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Sample records for hohlraums hlp1 hlp2

  1. Energy coupling in lined hohlraums (HLP1, HLP2, and HLP7)

    SciTech Connect

    Kauffman, R.L.; Suter, L.J.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) uses high-Z cavities, or hohlraums, to confine x rays for compressing and igniting deuterium-tritium fuel contained in spherical capsules. For laser-driven ICF, the intense laser beams enter the hohlraum through small laser entrance holes (LEHs), heating the high-Z hohlraum walls. The laser-produced radiation heats the unirradiated high-Z walls producing a nearly isotropic radiation environment for spherically compressing the lCF capsule. The radiation flux on the capsule is not completely isotropic, however, because the laser-irradiated area is generally brighter than the surrounding x-ray heated walls and the LEHs do not radiate. Furthermore, the angular distribution of flux on the capsule is time dependent because the unilluminated walls become hotter and more emissive as a function of time, and plasma dynamics cause the laser-irradiated area to move. Symmetric implosions are obtained by dynamically balancing the effects of the LEHs, wall heating, and laser-spot motion.

  2. Laser spot movement inside spherical hohlraums and hohlraum energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenyi, Huo; Zhichao, Li; Ke, Lan; Jie, Liu

    2015-11-01

    According to the ignition experiments performed at the NIF, the radiation asymmetry is a serious problem to be solved in indirect drive ICF. Lan et al. proposed an octahedral spherical hohlraum in order to obtain good radiation symmetry. However, one potential problem of the spherical hohlraum is that the laser beams are close to the hohlraum wall. The wall blow-off may cause the LEH to close faster and result in strong laser absorption in the LEH region. Aimed at alleviating the problem, Lan and Zheng proposed a novel octahedral hohlraum with cylindrical LEHs. In this work, we report the experimental observation of laser spot movements inside the spherical hohlraums with plane LEHs and cylindrical LEHs on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. The experimental results indicate that the cylindrical LEH could dramatically improve the laser propagation inside spherical hohlraum. We also completed the hohlraum energetics experiment on the SGIII-prototype laser facilty. We obtained good reproducible shock velocities in Al and Ti. For the hohlraum used in the experiment, the hohlraum radiation temperature is about 200 eV according to the FXRD's results with the driven laser energy o 5.5 kJ.

  3. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum Energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Atherton, L J; Callahan, D A; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Dzenitis, E G; Edwards, M J; Haynam, C A; Hinkel, D E; Jones, O S; Landen, O; London, R A; Michel, P A; Moody, J D; Milovich, J L; Schneider, M B; Thomas, C A; Town, R J; Warrick, A L; Weber, S V; Widmann, K; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; MacGowan, B J; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Nikroo, A

    2009-11-16

    The first series of experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses, R. N. Boyd, B. A. Remington, C. J. Keane, and R. Al-Ayat, 'The National Ignition Facility: ushering in a new age for high energy density science,' Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition hohlraum 'energetics,' a term described by four broad goals: (1) Measurement of laser absorption by the hohlraum; (2) Measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) Quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) Determining whether initial hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF hohlraum energetics experiments. The hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (< 10%) for hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes, that have been used to design the hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition hohlraum experiments.

  4. National Ignition Campaign Hohlraum energetics

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Atherton, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Dixit, S.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Edwards, M. J.; Haynam, C. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O.; London, R. A.; Michel, P. A.; Moody, J. D.; Milovich, J. L.; Schneider, M. B.; Thomas, C. A.; Town, R. P. J.; Warrick, A. L.; Weber, S. V.

    2010-05-15

    The first series of experiments of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] tested ignition Hohlraum 'energetics', a term described by four broad goals: (1) measurement of laser absorption by the Hohlraum; (2) measurement of the x-ray radiation flux (T{sub RAD}{sup 4}) on the surrogate ignition capsule; (3) quantitative understanding of the laser absorption and resultant x-ray flux; and (4) determining whether initial Hohlraum performance is consistent with requirements for ignition. This paper summarizes the status of NIF Hohlraum energetics experiments. The Hohlraum targets and experimental design are described, as well as the results of the initial experiments. The data demonstrate low backscattered energy (<10%) for Hohlraums filled with helium gas. A discussion of our current understanding of NIF Hohlraum x-ray drive follows, including an overview of the computational tools, i.e., radiation-hydrodynamics codes that have been used to design the Hohlraums. The performance of the codes is compared to x-ray drive and capsule implosion data from the first NIF experiments. These results bode well for future NIF ignition Hohlraum experiments.

  5. Study on Octahedral Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Zhichao; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Ren, Guoli; Chen, Yaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we report our recent study on octahedral spherical hohlraum which has six laser entrance holes (LEHs). First, our study shows that the octahedral hohlraums have robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion at hohlraum-to- capsule radius ratio larger than 3.7 and have potential superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. Second, we study the laser arrangement and constraints of the octahedral hohlraums and give their laser arrangement design for ignition facility. Third, we propose a novel octahedral hohlraum with LEH shields and cylindrical LEHs, in order to increase the laser coupling efficiency and improve the capsule symmetry and to mitigate the influence of the wall blowoff on laser transport. Fourth, we study the sensitivity of capsule symmetry inside the octahedral hohlraums to laser power balance, pointing accuracy, deviations from the optimal position and target fabrication accuracy, and compare the results with that of tradiational cylinders and rugby hohlraums. Finally, we present our recent experimental studies on the octahedral hohlraums on SGIII prototype laser facility.

  6. Fundamentals of ICF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M D

    2005-09-30

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The indirect drive (sometimes referred to as ''radiation drive'') approach converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray ''oven'' (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we've demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In these lectures we will be reviewing the physics of these laser heated hohlraums, recent attempts at optimizing their performance, and then return to the ICF problem in particular to discuss scaling of ICF gain with scale size, and to compare indirect vs. direct drive gains. In ICF, spherical capsules containing Deuterium and Tritium (DT)--the heavy isotopes of hydrogen--are imploded, creating conditions of high temperature and density similar to those in the cores of stars required for initiating the fusion reaction. When DT fuses an alpha particle (the nucleus of a helium atom) and a neutron are created releasing large amount amounts of energy. If the surrounding fuel is sufficiently dense, the alpha particles are stopped and can heat it, allowing a self-sustaining fusion burn to propagate radially outward and a high gain fusion micro-explosion ensues. To create those conditions the outer surface of the capsule is heated (either directly by a laser or indirectly by laser produced x-rays) to cause rapid ablation and outward expansion of the capsule material. A rocket-like reaction to that outward flowing heated material leads to an inward implosion of the remaining part of the capsule shell. The pressure generated on the outside of the capsule can reach nearly 100 megabar (100 million times atmospheric pressure [1b = 10{sup 6} cgs

  7. Reproducibility of NIF hohlraum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Casey, D. T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B. L.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Grim, G. P.; Hoover, M.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P. A.; Moore, A. S.; Pino, J. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy of experimentally ``tuning'' the implosion in a NIF hohlraum ignition target towards increasing hot-spot pressure, areal density of compressed fuel, and neutron yield relies on a level of experimental reproducibility. We examine the reproducibility of experimental measurements for a collection of 15 identical NIF hohlraum experiments. The measurements include incident laser power, backscattered optical power, x-ray measurements, hot-electron fraction and energy, and target characteristics. We use exact statistics to set 1-sigma confidence levels on the variations in each of the measurements. Of particular interest is the backscatter and laser-induced hot-spot locations on the hohlraum wall. Hohlraum implosion designs typically include variability specifications [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. We describe our findings and compare with the specifications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Gas-filled hohlraum fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, M.A.; Gobby, P.L.; Foreman, L.R.; Bush, H. Jr.; Gomez, V.M.; Moore, J.E.; Stone, G.F.

    1995-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) researchers have fabricated and fielded gas-filled hohlraums at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Nova laser. Fill pressures of 1--5 atmospheres have been typical. We describe the production of the parts, their assembly and fielding. Emphasis is placed on the production of gas-tight polyimide windows and the fielding apparatus and procedure.

  9. Laser-plasma instability in hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Hsing, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    A gas-filled hohlraum designed so as to approach plasma conditions expected in future ignition hohlraums has been fielded at the Nova laser. Radiation hydrodynamics modeling of these Nova hohlraums predicts reasonably well the measured plasma parameters. The measured reflectivity of a probe beam by Stimulated Brillouin scattering is modest. Some observed dependencies of reflectivity on laser and plasma parameters are understood theoretically, while others are not.

  10. High convergence implosion symmetry in cylindrical hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P A; Bradley, D K; Hammel, B A; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Wallace, R J

    1999-09-01

    High convergence, hohlraum-driven implosions will require control of time-integrated drive asymmetries to 1% levels for ignition to succeed on the NIF. We review how core imaging provides such asymmetry measurement accuracy for the lowest order asymmetry modes, and describe recent improvements in imaging techniques that should allow detection of higher order asymmetry modes. We also present a simple analytic model explaining how the sensitivity of symmetry control to beam pointing scales as we progress from single ring per side Nova cylindrical hohlraum illumination geometries to NIF-like multiple rings per side Omega hohlraum illumination geometries and ultimately to NIF-scale hohlraums.

  11. Hohlraum Modeling of Hybrid Shock Ignition Target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodd, E. S.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Loomis, E. N.

    2014-10-01

    Hybrid Shock Ignition (HSI) combines a hohlraum driven capsule with a directly driven shock for heating. Unlike standard Shock Ignition, the capsule is imploded with X-rays from a laser driven hohlraum to compress the fuel, which is too cold to ignite. However, as in Shock Ignition, the compressed fuel is subsequently heated to ignition temperatures with a directly-driven shock. The use of indirect and direct drive in the same target necessitates complex beam geometry, and thus HSI is being pursued with spherical hohlraums. More importantly for the NIF, the beam repointing required for polar direct drive will not be needed for the implosion phase with this target. Spherical hohlraums have been fielded previously at the OMEGA laser as a part of the Tetrahedral Hohlraum Campaign. They were originally proposed as an alternative to cylindrical hohlraums to achieve highly symmetric radiation drive. The new HSI hohlraums will require six laser entrance holes in hexahedral symmetry to accommodate all beams. This presentation will show radiation-hydrodynamic calculations of the current hexahedral OMEGA hohlraum design, as well as benchmark calculations of the old tetrahedral targets. Supported under the US DOE by the Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396. LA-UR-14-24945.

  12. Laser Plasma Coupling for High Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W.

    1999-11-04

    Simple scaling models indicate that quite high radiation temperatures can be achieved in hohlraums driven with the National Ignition Facility. A scaling estimate for the radiation temperature versus pulse duration for different size NIF hohlraums is shown in Figure 1. Note that a radiation temperature of about 650 ev is projected for a so-called scale 1 hohlraum (length 2.6mm, diameter 1.6mm). With such high temperature hohlraums, for example, opacity experiments could be carried out using more relevant high Z materials rather than low Z surrogates. These projections of high temperature hohlraums are uncertain, since the scaling model does not allow for the very strongly-driven laser plasma coupling physics. Lasnex calculations have been carried out to estimate the plasma and irradiation conditions in a scale 1 hohlraum driven by NIF. Linear instability gains as high as exp(100) have been found for stimulated Brillouin scattering, and other laser-driven instabilities are also far above their thresholds. More understanding of the very strongly-driven coupling physics is clearly needed in order to more realistically assess and improve the prospects for high temperature hohlraums. Not surprisingly, this regime has been avoided for inertial fusion applications and so is relatively unexplored.

  13. Radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L.J.; Kauffman, R.L.; Darrow, C.B.

    1995-11-03

    Nearly 10 years of Nova experiments and analysis have lead to a relatively detailed quantitative and qualitative understanding of radiation drive in laser heated hohlraums. Our most successful quantitative modelling tool is 2D Lasnex numerical simulations. Analysis of the simulations provides us with insight into the details of the hohlraum drive. In particular we find hohlraum radiation conversion efficiency becomes quite high with longer pulses as the accumulated, high Z blow-off plasma begins to radiate. Extensive Nova experiments corroborate our quantitative and qualitative understanding.

  14. Analysis of Reduced-Scale Nova Hohlraum Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, L. V.; Berger, R. L.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Kruer, W. L.; Langdon, A. B.; MacGowan, B. J.; Orzechowski, T. J.; Rosen, M. D.; Springer, P. T.; Still, C. H.; Suter, L. J.; Williams, E. A.; Blain, M. A.

    1996-11-01

    Establishing the practical limit on achievable radiation temperature in high-Z hohlraums is of interest both for ignition targets( S.M. Haan, et al., Phys. Plasmas 2, 2480 (1995).) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and for high energy density physics experiments( S.B. Libby, Energy and Technology Review, UCRL-52000-94-12, 23 (1994)). Two related efforts are underway to define the physics issues of high energy density hohlraum targets: 1) experiments on the Nova laser in reduced scale hohlraums, and 2) evaluation of high-temperature hohlraums designs for the NIF. Reduced scale Nova hohlraums approach conditions relevant to NIF high temperature designs, albeit at smaller scale. Analysis of reduced-scale experiments on Nova therefore provides valuable physics information for evaluating the capabilities of NIF for producing high energy density in hohlraums. Simulations of Nova reduced scale hohlraum experiments will be presented, and the relevance to a range of NIF hohlraum target designs will be discussed.

  15. Pulsed power driven hohlraum research at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Alberts, T.E.; Allshouse, G.A.

    1996-06-01

    Three pulsed power driven hohlraum concepts are being investigated at Sandia for application to inertial fusion research. These hohlraums are driven by intense proton and Li ion beams as well as by two different types of z-pinch x-ray sources. Research on these hohlraum systems will continue on Sandia`s PBFA II-Z facility.

  16. Current scaling of axially radiated power in dynamic hohlraums and dynamic hohlraum load design for ZR.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil; Nash, Thomas J.; Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-03-01

    We present designs for dynamic hohlraum z-pinch loads on the 28 MA, 140 ns driver ZR. The scaling of axially radiated power with current in dynamic hohlraums is reviewed. With adequate stability on ZR this scaling indicates that 30 TW of axially radiated power should be possible. The performance of the dynamic hohlraum load on the 20 MA, 100 ns driver Z is extensively reviewed. The baseline z-pinch load on Z is a nested tungsten wire array imploding onto on-axis foam. Data from a variety of x-ray diagnostics fielded on Z are presented. These diagnostics include x-ray diodes, bolometers, fast x-ray imaging cameras, and crystal spectrometers. Analysis of these data indicates that the peak dynamic radiation temperature on Z is between 250 and 300 eV from a diameter less than 1 mm. Radiation from the dynamic hohlraum itself or from a radiatively driven pellet within the dynamic hohlraum has been used to probe a variety of matter associated with the dynamic hohlraum: the tungsten z-pinch itself, tungsten sliding across the end-on apertures, a titanium foil over the end aperture, and a silicon aerogel end cap. Data showing the existence of asymmetry in radiation emanating from the two ends of the dynamic hohlraum is presented, along with data showing load configurations that mitigate this asymmetry. 1D simulations of the dynamic hohlraum implosion are presented and compared to experimental data. The simulations provide insight into the dynamic hohlraum behavior but are not necessarily a reliable design tool because of the inherently 3D behavior of the imploding nested tungsten wire arrays.

  17. State of Modeling Symmetry in Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    Modeling radiation drive asymmetry is challenging problem whose agreement with data depends on the hohlraum gas fill density. Modeling to date uses the HYDRA code with crossbeam energy transfer (CBET) calculated separately, and backscattered light removed from the input laser. For high fill hohlraums (~>1 mg/cc), matching symmetry requires ad hoc adjustments to CBET during picket and peak of drive. For near-vacuum hohlraums, there is little CBET or backscatter, and drive is more waist-high than predicted. For intermediate fill densities (~0.6 mg/cc) there appears to be a region of small CBET and backscatter where symmetry is reasonably well modeled. A new technique where backscatter and CBET are done “inline” appears it could bring high fill simulations closer to data.

  18. Implosion spectroscopy in Rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Franck; Tassin, Veronique; Bitaud, Laurent; Seytor, Patricia; Reverdin, Charles

    2014-10-01

    The rugby hohlraum concept has been validated in previous experiments on the OMEGA laser facility. This new hohlraum type can now be used as a well-characterized experimental platform to study indirect drive implosion, at higher radiation temperatures than would be feasible at this scale with classical cylindrical hohlraums. Recent experiments have focused on the late stages of implosion and hotspot behavior. The capsules included both a thin buried Titanium tracer layer, 0-3 microns from the inner surface, Argon dopant in the deuterium gas fuel and Germanium doped CH shells, providing a variety of spectral signatures of the plasma conditions in different parts of the target. X-ray spectroscopy and imaging were used to study compression, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities growth at the inner surface and mix between the shell and gas.

  19. In Pursuit of a More Ideal Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Kevin; Thomas, Cliff; Baumann, Ted; Berger, Richard; Biener, Monika; Callahan, Debbie; Celliers, Peter; Elsner, Fred; Felker, Sean; Hamza, Alex; Hinkel, Denise; Huang, Haibo; Jones, Oggie; Landen, Nino; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Nikroo, Abbas; Olson, Rick; Strozzi, David

    2015-11-01

    Current hohlraum designs have a number of issues which are detrimental to achieving ignition; including LPI, CBET, hot electrons, non-ideal spectral emission(gold M-Band) and wall motion leading to implosions with large symmetry swings. We are undertaking a campaign on the NIF to address many of these issues through the use of thin wall liners. We will present a comparison between three experiments, a gold hohlraum, a copper-lined hohlraum and a zinc oxide foam-lined hohlraum and discuss our future experimental plans which will utilize very low density foam liners, ~ 10 mg/cc, and low gas fill densities, <0.6 mg/cc. This combination is predicted in simulations to greatly reduce the expansion of the gold wall leading to reduced symmetry swings, result in large reductions in LPI(SBS, SRS and 2Wpe) and eliminate gold m-band emission. The removal of the gold m-band spectra reduces the ablator-fuel instability growth and allows the use of undoped or less doped capsules which in turn reduces the ablation front growth factors leading to a more stable implosion. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Improved hohlraums for high foot implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkel, D. E.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Ralph, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Kline, J. L.; Turnbull, D. P.; Call, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.

    2015-11-01

    Recent High Foot implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), where the laser power is high early in time, have resulted in record neutron yields. In these implosions, there is evidence of low mode radiation drive asymmetries impacting both in-flight and hot spot symmetry. Simulations suggest these asymmetries reduce neutron yield 2-4x, and thus improving the hohlraum should ameliorate implosion performance. To improve symmetry, a hohlraum 1.18x larger with a lower gas fill density has been designed and is being tested. This larger hohlraum with intermediate fill density has performed well for the shorter pulse lengths driving implosions with high-density carbon (HDC) ablators. The challenge here is to maintain the predictability shown by simulation at the longer pulse lengths necessary for plastic ablators. Upcoming shots provide the first tests of drive symmetry and deficit as well as laser backscatter in these larger hohlraums with an intermediate gas fill density using the longer High Foot pulse. Results will be presented and compared to design. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  1. Radiation Hydrodynamics Modeling of Hohlraum Energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Mehul V.; Mauche, Christopher W.; Jones, Ogden S.; Scott, Howard A.

    2015-11-01

    Attempts to model the energetics in NIF Hohlraums have been made with varying degrees of success, with discrepancies of 0-25% being reported for the X-ray flux (10-25% for the NIC ignition platform hohlraums). To better understand the cause(s) of these discrepancies, the effects of uncertainties in modeling thermal conduction, laser-plasma interactions, atomic mixing at interfaces, and NLTE kinetics of the high-Z wall plasma must be quantified. In this work we begin by focusing on the NLTE kinetics component. We detail a simulation framework for developing an integrated HYDRA hohlraum model with predefined tolerances for energetics errors due to numerical discretization errors or statistical fluctuations. Within this framework we obtain a model for a converged 1D spherical hohlraum which is then extended to 2D. The new model is used to reexamine physics sensitivities and improve estimates of the energetics discrepancy. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. The physics of radiation driven ICF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Rosen, M.D.

    1995-08-07

    On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we have recently demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next proposed laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The target uses the recently declassified indirect drive (sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}radiation drive{close_quotes}) approach which converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray {open_quotes}oven{close_quotes} (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we`ve demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In this lecture we briefly review the fundamentals of ICF, and describe the capsule implosion symmetry advantages of the hohlraum approach. We then concentrate on a quantitative understanding of the scaling of radiation drive with hohlraum size and wall material, and with laser pulse length and power. We demonstrate that coupling efficiency of x-ray drive to the capsule increases as we proceed from Nova to the NIF and eventually to a reactor, thus increasing the gain of the system.

  3. Analytic Models of High-Temperature Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Stygar, W.A.; Olson, R.E.; Spielman, R.B.; Leeper, R.J.

    2000-11-29

    A unified set of high-temperature-hohlraum models has been developed. For a simple hohlraum, P{sub s} = [A{sub s}+(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4} + (4V{sigma}/c)(dT{sub R}{sup r}/dt) where P{sub S} is the total power radiated by the source, A{sub s} is the source area, A{sub W} is the area of the cavity wall excluding the source and holes in the wall, A{sub H} is the area of the holes, {sigma} is the Stefan-Boltzmann constant, T{sub R} is the radiation brightness temperature, V is the hohlraum volume, and c is the speed of light. The wall albedo {alpha}{sub W} {triple_bond} (T{sub W}/T{sub R}){sup 4} where T{sub W} is the brightness temperature of area A{sub W}. The net power radiated by the source P{sub N} = P{sub S}-A{sub S}{sigma}T{sub R}{sup 4}, which suggests that for laser-driven hohlraums the conversion efficiency {eta}{sub CE} be defined as P{sub N}/P{sub LASER}. The characteristic time required to change T{sub R}{sup 4} in response to a change in P{sub N} is 4V/C[(l{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}]. Using this model, T{sub R}, {alpha}{sub W}, and {eta}{sub CE} can be expressed in terms of quantities directly measurable in a hohlraum experiment. For a steady-state hohlraum that encloses a convex capsule, P{sub N} = {l_brace}(1{minus}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub W}+A{sub H}+[(1{minus}{alpha}{sub C})(A{sub S}+A{sub W}{alpha}{sub W})A{sub C}/A{sub T}]{r_brace}{sigma}T{sub RC}{sup 4} where {alpha}{sub C} is the capsule albedo, A{sub C} is the capsule area, A{sub T} {triple_bond} (A{sub S}+A{sub W}+A{sub H}), and T{sub RC} is the brightness temperature of the radiation that drives the capsule. According to this relation, the capsule-coupling efficiency of the baseline National-Ignition-Facility (NIF) hohlraum is 15% higher than predicted by previous analytic expressions. A model of a hohlraum that encloses a z pinch is also presented.

  4. Status Update: Modeling Energy Balance in NIF Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    We have developed a standardized methodology to model hohlraum drive in NIF experiments. We compare simulation results to experiments by 1) comparing hohlraum xray fluxes and 2) comparing capsule metrics, such as bang times. Long-pulse, high gas-fill hohlraums require a 20-28% reduction in simulated drive and inclusion of ~15% backscatter to match experiment through (1) and (2). Short-pulse, low fill or near-vacuum hohlraums require a 10% reduction in simulated drive to match experiment through (2); no reduction through (1). Ongoing work focuses on physical model modifications to improve these matches.

  5. Novel spherical hohlraum with cylindrical laser entrance holes and shields

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-09-15

    Our recent works [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 052704 (2014)] have shown that the octahedral spherical hohlraums are superior to the cylindrical hohlraums in both higher symmetry during the capsule implosion and lower backscatter without supplementary technology. However, both the coupling efficiency from the drive laser energy to the capsule and the capsule symmetry decrease remarkably when larger laser entrance holes (LEHs) are used. In addition, the laser beams injected at angles > 45° transport close to the hohlraum wall, thus the wall blowoff causes the LEH to close faster and results in strong laser plasma interactions inside the spherical hohlraums. In this letter, we propose a novel octahedral hohlraum with LEH shields and cylindrical LEHs to alleviate these problems. From our theoretical study, with the LEH shields, the laser coupling efficiency is significantly increased and the capsule symmetry is remarkably improved in the spherical hohlraums. The cylindrical LEHs take advantage of the cylindrical hohlraum near the LEH and mitigate the influence of the blowoff on laser transport inside a spherical hohlraum. The cylindrical LEHs can also be applied to the rugby and elliptical hohlraums.

  6. First Hohlraum Drives Studies on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald,E.; Landen, O.; Suter, L.; et al; .

    2006-01-01

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the first four laser beams have activated the indirect-drive experimental capabilities and tested radiation temperature limits imposed by hohlraum plasma filling. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 9 TW, 1 to 9 ns long square pulses and energies of up to 17 kJ to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed previously at other laser facilities. Furthermore, for a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of plasma filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with analytical modeling that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits on full NIF (1.8 MJ) that are significantly greater than required for ignition hohlraums.

  7. First Laser-Plasma Interaction and Hohlraum Experiments on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Jones, O S; Schein, J; Froula, D; Divol, L; Campbell, K; Schneider, M S; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J

    2005-06-17

    Recently the first hohlraum experiments have been performed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. The effects of laser beam smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD) and polarization smoothing (PS) on the beam propagation in long scale gas-filled pipes has been studied at plasma scales as found in indirect drive gas filled ignition hohlraum designs. The long scale gas-filled target experiments have shown propagation over 7 mm of dense plasma without filamentation and beam break up when using full laser smoothing. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1-9 ns pulse lengths and energies up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Subsequently, novel long laser pulse hohlraum experiments have tested models of hohlraum plasma filling and long pulse hohlraum radiation production. The validity of the plasma filling assessment in analytical models and in LASNEX calculations has been proven for the first time. The comparison of these results with modeling will be discussed.

  8. Exploring symmetry in near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O.; Khan, S.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C.; Turnbull, D.; Amendt, P.; Wilks, S.; Zylstra, A.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments with near-vacuum hohlraums, which utilize a minimal but non-zero helium fill, have demonstrated performance improvements relative to conventional gas-filled (0.96 - 1.6 mg/cc helium) hohlraums: minimal backscatter, reduced capsule drive degradation, and minimal suprathermal electron generation. Because this is a low laser-plasma interaction platform, implosion symmetry is controlled via pulse-shaping adjustments to laser power balance. Extending this platform to high-yield designs with high-density carbon capsules requires achieving adequate symmetry control throughout the pulse. In simulations, laser propagation is degraded suddenly by hohlraum wall expansion interacting with ablated capsule material. Nominal radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have not yet proven predictive on symmetry of the final hotspot, and experiments show more prolate symmetry than preshot calculations. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the discrepancy between simulated and measured symmetry and on alternate designs for symmetry control through varying cone fraction, trade-offs between laser power and energy, and modifications to case-to-capsule ratio. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Progress in hohlraum physics for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moody, J. D. Callahan, D. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Amendt, P. A.; Baker, K. L.; Bradley, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Jones, O.; Haan, S. W.; Ho, D.; Hopkins, L. B.; Izumi, N.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; and others

    2014-05-15

    Advances in hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were made this past year in hohlraum efficiency, dynamic shape control, and hot electron and x-ray preheat control. Recent experiments are exploring hohlraum behavior over a large landscape of parameters by changing the hohlraum shape, gas-fill, and laser pulse. Radiation hydrodynamic modeling, which uses measured backscatter, shows that gas-filled hohlraums utilize between 60% and 75% of the laser power to match the measured bang-time, whereas near-vacuum hohlraums utilize 98%. Experiments seem to be pointing to deficiencies in the hohlraum (instead of capsule) modeling to explain most of the inefficiency in gas-filled targets. Experiments have begun quantifying the Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET) rate at several points in time for hohlraum experiments that utilize CBET for implosion symmetry. These measurements will allow better control of the dynamic implosion symmetry for these targets. New techniques are being developed to measure the hot electron energy and energy spectra generated at both early and late time. Rugby hohlraums offer a target which requires little to no CBET and may be less vulnerable to undesirable dynamic symmetry “swings.” A method for detecting the effect of the energetic electrons on the fuel offers a direct measure of the hot electron effects as well as a means to test energetic electron mitigation methods. At higher hohlraum radiation temperatures (including near vacuum hohlraums), the increased hard x-rays (1.8–4 keV) may pose an x-ray preheat problem. Future experiments will explore controlling these x-rays with advanced wall materials.

  10. Octahedral spherical hohlraum and its laser arrangement for inertial fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; He, Xian-Tu; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Wudi; Lai, Dongxian

    2014-05-15

    A recent publication [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014)] proposed a spherical hohlraum with six laser entrance holes of octahedral symmetry at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and superiority on low backscatter without supplementary technology. This paper extends the previous one by studying the laser arrangement and constraints of octahedral hohlraum in detail. As a result, it has serious beam crossing at θ{sub L}≤45°, and θ{sub L}=50° to 60° is proposed as the optimum candidate range for the golden octahedral hohlraum, here θ{sub L} is the opening angle that the laser quad beam makes with the Laser Entrance Hole (LEH) normal direction. In addition, the design of the LEH azimuthal angle should avoid laser spot overlapping on hohlraum wall and laser beam transferring outside hohlraum from a neighbor LEH. The octahedral hohlraums are flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches. This paper also applies the octahedral hohlraum to the recent proposed hybrid indirect-direct drive approach.

