-100 keV) between them. When the plates are connected via a quasi-loop conductor, this voltage sources current in the range of ~ 0.1-1 MA which produces a magnetic field along the axis of the loop. The field is generated on fast (~ ns) timescales, and can be scaled by changing the drive laser parameters. Recent experiments at the Jupiter Laser Facility have allowed temporally-resolved measurements of the voltage between the plates with ~ 1 J laser drive. Separate experiments at the Omega EP laser system have allowed direct Faraday rotation (in fused SiO2) measurements of the field strength inside the current loop by employing the 4w polarimetry capability of EP. We have also measured the extent and structure of the field with proton deflectometry at EP. The maximum field recorded along the axis of the quasi-loop is ~ 5 T at moderate (100 J) laser drive, and measurements of fringing fields outside the loop at 1 kJ indicate that the field increases to ~ 40 T. These results are compared with modeling to determine the current driven in the target, and infer information about the plasma conditions which sourced the current. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Guiseppe, V.; Kidd, M.; Rundberg, B.; Tybo, J.

    2013-04-01

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of 195Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  20. Ideal laser-beam propagation through high-temperature ignition Hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Meezan, N B; Dixit, S; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B B; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H

    2007-02-23

    We demonstrate that a blue (3omega, 351 nm) laser beam with an intensity of 2 x 10(15) W cm(-2) propagates nearly within the original beam cone through a millimeter scale, T(e)=3.5 keV high density (n(e)=5 x 10(20) cm(-3)) plasma. The beam produced less than 1% total backscatter at these high temperatures and densities; the resulting transmission is greater than 90%. Scaling of the electron temperature in the plasma shows that the plasma becomes transparent for uniform electron temperatures above 3 keV. These results are consistent with linear theory thresholds for both filamentation and backscatter instabilities inferred from detailed hydrodynamic simulations. This provides a strong justification for current inertial confinement fusion designs to remain below these thresholds. PMID:17359104

  1. Radiation flux and spectral analysis of the multi-temperature Z dynamic hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Lockard, T E; Idzorek, G C; Tierney, T E; Watt, R G

    2008-10-01

    Experiments performed at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Z-machine, located in Albuquerque, New Mexico produce hot (approximately 220 eV) plasmas. X-ray emission from the plasma is used to drive radiation flow experiments. Our standard plasma diagnostic suite consists of x-ray diodes (XRDs), silicon photodiodes, and nickel thin film bolometers. Small diagnostic holes allow us to view the hot plasma from the side, top axial anode side, and bottom axial cathode side. Computer software has been written to process the raw data to calculate data quality, fold in detector spectral response and experiment geometry for emitted flux, calculate a multidetector spectral unfold, and yield an equivalent time-dependent Planckian temperature profile. Spectral unfolds of our XRD data generally yield a Planckian-like spectrum. In our presentation we will compare our diagnostic techniques, analysis, and results to more accurately characterize spectral unfolds in order to establish better drive conditions for our experiments. PMID:19044635

  2. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  3. Neutron-induced reactions in the hohlraum to study reaction in flight neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Boswell, M. S.; Elliott, S. R.; Tybo, J.; Guiseppe, V.; Rundberg, B.; Kidd, M.

    2013-04-19

    We are currently developing the physics necessary to measure the Reaction In Flight (RIF) neutron flux from a NIF capsule. A measurement of the RIF neutron flux from a NIF capsule could be used to deduce the stopping power in the cold fuel of the NIF capsule. A foil irradiated at the Omega laser at LLE was counted at the LANL low-background counting facility at WIPP. The estimated production rate of {sup 195}Au was just below our experimental sensitivity. We have made several improvements to our counting facility in recent months. These improvements are designed to increase our sensitivity, and include installing two new low-background detectors, and taking steps to reduce noise in the signals.

  4. Progress Report for In-situ Diffraction from Hohlraum-driven Shock Waves in Solids

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew S. Schneider; Marc A. Meyers; Bimal Kad

    2003-03-21

    OAK-B135 Single crystal copper and copper aluminum alloys, oriented to [001] and [134], have been the subject of a number of laser-induced shock compression experiments over the past two years. In-situ x-ray diffraction, visar wave measurements, and recovery experiments have all been performed. The effects of orientation and pressure decay on recovered samples have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy and explained by the application of physically-based constitutive equations. Dislocation densities, dislocation structures, stacking faults, and twinning have all been characterized. Our current work is focused on examining compositional differences as it relates to the stacking fault energy. Additional research has been performed on the nucleation, growth and coalescence of voids in samples shocked at the highest pressures.

  5. Optical Mixing in the Strong Coupling Regime: A New Method of Beam Conditioning at Hohlraum LEH and Direct Drive ICF Coronal Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mardirian, Marine; Afeyan, Bedros; Huller, Stefan; Montgomery, David; Froula, Dustin; Kirkwood, Robert

    2012-10-01

    We will present theoretical and computational results on Brillouin interactions between two beams in co-, counter-, and orthogonal propagation geometries. The beams will be structured (with speckle patterns), the plasma will have inhomogeneous flow including the Mach -1 surface. As the growth rate of the instability surpasses the natural frequency of the ion wave, the strong coupling regime (SCR) is reached, where reactive quasi-modes with intensity dependent frequency shifts result. This is especially true in laser hot spots. We trace the consequences of operations in this regime with different damping rates on the ion acoustic waves. We consider convective and absolute instabilities as well as the design of experiments which could examine these new regimes of instability behavior with new 10 psec time resolved diagnostics. Whether well enough conditioned beams can result after 10's or 100's of pairwise crossings in direct and indirect drive ICF configurations, and whether SRS can thus be strongly suppressed downstream, remains to be demonstrated. But the prospects exist for such new paths to instability control in a staged manner before STUD pulses are implemented.-

  6. Laser-Plasma Interactions in Drive Campaign targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Moody, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Lasinski, B. F.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meeker, D.; Michel, P. A.; Ralph, J.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, J. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Storm, E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Williams, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The Drive campaign [D A Callahan et al., this conference] on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, R. Al-Ayat, Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] has the focused goal of understanding and optimizing the hohlraum for ignition. Both the temperature and symmetry of the radiation drive depend on laser and hohlraum characteristics. The drive temperature depends on the coupling of laser energy to the hohlraum, and the symmetry of the drive depends on beam-to-beam interactions that result in energy transfer [P. A. Michel, S. H. Glenzer, L. Divol, et al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010).] within the hohlraum. To this end, hohlraums are being fielded where shape (rugby vs. cylindrical hohlraums), gas fill composition (neopentane at room temperature vs. cryogenic helium), and gas fill density (increase of ∼ 150%) are independently changed. Cylindrical hohlraums with higher gas fill density show improved inner beam propagation, as should rugby hohlraums, because of the larger radius over the capsule (7 mm vs. 5.75 mm in a cylindrical hohlraum). Energy coupling improves in room temperature neopentane targets, as well as in hohlraums at higher gas fill density. In addition cross-beam energy transfer is being addressed directly by using targets that mock up one end of a hohlraum, but allow observation of the laser beam uniformity after energy transfer. Ideas such as splitting quads into “doublets” by re-pointing the right and left half of quads are also being pursued. LPI results of the Drive campaign will be summarized, and analyses of future directions presented.

  7. Dynamics of molecular clouds: observations, simulations, and NIF experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kane, Jave O.; Martinez, David A.; Pound, Marc W.; Heeter, Robert F.; Casner, Alexis; Mancini, Roberto C.

    2015-02-01

    For over fifteen years astronomers at the University of Maryland and theorists and experimentalists at LLNL have investigated the origin and dynamics of the famous Pillars of the Eagle Nebula, and similar parsec-scale structures at the boundaries of HII regions in molecular hydrogen clouds. Eagle Nebula was selected as one of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Science programs, and has been awarded four NIF shots to study the cometary model of pillar formation. These experiments require a long-duration drive, 30 ns or longer, to drive deeply nonlinear ablative hydrodynamics. The NIF shots will feature a new long-duration x-ray source prototyped at the Omega EP laser, in which multiple hohlraums are driven with UV light in series for 10 ns each and reradiate the energy as an extended x-ray pulse. The new source will be used to illuminate a science package with directional radiation mimicking a cluster of stars. The scaled Omega EP shots tested whether a multi-hohlraum concept is viable — whether earlier time hohlraums would degrade later time hohlraums by preheat or by ejecting ablated plumes that would deflect the later beams. The Omega EP shots illuminated three 2.8 mm long by 1.4 mm diameter Cu hohlraums for 10 ns each with 4.3 kJ per hohlraum. At NIF each hohlraum will be 4 mm long by 3 mm in diameter and will be driven with 80 kJ per hohlraum.

  8. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S H; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Dixit, S N; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, J; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindle, J D; LePape, S; Moody, J D; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Schneider, M B; Town, R J; Wegner, P; Widmann, K; Whitman, P; Young, B F; Van Wonterghem, B; Atherton, J E; Moses, E I

    2009-12-03

    The first indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 MJ. 192 simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million Kelvin compressing 1.8-millimeter capsules by the soft x rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma-optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum producing symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from capsule self-emission measurements. These experiments indicate conditions suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium filled capsules with the goal to achieve burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory.

  9. Symmetric inertial confinement fusion implosions at ultra-high laser energies.

    PubMed

    Glenzer, S H; MacGowan, B J; Michel, P; Meezan, N B; Suter, L J; Dixit, S N; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Divol, L; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; LePape, S; Moody, J D; Nikroo, A; Parham, T; Schneider, M B; Town, R P J; Wegner, P; Widmann, K; Whitman, P; Young, B K F; Van Wonterghem, B; Atherton, L J; Moses, E I

    2010-03-01

    Indirect-drive hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility have demonstrated symmetric capsule implosions at unprecedented laser drive energies of 0.7 megajoule. One hundred and ninety-two simultaneously fired laser beams heat ignition-emulate hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 3.3 million kelvin, compressing 1.8-millimeter-diameter capsules by the soft x-rays produced by the hohlraum. Self-generated plasma optics gratings on either end of the hohlraum tune the laser power distribution in the hohlraum, which produces a symmetric x-ray drive as inferred from the shape of the capsule self-emission. These experiments indicate that the conditions are suitable for compressing deuterium-tritium-filled capsules, with the goal of achieving burning fusion plasmas and energy gain in the laboratory. PMID:20110465

  10. Higher Velocity High-Foot Implosions on the National Ignition Facility Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra

    2014-10-01

    After the end of the National Ignition Campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser, we began a campaign to test capsule performance using a modified laser pulse-shape that delivers higher power early in the pulse (``high foot''). This pulse-shape trades one-dimensional performance (peak compression) for increased hydrodynamic stability. The focus of the experiments this year have been to improve performance by increasing the implosion velocity using higher laser power/energy, depleted uranium hohlraums, and thinner capsules. While the mix of ablator material into the hotspot has been low for all of these implosions, the challenge has been to keep the implosion shape under control. As the peak laser power is increased, the plasma density in the hohlraum is increased - making it more and more challenging for the inner cone beams to reach the midplane of the hohlraum and resulting in an oblate implosion. Depleted uranium hohlraums have higher albedo than Au hohlraums, which leads to additional drive and improved implosion shape. Thinner ablators increase the velocity by reducing the amount of payload; thinner ablators also put less mass into the hohlraum which results in improved inner beam propagation. These techniques have allowed us to push the capsule to higher and higher velocity. In parallel with this effort, we are exploring other hohlraums such as the rugby shaped hohlraum to allow us to push these implosions further. This talk will summarize the progress of the high foot campaign in terms of both capsule and hohlraum performance. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Measurement of preheat in aluminium target in indirect drive using the SGIII prototype facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, C.; Wang, Z. B.; Liu, H.; Peng, X. S.; Wang, F.; Ding, Y. K.; Zheng, J.

    2016-03-01

    The velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR) is used to demonstrate preheat effect in aluminium in indirect drive. The rear surface motion prior to shock front was observed and compared with a multi-group calculation. By properly adjusting the hard x-ray portion of the radiation source, the calculated rear surface motion fits well with the experimental results, which gives us confidence to predict the preheated temperature of the sample by hard x-rays. Further, the effect of hohlraum geometry is compared and discussed experimentally. The result suggests gas-filled hohlraum or hohlraum with low Z substrates should be considered to further reduce preheating.

  12. Lasnex Simulations of Axial Power Diagnostic for ZR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Heidi

    2015-11-01

    The dynamics of energy loss through diagnostic and/or laser entrance holes with or without shine shields is of inertial confinement fusion experiments envisioned for the National Ignition and ZR Facilities. 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations using Lasnex for power diagnostic experiments using a secondary gold hohlraum fielded at the ZR facility are discussed. The axial radiation exiting the aperture of the dynamic hohlraum is modeled as time and spectrum-dependent 1-D and 2-D sources. Hohlraum energy balance and implications for the measured power are discussed.

  13. Foot-pulse radiation drive necessary for ICF ignition capsule demonstrated on Z generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.

    1999-07-01

    Implosion and ignition of an indirectly-driven ICF capsule operating near a Fermi-degenerate isentrope requires initial Planckian-radiation-drive temperatures of 70-to-90 eV to be present for a duration of 10-to-15 ns prior to the main drive pulse. Such capsules are being designed for high pulsed-power generators. This foot-pulse drive capability has been recently demonstrated in a NIF-sized ({phi} = 6-mm 1 = 7-mm), gold hohlraum, using a one-sided static-wall hohlraum geometry on the Z generator. The general arrangement utilized nested tungsten-wire arrays of radii (mass) 20 mm (2 mg) and 10 mm (1 mg) that had an axial length of {approximately} 10 mm. The arrays were driven by a peak current of {approximately} 21 MA and were made to implode on a 2-{micro}m-thick Cu annulus (mass = 4.5 mg), which had a radius of 4 mm and was filled with a low-density CH foam, all centered about the z-axis. The gold hohlraum was mounted on axis and above the Cu/foam target. A 2.9-mm-radius axial hole between the top of the target and hohlraum permitted the x-rays generated from the implosion to enter the hohlraum. The radiation within the hohlraum was monitored by viewing the hohlraum through a 3-mm diameter hole on the lateral side of the hohlraum with a suite of diagnostics.The radiation entering the hohlraum was estimated by an additional suite of on-axis diagnostics, in a limited number of separate shots, when the hohlraum was not present. Additionally, the radiation generated outside the Cu annulus was monitored, for all shots, through a 3-mm diameter aperture located on the outside of the current return can. In the full paper, the characteristics of the radiation measured from these diagnostic sets, including the Planckian temperature of the hohlraum and radiation images, will be discussed as a function of the incident wire-array geometry (single vs nested array and array mass), target length (10, or 20 mm), annulus material (Cu, Au, or nothing), and CH-foam-fill density (10

  14. Design Calculations For NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R E; Hicks, D G; Meezan, N B; Callahan, D A; Landen, O L; Jones, O S; Langer, S H; Kline, J L; Wilson, D C; Rinderknecht, H; Zylstra, A; Petrasso, R D

    2011-10-25

    The NIF convergent ablation tuning effort is underway. In the early experiments, we have discovered that the design code simulations over-predict the capsule implosion velocity and shock flash rhor, but under-predict the hohlraum x-ray flux measurements. The apparent inconsistency between the x-ray flux and radiography data implies that there are important unexplained aspects of the hohlraum and/or capsule behavior.

  15. An assessment of the 3D geometric surrogacy of shock timing diagnostic techniques for tuning experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Munro, D. H.; Spears, B. K.; Marinak, M. M.; Jones, O. S.; Patel, M. V.; Haan, S. W.; Salmonson, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.

    2008-05-01

    Ignition capsule implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require a pulse shape with a carefully designed series of four steps, which launch a corresponding series of shocks through the ablator and DT ice shell. The relative timing of these shocks is critical for maintaining the DT fuel on a low adiabat. The current NIF specification requires that the timing of all four shocks be tuned to an accuracy of <= +/- 100ps. To meet these stringent requirements, dedicated tuning experiments are being planned to measure and adjust the shock timing on NIF. These tuning experiments will be performed in a modified hohlraum geometry, where a re-entrant Au cone is added to the standard NIF hohlraum to provide optical diagnostic (VISAR and SOP) access to the shocks as they break out of the ablator. This modified geometry is referred to as the 'keyhole' hohlraum and introduces a geometric difference between these tuning-experiments and the full ignition geometry. In order to assess the surrogacy of this modified geometry, 3D simulations using HYDRA [1] have been performed. The results from simulations of a quarter of the target geometry are presented. Comparisons of the hohlraum drive conditions and the resulting effect on the shock timing in the keyhole hohlraum are compared with the corresponding results for the standard ignition hohlraum.

  16. Radiation energy transport through hydrodynamically evolving slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, J. M.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M.; Moore, A.; Sorce, C.; Reighard, A.; MacLaren, S.; Young, P.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B.; Back, C.; Hund, J.

    2008-11-01

    Radiation transport through enclosed spaces with inwardly moving walls is a key component of the physics of laser-heated hohlraums. It arises in the cavity itself (where inward motion of the wall results in late-time stagnation of dense plasma on the hohlraum axis), and also in the laser-entry and diagnostic holes (where an understanding of hole-closure is important to hohlraum design and the interpretation of diagnostic data). To understand these phenomena better, we have carried out a series of experiments at the Omega laser facility. A laser-heated hohlraum is used to illuminate linear and annular slits machined in samples of solid-density tantalum and low-density, tantalum-oxide foam. Measurements of the transmitted energy are made indirectly (by measuring the temperature rise of a ``calorimeter'' hohlraum) and directly (by measuring the emission from the slit component, using a target in which the calorimeter hohlraum was omitted). The hydrodynamics is investigated by self-emission and absorption (backlighting) x-ray imaging of the closing slits. Simulations (using a 2-D Eulerian hydrocode) reproduce the overall energetics, the detail of the deceleration shock and axial stagnation region at the centre of the slit, and the complex shock interactions that occur at corners of the slits.

  17. First beryllium capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Wilson, D. C.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S. H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Ralph, J. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Rygg, J. R.; Khan, S. F.; Haan, S. W.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Hammel, B. A.; Kozioziemski, B.; Schneider, M. B.; Marinak, M. M.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Robey, H. F.; Salmonson, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ma, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Stadermann, M.; Baxamusa, S.; Alford, C.; Wang, M.; Nikroo, A.; Rice, N.; Hoover, D.; Youngblood, K. P.; Xu, H.; Huang, H.; Sio, H.

    2016-05-01

    The first indirect drive implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules at the National Ignition Facility confirm the superior ablation properties and elucidate possible Be-ablator issues such as hohlraum filling by ablator material. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities at lower radiation temperatures and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs measured the backscattered laser energy, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets under the same hohlraum conditions. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable to plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results indicate that the high mass ablation rate for beryllium capsules does not significantly alter hohlraum energetics. In addition, these data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicate that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules as seen in experiments.

  18. Performance of high-density-carbon (HDC) ablator implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Andy

    2013-10-01

    A series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been performed to measure high-density carbon (HDC) ablator performance for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). HDC is a very promising ablator material; being 3x denser than plastic, it absorbs more hohlraum x-rays, leading to higher implosion efficiency. For the HDC experiments the NIF laser generated shaped laser pulses with peak power up to 410 TW and total energy of 1.3 MJ. Pulse shapes were designed to drive 2, 3 or 4 shocks in cryogenic layered implosions. The 2-shock pulse, with a designed fuel adiabat of ~3 is 6-7ns in duration, allowing use of near vacuum hohlraums, which greatly increases the coupling efficiency due to low backscatter losses. Excellent results were obtained for 2,3 and 4 shock pulses. In particular a deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsule driven by a 4-shock pulse in a gas-filled hohlraum produced a neutron yield of 1.6 × 1015, a record for a non-cryogenically layered capsule driven by a gas-filled hohlraum. The first 2-shock experiment used a vacuum hohlraum to drive a DD gas filled HDC capsule with a 6.5 ns, laser pulse. This hohlraum was 40% more efficient than the gas-filled counterpart used for 3 and 4 shock experiments, producing near 1D performance at 11 x convergence ratio, peak radiation temperature of 317 eV, 98% laser-hohlraum coupling, and DD neutron yield of 2.2e13, a record for a laser driven DD implosion. The HDC campaigns will be presented, including options for pushing towards the alpha dominated regime. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J. Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  20. Analysis of stimulated Raman backscatter and stimulated Brillouin backscatter in experiments performed on SG-III prototype facility with a spectral analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Liang; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Xiaoyan; Zou, Shiyang; Yang, Dong; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Li, Zhichao; Li, Sanwei; Xu, Tao; Wei, Huiyue; Liu, Zhanjun; Zheng, Chunyang

    2014-07-15

    Experiments about the observations of stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin backscatter (SBS) in Hohlraum were performed on Shenguang-III (SG-III) prototype facility for the first time in 2011. In this paper, relevant experimental results are analyzed for the first time with a one-dimension spectral analysis code, which is developed to study the coexistent process of SRS and SBS in Hohlraum plasma condition. Spectral features of the backscattered light are discussed with different plasma parameters. In the case of empty Hohlraum experiments, simulation results indicate that SBS, which grows fast at the energy deposition region near the Hohlraum wall, is the dominant instability process. The time resolved spectra of SRS and SBS are numerically obtained, which agree with the experimental observations. For the gas-filled Hohlraum experiments, simulation results show that SBS grows fastest in Au plasma and amplifies convectively in C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas, whereas SRS mainly grows in the high density region of the C{sub 5}H{sub 12} gas. Gain spectra and the spectra of backscattered light are simulated along the ray path, which clearly show the location where the intensity of scattered light with a certain wavelength increases. This work is helpful to comprehend the observed spectral features of SRS and SBS. The experiments and relevant analysis provide references for the ignition target design in future.

