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Sample records for hold engage reorient

  1. Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, David W.; Wilson, Edward; How, Jonathan; Sanenz-Otero, Alvar; Chamitoff, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) are bowling-ball sized spherical satellites. They will be used inside the space station to test a set of well-defined instructions for spacecraft performing autonomous rendezvous and docking maneuvers. Three free-flying spheres will fly within the cabin of the station, performing flight formations. Each satellite is self-contained with power, propulsion, computers and navigation equipment. The results are important for satellite servicing, vehicle assembly and formation flying spacecraft configurations. SPHERES is a testbed for formation flying by satellites, the theories and calculations that coordinate the motion of multiple bodies maneuvering in microgravity. To achieve this inside the ISS cabin, bowling-ball-sized spheres perform various maneuvers (or protocols), with one to three spheres operating simultaneously . The Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) experiment will test relative attitude control and station-keeping between satellites, re-targeting and image plane filling maneuvers, collision avoidance and fuel balancing algorithms, and an array of geometry estimators used in various missions. SPHERES consists of three self-contained satellites, which are 18 sided polyhedrons that are 0.2 meter in diameter and weigh 3.5 kilograms. Each satellite contains an internal propulsion system, power, avionics, software, communications, and metrology subsystems. The propulsion system uses CO2, which is expelled through the thrusters. SPHERES satellites are powered by AA batteries. The metrology subsystem provides real-time position and attitude information. To simulate ground station-keeping, a laptop will be used to transmit navigational data and formation flying algorithms. Once these data are uploaded, the satellites will perform autonomously and hold the formation until a new command is given.

  2. 12 CFR 238.63 - Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities. 238.63 Section 238.63 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION...

  3. 12 CFR 238.63 - Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities. 238.63 Section 238.63 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION...

  4. 12 CFR 238.63 - Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Requirements to engage in financial holding company activities. 238.63 Section 238.63 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) SAVINGS AND LOAN HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION...

  5. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. 225.142 Section 225.142 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...

  6. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. 225.142 Section 225.142 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...

  7. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. 225.142 Section 225.142 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...

  8. 12 CFR 225.142 - Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Statement of policy concerning bank holding companies engaging in futures, forward and options contracts on U.S. Government and agency securities and money market instruments. 225.142 Section 225.142 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL...

  9. Attention Reorients Periodically.

    PubMed

    Dugué, Laura; Roberts, Mariel; Carrasco, Marisa

    2016-06-20

    Reorienting of voluntary attention enables the processing of stimuli at previously unattended locations. Although studies have identified a ventral fronto-parietal network underlying attention [1, 2], little is known about whether and how early visual areas are involved in involuntary [3, 4] and even less in voluntary [5] reorienting, and their temporal dynamics are unknown. We used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over the occipital cortex to interfere with attentional reorienting and study its role and temporal dynamics in this process. Human observers performed an orientation discrimination task, with either valid or invalid attention cueing, across a range of stimulus contrasts. Valid cueing induced a behavioral response gain increase, higher asymptotic performance for attended than unattended locations. During subsequent TMS sessions, observers performed the same task, with high stimulus contrast. Based on phosphene mapping, TMS double pulses were applied at one of various delays to a consistent brain location in retinotopic areas (V1/V2), corresponding to the evoked signal of the target or distractor, in a valid or invalid trial. Thus, the stimulation was identical for the four experimental conditions (valid/invalid cue condition × target/distractor-stimulated). TMS modulation of the target and distractor were both periodic (5 Hz, theta) and out of phase with respect to each other in invalid trials only, when attention had to be disengaged from the distractor and reoriented to the target location. Reorientation of voluntary attention periodically involves V1/V2 at the theta frequency. These results suggest that TMS probes theta phase-reset by attentional reorienting and help link periodic sampling in time and attention reorienting in space. PMID:27265395