  11. First Investigation on the Radiation Field of the Spherical Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wen Yi; Li, Zhichao; Chen, Yao-Hua; Xie, Xuefei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Ren, Guoli; Li, Yongsheng; Liu, Yonggang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Guo, Liang; Zhang, Huan; Hou, Lifei; Du, Huabing; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Chaoguang; Zhan, Xiayu; Yuan, Guanghui; Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Baibin; Huang, Lizhen; Du, Kai; Zhao, Runchang; Li, Ping; Wang, Wei; Su, Jingqin; Ding, Yongkun; He, Xian-Tu; Zhang, Weiyan

    2016-07-01

    The first spherical hohlraum energetics experiment is accomplished on the SGIII-prototype laser facility. In the experiment, the radiation temperature is measured by using an array of flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRDs) through a laser entrance hole at four different angles. The radiation temperature and M -band fraction inside the hohlraum are determined by the shock wave technique. The experimental observations indicate that the radiation temperatures measured by the FXRDs depend on the observation angles and are related to the view field. According to the experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the vacuum spherical hohlraum is in the range from 60% to 80%. Although this conversion efficiency is less than the conversion efficiency of the near vacuum hohlraum on the National Ignition Facility, it is consistent with that of the cylindrical hohlraums used on the NOVA and the SGIII-prototype at the same energy scale.

  12. Gas-filled hohlraum study on Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Huasen; Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Xin

    2015-11-01

    Experimental studies on gas-filled hohlraum were performed extensively in recent years on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. These experiments employed Au hohlraums within C5H12 gas fill heated by smoothing beams. In the first round of experiments, although the low-Z gas fill impeded the blow-off plasma ablated from hohlraum wall, the x-ray flux from the LEH decreased dramatically compared with the vacuum hohlraum. Further analysis of several ways of energy deposition including heating the gas-fill, extra scattered light and ablating the LEH membrane, revealed that too much laser energy were wasted in exploding the LEH membrane if we use a 1 ns square pulse. After we introduced a low power prepulse to intentionally exploding the membrane, the behavior of the x-ray flux from the gas-filled hohlraum is identical with the vacuum hohlraum. In subsequent studies, the motion of x-ray spot and corona plasma has also been studied using the gas-filled hohlraum. We obtained high quality data of the gas/wall interface and the boundary of the ablated wall near the LEH. The result agrees with that in simulation. However, there is a discrepancy between the experiment and the simulation in the spatial feature of the ablated wall near the LEH extracted from M-band x-ray image.

  13. Laser plasma interaction on rugby hohlraum on the Omega Laser Facility: Comparisons between cylinder, rugby, and elliptical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Tassin, V.; Philippe, F.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Neuville, C.; Villette, B.; Laffite, S.; Seytor, P.; Fremerye, P.; Seka, W.; Teychenné, D.; Debayle, A.; Marion, D.; Loiseau, P.; Casanova, M.

    2016-02-01

    Gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums have demonstrated high performances compared to a classical similar diameter cylinder hohlraum with a nearly 40% increase of x-ray drive, 10% higher measured peak drive temperature, and an increase in neutron production. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder, and elliptical hohlraums. The impact of these geometry differences on the laser plasma instabilities is examined. Using comparisons with hydrodynamic simulations carried out with the code FCI2 and postprocessed by Piranah, we have been able to reproduce the stimulated Raman and Brillouin scattering spectrum of the different beams. Using a methodology based on a statistical analysis for the gain calculations, we show that the behavior of the laser plasma instabilities in rugby hohlraums can be reproduced. The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques to mitigate these instabilities are discussed, and we show that while rugby hohlraums exhibit more laser plasma instabilities than cylinder hohlraum, the latter can be mitigated in the case of an elliptical hohlraum.

  14. Approach to Developing Predictive Capability for Hohlraum Drive and Symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, O. S.

    2015-07-22

    Currently, we do not have the ability to predict the hohlraum drive and symmetry without requiring ad hoc adjustments to physics models. This document describes a plan for code improvements and focused physics validation experiments.

  15. Hohlraum Drive and Asymmetry in High Foot Implosions on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callahan, D.; Hurricane, O.; Casey, D.; Dewald, E.; Dittrich, T.; Doeppner, T.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O.; Kritcher, A.; Lepape, S.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P.; Ralph, J.; Robey, H.; Ross, S.; Salmonson, J.; Spears, B.; Springer, P.; Tommasini, R.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy in the high foot campaign on NIF has been to take reasonably small steps away from a working design, which means that we have a very rich database to understand both capsule and hohlraum performance. Over the course of the campaign, we have changed the laser power and energy, used both gold and depleted uranium hohlraums, and varied the thickness of the ablator. Each of these changes has an impact on the hohlraum drive and drive asymmetry, as measured by the implosion shape. In this talk, we will discuss what we have learned about hohlraum performance and residual kinetic energy resulting from drive asymmetry in the high foot database. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA273.

  16. Kinetic modeling of Nernst effect in magnetized hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, A. S.; Ridgers, C. P.; Kingham, R. J.; Thomas, A. G. R.

    2016-04-01

    We present nanosecond time-scale Vlasov-Fokker-Planck-Maxwell modeling of magnetized plasma transport and dynamics in a hohlraum with an applied external magnetic field, under conditions similar to recent experiments. Self-consistent modeling of the kinetic electron momentum equation allows for a complete treatment of the heat flow equation and Ohm's law, including Nernst advection of magnetic fields. In addition to showing the prevalence of nonlocal behavior, we demonstrate that effects such as anomalous heat flow are induced by inverse bremsstrahlung heating. We show magnetic field amplification up to a factor of 3 from Nernst compression into the hohlraum wall. The magnetic field is also expelled towards the hohlraum axis due to Nernst advection faster than frozen-in flux would suggest. Nonlocality contributes to the heat flow towards the hohlraum axis and results in an augmented Nernst advection mechanism that is included self-consistently through kinetic modeling.

  17. Hohlraum drive and implosion experiments on Nova. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kilkenny, J.D.; Suter, L.J.; Cable, M.D.

    1994-09-08

    Experiments on Nova have demonstrated hohlraum radiation temperatures up to 300 eV and in lower temperature experiments reproducible time integrated symmetry to 1--2%. Detailed 2-D LASNEX simulations satisfactorily reproduce Nova`s drive and symmetry scaling data bases. Hohlraums has been used for implosion experiments achieving convergence ratios (initial capsule radius/final fuel radius) up to 24 with high density glass surrounding a hot gas fill.

  18. Energetics of multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P.; Berger, R. L.; Callahan, D.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; London, R. A.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P. A.; Ross, J. S.; Sorce, C.; Widmann, K.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-05-15

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes has been performed in multiple-ion species hohlraum plasmas at conditions similar to those expected in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with electron densities of 5.5x10{sup 20} and 9x10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} are heated by 14.3 kJ of laser energy (wavelength 351 nm) to electron temperatures of 3 keV and backscattered laser light is measured. Landau damping of the ion acoustic waves is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO{sub 2} or CF{sub 4} gas. Stimulated Brillouin backscattering of a 351 nm probe beam is found to decrease monotonically with increasing Landau damping, accompanied by a comparable increase in the transmission. More efficient energy coupling into the hohlraum by suppression of backscatter from the heater beams results in an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics. The reduction in backscatter is reproduced by linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale three-dimensional laser-plasma interaction simulations, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in inertial confinement fusion relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. These findings have led to the inclusion of multiple-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  19. Hohlraum energetics study on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Yi, Rongqing; Guo, Liang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Liu, Shenye; Yang, Jiamin; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun; Zou, Shiyang; Zhang, Huasen; Zhao, Yiqing; Huo, Wenyi; Li, Xin; Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke

    2014-10-01

    Comprehensive and accurate characterization of the hohlraum drive needs to use a variety of methods resolving different photon ranges and multiple viewing areas. In recent years, hohlraum physics have been studied extensively on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility. These experiments employed mainly Au hohlraums (vaccum or gas-filled, with capsule or not) heated by smoothing beams where scattering loss is less than 10%. With compact flat-response x-ray detector array and 14-channel soft x-ray spectrometer, the radiation flux from several specific regions inside the hohlraum is measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) or the diagnostic hole (DH) at different photon ranges and multiple lines of sight. The difference in radiation between the laser spot and the reemitting wall is quantitatively studied to interpret flux onto the capsule. The motion of laser ablated bubble and radiation ablated blow-off plasma is directly measured, and their effects on laser absorption and x-ray escaping LEH are evaluated. In addition, the radiation driven shock propagating in Al and Ti placed on the hohlraum wall, which is more representative of the drive inside the hohlraum, provide a unique information of radiation.

  20. Laser plasma interaction in rugby-shaped hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Monteil, M.-C.; Gauthier, P.; Casner, A.; Depierreux, S.; Seytor, P.; Teychenne, D.; Loiseau, P.; Freymerie, P.

    2014-10-01

    Rugby shaped-hohlraum has proven to give high performance compared to a classical similar-diameter cylinder hohlraum. Due to this performance, this hohlraum has been chosen as baseline ignition target for the Laser MegaJoule (LMJ). Many experiments have therefore been performed during the last years on the Omega laser facility in order to study in details the rugby hohlraum. In this talk, we will discuss the interpretation of these experiments from the point of view of the laser plasma instability problem. Experimental comparisons have been done between rugby, cylinder and elliptical shape rugby hohlraums and we will discuss how the geometry differences will affect the evolution of laser plasma instabilities (LPI). The efficiency of laser smoothing techniques on these instabilities will also be discussed as well as gas filling effect. The experimental results will be compared with FCI2 hydroradiative calculations and linear postprocessing with Piranah. Experimental Raman and Brillouin spectrum, from which we can infer the location of the parametric instabilities, will be compared to simulated ones, and will give the possibility to compare LPI between the different hohlraum geometries.

  1. Characterizing the hohlraum radiation via one-end driven experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yiqing; Zou, Shiyang; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang

    2014-07-15

    A new experiment is designed and performed on the Shenguang III laser facility with the first eight available beams to characterizing the hohlraum radiation, in which the hohlraum with laser entrance holes on both ends is driven through one-end only. The experiment enables us to identify the x-ray radiations originated from the hohlraum reemission wall and high-Z bubble plasmas utilizing their position and spectral characters, which provides a better test on the associated hohlraum models. The total and M-band x-ray radiation fluxes are measured with the flat response x-ray detectors and the filtered M-band x-ray detectors, respectively. Numerical simulations are conducted with the two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-INTEGRATION using the multi-group radiation transfer and/or diffusion models. It is found that the experimentally measured temporal profiles and angular distributions of hohlraum radiation are in good agreement with the predictions of simulation using radiation transfer models, but differ significantly from the results obtained with the multi-group radiation diffusion calculations. We thus note that to accurately represent the hohlraum radiation, a true radiation transfer model is essential.

  2. The Hohlraum Drive Campaign on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, John D.

    2013-10-01

    The Hohlraum drive effort on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser has three primary goals: 1) improve hohlraum performance by improving laser beam propagation, reducing backscatter from laser plasma interactions (LPI), controlling x-ray and electron preheat, and modifying the x-ray drive spectrum; 2) improve understanding of crossbeam energy transfer physics to better evaluate this as a symmetry tuning method; and 3) improve modeling in order to find optimum designs. Our experimental strategy for improving performance explores the impact of significant changes to the hohlraum shape, wall material, gasfill composition, and gasfill density on integrated implosion experiments. We are investigating the performance of a rugby-shaped design that has a significantly larger diameter (7 mm) at the waist than our standard 5.75 mm diameter cylindrical-shaped hohlraum but maintains approximately the same wall area. We are also exploring changes to the gasfill composition in cylindrical hohlraums by using neopentane at room temperature to compare with our standard helium gasfill. In addition, we are also investigating higher He gasfill density (1.6 mg/cc vs nominal 0.96 mg/cc) and increased x-ray drive very early in the pulse. Besides these integrated experiments, our strategy includes experiments testing separate aspects of the hohlraum physics. These include time-resolved and time-integrated measurements of cross-beam transfer rates and laser-beam spatial power distribution at early and late times using modified targets. Non-local thermal equilibrium modeling and heat transport relevant to ignition experiments are being studied using sphere targets on the Omega laser system. These simpler targets provide benchmarks for improving our modeling tools. This talk will summarize the results of the Hohlraum Drive campaign and discuss future directions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under

  3. Experimental characterization of hohlraum conditions by X-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Back, C.A.; Hsieh, E.J.; Kauffman, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Spectroscopy is a powerful technique used to measure the plasma parameters relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasmas. For instance, the onset of spectral signals from multilayer targets have been used to determine ablation rate scalings. Temperature and density measurements in coronal plasmas have enabled the study of laser coupling efficiency as a function of the laser wavelengths. More recently, dopants have been successfully used to determine capsule conditions of ICF targets. However, few spectroscopic studies have been performed to diagnose plasma conditions of the hohlraum itself. Several laboratories have studied enclosed cavities, previously concentrating on measurements of the radiative heat wave, the x-ray conversion efficiency, and temporal evolution of Au x rays. Measurements of electron temperature T{sub e} and electron densities n{sub e} are difficult because many physical processes occur and each diagnostic`s line-of-sight is restricted by the hohlraum wall. However, they are worth pursuing because they can provide critical information on the target energetics and the evolution of plasma parameters important to achieving fusion. Here the authors discuss spectroscopic tracers to diagnose plasma conditions in the hohlraum, using time- and space-resolved measurements. The tracers are typically mid-Z elements which are placed on the hohlraum wall or supended in the hohlraum volume. To demonstrate the breadth of measurements that can be performed, three types of experiments are presented.

  4. Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-05

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  5. Numerical Modeling of Hohlraum Radiation Conditions: Spatial and Spectral Variations due to Sample Position, Beam Pointing, and Hohlraum Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, D H; Landen, O L; MacFarlane, J J

    2005-01-25

    View-factor simulations are presented of the spatially varying radiation conditions inside double-ended gold hohlraums and single-ended gold hohlraums (''halfraums'') used in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) physics experiments [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004); M. D. Rosen, Phys. Plasmas 3, 1803 (1996)]. It is shown that in many circumstances, the common assumption that the hohlraum ''drive'' can be characterized by a single temperature is too simplistic. Specifically, the radiation conditions seen by an experimental package can differ significantly from the wall reemission measured through diagnostic holes or laser entrance holes (LEHs) by absolutely calibrated detectors. Furthermore, even in situations where the radiation temperature is roughly the same for diagnostics and experimental packages, or for packages at different locations, the spectral energy distributions can vary significantly, due to the differing fractions of reemitting wall, laser hot spots, and LEHs seen from different locations. We find that the spatial variation of temperature, and especially the differences between what diagnostics looking in the LEH measure vs. the radiation temperature on wall-mounted experimental packages, is generally greater for double-ended hohlraums than it is for halfraums. View-factor simulations can also be used to explore experimental variables (halfraum length and geometry, sample position, and beam pointing) that can be adjusted in order to, for example, maximize the radiation flux onto a sample, or other package. In this vein, simulations of hohlraums and halfraums with LEH shields are also presented.

  6. Lead (Pb) hohlraum: target for inertial fusion energy.

    PubMed

    Ross, J S; Amendt, P; Atherton, L J; Dunne, M; Glenzer, S H; Lindl, J D; Meeker, D; Moses, E I; Nikroo, A; Wallace, R

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress towards demonstrating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has sparked wide interest in Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) for carbon-free large-scale power generation. A LIFE-based fleet of power plants promises clean energy generation with no greenhouse gas emissions and a virtually limitless, widely available thermonuclear fuel source. For the LIFE concept to be viable, target costs must be minimized while the target material efficiency or x-ray albedo is optimized. Current ICF targets on the NIF utilize a gold or depleted uranium cylindrical radiation cavity (hohlraum) with a plastic capsule at the center that contains the deuterium and tritium fuel. Here we show a direct comparison of gold and lead hohlraums in efficiently ablating deuterium-filled plastic capsules with soft x rays. We report on lead hohlraum performance that is indistinguishable from gold, yet costing only a small fraction. PMID:23486285

  7. Radiosity Modeling of Radiation Transport in Z Hohlraum Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Mehlhorn, T. A.

    1998-11-01

    Vacuum radiation transport in three-dimensional geometry has been modeled, with simple physics assumptions, using the Lightscape^TM commercial radiosity code. This code utilizes progressive, hierarchical radiosity techniques and adaptive mesh refinement to allow greater spatial resolution and unlimited geometric model complexity compared to traditional radiosity methods. Applications to current Z experiments at Sandia will be presented, including (a) uniformity of the radiation flux driving shock physics samples in offset and direct-viewing secondary hohlraums, (b) radiation temperature gradients and capsule illumination in on-axis secondaries driven by static-walled primary hohlraums, and (c) radiation loss from primary hohlraums into the Z anode-cathode gap and feed hardware.

  8. New Advanced Hohlraums Utilizing Unique Geometries and Foam Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. S.; Tabak, M.; Amendt, P. A.; Hammer, J. H.; Afeyan, B.; Baker, K. L.; Biener, M. M.; Kim, S. H.; MacLaren, S. A.; Thomas, C. A.

    2015-11-01

    To date the indirect drive experiments on the NIF have principally utilized cylindrical gas-filled hohlraums that have been subject to a number of challenges, including generating inner cone SRS backscatter (up to 18 percent of total laser energy), producing hot electrons, and requiring cross beam energy transfer to inner beams to obtain adequate drive symmetry. Proposed new hohlraum concepts address the challenges facing standard cylindrical gas-filled hohlraums by having the beams traverse shorter, hotter plasmas to reduce backscatter, shielding the capsule from direct illumination from the laser spots, or avoiding cross-beam transfer altogether by not allowing crossing of the beams. These concepts also utilize high-Z and mid-Z foams to increase stability of the wall/fill interface, increase x-ray conversion efficiency, reduce backscatter, reduce symmetry swings, and allow smaller, more efficient, laser entrance holes. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Lead (Pb) Hohlraum: Target for Inertial Fusion Energy

    PubMed Central

    Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Atherton, L. J.; Dunne, M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Lindl, J. D.; Meeker, D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikroo, A.; Wallace, R.

    2013-01-01

    Recent progress towards demonstrating inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) has sparked wide interest in Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) for carbon-free large-scale power generation. A LIFE-based fleet of power plants promises clean energy generation with no greenhouse gas emissions and a virtually limitless, widely available thermonuclear fuel source. For the LIFE concept to be viable, target costs must be minimized while the target material efficiency or x-ray albedo is optimized. Current ICF targets on the NIF utilize a gold or depleted uranium cylindrical radiation cavity (hohlraum) with a plastic capsule at the center that contains the deuterium and tritium fuel. Here we show a direct comparison of gold and lead hohlraums in efficiently ablating deuterium-filled plastic capsules with soft x rays. We report on lead hohlraum performance that is indistinguishable from gold, yet costing only a small fraction. PMID:23486285

  10. Scaling and optimization of the radiation temperature in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; DOUGLAS,MELISSA R.; LASH,JOEL S.; VESEY,ROGER A.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; NASH,THOMAS J.; DERZON,MARK S.

    2000-04-13

    The authors have constructed a quasi-analytic model of the dynamic hohlraum. Solutions only require a numerical root solve, which can be done very quickly. Results of the model are compared to both experiments and full numerical simulations with good agreement. The computational simplicity of the model allows one to find the behavior of the hohlraum temperature as a function the various parameters of the system and thus find optimum parameters as a function of the driving current. The model is used to investigate the benefits of ablative standoff and axial convergence.

  11. Insensitivity of the octahedral spherical hohlraum to power imbalance, pointing accuracy, and assemblage accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, Wen Yi; Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Liu, Jie; Lan, Ke

    2014-11-15

    The random radiation asymmetry in the octahedral spherical hohlraum [K. Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 0 10704 (2014)] arising from the power imbalance, pointing accuracy of laser quads, and the assemblage accuracy of capsule is investigated by using the 3-dimensional view factor model. From our study, for the spherical hohlraum, the random radiation asymmetry arising from the power imbalance of the laser quads is about half of that in the cylindrical hohlraum; the random asymmetry arising from the pointing error is about one order lower than that in the cylindrical hohlraum; and the random asymmetry arising from the assemblage error of capsule is about one third of that in the cylindrical hohlraum. Moreover, the random radiation asymmetry in the spherical hohlraum is also less than the amount in the elliptical hohlraum. The results indicate that the spherical hohlraum is more insensitive to the random variations than the cylindrical hohlraum and the elliptical hohlraum. Hence, the spherical hohlraum can relax the requirements to the power imbalance and pointing accuracy of laser facility and the assemblage accuracy of capsule.

  12. High flux symmetry of the spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs at the hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; He, Xian-Tu; Lai, Dongxian; Zheng, Wudi

    2014-01-15

    We propose a spherical hohlraum with octahedral six laser entrance holes at a specific hohlraum-to-capsule radius ratio of 5.14 for inertial fusion study, which has robust high symmetry during the capsule implosion and low backscatter without supplementary technology. To produce an ignition radiation pulse of 300 eV, it needs 1.5 MJ absorbed laser energy in such a golden octahedral hohlraum, about 30% more than a traditional cylinder. Nevertheless, it is worth for a high symmetry and low backscatter. The proposed octahedral hohlraum is also flexible and can be applicable to diverse inertial fusion drive approaches.

  13. Radiation Symmetry in Sandia Z Accelerator Dynamic Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, G. R.; Bailey, J. E.; Chandler, G. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Hebron, D. E.; Lash, J. S.; Porter, J. L.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Slutz, S. A.; Vesey, R. A.

    2000-10-01

    Although the dynamic hohlraum has achieved the highest radiation temperatures generated by any z-pinch configuration, a number of critical issues remain before the high-yield ICF concept of an internally-located capsule can be considered credible. Of particular importance to the imploding capsule, embedded in foam, is the thermal radiation asymmetry in the hohlraum r-z plane, arising from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable z-pinch wire array forming the radiation cavity. Numerical simulation leads to an inadequate understanding of the RT instability growth and form, since, among other things, there is a discrepancy in the calculated and observed density variations between bubble and spikes. Likewise, by looking into the hohlraum open end for a direct observation, a wall emission uniformity measurement is precluded by the shallow viewing angle. However, to overcome this constraint, a semi-closed hohlraum configuration is described here, where a half W/half Al wire array permits a direct view through the low-opacity Al plasma and the optically thin foam. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corp., a Lockheed Martin Company, for the USDOE under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  14. Hohlraum Te Inferred from Au L-Shell Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Brown, G. V.; Callahan, D.; Doeppner, T.; Fournier, K. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kauffman, R.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Ross, J. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-ablation plasmas created at the inner wall of the hohlraum (Au bubble) and at the laser entrance hole (LEH) radiate L-shell emission from Ne-like to Co-like charge states of Au. A 1-D spatially resolved and time-integrated spectrum in the 6- to 16-keV range with E/d E = 100 to 300 is recorded along the axis of the hohlraum. The Au L-shell spectral line shapes of the 2p3 / 2 - 3 s , 2p3 / 2 - 3d5 / 2 , and 2p1 / 2 - 3d3 / 2 transitions are analyzed using an atomic physics code to infer the Te of the radiating plasma. Preliminary results indicate the Au LEH plasma of a near-vacuum hohlraum has an inferred Te of 5 to 6 keV, while a gas-filled hohlraum has a significantly lower Te. A comparison of the Au L-shell spectra and the Te sensitivity will be presented, along with the plan to measure the L-shell emission from the Au bubble. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Laser beam propagation through inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froula, D. H.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Dixit, S.; Neumayer, P.; Moody, J. D.; Pollock, B. B.; Ross, J. S.; Suter, L.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2007-05-01

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes have been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. The plasma emulator is produced in a gas-filled hohlraum; a blue 351-nm laser beam propagates along the axis of the hohlraum interacting with a high-temperature (Te=3.5keV), dense (ne=5×1020cm-3), long-scale length (L˜2mm) plasma. Experiments at these conditions have demonstrated that the interaction beam produces less than 1% total backscatter resulting in transmission greater than 90% for laser intensities less than I <2×1015Wcm-2. The bulk plasma conditions have been independently characterized using Thomson scattering where the peak electron temperatures are shown to scale with the hohlraum heater beam energy in the range from 2keV to 3.5keV. This feature has allowed us to determine the thresholds for both backscattering and filamentation instabilities; the former measured with absolutely calibrated full aperture backscatter and near backscatter diagnostics and the latter with a transmitted beam diagnostics. Comparing the experimental results with detailed gain calculations for the onset of significant laser scattering processes shows a stimulated Brillouin scattering threshold (R=10%) for a linear gain of 15; these high temperature, low density experiments produce plasma conditions comparable to those along the outer beams in ignition hohlraum designs. By increasing the gas fill density (ne=1021cm-3) in these targets, the inner beam ignition hohlraum conditions are accessed. In this case, stimulated Raman scattering dominates the backscattering processes and we show that scattering is small for gains less than 20 which can be achieved through proper choice of the laser beam intensity.

  16. Laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, R.E.; Powers, L.V.; Berger, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    Indirect-drive targets planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser consist of spherical fuel capsules enclosed in cylindrical Au hohlraums. Laser beams, arranged in cylindrical rings, heat the inside of the Au wall to produce x rays that in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Detailed calculations show that adequate implosion symmetry can be maintained by filling the hohlraum interior with low-density, low-Z gases. The plasma produced from the heated gas provides sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively. As the laser heats this gas, the gas becomes a relatively uniform plasma with small gradients in velocity and density. Such long-scale-length plasmas can be ideal mediums for stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS). SBS can reflect a large fraction of the incident laser light before it is absorbed by the hohlraum; therefore, it is undesirable in an inertial confinement fusion target. To examine the importance of SBS in NIF targets, the authors used Nova to measure SBS from hohlraums with plasma conditions similar to those predicted for high-gain NIF targets. The plasmas differ from the more familiar exploding foil or solid targets as follows: they are hot (3 keV); they have high electron densities (n{sub e}=10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}); and they are nearly stationary, confined within an Au cylinder, and uniform over large distances (>2 mm). These hohlraums have <3% peak SBS backscatter for an interaction beam with intensities of 1-4 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a laser wavelength of 0.351{micro}m, f/4 or f/8 focusing optics, and a variety of beam smoothing implementations. Based on these conditions the authors conclude that SBS does not appear to be a problem for NIF targets.

  17. Measurement of Radiation Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, David L.

    2001-10-01

    The z-pinch driven hohlraum (ZPDH) is a promising approach to high yield inertial confinement fusion currently being characterized in experiments on the Sandia Z accelerator [1]. In this concept [2], x rays are produced by an axial z-pinch in a primary hohlraum at each end of a secondary hohlraum. A fusion capsule in the secondary is imploded by a symmetric x-ray flux distribution, effectively smoothed by wall reemission during transport to the capsule position. Capsule radiation symmetry, a critical issue in the design of such a system, is influenced by hohlraum geometry, wall motion and time-dependent albedo, as well as power balance and pinch timing between the two z-pinch x-ray sources. In initial symmetry studies on Z, we used solid low density burnthrough spheres to diagnose highly asymmetric, single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries. We then applied this technique to the more symmetric double z-pinch geometry [3]. As a result of design improvements, radiation flux symmetry in Z double-pinch wire array experiments now exceeds the measurement sensitivity of this self-backlit foam ball symmetry diagnostic (15% max-min flux asymmetry). To diagnose radiation symmetry at the 2 - 5% level attainable with our present ZPDH designs, we are using high-energy x rays produced by the recently-completed Z-Beamlet laser backlighter for point-projection imaging of thin-wall implosion and symmetry capsules. We will present the results of polar flux symmetry measuremets on Z for several ZPDH capsule geometries together with radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics simulations for comparison. [1] M. E. Cuneo et al., Phys. Plasmas 8,2257(2001); [2] J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6,2129(1999); [3] D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 45,360(2000).

  18. Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

    2010-11-22

    A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

  19. Capsule symmetry sensitivity and hohlraum symmetry calculations for the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, Roger; Cuneo, M. E.; Hanson Porter, D. L., Jr.; Mehlhorn, T. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.