  1. Capsule Design for Hybrid Shock Ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Dodd, E. S.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock-Ignition (HSI) is an alternate fusion energy concept that combines indirect drive and shock ignition schemes in order to access new regimes in National Ignition Facility (NIF) hohlraum physics. Building off of tetrahedral hohlraum experiments at the OMEGA laser facility, we have preliminary designs for spherical hohlraums that combine symmetrically arranged laser entrance holes for indirect-drive beams (to initially compress the capsule) and holes for direct-drive beams to drive a strong ignitor shock (to further compress and ignite the fuel). A LANL Eulerian hydrodynamic code is being used to find optimal laser drive, hohlraum, and capsule specifications, via criteria such as implosion symmetry, implosion time, and neutron yield. At first, drive will be modeled using a radiation source to mimic the hohlraum drive, and later, ignitor beams will be added. Initial capsule designs will be presented for experiments to develop the HSI platform on the sub-ignition scale OMEGA laser facility in FY15. Supported under the U.S. Department of Energy by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-25071.

  2. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  3. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  4. Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-05-15

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  5. A Close-Coupled, Heavy Ion ICF Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra A.; Tabak, Max

    1998-11-01

    A ``close-coupled'' version of the distributed radiator, heavy ion ICF target has produced gain > 130 from 3.1 MJ of ion beam energy. To achieve these results, we reduced the hohlraum dimensions by 27% from our previous designs(M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, D. D.-M. Ho, G. B. Zimmerman, Nuc. Fusion, 38, 509 (1998)) (M. Tabak, D. A. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).) while driving the same capsule. This reduced the beam energy required from 5.9-6.5 MJ to 3.1 MJ. The smaller hohlraum resulted in a smaller beam spot; elliptically shaped beams with effective radius 1.7 mm were used in this design. In addition to describing this target, we will discuss the effect of the close-coupled hohlraum on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and scaling this design down to 1.5-2 MJ for an ETF (Engineering Test Facility).

  6. Deep Dive Topic: Choosing between ablators

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Thomas, C.; Olson, R.

    2015-07-14

    Recent data on implosions using identical hohlraums and very similar laser drives underscores the conundrum of making a clear choice of one ablator over another. Table I shows a comparison of Be and CH in a nominal length, gold, 575 μm-diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas-fill hohlraum while Table II shows a comparison of undoped HDC and CH in a +700 length, gold, 575 μm diameter, 1.6 mg/cc He gas fill hohlraum. As can be seen in the tables, the net integrated fusion performance of these ablators is the same to within error bars. In the case of the undoped HDC and CH ablators, the hot spot shapes of the implosions were nearly indistinguishable for the experiments listed in Table II.

  7. Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

    1998-10-19

    Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

  8. Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaigna)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hoffman, N.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kyrala, G. A.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Nikroo, A.; Olson, R. E.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A.; Weber, S. V.; Wilson, D. C.; Marinak, M. M.; Suter, L. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Atherton, J.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2010-05-01

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  9. Novel characterization of capsule x-ray drive at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    MacLaren, S A; Schneider, M B; Widmann, K; Hammer, J H; Yoxall, B E; Moody, J D; Bell, P M; Benedetti, L R; Bradley, D K; Edwards, M J; Guymer, T M; Hinkel, D E; Hsing, W W; Kervin, M L; Meezan, N B; Moore, A S; Ralph, J E

    2014-03-14

    Indirect drive experiments at the National Ignition Facility are designed to achieve fusion by imploding a fuel capsule with x rays from a laser-driven hohlraum. Previous experiments have been unable to determine whether a deficit in measured ablator implosion velocity relative to simulations is due to inadequate models of the hohlraum or ablator physics. ViewFactor experiments allow for the first time a direct measure of the x-ray drive from the capsule point of view. The experiments show a 15%-25% deficit relative to simulations and thus explain nearly all of the disagreement with the velocity data. In addition, the data from this open geometry provide much greater constraints on a predictive model of laser-driven hohlraum performance than the nominal ignition target. PMID:24679301

  10. Integrated ignition calculations for indirectly driven targets

    SciTech Connect

    Krauser, W.J.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilson, D.C.; Bradley, P.; Swenson, F.

    1995-07-01

    We present two-dimensional LASNEX calculations of the hohlraum and ignition capsules proposed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Our current hohlraum design is a 2.76 mm radius, 9.49 mm long gold cylinder with 1.39 mm radius laser entrance holes (LEH) which are covered by 1 {mu}m thick polyamide foils. Laser beams with less that 1.4 MJ total energy and less than 400 TW peak power irradiate the cylinder wall from two separate cones entering each LEH. The hohlraum interior is filled with hydrogen-helium gas (50-50 atomic) at a density of 0.83 mg/cm{sup 3} to suppress the inward expansion of the wall. The capsule uses either a 160 {mu}m plastic ablator doped with bromine (the baseline design), or a 155 {mu}m beryllium ablator doped with copper (the beryllium design). The ablator surrounds an 80 {mu}m thick deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer with an inner radius of 0.87 mm. We will show the results of integrated, two-dimensional calculations of the hohlraum and the capsule. Plasma conditions within the hohlraum will be described. Peak radiation temperatures in the hohlraum are about 300 eV. These calculations proceed through the implosion, ignition, and burn of the DT capsule. Current peak calculated yields are 12 MJ for the baseline design and 6.9 MJ for the capsule with the beryllium ablator, although higher yields should be achievable with improved ``tuning`` of the laser power levels.

  11. Temperature-extrapolation method for Implicit Monte Carlo - Radiation hydrodynamics calculations

    SciTech Connect

    McClarren, R. G.; Urbatsch, T. J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method for implementing temperature extrapolation in Implicit Monte Carlo solutions to radiation hydrodynamics problems. The method is based on a BDF-2 type integration to estimate a change in material temperature over a time step. We present results for radiation only problems in an infinite medium and for a 2-D Cartesian hohlraum problem. Additionally, radiation hydrodynamics simulations are presented for an RZ hohlraum problem and a related 3D problem. Our results indicate that improvements in noise and general behavior are possible. We present considerations for future investigations and implementations. (authors)

  12. Inline CBET Model Including SRS Backscatter

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David S.

    2015-06-26

    Cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) has been used as a tool on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) since the first energetics experiments in 2009 to control the energy deposition in ignition hohlraums and tune the implosion symmetry. As large amounts of power are transferred between laser beams at the entrance holes of NIF hohlraums, the presence of many overlapping beat waves can lead to stochastic ion heating in the regions where laser beams overlap [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 195004 (2012)]. Using the CBET gains derived in this paper, we show how to implement these equations in a ray-based laser source for a rad-hydro code.

  13. Observation of a reflected shock in an indirectly driven spherical implosion at the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Le Pape, S; Divol, L; Berzak Hopkins, L; Mackinnon, A; Meezan, N B; Casey, D; Frenje, J; Herrmann, H; McNaney, J; Ma, T; Widmann, K; Pak, A; Grimm, G; Knauer, J; Petrasso, R; Zylstra, A; Rinderknecht, H; Rosenberg, M; Gatu-Johnson, M; Kilkenny, J D

    2014-06-01

    A 200  μm radius hot spot at more than 2 keV temperature, 1  g/cm^{3} density has been achieved on the National Ignition Facility using a near vacuum hohlraum. The implosion exhibits ideal one-dimensional behavior and 99% laser-to-hohlraum coupling. The low opacity of the remaining shell at bang time allows for a measurement of the x-ray emission of the reflected central shock in a deuterium plasma. Comparison with 1D hydrodynamic simulations puts constraints on electron-ion collisions and heat conduction. Results are consistent with classical (Spitzer-Harm) heat flux. PMID:24949774

  14. Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion using highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, plasma slugs.

    PubMed

    Chittenden, J P; Dunne, M; Zepf, M; Lebedev, S V; Ciardi, A; Bland, S N

    2002-06-10

    We present a new approach to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion which makes use of highly supersonic, radiatively cooled, slugs of plasma to energize a hohlraum. 2D resistive magnetohydrodynamic simulations of slug formation in shaped liner Z-pinch implosions are presented along with 2D-radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the slug impacting a converter foil and 3D-view-factor simulations of a double-ended hohlraum. Results for the Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory indicate that two synchronous slugs of 250 kJ kinetic energy could be produced, resulting in a capsule surface temperature of approximately 225 eV. PMID:12059369

  15. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays Demonstrate Indirect-Drive ICF Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Chandler, G.A.; Derzon, M.S.; Hebron, D.E.; Leeper, R.J.; Matzen, M.K.; Mock, R.C.; Nash, T.J.; Olson, R.E.; Peterson, D.L.; Ruggles, L.E.; Sanford, T.W.L.; Simpson, W.W.; Struve, K.W.; Vesey, R.A.

    1999-06-16

    Hohlraums (measuring 6-mm in diameter by 7-mm in height) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch. Over measured x-ray input powers P of 0.7 to 13 TW, the hohlraum radiation temperature T increases from {approximately}55 to {approximately}130 eV, and is in agreement with the Planckian relation P-T{sup 4}. The results suggest that indirect-drive ICF studies involving NIF relevant pulse shapes and <2-mm diameter capsules can he studied using this arrangement.

  16. Observation of a Reflected Shock in an Indirectly Driven Spherical Implosion at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Mackinnon, A.; Meezan, N. B.; Casey, D.; Frenje, J.; Herrmann, H.; McNaney, J.; Ma, T.; Widmann, K.; Pak, A.; Grimm, G.; Knauer, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-06-01

    A 200 μm radius hot spot at more than 2 keV temperature, 1 g/cm3 density has been achieved on the National Ignition Facility using a near vacuum hohlraum. The implosion exhibits ideal one-dimensional behavior and 99% laser-to-hohlraum coupling. The low opacity of the remaining shell at bang time allows for a measurement of the x-ray emission of the reflected central shock in a deuterium plasma. Comparison with 1D hydrodynamic simulations puts constraints on electron-ion collisions and heat conduction. Results are consistent with classical (Spitzer-Harm) heat flux.

  17. The computational optimization of indirect-driven ICF targets

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, V.A.; Avrorin, E.N.; Karlykhanov, N.G.; Chernyakov, V.E.; Kozmanov, M.Y.; Murashkina, V.A.; Kandiev, Y.Z.

    1996-05-01

    The results of the ICF indirect-driven targets optimization performed by ZARYA/ERA code for a better insight into the requirements imposed on both target designs and hohlraum drive temperature to gain the ignition with laser of minimum power are presented. Two modification of cryogenic shell targets for hohlraum drive temperatures in the range of 0.25{endash}0.38 keV are proposed for the ignition. The 500 TW lasers are needed to perform such investigations. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Experimental Studies of Convection Effects in a Cryogenic NIF Ignition Target

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Bittner, D N; Giedt, W H; London, R L; Sater, J D; Burmann, J A; Jones, R L

    2003-08-22

    We describe experiments which investigate convection effects on hydrogen ice layers in a transparent CH capsule suspended with a fill-tube. These experiments validate simulations which show that unmitigated convection from the hohlraum fill gas can produce significant distortions to the cryogenic hydrogen ice layer. Experimental results show good agreement with thermal simulations which include conduction and convection.

  19. Time dependent view factor methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-03-01

    View factors have been used for treating radiation transport between opaque surfaces bounding a transparent medium for several decades. However, in recent years they have been applied to problems involving intense bursts of radiation in enclosed volumes such as in the laser fusion hohlraums. In these problems, several aspects require treatment of time dependence.

  20. Computer simulations of laser hot spots and implosion symmetry kiniform phase plate experiments on Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R. R.; Lindman, E. L.; Delamater, N. D.; Magelssen, G. R.

    2000-05-01

    LASNEX computer code simulations have been performed for radiation symmetry experiments on the Nova laser with vacuum and gas-filled hohlraum targets [R. L. Kauffman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 1927 (1998)]. In previous experiments with unsmoothed laser beams, the symmetry was substantially shifted by deflection of the laser beams. In these experiments, laser beams have been smoothed with Kiniform Phase Plates in an attempt to remove deflection of the beams. The experiments have shown that this smoothing significantly improves the agreement with LASNEX calculations of implosion symmetry. The images of laser produced hot spots on the inside of the hohlraum case have been found to differ from LASNEX calculations, suggesting that some beam deflection or self-focusing may still be present or that emission from interpenetrating plasmas is an important component of the images. The measured neutron yields are in good agreement with simulations for vacuum hohlraums but are far different for gas-filled hohlraums. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  1. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October-December 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, J.

    1997-01-01

    The articles in this issue report progress on: Supernova Hydrodynamics Experiments on the Nova Laser; Characterization of Laser-Driven Shock Waves Using Interferometry; Absolute Equation of State Measurements of Compressed Liquid Deuterium Using Nova; Low-Density-Foam Shells; Tetrahedral Hohlraums; The Rosseland Mean Opacity of a Composite Material at High Temperatures.

  2. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  3. Laser-plasma interactions in NIF-scale plasmas (HLP5 and HLP6)

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.; Berger, R.; Fernandez, J.

    1996-06-01

    The understanding of laser-plasma interactions in ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraum targets is important for the success of the proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF). The success of an indirect-drive ICF ignition experiment depends on the ability to predict and control the history and spatial distribution of the x-radiation produced by the laser beams that are absorbed by the inside of the hohlraum wall. Only by controlling the symmetry of this x-ray drive is it possible to obtain the implosion symmetry in the fusion pellet necessary for ignition. The larger hohlraums and longer time scales required for ignition-scale targets result in the presence of several millimeters of plasma (electron density n{sub e} {approximately} 0.1 n{sub c} {approximately} 10{sup 21} cm{sup {minus}3}), through which the 3{omega} (351-nm) laser beams must propagate before they are absorbed at the hohlraum wall. Hydrodynamic simulations show this plasma to be very uniform [density-gradient scalelength L{sub n} = n{sub e}(dn{sub e}/dx){sup {minus}1}{approximately} 2mm] and to exhibit low velocity gradients [velocity-gradient scale-length L{sub v} = c{sub s}(dv/dx){sup {minus}1} > 6 mm].

  4. Advances in NIF Shock Timing Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, Harry

    2012-10-01

    Experiments are underway to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to multiple shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of all four shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector). Experiments are now routinely conducted in a mirrored keyhole geometry, which allows for simultaneous diagnosis of the shock timing at both the hohlraum pole and equator. Further modifications are being made to improve the surrogacy to ignition hohlraums by replacing the standard liquid deuterium (D2) capsule fill with a deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layer. These experiments will remove any possible surrogacy difference between D2 and DT as well as incorporate the physics of shock release from the ice layer, which is absent in current experiments. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  5. Final Report: Development of X-ray tracer diagnostics for radiatively-driven ablator experiments, November 1, 1997 - October 31, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    MacFarlane, J.J.; Cohen, D.H.; Ping Wang, G.A.; Moses, R.R.; Peterson, P.A.; Jaanimagi; Landen, O.L.; Olson, R.E.; Murphy, T.J.; Magelssen, G.R.; Delamater, N.D.

    1999-06-01

    This is a combined experimental and theoretical analysis of tracer layers as spectral diagnostics for radiation burn-through of ablator materials. German-doped plastic is attached as a witness plate to a laser driven hohlraum. Backlit absorption spectroscopy is used as a diagnostic. Target shots were performed on the OMEGSA laser at UR/LLE.

  6. Update on indirect drive ignitin target design for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Haan, S W; Amendt, P A; Dittrich, T R; Hammel, B A; Hatchett, S P; Herrmann, M C; Hurricane, O A; Jones, O S; Lindl, J D; Marinak, M M; Munro, D; Pollaine, S M; Salmonson, J D; Strobel, G A; Suter, L J

    2003-10-21

    Recent ignition target design effort has emphasized systematic exploration of the parameter space of possible ignition targets, providing as specific as possible comparisons between the various targets. This is to provide guidance for target fabrication R&D, and for the other elements of the ignition program. Targets are being considered that span 250-300 eV drive temperatures, capsule energies from 150 to 600 kJ, cocktail and gold hohlraum spectra, and three ablator materials (Be[Cu], CH[Ge], and polyimide). Capsules with graded doped beryllium ablators are being found to be very stable with respect to short-wavelength Rayleigh-Taylor growth. Sensitivity to ablator roughness, ice roughness, and asymmetry is being explored, as it depends on ablator material, drive temperature, and absorbed energy. Special features being simulated include fill holes, fill tubes, and capsule support tents. Three-dimensional simulations are being used to ensure adequate radiation symmetry in 3D, and to ensure that coupling of 3D asymmetry and 3D Rayleigh-Taylor does not adversely affect planned performance. Integrated 3D hohlraum simulations indicate that 3D features in the laser illumination pattern affect the hohlraums' performance, and the hohlraum is being redesigned to accommodate these effects.

  7. Thomson scattering from laser plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J D; Alley, W E; De Groot, J S; Estabrook, K G; Glenzer, S H; Hammer, J H; Jadaud, J P; MacGowan, B J; Rozmus, W; Suter, L J; Williams, E A

    1999-01-12

    Thomson scattering has recently been introduced as a fundamental diagnostic of plasma conditions and basic physical processes in dense, inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Experiments at the Nova laser facility [E. M. Campbell et al., Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] have demonstrated accurate temporally and spatially resolved characterization of densities, electron temperatures, and average ionization levels by simultaneously observing Thomson scattered light from ion acoustic and electron plasma (Langmuir) fluctuations. In addition, observations of fast and slow ion acous- tic waves in two-ion species plasmas have also allowed an independent measurement of the ion temperature. These results have motivated the application of Thomson scattering in closed-geometry inertial confinement fusion hohlraums to benchmark integrated radiation-hydrodynamic modeling of fusion plasmas. For this purpose a high energy 4{omega} probe laser was implemented recently allowing ultraviolet Thomson scattering at various locations in high-density gas-filled hohlraum plasmas. In partic- ular, the observation of steep electron temperature gradients indicates that electron thermal transport is inhibited in these gas-filled hohlraums. Hydrodynamic calcula- tions which include an exact treatment of large-scale magnetic fields are in agreement with these findings. Moreover, the Thomson scattering data clearly indicate axial stagnation in these hohlraums by showing a fast rise of the ion temperature. Its timing is in good agreement with calculations indicating that the stagnating plasma will not deteriorate the implosion of the fusion capsules in ignition experiments.

  8. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 4, Number 4

    SciTech Connect

    Honea, E.

    1994-09-01

    The ICF Quarterly continues with six articles in this issue describing recent developments in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The topics include plasma characterization, production of millimeter scale-length plasmas for studying laser-plasma instabilities, hohlraum physics, three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling, crystal growth, and laser-beam smoothing.

  9. Gatling gun approach to long duration x-ray drives for laboratory astrophysics studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, David; Kane, J. O.; Heeter, R. F.; Casner, A.; Villette, B.; Mancini, R. C.; Remington, B. A.

    2013-10-01

    Laboratory astrophysics studies investigating the pillar structures in the Eagle Nebula, or photoionization studies require a steady light source of sufficient duration to recreate relevant physics. To address these experimental requirements we successfully developed a 30 ns, 90 eV x-ray radiation drive using a foam-filled multi-barrel (``Gatling Gun'') hohlraum driven with three 10ns pulse UV beams on the Omega EP laser system located at LLE. The multi-barrel hohlraum consisted of three adjacent Cu cavities, heated in succession to generate long duration x-ray source. The Gatling gun approach mitigated the issues of LEH closure from a single hohlraum heated for extended durations. Characterization of the Gatling gun hohlraum, using uDMX and VISAR diagnostics, will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-640737.

  10. Collection of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Spears, B. K.; Hicks, D. G.; Hudson, G. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Freeman, C. G.

    2012-02-15

    Collection of representative samples of debris following inertial confinement fusion implosions in order to diagnose implosion conditions and efficacy is a challenging endeavor because of the unique conditions within the target chamber such as unconverted laser light, intense pulse of x-rays, physical chunks of debris, and other ablative effects. We present collection of gas samples following an implosion for the first time. High collection fractions for noble gases were achieved. We also present collection of solid debris samples on flat plate collectors. Geometrical collection efficiencies for Au hohlraum material were achieved and collection of capsule debris (Be and Cu) was also observed. Asymmetric debris distributions were observed for Au and Be samples. Collection of Be capsule debris was higher for solid collectors viewing the capsule through the laser entrance hole in the hohlraum than for solid collectors viewing the capsule around the waist of the hohlraum. Collection of Au hohlraum material showed the opposite pattern: more Au debris was collected around the waist than through the laser entrance hole. The solid debris collectors were not optimized for minimal Cu backgrounds, which limited the conclusions about the symmetry of the Cu debris. The quality of the data limited conclusions on chemical fractionation effects within the burning, expanding, and then cooling plasma.