  10. Visually induced reorientation illusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, I. P.; Hu, G.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    It is known that rotation of a furnished room around the roll axis of erect subjects produces an illusion of 360 degrees self-rotation in many subjects. Exposure of erect subjects to stationary tilted visual frames or rooms produces only up to 20 degrees of illusory tilt. But, in studies using static tilted rooms, subjects remained erect and the body axis was not aligned with the room. We have revealed a new class of disorientation illusions that occur in many subjects when placed in a 90 degrees or 180 degrees tilted room containing polarised objects (familiar objects with tops and bottoms). For example, supine subjects looking up at a wall of the room feel upright in an upright room and their arms feel weightless when held out from the body. We call this the levitation illusion. We measured the incidence of 90 degrees or 180 degrees reorientation illusions in erect, supine, recumbent, and inverted subjects in a room tilted 90 degrees or 180 degrees. We report that reorientation illusions depend on the displacement of the visual scene rather than of the body. However, illusions are most likely to occur when the visual and body axes are congruent. When the axes are congruent, illusions are least likely to occur when subjects are prone rather than supine, recumbent, or inverted.

  11. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching.

    PubMed

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations--cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  12. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations—cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  13. Spin reorientation via antiferromagnetic coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Ranjbar, M.; Sbiaa, R.; Dumas, R. K.; Åkerman, J.; Piramanayagam, S. N.

    2014-05-07

    Spin reorientation in antiferromagnetically coupled (AFC) Co/Pd multilayers, wherein the thickness of the constituent Co layers was varied, was studied. AFC-Co/Pd multilayers were observed to have perpendicular magnetic anisotropy even for a Co sublayer thickness of 1 nm, much larger than what is usually observed in systems without antiferromagnetic coupling. When similar multilayer structures were prepared without antiferromagnetic coupling, this effect was not observed. The results indicate that the additional anisotropy energy contribution arising from the antiferromagnetic coupling, which is estimated to be around 6 × 10{sup 6} ergs/cm{sup 3}, induces the spin-reorientation.

  14. Reorientation from Altered States: Please, More Carefully.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heikkinen, Charles A.

    1989-01-01

    Claims counselors too often appear to forget to reorient clients from altered states of consciousness used in counseling and that failure to reorient can result in unnecessary discomfort for clients. Provides suggestions for when and how to reorient to avoid unwanted, lingering aftereffects. (Author/ABL)

  15. Genomic Signals of Reoriented ORFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dan Cristea, Paul

    2004-12-01

    Complex representation of nucleotides is used to convert DNA sequences into complex digital genomic signals. The analysis of the cumulated phase and unwrapped phase of DNA genomic signals reveals large-scale features of eukaryote and prokaryote chromosomes that result from statistical regularities of base and base-pair distributions along DNA strands. By reorienting the chromosome coding regions, a "hidden" linear variation of the cumulated phase has been revealed, along with the conspicuous almost linear variation of the unwrapped phase. A model of chromosome longitudinal structure is inferred on these bases.

  16. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted after astronauts return to Earth. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  17. Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The short-arm centrifuge subjects an astronaut to conflicting sensory input and study the astronaut's perception of motion. It is one of several instruments used in the Spatial Reorientation Following Space Flight investigation to be conducted on crewmembers. During space flight, the vestibular organs no longer respond in a familiar way. Instead, inputs from the irner ear do not match those coming from the eyes. While on Earth, you can open your eyes to see if you truly are spinning, but astronauts do not have this luxury. Astronauts can see the floor, but have no sense of down; when they bend their heads forward, the otoliths are not stimulated properly. This state, called sensory conflict, must be resolved by the brain to maintain orientation. When they first return to Earth, astronauts are again disoriented because of sensory conflict. They undergo a period of spatial reorientation, as their brains reconcile what their eyes see and what their vestibular system senses. Recovery can take anywhere from hours to days depending on the length of the mission. Principal Investigator: Dr. William Paloski, Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX.

  18. Two-impulse reorientation of asymmetric spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation conducted to determine minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of a two impulse coning method of reorientation is reported. Maneuver cost, proportional to the product of fuel consumed (total impulse) and time expended during a maneuver is discussed. Assumptions included external impulsive control torques, rigid body spacecraft rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Results are presented in terms of average cost and standard deviation for various maneuver ranges. Costs of individual reorientations are calculated with the computer program included.