    2000-10-01

    Capsule radiation symmetry is a crucial issue in the design of the z-pinch driven hohlraum approach to high-yield inertial confinement fusion [1]. Capsule symmetry may be influenced by power imbalance of the two z-pinch x-ray sources, and by hohlraum effects (geometry, time-dependent albedo, wall motion). We have conducted two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to estimate the symmetry sensitivity of the 220 eV beryllium ablator capsule that nominally yields 400 MJ in this concept. These estimates then determine the symmetry requirements to be met by the hohlraum design (for even Legendre modes) and by the top-bottom pinch imbalance and mistiming (for odd Legendre modes). We have used a combination of 2- and 3-D radiosity ("viewfactor"), and 2-D radiation-hydrodynamics calculations to identify hohlraum geometries that meet these symmetry requirements for high-yield, and are testing these models against ongoing Z foam ball symmetry experiments. 1. J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6, 2129 (1999).

  20. Radiation temperature measurements in laser-heated hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Cobble, J.A.; Goldman, S.R.; Bessarab, A.V.; Kunin, A.V.; Tokarev, V.A.

    1997-11-01

    Two x-ray spectrographs have been used on the Trident laser at LANL to monitor the radiation temperature of small Au hohlraums. The cylindrical targets are smaller than 1 mm. The x radiation produced by {approximately} 400 J of 0.53-{micro}m laser light is detected with a 7-channel VNIIEF soft-x-ray spectrometer. Each channel employs a multi-layer mirror and a filter to limit the channel bandwidth to 1--3% of the channel energy. X rays are detected with calibrated Al x-ray diodes. A second spectrometer is based on a free-standing Au transmission grating for spectral dispersion and a multi-channel diamond photo-conductive device detector. The small hohlraum results are consistent with radiation temperatures exceeding 100 eV. Simple computer modeling shows that late in the plasma discharge, radiation of this temperature is emitted from the target.

  1. Lithium ion beam driven hohlraums for PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Dukart, R.J.

    1994-05-06

    In our light ion inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program, fusion capsules are driven with an intense x-ray radiation field produced when an intense beam of ions penetrates a radiation case and deposits energy in a foam x-ray conversion region. A first step in the program is to generate and measure these intense fields on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II). Our goal is to generate a 100-eV radiation temperature in lithium ion beam driven hohlraums, the radiation environment which will provide the initial drive temperature for ion beam driven implosion systems designed to achieve high gain. In this paper, we describe the design of such hohlraum targets and their predicted performance on PBFA II as we provide increasing ion beam intensities.

  2. Symmetry control in subscale near-vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Ho, D. D.; Mackinnon, A.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Sio, H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    Controlling the symmetry of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions remains a key challenge. Increasing the ratio of the hohlraum diameter to the capsule diameter (case-to-capsule ratio, or CCR) facilitates symmetry tuning. By varying the balance of energy between the inner and outer cones as well as the incident laser pulse length, we demonstrate the ability to tune from oblate, through round, to prolate at a CCR of 3.2 in near-vacuum hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility, developing empirical playbooks along the way for cone fraction sensitivity of various laser pulse epochs. Radiation-hydrodynamic simulations with enhanced inner beam propagation reproduce most experimental observables, including hot spot shape, for a majority of implosions. Specular reflections are used to diagnose the limits of inner beam propagation as a function of pulse length.

  3. Optimization of Capsule Symmetry in Z-Pinch Driven Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M.; Hanson, D.; Porter, J.; Mehlhorn, T.; Ruggles, L.; Simpson, W.; Vargas, M.; Hammer, J.; Landen, O.

    1999-11-01

    The uniformity of the radiation flux incident on the capsule is a critical issue for indirect drive fusion using the z-pinch driven hohlraum high-yield concept(J.H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plas. 6), 2129 (1999).. Experiments on the Z accelerator at Sandia have demonstrated the ability to diagnose the uniformity of the flux striking a foam ball (surrogate capsule)(P.A. Amendt et al., Phys. Plas. 4), 1862 (1997); S.G. Glendinning et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 536 (1999).. These single-sided drive experiments have been modeled using radiosity and radiation-hydrodynamics codes, yielding agreement with the measured ablation rate vs. angle on the foam ball. Flux uniformity at the 1-2% level needed for high-convergence capsule implosions requires a 2-sided drive (top and bottom z-pinch) configuration. Constrained optimization methods have identified hohlraum geometries with improved symmetry.

  4. Laser Machining For Fabrication Of Hohlraums And Capsules

    SciTech Connect

    Shirk, M D; Kelly, B T; Haynes, S M; Stuart, B C; Sanchez, J J; Moody, J D; Cook, R C

    2005-06-24

    Laser machining technology has been used to demonstrate the ability to rapidly perform jobs on all aspects of ICF targets. Lasers are able to rapidly perform modifications and repairs to the gold metal parts on hohlraums, make cuts in the delicate polymer parts of the hohlraum, and drill holes in the capsules to enable them to be filled with fuel. Lasers investigated in this work include 193 nm ArF and 248 nm KrF excimers and 810 nm chirped-pulse amplification Ti:Sapphire lasers. The excimer lasers showed a definite advantage in drilling and machining of polymeric materials and the ultrashort infrared pulses of the Ti:Sapphire laser were far better for the gold structures.

  5. Impeding hohlraum plasma stagnation in inertial-confinement fusion.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Zylstra, A B; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Landen, O L; Mackinnon, A J; Town, R P J; Wilks, S C; Betti, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Hund, J; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2012-01-13

    This Letter reports the first time-gated proton radiography of the spatial structure and temporal evolution of how the fill gas compresses the wall blowoff, inhibits plasma jet formation, and impedes plasma stagnation in the hohlraum interior. The potential roles of spontaneously generated electric and magnetic fields in the hohlraum dynamics and capsule implosion are discussed. It is shown that interpenetration of the two materials could result from the classical Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring as the lighter, decelerating ionized fill gas pushes against the heavier, expanding gold wall blowoff. This experiment showed new observations of the effects of the fill gas on x-ray driven implosions, and an improved understanding of these results could impact the ongoing ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. PMID:22324691

  6. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei; Huang, Yunbao; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-10-01

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  7. Radiation-driven hydrodynamics of high- hohlraums on the national ignition facility.

    PubMed

    Dewald, E L; Suter, L J; Landen, O L; Holder, J P; Schein, J; Lee, F D; Campbell, K M; Weber, F A; Pellinen, D G; Schneider, M B; Celeste, J R; McDonald, J W; Foster, J M; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J; Glenzer, S H; Young, B K; Haynam, C A; Shaw, M J; Turner, R E; Froula, D; Kauffman, R L; Thomas, B R; Atherton, L J; Bonanno, R E; Dixit, S N; Eder, D C; Holtmeier, G; Kalantar, D H; Koniges, A E; Macgowan, B J; Manes, K R; Munro, D H; Murray, J R; Parham, T G; Piston, K; Van Wonterghem, B M; Wallace, R J; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P K; Hammel, B A; Moses, E I

    2005-11-18

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the initial four laser beams tested radiation temperature limits imposed by plasma filling. For a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with an analytical model that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits with full NIF (1.8 MJ), greater, and of longer duration than required for ignition hohlraums. PMID:16384150

  8. Three-wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Town, R. P. J.; Rosen, M. D.; Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Schneider, M. B.; Moody, J. D.; Dewald, E. L.; Widmann, K.; Bond, E.; Thomas, C. A.; Dixit, S.; Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Berger, R. L.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.; MacGowan, B. J.; Lindl, J. D.

    2011-04-15

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large-scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry.

  9. A three wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Town, R; Rosen, M

    2010-12-16

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths, and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry.

  10. Three-wavelength scheme to optimize hohlraum coupling on the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Town, R P J; Rosen, M D; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Schneider, M B; Kyrala, G A; Moody, J D; Dewald, E L; Widmann, K; Bond, E; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Dixit, S; Williams, E A; Hinkel, D E; Berger, R L; Landen, O L; Edwards, M J; MacGowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Haynam, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H; Moses, E

    2011-04-01

    By using three tunable wavelengths on different cones of laser beams on the National Ignition Facility, numerical simulations show that the energy transfer between beams can be tuned to redistribute the energy within the cones of beams most prone to backscatter instabilities. These radiative hydrodynamics and laser-plasma interaction simulations have been tested against large-scale hohlraum experiments with two tunable wavelengths and reproduce the hohlraum energetics and symmetry. Using a third wavelength provides a greater level of control of the laser energy distribution and coupling in the hohlraum, and could significantly reduce stimulated Raman scattering losses and increase the hohlraum radiation drive while maintaining a good implosion symmetry. PMID:21599318

  11. Radiation-driven hydrodynamics of long pulse hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dewald, D L; Landen, O L; Suter, L J; Schein, J; Holder, J; Campbell, K; Glenzer, S H; McDonald, J W; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A J; Schneider, M S; Haynam, C; Hinkel, D; Hammel, B A

    2005-10-17

    The first hohlraum experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using the first four laser beams have activated the indirect drive experimental capabilities and tested radiation temperature limits imposed by hohlraum plasma filling. Vacuum hohlraums have been irradiated with laser powers up to 6 TW, 1 ns to 9 ns long square pulses and energies of up to 17 kJ to activate several diagnostics, to study the hohlraum radiation temperature scaling with the laser power and hohlraum size, and to make contact with hohlraum experiments performed at the NOVA and Omega laser facilities. Furthermore, for a variety of hohlraum sizes and pulse lengths, the measured x-ray flux shows signatures of plasma filling that coincide with hard x-ray emission from plasma streaming out of the hohlraum. These observations agree with hydrodynamic simulations and with analytical modeling that includes hydrodynamic and coronal radiative losses. The modeling predicts radiation temperature limits on full NIF (1.8 MJ) that are significantly greater than required for ignition hohlraums.

  12. The effect of condensates and inner coatings on the performance of vacuum hohlraum targets

    SciTech Connect

    Boehly, T. R.; Seka, W.; Sangster, T. C.; Olson, R. E.; Celliers, P. M.; Munro, D. H.; Landen, O. L.; Collins, G. W.; Suter, L. J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-03-15

    Experiments on the OMEGA laser system [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using laser-driven vacuum hohlraum targets show distinct differences between cryogenic (<20 K) and warm targets. The cryogenic targets have 15% lower peak radiation temperatures, and the temporal profile of those temperatures is quite different than in warm targets. The cryogenic targets reflect significantly more (3%-7%) of the laser drive than the warm targets (<1%). The temporal and spectral features of the reflected light from the cryogenic targets show a significantly longer duration and more spectral features than the warm hohlraums. Warm hohlraum targets coated with 2 mum of CH replicate the behavior of cryogenic targets. This indicates that the cryogenic hohlraums are affected by the condensation of background gases on the cold hohlraum surface. The most important effect of low-Z material in the hohlraums is that they significantly reduce the x-ray conversion efficiency, resulting in lower hohlraum radiation temperature. The coatings (both CH and condensates) produce long-scale-length, low-Z plasmas that moderately reduce the absorption of laser light in the hohlraums. This causes higher reflectivity and produces hot electrons that generate hard x rays (hnu>20 keV), both of which are detrimental to the performance of hohlraum-driven inertial confinement fusion targets.

  13. Novel free-form hohlraum shape design and optimization for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Shaoen; Jing, Longfei Ding, Yongkun; Huang, Yunbao

    2014-10-15

    The hohlraum shape attracts considerable attention because there is no successful ignition method for laser-driven inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility. The available hohlraums are typically designed with simple conic curves, including ellipses, parabolas, arcs, or Lame curves, which allow only a few design parameters for the shape optimization, making it difficult to improve the performance, e.g., the energy coupling efficiency or radiation drive symmetry. A novel free-form hohlraum design and optimization approach based on the non-uniform rational basis spline (NURBS) model is proposed. In the present study, (1) all kinds of hohlraum shapes can be uniformly represented using NURBS, which is greatly beneficial for obtaining the optimal available hohlraum shapes, and (2) such free-form uniform representation enables us to obtain an optimal shape over a large design domain for the hohlraum with a more uniform radiation and higher drive temperature of the fuel capsule. Finally, a hohlraum is optimized and evaluated with respect to the drive temperature and symmetry at the Shenguang III laser facility in China. The drive temperature and symmetry results indicate that such a free-form representation is advantageous over available hohlraum shapes because it can substantially expand the shape design domain so as to obtain an optimal hohlraum with high performance.

  14. Increasing Z-pinch vacuum hohlraum capsule coupling efficiency.

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, Debbie; Vesey, Roger Alan; Cochrane, Kyle Robert; Nikroo, A.; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Porter, John L.; Streit, Jon; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Cuneo, Michael Edward

    2004-11-01

    Symmetric capsule implosions in the double-ended vacuum hohlraum (DEH) on Z have demonstrated convergence ratios of 14-21 for 2.15-mm plastic ablator capsules absorbing 5-7 kJ of x-rays, based on backlit images of the compressed ablator remaining at peak convergence [1]. Experiments with DD-filled 3.3-mm diameter capsules designed to absorb 14 kJ of x-rays have begun as an integrated test of drive temperature and symmetry, complementary to thin-shell symmetry diagnostic capsules. These capsule implosions are characterized by excellent control of symmetry (< 3% time-integrated), but low hohlraum efficiency (< 2%). Possible methods to increase the capsule absorbed energy in the DEH include mixed-component hohlraums, large diameter foam ablator capsules, transmissive shine shields between the z-pinch and capsule, higher spoke electrode x-ray transmission, a double-sided power feed, and smaller initial radius z-pinch wire arrays. Simulations will explore the potential for each of these modifications to increase the capsule coupling efficiency for near-term experiments on Z and ZR.

  15. Modeling laser-plasma interactions in NIF vacuum hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, E. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Still, C. H.; Langdon, A. B.; Olson, R. E.; Kline, J.

    2009-11-01

    In preparation for the NIF ignition campaign, a series of experiments are underway firing 96 and 192 beams of the NIF laser into empty gold hohlraums. The primary purpose of these experiments is to qualify the DANTE filtered x-ray diode radiation temerature diagnostic. We plan to have backscatter diagnostics available, giving us an opportunity to test our LPI modeling on the NIF scale. In addition to scaling with energy, we test the use of a gold-boron coating on the hohlraum wall to reduce SBS via increased ion Landau damping of the ion-acoustic waves. We use Lasnex to simulate the hydrodynamic evolution of the hohlraum plasma. Steady state gains were computed using our diagnostic NEWLIP. These were used to suggest appropriate backscatter simulations to be performed with pF3D, a massivel parallel code that couples paraxial light propagation with fluid models of the stimulated plasma ansd ion waves evolving on a background plasma. We describe the results of these simulations, pre- and post-shot, and compare them with experimental results.

  16. Demonstration of Symmetry Control of Infrared Heated Deuterium Layers in Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Koziozieski, B J; London, R A; McEachern, R L; Bittner, D N

    2003-08-22

    Infrared smoothed deuterium ice layers inside capsules have been successfully demonstrated for capsules inside cylindrical hohlraums. Improved characterization methods and infrared illumination enables low mode control in both the axial and azimuthal directions. Experimental results agree well with computer models. Results of these experiments will be used to derive accuracy requirements for an infrared heating system for ice layers in hohlraums on NIF.

  17. Modeling of drive-symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums at Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L.; Magelssen, G.R.; Delamater, E.L.; Hauer, A.A.; Wilde, B.H.; Powers, L.V.; Murphy, T.J.; Pollaine, S.M.; Suter, L.J.

    1995-05-01

    Experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes are more oblate than predicted using modeling methods which agree well with experiments in evacuated hohlraums. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  18. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  19. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; et al

    2016-05-25

    Here, the near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out tomore » examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30 implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.« less

  20. The near vacuum hohlraum campaign at the NIF: A new approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N.; Turnbull, D.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D.; Ross, J. S.; Khan, S.; Pak, A.; Dewald, E.; Benedetti, L. R.; Nagel, S.; Biener, J.; Callahan, D. A.; Yeamans, C.; Michel, P.; Schneider, M.; Kozioziemski, B.; Ma, T.; Macphee, A. G.; Haan, S.; Izumi, N.; Hatarik, R.; Sterne, P.; Celliers, P.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, R.; Strozzi, D.; Kilkenny, J.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Sio, H.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Frenje, J.; Petrasso, R.; Zylstra, A.; Town, R.; Hurricane, O.; Nikroo, A.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-05-01

    The near vacuum campaign on the National Ignition Facility has concentrated its efforts over the last year on finding the optimum target geometry to drive a symmetric implosion at high convergence ratio (30×). As the hohlraum walls are not tamped with gas, the hohlraum is filling with gold plasma and the challenge resides in depositing enough energy in the hohlraum before it fills up. Hohlraum filling is believed to cause symmetry swings late in the pulse that are detrimental to the symmetry of the hot spot at high convergence. This paper describes a series of experiments carried out to examine the effect of increasing the distance between the hohlraum wall and the capsule (case to capsule ratio) on the symmetry of the hot spot. These experiments have shown that smaller Case to Capsule Ratio (CCR of 2.87 and 3.1) resulted in oblate implosions that could not be tuned round. Larger CCR (3.4) led to a prolate implosion at convergence 30× implying that inner beam propagation at large CCR is not impeded by the expanding hohlraum plasma. A Case to Capsule ratio of 3.4 is a promising geometry to design a round implosion but in a smaller hohlraum where the hohlraum losses are lower, enabling a wider cone fraction range to adjust symmetry.

  1. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-01

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  2. Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

    2011-10-19

    In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

  3. A unified free-form representation applied to the shape optimization of the hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shaoen; Huang, Yunbao; Jing, Longfei; Li, Haiyan; Huang, Tianxuan; Ding, Yongkun

    2016-01-01

    The hohlraum is very crucial for indirect laser driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. Usually, its shape is designed as sphere, cylinder, or rugby with some kind of fixed functions, such as ellipse or parabola. Recently, a spherical hohlraum with octahedral 6 laser entrance holes (LEHs) has been presented with high flux symmetry [Lan et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010704 (2014); 21, 052704 (2014)]. However, there is only one shape parameter, i.e., the hohlraum to capsule radius ratio, being optimized. In this paper, we build the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs with a unified free-form representation, in which, by varying additional shape parameters: (1) available hohlraum shapes can be uniformly and accurately represented, (2) it can be used to understand why the spherical hohlraum has higher flux symmetry, (3) it allows us to obtain a feasible shape design field satisfying flux symmetry constraints, and (4) a synthetically optimized hohlraum can be obtained with a tradeoff of flux symmetry and other hohlraum performance. Finally, the hohlraum with octahedral 6LEHs is modeled, analyzed, and then optimized based on the unified free-form representation. The results show that a feasible shape design field with flux asymmetry no more than 1% can be obtained, and over the feasible design field, the spherical hohlraum is validated to have the highest flux symmetry, and a synthetically optimal hohlraum can be found with closing flux symmetry but larger volume between laser spots and centrally located capsule.

  4. Measurements of laser-plasma instability relevant to ignition hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Bauer, B.S.; Cobble, J.A.; DuBois, D.F.; Kyrala, G.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Watt, R.G.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Wood, W.M.; Failor, B.H.; Kirkwood, R.; MacGowan, B.J.

    1997-05-01

    The potential for laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce x-rays for imploding a fusion capsule symmetrically. The speckled nature of laser beams used in ICF is an important factor in laser-plasma instability processes. For example, models which calculate the spatial growth of convective instability by properly accounting for the laser speckles successfully predict the observed onsets of backscattering due to stimulated Brillouin and Raman scattering instabilities (SBS and SRS). Assuming pump depletion as the only saturation mechanism in these models results in very large predicted levels of SBS and SRS backscattering from the long-scale plasmas expected in ignition hohlraums. However, in the long-scale plasmas studied in the Nova and Trident lasers [E. M. Campbell, Rev. Sci. Instrum. {bold 57}, 2101 (1986) and N. K. Moncur {ital et al.}, Appl. Opt. {bold 34}, 4274 (1995)], SRS and SBS are observed to saturate much below the levels expected from pump depletion. While the mechanism of SBS saturation is not understood at present, the observations of SRS saturation are qualitatively understood. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Cylindrical target Li-beam-driven hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Aubert, J.; Chandler, G.A.

    1998-06-01

    The authors performed a series of experiments on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II (PBFA II) in May, 1994, and obtained a brightness temperature of 61 {+-} 2 eV for an ion-beam heated hohlraum. The hohlraum was a 4-mm-diameter, right-circular cylinder with a 1.5-mm-thick gold wall, a low-density CH foam fill, and a 1.5- or 3-mm-diameter diagnostic aperture in the top. The nominal parameters of the radially-incident PBFA II Li ion beam were 9 MeV peak energy ({approximately}10 MeV at the gas cell) at the target at a peak power of 2.5 {+-} 0.3 TW/cm{sup 2} and a 15 ns pulse width. Azimuthal variations in intensity of a factor of 3, with respect to the mean, were observed. Nonuniformities in thermal x-ray emission across the area of the diagnostic hole were also observed. Time-dependent hole-closure velocities were measured: the time-averaged velocity of {approximately}2 cm/{micro}s is in good agreement with sound speed estimates. Unfolded x-ray spectra and brightness temperatures as a function of time are reported and compared to simulations. Hole closure corrections are discussed with comparisons between XRD and bolometer measurements. Temperature scaling with power on target is also presented.

  6. Dynamic hohlraum and ICF pellet implosion experiments on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.

    1999-07-01

    By stabilizing an imploding z-pinch on Z (20 MA, 100 ns) with a solid current return can and a nested wire array the authors have achieved dynamic hohlraum radiation temperatures over 200 eV at a diameter of approximately 1 mm. The pinch configuration yielding this temperature is a nested tungsten wire array of 240 and 120 wires at 4 and 2 cm diameters weighing 2 and 1 mg, 1 cm long, imploding onto a 5 mm diameter, 14 mg/cc cylindrical CH foam, weighing 3 mg. They have used a single 4 cm diameter tungsten wire array to drive a 1.6 mm diameter ICF capsule mounted in a 6 mg/cc foam inside a 3 mg copper annulus at 5 mm diameter, and measured x-ray emissions indicative of the pellet implosion. Mounting the pellet in foam may have caused the hohlraum to become equator-hot. They will present results from upcoming pellet experiments in which the pellet is mounted by thread and driven by a larger diameter, 6 or 7 mm, copper annulus to improve radiation drive symmetry. They will also discuss designs for tapered foam annular targets that distort a cylindrical pinch into a quasi-sphere that will wrap around an ICF pellet to further improve drive symmetry.

  7. Rugby-like hohlraum experimental designs for demonstrating x-ray drive enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Cerjan, C.; Hinkel, D. E.; Milovich, J. L.; Park, H.-S.; Robey, H. F.

    2008-01-15

    A suite of experimental designs for the Omega laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using rugby and cylindrical hohlraums is proposed to confirm the energetics benefits of rugby-shaped hohlraums over cylinders under optimal implosion symmetry conditions. Postprocessed Dante x-ray drive measurements predict a 12-17 eV (23%-36%) peak hohlraum temperature (x-ray flux) enhancement for a 1 ns flattop laser drive history. Simulated core self-emission x-ray histories also show earlier implosion times by 200-400 ps, depending on the hohlraum case-to-capsule ratio and laser-entrance-hole size. Capsules filled with 10 or 50 atm of deuterium (DD) are predicted to give in excess of 10{sup 10} neutrons in two-dimensional hohlraum simulations in the absence of mix, enabling DD burn history measurements for the first time in indirect-drive on Omega. Capsule designs with 50 atm of D{sup 3}He are also proposed to make use of proton slowing for independently verifying the drive benefits of rugby hohlraums. Scale-5/4 hohlraum designs are also introduced to provide further margin to potential laser-plasma-induced backscatter and hot-electron production.

  8. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablatorsa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Meezan, N. B.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S.; Milovich, J. L.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Casey, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Pak, A.; Peterson, J. L.; Ralph, J.; Rygg, J. R.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] have explored driving high-density carbon ablators with near-vacuum hohlraums, which use a minimal amount of helium gas fill. These hohlraums show improved efficiency relative to conventional gas-filled hohlraums in terms of minimal backscatter, minimal generation of suprathermal electrons, and increased hohlraum-capsule coupling. Given these advantages, near-vacuum hohlraums are a promising choice for pursuing high neutron yield implosions. Long pulse symmetry control, though, remains a challenge, as the hohlraum volume fills with material. Two mitigation methodologies have been explored, dynamic beam phasing and increased case-to-capsule ratio (larger hohlraum size relative to capsule). Unexpectedly, experiments have demonstrated that the inner laser beam propagation is better than predicted by nominal simulations, and an enhanced beam propagation model is required to match measured hot spot symmetry. Ongoing work is focused on developing a physical model which captures this enhanced propagation and on utilizing the enhanced propagation to drive longer laser pulses than originally predicted in order to reach alpha-heating dominated neutron yields.

  9. Green Frequency-Doubled Laser-Beam Propagation in High-Temperature Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, C.; Berger, R. L.; Divol, L.; Froula, D. H.; Jones, O.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Meezan, N.; Moody, J. D.; Ross, J.; Sorce, C.; Suter, L. J.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2{omega}) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2{omega} laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2{omega} light is possible.

  10. Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F.

    2011-02-25

    We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of T{sub RAD}=300 eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100 {mu}m diameter hot core.