  11. Diagnosing Te of NIF plasmas using the isoelectronic ratios of microdot tracer elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, M. A.; Regan, S. P.; Fournier, K. B.; Schneider, M. B.; Liedahl, D. A.; Kemp, G. E.; Moody, J. D.; Brown, G. V.; Chen, H.; Landen, O.; Bradley, D.; Jones, O.; Epstein, R.; LLNL Collaboration; LLE Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    Experiments planned on NIF will diagnose the electron temperature (Te) of the hohlraum in the vicinity of the laser entrance hole (LEH) using x-ray spectroscopy. A microdot consisting of Ti and Cr will be coated on the surface of a CH implosion capsule and centered on the symmetry axis of the hohlraum. As the microdot is ablated it is ionized by the hohlraum plasma and flows into the LEH region. The experimental plan to use the isoelectronic line ratio technique to diagnose Te of the hohlraum plasma near the LEH will be presented. Exploratory experiments at NIF tested the Te sensitivity of the technique by recording time resolved K-shell emission of direct-drive spherical targets coated with a CrNiZn alloy. Application of the isoelectronic technique to the coronal plasma of these targets will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  12. Collection of solid and gaseous samples to diagnose inertial confinement fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Stoyer, M A; Velsko, C A; Spears, B K; Hicks, D G; Hudson, G B; Sangster, T C; Freeman, C G

    2012-02-01

    Collection of representative samples of debris following inertial confinement fusion implosions in order to diagnose implosion conditions and efficacy is a challenging endeavor because of the unique conditions within the target chamber such as unconverted laser light, intense pulse of x-rays, physical chunks of debris, and other ablative effects. We present collection of gas samples following an implosion for the first time. High collection fractions for noble gases were achieved. We also present collection of solid debris samples on flat plate collectors. Geometrical collection efficiencies for Au hohlraum material were achieved and collection of capsule debris (Be and Cu) was also observed. Asymmetric debris distributions were observed for Au and Be samples. Collection of Be capsule debris was higher for solid collectors viewing the capsule through the laser entrance hole in the hohlraum than for solid collectors viewing the capsule around the waist of the hohlraum. Collection of Au hohlraum material showed the opposite pattern: more Au debris was collected around the waist than through the laser entrance hole. The solid debris collectors were not optimized for minimal Cu backgrounds, which limited the conclusions about the symmetry of the Cu debris. The quality of the data limited conclusions on chemical fractionation effects within the burning, expanding, and then cooling plasma. PMID:22380089

  13. Characterization of Non-LTE Gold Plasmas in Controlled Conditions with Finite Tr

    SciTech Connect

    Heeter, R F; Foord, M E; Fournier, K B; Froula, D H; MacKinnon, A J; May, M J; Schneider, M B; Young, B K F

    2003-08-29

    Understanding the charge state distribution of golf plasmas, especially in conditions far from local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE conditions), is among the issues in ICF hohlraum physics research. Detailed models of these plasmas have historically disagreed by several charge states under a given set of conditions; simplified models in radiation-hydrodynamics codes disagree more. This impacts the accurate prediction of radiation coupling within the hohlraum. Nova laser data for uniform gold plasmas at T{sub e} = 2.2 and T{sub r} < 0.05 keV and additional data from plasmas inside hohlraums have not resolved all of the issues. Here they report experiments using the Omega laser to obtain data over a wider parameter space. Gold samples embedded in Be disks expand under direct laser heating to n{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} with T{sub e} from 1 to 3 keV. Some of the disks are placed within hohlraums, providing a finite radiation temperature T{sub r} {approx} 150 eV. Densities are measured by imaging of plasma expansion; temperatures by Thomson scattering and K-shell spectroscopy of co-mixed KCl tracers. Emission spectroscopy of Au 5-3 emission from 2.9-4.2 keV provides charge state distribution information. They summarize results to date and remaining issues.

  14. Pressure amplification in thermal X-ray irradiated foam layered gold targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batani, D.; Desai, T.; Lucchini, G.; Löwer, Th.; Hall, T. A.; Nazarov, W.; Koenig, M.; Benuzzi-Mounaix, A.

    2002-04-01

    We have studied the interaction of soft X-ray thermal radiation with foam-layered metal targets. The X-radiation was produced by focusing a high energy laser inside a small size hohlraum. An increment in shock pressure was observed with the foam layer as compared to bare metal targets.

  15. LLE Review. Volume 68, July--September 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-07-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period of July-September 1996, includes a description of an important experiment carried out on OMEGA by researchers from LANL, LLNL, and LLE to demonstrate the feasibility of using OMEGA for indirect drive. Additional topics include tetrahedral hohlraums, the speckle properties of phase- converted laser beams, design criteria for SSD phase modulators, and the design of slab amplifiers. Highlights of the research presented in this issue are (1) Results from the proof-of-principle indirect- drive experiments in which up to 40 OMEGA beams were used to irradiate cylindrical hohlraums. Nova results were reproduced, and new capabilities not available on other lasers were demonstrated. (2) A discussion of tetrahedral hohlraums (spherical hohlraums with four laser entrance holes) as a means of achieving better capsule irradiation uniformity. Tetrahedral hohlraums also allow the use of all 60 OMEGA beams and may provide an alternate route to ignition on the NIF. (3) An analysis of the residual target irradiation nonuniformity due to the fine laser speckle remaining on the beam after being phase converted by the DPP`s. A model shows how a uniformly ablating plasma atmosphere reduces the speckle contribution to the effective time-averaged irradiation nonuniformity. (4) A discussion of the theory, design, manufacture, testing, and implementation of the microwave SSD phase modulators used on OMEGA for two-dimensional SSD. The modulators are capable of operating in the gigahertz frequency range. (5) A discussion of the design and performance of a large-aperture, high-gain Nd:glass zig-zag slab amplifier for materials testing. The design incorporates improvements from previous work in addition to improvements obtained from careful design choices guided by analytic calculations.

  16. Using laser entrance hole shields to increase coupling efficiency in indirect drive ignition targets for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, D. A.; Amendt, P. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hinkel, D. E.; Izurni, N.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Pollaine, S. M.; Suter, L. J.; Tabak, M.; Turner, R. E.

    2006-05-01

    Coupling efficiency, the ratio of the capsule absorbed energy to the driver energy, is a key parameter in ignition target designs. The hohlraum originally proposed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, S228 (2004)] coupled ˜11% of the absorbed laser energy to the capsule as x rays. Described here is a second generation of the hohlraum target which has a higher coupling efficiency, ˜16%. Because the ignition capsule's ability to withstand three-dimensional effects increases rapidly with absorbed energy, the additional energy can significantly increase the likelihood of ignition. The new target includes laser entrance hole (LEH) shields as a principal method for increasing coupling efficiency while controlling symmetry in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion. The LEH shields are high Z disks placed inside the hohlraum on the symmetry axis to block the capsule's view of the relatively cold LEHs. The LEH shields can reduce the amount of laser energy required to drive a target to a given temperature via two mechanisms: (1) keeping the temperature high near the capsule pole by putting a barrier between the capsule and the pole; (2) because the capsule pole does not have a view of the cold LEHs, good symmetry requires a shorter hohlraum with less wall area. Current integrated simulations of this class of target couple 140kJ of x rays to a capsule out of 865kJ of absorbed laser energy and produce ˜10MJ of yield. In the current designs, which continue to be optimized, the addition of the LEH shields saves ˜95kJ of energy (about 10%) over hohlraums without LEH shields.

  17. Investigation of radiation flux in certain band via the preheat of aluminum sample

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chen; Wang, Zhebin; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Zhao, Bin; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian

    2013-12-15

    Quantitative evaluation of the fractions of high energy x-rays in a hohlraum is crucial to the indirect driven-drive scheme of inertial confinement fusion and many other applications in high energy density physics. Preheat of a sample due to x-rays sensitively depends on optical thin photons. Analyzing the motion of a sample due to preheat can thus provide valuable information of those x-rays. In this article, we propose a method to infer the temporal evolution of the x-ray fluxes in the bands of our interest. By matching the simulation results to the motions of an aluminum sample, we can infer the time-resolved x-ray fluxes around the aluminum K-edge and the gold M-band inside the hohlraum.

  18. Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.

    2013-07-01

    The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1-1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

  19. Capsule Performance Optimization in the National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Haan, S W; Edwards, J

    2009-10-13

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  20. Target technologies for indirect drive ignition on the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Bernat, T P

    1999-09-09

    X-ray driven ignition targets for the NIF will include fuel capsule materials different from those used up to now in ICF experiments. They will contain cryogenic fuel layers, and will be enclosed in cryogenic hohlraums. These hohlraums must provide the thermal environment required to shape the fuel layers, and must be supported by cryogenic equipment in the NIF target chamber. The methods for filling and delivering the targets to the NIF chamber will combine high-temperature diffusion with cryogenic transport. A program is in place in the US to design and develop the ignition targets, and the cryogenic support and fill systems needed to field them. This program includes participation from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and General Atomics.

  1. Using Radiation Shims to Improve Symmetry in Indirect Drive ICF Capsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, Debra; Herrmann, Mark; Tabak, Max

    2001-10-01

    For indirect drive targets, low order asymmetries are controlled by the hohlraum geometry, placement of the beam spots (ion or laser beams), and radiation smoothing from the hohlraum to the capsule. Thus, symmetry requirements may put undesirable restrictions on the driver in terms of spot size and/or entrance angle. By placing a thin layer of material at strategic locations on or near the capsule surface (a ``radiation shim''), small asymmetries can be corrected and reduce the restrictions on the driver. As an example, a heavy ion target which uses a radiation shim to correct a P4 asymmetry allows a 66% larger beam radius[1]. The radiation shim can produce a large seed for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, however. We will discuss calculations of capsules with radiation shims which minimize Rayleigh-Taylor seeding as well as possible experiments to test the concept. [1] D. A. Callahan-Miller, M. Tabak, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc., 45, 300 (2000).

  2. eHXI: A permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Doppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; et al

    2016-06-14

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (≥ 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. Lastly, eHXI provides valuable information onmore » hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.« less

  3. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  4. Capsule performance optimization in the national ignition campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Haan, S. W.; Edwards, J.

    2010-08-01

    A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [1] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

  5. Imaging of High-Z doped, Imploded Capsule Cores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisbrey, Shon T.; Edwards, M. John; Suter, Larry J.

    2006-10-01

    The ability to correctly ascertain the shape of imploded fusion capsules is critical to be able to achieve the spherical symmetry needed to maximize the energy yield of proposed fusion experiments for the National Ignition Facility. Implosion of the capsule creates a hot, dense core. The introduction of a high-Z dopant into the gas-filled core of the capsule increases the amount of bremsstrahlung radiation produced in the core and should make the imaging of the imploded core easier. Images of the imploded core can then be analyzed to ascertain the symmetry of the implosion. We calculate that the addition of Ne gas into a deuterium gas core will increase the amount of radiation emission while preserving the surrogacy of the radiation and hydrodynamics in the indirect drive NIF hohlraum in the proposed cryogenic hohlraums. The increased emission will more easily enable measurement of asymmetries and tuning of the implosion.

  6. Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Guo, Liang; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-09-01

    Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses.

  7. Measurements of preheat and shock melting in Be ablators during the first few nanoseconds of a National Ignition Facility ignition drive using the Omega laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D. K.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Page, R. H.; Braun, D. G.; Edwards, M. J.; Hibbard, R.; Moreno, K. A.; Mauldin, M. P.; Nikroo, A.

    2009-04-15

    A scaled Hohlraum platform was used to experimentally measure preheat in ablator materials during the first few nanoseconds of a radiation drive proposed for ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility [J. A. Paisner et al., Laser Focus World 30, 75 (1994)]. The platform design approximates the radiation environment of the pole of the capsule by matching both the laser spot intensity and illuminated Hohlraum wall fraction in scaled halfraums driven by the OMEGA laser system [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Back surface motion measured via VISAR reflecting from the rear surface of the sample was used to measure sample motion prior to shock breakout. The experiments show that the first {approx}20 {mu}m of a Be ablator will be melted by radiation preheat, with subsequent material melted by the initial shock, in agreement with simulations. The experiments also show no evidence of anomalous heating of buried high-Z doped layers in the ablator.

  8. Development of X-ray tracer diagnostics for radiatively-driven ablator experiments [annual report FY1998

    SciTech Connect

    J.J. MacFarlane; D.H. Cohen; P. Wang; G.A. Moses; R.R. Peterson; P.A. Jaanimagi; O.L. Langen; R.E. Olson; T.J. Murphy; G.R. Magelssen; N.D. Delamater

    1999-05-01

    This report covers fiscal year 1998 of our ongoing project to develop tracer X-ray spectroscopic diagnostics for hohlraum environments. This effort focused on an experimental campaign carried out at OMEGA on 25--27 August 1998. This phase of the project heavily emphasized experimental design, diagnostic development, and target fabrication, as well as building up numerical models for the experiments. The spectral diagnostic under development involves using two thin (few 1000 {angstrom}) mid-Z tracers in two witness plates mounted on the side of a hohlraum with the tracers' K{sub a} absorption features seen against an X-ray backlighter. The absorption data are used to sample the time-dependent, localized properties of each witness plate as a radiation wave ablates it. The experiments represented the first application of this diagnostic, in this case to side-by-side doped and undoped plastic to investigate the effects of capsule ablator dopants.

  9. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-05-16

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  10. April 1999 highlights of the pulsed power inertial confinement fusion program.

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Mary Ann

    1999-06-01

    In April they received a DOE Defense Programs award for significant contributions to the Nuclear Weapons Program in developing and applying z-pinch x-ray sources to stockpile stewardship. DOE also recognized pulsed power for outstanding performance at a world-class level as part of the FY98 performance appraisal review. There were 13 Z shots: 3 for LANL weapon physics, 2 to prepare to measure the D{sub 2} equation of state (EOS), 4 to assess energetics of single-sided drive with the z-pinch-driven hohlraum, and 4 to study the variation in x-ray power with the mass of a copper converter foil inside a nested wire array for the dynamic hohlraum.

  11. 2D X-ray radiography of imploding capsules at the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Rygg, J R; Jones, O S; Field, J E; Barrios, M A; Benedetti, L R; Collins, G W; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Kline, J L; Kroll, J J; Landen, O L; Ma, T; Pak, A; Peterson, J L; Raman, K; Town, R P J; Bradley, D K

    2014-05-16

    First measurements of the in-flight shape of imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were obtained by using two-dimensional x-ray radiography. The sequence of area-backlit, time-gated pinhole images is analyzed for implosion velocity, low-mode shape and density asymmetries, and the absolute offset and center-of-mass velocity of the capsule shell. The in-flight shell is often observed to be asymmetric even when the concomitant core self-emission is round. A ∼ 15 μm shell asymmetry amplitude of the Y(40) spherical harmonic mode was observed for standard NIF ICF hohlraums at a shell radius of ∼ 200 μm (capsule at ∼ 5× radial compression). This asymmetry is mitigated by a ∼ 10% increase in the hohlraum length. PMID:24877944

  12. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Gharibyan, N; Grant, P M; Gostic, J M; Torretto, P C; Wooddy, P T; Bandong, B B; Despotopulos, J D; Cerjan, C J; Hagmann, C A; Caggiano, J A; Yeamans, C B; Bernstein, L A; Schneider, D H G; Henry, E A; Fortner, R J

    2014-06-01

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of (198m+g)Au and (196g)Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF. PMID:24985820

  13. Enhanced NLTE Atomic Kinetics Modeling Capabilities in HYDRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Scott, Howard A.; Marinak, Michael M.

    2014-10-01

    In radiation hydrodynamics modeling of ICF targets, an NLTE treatment of atomic kinetics is necessary for modeling high-Z hohlraum wall materials, high-Z dopants mixed in the central gas hotspot, and is potentially needed for accurate modeling of outer layers of the capsule ablator. Over the past several years, the NLTE DCA atomic physics capabilities in the 3D ICF radiation hydrodynamics code HYDRA have been significantly enhanced. The underlying atomic models have been improved, additional kinetics options including the ability to run DCA in cells with dynamic mixing of species has been added, and the computational costs have been significantly reduced using OpenMP threading. To illustrate the improved capabilities, we will show higher fidelity results from simulations of ICF hohlraum energetics, laser irradiated sphere experiments, and ICF capsule implosions. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Nuclear science research with dynamic high energy density plasmas at NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaughnessy, D. A.; Gharibyan, N.; Moody, K. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Grant, P. M.; Yeamans, C. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Cerjan, C. J.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Faye, S.

    2016-05-01

    Nuclear reaction measurements are performed at the National Ignition Facility in a high energy density plasma environment by adding target materials to the outside of the hohlraum thermo-mechanical package on an indirect-drive exploding pusher shot. Materials are activated with 14.1-MeV neutrons and the post-shot debris is collected via the Solid Radiochemistry diagnostic, which consists of metal discs fielded 50 cm from target chamber center. The discs are removed post-shot and analyzed via radiation counting and mass spectrometry. Results from a shot using Nd and Tm foils as targets are presented, which indicate enhanced collection of the debris in the line of sight of a given collector. The capsule performance was not diminished due to the extra material. This provides a platform for future measurements of nuclear reaction data through the use of experimental packages mounted external to the hohlraum.

  15. Differential ablator-fuel adiabat tuning in indirect-drive implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, J. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Jones, O. S.; Clark, D. S.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a design adjustment to the high foot laser pulse [T. R. Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.055002] that is predicted to lower the fuel adiabat, increase compression and neutron production, but maintain similar ablation front growth. This is accomplished by lowering the laser power between the first and the second pulses (the "trough") so that the first shock remains strong initially but decays as it transits the ablator and enters the capsule fuel in a process similar to direct-drive "adiabat shaping" [S. E. Bodner et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 2298 (2000), 10.1063/1.874063]. Integrated hohlraum simulations show that hohlraum cooling is sufficient to launch decaying shocks with adequate symmetry control, suggesting that adiabat shaping may be possible with indirect-drive implosions. Initial experiments show the efficacy of this technique.

  16. Simulating NIF laser-plasma interaction with multiple SRS frequencies

    SciTech Connect

    Still, C H; Hinkel, D E; Langdon, A B; Palastro, J P; Williams, E A

    2009-10-05

    Understanding the energetics of a NIF ignition hohlraum is important to achieving ignition. Laser-plasma interactions (LPI) can reduce the radiation drive if backscatter occurs, and can also affect the hohlraum energetics by modifying the laser beam energy deposition which in turn can alter the implosion symmetry. The addition of a second SRS frequency to the modeling code pF3d can capture physics which would otherwise have been omitted. In the case of a wide or bi-modal SRS spectrum, this physics can be important. We discuss the modifications to the pF3d computational model, and exhibit its effect in a NIF ignition-relevant LPI simulation.

  17. Towards an Integrated Model of the NIC Layered Implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O S; Callahan, D A; Cerjan, C J; Clark, D S; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Marinak, M M; Meezan, N B; Milovich, J L; Olson, R E; Patel, M V; Robey, H F; Sepke, S M; Spears, B K; Springer, P T; Weber, S V; Wilson, D C

    2011-10-31

    A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign (NIC) cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. The model adjustments brought much of the simulated data into closer agreement with the experiment, with the notable exception of the measured yields, which were 15-45% of the calculated yields.

  18. Total hemispherical emittance measured at high temperatures by the calorimetric method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Difilippo, Frank; Mirtich, Michael J.; Banks, Bruce A.; Stidham, Curtis; Kussmaul, Michael

    1989-01-01

    A calorimetric vacuum emissometer (CVE) capable of measuring total hemispherical emittance of surfaces at elevated temperatures was designed, built, and tested. Several materials with a wide range of emittances were measured in the CVE between 773 to 923 K. These results were compared to values calculated from spectral emittance curves measured in a room temperature Hohlraum reflectometer and in an open-air elevated temperature emissometer. The results differed by as much as 0.2 for some materials but were in closer agreement for the more highly-emitting, diffuse-reflecting samples. The differences were attributed to temperature, atmospheric, and directional effects, and errors in the Hohlraum and emissometer measurements (plus or minus 5 percent). The probable error of the CVE measurements was typically less than 1 percent.

  19. Angular biasing in implicit Monte-Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, G.B.

    1994-10-20

    Calculations of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion target experiments require an integrated approach in which laser irradiation and radiation transport in the hohlraum are solved simultaneously with the symmetry, implosion and burn of the fuel capsule. The Implicit Monte Carlo method has proved to be a valuable tool for the two dimensional radiation transport within the hohlraum, but the impact of statistical noise on the symmetric implosion of the small fuel capsule is difficult to overcome. We present an angular biasing technique in which an increased number of low weight photons are directed at the imploding capsule. For typical parameters this reduces the required computer time for an integrated calculation by a factor of 10. An additional factor of 5 can also be achieved by directing even smaller weight photons at the polar regions of the capsule where small mass zones are most sensitive to statistical noise.

  20. A High-Resolution Integrated Model of the National Ignition Campaign Cryogenic Layered Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Dopppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Haan, S. W.; Haid, B. J.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; LaFortune, K. N.; Landen, O. L.; Mapoles, E. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Moran, M. J.; Munro, D. H.; Patel, M. V.; Parham, T. G.; Sater, J. D.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Town, R. J.; Weber, S. V.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Williams, E. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Suter, L. J.; Olson, R. E.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Frenje, J.; Boehly, T. R.; Glebov, V.; Knauer, J. P.; Nikroo, A.; Wilkens, H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Marinak, M. M.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.; Springer, P. T.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2012-05-29

    A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign (NIC) cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60. Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. The model adjustments brought much of the simulated data into closer agreement with the experiment, with the notable exception of the measured yields, which were 15-40% of the calculated yields.

  1. A High-Resolution Integrated Model of the National Ignition Campaign Cryogenic Layered Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jones, O. S.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Dixit, S. M.; Dopppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R. J.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; et al

    2012-05-29

    A detailed simulation-based model of the June 2011 National Ignition Campaign (NIC) cryogenic DT experiments is presented. The model is based on integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations that utilize the best available models for the hohlraum wall, ablator, and DT equations of state and opacities. The calculated radiation drive was adjusted by changing the input laser power to match the experimentally measured shock speeds, shock merger times, peak implosion velocity, and bangtime. The crossbeam energy transfer model was tuned to match the measured time-dependent symmetry. Mid-mode mix was included by directly modeling the ablator and ice surface perturbations up to mode 60.more » Simulated experimental values were extracted from the simulation and compared against the experiment. The model adjustments brought much of the simulated data into closer agreement with the experiment, with the notable exception of the measured yields, which were 15-40% of the calculated yields.« less

  2. Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A.

    2013-07-15

    The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1–1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

  3. eHXI: a permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; Huntington, C. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; Landen, O. L.; Palmer, N.; Park, H.-S.; Thomas, C. A.

    2016-06-01

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (>= 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. eHXI provides valuable information on hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.

  4. Study of shock-coalescence on the LIL laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debras, G.; Courtois, C.; Lambert, F.; Brygoo, S.; Duval, A.; Darbon, S.; Villette, B.; Masclet-Gobin, I.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Seytor, P.; Videau, L.; Graillot, H.; Chies, T.; Henry, O.; Raffestin, D.; Chicanne, C.