  19. Cryogenic liquid hydrogen reorientation activated by constant reverse gravity acceleration of geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1990-01-01

    A key objective for cryogenic fluid management in a spacecraft propulsion system is development of the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing a reverse gravity acceleration from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines which exceeds critical value for the initiation of a geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flow fields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted. These parameters hold near-constant values through the entire range of liquid filled levels, from 30 to 80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  20. Constant reverse thrust activated reorientation of liquid hydrogen with Geyser initiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    A key objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquisition or positioning of liquid outflow or vapor venting. Numerical simulation of positive liquid acquisition is attempted by introducing reverse gravity acceleration, resulting from the propulsive thrust of auxiliary engines, which exceeds critical value for the initiation of geyser. Based on the computer simulation of flowfields during the course of fluid reorientation, six dimensionless parameters resulted in this study. It shows that these parameters hold near-constant values through the entire ranges of liquid filled levels, from 30-80 percent, during the course of fluid reorientation.

  1. Planned Axial Reorientation Investigation on Sloshsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, David J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper details the design and logic of an experimental investigation to study axial reorientation in low gravity. The Sloshsat free-flyer is described. The planned axial reorientation experiments and test matrixes are presented. Existing analytical tools are discussed. Estimates for settling range from 64 to 1127 seconds. The planned experiments are modelled using computational fluid dynamics. These models show promise in reducing settling estimates and demonstrate the ability of pulsed high thrust settling to emulate lower thrust continuous firing.

  2. Junction Plasmon-Induced Molecular Reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    El-Khoury, Patrick Z.; Hu, Dehong; Hess, Wayne P.

    2013-10-17

    Time and frequency dependent intensity variations in sequences of Raman spectra recorded at plasmonic junctions can be assigned to molecular reorientation. This is revealed through Raman trajectories recorded at a nanojunction formed between a silver AFM tip and a corrugated silver surface coated with biphenyl-4,4’-dithiol. Molecular motion is not observed when the tip is retracted and only surface enhancement is operative. In effect, junction plasmon induced molecular reorientation is tracked.

  3. Spin reorientation transition of magnetite (001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martín-García, Laura; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Pabón, Beatriz M.; Bliem, Roland; Parkinson, Gareth S.; Chen, Gong; Schmid, Andreas K.; de la Figuera, Juan

    2016-04-01

    We have imaged the rearrangement of the magnetic domains on magnetite (001) when crossing the spin reorientation transition and the Verwey transition with nanometer resolution. By means of spin-polarized low-energy electron microscopy we have monitored the change in the easy axes lowering the temperature through both transitions in remanence. The spin reorientation transition occurs in two steps: initial nucleation and growth of domains with a new surface magnetic orientation is followed by a smooth evolution.

  4. ESR Studies of a Reorienting Nickel Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowert, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    Electron spin resonance spectra of the planar bis(maleonitriledithiolato)nickel anion radical (BMNT) in the intermediate motional region have been simulated in several polar solvents using axially symmetric reorientation. The rotational diffusion about the long in-plane axis is three to four times faster than that about the two axes perpendicular to it. The reorientational model needed to produce agreement with experiment is either in or close to the Brownian rotational diffusion limit. The solvents are 4-allyl-2-methoxyphenol (eugenol), dimethyl phthalate, tri-n-butyl phosphate, tris(2-ethyl-hexyl)phosphate, and 2-methoxyethyl ether (diglyme), ethyl alcohol, and a dimethylformamide-chloroform mixed solvent. The reorientational rates from the simulations are in general agreement with those from line width analyses carried out from the fast to the slow motional regions. The temperature dependence of the diffusion rates is discussed in terms of the Stokes-Einstein-Debye (SED) model and the Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher equation.

  5. Children's Use of Geometry for Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2008-01-01

    Research on navigation has shown that humans and laboratory animals recover their sense of orientation primarily by detecting geometric properties of large-scale surface layouts (e.g. room shape), but the reasons for the primacy of layout geometry have not been clarified. In four experiments, we tested whether 4-year-old children reorient by the…

  6. Using Perceptrons to Explore the Reorientation Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Michael R. W.; Kelly, Debbie M.; Spetch, Marcia L.; Dupuis, Brian

    2010-01-01

    The reorientation task is a paradigm that has been used extensively to study the types of information used by humans and animals to navigate in their environment. In this task, subjects are reinforced for going to a particular location in an arena that is typically rectangular in shape. The subject then has to find that location again after being…

  7. Thickness quantization in a reorientation transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venus, David; He, Gengming; Winch, Harrison; Belanger, Randy