  11. Demonstration of Ignition Radiation Temperatures in Indirect-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenzer, S. H.; MacGowan, B. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Adams, P. A.; Alfonso, J. B.; Alger, E. T.; Alherz, Z.; Alvarez, L. F.; Alvarez, S. S.; Amick, P. V.; Andersson, K. S.; Andrews, S. D.; Antonini, G. J.; Arnold, P. A.; Atkinson, D. P.; Auyang, L.; Azevedo, S. G.; Balaoing, B. N. M.; Baltz, J. A.; Barbosa, F.; Bardsley, G. W.; Barker, D. A.; Barnes, A. I.; Baron, A.; Beeler, R. G.; Beeman, B. V.; Belk, L. R.; Bell, J. C.; Bell, P. M.; Berger, R. L.; Bergonia, M. A.; Bernardez, L. J.; Berzins, L. V.; Bettenhausen, R. C.; Bezerides, L.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Bishop, C. L.; Bond, E. J.; Bopp, D. R.; Borgman, J. A.; Bower, J. R.; Bowers, G. A.; Bowers, M. W.; Boyle, D. T.; Bradley, D. K.; Bragg, J. L.; Braucht, J.; Brinkerhoff, D. L.; Browning, D. F.; Brunton, G. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burns, S. R.; Burns, K. E.; Burr, B.; Burrows, L. M.; Butlin, R. K.; Cahayag, N. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Cardinale, P. S.; Carey, R. W.; Carlson, J. W.; Casey, A. D.; Castro, C.; Celeste, J. R.; Chakicherla, A. Y.; Chambers, F. W.; Chan, C.; Chandrasekaran, H.; Chang, C.; Chapman, R. F.; Charron, K.; Chen, Y.; Christensen, M. J.; Churby, A. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Cline, B. D.; Clowdus, L. C.; Cocherell, D. G.; Coffield, F. E.; Cohen, S. J.; Costa, R. L.; Cox, J. R.; Curnow, G. M.; Dailey, M. J.; Danforth, P. M.; Darbee, R.; Datte, P. S.; Davis, J. A.; Deis, G. A.; Demaret, R. D.; Dewald, E. L.; di Nicola, P.; di Nicola, J. M.; Divol, L.; Dixit, S.; Dobson, D. B.; Doppner, T.; Driscoll, J. D.; Dugorepec, J.; Duncan, J. J.; Dupuy, P. C.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eckart, M. J.; Edson, S. L.; Edwards, G. J.; Edwards, M. J.; Edwards, O. D.; Edwards, P. W.; Ellefson, J. C.; Ellerbee, C. H.; Erbert, G. V.; Estes, C. M.; Fabyan, W. J.; Fallejo, R. N.; Fedorov, M.; Felker, B.; Fink, J. T.; Finney, M. D.; Finnie, L. F.; Fischer, M. J.; Fisher, J. M.; Fishler, B. T.; Florio, J. W.; Forsman, A.; Foxworthy, C. B.; Franks, R. M.; Frazier, T.; Frieder, G.; Fung, T.; Gawinski, G. N.; Gibson, C. R.; Giraldez, E.; Glenn, S. M.; Golick, B. P.; Gonzales, H.; Gonzales, S. A.; Gonzalez, M. J.; Griffin, K. L.; Grippen, J.; Gross, S. M.; Gschweng, P. H.; Gururangan, G.; Gu, K.; Haan, S. W.; Hahn, S. R.; Haid, B. J.; Hamblen, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A. V.; Hardy, D. L.; Hart, D. R.; Hartley, R. G.; Haynam, C. A.; Heestand, G. M.; Hermann, M. R.; Hermes, G. L.; Hey, D. S.; Hibbard, R. L.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hipple, D. L.; Hitchcock, J. D.; Hodtwalker, D. L.; Holder, J. P.; Hollis, J. D.; Holtmeier, G. M.; Huber, S. R.; Huey, A. W.; Hulsey, D. N.; Hunter, S. L.; Huppler, T. R.; Hutton, M. S.; Izumi, N.; Jackson, J. L.; Jackson, M. A.; Jancaitis, K. S.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Johnson, B.; Johnson, M. C.; Johnson, T.; Johnston, M. P.; Jones, O. S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Kauffman, R. L.; Keating, G. A.; Kegelmeyer, L. M.; Kenitzer, S. L.; Kimbrough, J. R.; King, K.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Klingmann, J. L.; Knittel, K. M.; Kohut, T. R.; Koka, K. G.; Kramer, S. W.; Krammen, J. E.; Krauter, K. G.; Krauter, G. W.; Krieger, E. K.; Kroll, J. J.; La Fortune, K. N.; Lagin, L. J.; Lakamsani, V. K.; Landen, O. L.; Lane, S. W.; Langdon, A. B.; Langer, S. H.; Lao, N.; Larson, D. W.; Latray, D.; Lau, G. T.; Le Pape, S.; Lechleiter, B. L.; Lee, Y.; Lee, T. L.; Li, J.; Liebman, J. A.; Lindl, J. D.; Locke, S. F.; Loey, H. K.; London, R. A.; Lopez, F. J.; Lord, D. M.; Lowe-Webb, R. R.; Lown, J. G.; Ludwigsen, A. P.; Lum, N. W.; Lyons, R. R.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Magat, M. D.; Maloy, D. T.; Malsbury, T. N.; Markham, G.; Marquez, R. M.; Marsh, A. A.; Marshall, C. D.; Marshall, S. R.; Maslennikov, I. L.; Mathisen, D. G.; Mauger, G. J.; Mauvais, M.-Y.; McBride, J. A.; McCarville, T.; McCloud, J. B.; McGrew, A.; McHale, B.; Macphee, A. G.; Meeker, J. F.; Merill, J. S.; Mertens, E. P.; Michel, P. A.; Miller, M. G.; Mills, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Miramontes, R.; Montesanti, R. C.; Montoya, M. M.; Moody, J.; Moody, J. D.; Moreno, K. A.; Morris, J.; Morriston, K. M.; Nelson, J. R.; Neto, M.; Neumann, J. D.; Ng, E.; Ngo, Q. M.; Olejniczak, B. L.; Olson, R. E.; Orsi, N. L.; Owens, M. W.; Padilla, E. H.; Pannell, T. M.; Parham, T. G.; Patterson, R. W., Jr.; Pavel, G.; Prasad, R. R.; Pendlton, D.; Penko, F. A.; Pepmeier, B. L.; Petersen, D. E.; Phillips, T. W.; Pigg, D.; Piston, K. W.; Pletcher, K. D.; Powell, C. L.; Radousky, H. B.; Raimondi, B. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Rampke, R. L.; Reed, R. K.; Reid, W. A.; Rekow, V. V.; Reynolds, J. L.; Rhodes, J. J.; Richardson, M. J.; Rinnert, R. J.; Riordan, B. P.; Rivenes, A. S.; Rivera, A. T.; Roberts, C. J.; Robinson, J. A.; Robinson, R. B.; Robison, S. R.; Rodriguez, O. R.; Rogers, S. P.; Rosen, M. D.; Ross, G. F.; Runkel, M.; Runtal, A. S.; Sacks, R. A.; Sailors, S. F.; Salmon, J. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Saunders, R. L.; Schaffer, J. R.; Schindler, T. M.; Schmitt, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Segraves, K. S.; Shaw, M. J.; Sheldrick, M. E.; Shelton, R. T.; Shiflett, M. K.; Shiromizu, S. J.; Shor, M.; Silva, L. L.; Silva, S. A.; Skulina, K. M.; Smauley, D. A.; Smith, B. E.; Smith, L. K.; Solomon, A. L.; Sommer, S.; Soto, J. G.; Spafford, N. I.; Speck, D. E.; Springer, P. T.; Stadermann, M.; Stanley, F.; Stone, T. G.; Stout, E. A.; Stratton, P. L.; Strausser, R. J.; Suter, L. J.; Sweet, W.; Swisher, M. F.; Tappero, J. D.; Tassano, J. B.; Taylor, J. S.; Tekle, E. A.; Thai, C.; Thomas, C. A.; Thomas, A.; Throop, A. L.; Tietbohl, G. L.; Tillman, J. M.; Town, R. P. J.; Townsend, S. L.; Tribbey, K. L.; Trummer, D.; Truong, J.; Vaher, J.; Valadez, M.; van Arsdall, P.; van Prooyen, A. J.; Vergel de Dios, E. O.; Vergino, M. D.; Vernon, S. P.; Vickers, J. L.; Villanueva, G. T.; Vitalich, M. A.; Vonhof, S. A.; Wade, F. E.; Wallace, R. J.; Warren, C. T.; Warrick, A. L.; Watkins, J.; Weaver, S.; Wegner, P. J.; Weingart, M. A.; Wen, J.; White, K. S.; Whitman, P. K.; Widmann, K.; Widmayer, C. C.; Wilhelmsen, K.; Williams, E. A.; Williams, W. H.; Willis, L.; Wilson, E. F.; Wilson, B. A.; Witte, M. C.; Work, K.; Yang, P. S.; Young, B. K.; Youngblood, K. P.; Zacharias, R. A.; Zaleski, T.; Zapata, P. G.; Zhang, H.; Zielinski, J. S.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Niemann, C.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; van Wonterghem, B. M.; Atherton, L. J.; Moses, E. I.

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate the hohlraum radiation temperature and symmetry required for ignition-scale inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions. Cryogenic gas-filled hohlraums with 2.2 mm-diameter capsules are heated with unprecedented laser energies of 1.2 MJ delivered by 192 ultraviolet laser beams on the National Ignition Facility. Laser backscatter measurements show that these hohlraums absorb 87% to 91% of the incident laser power resulting in peak radiation temperatures of TRAD=300eV and a symmetric implosion to a 100μm diameter hot core.

  12. Characteristics of ICF Relevant Hohlraums Driven by X-Rays from a Z-Pinch

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,R.L.; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSKA,W.; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,RICHARD E.; PETERSON,D.L.; PETERSON,R.R.; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; RUIZ,CARLOS L.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-03

    Radiation environments characteristic of those encountered during the low-temperature foot pulse and subsequent higher-temperature early-step pulses (without the foot pulse) required for indirect-drive ICF ignition on the National ignition Facility have been produced in hohlraums driven by x-rays from a z-pinch. These environments provide a platform to better understand the dynamics of full-scale NIF hohlraums, ablator material, and capsules prior to NIF completion. Radiation temperature, plasma fill, and wall motion of these hohlraums are discussed.

  13. Stauts of the Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) Hohlraum Point Design

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, P; Dunne, M; Ho, D; Lasinski, B; Meeker, D; Ross, J S

    2012-04-10

    Progress on the hohlraum point design for the LIFE engine is described. New features in the original design [Amendt et al., Fus. Sci. Technol. 60, 49 (2011)] are incorporated that address the imperatives of low target cost, high manufacturing throughput, efficient and prompt material recycling, an ability for near-term testing of key target design uncertainties on the National Ignition Facility, and robustness to target chamber environment and injection insults. To this end, the novel use of Pb hohlraums and aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel loading within a high-density-carbon (HDC) ablator is implemented in the hohlraum point design.

  14. Green frequency-doubled laser-beam propagation in high-temperature hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Niemann, C; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; Jones, O; Kirkwood, R K; Meezan, N; Moody, J D; Ross, J; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-02-01

    We demonstrate propagation and small backscatter losses of a frequency-doubled (2omega) laser beam interacting with inertial confinement fusion hohlraum plasmas. The electron temperature of 3.3 keV, approximately a factor of 2 higher than achieved in previous experiments with open geometry targets, approaches plasma conditions of high-fusion yield hohlraums. In this new temperature regime, we measure 2omega laser-beam transmission approaching 80% with simultaneous backscattering losses of less than 10%. These findings suggest that good laser coupling into fusion hohlraums using 2omega light is possible. PMID:18352288

  15. Simulation study of Hohlraum experiments on SGIII-prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Huo Wenyi; Ren Guoli; Lan Ke; Li Xin; Wu Changshu; Li Yongsheng; Zhai Chuanlei; Qiao Xiumei; Meng Xujun; Lai Dongxian; Zheng Wudi; Gu Peijun; Pei Wenbing; Li Sanwei; Yi Rongqing; Song Tianming; Jiang Xiaohua; Yang Dong; Jiang Shaoen; Ding Yongkun

    2010-12-15

    The Hohlraum physics experiments performed on the SGIII-prototype laser facility are simulated by using our two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code LARED-H, and the influence of laser intensity on the two-dimensional Hohlraum simulations is studied. Both the temporal radiation temperature and the x-ray spectrum from the simulations agree well with the observations, except that the simulated M-band fraction (greater than 2 keV) is obviously smaller than the observation. According to our study, the coupling efficiency from laser to x-ray is around 70% for SGIII-prototype laser facility Hohlraums.

  16. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; et al

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled usingmore » the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.« less

  17. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Yin, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-13

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. As a result, the experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  18. Study on optimal inertial-confinement-fusion hohlraum wall radial density and wall loss

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Lu; Wu Shunchao; Ding Yongkun; Yang Jiamin; Jiang Shaoen

    2011-03-15

    Reducing hohlraum wall loss is one of the most important ways to improve hohlraum coupling efficiency in laser indirect drive inertial-confinement fusion. It is appeared that a high Z metallic foam as hohlraum wall material will reduce wall loss. By adjusting initial hohlraum wall density distribution along radial axes to {rho}{sub 0}(r)=kr, the numerical simulation results show that it can indeed bring best savings of {approx}40% general wall loss. We conclude that absorbed energy mainly decreases by restraining rarefactions, and a proper slope k can optimize internal energy loss of low density and increased kinetic loss by subsonic. Also saved energy ratio reduces with source temperature decreasing. This approach would cut the reactor driver that needs quite substantially if experiments demonstrate it.

  19. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, D. S. Albright, B. J.; Kline, J. L.; Yin, L.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Betti, R.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.

    2015-01-15

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with B{sub z} ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field B{sub z} = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. The experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  20. Use of external magnetic fields in hohlraum plasmas to improve laser-coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, D. S.; Albright, B. J.; Barnak, D. H.; Chang, P. Y.; Davies, J. R.; Fiksel, G.; Froula, D. H.; Kline, J. L.; MacDonald, M. J.; Sefkow, A. B.; Yin, L.; Betti, R.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient coupling of laser energy into hohlraum targets is important for indirect drive ignition. Laser-plasma instabilities can reduce coupling, reduce symmetry, and cause preheat. We consider the effects of an external magnetic field on laser-energy coupling in hohlraum targets. Experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility using low-Z gas-filled hohlraum targets which were placed in a magnetic coil with Bz ≤ 7.5-T. We found that an external field Bz = 7.5-T aligned along the hohlraum axis results in up to a 50% increase in plasma temperature as measured by Thomson scattering. The experiments were modeled using the 2-D magnetohydrodynamics package in HYDRA and were found to be in good agreement.

  1. Electron-density measurements in hohlraums using soft-x-ray deflectometry

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, C.D.; London, R.A.; Harte, J.A.; Powers, L.V.; Trebes, J.E.

    1998-05-01

    This paper presents design calculations for experiments that measure electron densities of laser heated hohlraums with soft-x-ray moir{acute e} deflectometry. Hydrodynamical simulations of the hohlraums are analyzed to obtain deflection angles of the probing beam and x-ray emission from the hohlraum. The deflection angles and resulting moir{acute e} fringe shifts and fringe contrast are predicted to be sufficient to infer electron-density gradients from measurements. In addition, the self-emission is found to be much lower than that of the probing laser beam, giving a good signal-to-noise ratio. In conclusion, moir{acute e} deflectometry with soft-x-ray lasers has the potential to give valuable information about the electron density in laser driven hohlraums. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  2. Characterizing Hohlraum Plasma Conditions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrios, Maria Alejandra

    2015-11-01

    Improved hohlraums will have a significant impact on increasing the likelihood of indirect drive ignition at the NIF. In indirect-drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), a high-Z hohlraum converts laser power into a tailored x-ray flux that drives the implosion of a spherical capsule filled with D-T fuel. The x-radiation drive to capsule coupling sets the velocity, adiabat, and symmetry of the implosion. Previous experiments in gas-filled hohlraums determined that the laser-hohlraum energy coupling is 20-25% less than modeled, therefore identifying energy loss mechanisms that reduce the efficacy of the hohlraum drive is central to improving implosion performance. Characterizing the plasma conditions, particularly the plasma electron temperature (Te) , is critical to understanding mechanism that affect the energy coupling such as the laser plasma interactions (LPI), hohlraum x-ray conversion efficiency, and dynamic drive symmetry. The first Te measurements inside a NIF hohlraum, presented here, were achieved using K-shell X-ray spectroscopy of an Mn-Co tracer dot. The dot is deposited on a thin-walled CH capsule, centered on the hohlraum symmetry axis below the laser entrance hole (LEH) of a bottom-truncated hohlraum. The hohlraum x-ray drive ablates the dot and causes it to flow upward, towards the LEH, entering the hot laser deposition region. An absolutely calibrated streaked spectrometer with a line of sight into the LEH records the temporal history of the Mn and Co X-ray emission. The measured (interstage) Lyα/ Heα line ratios for Co and Mn and the Mn-Heα/Co-Heα isoelectronic line ratio are used to infer the local plasma Te from the atomic physics code SCRAM. Time resovled x-ray images perpendicular to the hohlraum axis record the dot expansion and trajectory into the LEH region. The temporal evolution of the measured Te and dot trajectory are compared with simulations from radiation-hydrodynamic codes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U

  3. Experimental results and modeling of a dynamic hohlraum on SATURN

    SciTech Connect

    Derzon, M.S.; Allshouse, G.O.; Deeney, C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; MacFarlane, J.J.; Ryutov, D.D.

    1998-06-01

    Experiments were performed at SATURN, a high current z-pinch, to explore the feasibility of creating a hohlraum by imploding a tungsten wire array onto a low-density foam. Emission measurements in the 200--280 eV energy band were consistent with a 110--135 eV Planckian before the target shock heated, or stagnated, on-axis. Peak pinch radiation temperatures of nominally 160 eV were obtained. Measured early time x-ray emission histories and temperature estimates agree well with modeled performance in the 200--280 eV band using a 2D radiation magneto-hydrodynamics code. However, significant differences are observed in comparisons of the x-ray images and 2D simulations.

  4. A new ignition hohlraum design for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin; Wu, Chang-Shu; Dai, Zhen-Sheng; Zheng, Wu-Di; Gu, Jian-Fa; Gu, Pei-Jun; Zou, Shi-Yang; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Shao-Ping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a six-cylinder-port hohlraum is proposed to provide high symmetry flux on capsule. It is designed to ignite a capsule with 1.2-mm radius in indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Flux symmetry and laser energy are calculated by using three-dimensional view factor method and laser energy balance in hohlraum. Plasma conditions are analyzed based on the two-dimensional radiation-hydrodynamic simulations. There is no Y lm (l ⩽ 4) asymmetry in the six-cylinder-port hohlraum when the influences of laser entrance holes (LEHs) and laser spots cancel each other out with suitable target parameters. A radiation drive with 300 eV and good flux symmetry can be achieved by using a laser energy of 2.3 MJ and peak power of 500 TW. According to the simulations, the electron temperature and the electron density on the wall of laser cone are high and low, respectively, which are similar to those of outer cones in the hohlraums on National Ignition Facility (NIF). And the laser intensity is also as low as those of NIF outer cones. So the backscattering due to laser plasma interaction (LPI) is considered to be negligible. The six-cyliner-port hohlraum could be superior to the traditional cylindrical hohlraum and the octahedral hohlraum in both higher symmetry and lower backscattering without supplementary technology at an acceptable laser energy level. It is undoubted that the hohlraum will add to the diversity of ICF approaches. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11435011 and 11575034).

  5. Near-vacuum hohlraums for driving fusion implosions with high density carbon ablators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, Laura

    2014-10-01

    Achieving ignition requires reaching fast implosion velocities, which highlights the need for a highly efficient hohlraum to drive indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions. Gas-filled hohlraums are typically utilized due to the pulse length (15-20 ns) needed to drive plastic (CH) capsules. With the recent use of 3× denser high-density carbon (HDC) capsules, ignition pulses can be less than 10 ns in duration, providing the opportunity to utilize near-vacuum hohlraums (NVH) to drive ignition-relevant implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with minimal laser-plasma instabilities which complicate standard gas-filled hohlraums. Initial NVH implosions on the NIF have demonstrated coupling efficiency significantly higher than observed in gas-filled hohlraums - backscatter losses less than 2% and virtually no suprathermal electron generation. A major design challenge for the NVH is symmetry control. Without tamping gas, the hohlraum wall quickly expands filling the volume with gold plasma. However, results to-date indicate that the inner-cone beams propagate freely to the hohlraum wall for at least 6.5 ns. With minimal predicted cross-beam power transfer, this propagation enables symmetry control via dynamic beam phasing - time-dependent direct adjustment of the inner- and outer-cone laser pulses. A series of experiments with an HDC ablator and NVH culminated in a 6 ns, 1.2 MJ cryogenic DT layered implosion yielding 1.8 × 1015 neutrons--significantly higher yield than any CH implosion at comparable energy. This implosion reached an ignition-relevant velocity -350 km/s - with no observed ablator mix in the hot spot. Recent experiments have explored two-shock designs in a larger, 6.72 mm hohlraum, and upcoming experiments will incrementally extend the pulse duration toward a 9 ns long, three-shock ignition design. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Lowering the risk of stimulated Brillouin backscatter from NIF hohlraums by re-pointing beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Richard; Baker, K. L.; Thomas, C. A.; Milovich, J. L.; Langdon, A. B.; Strozzi, D. J.; Michel, M.

    2015-11-01

    The 64 beams that make a 50 degree angle with the hohlraum axis have been measured to reflect by Stimulated Brillouin Backscatter (SBS) enough laser light to cause optical damage and limit design parameter space. The amount of backscatter has been seen to depend on the initial plasma density filling the hohlraum, the hohlraum wall material, and the laser pulse length. The most important parameter causing SBS is the laser intensity on the hohlraum wall. In previous hohlraum designs, the intensity of the 50 degree beams has been controlled by cross-beam energy transfer (CBET). [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 102, 025004 (2009)] Recent designs with reduced CBET have experienced an increase in SBS. Here we show that repointing beams can reduce the laser intensity at the wall and still maintain good beam smoothing. The reduction in intensity is achieved by separating the 44 and 50 degree cones of beams along the hohlraum axis and then repointing beams within each cone to reduce overlap while preserving polarization smoothing. PF3D simulations show dramatic reductions of SBS are possible. Experiments will determine whether increased laser entrance hole sizes will be required and whether this technique will open up new design options. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Correspondence between laser coupling and x-ray flux measurements in a NIF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Divol, L.; Landen, O.; Lepape, S.; Michel, P.; Ralph, J.; Town, R. P. J.; Widmann, K.; Moore, A.

    2014-10-01

    We describe a simple model relating measurements of the hohlraum x-ray emission (DANTE) to the coupled (incident less backscattered) laser power in NIF indirect drive hohlraum experiments. The model was motivated by observing that the measured x-ray emission showed a lag in rise corresponding to a measured reduction in laser coupling due to backscatter. Two adjustable scalar parameters (a coupling efficiency and a time-scale) in the model are determined for each experiment. Comparing these parameters for different hohlraum gas-fill, ablator, pulse-length, and laser power conditions provides insight into the hohlraum behavior and performance. In some cases, the model can be inverted to estimate the backscatter loss using the measured hohlraum x-ray emission time-history and delivered laser power. We will describe the model and compare the adjustable parameters between different hohlraum platforms. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  8. Soft x-ray images of the Laser Entrance Hole of NIC Hohlraums (paper, HTPD2012)

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B

    2012-04-30

    Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes the capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer that views the hohlraum's laser entrance hole (LEH) at 37{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the area and fraction of the measured x-radiation which comes from the region inside the hohlraum must be known. The size of the LEH is measured with the time integrated Static X-ray Imager (SXI) which view the LEH at 18{sup o} to the hohlraum axis. A soft x-ray image has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation inside the LEH's Clear Aperture in order to correct the measured radiation. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the x-ray energy peak of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed.

  9. Development of a Z-pinch-driven ICF hohlraum concept on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, M.E.; Porter, J.L. Jr.; Vesey, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    Recent development of high power z-pinches (> 150 MW) on the Z driver has permitted the study of high-temperature, radiation-driven hohlraums. Three complementary, Z-pinch source-hohlraum-ICF capsule configurations are being developed to harness the x-ray output of these Z-pinch's. These are the dynamic-hohlraum, static-wall hohlraum, and Z-pinch-driven hohlraum concepts. Each has different potential strengths and concerns. In this paper, the authors report on the first experiments with the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum (ZPDH) concept. A high-yield ICF capsule design for this concept appears feasible, when driven by z-pinches from a 60 MA-class driver. Initial experiments characterize the behavior of the spoke array on Z-pinch performance and x-ray transmission, and the uniformity of radiation flux incident on a foam capsule in the secondary, for a single-sided drive. Measurements of x-ray wall re-emission power and spectrum, radiation temperatures, spoke-plasma location, and drive uniformity will be presented and compared with 0-D energetics, 2-D Lasnex rad-hydro, and 3-D radiosity calculations of energy transport and drive uniformity.

  10. Stimulated Brillouin Scatter Reduction using Borated Gold Hohlraums on the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, Joseph; Strozzi, David; Berger, Richard; Michel, Pierre; Callahan, Debra; Hinkel, Denise; Divol, Laurent; MacGowan, Brian; Albert, Felicie; Moody, John; NIF Hohlraum Team

    2014-10-01

    New target platforms for indirect drive ignition on NIF are being introduced to improve capsule and hohlraum performance. A number of these targets show increased Stimulated Brillioun Backscattering (SBS) late in the laser pulse on the outer cone beams. This scattering reduces the laser power available for x-ray drive in an ignition hohlraum as well as poses a damage risk to the laser optics. We observe a factor of 5 reduction in the SBS power from outer cone beams by doping the Au hohlraum wall with 1.5 μm layer of 40% Boron in Au. The experiment used a room temperature Neopentane-filled ignition scale hohlraum and a 1 MJ, 370 TW laser pulse. The measured SBS backscatter from the outer cone beams on NIF is quantified temporally and spectrally. Comparing the measurements between a pure Au and a AuB hohlraum show approximately a 5× reduction in SBS power. Simulations show that the reduction is in the hohlraum wall plasma. A continuation of this study will extend the duration of the laser pulse to measure the time-dependence of the outer beam SBS. Experimental results from these experiments and detailed simulation results will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  11. Comparative properties of the interior and blowoff plasmas in a dynamic hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Apruzese, J. P.; Clark, R. W.; Davis, J.; Sanford, T. W. L.; Nash, T. J.; Mock, R. C.; Peterson, D. L.

    2007-04-15

    A Dynamic Hohlraum (DH) is formed when arrays of tungsten wires driven by a high-current pulse implode and compress a cylindrical foam target. The resulting radiation is confined by the wire plasma and forms an intense, {approx}200-250 eV Planckian x-ray source. The internal radiation can be used for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion. The radiation emitted from the ends can be employed for radiation flow and material interaction studies. This external radiation is accompanied by an expanding blowoff plasma. We have diagnosed this blowoff plasma using K-shell spectra of Mg tracer layers placed at the ends of some of the Dynamic Hohlraum targets. A similar diagnosis of the interior hohlraum has been carried out using Al and Mg tracers placed at 2 mm depth from the ends. It is found that the blowoff plasma is about 20-25% as dense as that of the interior hohlraum, and that its presence does not significantly affect the outward flow of the nearly Planckian radiation field generated in the hohlraum interior. However, the electron temperature of the blowoff region, at {approx}120 eV, is only about half that of the interior hohlraum plasma.

  12. Development and characterization of a Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion target concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuneo, Michael E.; Vesey, Roger A.; Porter, John L.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Fehl, David L.; Gilliland, Terrance L.; Hanson, David L.; McGurn, John S.; Reynolds, Paul G.; Ruggles, Laurence E.; Seamen, Hans; Spielman, Rick B.; Struve, Ken W.; Stygar, William A.; Simpson, Walter W.; Torres, Jose A.; Wenger, David F.; Hammer, James H.; Rambo, Peter W.; Peterson, Darrell L.; Idzorek, George C.

    2001-05-01

    Initial experiments to study the Z-pinch-driven hohlraum high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concept of Hammer, Tabak, and Porter [Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)] are described. The relationship between measured pinch power, hohlraum temperature, and secondary hohlraum coupling ("hohlraum energetics") is well understood from zero-dimensional semianalytic, and two-dimensional view factor and radiation magnetohydrodynamics models. These experiments have shown the highest x-ray powers coupled to any Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum (26±5 TW), indicating the concept could scale to fusion yields of >200 MJ. A novel, single-sided power feed, double-pinch driven secondary that meets the pinch simultaneity requirements for polar radiation symmetry has also been developed. This source will permit investigation of the pinch power balance and hohlraum geometry requirements for ICF relevant secondary radiation symmetry, leading to a capsule implosion capability on the Z accelerator [Spielman et al., Phys. Plasmas 5, 2105 (1998)].

  13. Enchanced hohlraum radiation drive through reduction of wall losses with high-Z mixture "cocktail" wall materials

    SciTech Connect

    Schein, J; Jones, O; Rosen, M; Dewald, E; Glenzer, S; Gunther, J; Hammel, B; Landen, O; Suter, L; Wallace, R

    2006-05-17

    We present results from experiments, numerical simulations and analytic modeling, demonstrating enhanced hohlraum performance. Care in the fabrication and handling of hohlraums with walls consisting of high-Z mixtures (cocktails) has led to our demonstration, for the first time, of a significant increase in radiation temperature (up to +7eV at 300 eV) compared to a pure Au hohlraum, in agreement with predictions and ascribable to reduced wall losses. The data extrapolated to full NIF suggest we can expect an 18% reduction in wall loss for the current ignition design by switching to cocktail hohlraums, consistent with requirements for ignition with 1MJ laser energy.

  14. Observation of High Soft X-Ray Drive in Large-Scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Suter, L. J.; Widmann, K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dixit, S. N.; Thomas, C. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Williams, E. A.; Celeste, J.; Dewald, E.; Hsing, W. W.; Warrick, A.; Atherton, J.; Azevedo, S.; Beeler, R.; Berger, R.; Conder, A.; Divol, L.

    2011-02-25

    The first soft x-ray radiation flux measurements from hohlraums using both a 96 and a 192 beam configuration at the National Ignition Facility have shown high x-ray conversion efficiencies of {approx}85%-90%. These experiments employed gold vacuum hohlraums, 6.4 mm long and 3.55 mm in diameter, heated with laser energies between 150-635 kJ. The hohlraums reached radiation temperatures of up to 340 eV. These hohlraums for the first time reached coronal plasma conditions sufficient for two-electron processes and coronal heat conduction to be important for determining the radiation drive.

  15. 3D Simulations of the ``Keyhole'' Hohlraum for Shock Timing on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robey, H. F.; Marinak, M. M.; Munro, D. H.; Jones, O. S.

    2007-11-01

    Ignition implosions planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) require a pulse shape with a carefully designed series of steps, which launch a series of shocks through the ablator and DT fuel. The relative timing of these shocks must be tuned to better than +/- 100ps to maintain the DT fuel on a sufficiently low adiabat. To meet these requirements, pre-ignition tuning experiments using a modified hohlraum geometry are being planned. This modified geometry, known as the ``keyhole'' hohlraum, adds a re-entrant gold cone, which passes through the hohlraum and capsule walls, to provide an optical line-of-sight to directly measure the shocks as they break out of the ablator. In order to assess the surrogacy of this modified geometry, 3D simulations using HYDRA [1] have been performed. The drive conditions and the resulting effect on shock timing in the keyhole hohlraum will be compared with the corresponding results for the standard ignition hohlraum. [1] M.M. Marinak, et al., Phys. Plasmas 8, 2275 (2001).

  16. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.  J.; Ho, D.  D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.  S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.  L.; et al

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated inmore » a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.« less

  17. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Berzak Hopkins, L.  F.; Meezan, N.  B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A.  J.; Ho, D.  D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O.  S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J.  L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.  E.; Ross, J.  S.; Benedetti, L.  R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D.  N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E.  P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H.  W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.  F.; Rygg, J.  R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R.  P. J.; Volegov, P.  L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O.  L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M.  J.

    2015-04-29

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ~ 3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 X 10¹⁵ neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ~27X.

  18. Non-destructive analysis of DU content in the NIF hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Gharibyan, Narek; Moody, Ken J.; Shaughnessy, Dawn A.