    2013-11-01

    We use the LIL (Ligne d'Intégration Laser) facility to study the coalescence of two planar shocks in an indirectly-driven planar sample of polystyrene. This experiment represents the preliminary stage of the future shock-timing campaign for the Laser Megajoule (LMJ). The main objectives are to validate the experimental concept and to test the numerical simulations. We used a gold spherical hohlraum to convert into X-ray the 351 nm wavelength laser pulse and to initiate the two shocks in the sample. To access time resolved shock velocities and temperature, we used two rear-side diagnostics: a VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflection) working at two different wavelengths and a streaked optical self-emission diagnostic. We observed the coalesced shock, in good agreement with the numerical simulations. We also observed a loss of signal during the first nanoseconds probably due to sample heating from the hohlraum X-ray flux.

  5. Magnetized Inertial Confinement Fusion on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, G.; Rhodes, M.; Zimmermann, G.; Ho, D.; Strozzi, D.; Blackfield, D.; Hawkins, S.

    2015-11-01

    We are assessing the potential of imposed magnetic fields on ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility. Both magnetized room-temperature DT gas targets and CH/diamond cryo-ignition capsules are under study. Initial applied fields of 30-70T that compress to greater than 10,000T (100MG) under capsule implosion may relax conditions required for ignition and burn due to suppression of electron heat conduction, reduction of alpha deposition range and stabilization of hydro instabilities. This may permit recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in otherwise submarginal capsules. We will report on the design and performance simulations of magnetized ignition targets and hohlraum physics, and summarize present experiments testing the attainable magnetic field limits in hohlraum-coil systems driven by a pulsed power supply. Work performed under auspices of U.S. DOE by LLNL under DE-AC52-07NA27344 and LDRD 14-ERD-028.

  6. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Shaughnessy, D. A. Moody, K. J.; Gharibyan, N.; Grant, P. M.; Gostic, J. M.; Torretto, P. C.; Wooddy, P. T.; Bandong, B. B.; Cerjan, C. J.; Hagmann, C. A.; Caggiano, J. A.; Yeamans, C. B.; Bernstein, L. A.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Henry, E. A.; Fortner, R. J.; Despotopulos, J. D.

    2014-06-15

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of {sup 198m+g}Au and {sup 196g}Au is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF.

  7. Total hemispherical emittance measured at high temperatures by the calorimetric method

    SciTech Connect

    DiFilippo, F.; Mirtich, M.J.; Banks, B.A.; Stidham, C.; Kussmaul, M.

    1994-09-01

    A calorimetric vacuum emissometer (CVE) capable of measuring total hemispherical emittance of surfaces at elevated temperatures was designed, built, and tested. Several materials with a wide range of emittances were measured in the CVE between 773 to 923 K. These results were compared to values calculated from spectral emittance curves measured in a room temperature Hohlraum reflectometer and in an open-air elevated temperature emissometer. The results differed by as much as 0.2 for some materials but were in closer agreement for the more highly-emitting, diffuse-reflecting samples. The differences were attributed to temperature, atmospheric, and directional effects, and errors in the Hohlraum and emissometer measurements ({+-} 5 percent). The probable error of the CVE measurements was typically less than 1 percent.

  8. National Ignition Facility Target Design and Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, R C; Kozioziemski, B J; Nikroo, A; Wilkens, H L; Bhandarkar, S; Forsman, A C; Haan, S W; Hoppe, M L; Huang, H; Mapoles, E; Moody, J D; Sater, J D; Seugling, R M; Stephens, R B; Takagi, M; Xu, H W

    2007-12-10

    The current capsule target design for the first ignition experiments at the NIF Facility beginning in 2009 will be a copper-doped beryllium capsule, roughly 2 mm in diameter with 160-{micro}m walls. The capsule will have a 75-{micro}m layer of solid DT on the inside surface, and the capsule will driven with x-rays generated from a gold/uranium cocktail hohlraum. The design specifications are extremely rigorous, particularly with respect to interfaces, which must be very smooth to inhibit Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth. This paper outlines the current design, and focuses on the challenges and advances in capsule fabrication and characterization; hohlraum fabrication, and D-T layering and characterization.

  9. First Beryllium Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, John

    2015-11-01

    The first implosion experiments using Beryllium (Be) capsules have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to confirm the superior ablation properties and to elucidate possible Be-ablator issues. Since the 1990s, Be has been the preferred Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) ablator because of its higher mass ablation rate compared to that of carbon-based ablators. This enables ICF target designs with higher implosion velocities and improved hydrodynamic stability through greater ablative stabilization. Recent experiments to demonstrate the viability of Be ablator target designs have measured the laser energy backscatter, shock velocities, capsule implosion velocity, core implosion shape from self-emission, and in-flight capsule shape from backlit imaging. The laser backscatter is similar to that from comparable plastic (CH) targets. Implosion velocity measurements from backlit streaked radiography show that laser energy coupling to the hohlraum wall is comparable, if not better, for Be than for plastic ablators. The measured implosion shape indicates no significant reduction of laser energy from the inner laser cone beams reaching the hohlraum wall as compared with plastic and high-density carbon ablators. These results demonstrate good coupling of laser energy to the target and control over the implosion shape indicating the feasibility of Be capsule design opening up a larger design space for ICF. In addition, this data, together with data for low fill-density hohlraum performance, indicates that laser power multipliers, required to reconcile simulations with experimental observations, are likely due to our limited understanding of the hohlraum rather than the capsule physics since similar multipliers are needed for both Be and CH capsules.

  10. Capsule Performance Optimization for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, Otto

    2009-11-01

    The overall goal of the capsule performance optimization campaign is to maximize the probability of ignition by experimentally correcting for likely residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. This will be accomplished using a variety of targets that will set key laser, hohlraum and capsule parameters to maximize ignition capsule implosion velocity, while minimizing fuel adiabat, core shape asymmetry and ablator-fuel mix. The targets include high Z re-emission spheres setting foot symmetry through foot cone power balance [1], liquid Deuterium-filled ``keyhole'' targets setting shock speed and timing through the laser power profile [2], symmetry capsules setting peak cone power balance and hohlraum length [3], and streaked x-ray backlit imploding capsules setting ablator thickness [4]. We will show how results from successful tuning technique demonstration shots performed at the Omega facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. We will also present estimates of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors, and show that these get reduced after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty. Finally, we will present results from upcoming tuning technique validation shots performed at NIF at near full-scale. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. [4pt] [1] E. Dewald, et. al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79 (2008) 10E903. [0pt] [2] T.R. Boehly, et. al., Phys. Plasmas 16 (2009) 056302. [0pt] [3] G. Kyrala, et. al., BAPS 53 (2008) 247. [0pt] [4] D. Hicks, et. al., BAPS 53 (2008) 2.

  11. Thomson scattering from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S.H.; Back, C.A.; Suter, L.J.

    1997-07-08

    Thomson scattering has been developed at the Nova laser facility as a direct and accurate diagnostic to characterize inertial confinement fusion plasmas. Flat disks coated with thin multilayers of gold and beryllium were with one laser beam to produce a two ion species plasma with a controlled amount of both species. Thomson scattering spectra from these plasmas showed two ion acoustic waves belonging to gold and beryllium. The phase velocities of the ion acoustic waves are shown to be a sensitive function of the relative concentrations of the two ion species and are in good agreement with theoretical calculations. These open geometry experiments further show that an accurate measurement of the ion temperature can be derived from the relative damping of the two ion acoustic waves. Subsequent Thomson scattering measurements from methane-filled, ignition-relevant hohlraums apply the theory for two ion species plasmas to obtain the electron and ion temperatures with high accuracy. The experimental data provide a benchmark for two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations using LASNEX, which is presently in use to predict the performance of future megajoule laser driven hohlraums of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The data are consistent with modeling using significantly inhibited heat transport at the peak of the drive. Applied to NIF targets, this flux limitation has little effect on x- ray production. The spatial distribution of x-rays is slightly modified but optimal symmetry can be re-established by small changes in power balance or pointing. Furthermore, we find that stagnating plasma regions on the hohlraum axis are well described by the calculations. This result implies that stagnation in gas-filled hohlraums occurs too late to directly affect the capsule implosion in ignition experiments.

  12. Science and code validation program to secure ignition on LMJ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, E.; Boniface, C.; Bonnefille, M.; Casner, A.; Esnault, C.; Galmiche, D.; Gauthier, P.; Girard, F.; Gisbert, R.; Leidinger, J.-P.; Loiseau, P.; Masse, L.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Mignon, P.; Monteil, M.-C.; Seytor, P.; Tassin, V.

    2016-03-01

    The CEA/DAM ICF experimental program is currently conducted on LIL and Omega with the goal of improving our simulation tool, the FCI2 code. In this effort, we focus on typical ICF observables: hohlraum radiation drive history, capsule core shape and neutron emission history, hydrodynamic instability growth. In addition to integrated experiment, specific designs are also helpful to pinpoint a particular phenomenon. In this article, we review our current efforts and status, and our future projects on Omega and LMJ.

  13. Tuning the implosion symmetry of ICF targets via controlled crossed-beam energy transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Williams, E; Weber, S; Thomas, C A; Callahan, D A; Haan, S W; Salmonson, J D; Dixit, S; Hinkel, D E; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L

    2008-07-29

    Radiative hydrodynamics simulations of ignition experiments show that energy transfer between crossing laser beams allows tuning of the implosion symmetry. A new full-scale, three dimensional quantitative model has been developed for crossed-beam energy transfer, allowing calculations of the propagation and coupling of multiple laser beams and their associated plasma waves in ignition hohlraums. This model has been implemented in a radiative-hydrodynamics code, demonstrating control of the implosion symmetry by a wavelength separation between cones of laser beams.

  14. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 5, No. 2

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included this quarter include: the role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of Inertial Confinement Fusion, laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums, evolution of solid-state induction modulators for a heavy-ion recirculator, the National Ignition Facility project, and terminal-level relaxation in Nd-doped laser material.

  15. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.B.; Bowers, R.L.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-11-01

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock.

  16. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, Joysree B.; Bowers, Richard L.; Peterson, Darrell L.

    1997-05-05

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock.

  17. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Safronova, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Esaulov, A. A.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.

    2014-03-01

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  18. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100 ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  19. X-ray emission from National Ignition Facility indirect drive targets

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, A.T.; Managan, R.A.; Tobin, M.T.; Peterson, P.F.

    1996-06-04

    We have performed a series of 1-D numerical simulations of the x-ray emission from National Ignition Facility (NIF) targets. Results are presented in terms of total x-ray energy, pulse length, and spectrum. Scaling of x-ray emissions is presented for variations in both target yield and hohlraum thickness. Experiments conducted on the Nova facility provide some validation of the computational tools and methods.

  20. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hang; Kuang, Longyu; Jiang, Shaoen Ding, Yongkun; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-15

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2–5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  1. Recent progress in metal-lined cylindrical as efficient x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primout, M.; Jacquet, L.; Babonneau, D.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Naudy, M.; Stemmler, Ph; Ulmer, J. L.

    2008-05-01

    Feasability of efficient X-ray sources for LMJ (LaserMégaJoule) targets radiography in the multi-keV/ns regime was demonstrated on OMEGA laser facility (University of Rochester) from 2002 to 2004 [1][2][3]. We significantly enhanced the conversion efficiency of titanium, copper and germanium foils using an optimized prepulse/pulse combination [4]. Since higher X-ray energy and therefore high electronic temperature require more confinement, we built and successfully tested in 2005, plastic cylindrical hohlraums internally coated with titanium in various OMEGA beam configurations, pulse types (with and without prepulse) and target designs. The conversion efficiency (CE), depends on hohlraum length and diameter and the highest CE was measured above 17%, which is better than any other x-ray sources in this photon energy range (i.e. 4.7 keV). The best experimental setup was a 2-cone irradiation scheme without prepulse i.e. the simplest and the most economic configuration in view of radiographic purposes. These studies were carried on in february 2007 with Ge-lined hohlraums and Ti-lined halfraums. We describe and show comparisons between experimental results (time integrated and resolved x-ray imaging, pinholes and x-ray diode) with 2D hydrorad simulations.

  2. Theoretical study of symmetry of flux onto a capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Hao; Wu, Changshu; Zou, Shiyang; Pei, Wenbing

    2015-09-15

    An analytic model to describe the flux asymmetry onto a capsule based on the viewfactor approximation is developed and verified with numerical simulations. By using a nested spheres technique to represent the various sources of flux asymmetry, the model can treat spherically and cylindrically symmetric hohlraums, e.g., cylinder, elliptic, and rugby. This approach includes the more realistic case of frequency-dependent flux asymmetry compared with the more standard frequency-integrated or single-frequency approaches [D. W. Phillion and S. M. Pollaine, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2963 (1994)]. Correspondingly, the approach can be used to assess x-ray preheat asymmetry generated from localized laser absorption in the high-Z hohlraum wall. For spherical hohlraums with 4, 6, or 8 laser entrance holes (LEHs), an optimal configuration of LEHs, laser spot placement, and angle-of-incidence of the single-ringed laser beams is defined. An analogy between minimizing the flux asymmetry onto a capsule and the Thomson problem of point charge placement on a sphere for minimized energy is shown.

  3. Experimental evaluation of the x-ray preheat of fast-ignition cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Town, R. P. J.; May, M. J.; Robey, H. F.; Clark, D. S.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Amendt, P. A.; Key, M. H.; Patel, P. K.; Storm, E.; Tabak, M.

    2008-11-01

    In planned fast-ignition implosions, a gold cone will be inserted into the capsule to allow a short-pulse laser to directly irradiate the compressed fuel without having to propagate through the ablated shell plasma [M. Tabak et al., Fus. Science and Technol., 49, 254 (2006)]. For the case of indirect-drive implosions, L-band line emission from the gold hohlraum wall (8˜13 keV) can penetrate though the shell and heat the outer 2-6 μm of the cone, causing the gold to expand and mix with the fuel. Since mixing of high-Z material with the fuel reduces the margin for achieving ignition, it is important to quantify the L-shell emission from Au hohlraums and to evaluate the effects on the Au cone. We measured the absolute x-ray flux from thin-wall (5 μm thick) gold hohlraums at the OMEGA laser facility, and we have observed the expansion of a surrogate gold surface with time-gated radiography. Results from these experiments will be discussed.

  4. The velocity campaign for ignition on NIFa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Robey, H. F.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Suter, L. J.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Edwards, M. J.; MacGowan, B. J.; Lindl, J. D.; Atherton, L. J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Olson, R. E.; Edgell, D.; Regan, S. P.; Nikroo, A.; Wilkins, H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Moore, A. S.

    2012-05-01

    Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 ± 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 ± 5 μm/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 ± 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our "first pass" tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

  5. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  6. Laser/x-ray coupling in the first NIF beryllium implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, D. C.; Kline, J. L.; Yi, S. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Olson, R. E.; Kyrala, G. A.; Perry, T. S.; Batha, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Jones, O.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Macphee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Schneider, M. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The x-ray flux driving a capsule is currently overestimated in standard Hydra high-flux model (Rosen et al., HEDP 7,180 (2011)) calculations of gas-filled hohlraums. Jones et al. (Phys. Plasmas,19,056315 (2012)) introduced time dependent multipliers to reduce the laser drive and achieve an appropriate radiation drive on NIF capsules. Using shock velocities from VISAR capsule experiments, symmetry capsule implosion times with truncated laser pulses, and time dependent DANTE X-ray flux measurements from 1D and 2D convergent ablator implosions, we derived a set of time dependent flux multipliers for the first NIF cryogenically layered beryllium capsule implosion. The similarity between these multipliers for both plastic and beryllium capsules suggests that they are primarily correcting for improper modeling of the hohlraum physics, with possibly some residual contribution from capsule modeling deficiencies. Using Lasnex we have adjusted hohlraum physics and resolution in an attempt to model these implosions without drive multipliers. This work was funded by the US Department of Energy.

  7. Radiation Transport through cylindrical foams with heated walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; MacLaren, Steve; Kallman, Joshua; Heinz, Ken; Hsing, Warren

    2012-10-01

    Radiation transport through low density SiO2 foams has been experimentally studied on the Omega laser. In particular these experiments examined the effects on radiation transport when the boundaries of the SiO2 foam are heated such that energy loss to the boundaries is minimized. The initial density of the SiO2 foams was determined by taking an x-ray radiograph of the foams using a monochromatic Henke source at multiple x-ray energies. The radiation drive used to both study the transport in the SiO2 foam as well as to heat the higher density CRF wall was generated in a laser-heated gold hohlraum using ˜7.5 kJ of the laser energy. The time-dependent spatial profile of the heat wave breaking out of the SiO2 foam was detected with an x-ray streak camera coupled with a soft x-ray transmission grating. The Omega DANTE diagnostic measured the radiation drive in the hohlraum and the Omega VISAR diagnostic monitored the spatial temperature gradient in the foam section of the hohlraum.

  8. Using radiation temperature to monitor plasma drive in materials strength experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Laura Robin; Moore, A. S.; Park, H.-S.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Huntington, C. M.; McNaney, J. M.; Smith, R.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Remington, B. A.; Arsenlis, A.

    2015-11-01

    Materials strength experiments at the National Ignition Facility generate smooth loading in a material by the plasma drive of a shocked reservoir mounted on the side of a gold hohlraum. In these experiments, the loading profile of plasma unloading across a gap and then stagnating at the target is measured with VISAR. Geometric limitations preclude simultaneous measurement of VISAR and the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth that is used to determine strength. We use hohlraum radiation temperatures measured with the Dante spectrometer to link the drive measured with VISAR to the stress condition when RT growth is measured. By combining Dante measurements from two different lines of sight with view factor calculations, we infer the radiation drive into the reservoir. With this method, we can account for spatial variations within the hohlraum and also reproduce observed variations due to changes in pointing and target orientation. We describe the simplified, physics-based analysis of Dante spectra and the methods of determining radiation drive to the reservoir. We then discuss the effectiveness of this method for inferring drive at the target material. This work was performed under the auspices of the Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, (LLNS) under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-674966.

  9. Hard X-ray Imaging for Measuring Laser Absorption Spatial Profiles on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Jones, O S; Landen, O L; Suter, L; Amendt, P; Turner, R E; Regan, S

    2006-04-25

    Hard x-ray (''Thin wall'') imaging will be employed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to spatially locate laser beam energy deposition regions on the hohlraum walls in indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments, relevant for ICF symmetry tuning. Based on time resolved imaging of the hard x-ray emission of the laser spots, this method will be used to infer hohlraum wall motion due to x-ray and laser ablation and any beam refraction caused by plasma density gradients. In optimizing this measurement, issues that have to be addressed are hard x-ray visibility during the entire ignition laser pulse with intensities ranging from 10{sup 13} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, as well as simultaneous visibility of the inner and the outer laser drive cones. In this work we will compare the hard x-ray emission calculated by LASNEX and analytical modeling with thin wall imaging data recorded previously on Omega and during the first hohlraum experiments on NIF. Based on these calculations and comparisons the thin wall imaging will be optimized for ICF/NIF experiments.

  10. Preconceptual design requirements for the X-1 Advanced Radiation Source

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, G.E.; Hands, J.A.; Raglin, P.S.; Ramirez, J.J.; Goldstein, S.A.; Cereghino, S.J.; MacLeod, G.

    1998-09-01

    The X-1 Advanced Radiation Source represents the next step in providing the US Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program with the high-energy, large volume, laboratory x-ray source for the Radiation Effects Science and Simulation, Inertial Confinement Fusion, and Weapon Physics Programs. Advances in fast pulsed power technology and in z-pinch hohlraums on Sandia National Laboratories` Z Accelerator provide sufficient basis for pursuing the development of X-1. The X-1 plan follows a strategy based on scaling the 2 MJ x-ray output on Z via a 3-fold increase in z-pinch load current. The large volume (>5 cm{sup 3}), high temperature (>150 eV), temporally long (>10 ns) hohlraums are unique outside of underground nuclear weapon testing. Analytical scaling arguments and hydrodynamic simulations indicate that these hohlraums at temperatures of 230--300 eV will ignite thermonuclear fuel and drive the reaction to a yield of 200 to 1,000 MJ in the laboratory. X-1 will provide the high-fidelity experimental capability to certify the survivability and performance of non-nuclear weapon components in hostile radiation environments. Non-ignition sources will provide cold x-ray environments (<15 keV), and high yield fusion burn sources will provide high fidelity warm x-ray environments (15 keV--80 keV).

  11. LLE Review 117 (October-December 2008)

    SciTech Connect

    Bittle, W., editor

    2009-05-28

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October-December 2008, features 'Demonstration of the Shock-Timing Technique for Ignition Targets at the National Ignition Facility' by T. R. Boehly, V. N. Goncharov, S. X. Hu, J. A. Marozas, T. C. Sangster, D. D. Meyerhofer (LLE), D. Munro, P. M. Celliers, D. G. Hicks, G. W. Collins, H. F. Robey, O. L. Landen (LLNL), and R. E. Olson (SNL). In this article (p. 1) the authors report on a technique to measure the velocity and timing of shock waves in a capsule contained within hohlraum targets. This technique is critical for optimizing the drive profiles for high-performance inertial-confinement-fusion capsules, which are compressed by multiple precisely timed shock waves. The shock-timing technique was demonstrated on OMEGA using surrogate hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV and fitted with a re-entrant cone and quartz window to facilitate velocity measurements using velocity interferometry. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were also used to validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, thereby optimizing these critical parameters.

  12. Update on design simulations for NIF ignition targets, and the rollup of all specifications into an error budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haan, S. W.; Herrmann, M. C.; Salmonson, J. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Pollaine, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Suter, L. J.

    2007-08-01

    Targets intended to produce ignition on NIF are being simulated and the simulations are used to set specifications for target fabrication and other program elements. Recent design work has focused on designs that assume only 1.0 MJ of laser energy instead of the previous 1.6 MJ. To perform with less laser energy, the hohlraum has been redesigned to be more efficient than previously, and the capsules are slightly smaller. Three hohlraum designs are being examined: gas fill, SiO2 foam fill, and SiO2 lined. All have a cocktail wall, and shields mounted between the capsule and the laser entrance holes. Two capsule designs are being considered. One has a graded doped Be(Cu) ablator, and the other graded doped CH(Ge). Both can perform acceptably with recently demonstrated ice layer quality, and with recently demonstrated outer surface roughness. Complete tables of specifications are being prepared for both targets, to be completed this fiscal year. All the specifications are being rolled together into an error budget indicating adequate margin for ignition with the new designs. The dominant source of error is hohlraum asymmetry at intermediate modes 4 8, indicating the importance of experimental techniques to measure and control this asymmetry.

  13. Update on Thermal and Hydrodynamic Simulations on LMJ Cryogenic Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Moll, G.; Charton, S.

    2004-03-15

    The temperature of the cryogenic target inside the hohlraum has been studied with a computational fluid dynamics code (FLUENT). Specific models have been developed and used for both thermal and hydrodynamic calculations.With thermal calculations only, we first have found the optimum heat flux required to counteract the effect of the laser entrance windows. This heat flux is centered on the hohlraum wall along the axis of revolution. With this heat flux, the temperature surface profiles of the capsule and the DT ice layer have been significantly reduced. Second, the sensitivity of the target temperature profiles (capsule and DT layer) relatively to capsule displacement has been determined. Thirdly, the effect of the shield extraction (shield surrounding the cryogenic structure) has been studied and has indicated that the target lifetime before the laser shot is less than 1s. Meanwhile, with hydrodynamic simulations, we have investigated the surface temperature profiles alteration due to He and H{sub 2} mixture convection within the hohlraum.In order to find out the variations between different configurations, results of these studies are given with seven significant digit outputs. Those results only indicate a trend because of the material's properties incertitude and the code approximation.

  14. Determining Point of Structural Failure of a Foil Liner Under High Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Hannah; Bell, Emma; Duggan, Robbert; Lambert, Nathan; Liang, Daniel; Ransohoff, Lauren; Tabak, Grigoriy; Gourdain, Pierre; Potter, William; Greenly, John

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the path to nuclear fusion relies on indirect drive, where the fuel capsule is irradiated by x-rays produced by a MJ laser heating the wall of a hohlraum. However laser plasma interactions prevent optimal focusing and the quality of the implosion may suffer from it. One way to mitigate this issue is to impose an external magnetic field on the hohlraum, reducing plasma outflows thereby limiting plasma-laser interaction. While the optimal magnetic field strength is still under debate, one major issue is the effect of the field on hohlraum integrity. Our goal is to study the effect of large magnetic fields (>100 T) on a thin aluminum liner (thickness 10 microns) and identify the maximum magnetic field (<150 T) where the liner maintains its structural integrity. In past COBRA experiments using a coaxial coil design, we were able to consistently produce magnetic fields above 150 T. We will use this setup coupled with the liner and use a B-dot probe to measure the field penetration inside of the liner. From laser interferometry and XUV measurements we will also be able to observe how the liner reacts to the different magnetic field strengths.

  15. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhichao; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Huang, Tianxuan; Zheng, Jian; Yang, Jiamin; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhao, Xuefeng; Du, Huabin; Song, Tianming; Yi, Rongqing; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2010-07-01

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector. PMID:20687719

  16. Theoretical study of symmetry of flux onto a capsule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hao; Wu, Changshu; Pei, Wenbing; Zou, Shiyang

    2015-09-01

    An analytic model to describe the flux asymmetry onto a capsule based on the viewfactor approximation is developed and verified with numerical simulations. By using a nested spheres technique to represent the various sources of flux asymmetry, the model can treat spherically and cylindrically symmetric hohlraums, e.g., cylinder, elliptic, and rugby. This approach includes the more realistic case of frequency-dependent flux asymmetry compared with the more standard frequency-integrated or single-frequency approaches [D. W. Phillion and S. M. Pollaine, Phys. Plasmas 1, 2963 (1994)]. Correspondingly, the approach can be used to assess x-ray preheat asymmetry generated from localized laser absorption in the high-Z hohlraum wall. For spherical hohlraums with 4, 6, or 8 laser entrance holes (LEHs), an optimal configuration of LEHs, laser spot placement, and angle-of-incidence of the single-ringed laser beams is defined. An analogy between minimizing the flux asymmetry onto a capsule and the Thomson problem of point charge placement on a sphere for minimized energy is shown.

  17. Observation of hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated plasma in a small hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hang; Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo; Lin, Zhiwei; Zheng, Jianhua; Kuang, Longyu; Zhang, Haiying; Yu, Ruizhen; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin; Zheng, Jian

    2015-07-01

    In the hohlraum used in laser indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments, hydrodynamic processes of radiation-ablated high-Z plasma have a great effect on laser injection efficiency, radiation uniformity, and diagnosis of hohlraum radiation field from diagnostic windows (DW). To study plasma filling in the DWs, a laser-irradiated Ti disk was used to generate 2-5 keV narrow energy band X-ray as the intense backlighter source, and laser-produced X-ray in a hohlraum with low-Z foam tamper was used to heat a small hole surrounded by gold wall with 150 μm in diameter and 100 μm deep. The hydrodynamic movement of the gold plasma in the small hole was measured by an X-ray framing camera and the results are analyzed. Quantitative measurement of the plasma areal density distribution and evolution in the small hole can be used to assess the effect of plasma filling on the diagnosis from the DWs.

  18. Re-examining our inhibitions: A speculative re-analysis of data from gold spheres illuminated by the URLLE Omega laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Mordecai; Ross, Steven; Thomas, Cliff

    2015-11-01

    A 2006 campaign, that illuminated 1 mm diameter gold spheres using the Omega laser at LLE, required the simulations to use a ``liberal'' flux limiter of f =0.15 (or equivalently a non-local model) in order to match the high levels of measured x-ray emission. In 2013, Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnosed the plasma conditions in the Au sphere's laser heated corona at various radial positions as a function of time. The simulation model using non-local transport compared well for some of the TS data (for ZTe) but not for all of it. Meanwhile, using this model for hohlraums, led to discrepancies with data (such as drive) when applied to some hohlraums, though less-so for others. As a result, hohlraum models with a more restrictive flux limiter, including a ``two-stream-instability (TSI)'' flux limit model (which, when operative, is effectively f =0.015) are being considered. Here we invoke the possibility that the same ion acoustic turbulence (an outgrowth of the TSI), which acts like an effective scatterer to inhibit electron transport, can, by the same token, also increase absorption. This increase in absorption, applied (speculatively) close by the critical surface, can begin to match the Au sphere x-ray emission, as well as a preponderance of the ZTe data. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic for National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E.L.; Campbell, K.M.; Turner, R.E.; Holder, J.P.; Landen, O.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Landon, M.; Rhodes, M.; Lee, D.

    2004-10-01

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for measuring the total x-ray flux, radiation temperature, conversion efficiency, and albedo that define the energetics in indirect and direct drive, as well as other types of high temperature laser plasma experiments. A key diagnostic for absolute radiation flux and radiation temperature in hohlraum experiments is the Dante broadband soft x-ray spectrometer. For the extended range of x-ray fluxes predicted for National Ignition Facility (NIF) compared to Omega or Nova hohlraums, the Dante spectrometer for NIF will include more high energy (<2 keV) edge filter band-pass channels and access to an increased dynamic range using grids and signal division. This will allow measurements of radiation fluxes of between 0.01 to 100 TW/sr, for hohlraum radiation temperatures between 50 eV and 1 keV. The NIF Dante will include a central four-channel imaging line-of-sight to verify the source size, alignment as well as checking for any radiation contributions from unconverted laser light plasmas.

  20. A novel flat-response x-ray detector in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhichao; Guo Liang; Jiang Xiaohua; Liu Shenye; Huang Tianxuan; Yang Jiamin; Li Sanwei; Zhao Xuefeng; Du Huabin; Song Tianming; Yi Rongqing; Liu Yonggang; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun; Zheng Jian

    2010-07-15

    A novel flat-response x-ray detector has been developed for the measurement of radiation flux from a hohlraum. In order to obtain a flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, it is found that both the cathode and the filter of the detector can be made of gold. A further improvement on the compound filter can then largely relax the requirement of the calibration x-ray beam. The calibration of the detector, which is carried out on Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility at Institute of High Energy Physics, shows that the detector has a desired flat response in the photon energy range of 0.1-4 keV, with a response flatness smaller than 13%. The detector has been successfully applied in the hohlraum experiment on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. The radiation temperatures inferred from the detector agree well with those from the diagnostic instrument Dante installed at the same azimuth angle from the hohlraum axis, demonstrating the feasibility of the detector.

  1. Asymmetrically driven implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughan, K.; McAlpin, S.; Foster, J. M.; Stevenson, R. M.; Glendinning, S. G.; Sorce, C.

    2010-05-15

    Techniques to achieve uniform near-spherical symmetry of radiation drive on a capsule in a laser-heated hohlraum have received detailed attention in the context of inertial confinement fusion. However, much less attention has been paid to the understanding of the hohlraum physics in cases where the radiation drive departs significantly from spherical symmetry. A series of experiments has been carried out to study the implosion dynamics of a capsule irradiated by a deliberately asymmetric x-ray drive. The experimental data provide a sensitive test of radiation transport in hohlraums in which drive symmetry is modulated by asymmetric laser beam timing and the use of wall materials of different albedos. Data from foam ball and thin-shell capsule experiments are presented together with modeling using consecutively linked Lagrangian and Eulerian calculational schemes. The thin-shell capsules exhibit much stronger sensitivity to early-time asymmetry than do the foam balls, and this sensitivity results in the formation of a well-defined polar jet. These data are shown to challenge computational modeling in this highly asymmetric convergent regime. All of the experiments detailed were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester, NY.

  2. A clean radiation environment for opacity measurements of radiatively heated material

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Yan; Zhang Jinyan; Yang Jiamin; Pei Wenbing; Ding Yongkun; Lai Donxian; Men Guangwei; Luo Zheng

    2007-05-15

    A clean x-ray radiation environment is essential for detailed measurements of the opacity of high-temperature radiatively heated material. A lot of laser energy is usually needed to heat a large hohlraum to produce such a clean x-ray radiation environment. A type of target is proposed that uses low-density, low-Z foam to provide a passage to radiation while isolating the sample from the disturbance from laser produced, high-temperature, high-Z plasma and heating by reflected laser light. With a smaller hohlraum, less laser energy is needed to produce high-temperature x-ray radiation for sample heating. Experiments have been done to check the proposal. The recorded clean Al self-emission spectra proved there was no gold plasma in the view-way to disturb the measurement. This type of hohlraum can provide a high-quality work-table for opacity measurement even in a relatively small laser facility.

  3. NIF target area design support. Final summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Tokheim, R.E.; Seaman, L.; Curran, D.R.

    1996-02-01

    SRI International continued support work for the National Ignition Facility, Chamber Dynamics Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The work entailed computational modeling of shrapnel and debris generation from copper shine shields, hohlraum, and stainless steel cryogenic support tubes for 1.8 MJ and 1.0 MJ no-yield and 20 MJ yield shots. Also, the authors addressed the effects of shrapnel at the first wall. Computations for 1.8 MJ showed an ionized gold hohlraum, but about half solid and half ionized copper shine shields, when material cell phase boundaries were maintained. This debris generation represents a potential threat to the first wall and debris shields. Further work is required to translate these results into particle size distributions based on computed strain rates. The authors used simple algorithms for x-ray loading of frost layers protecting the target support to compute peak stress attenuation. They developed algorithmic formulas for predicting damage in candidate first wall materials and they found damage algorithms for fused-silica debris shield material. They obtained very preliminary computational results at 20 MJ for predicting shrapnel mass and particle density at the first wall in spherical polar coordinate space with the hohlraum axis as the polar direction.

  4. Asymmetrically driven implosionsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, K.; McAlpin, S.; Foster, J. M.; Stevenson, R. M.; Glendinning, S. G.; Sorce, C.

    2010-05-01

    Techniques to achieve uniform near-spherical symmetry of radiation drive on a capsule in a laser-heated hohlraum have received detailed attention in the context of inertial confinement fusion. However, much less attention has been paid to the understanding of the hohlraum physics in cases where the radiation drive departs significantly from spherical symmetry. A series of experiments has been carried out to study the implosion dynamics of a capsule irradiated by a deliberately asymmetric x-ray drive. The experimental data provide a sensitive test of radiation transport in hohlraums in which drive symmetry is modulated by asymmetric laser beam timing and the use of wall materials of different albedos. Data from foam ball and thin-shell capsule experiments are presented together with modeling using consecutively linked Lagrangian and Eulerian calculational schemes. The thin-shell capsules exhibit much stronger sensitivity to early-time asymmetry than do the foam balls, and this sensitivity results in the formation of a well-defined polar jet. These data are shown to challenge computational modeling in this highly asymmetric convergent regime. All of the experiments detailed were carried out at the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester, NY.

  5. Tuning indirect-drive implosions using cone power balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyrala, G. A.; Seifter, A.; Kline, J. L.; Goldman, S. R.; Batha, S. H.; Hoffman, N. M.

    2011-07-01

    We demonstrate indirect-drive implosion symmetry tuning in a vacuum hohlraum 6.6 mm in length and 3.56 mm in diameter with a CH capsule 6.38 μm in thickness and 1414 μm in diameter, scaled roughly 0.7 × from a National ignition facility (NIF) [E. Moses and C. R. Wuest, Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 314 (2005)] The hohlraums have radiation drives of 117 ± 4 eV relevant to conditions for the first ˜1 ns of ignition experiments. By varying the relative ratio of the energy between inner and outer beam cones illuminating the hohlraum at OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. the shape of the x-ray self-emission, and hence the shape of the emitting object, can be tuned from prolate to oblate. The second-order Legendre coefficient, used to characterize the shape, changes from a negative to a positive value at the time of peak x-ray emission during the implosion through the variation of the cone power balance. With the appropriate selection of the cone power balance, the implosion can be tuned to produce a spherical implosion. Using capsules with thicker walls, this technique can be extended to measure the drive symmetry at later times as the length of the drive pulse is increased [N. M. Hoffman et al., J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 112, 022075 (2008); N. M. Hoffman et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2022 (1996)].

  6. X-ray energy flow and radiography measurements of evolving density perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, A. S.; Graham, P.; Taylor, M. J.; Foster, J. M.; Sorce, C.; Reighard, A.; MacLaren, S.; Young, P.; Glendinning, G.; Blue, B. E.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.

    2008-11-01

    X-radiation transport through plasma density gradients, such as N-waves, form a closely coupled system that is challenging to simulate. Such situations are a key component of the physics of laser-heated hohlraums occurring in the laser-heated cavity and also in the laser-entry and any diagnostic holes. In addition the similarity to some astrophysical conditions may mean that such experiments can be used as a laboratory-scale analogue for their investigation. To better understand these phenomena, we present results from a series of experiments performed at the Omega laser facility. Using a laser-heated hohlraum drive, a tantalum aerogel with an initial seed perturbation is heated, and x-rays initially free-stream through the perturbation before they fill with plasma and radiation transport becomes diffuse. We present energy flux measurements diagnosed using two different methods, and complementary radiography results that achieve sufficient contrast, despite the high background of the hohlraum, to enable the complex shock interactions and stagnation to be directly observed. These results are compared with simulations performed using a 2-D Eulerian hydrocode, which are able to reproduce the overall energetics, and much of the details of the deceleration shock and axial stagnation region at the centre of the slit.

  7. To acquire more detailed radiation drive by use of ``quasi-steady'' approximation in atomic kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guoli; Pei, Wenbing; Lan, Ke; Gu, Peijun; Li, Xin

    2012-10-01

    In current routine 2D simulation of hohlraum physics, we adopt the principal-quantum- number(n-level) average atom model(AAM) in NLTE plasma description. However, the detailed experimental frequency-dependant radiative drive differs from our n-level simulated drive, which reminds us the need of a more detailed atomic kinetics description. The orbital-quantum- number(nl-level) average atom model is a natural consideration, however the nl-level in-line calculation needs much more computational resource. By distinguishing the rapid bound-bound atomic processes from the relative slow bound-free atomic processes, we found a method to build up a more detailed bound electron distribution(nl-level even nlm-level) using in-line n-level calculated plasma conditions(temperature, density, and average ionization degree). We name this method ``quasi-steady approximation'' in atomic kinetics. Using this method, we re-build the nl-level bound electron distribution (Pnl), and acquire a new hohlraum radiative drive by post-processing. Comparison with the n-level post-processed hohlraum drive shows that we get an almost identical radiation flux but with more fine frequency-denpending spectrum structure which appears only in nl-level transition with same n number(n=0) .

  8. Indirect-Drive Noncryogenic Double-Shell Ignition Targets for the National Ignition Facility: Design and Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P.; Colvin, J.; Tipton, R.E.; Hinkel, D.; Edwards, J.J.; Landen, O.I.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Watt, W.G.

    2001-10-15

    The central goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is demonstration of controlled thermonuclear ignition. The mainline ignition target is a low-Z, single-shell cryogenic capsule designed to have weakly nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor growth of surface perturbations. Double-shell targets are an alternative design concept that avoids the complexity of cryogenic preparation but has greater physics uncertainties associated with performance-degrading mix. A typical double-shell design involves a high-Z inner capsule filled with DT gas and supported within a low-Z ablator shell. The largest source of uncertainty for this target is the degree of highly evolved nonlinear mix on the inner surface of the high-Z shell. High Atwood numbers and feed-through of strong outer surface perturbation growth to the inner surface promote high levels of instability. The main challenge of the double-shell target designs is controlling the resulting nonlinear mix to levels that allow ignition to occur. Design and analysis of a suite of indirect-drive NIF double-shell targets with hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV and 250 eV are presented. Analysis of these targets includes assessment of two-dimensional radiation asymmetry as well as nonlinear mix. Two-dimensional integrated hohlraum simulations indicate that the x-ray illumination can be adjusted to provide adequate symmetry control in hohlraums specially designed to have high laser-coupling efficiency [Suter et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2092 (2000)]. These simulations also reveal the need to diagnose and control localized 10-15 keV x-ray emission from the high-Z hohlraum wall because of strong absorption by the high-Z inner shell. Preliminary estimates of the degree of laser backscatter from an assortment of laser-plasma interactions suggest comparatively benign hohlraum conditions. Application of a variety of nonlinear mix models and phenomenological tools, including buoyancy-drag models, multimode simulations and fall-line optimization

  9. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R L

    2011-10-17

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger

  10. A1.5 Fusion Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P

    2011-03-31

    Analysis and radiation hydrodynamics simulations for expected high-gain fusion target performance on a demonstration 1-GWe Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) power plant in the mid-2030s timeframe are presented. The required laser energy driver is 2.2 MJ at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength, and a fusion target gain greater than 60 at a repetition rate of 16 Hz is the design goal for economic and commercial attractiveness. A scaling-law analysis is developed to benchmark the design parameter space for hohlraum-driven central hot-spot ignition. A suite of integrated hohlraum simulations is presented to test the modeling assumptions and provide a basis for a near-term experimental resolution of the key physics uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF is poised to demonstrate ignition by 2012 based on the central hot spot (CHS) mode of ignition and propagating thermonuclear burn [1]. This immediate prospect underscores the imperative and timeliness of advancing inertial fusion as a carbon-free, virtually limitless source of energy by the mid-21st century to substantially offset fossil fuel technologies. To this end, an intensive effort is underway to leverage success at the NIF and to provide the foundations for a prototype 'LIFE.1' engineering test facility by {approx}2025, followed by a commercially viable 'LIFE.2' demonstration power plant operating at 1 GWe by {approx}2035. The current design goal for LIFE.2 is to accommodate {approx}2.2 MJ of laser energy (entering the high-Z radiation enclosure or 'hohlraum') at a 0.351-{micro}m wavelength operating at a repetition rate of 16 Hz and to provide a fusion target yield of 132 MJ. To achieve this design goal first requires a '0-d' analytic gain model that allows convenient exploration of parameter space and target optimization. This step is then followed by 2- and 3-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics simulations that incorporate laser beam transport, x-ray radiation transport, atomic physics, and

  11. 0.351 micron Laser Beam propagation in High-temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D; Divol, L; Meezan, N; Ross, J; Berger, R L; Michel, P; Dixit, S; Rekow, V; Sorce, C; Moody, J D; Neumayer, P; Pollock, B; Wallace, R; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-12-10

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (T{sub e} = 3.5 keV), dense (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20}cm{sup -3}), long-scale length (L {approx} 2 mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I < 2 x 10{sup 15} W-cm{sup -2}. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2 keV to 3.5 keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. A plasma length scaling is also investigated extending our measurements to 4-mm long high-temperature plasmas. At intensities I < 5 x 10{sup 14} W-cm{sup -2}, greater than 80% of the energy in the laser is transmitted through a 5-mm long, high-temperature (T{sub e} > 2.5 keV) high-density (n{sub e} = 5 x 10{sup 20} w-cm{sup -3}) plasma. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (n{sub e} = 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are

  12. The feed-out process: Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in thin, laser-driven foils

    SciTech Connect

    Smitherman, D.P.

    1998-04-01

    Eight beams carrying a shaped pulse from the NOVA laser were focused into a hohlraum with a total energy of about 25 kJ. A planar foil was placed on the side of the hohlraum with perturbations facing away from the hohlraum. All perturbations were 4 {micro}m in amplitude and 50 {micro}m in wavelength. Three foils of pure aluminum were shot with thicknesses and pulse lengths respectively of 86 {micro}m and 2. 2 ns, 50 {micro}m and 4.5 ns, and 35 {micro}m with both 2.2 ns and 4. 5 ns pulses. Two composite foils constructed respectively of 32 and 84 {micro}m aluminum on the ablative side and 10 {micro}m beryllium on the cold surface were also shot using the 2.2 ns pulse. X-ray framing cameras recorded perturbation growth using both face- and side-on radiography. The LASNEX code was used to model the experiments. A shock wave interacted with the perturbation on the cold surface generating growth from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability and a strong acoustic mode. The cold surface perturbation fed-out to the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable ablation surface, both by differential acceleration and interface coupling, where it grew. A density jump did not appear to have a large effect on feed-out from interface coupling. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability`s vortex pairs overtook and reversed the direction of flow of the Richtmyer-Meshkov vortices, resulting in the foil moving from a sinuous to a bubble and spike configuration. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability may have acted as an ablative instability on the hot surface, and as a classical instability on the cold surface, on which grew second and third order harmonics.