    2015-12-16

    The advantage of using depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums in high-yield deuterium-tritium (DT) shots at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is addressed by Döppner, et al., in great detail [1]. This DU based hohlraum incorporates a thin layer of DU, ~7 μm thick, on the inner surface along with a thin layer of a gold coating, ~0.7 μm thick, while the outer layer is ~22 μm thick gold. A thickness measurement of the DU layer can be performed using an optical microscope where the total DU weight can be computed provided a uniform DU layer. However, the uniformity of the thickness is not constant throughout the hohlraum since CAD drawing calculations of the DU weight do not agree with the computed values from optical measurements [2]. Therefore, a non-destructive method for quantifying the DU content in hohlraums has been established by utilizing gamma-ray spectroscopy. The details of this method, along with results from several hohlraums, are presented in this report.

  19. Controlling Laser-Driven Hohlraums-Clues from Experiments with Earlier Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruer, William; Thomas, Cliff

    2015-11-01

    Better characterized and controlled hohlraums are very important for both implosion and science experiments on NIF. A brief review of some hohlraum and related experiments with earlier lasers is given to search for lessons learned and clues for better understanding NIF hohlraums. For example, surprises associated with heat transport inhibition and improved models for radiation generation have been a recurring theme in indirect drive experiments. In Shiva experiments, the hohlraum filling with plasma with density near quarter-critical was only calculated after inhibited heat transport and improved radiation models were adopted in the design code. Early NIF experiments also led to a change in the heat transport and radiation models. In this case, the heat transport model was changed from one with modest inhibition (which had been used to model Nova experiments) to near classical transport. Most recently, a design model invoking very inhibited transport (at various times and locations) has been proposed by C. Thomas for NIF hohlraums. Other recurring themes will also be discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. First High-Convergence Cryogenic Implosion in a Near-Vacuum Hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Meezan, N. B.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Hohenberger, M.; Jones, O. S.; Kyrala, G.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Ross, J. S.; Benedetti, L. R.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D.; Caggiano, J.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Church, J.; Clark, D.; Döppner, T.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Eckart, M.; Edgell, D.; Field, J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Haan, S.; Hamza, A.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hinkel, D.; Hoover, D.; Huang, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S.; Kozioziemski, B.; Kroll, J.; Ma, T.; MacPhee, A.; McNaney, J.; Merrill, F.; Moody, J.; Nikroo, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H. F.; Rygg, J. R.; Sater, J.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Sepke, S.; Stadermann, M.; Stoeffl, W.; Thomas, C.; Town, R. P. J.; Volegov, P. L.; Wild, C.; Wilde, C.; Woerner, E.; Yeamans, C.; Yoxall, B.; Kilkenny, J.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α ˜3.5 ) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8 ×1015 neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ˜27 × .

  1. Optimizing the hohlraum gas density for better symmetry control of indirect drive implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Hall, G. N.; Nagel, S. R.; Khan, S.; Rygg, R. R.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Ho, D. D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Jones, O. S.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.

    2014-10-01

    To achieve a spherically symmetric implosion, control of drive uniformity is essential. Both the ablation pressure and the mass ablation rate on the capsule surface should be made as uniform as possible for the duration of the drive. For an indirect drive implosion, the drive uniformity changes during the pulse because of: (1) the dynamic movement of the laser spots due to blow-off of the hohlraum wall, and (2) cross-beam energy transfer caused by laser-plasma interaction in the hohlraum. To tamp the wall blow-off, we use gas filled hohlraums. The cross-beam energy transfer can be controlled by applying a wave length separation between the cones of the laser beams. However, both of those dynamic effects are sensitive to the initial density of the hohlraum gas fill. To assess this, we performed implosion experiments with different hohlraum gas densities and tested the effect on drive asymmetry. The uniformity of the acceleration was measured by in-flight x-ray backlit imaging of the capsule. The uniformity of the core assembly was observed by imaging the self emission x-ray from the core. We will report on the experimental results and compare them to hydrodynamic simulations. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-626372.

  2. First high-convergence cryogenic implosion in a near-vacuum hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Berzak Hopkins, L F; Meezan, N B; Le Pape, S; Divol, L; Mackinnon, A J; Ho, D D; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Kyrala, G; Milovich, J L; Pak, A; Ralph, J E; Ross, J S; Benedetti, L R; Biener, J; Bionta, R; Bond, E; Bradley, D; Caggiano, J; Callahan, D; Cerjan, C; Church, J; Clark, D; Döppner, T; Dylla-Spears, R; Eckart, M; Edgell, D; Field, J; Fittinghoff, D N; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Guler, N; Haan, S; Hamza, A; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Herrmann, H W; Hinkel, D; Hoover, D; Huang, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S; Kozioziemski, B; Kroll, J; Ma, T; MacPhee, A; McNaney, J; Merrill, F; Moody, J; Nikroo, A; Patel, P; Robey, H F; Rygg, J R; Sater, J; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Sepke, S; Stadermann, M; Stoeffl, W; Thomas, C; Town, R P J; Volegov, P L; Wild, C; Wilde, C; Woerner, E; Yeamans, C; Yoxall, B; Kilkenny, J; Landen, O L; Hsing, W; Edwards, M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent experiments on the National Ignition Facility [M. J. Edwards et al., Phys. Plasmas 20, 070501 (2013)] demonstrate that utilizing a near-vacuum hohlraum (low pressure gas-filled) is a viable option for high convergence cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions. This is made possible by using a dense ablator (high-density carbon), which shortens the drive duration needed to achieve high convergence: a measured 40% higher hohlraum efficiency than typical gas-filled hohlraums, which requires less laser energy going into the hohlraum, and an observed better symmetry control than anticipated by standard hydrodynamics simulations. The first series of near-vacuum hohlraum experiments culminated in a 6.8 ns, 1.2 MJ laser pulse driving a 2-shock, high adiabat (α∼3.5) cryogenic DT layered high density carbon capsule. This resulted in one of the best performances so far on the NIF relative to laser energy, with a measured primary neutron yield of 1.8×10(15) neutrons, with 20% calculated alpha heating at convergence ∼27×. PMID:25978240

  3. Laser-generated magnetic fields in quasi-hohlraum geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollock, Bradley; Turnbull, David; Ross, Steven; Hazi, Andrew; Ralph, Joseph; Lepape, Sebastian; Froula, Dustin; Haberberger, Dan; Moody, John

    2014-10-01

    Laser-generated magnetic fields of 10--40 T have been produced with 100--4000 J laser drives at Omega EP and Titan. The fields are generated using the technique described by Daido et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 56, 846 (1986)], which works by directing a laser through a hole in one plate to strike a second plate. Hot electrons generated in the laser-produced plasma on the second plate collect on the first plate. A strap connects the two plates allowing a current of 10 s of kA to flow and generate a solenoidal magnetic field. The magnetic field is characterized using Faraday rotation, b-dot probes, and proton radiography. Further experiments to study the effect of the magnetic field on hohlraum performance are currently scheduled for Omega. This work was performed under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA-27344.

  4. A photon-photon collider in a vacuum hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, O. J.; Mackenroth, F.; Hill, E. G.; Rose, S. J.

    2014-06-01

    The ability to create matter from light is amongst the most striking predictions of quantum electrodynamics. Experimental signatures of this have been reported in the scattering of ultra-relativistic electron beams with laser beams, intense laser-plasma interactions and laser-driven solid target scattering. However, all such routes involve massive particles. The simplest mechanism by which pure light can be transformed into matter, Breit-Wheeler pair production (γγ' --> e+e-), has never been observed in the laboratory. Here, we present the design of a new class of photon-photon collider in which a gamma-ray beam is fired into the high-temperature radiation field of a laser-heated hohlraum. Matching experimental parameters to current-generation facilities, Monte Carlo simulations suggest that this scheme is capable of producing of the order of 105 Breit-Wheeler pairs in a single shot. This would provide the first realization of a pure photon-photon collider, representing the advent of a new type of high-energy physics experiment.

  5. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Thomas, C A

    2010-10-01

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87× during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics. PMID:21034047

  6. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition Hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multipinhole x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hye-Sook; Dewald, E. D.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Kilkenny, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Maddox, B. R.; Milovich, J. L.; Prasad, R. R.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Thomas, C. A.

    2010-10-15

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside Hohlraums is important to the national ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes with four independent filter combinations to image entire Hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the Hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with Hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 10-40 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser-plasma interactions rather than from Hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  7. High-Performance Layered DT Capsule Implosions in Depleted Uranium Hohlraums on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doeppner, Tilo; Hurricane, O. A.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Benedetti, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Fittinghoff, D.; Haan, S.; Hinkel, D.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Izumi, N.; Kritcher, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P.; Robey, H.; Remington, B.; Salmonson, J.; Springer, P.; Widmann, K.; Merrill, F.; Wilde, C.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the first layered DT capsule implosions in depleted uranium (DU) hohlraums driven with a high-foot pulse shape. High-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to hydrodynamic instabilities. [Hurricane et al., Nature 506, 343 (2014)]. DU hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to 25 TW extra laser power at the peak of the drive compared to Au hohlraums. Additionally, we observe an improved implosion shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. As a result, these first high-foot DU experiments achieved total neutron yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. This work performed under the auspices of U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. A coordinate transformation method for calculating the 3D light intensity distribution in ICF hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Zhili; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Kuixia; Chen, Xudong; Chen, Mingyu; Pu, Jixiong

    2016-06-01

    For an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) system, the light intensity distribution in the hohlraum is key to the initial plasma excitation and later laser-plasma interaction process. Based on the concept of coordinate transformation of spatial points and vector, we present a robust method with a detailed procedure that makes the calculation of the three dimensional (3D) light intensity distribution in hohlraum easily. The method is intuitive but powerful enough to solve the complex cases of random number of laser beams with arbitrary polarization states and incidence angles. Its application is exemplified in the Shenguang III Facility (SG-III) that verifies its effectiveness and it is useful for guiding the design of hohlraum structure parameter.

  9. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S.; Cooper, A. B.R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Graham, P.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Comley, A. J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Back, C. A.; Hund, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Foster, J.; Young, B.; Young, P.

    2014-06-01

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in bench-marking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic di usive Marshak wave which propagates into a high atomic number Ta2O5 aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range

  10. Radiation transport and energetics of laser-driven half-hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, A. S. Graham, P.; Comley, A. J.; Foster, J.; Cooper, A. B. R.; Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S.; Lu, K.; Seugling, R.; Satcher, J.; Klingmann, J.; Marrs, R.; May, M.; Widmann, K.; Glendinning, G.; Castor, J.; Sain, J.; Baker, K.; Hsing, W. W.; Young, B.; and others

    2014-06-15

    Experiments that characterize and develop a high energy-density half-hohlraum platform for use in benchmarking radiation hydrodynamics models have been conducted at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Results from the experiments are used to quantitatively compare with simulations of the radiation transported through an evolving plasma density structure, colloquially known as an N-wave. A half-hohlraum is heated by 80 NIF beams to a temperature of 240 eV. This creates a subsonic diffusive Marshak wave, which propagates into a high atomic number Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} aerogel. The subsequent radiation transport through the aerogel and through slots cut into the aerogel layer is investigated. We describe a set of experiments that test the hohlraum performance and report on a range of x-ray measurements that absolutely quantify the energetics and radiation partition inside the target.

  11. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-15

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc {sup 4}He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  12. Observations of electromagnetic fields and plasma flow in hohlraums with proton radiography.

    PubMed

    Li, C K; Séguin, F H; Frenje, J A; Petrasso, R D; Amendt, P A; Town, R P J; Landen, O L; Rygg, J R; Betti, R; Knauer, J P; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Back, C A; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A

    2009-05-22

    We report on the first proton radiography of laser-irradiated hohlraums. This experiment, with vacuum gold (Au) hohlraums, resulted in observations of self-generated magnetic fields with peak values approximately 10;{6} G. Time-gated radiographs of monoenergetic protons with discrete energies (15.0 and 3.3 MeV) reveal dynamic pictures of field structures and plasma flow. Near the end of the 1-ns laser drive, a stagnating Au plasma (approximately 10 mg cm;{-3}) forms at the center of the hohlraum. This is a consequence of supersonic, radially directed Au jets (approximately 1000 microm ns;{-1}, approximately Mach 4) that arise from the interaction of laser-driven plasma bubbles expanding into one another. PMID:19519034

  13. High-density carbon ablator ignition path with low-density gas-filled rugby hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amendt, Peter; Ho, Darwin D.; Jones, Ogden S.

    2015-04-01

    A recent low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) cylindrical hohlraum experiment on the National Ignition Facility has shown high laser-coupling efficiency (>96%), reduced phenomenological laser drive corrections, and improved high-density carbon capsule implosion symmetry [Jones et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 59(15), 66 (2014)]. In this Letter, an ignition design using a large rugby-shaped hohlraum [Amendt et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 112703 (2014)] for high energetics efficiency and symmetry control with the same low gas-fill density (0.6 mg/cc 4He) is developed as a potentially robust platform for demonstrating thermonuclear burn. The companion high-density carbon capsule for this hohlraum design is driven by an adiabat-shaped [Betti et al., Phys. Plasmas 9, 2277 (2002)] 4-shock drive profile for robust high gain (>10) 1-D ignition performance and large margin to 2-D perturbation growth.

  14. Target design for high fusion yield with the double Z-pinch-driven hohlraum.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, Roger

    2006-10-01

    A key demonstration on the path to inertial fusion energy is the achievement of high fusion yield (hundreds of MJ) and high target gain. An indirect-drive high-yield inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target involving two z-pinch x-ray sources heating a central secondary hohlraum is described by Hammer, Tabak, Wilks, et al. [Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999)]. In subsequent research at Sandia National Laboratories, we have developed theoretical/computational models and performed an extensive series of validation experiments to study hohlraum energetics, capsule coupling, and capsule implosion symmetry. We are using these models to design a 0.5 GJ yield z-pinch-driven ICF target that incorporates the latest experience in capsule design, hohlraum symmetry control, and x-ray production by z-pinches. An x-ray energy output of 8-9 MJ per pinch, suitably pulse-shaped, is sufficient for this concept to drive 0.3-0.5 GJ capsules. Integrated 2D hohlraum/capsule LASNEX radiation-hydrodynamics simulations have demonstrated adequate hohlraum coupling, radiation symmetry control, and the successful implosion, ignition and burn of a 0.5 GJ ICF capsule. An important new feature of this target design is mode-selective symmetry control: the use of burnthrough shields offset from the capsule that selectively tune certain low-order asymmetry modes (P2, P4) without significantly perturbing higher-order modes. This talk will describe the capsule and hohlraum design that have produced 0.5 GJ yields in 2D simulations, as well as provide a preliminary design of the z-pinch load and accelerator requirements necessary to drive the system. In collaboration with M. C. Herrmann, R. W. Lemke, G. R. Bennett, R. B. Campbell, P. J. Christenson, M. E. Cuneo, M. P. Desjarlais, T. A. Mehlhorn, J. L. Porter, D. B. Sinars, S. A. Slutz, W. A. Stygar, E. P. Yu, and J. H. Hammer (LLNL).

  15. Characterizing high energy spectra of NIF ignition hohlraums using a differentially filtered high energy multi-pinhole X-ray imager

    SciTech Connect

    Park, H; Dewald, E D; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; MacGowan, B J; Maddox, B R; Milovich, J L; Prasad, R R; Remington, B A; Thomas, C A

    2010-05-11

    Understanding hot electron distributions generated inside hohlraums is important to the ignition campaign for controlling implosion symmetry and sources of preheat. While direct imaging of hot electrons is difficult, their spatial distribution and spectrum can be deduced by detecting high energy x-rays generated as they interact with the target materials. We used an array of 18 pinholes, with four independent filter combinations, to image entire hohlraums with a magnification of 0.87x during the hohlraum energetics campaign on NIF. Comparing our results with hohlraum simulations indicates that the characteristic 30 keV hot electrons are mainly generated from backscattered laser plasma interactions rather than from hohlraum hydrodynamics.

  16. Demonstration of Radiation Symmetry Control for Inertial Confinement Fusion in Double Z-Pinch Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Bennett, G. R.; Porter, J. L.; Adams, R. G.; Aragon, R. A.; Rambo, P. K.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Smith, I. C.

    2003-01-01

    Simulations of a double Z-pinch hohlraum, relevant to the high-yield inertial-confinement-fusion concept, predict that through geometry design the time-integrated P2 Legendre mode drive asymmetry can be systematically controlled from positive to negative coefficient values. Studying capsule elonga­tion, recent experiments on Z confirm such control by varying the secondary hohlraum length. Since the experimental trend and optimum length are correctly modeled, confidence is gained in the simu­lation tools; the same tools predict capsule drive uniformity sufficient for high-yield fusion ignition.

  17. Simulation of laser-plasma interaction experiments with gas-filled hohlraums on the LIL facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P.-E.; Teychenné, D.; Monteil, M.-C.; Casanova, M.; Marion, D.; Tran, G.; Huser, G.; Rousseaux, C.; Hüller, S.; Héron, A.; Pesme, D.

    2016-03-01

    Laser-plasma interaction is a major issue for achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion schemes, and still a major concern for the upcoming french laser mégajoule (LMJ) program. In order to mitigate the deleterious effects due to laser-plasma instabilities (LPI), clearly evidenced during the recent US National Ignition Campaign conducted on the National Ignition Facility, we use the LIL facility as a demonstrator for LPI studies. In this article, we focus on preliminary results regarding the propagation of a typical LMJ quadruplet through gas-filled hohlraums. Results on hohlraum energetics will then be discussed.

  18. Evidence for high-efficiency laser-heated hohlraum performance at 527 nm.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, R M; Oades, K; Thomas, B R; Schneider, M; Slark, G E; Suter, L J; Kauffman, R; Hinkel, D; Miller, M C

    2005-02-11

    A series of experiments conducted on the HELEN laser system [M. J. Norman, Appl. Opt.4120023497], into thermal x-ray generation from hohlraum targets using 527 nm (2omega) wavelength laser light, has shown that it is possible to exceed radiation temperatures previously thought limited by high levels of superthermal or hot electron production or stimulated backscatter. This Letter questions whether the assumptions traditionally applied to hohlraum design with respect to hot plasma filling and the use of 2omega light are too conservative. PMID:15783658

  19. Suppression of stimulated brillouin scattering by increased landau damping in multiple-ion-species hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R L; Divol, L; Froula, D H; London, R A; Macgowan, B J; Meezan, N B; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-03-14

    We demonstrate that multiple-ion-species plasmas greatly reduce stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in high-electron temperature inertial confinement fusion hohlraums. Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to a CO(2) gas filled hohlraum. We find that the SBS reflectivity decreases monotonically with increasing hydrogen fraction from 18% to 3% with a simultaneous increase of laser beam transmission. Detailed simulations with a 3D laser-plasma interaction code are in agreement with the experimentally observed reduction in backscattered light. PMID:18352195

  20. The design and characterization of toroidal-shaped Nova hohlraums that simulate National Ignition Facility plasma conditions for plasma instability experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wilde, B.H.; Fernandez, J.C.; Hsing, W.W.; Cobble, J.A.; Delamater, N.D.; Krauser, W.J.; Lindman, E.L.; Failor, B.H.

    1995-07-01

    Special Nova hohlraums have been designed to simulate the plasma conditions calculated for various NIF hohlraum point designs. These hohlraums attempt to maximize the laser pathlength for parametric instability measurements. A toroidal-shaped hohlraum with a diameter of 3200 microns and a length of 1600 microns allows a laser pathlength of about 2 mm. Filling the hohlraum with 1 atmosphere of neopentane gas gives an electron temperature of 3 keV and electron density near 0.1 of critical. Detailed LASNEX calculations for these hohlraums and comparisons to the NIF point design will be presented. Comparisons between data and calculations that characterize the plasma conditions (electron, radiation, and ion temperatures, electron density, etc) in these Nova hohlraums will also be shown.

  1. Soft x-ray images of the laser entrance hole of ignition hohlraums.

    PubMed

    Schneider, M B; Meezan, N B; Alvarez, S S; Alameda, J; Baker, S; Bell, P M; Bradley, D K; Callahan, D A; Celeste, J R; Dewald, E L; Dixit, S N; Döppner, T; Eder, D C; Edwards, M J; Fernandez-Perea, M; Gullikson, E; Haugh, M J; Hau-Riege, S; Hsing, W; Izumi, N; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D H; Kilkenny, J D; Kline, J L; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; London, R A; MacGowan, B J; MacKinnon, A J; McCarville, T J; Milovich, J L; Mirkarimi, P; Moody, J D; Moore, A S; Myers, M D; Palma, E A; Palmer, N; Pivovaroff, M J; Ralph, J E; Robinson, J; Soufli, R; Suter, L J; Teruya, A T; Thomas, C A; Town, R P; Vernon, S P; Widmann, K; Young, B K

    2012-10-01

    Hohlraums are employed at the national ignition facility to convert laser energy into a thermal x-radiation drive, which implodes a fusion capsule, thus compressing the fuel. The x-radiation drive is measured with a low spectral resolution, time-resolved x-ray spectrometer, which views the region around the hohlraum's laser entrance hole. This measurement has no spatial resolution. To convert this to the drive inside the hohlraum, the size of the hohlraum's opening ("clear aperture") and fraction of the measured x-radiation, which comes from this opening, must be known. The size of the clear aperture is measured with the time integrated static x-ray imager (SXI). A soft x-ray imaging channel has been added to the SXI to measure the fraction of x-radiation emitted from inside the clear aperture. A multilayer mirror plus filter selects an x-ray band centered at 870 eV, near the peak of the x-ray spectrum of a 300 eV blackbody. Results from this channel and corrections to the x-radiation drive are discussed. PMID:23127032

  2. Effect of NLTE emissivity models on NIF ignition hohlraum power requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, L.; Hansen, S.; Rosen, M.; Springer, P.; Callahan, D.

    2008-11-01

    It's well known that the NLTE atomic physics model can significantly affect the power requirements and plasma conditions in ignition hohlraums. This is because the emissivity(Te,ne) is a significant factor in determining the time dependent coronal temperature of the hot blow-off plasma filling ignition hohlraums which, in turn, determines the total energy stored in that coronal plasma at any instant. In this talk we present best estimates of NLTE emissivity using the SCRAM model, including the range of uncertainty, and compare them with the emissivity of the model used to design NIF ignition hohlraums and set the NIF pulse shape. We then present pulse shapes derived from hohlraum simulations using an atomic physics model that approximates the SCRAM emissivities. We discuss the differences in coronal energetics and show how this affects the pulse shape and decreases the peak power requirement. Finally, we present design simulations of potential NIF-commissioning scaling experiments that could distinguish among emissivity models. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Towards a more universal understanding of radiation drive in gas-filled hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Amendt, P. A.; Hall, G. N.; Izumi, N.; Barrios Garcia, M. A.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Chen, H.; Dewald, E. L.; Hinkel, D. E.; Kritcher, A. L.; Marinak, M. M.; Meezan, N. B.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Patel, M. V.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Sepke, S. M.; Strozzi, DJ; Turnbull, D. P.

    2016-05-01

    We have found that radiation-hydrodynamic calculations that use the high flux model assumptions [1] can accurately predict the radiation drive produced by a laser-heated hohlraum under certain conditions, but can not predict drive over a broad range of parameters (pulse energy, hohlraum gas fill density, hohlraum case-to-capsule ratio). In particular, the model is accurate for ∼7 ns long laser pulses used to implode capsules with high density carbon (HDC) ablators in hohlraums with helium fill gas densities of 0-0.6 mg/cc. By systematically varying the gas fill density from 0 to 1.6 mg/cc we found that the agreement with drive begins to diverge for fills > 0.85 mg/cc. This divergence from the model coincides with the onset of measureable SRS backscatter. In this same set of experiments the radiation drive symmetry inferred from the imploded shape of a gas-filled capsule is not predicted with this model. Finally, several possible fixes to the model to reduce the observed discrepancies are considered.

  4. Titanium and germanium lined hohlraums and halfraums as multi-keV x-ray radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, F.; Primout, M.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Jacquet, L.; Babonneau, D.; Fournier, K. B.

    2009-05-01

    As multi-keV x-ray radiators, hohlraums and halfraums with inner walls coated with metallic materials (called liner) have been tested for the first time with laser as the energy drive. For titanium, conversion efficiencies (CEs) are up to ˜14% for emission into 4π, integrating between 4.6 and 6.5 keV when a large diameter hohlraum is used. Germanium CE is ˜0.8% into 4π between 9 and 13 keV. The highest CEs have been obtained with a 1 ns squared pulse and phase plates giving laser absorption near 99%. These high CEs are due to long-lasting, good plasma conditions for multi-keV x-ray production maintained by plasma confinement inside the plastic cylinder and plasma collision leading to a burst of x rays at a time that depends on target size. As photon emitters at 4.7 keV, titanium-lined hohlraums are the most efficient solid targets and data are close to CEs for gas targets, which are considered as the upper limit for x-ray yields since their low density allows good laser absorption and low kinetics losses. As 10.3 keV x-ray emitters, exploded germanium foils give best results one order of magnitude more efficient than thick targets; doped aerogels and lined hohlraums give similar yields, about three times lower than those from exploded foils.

  5. Effects of plasma physics on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Lindman, E.L.; Delamater, N.D.; Magelssen, G.R.; Hauer, A.

    1994-10-01

    Initial experiments on capsule implosions in gas-filled hohlraums have been carried out on the NOVA Laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Observed capsule shapes from preliminary experiments are more oblate than predicted. Improvements in modeling required to calculate these experiments and additional experiments are being pursued.

  6. Multi-keV X-ray sources from metal-lined cylindrical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, L.; Girard, F.; Villette, B.; Stemmler, Ph.; Primout, M.

    2013-11-01

    In 2009 a series of metal-lined hohlraums were tested on the Omega laser facility. The main aims of the campaign were to improve our understanding of the multi-keV energy production and our capability to numerically reproduce the measured conversion efficiencies (CE's). Two studies have been primarily planned: the effect of the metallic plasma mean ionization states and that of hydrodynamics. Six targets were experimented for which the metallic materials (titanium, copper, germanium), the cavity diameter, and the irradiation energy were varied. Here we compare experimental and calculated results. The numerical simulations are performed with the 2D hydro-radiative code FCI2. For all the cavities, the measured multi-keV x-ray powers versus time are qualitatively well reproduced by the simulations, indicating that hohlraum hydrodynamics seems to be well calculated. But we have an underestimation by a factor of ˜2 for the calculated CEs versus experimental values for titanium and copper hohlraums. By contrast there is a good agreement between measurements and calculations for the germanium hohlraum. To explain these results, we have calculated off-line integrated emissivities for couples of (ρ, Te) values contributing to the multi-keV production with several non-local-thermal-equilibrium (NLTE) atomic physics models.

  7. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-15

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  8. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources - planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  9. A new symmetry model for hohlraum-driven capsule implosion experiments on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, O.; Rygg, R.; Tomasini, R.; Eder, D.; Kritcher, A.; Milovich, J.; Peterson, L.; Thomas, C.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, R.; Doeppner, T.; Ma, T.; Nagel, S.; Pak, A.; Field, J.; Izumi, N.; Glenn, S.; Town, R.; Bradley, D.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed a new model for predicting the time-dependent radiation drive asymmetry in laser-heated hohlraums. The model consists of integrated Hydra capsule-hohlraum calculations coupled to a separate model for calculating the crossbeam energy transfer between the inner and outer cones of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) indirect drive configuration. The time- dependent crossbeam transfer model parameters were adjusted in order to best match the P2 component of the shape of the inflight shell inferred from backlit radiographs of the capsule taken when the shell was at a radius of 150-250 μm. The adjusted model correctly predicts the observed inflight P2 and P4 components of the shape of the inflight shell, and also the P2 component of the shape of the hotspot inferred from x-ray self-emission images at the time of peak emission. It also correctly captures the scaling of the inflight P4 as the hohlraum length is varied. We then applied the newly benchmarked model to quantify the improved symmetry of the N130331 layered deuterium- tritium (DT) experiment in a re-optimized longer hohlraum.

  10. Mitigating the impact of hohlraum asymmetries in National Ignition Facility implosions using capsule shims

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, D. S.; Weber, C. R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Robey, H. F.; Kritcher, A. L.; Milovich, J. L.; Salmonson, J. D.

    2016-07-01

    Current indirect drive implosion experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] are believed to be strongly impacted by long wavelength perturbations driven by asymmetries in the hohlraum x-ray flux. To address this perturbation source, active efforts are underway to develop modified hohlraum designs with reduced asymmetry imprint. An alternative strategy, however, is to modify the capsule design to be more resilient to a given amount of hohlraum asymmetry. In particular, the capsule may be deliberately misshaped, or "shimmed," so as to counteract the expected asymmetries from the hohlraum. Here, the efficacy of capsule shimming to correct the asymmetries in two recent NIF implosion experiments is assessed using two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics simulations. Despite the highly time-dependent character of the asymmetries and the high convergence ratios of these implosions, simulations suggest that shims could be highly effective at counteracting current asymmetries and result in factors of a few enhancements in neutron yields. For higher compression designs, the yield improvement could be even greater.