  13. Three-dimensional simulations of low foot and high foot implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.; Kritcher, A. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hurricane, O. A.; Jones, O. S.; Marinak, M. M.; Patel, P. K.; Robey, H. F.; Sepke, S. M.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to achieve the several hundred Gbar stagnation pressures necessary for inertial confinement fusion ignition, implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] require the compression of deuterium-tritium fuel layers by a convergence ratio as high as forty. Such high convergence implosions are subject to degradation by a range of perturbations, including the growth of small-scale defects due to hydrodynamic instabilities, as well as longer scale modulations due to radiation flux asymmetries in the enclosing hohlraum. Due to the broad range of scales involved, and also the genuinely three-dimensional (3D) character of the flow, accurately modeling NIF implosions remains at the edge of current simulation capabilities. This paper describes the current state of progress of 3D capsule-only simulations of NIF implosions aimed at accurately describing the performance of specific NIF experiments. Current simulations include the effects of hohlraum radiation asymmetries, capsule surface defects, the capsule support tent and fill tube, and use a grid resolution shown to be converged in companion two-dimensional simulations. The results of detailed simulations of low foot implosions from the National Ignition Campaign are contrasted against results for more recent high foot implosions. While the simulations suggest that low foot performance was dominated by ablation front instability growth, especially the defect seeded by the capsule support tent, high foot implosions appear to be dominated by hohlraum flux asymmetries, although the support tent still plays a significant role. For both implosion types, the simulations show reasonable, though not perfect, agreement with the data and suggest that a reliable predictive capability is developing to guide future implosions toward ignition.

  14. Progress in Target Physics and Design for Heavy Ion Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan-Miller, Debra

    1999-11-01

    Two-dimensional, integrated calculations of a close-coupled version of the distributed radiator, heavy ion target predict gain 130 from 3.3 MJ of beam energy. To achieve these results, the case-to-capsule ratio was decreased by about 25% from our previous targets.(M. Tabak, D. Callahan-Miller, Phys. Plasmas, 5, 1895 (1998).) The smaller hohlraum results in smaller beam spots than had been previously assumed; this puts renewed emphasis on controlling emittance growth in the accelerator and on space-charge neutralization in the reactor chamber. These targets are robust--changes in ion range and ion stopping model can be accommodated by changes in the target. Single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor growth rates for this capsule are smaller than those for at least one NIF design. As a result, stability issues for the heavy ion capsule can be settled on NIF. The close-coupled target also opens up the possibility of a high gain Engineering Test Facility from a 1.5-2 MJ driver; calculations predict that gain 90 is achievable from 1.75 MJ of beam energy. Gain curves, used for optimizing the system of accelerator, final focus, chamber transport, and target, are in good agreement with the two-dimensional calculations for both the ``conventional'' and close-coupled case-to-capsule ratio. Finally, we will discuss the choice of hohlraum wall material which must satisfy constraints from target physics (high opacity/low heat capacity to minimize the amount of energy in the hohlraum wall), environment and safety (low activation for recycling and waste disposal), chamber design (recovery of the material from the chamber), and target fabrication (need to produce many low cost targets per day).

  15. Review of Inertial Confinement Fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haines, M. G.

    The physics of inertial confinement fusion is reviewed. The trend to short-wavelength lasers is argued, and the distinction between direct and indirect (soft X-ray) drive is made. Key present issues include the non-linear growth of Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities, the seeding of this instability by the initial laser imprint, the relevance of self-generated magnetic fields, and the importance of parametric instabilities (stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering) in gas-filled hohlraums. Experiments are reviewed which explore the R-T instability in both planar and converging geometry. The employment of various optical smoothing techniques is contrasted with the overcoating of the capsule by gold coated plastic foams to reduce considerably the imprint problem. The role of spontaneously generated magnetic fields in non-symmetric plasmas is discussed. Recent hohlraum compression results are presented together with gas bag targets which replicate the long-scale-length low density plasmas expected in NIF gas filled hohlraums. The onset of first Brillouin and then Raman scattering is observed. The fast ignitor scheme is a proposal to use an intense short pulse laser to drill a hole through the coronal plasma and then, with laser excited fast electrons, create a propagating thermonuclear spark in a dense, relatively cold laser-compressed target. Some preliminary results of laser hole drilling and 2-D and 3-D PIC simulations of this and the > 10^8 Gauss self-generated magnetic fields are presented. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) is described.

  16. Measurements of Relativistic Effects in Collective Thomson Scattering at Electron Temperatures less than 1 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, James Steven

    2010-01-01

    Simultaneous scattering from electron-plasma waves and ion-acoustic waves is used to measure local laser-produced plasma parameters with high spatiotemporal resolution including electron temperature and density, average charge state, plasma flow velocity, and ion temperature. In addition, the first measurements of relativistic modifications in the collective Thomson scattering spectrum from thermal electron-plasma fluctuations are presented [1]. Due to the high phase velocity of electron-plasma fluctuations, relativistic effects are important even at low electron temperatures (Te < 1 keV). These effects have been observed experimentally and agree well with a relativistic treatment of the Thomson scattering form factor [2]. The results are important for the interpretation of scattering measurements from laser produced plasmas. Thomson scattering measurements are used to characterize the hydrodynamics of a gas jet plasma which is the foundation for a broad series of laser-plasma interaction studies [3, 4, 5, 6]. The temporal evolution of the electron temperature, density and ion temperature are measured. The measured electron density evolution shows excellent agreement with a simple adiabatic expansion model. The effects of high temperatures on coupling to hohlraum targets is discussed [7]. A peak electron temperature of 12 keV at a density of 4.7 × 1020cm-3 are measured 200 μm outside the laser entrance hole using a two-color Thomson scattering method we developed in gas jet plasmas [8]. These measurements are used to assess laser-plasma interactions that reduce laser hohlraum coupling and can significantly reduce the hohlraum radiation temperature.

  17. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D.; Datte, P.; Krauter, K.; Bond, E.; Michel, P. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Divol, L.; Suter, L.; Meezan, N.; MacGowan, B. J.; Hibbard, R.; London, R.; Kilkenny, J.; Wallace, R.; Knittel, K.; Frieders, G.; Golick, B.; Ross, G.; Widmann, K.; Jackson, J.; and others

    2010-10-15

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of {approx}15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie.

  18. NIF Ignition Target 3D Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O; Marinak, M; Milovich, J; Callahan, D

    2008-11-05

    We have developed an input file for running 3D NIF hohlraums that is optimized such that it can be run in 1-2 days on parallel computers. We have incorporated increasing levels of automation into the 3D input file: (1) Configuration controlled input files; (2) Common file for 2D and 3D, different types of capsules (symcap, etc.); and (3) Can obtain target dimensions, laser pulse, and diagnostics settings automatically from NIF Campaign Management Tool. Using 3D Hydra calculations to investigate different problems: (1) Intrinsic 3D asymmetry; (2) Tolerance to nonideal 3D effects (e.g. laser power balance, pointing errors); and (3) Synthetic diagnostics.

  19. Compact wire array sources: power scaling and implosion physics.

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Jones, M. C.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo M.; Ivanov, V. V.; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Ampleford, David J.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Rudakov, L. I.; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Vigil, Marcelino Patricio

    2008-09-01

    A series of ten shots were performed on the Saturn generator in short pulse mode in order to study planar and small-diameter cylindrical tungsten wire arrays at {approx}5 MA current levels and 50-60 ns implosion times as candidates for compact z-pinch radiation sources. A new vacuum hohlraum configuration has been proposed in which multiple z pinches are driven in parallel by a pulsed power generator. Each pinch resides in a separate return current cage, serving also as a primary hohlraum. A collection of such radiation sources surround a compact secondary hohlraum, which may potentially provide an attractive Planckian radiation source or house an inertial confinement fusion fuel capsule. Prior to studying this concept experimentally or numerically, advanced compact wire array loads must be developed and their scaling behavior understood. The 2008 Saturn planar array experiments extend the data set presented in Ref. [1], which studied planar arrays at {approx}3 MA, 100 ns in Saturn long pulse mode. Planar wire array power and yield scaling studies now include current levels directly applicable to multi-pinch experiments that could be performed on the 25 MA Z machine. A maximum total x-ray power of 15 TW (250 kJ in the main pulse, 330 kJ total yield) was observed with a 12-mm-wide planar array at 5.3 MA, 52 ns. The full data set indicates power scaling that is sub-quadratic with load current, while total and main pulse yields are closer to quadratic; these trends are similar to observations of compact cylindrical tungsten arrays on Z. We continue the investigation of energy coupling in these short pulse Saturn experiments using zero-dimensional-type implosion modeling and pinhole imaging, indicating 16 cm/?s implosion velocity in a 12-mm-wide array. The same phenomena of significant trailing mass and evidence for resistive heating are observed at 5 MA as at 3 MA. 17 kJ of Al K-shell radiation was obtained in one Al planar array fielded at 5.5 MA, 57 ns and we

  20. Planar wire array dynamics and radiation scaling at multi-MA levels on the Saturn pulsed power generator.

    SciTech Connect

    Chuvatin, Alexander S.; Vesey, Roger Alan; Waisman, Eduardo Mario; Esaulov, Andrey A.; Ampleford, David J.; Kantsyrev, Victor Leonidovich; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Rudakov, Leonid I.; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Safronova, Alla S.; Jones, Michael C.

    2008-08-01

    Planar wire arrays are studied at 3-6 MA on the Saturn pulsed power generator as potential drivers of compact hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion studies. Comparison with zero-dimensional modeling suggests that there is significant trailing mass. The modeled energy coupled from the generator cannot generally explain the energy in the main x-ray pulse. Preliminary comparison at 1-6 MA indicates sub-quadratic scaling of x-ray power in a manner similar to compact cylindrical wire arrays. Time-resolved pinhole images are used to study the implosion dynamics.

  1. Transient x-ray diffraction used to diagnose shock compressed Si crystals on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kalantar, D.H.; Chandler, E.A.; Colvin, J.D.; Lee, R.; Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Wiley, L.G.; Hauer, A.; Wark, J.S.; Loveridge, A.; Failor, B.H.; Meyers, M.A.; Ravichandran, G.

    1999-01-01

    Transient x-ray diffraction is used to record time-resolved information about the shock compression of materials. This technique has been applied on Nova shock experiments driven using a hohlraum x-ray drive. Data were recorded from the shock release at the free surface of a Si crystal, as well as from Si at an embedded ablator/Si interface. Modeling has been done to simulate the diffraction data incorporating the strained crystal rocking curves and Bragg diffraction efficiencies. Examples of the data and post-processed simulations are presented. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Nova symmetry: Experiments, modeling, and interpretation (HLP3 and HLP4)

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.J.; Hauer, A.A.; Powers, L.V.

    1996-06-01

    Understanding and controlling capsule implosion symmetry is a key requirement for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Symmetry was specifically called out in the Nova Technical Contract (NTC) as the HLP4 task. Later, elements of HLP3 were expanded to include symmetry work. For nearly a decade and a half it has been recognized that the fundamental asymmetry in a laser-heated hohlraum is a long-wavelength pole-waist radiation flux variation that varies like the P{sub 2} Legendre polynomial. It has also been recognized that one can control this asymmetry and achieve nearly symmetric implosions by appropriately pointing the laser beams.

  3. LLE Review 120 (July-September 2009)

    SciTech Connect

    Edgell, D.H., editor

    2001-02-19

    This issue has the following articles: (1) The Omega Laser Facility Users Group Workshop; (2) The Effect of Condensates and Inner Coatings on the Performance of Vacuum Hohlraum Targets; (3) Zirconia-Coated-Carbonyl-Iron-Particle-Based Magnetorheological Fluid for Polishing Optical Glasses and Ceramics; (4) All-Fiber Optical Magnetic Field Sensor Based on Faraday Rotation in Highly Terbium Doped Fiber; (5) Femtosecond Optical Pump-Probe Characterization of High-Pressure-Grown Al{sub 0.86}Ga{sub 0.14}N Single Crystals; (6) LLE's Summer High School Research Program; (7) Laser Facility Report; and (8) National Laser Users Facility and External Users Programs.

  4. Planar Wire Array Dynamics and Radiation Scaling at Multi-MA Levels on the Saturn Pulsed Power Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Cuneo, M. E.; Ampleford, D. J.; Coverdale, C. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Vesey, R. A.; Jones, M. C.; Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2009-01-21

    Planar wire arrays are studied at 3-6 MA on the Saturn pulsed power generator as potential drivers of compact hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion studies. Comparison with zero-dimensional modeling suggests that there is significant trailing mass. The modeled energy coupled from the generator cannot generally explain the energy in the main x-ray pulse. Preliminary comparison at 1-6 MA indicates sub-quadratic scaling of x-ray power in a manner similar to compact cylindrical wire arrays. Time-resolved pinhole images are used to study the implosion dynamics.

  5. ICF ignition capsule neutron, gamma ray, and high energy x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Wilson, D. C.; Swenson, F. J.; Morgan, G. L.

    2003-03-01

    Post-processed total neutron, RIF neutron, gamma-ray, and x-ray images from 2D LASNEX calculations of burning ignition capsules are presented. The capsules have yields ranging from tens of kilojoules (failures) to over 16 MJ (ignition), and their implosion symmetry ranges from prolate (flattest at the hohlraum equator) to oblate (flattest towards the laser entrance hole). The simulated total neutron images emphasize regions of high DT density and temperature; the reaction-in-flight neutrons emphasize regions of high DT density; the gamma rays emphasize regions of high shell density; and the high energy x rays (>10 keV) emphasize regions of high temperature.

  6. The physics basis for ignition using indirect-drive targets on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindl, John D.; Amendt, Peter; Berger, Richard L.; Glendinning, S. Gail; Glenzer, Siegfried H.; Haan, Steven W.; Kauffman, Robert L.; Landen, Otto L.; Suter, Laurence J.

    2004-02-01

    The 1990 National Academy of Science final report of its review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the 10-beam Nova laser at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory as the highest-priority prerequisite for proceeding with construction of an ignition-scale laser facility, now called the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These objectives were chosen to demonstrate that there was sufficient understanding of the physics of ignition targets that the laser requirements for laboratory ignition could be accurately specified. This research on Nova, as well as additional research on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester, is the subject of this review. The objectives of the U.S. indirect-drive target physics program have been to experimentally demonstrate and predictively model hohlraum characteristics, as well as capsule performance in targets that have been scaled in key physics variables from NIF targets. To address the hohlraum and hydrodynamic constraints on indirect-drive ignition, the target physics program was divided into the Hohlraum and Laser-Plasma Physics (HLP) program and the Hydrodynamically Equivalent Physics (HEP) program. The HLP program addresses laser-plasma coupling, x-ray generation and transport, and the development of energy-efficient hohlraums that provide the appropriate spectral, temporal, and spatial x-ray drive. The HEP experiments address the issues of hydrodynamic instability and mix, as well as the effects of flux asymmetry on capsules that are scaled as closely as possible to ignition capsules (hydrodynamic equivalence). The HEP program also addresses other capsule physics issues associated with ignition, such as energy gain and energy loss to the fuel during implosion in the absence of alpha-particle deposition. The results from the Nova and Omega experiments approach the NIF requirements for most of the important ignition capsule parameters, including

  7. Shock compressed solids on the Nova laser

    SciTech Connect

    Colvin, J D; Gold, D M; Kalantar, D H; Mikaelian, K O; Remington, B A; Weber, S V; Wiley, G

    1999-08-03

    Experiments are being developed to shock compress metal foils in the solid state to study the material strength under high compression. The x-ray drive has been characterized and hydrodynamics experiments performed to study growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Al foils at a peak pressure of about 1.8 Mbar. Pre-imposed modulations with an initial wavelength of lo-50 pm, and amplitude of 0.5 pm show growth. Variation in the growth factors may be a result of shot-shot variation in preheating of the Al sample due to emission from the plasma in the hohlraum target

  8. Capsule Ablator Inflight Performance Measurements Via Streaked Radiography Of ICF Implosions On The NIF*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Tommasini, R.; Mackinnon, A.; MacPhee, A.; Meezan, N.; Olson, R.; Hicks, D.; LePape, S.; Izumi, N.; Fournier, K.; Barrios, M. A.; Ross, S.; Pak, A.; Döppner, T.; Kalantar, D.; Opachich, K.; Rygg, R.; Bradley, D.; Bell, P.; Hamza, A.; Dzenitis, B.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B.; LaFortune, K.; Widmayer, C.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Edwards, M. J.; Atherton, J.; Moses, E. I.

    2016-03-01

    Streaked 1-dimensional (slit imaging) radiography of 1.1 mm radius capsules in ignition hohlraums was recently introduced on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and gives an inflight continuous record of capsule ablator implosion velocities, shell thickness and remaining mass in the last 3-5 ns before peak implosion time. The high quality data delivers good accuracy in implosion metrics that meets our requirements for ignition and agrees with recently introduced 2-dimensional pinhole radiography. Calculations match measured trajectory across various capsule designs and laser drives when the peak laser power is reduced by 20%. Furthermore, calculations matching measured trajectories give also good agreement in ablator shell thickness and remaining mass.

  9. L-Shell Spectroscopy of Au as a Temperature Diagnostic Tool

    SciTech Connect

    Trabert, E; Hansen, S B; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Widmann, K; Chung, H K

    2008-03-27

    In order to develop plasma diagnostic for reduced-size hot hohlraums under laser irradiation, they have studied the L-shell emission from highly charged gold ions in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap. The resolving power necessary to identify emission features from individual charge states in a picket fence pattern has been estimated, and the observed radiation features have been compared with atomic structure calculations. They find that the strong 3d{sub 5/2} {yields} 2p{sub 3/2} emission features are particularly useful in determining the charge state distribution and average ion charge , which are strongly sensitive to the electron temperature.

  10. Pushing the Limits of Plasma Length in Inertial-Fusion Laser-Plasma Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; London, R. A.; Michel, P.; Berger, R. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Neumayer, P.; Ross, J. S.; Wallace, R.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate laser beam propagation and low backscatter in laser produced hohlraum plasmas of ignition plasma length. At intensities I<5×1014Wcm-2 greater than 80% of the energy in a blue (3ω, 351 nm) laser is transmitted through a L=5-mm long, high-temperature (Te=2.5keV), high-density (ne=5×1020cm-3) plasma. These experiments show that the backscatter scales exponentially with plasma length which is consistent with linear theory. The backscatter calculated by a new steady state 3D laser-plasma interaction code developed for large ignition plasmas is in good agreement with the measurements.

  11. Review of high convergence implosion experiments with single and double shell targets

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N. D.; Watt, R. G.; Varnum, W. S.

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been been performed in recent years at the Omega laser studying double shell capsules as an a1 teinative, 11011 cryogenic, path towards ignition at NTF. Double shell capsules designed to mitigate the Au M-band radiation asymmetries, were experimentally found to perform well in both spherical and cylindrical hohlraums, achieving near 1-D (-90 %) clean calculated yield at convergence comparable to that required for NIF ignition. Near-term plans include directly driven double shell experiments at Omega, which eliminates Au M-band radiation as a yield degradation m ec h an i s in.

  12. Simulations of radiatively-driven implosions on the PBFA-Z facility

    SciTech Connect

    Aubrey, J.B.; Bowers, R.L.; Peterson, D.L.

    1997-05-01

    We have performed two-dimensional calculations of the implosions of thin-walled aluminum cylinders driven by a source of radiation. The source is generated by the stagnation of an imploding plasma liner on to a foam target (dynamic hohlraum or flying radiation case) in the PBFA-Z facility at Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Both Lagrangian and Eulerian codes are used for the simulations of the compression of the shell by the ablatively-driven main shock. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing; Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang; Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2010-01-15

    The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

  14. Probing matter at extreme Gbar pressures at the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kritcher, A. L.; Doeppner, T.; Swift, D.; Hawreliak, J.; Collins, G.; Nilsen, J.; Bachmann, B.; Dewald, E.; Strozzi, D.; Felker, S.; Landen, O. L.; Jones, O.; Thomas, C.; Hammer, J.; Keane, C.; Lee, H. J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Rothman, S.; Chapman, D.; Kraus, D.; Neumayer, P.; Falcone, R. W.

    2013-12-04

    Here we describe a platform to measure the material properties, specifically the equation of state and electron temperature, at pressures of 100 Mbar to a Gbar at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In our experiments we launch spherically convergent shock waves into solid CH, CD, or diamond samples using a hohlraum radiation drive, in an indirect drive laser geometry. X-ray radiography is applied to measure the shock speed and infer the mass density profile, enabling determination of the material pressure and Hugoniot equation of state. X-ray scattering is applied to measure the electron temperature through probing of the electron velocity distribution via Doppler broadening.

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering in ignition-scale experiments.

    PubMed

    Divol, L; Berger, R L; Meezan, N B; Froula, D H; Dixit, S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-06-27

    The first three-dimensional simulations of a high power 0.351 mum laser beam propagating through a high temperature hohlraum plasma are reported. We show that 3D fluid-based modeling of stimulated Brillouin scattering, including linear kinetic corrections, reproduces quantitatively the experimental measurements, provided it is coupled to detailed hydrodynamics simulation and a realistic description of the laser beam from its millimeter-size envelope down to the micron scale speckles. These simulations accurately predict the strong reduction of stimulated Brillouin scattering measured when polarization smoothing is used. PMID:18643667

  16. Charged-particle probing of x-ray-driven inertial-fusion implosions.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Park, H S; Robey, H F; Town, R P J; Casner, A; Philippe, F; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Back, C A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2010-03-01

    Measurements of x-ray-driven implosions with charged particles have resulted in the quantitative characterization of critical aspects of indirect-drive inertial fusion. Three types of spontaneous electric fields differing in strength by two orders of magnitude, the largest being nearly one-tenth of the Bohr field, were discovered with time-gated proton radiographic imaging and spectrally resolved proton self-emission. The views of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of both the laser drive in a hohlraum and implosion properties provide essential insight into, and modeling validation of, x-ray-driven implosions. PMID:20110464

  17. Controlling stimulated brillouin backscatter with beam smoothing in weakly damped systems.

    PubMed

    Divol, Laurent

    2007-10-12

    We derive an analytical estimate of the effect of temporal smoothing of laser beams on stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a regime relevant to indirect drive ignition. We predict a strong reduction of SBS in the gold plasma expanding from the Hohlraum wall with temporal smoothing. This is a new regime far above threshold where the time to reach convective saturation allows for an effective contrast reduction of the beam intensity driving the instability. This result agrees with three dimensional simulations. Polarization smoothing is shown to double the effective bandwidth. PMID:17995176

  18. Backscatter measurements for NIF ignition targets (invited).

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Datte, P; Krauter, K; Bond, E; Michel, P A; Glenzer, S H; Divol, L; Niemann, C; Suter, L; Meezan, N; MacGowan, B J; Hibbard, R; London, R; Kilkenny, J; Wallace, R; Kline, J L; Knittel, K; Frieders, G; Golick, B; Ross, G; Widmann, K; Jackson, J; Vernon, S; Clancy, T

    2010-10-01

    Backscattered light via laser-plasma instabilities has been measured in early NIF hohlraum experiments on two beam quads using a suite of detectors. A full aperture backscatter system and near backscatter imager (NBI) instrument separately measure the stimulated Brillouin and stimulated Raman scattered light. Both instruments work in conjunction to determine the total backscattered power to an accuracy of ∼15%. In order to achieve the power accuracy we have added time-resolution to the NBI for the first time. This capability provides a temporally resolved spatial image of the backscatter which can be viewed as a movie. PMID:21033953

  19. Raman backscatter as a remote laser power sensor in high-energy-density plasmas.

    PubMed

    Moody, J D; Strozzi, D J; Divol, L; Michel, P; Robey, H F; LePape, S; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Glenzer, S H; Kirkwood, R K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Nikroo, A; Williams, E A

    2013-07-12

    Stimulated Raman backscatter is used as a remote sensor to quantify the instantaneous laser power after transfer from outer to inner cones that cross in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) gas-filled hohlraum plasma. By matching stimulated Raman backscatter between a shot reducing outer versus a shot reducing inner power we infer that about half of the incident outer-cone power is transferred to inner cones, for the specific time and wavelength configuration studied. This is the first instantaneous nondisruptive measure of power transfer in an indirect drive NIF experiment using optical measurements. PMID:23889410

  20. Omega Dante Soft X-Ray Power Diagnostic Component Calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K; Weber, F; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Landen, O; Turner, R; Waide, P

    2004-04-15

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester is a twelve-channel filter-edge defined x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50eV-1keV) and X8A (1keV-6keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been implemented to insure the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  1. Dante Soft X-ray Power Diagnostic for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E; Campbell, K; Turner, R; Holder, J; Landen, O; Glenzer, S; Kauffman, R; Suter, L; Landon, M; Rhodes, M; Lee, D

    2004-04-15

    Soft x-ray power diagnostics are essential for measuring spectrally resolved the total x-ray flux, radiation temperature, conversion efficiency and albedo that are important quantities for the energetics of indirect drive hohlraums. At the Nova or Omega Laser Facilities, these measurements are performed mainly with Dante, but also with DMX and photo-conductive detectors (PCD's). The Dante broadband spectrometer is a collection of absolute calibrated vacuum x-ray diodes, thin filters and x-ray mirrors used to measure the soft x-ray emission for photon energies above 50 eV.

  2. Omega Dante soft x-ray power diagnostic component calibration at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, K.M.; Weber, F.A.; Dewald, E.L.; Glenzer, S.H.; Landen, O.L.; Turner, R.E.; Waide, P.A.

    2004-10-01

    The Dante soft x-ray spectrometer, installed on the Omega laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, is a 12-channel filter-edge defined soft x-ray power diagnostic. It is used to measure the spectrally resolved, absolute flux from direct drive, indirect drive (hohlraums) and other plasma sources. Dante component calibration efforts using two beam lines, U3C (50 eV-1 keV) and X8A (1-6 keV) at the National Synchrotron Light Source have been implemented to improve the accuracy of these measurements. We have calibrated metallic vacuum x-ray diodes, mirrors and filters.

  3. Laser Plasma instability reduction by coherence disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W l; Amendt, P A; Meezan, N; Suter, L J

    2006-04-19

    The saturation levels of stimulated scattering of intense laser light in plasmas and techniques to reduce these levels are of great interest. A simple model is used to highlight the dependence of the reflectivity on the coherence length for the density fluctuations producing the scattering. Sometimes the coherence lengths can be determined nonlinearly. For NIF hohlraum plasmas, a reduction in the coherence lengths might be engineered in several ways. Finally, electron trapping in ion sound waves is briefly examined as a potentially important effect for the saturation of stimulated Brillouin scattering.

  4. Ignition at NIF: Where we have been, and where we are going

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Mordecai

    2014-10-01

    This talk reviews results from the past several years in the pursuit of indirect-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and summarizes ideas and plans for moving forward. We describe the challenging issues encountered by the low-adiabat (``low foot''), ``ignition point design'' approach, such as: hydrodynamic instability growth and ensuing mix of the CH ablator into the DT hot spot; very high convergence implosions with resultant imperfect symmetry; possible other issues such as hot electron preheat. The complex interplay among these issues is a key theme. We describe the progress that has been made in the understanding and diagnosis of these issues. We present the results from the high-adiabat (``high foot'') approach, with its property of relative hydrodynamic stability when compared to the low foot approach, its somewhat reduced convergence ratio, and its achievement of entering the alpha heating regime, an important milestone on the road to ignition. Paths forward towards ignition include excursions from the present approaches in pulse shape, hohlraum, and choice of ablator. Further pulse shaping can lower the adiabat of the high foot approach and lead to higher performance if it continues to retain its hydrodynamic stability properties. Conversely, pulse shaping can provide for ``adiabat-shaping'' for the low foot approach for it to try to attain better stability. A plethora of hohlraum approaches (size, shape, materials, gas fills) can improve the zero-order drive, as well as the low-mode shape of the implosion. Diagnosing, and then correcting, the time dependence of the symmetry is also a key issue. A variety of ablator materials, along with carefully engineering the drive spectrum, can increase implosion velocity. The high-density carbon ablator has shown promising results in this regard. Some combinations of these developments may allow for an operating space that has a relatively short pulse, in a near vacuum hohlraum. That combination

  5. Investigating radial wire array Z pinches as a compact x-ray source on the Saturn generator

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ampleford, David J.; Bland, S. N.; Jennings, Christopher A.; Lebedev, S. V.; Chittenden, J. P.; Cuneo, Michael E.; McBride, Ryan D.; Jones, Brent Manley; Hall, G. N.; Suzuki-Vidal, F.; et al

    2015-08-27

    Radial wire array z pinches, where wires are positioned radially outward from a central cathode to a concentric anode, can act as a compact bright x-ray source that could potentially be used to drive a hohlraum. Experiments were performed on the 7-MA Saturn generator using radial wire arrays. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1-MA level, where they have been shown to be a promising compact X-ray source. Data indicates that at 7 MA, radial wire arrays can radiate ~9 TW with 10-ns full-width at half-maximum from a compact pinch.

  6. Deep Dive Topic: State of understanding of capsule modeling in context of high-foot

    SciTech Connect

    Hurricane, O. A.; Clark, D. S.

    2015-07-14

    The work is summarized from several perspectives: 1D simulation perspective: Post-shot models agree with yield data to within a factor of ~2 at low implosion velocities, but the models diverge from the data as the velocity and convergence ratio increase. 2D simulation perspective: Integrated hohlraum-capsule post-shot models agree with primary data for most implosions, but overpredict yield and DSR for a few of the highest velocity implosions. High-resolution 3D post-shot capsule-only modeling captures much of the delivered performance of the one shot currently simulated.

  7. NLTE Opacities of Mid- and High-Z Cocktails

    SciTech Connect

    Sherrill, Manolo; Abdallah, Joseph; Honglin, Zhang; Fontes, Christopher J; Kilcrease, David P

    2009-01-01

    In this work we report on the development of a new method for computing mid-and high-Z NLTE opacities. A study has been performed using this method to assess the EOS and opacity sensitivities to the radiation field for both single species Au and multi-species SnNb and U{sub 3}Au plasma cocktails with an emphasis on moderately to highly ionized systems. Developed as a benchmark tool to assess both current and future in line NLTE opacity capabilities, we have applied this new approach to assess XSN spectral fidelity for Au at commonly expected NIF hohlraum conditions.

  8. The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

    2005-11-11

    A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

  9. Effect of the mounting membrane on shape in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, S. R. Haan, S. W.; Rygg, J. R.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Pak, A. E.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.

    2015-02-15

    The performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion targets relies on the symmetric implosion of highly compressed fuel. X-ray area-backlit imaging is used to assess in-flight low mode 2D asymmetries of the shell. These time-resolved images of the shell exhibit features that can be related to the lift-off position of the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum. Here, we describe a systematic study of this membrane or “tent” thickness and its impact on the measured low modes for in-flight and self-emission images. The low mode amplitudes of the shell in-flight shape (P{sub 2} and P{sub 4}) are weakly affected by the tent feature in time-resolved, backlit data. By contrast, time integrated self-emission images along the same axis exhibit a reversal in perceived P{sub 4} mode due to growth of a feature seeded by the tent, which can explain prior inconsistencies between the in-flight P{sub 4} and core P{sub 4}, leading to a reevaluation of optimum hohlraum length. Simulations with a tent-like feature normalized to match the feature seen in the backlit images predict a very large impact on the capsule performance from the tent feature.

  10. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.

    2011-05-15

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  11. Ignition target design and robustness studies for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Krauser, W.J.; Hoffman, N.M.; Wilson, D.C.

    1995-12-01

    Recent results are presented from two-dimensional LASNEX calculations of the indirectly driven hohlraum and ignition capsules proposed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The calculations concentrate on two capsule designs, the baseline design which has a bromine-doped plastic ablator, and the beryllium design which has a copper-doped beryllium ablator. Both capsules have a cryogenic fuel layer. Primary emphasis in these calculations is placed upon robustness studies detailing various sensitivities. These studies fall naturally into two categories, those performed with integrated modeling where the capsule, hohlraum, and laser rays all are modeled simultaneously with the laser power levels as the only energy input, and those performed in a capsule-only mode where an externally imposed drive is applied to the exterior of the ignition capsule and only the capsule performance is modeled. Integrated modeling calculations address sensitivities to, e.g., the laser pointing; among other things, capsule-only calculations address yield degradation due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by initial surface roughnesses on the capsules. Limitations of the calculational models and directions for future research are discussed. The results of the robustness studies performed to date enhance the authors` confidence that the NIF can achieve ignition and produce 10--15 MJ of capsule yield with one or more capsule designs.

  12. Review of drive symmetry measurement and control experiments on the Nova laser system (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Hauer, A.; Delamater, N.; Ress, D.; Hsing, W.; Suter, L.; Powers, L.; Landen, O.; Harris, D.; Thiessen, R.; Magelssen, G.; Lindman, E.; Phillion, D.; Amendt, P.; Watt, R.; Hammel, B. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94550 )

    1995-01-01

    Good radiation drive symmetry is crucial for achieving ignition in laboratory inertial fusion experiments. X-ray drive symmetry in hohlraums has been the subject of investigation for more than four years and a great deal of progress has been made. Over the last two to three years, a concerted series of (indirect) drive symmetry experiments has been performed on the Nova laser system and is the subject of the present paper. The goals of this work have been to develop measurement techniques and to apply them to symmetry variation and control experiments. The principal diagnostic has utilized the symmetry signature impressed on the dense core of a target imploded by the hohlraum x-ray environment. The core is distorted by drive asymmetries and x-ray imaging of this core provides a mapping that can be compared with theoretical modeling and thus related to specific amounts of drive asymmetry. We will describe the instruments and measurement techniques used in these experiments and present representative data analysis.

  13. Hemispherical Capsule Implosion Measurements in a Z-Pinch-Driven Fast Ignitor Fuel Compression Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Slutz, S. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Porter, J. L.; Adams, R. G.; Chandler, G. A.; Dropinski, S. C.; Johnson, D. W.; Keller, K. L.; McGurn, J. S.; Rambo, P. K.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Speas, C. S.; Torres, J. A.; Smith, I. C.; Bennett, G. R.; Green, R.; Seamen, H.; Smelser, R. M.; Gilliland, T. L.; Cowan, T. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Tanner, D. L.

    2002-11-01

    In the fast ignitor approach to inertial fusion [Tabak et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1626 (1994)], ignition is produced by heating highly-compressed fuel with a fast, ultra-high power laser pulse. By separating the fuel compression and fast heating processes, symmetry and energy requirements for ignition are significantly relaxed. Laser propagation issues can be avoided by maintaining a plasma-free path for the short-pulse laser [Kodama et al., Nature 412, 798 (2001)]. In experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia, we are exploring a fast ignitor hohlraum geometry uniquely adapted to fuel compression with a single-sided z-pinch radiation drive [Hanson et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2173 (2002)]. In this geometry, a hemispherical capsule mounted on a pedestal (short-pulse laser channel) is symmetrically imploded in a cylindrical secondary hohlraum heated by a single-wire-array z-pinch. Z-Beamlet point projection backlighter images of initial hemispherical capsule implosions on Z will be presented.

  14. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiaoding, Zhang; Jiyan, Zhang; Yang, Zhao; Gang, Xiong; Bin, Zhao; Guohong, Yang; Jian, Zheng; Jiamin, Yang

    2012-12-01

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.

  15. The hydrodynamic and radiative properties of low-density foams heated by x-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosmej, O. N.; Suslov, N.; Martsovenko, D.; Vergunova, G.; Borisenko, N.; Orlov, N.; Rienecker, T.; Klir, D.; Rezack, K.; Orekhov, A.; Borisenko, L.; Krousky, E.; Pfeifer, M.; Dudzak, R.; Maeder, R.; Schaechinger, M.; Schoenlein, A.; Zaehter, S.; Jacoby, J.; Limpouch, J.; Ullschmied, J.; Zhidkov, N.

    2015-09-01

    An advanced type of hydrodynamic stable plasma targets with homogeneous distribution of plasma parameters has been proposed for application in experiments on heavy ion stopping in plasmas and relativistic laser based particle acceleration. Plasma was created via x-ray heating of polymer aerogels with a mean density 103 times lower than that of solid matter. Hydrodynamic and radiation properties of low-density polymer aerogels heated by x-rays, which were generated due to laser interaction with a gold hohlraum, have been investigated experimentally and numerically. In experiments carried out at the PALS laser facility in Prague, the parameters of the hohlraum based soft x-ray source and the fraction of x-ray energy absorbed by foam layers have been measured. The results of these experiments and numerical simulations show that the x-ray heat process occurs via propagation of supersonic radiation driven heat waves. The measured heat wave velocity of 107 cm s-1 allows one to estimate the plasma temperature reached as 25 eV. The hydrodynamic stability of x-ray heated plasma layers has been demonstrated by means of an optical streak camera viewing the plasma expansion process. Simulations of the foam heating process denote rather homogeneous distribution of the plasma temperature and density in the x-ray heated plasma layer and sharp plasma boundaries. The investigated features of such plasma targets are a great advantage for experiments with heavy ion and relativistic laser beams.

  16. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.; Hollowell, D. E.; Mason, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150 {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.

  17. The Ignition Physics Campaign on NIF: Status and Progress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, M. J.; Ignition Team

    2016-03-01

    We have made significant progress in ICF implosion performance on NIF since the 2011 IFSA. Employing a 3-shock, high adiabat CH (“High-Foot”) design, total neutron yields have increased 10-fold to 6.3 x1015 (a yield of ∼ 17 kJ, which is greater than the energy invested in the DT fuel ∼ 12kJ). At that level, the yield from alpha self-heating is essentially equivalent to the compression yield, indicating that we are close to the alpha self-heating regime. Low adiabat, 4-shock High Density Carbon (HDC) capsules have been imploded in conventional gas-filled hohlraums, and employing a 6 ns, 2-shock pulse, HDC capsules were imploded in near-vacuum hohlraums with overall coupling ∼ 98%. Both the 4- and 2-shock HDC capsules had very low mix and high yield over simulated performance. Rugby holraums have demonstrated uniform x-ray drive with minimal Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET), and we have made good progress in measuring and modelling growth of ablation front hydro instabilities.

  18. Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.

    SciTech Connect

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres; Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville; Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

  19. Streaked extreme ultraviolet imaging of the motion of low-Z foam buffered indirectly driven intermediate and high-Z payloads

    SciTech Connect

    Pasley, J.; Nilson, P.; Willingale, L.; Haines, M.G.; Notley, M.; Tolley, M.; Neely, D.; Nazarov, W.; Willi, O.

    2006-03-15

    Results of experiments conducted at the Central Laser Facility (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory), illustrating the efficacy of utilizing a combination of transonic and subsonic ablation to increase the impulse delivered to an indirectly driven payload, are reported. Extreme ultraviolet imaging has been utilized to map the trajectory of the rear surface of an accelerating payload driven by a hohlraum with a peak energy-density-equivalent radiation temperature of around 130 eV. Payloads comprising an approximately 30-{mu}m-thick solid-density plastic foil doped with chlorine, both with and without a gold flashing on the driver-facing surface, were accelerated by a combination of subsonic x-ray ablation of the rear surface of the payload and either subsonic, transonic, or supersonic ablation in a hohlraum facing low-density foam layer in intimate contact with the payload. Two different thicknesses of foam layer were incorporated in the experiment -- 150 and 200 {mu}m -- in addition to a range of different foam densities from 30 to 100 mg/cc. It was observed that the maximum impulse was delivered in the case where the ablation wave propagation was approximately transonic in the foam layer. In such cases the impulse delivered to the payload was significantly greater than that achieved by direct (subsonic) ablation of the payload.

  20. Shock Timing and Radiation Temperature in National Ignition Campaign Holhraum Tuning Experiments using the Dante X-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radousky, H. B.; Robey, H. F.; Widmann, K.; Moody, J. D.; Landen, O. L.

    2011-06-01

    Indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) utilizes a sequence of four shocks to compress a spherically-shaped fuel capsule within a laser heated gold hohlraum target. The soft x-ray power diagnostic DANTE, provides the important capability of measuring the spectrally and temporally resolved absolute x-ray emission flux from the hohlraum. Up to 18 x-ray diodes are fielded on DANTE which allows continuous spectral coverage from 50eV to 20,000 eV. This spectral range fully covers the black body radiation and the characteristic M-band and L-band emission from the high-Z target. Energetics experiments on NIF produce over 10 TW/sr of peak x-ray flux which corresponds to peak radiation temperatures near 300 eV (3.5 Million Deg. K). The Dante measured flux and radiation temperature are correlated with measurements of important shock parameters such as the break out times and shock velocity for the complex shock timing sequence. We will discuss the rationale for this shock configuration and show how recent Dante data can improve confidence in tuning adjustments to the laser and target parameters for achieving ignition. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Use of a priori spectral information in the measurement of x-ray flux with filtered diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrs, R. E.; Widmann, K.; Brown, G. V.; Heeter, R. F.; MacLaren, S. A.; May, M. J.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.

    2015-10-01

    Filtered x-ray diode (XRD) arrays are often used to measure x-ray spectra vs. time from spectrally continuous x-ray sources such as hohlraums. A priori models of the incident x-ray spectrum enable a more accurate unfolding of the x-ray flux as compared to the standard technique of modifying a thermal Planckian with spectral peaks or dips at the response energy of each filtered XRD channel. A model x-ray spectrum consisting of a thermal Planckian, a Gaussian at higher energy, and (in some cases) a high energy background provides an excellent fit to XRD-array measurements of x-ray emission from laser heated hohlraums. If high-resolution measurements of part of the x-ray emission spectrum are available, that information can be included in the a priori model. In cases where the x-ray emission spectrum is not Planckian, candidate x-ray spectra can be allowed or excluded by fitting them to measured XRD voltages. Examples are presented from the filtered XRD arrays, named Dante, at the National Ignition Facility and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics.

  2. Design Calculations for NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Callahan, D. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Spears, B. K.; Widmann, K.; Kline, J. L.; Wilson, D. C.; Petrasso, R. D.; Leeper, R. J.

    2010-11-01

    Design calculations for NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The convergent ablator experiments measure the implosion trajectory, velocity, and ablation rate of an x-ray driven capsule and are a important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign at NIF. The design calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics -- 1) Dante measurements of hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum, 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell, 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra, and 4) GXD measurements of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics will be compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code predictions of hohlraum radiation temperature, capsule ablation rate, implosion velocity, shock flash areal density, and x-ray bang time. Post-shot versions of the design calculations are used to enhance the understanding of the experimental measurements and will assist in choosing parameters for subsequent shots and the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning. *SNL, LLNL, and LANL are operated under US DOE contracts DE-AC04-94AL85000. DE-AC52-07NA27344, and DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. Comparison of measured soft x-ray drive with shock and capsule implosion velocity for ignition tuning experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J.; Callahan, D.; Meezan, N.; Glenzer, S.; MacKinnon, A.; Dixit, S.; Kyrala, G.; Widmann, K.; Robey, H.; Clark, D.; Jones, O.; Hicks, D.; Celliers, P.; Farley, D.; Town, R.; Kalantar, D.; Dewald, E.; Moore, A.; Olson, R.; Doeppner, T.; Moody, J.; Ralph, J.; Thomas, C.; Landen, O.; Edwards, M.