  11. A simple model of hohlraum power balance and mitigation of SRS

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Albright, Brian J.; Montgomery, David S.; Yin, Lin; Kline, John L.

    2016-01-01

    A simple energy balance model has been obtained for laser-plasma heating in indirect drive hohlraum plasma that allows rapid temperature scaling and evolution with parameters such as plasma density and composition. Furthermore, this model enables assessment of the effects on plasma temperature of, e.g., adding high-Z dopant to the gas fill or magnetic fields.

  12. X-ray conversion efficiency in vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, R. E.; Suter, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Dixit, S. N.; Landen, O. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Warrick, A.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kline, J. L.

    2012-05-15

    X-ray fluxes measured in the first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were significantly higher than predicted by computational simulations employing XSN average atom atomic physics and highly flux-limited electron heat conduction. For agreement with experimental data, it was found that the coronal plasma emissivity must be simulated with a detailed configuration accounting model that accounts for x-ray emission involving all of the significant ionization states. It was also found that an electron heat conduction flux limit of f= 0.05 is too restrictive, and that a flux limit of f= 0.15 results in a much better match with the NIF vacuum hohlraum experimental data. The combination of increased plasma emissivity and increased electron heat conduction in this new high flux hohlraum model results in a reduction in coronal plasma energy and, hence, an explanation for the high ({approx}85%-90%) x-ray conversion efficiencies observed in the 235 < T{sub r} < 345 eV NIF vacuum hohlraum experiments.

  13. Electron heat conduction under non-Maxwellian distribution in hohlraum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen Yihuo; Ke Lan; Pei Jungu; Heng Yong; Qing Hongzeng

    2012-01-15

    An electron transport model based on the non-Maxwellian distribution f{sub 0}{proportional_to}e{sup -{nu}{sup m}} (NM model), caused by the inverse bremsstrahlung heating, is used in 1-D plane target and 2-D hohlraum simulations. In the NM model, the electron heat flux depends not only on the gradient of electron temperature T{sub e} but also on the gradients of electron number density and the index m. From 1-D simulations, the spatial distribution of T{sub e} is dune-like and T{sub e} decreases obviously in the flux-heated region, which is very different from the flat profile obtained by using the flux limit model (FL model) but similar to the experimental observations [Gregori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 205006 (2004)] and the nonlocal results [Rosen et al., High Energy Density Phys. 7, 180 (2011)]. The reason which causes the dune-like profile of T{sub e} is discussed in the paper. From 2-D hohlraum simulations, the NM results of the plasma status, the emission peak and profile inside hohlraum are very different from the FL model results. Finally, it is hard to use an average flux limiter in the FL model to obtain the same hohlraum plasma status and emission with those under the NM model.

  14. The Near Vacuum Hohlraum Campaign at the NIF: A New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Pape, Sebastien

    2015-11-01

    Hohlraums filled with helium >1 mg/cc have been used with some success on the National Ignition Facility. However challenges remain due to significant backscatter level, supra-thermal electron production and difficulties in modeling implosion symmetry via Cross Beam Energy Transfer (CBET). Near Vacuum Hohlraum (NVH, filled with <0.1 mg/cc of helium) may provide a viable alternative with negligible laser plasma instabilities and high laser-to-hohlraum coupling. In this reduced laser-plasma interaction system, implosion symmetry is controlled through direct adjustment of the laser beam power balance rather than through CBET. A significant challenge in extending this platform to higher convergence designs is achieving adequate symmetry control of the drive throughout the pulse. This talk will summarize experimental campaigns exploring laser pulse duration and power limits in three hohlraum size scales and two capsule size scales. Experiments with small capsules have shown good symmetry control using laser cone fraction tuning at convergence ratio (CR) of 18x and 7ns pulses. Results from higher convergence (CR ~ 25x) cryogenic DT layered capsule implosions with ~ 9 ns pulses will be presented and implications for achieving conditions required for robust alpha heating with NVH driven implosions will be discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. A Simple Model of Hohlraum Power Balance and Mitigation of SRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, B. J.; Montgomery, David S.; Yin, L.; Kline, J. L.

    2016-03-01

    A simple energy balance model has been obtained for laser-plasma heating in indirect drive hohlraum plasma that allows rapid temperature scaling and evolution with parameters such as plasma density and composition. This model enables assessment of the effects on plasma temperature of, e.g., adding high-Z dopant to the gas fill or magnetic fields.

  16. High performance capsule implosions on the OMEGA Laser facility with rugby hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Robey, H. F.; Amendt, P.; Park, H.-S.; Town, R. P. J.; Milovich, J. L.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Sorce, C.; Strozzi, D. J.; Philippe, F.; Casner, A.; Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Liberatore, S.; Monteil, M.-C.; Seguin, F.; Rosenberg, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.

    2010-05-15

    Rugby-shaped hohlraums have been proposed as a method for x-ray drive enhancement for indirectly driven capsule implosions. This concept has recently been tested in a series of shots on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. In this paper, experimental results are presented comparing the performance of D{sub 2}-filled capsules between standard cylindrical Au hohlraums and rugby-shaped hohlraums. The rugby hohlraums demonstrated 18% more x-ray drive energy as compared with the cylinders, and the high-performance design of these implosions (both cylinder and rugby) also provided {approx_equal}20x more deuterium (DD) neutrons than any previous indirectly driven campaign on OMEGA and {approx_equal}3x more than ever achieved on NOVA [E. M. Campbell, Laser Part. Beams 9, 209 (1991)] implosions driven with nearly twice the laser energy. This increase in performance enables, for the first time, a measurement of the neutron burn history and imaging of the neutron core shapes in an indirectly driven implosion. Previous DD neutron yields had been too low to register this key measurement of capsule performance and the effects of dynamic mix. A wealth of additional data on the fuel areal density from the suite of charged particle diagnostics was obtained on a subset of the shots that used D {sup 3}He rather than D{sub 2} fuel. Comparisons of the experimental results with numerical simulations are shown to be in very good agreement. The design techniques employed in this campaign, e.g., smaller laser entrance holes and hohlraum case-to-capsule ratios, provide added confidence in the pursuit of ignition on the National Ignition Facility [J. D. Lindl, P. Amendt, R. L. Berger et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)].

  17. Dynamics of a Z Pinch X Ray Source for Heating ICF Relevant Hohlraums to 120-160eV

    SciTech Connect

    SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; OLSON,RICHARD E.; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; NASH,THOMAS J.; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; PETERSON,D.L.; BOWERS,R.L.; MATUSKA,W.

    2000-07-10

    A z-pinch radiation source has been developed that generates 60 {+-} 20 KJ of x-rays with a peak power of 13 {+-} 4 TW through a 4-mm diameter axial aperture on the Z facility. The source has heated NIF (National Ignition Facility)-scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm high) hohlraums to 122 {+-} 6 eV and reduced-scale (4-mm diameter by 4-mm high) hohlraums to 155 {+-} 8 eV -- providing environments suitable for indirect-drive ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) studies. Eulerian-RMHC (radiation-hydrodynamics code) simulations that take into account the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the r-z plane provide integrated calculations of the implosion, x-ray generation, and hohlraum heating, as well as estimates of wall motion and plasma fill within the hohlraums. Lagrangian-RMHC simulations suggest that the addition of a 6 mg/cm{sup 3} CH{sub 2} fill in the reduced-scale hohlraum decreases hohlraum inner-wall velocity by {approximately}40% with only a 3--5% decrease in peak temperature, in agreement with measurements.

  18. Study of shockwave method for diagnosing the radiation fields of laser-driven gold hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongsheng; Lan, Ke; Huo, Wenyi; Lai, Dongxian; Gao, Yaoming; Pei, Wenbing

    2013-11-01

    Besides the routinely used broad-band x-ray spectrometer (Dante or SXS), ablative shock-wave method is often used to diagnose the radiation fields of laser-driven Hohlraums. The x-ray ablation process of Aluminum and Titanium is studied numerically with a 1-D radiation hydrodynamic code RDMG [F. Tinggui et al., Chin. J. Comput. Phys. 16, 199 (1999)], based on which a new scaling relation of the equivalent radiation temperature with the ablative shock velocity in Aluminum plates is proposed, and a novel method is developed for determining simultaneously the radiation temperature and the M-band (2-4 keV) fraction in laser-driven gold Hohlraums.

  19. A cylinder-to-sphere Fourier view factor model for azimuthal asymmetry studies in cylindrical hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorla, J.; Poggi, F.; Paillard, D.

    2002-01-01

    This work addresses the analytical calculation of the irradiation coming from a cylindrical surface to a spherical one. This exact solution of the x-ray transport equation allows one to connect the emitted and the received fluxes, expanded as Fourier modes, by coefficients called Fourier view factors. Such a calculation is well suited to a symmetry study in the Laser Megajoule configuration [P.-A. Holstein, M. André, M. Casanova et al., C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 1, 693 (2000)] where a cylindrical hohlraum and a spherical capsule are irradiated. Indeed, this 60 quad laser system induces an azimuthal asymmetry of the hohlraum lighting depending on the laser focal spot size. Thus, the Fourier view factors allow one to express the modes of the capsule irradiation as functions of the elliptic spot dimensions.

  20. Expectations for hohlraum environment driven by spatially compressed flying radiation case at intermediate currents

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, R.L.; Brownell, J.H.; Rogers, H.H.

    1997-12-31

    The radiation environment produced by the magnetic implosion of a hot, low density plasma and its stagnation on an axial cushion (a Flying Radiation Case) is modeled using a two-dimensional radiation magnetohydrodynamic code and drive parameters for the PFZA-Z machine pulsed power machine. The authors consider the effects of instability growth in the plasma during the implosion, its reassembly on the cushion, and plasma interactions with shaped electrodes. The radiation environment within the pinch and in an axial side hohlraum are modeled. They also consider effects of the pinch on the side hohlraum. The computational approach has been successful in modeling the implosion and radiation output of Z-pinches on the Pegasus facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, and on the Saturn and PFZA-Z machines at Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, F.; Villette, B.; Michel, P.; Petrasso, R.; Stoeckl, C.; Giraldez, E.; Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Döppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; and others

    2014-07-15

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  2. Demonstrated high performance of gas-filled rugby-shaped hohlraums on Omega

    SciTech Connect

    Philippe, F.; Tassin, V.; Depierreux, S.; Gauthier, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Monteil, M. C.; Seytor, P.; Villette, B.; Lasinski, B.; Park, H. S.; Ross, J. S.; Amendt, P.; Doeppner, T.; Hinkel, D. E.; Wallace, R.; Williams, E.; Michel, P.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Glebov, V.; Sorce, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Nikroo, A.; Giraldez, E.

    2014-07-25

    A direct experimental comparison of rugby-shaped and cylindrical shaped gas-filled hohlraums on the Omega laser facility demonstrates that higher coupling and minimal backscatter can be achieved in the rugby geometry, leading to significantly enhanced implosion performance. A nearly 50% increase of x-ray drive is associated with earlier bangtime and increase of neutron production. The observed drive enhancement from rugby geometry in this study is almost twice stronger than in previously published results.

  3. Instability analysis of pointing accuracy and power imbalance of spherical hohlraum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Hao; Wu, Changshu; Pei, Wenbing; Zou, Shiyang

    2016-05-01

    An analytic model to describe the statistic behavior of flux asymmetry on the capsule shell under the influence of random fluctuation of laser spots' position and laser energy is developed. Based on our previous work [Duan et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 092704 (2015)] and a diagram technique, the expectation, variance, and probability density function of flux asymmetry raised by laser pointing accuracy and laser power imbalance of 4, 6, and 8 laser entrance holes (LEHs) spherical hohlraums are shown. For spherical hohlraums with different numbers of LEHs, it is found that the random part of flux asymmetry is proportional to the ratio between laser energy and square root of total spots' number ELaser/√{Nt } , and angle-of-incidence θ0, which indicates that a choice of small θ0 and a great number of Nt can reduce the random flux asymmetry. In order to achieve a cumulative probability in which each l-order flux asymmetry can meet corresponding requirements [Gu et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 012704 (2014)] beyond 90% in the condition of a 1000 μm capsule and 4000 μm hohlraum, the power imbalance, i.e., the ratio between standard derivation and expectation of laser spots power ΔF/Fspot for 4, 6, and 8 LEHs spherical hohlraums must not exceed 8.1%, 9.1%, and 8.5%, corresponding pointing accuracy rHΔθ must not exceed 79 μm , 102 μm , and 96 μm along the ê θ direction, and rH sin 2 θ0Δϕ must not exceed 77 μm , 99 μm , and 94 μm along the ê ϕ direction, respectively.

  4. Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2007-04-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

  5. Observed Dependence of Stimulated Raman Scattering on Ion-Acoustic Damping in Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; DuBois, D.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Rose, H.A.; Vu, H.X.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilke, M.D.; Chrien, R.E. ||

    1996-09-01

    The reflectivity of a laser due to stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from long scale-length hohlraum plasmas is shown to depend on the damping of ion-acoustic waves. This dependence is observed in plasmas with either low or high ionization states. Since the SRS process itself is unrelated to acoustic waves, these data are evidence of a nonlinear coupling of SRS to other parametric processes involving daughter acoustic waves. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  6. Evaluation of laser light specularly reflected by the hohlraum surface on OMEGA indirect implosion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izumi, Nobuhiko; Turner, R. E.; Landen, O. L.; Wallace, R. J.; Koch, R. A.

    2003-10-01

    Due to the cylindrical shape of hohlraums typically used in indirect implosion experiments, the laser beams specularly reflected by the inner hohlraum surface are focused onto the capsule surface. This effect, which is known as the glint light effect, is important during the early stages of laser irradiation ( ˜200 ps), and might seed undesirable hydrodynamic instabilities which could grow during the implosion. We performed ray-trace calculations to evaluate this effect, and found that with a typical laser configuration the peak intensity of glint light can be up to 4 × 10^14 W/cm^2. We also performed experiments to measure of glint light effect at Omega using a time resolved x-ray re-emission technique, and evaluated the effect of rough hohlraum walls on the glint light intensity and spatial distribution. The results of the calculations and experiments will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  7. Neutron reactions in the hohlraum at the LLNL National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, P. A.; Grim, G. P.; Hayes, A. C.; Jungman, Gerard; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Hale, G. M.; Korzekwa, R. C.

    2012-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser energy captured in a hohlraum. The projected yields at NIF suggest that interactions of neutrons with the hohlraum can directly probe the neutron spectrum. Different physical parameters of the burning capsule can be probed by different neutron reactions. We suggest a variety of neutron reactions on the gold and uranium present in National Ignition Campaign hohlraums that will be useful for both neutron diagnostics and dosimetry at the NIF. The radiochemical daughter products may then be used to infer the neutron spectrum from the capsule. The downscattered neutrons may be studied by the (n,γ) and (n,n') reactions to infer the areal density of the capsule. The 14 MeV neutron fluence may be measured by (n,2n) daughter products for comparison to neutron spectrometer data. The hydrodynamical mix in the capsule can be studied with RIF neutrons, which are probed by (n,3n) reactions.

  8. Hohlraum target alignment from x-ray detector images using starburst design patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leach, Richard R., Jr.; Conder, Alan; Edwards, Oliver; Kroll, Jeremy; Kozioziemski, Bernard; Mapoles, Evan; McGuigan, Dave; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2011-03-01

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  9. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Hartemann, F.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Hohenberger, M.; Pak, A.; Landen, O. L.; Divol, L.; Robey, H. F.; Hurricane, O. A.; Döppner, T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B.; Meezan, N. B.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10 × higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma.

  10. The application of quasi-steady approximation in atomic kinetics in simulation of hohlraum radiation drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guoli; Pei, Wenbing; Lan, Ke; Gu, Peijun; Li, Xin; Institute of Applied Physics; Computional Mathematics Team

    2011-10-01

    In current routine 2D simulation of hohlraum physics, we adopt the principal-quantum- number(n-level) average atom model(AAM). However, the experimental frequency-dependant radiative drive differs from our n-level simulated drive, which reminds us the need of a more detailed atomic kinetics description. The orbital-quantum-number(nl-level) AAM is a natural consideration but the in-line calculation consumes much more resources. We use a new method to built up a nl-level bound electron distribution using in-line n-level calculated plasma condition (such as temperature, density, average ionization degree). We name this method ``quasi-steady approximation.'' Using the re-built nl-level bound electron distribution (Pnl) , we acquire a new hohlraum radiative drive by post-processing. Comparison with the n-level post-processed hohlraum drive shows that we get an almost identical radiation flux but with more-detailed frequency-dependant structures.

  11. The application of quasi-steady approximation in atomic kinetics in simulation of hohlraum radiation drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Guoli; Pei, Wenbing; Lan, Ke; Li, Xin; Hohlraum Physics Team

    2014-10-01

    In current routine 2D simulation of hohlraum physics, we adopt the principal-quantum-number (n-level) average atom model (AAM) in NLTE plasma description. The more sophisticated atomic kinetics description is better choice, but the in-line calculation consumes much more resource. By distinguishing the much more fast bound-bound atomic processes from the relative slow bound-free atomic processes, we found a method to built up a bound electron distribution (n-level or nl-level) using in-line n-level calculated plasma condition (such as temperature, density, average ionization degree). We name this method ``quasi-steady approximation.'' Using this method and the plasma condition calculated under n-level, we re-build the nl-level bound electron distribution (Pnl), and acquire a new hohlraum radiative drive by post-processing. Comparison with the n-level post-processed hohlraum drive shows that we get an almost identical radiation flux but with more-detailed frequency-dependant structures. Also we use this method in the benchmark gold sphere experiment, the constructed nl-level radiation drive resembles the experimental results and DCA results, while the n-level raditation does not.

  12. Convergent ablation measurements with gas-filled rugby hohlraum on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Galmiche, D.

    2016-03-01

    Convergent ablation experiments with gas-filled rugby hohlraum were performed for the first time on the OMEGA laser facility. A time resolved 1D streaked radiography of capsule implosion is acquired in the direction perpendicular to hohlraum axis, whereas a 2D gated radiography is acquired at the same time along the hohlraum axis on a x-ray framing camera. The implosion trajectory has been measured for various kinds of uniformly doped ablators, including germanium-doped and silicon-doped polymers (CH), at two different doping fraction (2% and 4% at.). Our experiments aimed also at measuring the implosion performance of laminated capsules. A laminated ablator is constituted by thin alternate layers of un-doped and doped CH. It has been previously shown in planar geometry that laminated ablators could mitigate Rayleigh Taylor growth at ablation front. Our results confirm that the implosion of a capsule constituted with a uniform or laminated ablator behaves similarly, in accordance with post-shot simulations performed with the CEA hydrocode FCI2.

  13. Early hot electrons generation and beaming in ICF gas filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, Eduard; Michel, Pierre; Hartemann, Fred; Milovich, Jose; Hohenberger, Matthias; Divol, Laurent; Landen, Otto; Pak, Arthur; Thomas, Cliff; Doeppner, Tilo; Bachmann, Benjamin; Meezan, Nathan; MacKinnon, Andrew; Hurricane, Omar; Callahan, Debbie; Hinkel, Denise; Edwards, John

    2015-11-01

    In laser driven hohlraum capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility, supra-thermal hot electrons generated by laser plasma instabilities can preheat the capsule. Time resolved hot electron Bremsstrahlung spectra combined with 30 keV x-ray imaging uncover for the first time the directionality of hot electrons onto a high-Z surrogate capsule located at the hohlraum center. In the most extreme case, we observed a collimated beaming of hot electrons onto the capsule poles, reaching 50x higher localized energy deposition than for isotropic electrons. A collective SRS model where all laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave provides a physical interpretation for the observed beaming. Imaging data are used to distinguish between this mechanism and 2ωp instability. The amount of hot electrons generated can be controlled by the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma conditions. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Simulating hohlraum dynamics and radiation flow for Pleiades experiments on NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussack, K.; Devolder, B. G.; Keiter, P. A.; Kline, J. L.; Lanier, N.; Magelssen, G. R.; Peterson, R. R.; Taccetti, J. M.

    2011-10-01

    The Pleiades campaign is developing and validating an experimental platform on NIF to produce a high-quality radiation drive to study super-, trans- and subsonic radiation flow. Platform requirements include 5% shot-to-shot repeatability, a minimum radiation drive of 300 eV, and the ability to provide supersonic radiation. Here we discuss the ongoing series of experiments, focusing on simulations of the hohlraum and package. We assess the platform's ability to provide the required drive and reproducibility, the effectiveness of spectral tailoring with M-band absorbing foam, and the ability of our models to simulate the hohlraum drive and radiation flow. Early shots in the campaign have met or surpassed requirements. The first shot produced a 340 eV drive, exceeding the minimum drive requirement. The Dante-measured flux from the second shot demonstrated success in meeting the repeatability requirement. Simulated Dante temperatures match both shots well, indicating that simulations successfully model the laser energy deposition and hohlraum dynamics.

  15. Laser{endash}plasma interactions in ignition-scale hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    MacGowan, B.J.; Afeyan, B.B.; Back, C.A.; Berger, R.L.; Bonnaud, G.; Casanova, M.; Cohen, B.I.; Desenne, D.E.; DuBois, D.F.; Dulieu, A.G.; Estabrook, K.G.; Fernandez, J.C.; Glenzer, S.H.; Hinkel, D.E.; Kaiser, T.B.; Kalantar, D.H.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kirkwood, R.K.; Kruer, W.L.; Langdon, A.B.; Lasinski, B.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Moody, J.D.; Munro, D.H.; Powers, L.V.; Rose, H.A.; Rousseaux, C.; Turner, R.E.; Wilde, B.H.; Wilks, S.C.; Williams, E.A.

    1996-05-01

    Scattering of laser light by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is a concern for indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The hohlraum designs for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) raise particular concerns due to the large scale and homogeneity of the plasmas within them. Experiments at Nova have studied laser{endash}plasma interactions within large scale length plasmas that mimic many of the characteristics of the NIF hohlraum plasmas. Filamentation and scattering of laser light by SBS and SRS have been investigated as a function of beam smoothing and plasma conditions. Narrowly collimated SRS backscatter has been observed from low density, low-{ital Z}, plasmas, which are representative of the plasma filling most of the NIF hohlraum. SBS backscatter is found to occur in the high-{ital Z} plasma of gold ablated from the wall. Both SBS and SRS are observed to be at acceptable levels in experiments using smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Development of short pulse laser driven micro-hohlraums as a source of EUV radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krushelnick, Karl; Batson, Thomas; McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Thomas, Alec; Yanovsky, Victor; Nees, John; Maksimchuk, Anatoly

    2015-11-01

    Experiments at large scale laser facilities such as NIF allow the radiativ properties of dens, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regime, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled system using a short laser pulses and delivering energy to much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a much smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavit. The laser is tightl focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall. Experiments were performe using the Hercules Ti:Sapphire laser system at Michiga. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser power, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricate target. Spectral characteristics were measured using a soft X-ray spectromete, K-alpha x-ray imaging system and a filtered photo cathode array. Scalings of the radiation temperature were made for variations in the hohlraum cavit, the pulse duration as well as the focusing conditions. Proof of principle time resolved absorption spectroscopy experiments were also performe. These sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma an radiation temperatures comparable to much larger hohlraums, but with much higher repetition rate and in a university scale laboratory. We acknowledge funding from DTRA grant HDTRA1-11-1-0066.

  17. Generation and Beaming of Early Hot Electrons onto the Capsule in Laser-Driven Ignition Hohlraums.

    PubMed

    Dewald, E L; Hartemann, F; Michel, P; Milovich, J; Hohenberger, M; Pak, A; Landen, O L; Divol, L; Robey, H F; Hurricane, O A; Döppner, T; Albert, F; Bachmann, B; Meezan, N B; MacKinnon, A J; Callahan, D; Edwards, M J

    2016-02-19

    In hohlraums for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions on the National Ignition Facility, suprathermal hot electrons, generated by laser plasma instabilities early in the laser pulse ("picket") while blowing down the laser entrance hole (LEH) windows, can preheat the capsule fuel. Hard x-ray imaging of a Bi capsule surrogate and of the hohlraum emissions, in conjunction with the measurement of time-resolved bremsstrahlung spectra, allows us to uncover for the first time the directionality of these hot electrons and infer the capsule preheat. Data and Monte Carlo calculations indicate that for most experiments the hot electrons are emitted nearly isotropically from the LEH. However, we have found cases where a significant fraction of the generated electrons are emitted in a collimated beam directly towards the capsule poles, where their local energy deposition is up to 10× higher than the average preheat value and acceptable levels for ICF implosions. The observed "beaming" is consistent with a recently unveiled multibeam stimulated Raman scattering model [P. Michel et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 055003 (2015)], where laser beams in a cone drive a common plasma wave on axis. Finally, we demonstrate that we can control the amount of generated hot electrons by changing the laser pulse shape and hohlraum plasma. PMID:26943541

  18. The Evolution of the Gold Bubble in NIF Ignition Gas-Filled Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Marilyn; MacLaren, Steve; Widmann, Klaus; Meezan, Nathan; Hammer, James; Bell, Perry; Benedetti, Robin; Bradley, David; Callahan, Deborah; Dewald, Eduard; Doeppner, Tilo; Hinkel, Denise; Jones, Oggie; Landen, O. L.; Michel, Pierre; Milovich, Jose; Moody, John; Moore, Alastair

    2015-11-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the energy from 192 laser beams is converted to an x-ray drive in a gas-filled gold hohlraum. The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The ViewFactor platform uses a truncated hohlraum to measure the x-ray drive from the capsule point-of-view. This platform also affords excellent diagnostic views of the hohlraum interior, in particular, of the region in which the outer beams deposit their energy (the ``gold bubble'') Time-resolved and time-integrated images in the hard x-ray range (>3 keV) reveal an 8-fold symmetry in the gold bubble. The Au plasma in the bubble from the eight 50 degree quads expands faster than that from the interleaved 44.5 degree quads. The variation in this structure with laser intensity, with pulse shape and cross beam energy transfer, and comparison to models, will be discussed. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  20. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Guymer, T. M.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. P.; Thomas, C. A.; Wan, A. S.

    2015-12-01

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a "hohlraum." The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3-5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum ("ViewFactor hohlraum") is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%-20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  1. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the national ignition facility using DANTE

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, John L; Glenzer, S H; Olson, Rick; Suter, Larry J; Widmann, K; Callahan, D A; Dixit, S N; Thomas, C A; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Moore, A; Celeste, J; Dewald, E; Hsing, W W; Warrick, A; Atherton, J; Azevedo, S; Beeler, R; Berger, R; Conder, A; Divol, L; Haynam, C A; Kalantar, D H; Kauffman, R; Kilkenny, J; Liebman, J; Larson, D; Meezan, N B; Michel, P; Moody, J; Rosen, M D; Schneider, M B; Van Wontergheman, B; Wallace, R J; Young, B K; Landen, O L; MacGowan, B J; Berzins, L; Tran, Vu; Torres, P., III

    2010-01-01

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr representing a 20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale hohlraums. The vacuum hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square pulses with energies between 150 - 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30 {+-} 10% more flux than predicted by the current radiation hydrodynamic simulations after careful verification of all component calibrations (which included an {approx} 10% downward correction to Center X-Ray Optics opacities just below the Cu L edge at 50-750 eV), cable deconvolution, and analysis software routines. To corroborate these results, first a half hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns-long axial quad with an irradiance of {approx} 1-2 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. Second, we completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1 x 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for non-local heat conduction and non-linear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to {+-}5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we concluded the 30 {+-} 10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics when we transitioned to large hot hohlraums. Specifically, using variants in the atomic physics models and electron heat conduction, newer simulations show that nonlocalization of energy deposition leads to less energy being stored in the coronal plasma leading to

  2. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  3. Laser absorption, power transfer, and radiation symmetry during the first shock of inertial confinement fusion gas-filled hohlraum experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, A.; Dewald, E. L.; Landen, O. L.; Milovich, J.; Strozzi, D. J.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Bradley, D. K.; Divol, L.; Ho, D. D.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Michel, P.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. S.; Schneider, M. B.; Town, R. P. J.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-12-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of the hohlraum radiation flux asymmetry incident onto a bismuth coated surrogate capsule have been made over the first two nanoseconds of ignition relevant laser pulses. Specifically, we study the P2 asymmetry of the incoming flux as a function of cone fraction, defined as the inner-to-total laser beam power ratio, for a variety of hohlraums with different scales and gas fills. This work was performed to understand the relevance of recent experiments, conducted in new reduced-scale neopentane gas filled hohlraums, to full scale helium filled ignition targets. Experimental measurements, matched by 3D view factor calculations, are used to infer differences in symmetry, relative beam absorption, and cross beam energy transfer (CBET), employing an analytic model. Despite differences in hohlraum dimensions and gas fill, as well as in laser beam pointing and power, we find that laser absorption, CBET, and the cone fraction, at which a symmetric flux is achieved, are similar to within 25% between experiments conducted in the reduced and full scale hohlraums. This work demonstrates a close surrogacy in the dynamics during the first shock between reduced-scale and full scale implosion experiments and is an important step in enabling the increased rate of study for physics associated with inertial confinement fusion.

  4. Observation of reduced beam deflection using smoothed beams in gas-filled hohlraum symmetry experiments at Nova

    SciTech Connect

    Delamater, N. D.; Lindman, E. L.; Magelssen, G. R.; Failor, B. H.; Murphy, T. J.; Hauer, A. A.; Gobby, P.; Moore, J. B.; Gomez, V.; Gifford, K.

    2000-05-01

    Execution and modeling of drive symmetry experiments in gas-filled hohlraums have been pursued to provide both a better understanding of radiation symmetry in such hohlraums and to verify the accuracy of the design tools which are used to predict target performance for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [J. Lindl, Phys. Plasmas 2, 3933 (1995)]. In this paper, the results of a series of drive symmetry experiments using gas-filled hohlraums at the Nova laser facility [C. Bibeau et al., Appl. Opt. 31, 5799 (1992)] at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. A very important element of these experiments was the use of kineform phase plates (KPP) to smooth the Nova beams. The effect of smoothing the ten Nova beams with KPP phase plates is to remove most of the beam bending which had been observed previously, leaving a residual bending of only 1.5 degree sign , equivalent to a 35 {mu}m pointing offset at the hohlraum wall. The results show that the symmetry variation with pointing of implosions in gas-filled hohlraums is consistent with time integrated modeling. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  5. Crystal spectroscopy of silicon aero-gel end-caps driven by a dynamic hohlraum on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Gilliland, Terrance Leo; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Lake, Patrick Wayne; Nash, Thomas J.; Idzorek, George C.; Apruzese, John P.; Moore, Tracy Croft; McKenney, John Lee; Torres, Jose A.; Schroen, Diana Grace; Jobe, Daniel Olarry; Chrien, Robert E.; Nielsen, Daniel Scott; Mock, Raymond Cecil; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; McGurn, John Stephen; Peterson, Darrell L.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Lucas, Joshua M.; Watt, Robert G.; Russell, Christopher Owen; Seamen, Johann Franz

    2003-07-01

    We present results from crystal spectroscopic analysis of silicon aero-gel foams heated by dynamic hohlraums on Z. The dynamic hohlraum on Z creates a radiation source with a 230-eV average temperature over a 2.4-mm diameter. In these experiments silicon aero-gel foams with 10-mg/cm{sup 3} densities and 1.7-mm lengths were placed on both ends of the dynamic hohlraum. Several crystal spectrometers were placed both above and below the z-pinch to diagnose the temperature of the silicon aero-gel foam using the K-shell lines of silicon. The crystal spectrometers were (1) temporally integrated and spatially resolved, (2) temporally resolved and spatially integrated, and (3) both temporally and spatially resolved. The results indicate that the dynamic hohlraum heats the silicon aero-gel to approximately 150-eV at peak power. As the dynamic hohlraum source cools after peak power the silicon aero-gel continues to heat and jets axially at an average velocity of approximately 50-cm/{micro}s. The spectroscopy has also shown that the reason for the up/down asymmetry in radiated power on Z is that tungsten enters the line-of-sight on the bottom of the machine much more than on the top.

  6. The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Dong; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-03-15

    Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%–3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

  7. The influence of laser clipped by the laser entrance hole on hohlraum radiation measurement on Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Li, Sanwei; Yi, Rongqing; Song, Tianming; Zhang, Huan; Wang, Zhebin; Jiang, Xiaohua; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-03-01

    Measuring the x-ray flux exiting the target's laser entrance hole (LEH) is the most common diagnostic that quantifies the x-ray intensity inside the laser-driven hohlraum. However, this signal accounts for only a small portion of the incident laser power and thus is likely to be affected by unwanted x-ray background from non-target area, leading to an overestimation of the hohlraum drive. Unwanted emission might be produced when the laser light is clipped by the LEH (LEH clipping) because of a lack of clearance for laser spot, or with a laser spot comprising of discrete structure, or even with a poor pointing accuracy. Its influence on the hohlraum radiation diagnostic is investigated on Shenguang-III prototype laser facility with the typical 1 ns square pulse. The experiment employed three types of targets to excite the unwanted x-ray background from LEH clipping, unconverted light, and both effects, respectively. This work gives an absolute evaluation of x-ray produced by the LEH clipping, which is measured by flat-response x-ray detectors (FXRD) at multiple view angles. The result indicates that there is little variation in measured emission to various view angles, because the unwanted x-rays are mainly generated at the side face of the LEH lip when laser is obliquely incident. Therefore, the LEH clipping brings more overestimation in hohlraum radiation measurement at larger view angle since the hohlraum LEH as an emitting source viewed by FXRD is decreased as the view angle increases. In our condition, the LEH clipping contributes 2%-3.5% overestimation to the hohlraum flux measurement.

  8. Scattered and Reflected Light Polarimetry as a Diagnostic of Multibeam Hohlraum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turnbull, David

    2015-11-01

    Scattered light provides a window into the complex laser-plasma interactions and hydrodynamics occurring within indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums. Understanding hohlraum physics is an important part of developing improved targets and increasing the likelihood of ignition. Measurements of the scattered light power and spectrum are routinely made on each cone of beams at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in order to correct for coupling losses due to laser-plasma instabilities. The additional ability to probe scattered light polarization on a 30° incidence beam was recently added, which has produced a number of discoveries regarding multibeam hohlraum physics. One particularly important insight is that the polarizations of an incident beam and its backscatter are affected by amplitude and phase modulations induced by crossing laser beams. The revised theory describing this optical wave mixing has recently been validated by conducting a two beam pump-probe experiment under carefully controlled conditions. This effect could be utilized more generally to produce ultrafast, damage-resistant, and tunable laser-plasma wave plates, polarizers, or other photonic devices. It also enables remote polarimetry-based probing of plasma conditions such as electron temperature. To extract more quantitative feedback about crossed-beam energy transfer (CBET) from the polarimetry data in ICF experiments at the NIF, the diagnostic has been upgraded to measure the complete Stokes vector with temporal resolution. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  9. Dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering on laser intensity, laser {ital f} number, and ion species in hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Failor, B.H.; Hsing, W.W.; Rose, H.A.; Wilde, B.H.; Bradley, K.S.; Gobby, P.L.; Kirkwood, R.; Kornblum, H.N.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D. ||

    1996-03-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering has been studied in plasma conditions approaching those expected within laser-driven cavities (hohlraums) capable of driving a fusion capsule to ignition with x rays. These conditions are achieved using a gas-filled hohlraum design that was fielded at the Nova laser. As the intensity of an interaction beam (351 nm in wavelength) is increased above an onset value {ital I}{sub {ital c}}, the measured Brillouin backscatter into the lens rises sharply and saturates. {ital I}{sub {ital c}} decreases as the optic {ital f} number increases. The saturation level depends on the gas ion species. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Experimental basis for laser-plasma interactions in ignition hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; London, R A; Berger, R L; Doeppner, T; Meezan, N B; Ralph, J; Ross, J S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2009-11-12

    A series of laser plasma interaction experiments at OMEGA (LLE, Rochester) using gas-filled hohlraums shed light on the behavior of stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering at various plasma conditions encountered in indirect drive ignition designs. We present detailed experimental results that quantify the density, temperature, and intensity thresholds for both of these instabilities. In addition to controlling plasma parameters, the National Ignition Campaign relies on optical beam smoothing techniques to mitigate backscatter. We show that polarization smoothing is effective at controlling backscatter. These results provide an experimental basis for forthcoming experiments on National Ignition Facility.

  11. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  12. Continued Study on Hohlraum Radiation Source with Approximately Constant Radiation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tianming; Yang, Jiamin; Zhu, Tuo; Li, Zhichao; Huang, Chengwu

    2016-04-01

    An experiment was performed on the Shenguang III prototype laser facility to continue the study on hohlraum radiation source with approximately constant radiation temperature using a continuously shaped laser pulse. A radiation source with a flattop temperature of about 130 eV that lasted about 5 ns was obtained. The previous analytical iteration method based on power balance and self-similar solution of ablation was modified taking into account the plasma movements and it was used to design the laser pulse shape for experiment. A comparison between experimental results and simulation is presented and better agreement was achieved using the modified method. Further improvements are discussed.

  13. X-ray imaging measurements of capsule implosions driven by a Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J E; Chandler, G A; Slutz, S A; Bennett, G R; Cooper, G; Lash, J S; Lazier, S; Lemke, R; Nash, T J; Nielsen, D S; Moore, T C; Ruiz, C L; Schroen, D G; Smelser, R; Torres, J; Vesey, R A

    2002-08-26

    The radiation and shock generated by impact of an annular tungsten Z-pinch plasma on a 10-mm diam 5-mg/cc CH(2) foam are diagnosed with x-ray imaging and power measurements. The radiative shock was virtually unaffected by Z-pinch plasma instabilities. The 5-ns-duration approximately 135-eV radiation field imploded a 2.1-mm-diam CH capsule. The measured radiation temperature, shock radius, and capsule radius agreed well with computer simulations, indicating understanding of the main features of a Z-pinch dynamic-hohlraum-driven capsule implosion. PMID:12190409

  14. Inline Modeling of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer and Raman Scattering in NIF Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, David; Bailey, D. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Michel, P.; Divol, L.; Jones, O. S.

    2015-11-01

    Inline models of cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) and stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) have been added to the radiation-hydrodynamics codes Hydra and Lasnex. Both processes are important in hohlraums with high gas fill density, particularly for implosion symmetry. Coupled-mode equations are solved along laser ray paths for both models. The inline model shows the SRS gain rate exceeds that of SRS light absorption along most of the laser ray path, and most SRS light escapes the target. Most SRS-driven Langmuir wave power is deposited slightly inside the laser entrance hole (LEH), which reduces how much inner-beam power reaches the equator. This also makes the LEH hotter, which affects CBET. Compared to removing SRS power from the incident laser, the inline SRS model does not change total x-ray drive but makes the drive stronger from the poles than the equatorial waist. This reduces the need to artificially clamp CBET in order to match implosion shape data, which has historically been needed for high gas fill hohlraums. We are applying the models to a set of NIF shots with varying gas fill densities. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Experimental demonstration of early time, hohlraum radiation symmetry tuning for indirect drive ignition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewald, E. L.; Milovich, J.; Thomas, C.; Kline, J.; Sorce, C.; Glenn, S.; Landen, O. L.

    2011-09-01

    Early time radiation symmetry at the capsule for indirect drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] will be inferred from the instantaneous soft x-ray re-emission pattern of a high-Z sphere replacing the ignition capsule. This technique was tested on the OMEGA laser facility [J. M. Soures, R. L. McCrory, T. Boehly et al., Laser Part. Beams 11, 317 (1991)] in near full ignition scale vacuum hohlraums using an equivalent experimental setup to the one planned for NIF. Two laser cones entering each laser entrance hole heat the hohlraums to radiation temperatures of 100 eV, mimicking the NIF ignition pulse foot drive. The experiments have demonstrated accuracies of ±1.5% (±2%) in inferred P2/P0 (P4/P0) Legendre mode incident flux asymmetry and consistency between 900 eV and 1200 eV re-emission patterns. We have also demonstrated the expected tuning capability of P2/P0, from positive (pole hot) to negative (waist hot), decreasing linearly with the inner/outer beams power fraction. P4/P0 on the other hand shows very little variation with power fraction. We developed a simple analytical viewfactor model that is in good agreement with both measured P2/P0 and P4/P0 and their dependence on inner beam power fraction.

  16. The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction on the SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wenyi; Yang, Dong; Lan, Ke; Li, Sanwei; Li, Yongsheng

    2014-10-01

    The hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction are determined by a shock-wave technique and measured by a broadband soft x-ray spectrometer. The peak radiation temperature TR and M-band fraction fm are simultaneously determined by using the observed shock velocities in Al and Ti. For the vacuum Au hohlraum used in the experiments, TR is about 160 eV and fm is between 4.3-6.3% under 1ns laser pulse of 2 k. And TR is about 202 eV and fm is about 9% with laser energy 6 kJ. The Continuous Phase Plate (CPP) for beam smoothing is applied in the experiment, which increases TR to 207 eV while has almost no influence on fm. Comparisons between the results from the two kinds of technologies show that TR from the shock wave technique is lower than that from SXS whether CPP is applied or not. However, fm from the shock wave technique is consistent with that from SXS without CPP, but obviously lower than the SXS's result with CPP.

  17. A novel double hohlraum target to create a moderately coupled plasma for ion stopping experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortner, A.; Faik, S.; Schumacher, D.; Basko, M. M.; Blazevic, A.; Busold, S.; Bedacht, S.; Cayzac, W.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Rienecker, T.; Schaumann, G.; Tauschwitz, An.; Wagner, F.; Roth, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new double hohlraum target for the creation of a moderately coupled (0.1 < Γ < 1) carbon plasma for energy loss and charge state measurements of projectile ions interacting with this plasma. A spherical cavity of 600 μm in diameter is heated with a 150-J laser pulse (λL = 527nm) within 1.2ns to produce a quasi-Planckian X-ray source with a radiation temperature of Tr ≈ 100eV . These X-rays are then used to heat volumetrically two thin carbon foils in a secondary cylindrical hohlraum to a dense plasma state. An axi-symmetric plasma column with a free-electron density of up to 8 ×1021cm-3, a temperature of T ≈ 10 eV, and an average ionization degree of Z ≈ 3 is generated. This plasma stays in a dense and an almost uniform state for about 5ns . Ultimately, such targets are supposed to be used in experiments where a heavy ion beam is launched through the sample plasma, and the ion energy losses as well as the charge distributions are to be measured. The present paper is in a certain sense a symbiotic one, where the theoretical analysis and the experimental results are combined to investigate the basic properties and the prospects of this type of plasma targets.

  18. Inline Modeling of Cross-Beam Energy Transfer and Backscatter in Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, D. J.; Sepke, S. M.; Kerbel, G. D.; Michel, P.; Marinak, M. M.; Jones, O. S.

    2014-10-01

    NIF Ignition experiments with gas-filled hohlraums use significant cross-beam energy transfer (CBET) to control implosion symmetry. They also display substantial stimulated Raman backscatter (SRS) from inner laser beams, and associated ``hot'' electrons. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA has been extended to include inline models for CBET and SRS. Coupled-mode equations in the strong damping limit (with linear, kinetic gain rates) are solved along the entire path of incident laser rays. Driven ion-acoustic and Langmuir waves, and inverse-bremsstrahlung absorption, are treated. The inline model includes heating by CBET-driven ion waves, which reduces subsequent CBET. SRS developing inside the target leads to more heating of the underdense fill - and more depletion of the inner beams reaching the hohlraum wall - than removing the escaping SRS light from the incident laser. Thus, SRS also modifies the plasma conditions so as to limit CBET. We compare inline results with post-processing CBET calculations on plasma conditions from simulations that do not include CBET or SRS. Prepared by LLNSL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  19. The structure of the Laser Entrance Hole in NIF Ignition gas-filled hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, M. B.; Doeppner, T.; Thomas, C. A.; Widmann, K.; MacLaren, S. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Eder, D.; Hammer, J. H.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J. L.; Moody, J. D.; Moore, A. J.; Park, H. S.; Ralph, J. E.; Regan, S. E.; Strozzi, D. J.; Town, R. P.

    2014-10-01

    At the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the energy from 192 laser beams is converted to an x-ray drive in a gas-filled hohlraum. The drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH size decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma in the laser deposition region pushing radially outward. Compared to models, the LEH size is larger than predicted. In addition, the plasma in the LEH region is hotter than predicted. Instead of being at the radiation temperature of about 300 eV, it is at an electron temperature of 1 to a few keV. The experimental measurements for this conclusion are discussed. Data on the LEH as a function of laser pulse shape, gas fill, and energy transfer are presented. This work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  20. Characterization of ultrashort pulse laser-produced miniature hohlraum XUV sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKelvey, Andrew; Raymond, Anthony; Zulick, Calvin; Maksimchuk, Anatoly; Nees, John; Yanovsky, Victor; Chvykov, Vladimir; Thomas, Alexander; Krushelnick, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) allow the radiative properties of dense, high-temperature matter to be studied at previously unreachable regimes, but are limited by cost and system availability. A scaled down system using ultra-short laser pulses and delivering energy to a much smaller hohlraum could be capable of reaching comparable energy densities by depositing the energy in a significantly smaller volume before ablation of the wall material closes the cavity. The laser is tightly focused through the cavity and then expands to illuminate the wall with an intensity closer to that of a long pulse laser. Experiments were performed on a number of short-pulse Ti:sapphire tabletop laser systems. Targets include cavities machined in bulk material using low laser powers, and then shot in situ with a single full power pulse as well as micron scale pre-fabricated targets. Spectral characteristics were measured using a flat-field soft X-ray spectrometer and a seven channel filtered photo cathode array. These broadband EUV sources may allow opacity and atomic physics measurements with plasma and radiation temperatures comparable to NIF type hohlraums, but with a significantly higher repetition rate and in a university scale system.

  1. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H.-S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S. W.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-01

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  2. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; et al

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shapemore » closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.« less

  3. Polar Radiation-Flux Symmetry Measurements in Z-Pinch-Driven Hohlraums with Symmetric Double-Pinch Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, D. L.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo Porter, M. E., Jr.; Chandler, G. A.; Ruggles, L. E.; Simpson, W. W.; Seamen, H.; Primm, P.; Torres, J.; McGurn, J.; Gilliland, T. L.; Reynolds, P.; Hebron, D. E.; Dropinski, S. C.; Schroen-Carey, D. G.; Hammer, J. H.; Landen, O.; Koch, J.

    2000-10-01

    We are currently exploring symmetry requirements of the z-pinch-driven hohlraum concept [1] for high-yield inertial confinement fusion. In experiments on the Z accelerator, the burnthrough of a low-density self-backlit foam ball has been used to diagnose the large time-dependent flux asymmetry of several single-sided-drive hohlraum geometries [2]. We are currently applying this technique to study polar radiation flux symmetry in a symmetric double z-pinch geometry. Wire arrays on opposite ends of the hohlraum, connected in series to a single current drive of 18 MA, implode and stagnate on axis, efficiently radiating about 100 TW of x rays which heat the secondary to 75 eV. Comparisons with 3-D radiosity and 2-D rad-hydro models of hohlraum symmetry performance will be presented. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 1 J. H. Hammer et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 2129 (1999). 2 D. L. Hanson et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 44, 40 (1999).

  4. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Döppner, T; Callahan, D A; Hurricane, O A; Hinkel, D E; Ma, T; Park, H-S; Berzak Hopkins, L F; Casey, D T; Celliers, P; Dewald, E L; Dittrich, T R; Haan, S W; Kritcher, A L; MacPhee, A; Le Pape, S; Pak, A; Patel, P K; Springer, P T; Salmonson, J D; Tommasini, R; Benedetti, L R; Bond, E; Bradley, D K; Caggiano, J; Church, J; Dixit, S; Edgell, D; Edwards, M J; Fittinghoff, D N; Frenje, J; Gatu Johnson, M; Grim, G; Hatarik, R; Havre, M; Herrmann, H; Izumi, N; Khan, S F; Kline, J L; Knauer, J; Kyrala, G A; Landen, O L; Merrill, F E; Moody, J; Moore, A S; Nikroo, A; Ralph, J E; Remington, B A; Robey, H F; Sayre, D; Schneider, M; Streckert, H; Town, R; Turnbull, D; Volegov, P L; Wan, A; Widmann, K; Wilde, C H; Yeamans, C

    2015-07-31

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a "high-foot" laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 10^{16} neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel. PMID:26274424

  5. Demonstration of High Performance in Layered Deuterium-Tritium Capsule Implosions in Uranium Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Döppner, T.; Callahan, D. A.; Hurricane, O. A.; Hinkel, D. E.; Ma, T.; Park, H. -S.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. P.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Haan, S.; Kritcher, A. L.; MacPhee, A.; Le Pape, S.; Pak, A.; Patel, P. K.; Springer, P. T.; Salmonson, J. D.; Tommasini, R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bond, E.; Bradley, D. K.; Caggiano, J.; Church, J.; Dixit, S.; Edgell, D.; Edwards, M. J.; Fittinghoff, D. N.; Frenje, J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G.; Hatarik, R.; Havre, M.; Herrmann, H.; Izumi, N.; Khan, S. F.; Kline, J. L.; Knauer, J.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Merrill, F. E.; Moody, J.; Moore, A. S.; Nikroo, A.; Ralph, J. E.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H.; Sayre, D.; Schneider, M.; Streckert, H.; Town, R.; Turnbull, D.; Volegov, P. L.; Wan, A.; Widmann, K.; Wilde, C. H.; Yeamans, C.

    2015-07-28

    We report on the first layered deuterium-tritium (DT) capsule implosions indirectly driven by a “highfoot” laser pulse that were fielded in depleted uranium hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility. Recently, high-foot implosions have demonstrated improved resistance to ablation-front Rayleigh-Taylor instability induced mixing of ablator material into the DT hot spot [Hurricane et al., Nature (London) 506, 343 (2014)]. Uranium hohlraums provide a higher albedo and thus an increased drive equivalent to an additional 25 TW laser power at the peak of the drive compared to standard gold hohlraums leading to higher implosion velocity. Additionally, we observe an improved hot-spot shape closer to round which indicates enhanced drive from the waist. In contrast to findings in the National Ignition Campaign, now all of our highest performing experiments have been done in uranium hohlraums and achieved total yields approaching 1016 neutrons where more than 50% of the yield was due to additional heating of alpha particles stopping in the DT fuel.

  6. Study of implosion dynamics of Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum on the Angara-5-1 facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Faqiang; Xu, Rongkun; Xu, Zeping; Yang, Jianlun; Li, Zhenghong; Xia, Guangxin; Ning, Jiamin; Li, Linbo; Chen, Dingyang; Chen, Jinchuan

    2015-02-01

    The Z-pinch dynamic hohlraum (ZPDH) is one of high-power X-ray sources that has been used in a variety of high energy-density experiments including inertial confinement fusion (ICF) studies. Dynamic hohlraums driven by a 12-mm and a 18-mm-diameter single tungsten wire arrays embedded with a C16H20O6 foam, respectively, exhibit no visible differences in radiation from the axial exit, although the radial radiation is a little higher in a large array. The analysis of the images suggests that the implosion of a large array is quasi-continuous and has a faster imploding velocity, indicating that the large array is matched to the embedded foam and, oppositely, the small array is mismatched. The analysis also shows that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability develops much harder in implosions of a large array, and this leads to a lower hohlraum temperature. The conclusion was drawn that, for the purpose of enhancing the hohlraum temperature, increasing the conversion efficiency of kinetic energy into thermal energy is more important than increasing the kinetic energy from wire plasma.

  7. pF3D Simulations of Large Outer-Beam Brillouin Scattering from NIF Rugby Hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Steven; Strozzi, David; Chapman, Thomas; Amendt, Peter

    2015-11-01

    We assess the cause of large outer-beam stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in a NIF shot with a rugby-shaped hohlraum, which has less wall surface loss and thus higher x-ray drive than a cylindrical hohlraum of the same radius. This shot differed from a prior rugby shot with low SBS in three ways: outer beam pointing, split-pointing of the four beams within each outer-beam quadruplet, and a small amount of neon added to the hohlraum helium fill gas. We use pF3D, a massively-parallel, paraxial-envelope laser plasma interaction code, with plasma profiles from the radiation-hydrodynamics code Lasnex. We determine which change between the two shots increased the SBS by adding them one at a time to the simulations. We compare the simulations to experimental data for total SBS power, its spatial distribution at the lens, and the SBS spectrum. For each shot, we use profiles from Lasnex simulations with and without a model for mix at the hohlraum wall-gas interface. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Release number LLNL-ABS-674893.

  8. Compact hohlraum configuration with parallel planar-wire-array x-ray sources at the 1.7-MA Zebra generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources is experimentally demonstrated in a configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields at a 1.7-MA Zebra generator. Driving in parallel two magnetically decoupled compact double-planar-wire Z pinches has demonstrated the generation of synchronized x-ray bursts that correlated well in time with x-ray emission from a central reemission target. Good agreement between simulated and measured hohlraum radiation temperature of the central target is shown. The advantages of compact hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities are discussed.

  9. Compact hohlraum configuration with parallel planar-wire-array x-ray sources at the 1.7-MA Zebra generator.

    PubMed

    Kantsyrev, V L; Chuvatin, A S; Rudakov, L I; Velikovich, A L; Shrestha, I K; Esaulov, A A; Safronova, A S; Shlyaptseva, V V; Osborne, G C; Astanovitsky, A L; Weller, M E; Stafford, A; Schultz, K A; Cooper, M C; Cuneo, M E; Jones, B; Vesey, R A

    2014-12-01

    A compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources is experimentally demonstrated in a configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields at a 1.7-MA Zebra generator. Driving in parallel two magnetically decoupled compact double-planar-wire Z pinches has demonstrated the generation of synchronized x-ray bursts that correlated well in time with x-ray emission from a central reemission target. Good agreement between simulated and measured hohlraum radiation temperature of the central target is shown. The advantages of compact hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities are discussed. PMID:25615200

  10. Planar Wire-Array Z-Pinch Implosion Dynamics and X-Ray Scaling at Multiple-MA Drive Currents for a Compact Multisource Hohlraum Configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Ampleford, D. J.; Vesey, R. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Coverdale, C. A.; Waisman, E. M.; Jones, M. C.; Fowler, W. E.; Stygar, W. A.; Serrano, J. D.; Vigil, M. P.; Esaulov, A. A.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.

    2010-03-26

    An indirect drive configuration is proposed wherein multiple compact Z-pinch x-ray sources surround a secondary hohlraum. Planar compact wire arrays allow reduced primary hohlraum surface area compared to cylindrical loads. Implosions of planar arrays are studied at up to 15 TW x-ray power on Saturn with radiated yields exceeding the calculated kinetic energy, suggesting other heating paths. X-ray power and yield scaling studied from 1-6 MA motivates viewfactor modeling of four 6-MA planar arrays producing 90 eV radiation temperature in a secondary hohlraum.

  11. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C.; Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Chrien, Robert E.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich; Peterson, Darrell L.; Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Watt, Robert G.

    2004-06-01

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  12. X-ray conversion efficiency and radiation non-uniformity in the hohlraum experiments at Shenguang-III prototype laser facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Huasen; Song, Peng; Zou, Shiyang Zhao, Yiqing; Zheng, Wudi; Gu, Peijun; Pei, Wenbing; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei; Li, Zhichao; Guo, Liang; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Wei, Huiyue; Xu, Tao; Jiang, Shaoen; Ding, Yongkun

    2014-11-15

    The hohlraum radiation properties are studied experimentally by the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility and numerically by the two-dimensional code LARED with the multi-group radiation transfer model. The measured radiation temperature is consistent with the prediction of the simulations in a wide laser energy range, suggesting that the x-ray conversion efficiency is around 75% at the peak radiation temperature. The delicate hohlraum experiments further show that the radiation intensity inside the hohlraum is significantly non-uniform. The measured radiation flux of the hot spot region is over twice higher than that of the re-emitted wall region. Good agreements between the experiments and simulations further demonstrate the validity of the LARED code to study the hohlraum radiation properties.

  13. Demonstartion of density dependence of x-ray flux in a laser-driven hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P E; Rosen, M D; Hammer, J H; Hsing, W S; Glendinning, S G; Turner, R E; Kirkwood, R; Schein, J; Sorce, C; Satcher, J; Hamza, A; Reibold, R A; Hibbard, R; Landen, O; Reighard, A; McAlpin, S; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B

    2008-02-11

    Experiments have been conducted using laser-driven cylindrical hohlraums whose walls are machined from Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} foams of 100 mg/cc and 4 g/cc densities. Measurements of the radiation temperature demonstrate that the lower density walls produce higher radiation temperatures than the high density walls. This is the first experimental demonstration of the prediction that this would occur [M. D. Rosen and J. H. Hammer, Phys. Rev. E 72, 056403 (2005)]. For high density walls, the radiation front propagates subsonically, and part of the absorbed energy is wasted by the flow kinetic energy. For the lower wall density, the front velocity is supersonic and can devote almost all of the absorbed energy to heating the wall.