    2011-10-01

    Indirect drive inertial confinement fusion experiments use high-Z hohlraums to convert laser energy to soft x-ray energy. The soft x-rays then drive the capsule via material ablation to compress the fuel payload and heat the central hot spot to initiate ignition. To achieve the highest fuel compression, a shaped radiation drive is used launching multiple shocks timed minimizes fuel entropy. The strength and velocity of these shocks depend directly on the radiation drive. The main laser pulse is then used to drive the implosion such that the PdV work can heat the central core to fusion conditions. To diagnose the soft x-ray drive in the hohlraum, Dante, an 18 channel soft x-ray spectrometer, measures the flux escaping the laser entrance hole. Measurements of this flux are used to assess the conditions for the capsule implosion. In this presentation, we will examine correlations between the soft x-ray measurements and shock velocity, as well as implosion velocity for recent ignition tuning experiments on NIF.

  4. Source geometric considerations for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Patterson, J. R.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Fournier, K. B.; Perez, F.

    2012-10-01

    The Dante is a 15 channel filtered diode array which is installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The system yields the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from 50 eV to 10 keV from various targets (i.e., Hohlraum, gas pipes, etc.). The absolute flux is determined from the radiometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters, and mirrors and an unfold algorithm applied to the recorded voltages from each channel. The unfold algorithm assumes an emitting source that is spatially uniform and has a constant area as a function of photon energy. The emitting x-ray source is usually considered to be the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a given diameter for Hohlraum type targets or the effective wall area of high conversion efficiency K-shell type targets. This assumption can be problematic for several reasons. High intensity regions or "hot spots" in the x-ray are observed where the drive laser beams strike the target. The "hot spots" create non-uniform emission seen by the Dante. Additionally, thinned walled (50 μm) low-Z targets (C22H10N2O5) have an energy dependent source size since the target's walls will be fully opaque for low energies (E < 2-3 keV) yet fully transmissive at higher energies. Determining accurate yields can be challenging for these types of targets. Discussion and some analysis will be presented.

  5. Post Shot Simulations of NIF Convergent Ablator Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, R. E.; Meezan, N. B.; Hicks, D. G.; Landen, O. L.; Dewald, E. L.; Jones, O. S.; Langer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Zylstra, A. B.

    2012-10-01

    Post shot simulations of NIF convergent ablator experiments will be described. The experiments use a streaked radiograph of a backlit capsule implosion to measure the trajectory, velocity, remaining mass, and ablator rhoR and are an important component of the U. S. National Ignition Campaign. The integrated (capsule-in-hohlraum) post shot simulations use measured target parameters, measured laser input powers, measured time-resolved backscatter, and calculated cross-beam power transfer. The integrated calculations are post-processed to provide simulations of the key diagnostics, including: 1) Dante measurements of the hohlraum x-ray flux and spectrum; 2) streaked radiographs of the imploding ablator shell; 3) wedge range filter measurements of D-He3 proton output spectra; and 4) GXD images of the imploded core. The simulated diagnostics are compared to the experimental measurements to provide an assessment of the accuracy of the design code, to enhance understanding of the experiments, and to assist in choosing parameters for subsequent steps in the path towards optimal ignition capsule tuning.

  6. KULL Simulations of OMEGA Radiation Flow Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallman, J.; MacLaren, S.; Baker, K.; Amala, P.; Lewis, K.; Zika, M.

    2012-10-01

    The problem of radiation flow in a right circular cylinder is of interest for the verification and validation of radiation codes, which utilize several mechanisms for determining radiation transport (diffusion, discrete ordinates, and Monte Carlo). This flow is analogous to free molecular flow in a similar geometry.footnotetextE. Garelis and T.E. Wainwright. Phys. Fluids. 16, 4 (1973) A series of experiments were conducted on the OMEGA laser in cases with a low-density heated cylindrical wall. The experiments consisted of a 1.6 mm diameter gold hohlraum containing an on-axis 700 μm diameter SiO2 cylinder contained in an 80 μm thick carbon foam tube. Five shots panning three test cases were used: the nominal geometry described above (heated wall), the carbon tube replaced with solid gold, and a gold cap placed on the laser end of the cylinder assembly to block axial radiation flow. Simulations of each experimental target type were run with the KULL radiation code, and were used to compare the different radiation transport packages in KULL by employing synthetic diagnostics to match the experimental DANTE cavity radiation temperature time history and soft x-ray images taken by a streak camera imaging the far end of the hohlraum.

  7. Uncertainty analysis technique for OMEGA Dante measurementsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, M. J.; Widmann, K.; Sorce, C.; Park, H.-S.; Schneider, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Dante is an 18 channel x-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g., hohlraums, etc.) at x-ray energies between 50 eV and 10 keV. It is a main diagnostic installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the x-ray diodes, filters and mirrors, and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  8. Post-Shot Simulations of NIC Experiments with Comparison to X-ray Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, David; Jones, Oggie; Suter, Larry; Moore, Alastair; Schneider, Marilyn

    2012-10-01

    National Ignition Campaign experiments at NIF are ongoing and post-shot simulations play an important role in understanding the physical processes occurring in the quest for demonstrating fusion burn. In particular, it is important to understand the x-ray environment inside the hohlraum targets, which is studied using various x-ray diagnostics. The Dante instrument measures the time dependent x-ray emission escaping out of the hohlraum laser entrance holes (LEHs) and the SXI instrument provides a time-integrated image of both soft and hard x-rays. We compare calculated total x-ray emission with Dante data as well as the relative high energy Mband emission that contributes to capsule preheat. We correct our calculated x-ray emission to account for differences between simulation and data on LEH closure using SXI data. We provide results for both ``standard candle'' simulation with no added multipliers and for simulations with time-dependent multipliers that are used to obtain agreement with shock timing and implosion velocity data. The physics justification for the use of multipliers is to account for potential missing energy or incorrect ablation modeling. The relative importance of these two effects can be studied through comparison of post-shot simulations with x-ray measurements.

  9. National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Precision Tuning Series Shock Timing Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H F; Celliers, P M

    2011-07-19

    A series of precision shock timing experiments have been performed on NIF. These experiments continue to adjust the laser pulse shape and employ the adjusted cone fraction (CF) in the picket (1st 2 ns of the laser pulse) as determined from the re-emit experiment series. The NIF ignition laser pulse is precisely shaped and consists of a series of four impulses, which drive a corresponding series of shock waves of increasing strength to accelerate and compress the capsule ablator and fuel layer. To optimize the implosion, they tune not only the strength (or power) but also, to sub-nanosecond accuracy, the timing of the shock waves. In a well-tuned implosion, the shock waves work together to compress and heat the fuel. For the shock timing experiments, a re-entrant cone is inserted through both the hohlraum wall and the capsule ablator allowing a direct optical view of the propagating shocks in the capsule interior using the VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) diagnostic from outside the hohlraum. To emulate the DT ice of an ignition capsule, the inside of the cone and the capsule are filled with liquid deuterium.

  10. Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Boehly, T. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Frenje, J. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hammel, B. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hoffman, N.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Marinak, M. M.; Meezan, N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Michel, P.; Munro, D. H.; Olson, R. E.; Nikroo, A.; Regan, S. P.; Suter, L. J.; Thomas, C. A.; Wilson, D. C.

    2011-05-01

    Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

  11. Computer acquired performance data from a chemically vapor-deposited-rhenium, niobium planar diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manista, E. J.; Morris, J. F.; Smith, A. L.; Lancashire, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    Performance data from a chemically vapor-deposited-rhenium, niobium thermionic converter are presented. The planar converter has a guard-ringed collector and a nominal fixed spacing of 0.25 mm (10 mils). The data were obtained by using a computerized acquisition system and are available on request to one of the authors on microfiche as individual and composite parametric current, voltage curves. The parameters are the temperatures of the emitter T sub E collector T sub C, and cesium reservoir T sub R. The composite plots have constant T sub E and varying T sub C or T sub R, or both. Current, voltage envelopes having constant T sub E with and without fixed T sub C appear in the present report. The diode was tested at increments between 1600 and 2000 K for the emitter Hohlraum, 800 to 1100 K for the collector, and 540 and 650 K for the reservoir. A total of 312 current, voltage curves were obtained in the present performance evaluation. Current, voltage envelopes from three rhenium emitter converters evaluated in the present program are also given. The data are compared at commom emitter Hohlraum temperatures.

  12. The first target experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landen, O. L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Froula, D. H.; Dewald, E. L.; Suter, L. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Fernandez, J. C.; Kline, J. L.; Goldman, S. R.; Braun, D. G.; Celliers, P. M.; Moon, S. J.; Robey, H. S.; Lanier, N. E.; Glendinning, S. G.; Blue, B. E.; Wilde, B. H.; Jones, O. S.; Schein, J.; Divol, L.; Kalantar, D. H.; Campbell, K. M.; Holder, J. P.; McDonald, J. W.; Niemann, C.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Collins, G. W.; Bradley, D. K.; Eggert, J. H.; Hicks, D. G.; Gregori, G.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Young, B. K.; Foster, J. M.; Hansen, J. F.; Perry, T. S.; Munro, D. H.; Baldis, H. A.; Grim, G. P.; Heeter, R. F.; Hegelich, M. B.; Montgomery, D. S.; Rochau, G. A.; Olson, R. E.; Turner, R. E.; Workman, J. B.; Berger, R. L.; Cohen, B. I.; Kruer, W. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S. H.; Meezan, N. B.; Rose, H. A.; Still, C. H.; Williams, E. A.; Dodd, E. S.; Edwards, M. J.; Monteil, M.-C.; Stevenson, R. M.; Thomas, B. R.; Coker, R. F.; Magelssen, G. R.; Rosen, P. A.; Stry, P. E.; Woods, D.; Weber, S. V.; Young, P. E.; Alvarez, S.; Armstrong, G.; Bahr, R.; Bourgade, J.-L.; Bower, D.; Celeste, J.; Chrisp, M.; Compton, S.; Cox, J.; Constantin, C.; Costa, R.; Duncan, J.; Ellis, A.; Emig, J.; Gautier, C.; Greenwood, A.; Griffith, R.; Holdner, F.; Holtmeier, G.; Hargrove, D.; James, T.; Kamperschroer, J.; Kimbrough, J.; Landon, M.; Lee, F. D.; Malone, R.; May, M.; Montelongo, S.; Moody, J.; Ng, E.; Nikitin, A.; Pellinen, D.; Piston, K.; Poole, M.; Rekow, V.; Rhodes, M.; Shepherd, R.; Shiromizu, S.; Voloshin, D.; Warrick, A.; Watts, P.; Weber, F.; Young, P.; Arnold, P.; Atherton, L.; Bardsley, G.; Bonanno, R.; Borger, T.; Bowers, M.; Bryant, R.; Buckman, S.; Burkhart, S.; Cooper, F.; Dixit, S. N.; Erbert, G.; Eder, D. C.; Ehrlich, R. E.; Felker, B.; Fornes, J.; Frieders, G.; Gardner, S.; Gates, C.; Gonzalez, M.; Grace, S.; Hall, T.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G.; Henesian, M. A.; Hermann, M.; Hermes, G.; Huber, S.; Jancaitis, K.; Johnson, S.; Kauffman, B.; Kelleher, T.; Kohut, T.; Koniges, A. E.; Labiak, T.; Latray, D.; Lee, A.; Lund, D.; Mahavandi, S.; Manes, K. R.; Marshall, C.; McBride, J.; McCarville, T.; McGrew, L.; Menapace, J.; Mertens, E.; Murray, J.; Neumann, J.; Newton, M.; Opsahl, P.; Padilla, E.; Parham, T.; Parrish, G.; Petty, C.; Polk, M.; Powell, C.; Reinbachs, I.; Rinnert, R.; Riordan, B.; Ross, G.; Robert, V.; Tobin, M.; Sailors, S.; Saunders, R.; Schmitt, M.; Shaw, M.; Singh, M.; Spaeth, M.; Stephens, A.; Tietbohl, G.; Tuck, J.; van Wonterghem, B. M.; Vidal, R.; Wegner, P. J.; Whitman, P.; Williams, K.; Winward, K.; Work, K.; Wallace, R.; Nobile, A.; Bono, M.; Day, B.; Elliott, J.; Hatch, D.; Louis, H.; Manzenares, R.; O'Brien, D.; Papin, P.; Pierce, T.; Rivera, G.; Ruppe, J.; Sandoval, D.; Schmidt, D.; Valdez, L.; Zapata, K.; MacGowan, B. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Springer, P. T.; Hammel, B. A.; Moses, E. I.; Miller, G. H.

    2007-08-01

    A first set of shock timing, laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and X-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1 9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options. The experiments have demonstrated excellent agreement between measured and predicted laser-target coupling in foils and hohlraums, even when extended to a longer pulse regime unattainable at previous laser facilities, validated the predicted effects of beam smoothing on intense laser beam propagation in long scale-length plasmas and begun to test 3D codes by extending the study of laser driven hydrodynamic jets to 3D geometries.

  13. Z pinches as intense x-ray sources for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Matzen, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Fast z-pinch implosions can convert more than 10% of the stored electrical energy in a pulsed-power accelerator into x-rays. On the Saturn pulsed-power accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories, currents of 6 to 8 MA with a risetime of less than 50 ns have been used to drive cylindrically-symmetric arrays of wires, producing x-ray energies greater than 400 kJ with x-ray pulsewidths less than 5 ns and peak x-ray powers of 75 {+-} 10 TW. Using similar loads, PBFA Z has produced > 1.5 MJ and > 150 TW of x-rays in the first four months of operation in the z-pinch mode. These x-ray energies and powers are records for laboratory x-ray production. The x-ray output can be thermalized into a near-Planckian x-ray source by containing it within a cylindrical radiation case (a hohlraum). These energetic, intense, large volume, long-lived hohlraum x-ray sources have recently been used for ICF-relevant ablator physics experiments and offer the potential for performing many new basic physics and fusion-relevant experiments.

  14. Plans for Double Shell Experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Daughton, W. S.; Gunderson, M. A.; Simakov, A. N.; Wilson, D. C.; Watt, R. G.; Kline, J. L.; Hayes, A. C.; Herrmann, H. W.; Boswell, M.; Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Batha, S. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Robey, H. F.

    2015-11-01

    Double-shells are an alternative approach to achieving indirect drive ignition. These targets consist of a low-Z ablatively-driven outer shell that impacts a high-Z inner shell filled with DT fuel. In contrast to single-shell designs, double-shell targets burn the fuel via volume ignition, albeit with a lower gain. While double-shell capsules are complicated to fabricate, their design includes several beneficial metrics such as a low convergence pusher (C.R. < 10), low implosion speed (~ 250 km/s), a simple few-ns laser drive in a vacuum hohlraum, less sensitivity to hohlraum asymmetries, and low expected laser-plasma instabilities. We present preliminary double-shell capsule designs for NIF using a cryogenic gas DT fill which are optimized for yield and minimized for fall-line mix. Challenges will be discussed, as well as uncertainties and trade-offs in the physics issues compared to single-shells. A development path for double-shell experiments on NIF will be presented. Work performed under the auspices of DOE by LANL under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  15. Influence of Capsule Offset on Radiation Asymmetry in Shenguang-II Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Longfei; Li, Hang; Lin, Zhiwei; Li, Liling; Kuang, Longyu; Huang, Yunbao; Zhang, Lu; Huang, Tianxuan; Jiang, Shao'en; Ding, Yongkun

    2015-10-01

    The re-emitted images of the frame camera indicated that the high-Z (Bi) capsule deviated about 29 μm from the center of the hohlraum in experiments at the Shenguang-II (SG-II) laser facility; however, investigations on this issue have seldom been performed. The influence of three dimensional offsets of a capsule on its radiation asymmetry in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) will be analyzed in this paper. Simulations demonstrate that the axial offset of 100 μm of a capsule from the center of the hohlraum brings an additional 3.5% radiation drive asymmetry and 6.5% P1 asymmetry (Legendre odd model) on the capsule in the SG-II laser facility, and the offset must be within 25 μm if the P1 asymmetry is restricted to below 2%. supported by Science and Technology on Plasma Physics Laboratory of China (Nos. 9140C680104140C68287, 9140C680104130C68241), and in part by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11475154, 51375185, U1430124, 11435011, 11305160)

  16. The impact of laser plasma interactions on three-dimensional drive symmetry in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J. L. Michel, P.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J.

    2014-07-15

    Achieving symmetric hohlraum radiation drive is an important aspect of indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion experiments. However, when experimentally delivered laser powers deviate from ideal conditions, the resultant radiation field can become asymmetric. Two situations in which this may arise are random uncorrelated fluctuations, in as-delivered laser power and laser beams that do not participate in the implosion (either intentionally or unintentionally). Furthermore, laser plasma interactions in the hohlraum obfuscate the connection between laser powers and radiation drive. To study the effect of these situations on drive symmetry, we develop a simplified model for crossed-beam energy transfer, laser backscatter, and plasma absorption that can be used in conjunction with view factor calculations to expediently translate laser powers into three-dimensional capsule flux symmetries. We find that crossed-beam energy transfer can alter both the statistical properties of uncorrelated laser fluctuations and the impact of missing laser beams on radiation symmetry. A method is proposed to mitigate the effects of missing laser beams.

  17. Higher velocity, high-foot implosions on the National Ignition Facility lasera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Döppner, T.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Edwards, M. J.; Haan, S. W.; Hamza, A. V.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J. P.; Kritcher, A. L.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; Milovich, J. L.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A. E.; Patel, P. K.; Rygg, J. R.; Ralph, J. E.; Salmonson, J. D.; Spears, B. K.; Springer, P. T.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J. A.; Field, J. E.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hatarik, R.; Merrill, F. E.; Nagel, S. R.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Town, R. P. J.; Sayre, D. B.; Volegov, P.; Wilde, C. H.

    2015-05-01

    By increasing the velocity in "high foot" implosions [Dittrich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055002 (2014); Park et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 055001 (2014); Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014); Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056314 (2014)] on the National Ignition Facility laser, we have nearly doubled the neutron yield and the hotspot pressure as compared to the implosions reported upon last year. The implosion velocity has been increased using a combination of the laser (higher power and energy), the hohlraum (depleted uranium wall material with higher opacity and lower specific heat than gold hohlraums), and the capsule (thinner capsules with less mass). We find that the neutron yield from these experiments scales systematically with a velocity-like parameter of the square root of the laser energy divided by the ablator mass. By connecting this parameter with the inferred implosion velocity ( v ), we find that for shots with primary yield >1 × 1015 neutrons, the total yield ˜ v 9.4 . This increase is considerably faster than the expected dependence for implosions without alpha heating (˜ v 5.9 ) and is additional evidence that these experiments have significant alpha heating.

  18. Perturbation Growth Seeded by a Metal Foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glendinning, S. G.; Baker, K. L.; Cook, A. W.; Doane, D. M.; Dittrich, T. R.; Felker, S. A.; Seugling, R. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Moore, A. S.; McAlpin, S.

    2014-10-01

    We have designed experiments for the Omega laser investigating the growth of pertubations between a Cu foam (density ~1 g/cc) and a carbonized resorcinol formaldehyde (CRF) foam (density ~0.05 g/cc). The interface between the two foams is impulsively accelerated by a 1 ns (7.5 kJ) laser drive in a gold hohlraum (peak TR ~ 185 eV). The growth is seeded by internal structures in the Cu foam that are characterized by x-ray tomography. Because of the strong dependence of viscosity on ionization, the Cu plasma is expected to have a much lower viscosity (and higher Reynolds number) than a comparable experiment with plastic in place of the Cu, and the Cu experiment is predicted to quickly become turbulent. We have simulated this experiment with the radiation-hydrodynamics code LASNEX (integrated hohlraum simulations). Various void structures were then simulated using the codes KULL and MIRANDA to test the effect of differing initial conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  19. The Application of Imposed Magnetic Fields to Ignition and Thermonuclear Burn on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, L. John; Logan, G.; Ho, D.; Zimmerman, G.; Strozzi, D.; Rhodes, M.; Plummer, R.; Hawkins, S.

    2014-10-01

    We are studying the impact of highly compressed axial magnetic fields on ignition targets for the National Ignition Facility. Both magnetized room-temperature DT gas targets and CH/diamond cryo-ignition capsules are under study. Initial seed fields of 30--70 T that compress to greater than 10000 T (100 MG) under implosion can reduce hotspot conditions required for ignition and propagating burn [L. J. Perkins et al., Phys. Plasmas (2013)]. The field can also reduce hohlraum laser-plasma interactions by increasing the temperature, and supress the transport of hot electron preheat to the capsule. These combined attributes of compressed B-fields may permit recovery of ignition, or at least significant alpha particle heating, in submarginal capsules that would otherwise fail because of adverse hydrodynamic conditions and, more generally, may permit attainment of ignition in targets redesigned to operate under reduced drive and/or lower convergence ratios. Present engineering studies are also assessing the maximum attainable fields for a NIF hohlraum coil driven by a pulsed power supply located in a NIF Diagnostic Insertion Module (DIM). LLNL is operated by LLNS, LLC, for the U.S.DOE, NNSA under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. This work supported by LLNL LDRD 14-ER-028.

  20. Diagnosing the plasma nonuniformity in an iron opacity experiment by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Xiaoding; Zhang Jiyan; Zhao Yang; Xiong Gang; Yang Guohong; Yang Jiamin; Zhao Bin; Zheng Jian

    2012-12-15

    Generating a well-characterized hot-dense sample is of great importance to high quality opacity measurements. In this paper, we report on an experimental investigation of the plasma nonuniformity in a radiatively heated iron opacity sample by spatially resolved Al 1s-2p absorption spectroscopy. The iron sample was tamped by plastic at both sides and was heated by thermal x-ray radiation generated in a gold Hohlraum, and an Al layer attached to it was used as a tracer for temperature diagnosis. Spatially resolved 1s-2p transition absorption spectra of the Al tracer were measured by the technique of point-projection-spectroscopy, and temperatures in the sample were obtained by comparing the measured spectra with detailed-term-accounting model calculations, with the density of the sample deduced using a combination of side-on radiography and radiative hydrodynamic simulation. The results showed the existence of axial temperature nonuniformity in the sample, and these temperature variations have been used to explain the shift of iron 2p-3d transition absorption feature along the axial direction of the Hohlraum used to heat the sample successfully.