  14. Modeling of NIC Symcap and THD Experiments Using High Resolution Integrated Hohlraum-Capsule Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Ogden; Milovich, Jose; Marinak, Marty; Sepke, Scott; Patel, Mehul; Meezan, Nathan; Callahan, Deborah; Town, Richard; Glenzer, Siegfried; Schneider, Marilyn; Langer, Steve; Munro, Dave; Spears, Brian; Springer, Paul; Edwards, John; Wilson, Doug; Kyrala, George; Kline, John

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a capability to do very high spatial resolution 2D integrated hohlraum-capsule simulations using the Hydra code. Surface perturbations for all ablator layer surfaces and the DT ice layer are calculated explicitly up to mode 30 or 100. The effects of the fill tube, grooves in the ice layer, and surface defects on the ablator are included via models extracted from higher resolution calculations. High wave number mix is included through a mix model. Measured backscatter and a model for crossbeam energy transfer are included to enable a best estimate of the drive asymmetry for each shot. We have applied this model to National Ignition Campaign (NIC) experiments from the fall of 2009 and more recent symmetry capsule and cryogenic layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) experiments. We compare the measured x-ray and neutron diagnostic signatures to the simulated diagnostic signatures extracted from the model.

  15. Target diagnostics for intense lithium ion hohlraum experiments on PBFA II

    SciTech Connect

    Leeper, R.J.; Bailey, J.E.; Carlson, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    A review of the diagnostics used at Sandia National Laboratories to measure the parameters of intense lithium ion-beam hohlraum target experiments on PBFA II will be presented. This diagnostic package contains an extensive suite of x-ray spectral and imaging diagnostics that enable measurements of target temperature and x-ray output. The x-ray diagnostics include time-integrated and time-resolved pinhole cameras, energy-resolved I-D streaked imaging, diagnostics, time-integrated and time-resolved grazing, incidence spectrographs, a transmission grating spectrograph, an elliptical crystal spectrograph, a bolometer array, an eleven-element x-ray diode (XRD) array, and an eleven-element PIN diode detector array. The incident Li beam symmetry and an estimate of incident Li beam power density can be measured from ion beam-induced characteristic x-ray line emission and neutron emission.

  16. Radial electric field 3D modeling for wire arrays driving dynamic hohlraums on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Raymond Cecil

    2007-06-01

    The anode-cathode structure of the Z-machine wire array results in a higher negative radial electric field (Er) on the wires near the cathode relative to the anode. The magnitude of this field has been shown to anti-correlate with the axial radiation top/bottom symmetry in the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum). Using 3D modeling, the structure of this field is revealed for different wire-array configurations and for progressive mechanical alterations, providing insight for minimizing the negative Er on the wire array in the anode-to-cathode region of the DH. Also, the 3D model is compared to Sasorov's approximation, which describes Er at the surface of the wire in terms of wire-array parameters.

  17. Considerations of stimulated sideward scattering in NIF ignition-scale hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruer, William

    2009-11-01

    It's prudent to consider the possibility of stimulated Raman and Brillouin sideward scattering in NIF ignition-scale hohlraums. NIF beam spots are quite large (with diameter >1mm), and the gradient threshold intensities for these instabilities are rather low. Some simple calculations are given for the convective gain of sideward scattering assuming heavily-damped electrostatic waves. A possible enhancement of sideward scattering in the azimuthal direction is examined. Various ways to detect sideward scattering and its effects are discussed. For seeded angular scattering in the region where the laser beams overlap, see recent calculations by P. Michel et. al.footnotetextP. Michel et. al., 39^th Anomalous Absorption Conference, Bodega Bay, CA (June 14-19, 2009)

  18. Convergent ablation measurements of plastic ablators in gas-filled rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casner, A.; Jalinaud, T.; Masse, L.; Galmiche, D.

    2015-10-01

    Indirect-drive implosions experiments were conducted on the Omega Laser Facility to test the performance of uniformly doped plastic ablators for Inertial Confinement Fusion. The first convergent ablation measurements in gas-filled rugby hohlraums are reported. Ignition relevant limb velocities in the range from 150 to 300 μm .n s-1 have been reached by varying the laser drive energy and the initial capsule aspect ratio. The measured capsule trajectory and implosion velocity are in good agreement with 2D integrated simulations and a zero-dimensional modeling of the implosions. We demonstrate experimentally the scaling law for the maximum implosion velocity predicted by the improved rocket model [Y. Saillard, Nucl. Fusion 46, 1017 (2006)] in the high-ablation regime case.

  19. Design and experimental study of a secondary hohlraum radiation source with laser focal spots blocked

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Tianming; Zhu, Tuo; Yang, Jiamin; Huang, Chengwu; Wang, Feng; Peng, Xiaoshi; Xu, Tao; Li, Zhichao; Zhang, Huan

    2016-01-01

    A design of secondary hohlraum radiation source with laser focal spots blocked is introduced. The hard x-ray radiation such as the gold M-band emission and hot electrons from the coronal plasma were designed to be shielded using a cylindrical shield. Three-dimensional view factor analysis was carried out to optimize the shield structure to achieve higher radiation temperature. An experiment was performed at Shenguang III prototype laser facility to verify the design. Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector was used to measure the shock wave speed in a three-stepped Al sample driven by this radiation source and the peak radiation temperature of the radiation source was estimated to be about 90 eV.

  20. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hessling, T.; Blazevic, A.; Stoehlker, T.; Frank, A.; Kraus, D.; Roth, M.; Schaumann, G.; Schumacher, D.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.

    2011-07-15

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 {mu}m were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved.

  1. Time- and spectrally resolved measurements of laser-driven hohlraum radiation.

    PubMed

    Hessling, T; Blažević, A; Frank, A; Kraus, D; Roth, M; Schaumann, G; Schumacher, D; Stöhlker, T; Hoffmann, D H H

    2011-07-01

    At the GSI Helmholtz center for heavy-ion research combined experiments with heavy ions and laser-produced plasmas are investigated. As a preparation to utilize indirectly heated targets, where a converter hohlraum provides thermal radiation to create a more homogeneous plasma, this converter target has to be characterized. In this paper the latest results of these measurements are presented. Small spherical cavities with diameters between 600 and 750 μm were heated with laser energies up to 30 J at 532-nm wavelength. Radiation temperatures could be determined by time-resolved as well as time-integrated diagnostics, and maximum values of up to 35 eV were achieved. PMID:21867327

  2. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic fieldmore » $$B_{z0}$$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $$B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.« less

  3. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-02

    The effects of an imposed, axial magnetic field $B_{z0}$ on hydrodynamics and energetic electrons in inertial confinement fusion indirect-drive hohlraums are studied. We present simulations from the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA of a low-adiabat ignition design for the National Ignition Facility, with and without $B_{z0}=70~\\text{T}$. The field’s main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or ‘hot’, electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium–tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. Furthermore, the effect of the field on deuterium–tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.

  4. The size and structure of the laser entrance hole in gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M. B. MacLaren, S. A.; Widmann, K.; Meezan, N. B.; Hammer, J. H.; Yoxall, B. E.; Bell, P. M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Döppner, T.; Eder, D. C.; Edwards, M. J.; Hinkel, D. E.; Hsing, W. W.; Kervin, M. L.; Landen, O. L.; Lindl, J. D.; May, M. J.; and others

    2015-12-15

    At the National Ignition Facility, a thermal X-ray drive is created by laser energy from 192 beams heating the inside walls of a gold cylinder called a “hohlraum.” The x-ray drive heats and implodes a fuel capsule. The laser beams enter the hohlraum via laser entrance holes (LEHs) at each end. The LEH radius decreases as heated plasma from the LEH material blows radially inward but this is largely balanced by hot plasma from the high-intensity region in the center of the LEH pushing radially outward. The x-ray drive on the capsule is deduced by measuring the time evolution and spectra of the x-radiation coming out of the LEH and correcting for geometry and for the radius of the LEH. Previously, the LEH radius was measured using time-integrated images in an x-ray band of 3–5 keV (outside the thermal x-ray region). For gas-filled hohlraums, the measurements showed that the LEH radius is larger than that predicted by the standard High Flux radiation-hydrodynamic model by about 10%. A new platform using a truncated hohlraum (“ViewFactor hohlraum”) is described, which allows time-resolved measurements of the LEH radius at thermal x-ray energies from two views, from outside the hohlraum and from inside the hohlraum. These measurements show that the LEH radius closes during the low power part of the pulse but opens up again at peak power. The LEH radius at peak power is larger than that predicted by the models by about 15%–20% and does not change very much with time. In addition, time-resolved images in a >4 keV (non-thermal) x-ray band show a ring of hot, optically thin gold plasma just inside the optically thick LEH plasma. The structure of this plasma varies with time and with Cross Beam Energy Transfer.

  5. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Jorge J.; Giedt, Warren H.

    2004-03-15

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx}2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  6. Predicting the Equilibrium Deuterium-Tritium Fuel Layer Thickness Profile in an Indirect-Drive Hohlraum Capsule

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, J J; Giedt, W H

    2003-09-02

    A numerical procedure for calculating the equilibrium thickness distribution of a thin layer of deuterium and tritium on the inner surface of an indirect drive target sphere ({approx} 2.0 mm in diameter) is described. Starting with an assumed uniform thickness layer and with specified thermal boundary conditions, the temperature distribution throughout the capsule and hohlraum (including natural convection in the hohlraum gas) is calculated. Results are used to make a first estimate of the final non-uniform thickness distribution of the layer. This thickness distribution is then used to make a second calculation of the temperature distribution with the same boundary conditions. Legendre polynomial coefficients are evaluated for the two temperature distributions and the two thickness profiles. Final equilibrium Legendre coefficients are determined by linear extrapolation. From these coefficients, the equilibrium layer thickness can be computed.

  7. Radiative heating of plastic-tamped aluminum foil by x rays from a foam-buffered hohlraum.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiyan; Yang, Jiamin; Xu, Yan; Yang, Guohong; Ding, Yaonan; Yan, Jun; Yuan, Jianmin; Ding, Yongkun; Zheng, Zhijian; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin

    2009-01-01

    The time dependence of the x-ray absorption of aluminum samples heated with intense radiation sources from a foam-buffered gold hohlraum has been studied in this work. Hydrodynamic simulations were used to illustrate the plasma conditions in the plastic-tamped aluminum foils contained in this type of hohlraum. Experiments were conducted to measure the K -shell x-ray absorption spectra of the aluminum sample. With densities taken from the hydrodynamic simulations, electron temperatures were then inferred by fitting the measured absorption spectra with detailed-term-accounting calculations. The inferred temperatures have a maximum of about 93eV and were found to agree within 25% with the simulated results at times after 1ns , indicating that the use of foam shields, together with a compact cavity, has created a clean and high-temperature radiation source preferable to opacity measurements. PMID:19257142

  8. Calculations for NIF first quad gas-filled hohlraum experiments testing beryllium microstructure growth and laser plasma interaction physics

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, S. R.; Fernández, J. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Kindel, J. M.; Langdon, A. Bruce

    2004-01-01

    The first quad of the NIF provides four nearly collinear f/20 laser beams, which can be treated as a single f/8 beam of maximum energy 16 kJ. We are designing experiments on halfraums in which the composite beam is focused in the plane of the (single) halfraum laser entry hole (LEH) with its symmetry axis collinear with the halfiaum symmetry axis. For most of the calculations, the halfraum diameter is 1.6mm, the LEH is 1.2mm, and axial length is 3.0mm. The incident laser power consists of an early foot followed by a final peak. Peak radiation temperatures for this relatively narrow hohlraum are greater than for wider hohlraums of the same length. Plasma conditions within the halfraum are calculated with Lasnex using azimuthally symmetric, (r,z) geometry, taking into account a polyimide membrane which contains the fill gas (CH{sub 2}) within the halfraum. Estimates for microstructure growth due to the volume crystalline structure within a beryllium slab mounted in the halfraum sidewall are obtained by a post-processor, which applies plasma conditions within the halfraum to an ablatively accelerated, two-dimensional beryllium slab. We present a detailed simulation of the hohlraum conditions resulting from a laser spot of diameter 500 {mu}m, with peak intensity at 3.5 x 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}, a comparison with a simulation with the same power-time profile at an intensity about 1/4 as great, and a comparison with a simulation with more detailed attention to hydro coupling between the gold and gas-fill regions of the hohlraum. We are currently attempting to model the consequences of possible beam filamentation during the pulse.

  9. Sensitivity study of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Jianfa; Zou Shiyang; Li Yongsheng; Dai Zhensheng; Ye Wenhua

    2012-12-15

    The paper investigates theoretically the sensitivities of ignition capsule implosion performance on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum. In the simulation, the hohlraum radiation is represented by a Planckian spectrum for the main drive plus a gaussian bump centered at energy E{sub c} for preheating x-rays. Simulation results show that with the increasing of center energy E{sub c}, the Atwood number at the fuel-ablator interface increases rapidly due to the preheating and expanding of the inner undoped CH layer. The growing of Atwood number indicates the hydrodynamic instability (HI) growth and mixing at this interface. On the other hand, the increasing of E{sub c} results in a large density gradient scale length of ablation front and stabilizes the HI growth at ablation front. The changes of the hard x-ray spectrum have significant influences on other important implosion parameters including the ablator mass remaining, shock timing, implosion velocity, and yield as well. High-precision results on the hard x-ray spectral distribution of hohlraum are thus critical for optimizing the ignition capsule design to limit the HI growth.

  10. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kyrala, G. A.; Kline, J. L.; Dixit, S.; Glenzer, S.; Kalantar, D.; Bradley, D.; Izumi, N.; Meezan, N.; Landen, O. L.; Callahan, D.; Weber, S. V.; Holder, J. P.; Glenn, S.; Edwards, M. J.; Bell, P.; Kimbrough, J.; Koch, J.; Prasad, R.; Suter, L.; Kilkenny, J.

    2010-10-15

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 {mu}m and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules.

  11. Time-dependent, x-ray spectral unfolds and brightness temperatures for intense Li + ion beam-driven hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Biggs, F.; Dukart, R. J.; Moats, A. R.; Leeper, R. J.

    1997-01-01

    X-ray-producing hohlraums are being studied as indirect drives for inertial confinement fusion targets. In a 1994 target series on the PBFAII accelerator, cylindrical hohlraum targets were heated by an intense Li+ ion beam and viewed by an array of 13 time-resolved, filtered x-ray detectors (XRDs). The unfold operator (UFO) code and its suite of auxiliary functions were used extensively in obtaining time-resolved x-ray spectra and radiation temperatures from this diagnostic. The UFO was also used to obtain fitted response functions from calibration data, to simulate data from blackbody x-ray spectra of interest, to determine the suitability of various unfolding parameters (e.g., energy domain, energy partition, smoothing conditions, and basis functions), to interpolate the XRD signal traces, and to unfold experimental data. The simulation capabilities of the code were useful in understanding an anomalous feature in the unfolded spectra at low photon energies (⩽100 eV). Uncertainties in the differential and energy-integrated unfolded spectra were estimated from uncertainties in the data. The time-history of the radiation temperature agreed well with independent calculations of the wall temperature in the hohlraum.

  12. Measuring symmetry of implosions in cryogenic Hohlraums at the NIF using gated x-ray detectors (invited).

    PubMed

    Kyrala, G A; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S; Kalantar, D; Bradley, D; Izumi, N; Meezan, N; Landen, O L; Callahan, D; Weber, S V; Holder, J P; Glenn, S; Edwards, M J; Bell, P; Kimbrough, J; Koch, J; Prasad, R; Suter, L; Kline, J L; Kilkenny, J

    2010-10-01

    Ignition of imploding inertial confinement capsules requires, among other things, controlling the symmetry with high accuracy and fidelity. We have used gated x-ray imaging, with 10 μm and 70 ps resolution, to detect the x-ray emission from the imploded core of symmetry capsules at the National Ignition Facility. The measurements are used to characterize the time dependent symmetry and the x-ray bang time of the implosion from two orthogonal directions. These measurements were one of the primary diagnostics used to tune the parameters of the laser and Hohlraum to vary the symmetry and x-ray bang time of the implosion of cryogenically cooled ignition scale deuterium/helium filled plastic capsules. Here, we will report on the successful measurements performed with up to 1.2 MJ of laser energy in a fully integrated cryogenics gas-filled ignition-scale Hohlraum and capsule illuminated with 192 smoothed laser beams. We will describe the technique, the accuracy of the technique, and the results of the variation in symmetry with tuning parameters, and explain how that set was used to predictably tune the implosion symmetry as the laser energy, the laser cone wavelength separation, and the Hohlraum size were increased to ignition scales. We will also describe how to apply that technique to cryogenically layered tritium-hydrogen-deuterium capsules. PMID:21034014

  13. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    BOWERS,RICHARD; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSLKA,WALTER; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,BOB; PETERSON,DARRELL; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-01

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch magnet on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {approx}85 eV for a duration of {approx}10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approx}122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approx}150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation T{approx}(P/A){sup 1/4}. P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  14. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility using DANTE (invited)a)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kline, J. L.; Widmann, K.; Warrick, A.; Olson, R. E.; Thomas, C. A.; Moore, A. S.; Suter, L. J.; Landen, O.; Callahan, D.; Azevedo, S.; Liebman, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Conder, A.; Dixit, S. N.; Torres, P.; Tran, V.; Dewald, E. L.; Kamperschroer, J.; Atherton, L. J.; Beeler, R.; Berzins, L.; Celeste, J.; Haynam, C.; Hsing, W.; Larson, D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Hinkel, D.; Kalantar, D.; Kauffman, R.; Kilkenny, J.; Meezan, N.; Rosen, M. D.; Schneider, M.; Williams, E. A.; Vernon, S.; Wallace, R. J.; Van Wonterghem, B.; Young, B. K.

    2010-10-01

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraum target experiments have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr as viewed by DANTE representing an ˜20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale Hohlraums. The vacuum Hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square laser pulses with energies between 150 and 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30±10% more flux than predicted by the preshot radiation hydrodynamic simulations. To validate these results, careful verification of all component calibrations, cable deconvolution, and software analysis routines has been conducted. In addition, a half Hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns long axial quad with an irradiance of ˜2×1015 W/cm2 for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. We have also completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1×1014 W/cm2 over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for nonlocal heat conduction and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-Hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere, and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to ±5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we conclude that the 30±10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics of the larger Hohlraums.

  15. The first measurements of soft x-ray flux from ignition scale Hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility using DANTE (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Kline, J. L.; Widmann, K.; Warrick, A.; Thomas, C. A.; Suter, L. J.; Landen, O.; Callahan, D.; Azevedo, S.; Liebman, J.; Glenzer, S. H.; Conder, A.; Dixit, S. N.; Dewald, E. L.; Kamperschroer, J.; Atherton, L. J.; Beeler, R. Jr.; Berzins, L.; Celeste, J.; Haynam, C.; Hsing, W.; and others

    2010-10-15

    The first 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraum target experiments have been fielded at the National Ignition Facility demonstrating radiation temperatures up to 340 eV and fluxes of 20 TW/sr as viewed by DANTE representing an {approx}20 times flux increase over NOVA/Omega scale Hohlraums. The vacuum Hohlraums were irradiated with 2 ns square laser pulses with energies between 150 and 635 kJ. They produced nearly Planckian spectra with about 30{+-}10% more flux than predicted by the preshot radiation hydrodynamic simulations. To validate these results, careful verification of all component calibrations, cable deconvolution, and software analysis routines has been conducted. In addition, a half Hohlraum experiment was conducted using a single 2 ns long axial quad with an irradiance of {approx}2x10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} for comparison with NIF Early Light experiments completed in 2004. We have also completed a conversion efficiency test using a 128-beam nearly uniformly illuminated gold sphere with intensities kept low (at 1x10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2} over 5 ns) to avoid sensitivity to modeling uncertainties for nonlocal heat conduction and nonlinear absorption mechanisms, to compare with similar intensity, 3 ns OMEGA sphere results. The 2004 and 2009 NIF half-Hohlraums agreed to 10% in flux, but more importantly, the 2006 OMEGA Au Sphere, the 2009 NIF Au sphere, and the calculated Au conversion efficiency agree to {+-}5% in flux, which is estimated to be the absolute calibration accuracy of the DANTEs. Hence we conclude that the 30{+-}10% higher than expected radiation fluxes from the 96 and 192 beam vacuum Hohlraums are attributable to differences in physics of the larger Hohlraums.

  16. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Sandord, T.W.L.; Olson, R.E.; Chandler, G.A.; Hebron, D.E.; Mock, R.C.; Leeper, R.J.; Nash, T.J.; Ruggles, L.E.; Simpson, W.W.; Struve, K.W.; Vesey, R.A.; Bowers, R.L.; Matuska, W.; Peterson, D.L.; Peterson, R.R.

    1999-08-25

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch target on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {minus}85 eV for a duration of {approximately} 10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approximately} 122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approximately} 150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation (T-(P/A){sup 1/4}). P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  17. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Ding, Yongkun; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-15

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum.

  18. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype.

    PubMed

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Ding, Yongkun; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum. PMID:26520945

  19. New two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique for measurement of hohlraum inner radiation in Shenguang-III prototype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kuan; Liu, Shenye; Du, Huabing; Hou, Lifei; Jing, Longfei; Zhao, Yang; Yang, Zhiwen; Wei, Minxi; Deng, Keli; Yao, Li; Yang, Guohong; Li, Sanwei; Lan, Ke; Liu, Jie; Zhu, Xiaoli; Ding, Yongkun; Yi, Lin

    2015-10-01

    The space-resolving measurement of X-ray flux from a specific area (laser spot, re-emitting wall, or capsule) inside the hohlraum is an ongoing and critical problem in indirectly driven inertial-confinement fusion experiments. In this work, we developed a new two-dimensional space-resolving flux detection technique to measure the X-ray flux from specific areas inside the hohlraum by using the time- and space-resolving flux detector (SRFD). In two typical hohlraum experiments conducted at the Shenguang-III prototype laser facility, the X-ray flux and radiation temperature from an area 0.2 mm in diameter inside the hohlraum were measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH). The different flux intensities and radiation temperatures detected using the SRFD from the inner area of the LEH were compared with the result measured using the flat-response X-ray detector from the entire LEH. This comparison was also analyzed theoretically. The inner area detected using the SRFD was found to be the re-emitting wall area alone. This important improvement in space-resolving X-ray flux measurement will enhance the current X-ray flux space characterization techniques, thereby furthering the quantitative understanding of X-ray flux space behavior in the hohlraum.

  20. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  1. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  2. Assessing the two plasmon decay instability in ignition-scale hohlraums

    SciTech Connect

    Kruer, W L; Meezan, N; Town, R; Strozzi, D; Wilks, S; Williams, E; Meeker, D; Suter, L; Regan, S

    2009-10-08

    In recent experiments Sean Regan, et. al. for the first time observed the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability from window plasma in hohlraum targets. This instability can also operate at peak power near the edge of the inner beams in the ablator plasma and near the edge of the outer beams in the liner plasma. Fortunately, only a small fraction of the laser energy was estimated to be at risk. A more quantitative assessment of the energy at risk at peak power and its sensitivity to variations in target design and to details of the instability threshold model will here be given. They also explore how strong collisionality restricts this instability in the Au wall plasma. They show that the instability threshold can be significantly reduced for laser beams with an angle of incidence of about 60 degrees due to the swelling of the laser field near its turning point. A simple model is given. It is also shown that for frequently cited plasma conditions, the SRS-scattered light wave can itself drive the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability. This effect is relevant for the nonlinear saturation of SRS and the resulting heated electron generation. Some estimates are given. Finally, several important issues concerning the high-energy electron distributions due to the 2{omega}{sub pe} instability and other laser plasma processes are discussed.

  3. Design of dynamic hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z.

    SciTech Connect

    Rochau, Gregory Alan; Nash, Thomas J.; Bailey, James E.

    2010-03-01

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9 x 10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3{micro}m of magnesium and 0.078{micro}m of iron sandwiched between 10{micro}m layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing.

  4. Design of dynamic Hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, T. J.; Rochau, G. A.; Bailey, J. E.

    2010-10-15

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9x10{sup 22}/cm{sup 3} electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3 {mu}m of magnesium and 0.078 {mu}m of iron sandwiched between 10 {mu}m layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing.

  5. Imposed magnetic field and hot electron propagation in inertial fusion hohlraums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strozzi, David J.; Perkins, L. J.; Marinak, M. M.; Larson, D. J.; Koning, J. M.; Logan, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    > . The field's main hydrodynamic effect is to significantly reduce electron thermal conduction perpendicular to the field. This results in hotter and less dense plasma on the equator between the capsule and hohlraum wall. The inner laser beams experience less inverse bremsstrahlung absorption before reaching the wall. The X-ray drive is thus stronger from the equator with the imposed field. We study superthermal, or `hot', electron dynamics with the particle-in-cell code ZUMA, using plasma conditions from HYDRA. During the early-time laser picket, hot electrons based on two-plasmon decay in the laser entrance hole (Regan et al., Phys. Plasmas, vol. 17(2), 2010, 020703) are guided to the capsule by a 70 T field. Twelve times more energy deposits in the deuterium-tritium fuel. For plasma conditions early in peak laser power, we present mono-energetic test-case studies with ZUMA as well as sources based on inner-beam stimulated Raman scattering. The effect of the field on deuterium-tritium deposition depends strongly on the source location, namely whether hot electrons are generated on field lines that connect to the capsule.

  6. Simulations of the 3-Shock HDC gas-filled hohlraum experiments at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovich, Jose; Ross, J. S.; Ho, D.; Weber, C.; Sepke, S.; Khan, S.; Cerjan, C.; Meezan, N.; MacKinnon, A.

    2015-11-01

    We describe simulation efforts to design and field a series of high-density-carbon (HDC) capsule tuning experiments in 1.6 mg/cc gas-filled hohlraums at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), culminating in two DT-layered shots. The radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA coupled to an off-line power transfer model was employed to ascertain the optimal laser pulse that minimizes radiation asymmetries and implosion adiabat for a given stability margin. We found that these HDC targets have similar sensitivity as their CH ``high-foot'' counterparts when laser cone-fraction and power as well as ablator thickness are varied, leading to comparable implosions. A point of divergence, however, is the measured neutron down-scatter-ratio (DSR) that typically gauges the degree of compression obtained in a DT implosion, with HDC targets having approximately half the CH value. Concerted efforts are underway to understand and ascertain the causes of this discrepancy. Simulations and comparisons with data will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Design of dynamic Hohlraum opacity samples to increase measured sample density on Z.

    PubMed

    Nash, T J; Rochau, G A; Bailey, J E

    2010-10-01

    We are attempting to measure the transmission of iron on Z at plasma temperatures and densities relevant to the solar radiation and convection zone boundary. The opacity data published by us to date has been taken at an electron density about a factor of 10 below the 9×10(22)/cm(3) electron density of this boundary. We present results of two-dimensional (2D) simulations of the heating and expansion of an opacity sample driven by the dynamic Hohlraum radiation source on Z. The aim of the simulations is to design foil samples that provide opacity data at increased density. The inputs or source terms for the simulations are spatially and temporally varying radiation temperatures with a Lambertian angular distribution. These temperature profiles were inferred on Z with on-axis time-resolved pinhole cameras, x-ray diodes, and bolometers. A typical sample is 0.3 μm of magnesium and 0.078 μm of iron sandwiched between 10 μm layers of plastic. The 2D LASNEX simulations indicate that to increase the density of the sample one should increase the thickness of the plastic backing. PMID:21034046

  8. Determining the hohlraum radiation temperature and M-band fraction by using shock wave technique on SGIII-prototype laser facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Wenyi; Lan, Ke; Li, Yongsheng; Yang, Dong; Li, Sanwei

    2012-10-01

    Experiments have been conducted on SGIII-prototype laser facility using tow materials Al and Ti as shock wave witness plates. The radiation temperature ^TR and M-band fraction fM inside a hohlraum are determined by using the observed shock velocities in Al and Ti. This is the first experimental demonstration of the proposal that ^TR and fM can be simultaneously determined by using shock wave technique [Y. S. Li, et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 022701 (2011)]. For the Au hohlraum used in the experiments, TR is about 160 eV and ^fM is around 4.3% under a 1 ns laser pulse of 2 kJ. The results from this technique are complementary to those from the broadband soft x-ray spectrometer (SXS), and the technique can be used to determine ^TR and fM inside an ignition hohlraum.

  9. Direct measurements of an increased threshold for stimulated brillouin scattering with polarization smoothing in ignition hohlraum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Froula, D H; Divol, L; Berger, R L; London, R A; Meezan, N B; Strozzi, D J; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Stagnitto, S; Suter, L J; Glenzer, S H

    2008-09-12

    We demonstrate a significant reduction of stimulated Brillouin scattering by polarization smoothing in large-scale high-temperature hohlraum plasma conditions where filamentation is measured to be negligible. The stimulated Brillouin scattering experimental threshold (defined as the intensity at which 5% of the incident light is backscattered) is measured to increase by a factor of 1.7+/-0.2 when polarization smoothing is applied. An analytical model relevant to inertial confinement fusion plasma conditions shows that the measured reduction in backscatter with polarization smoothing results from the random spatial variation in polarization of the laser beam, not from the reduction in beam contrast. PMID:18851289

  10. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-09-15

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MegaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength {lambda}=35, 50, and 70 {mu}m) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength {lambda}=35 and 70 {mu}m, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.