    The reorientation transition of an ultrathin film from perpendicular to in-plane magnetization is driven by a competition between shape and surface anisotropy. It is accompanied by a ''stripe'' domain structure that evolves as the reorientation progresses. Often, an n layer film has stable perpendicular magnetization and an n+1 layer film has stable in-plane magnetization. If the domain walls are not pinned, the long-range stripe domain pattern averages over this structure so that the transition occurs at a non-integer layer thickness. We report in situ experimental measurements of the magnetic susceptibility (via MOKE) of the reorientation transition in Fe/2 ML Ni/W(110) films as a function of thickness as they are deposited at room temperature. In addition to a peak at the reorientation transition, we observe a strong precursor due to thickness quantization in atomic layers. This peak is described quantitatively by the response of small islands of thickness 3 layers with in-plane anisotropy in a sea of 2 layers Fe with perpendicular anisotropy. The fitted parameters give an estimate of the island size at which the response disappears. This size corresponds to a domain wall thickness, so that the islands become locally in-plane, demonstrating the self-consistency of the model.

  8. Reorientation patterns in central-place foraging: internal clocks and klinokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Daniel; Bartumeus, Frederic; Méndez, Vicenç; Espadaler, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    We study central-place foraging patterns of Aphaenogaster senilis ants at a population level by video framing individual ant trajectories in a circular arena with a nest connected to its centre. The ants naturally leave and enter the nest and forage generating non-trivial movement patterns around the nest. Our data analysis indicated that the trajectories observed can be classified into two strategies: the risk-averse strategy, which involves wandering around the nest without departing far from it and the risk-prone strategy, which involves long exploration paths with periodic returns to the central region, nearby the nest. We found that both risk-prone and risk-averse strategies exhibit qualitatively the same reorientation patterns, with the time between consecutive reorientations covering a wide range of scales, and fitting a stretched exponential function. Nevertheless, differences in the temporal scales and the time variability of such reorientation events differ, together with other aspects of motion, such as average speed and turns. Our results give experimental evidence that the internal mechanisms driving reorientations in ants tend to favour frequently long relocations, as theory predicts for efficient exploration in patchy landscapes, but ants engaged in central-place foraging can modulate such behaviour to control distances from the nest. Previous works on the species support the idea that risk-prone and risk-averse strategies may reflect actual differences between individuals age and experience; these factors (age and experience) should be then relevant in modulating the internal reorientation clocks. To support the validity of our findings, we develop a random-walk model combining stretched exponential reorientation clocks with klinokinesis that fits the time length and the travelled distance distributions of the observed trajectories. PMID:24152814

  9. Photoinduced molecular reorientation of absorbing liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marrucci, L.; Paparo, D.

    1997-08-01

    The phenomenon of photoinduced molecular reorientation of absorbing nematic liquid crystals is analyzed in a macroscopic general framework and with a specific molecular model. The photoinduced torque responsible for the reorientation is shown to describe a transfer of angular momentum from the molecule center-of-mass degrees of freedom to the rotational ones, mediated by molecular friction. As a consequence, a photoinduced stress tensor is predicted to develop together with the torque in the illuminated fluid. A molecular expression of the photoinduced torque is derived with a rigorous procedure, valid both for a pure material and for a dye-liquid-crystal mixture. This torque expression corrects those reported in previous works on the same subject. The photoinduced torque is evaluated analytically in a simple approximate limit.

  10. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  11. Attitude reorientation of spacecraft by means of impulse coning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martz, C. W.

    1977-01-01

    Minimum maneuver costs for attitude reorientation of spacecraft of all possible inertial distribution over a wide range of maneuver angles by use of the impulse coning method of reorientation was studied. Maneuver cost is proportional to the product of fuel consumed and time expended during a maneuver. Assumptions included impulsive external control torques, rigid-body spacecraft, rest-to-rest maneuvers, and no disturbance torques. Also, coning maneuvers were constrained to have equal initial and final cone angles. Maneuver costs are presented for general reorientations as well as for spin-axis reorientations where final attitude about the spin axis is arbitrary.

  12. Holding fast.

    PubMed

    Gourville, John T

    2005-06-01

    CEO Peter Walsh faces a classic innovator's dilemma. His company, Crescordia, produces high-quality metal plates, pins, and screws that orthopedic surgeons use to repair broken bones. In fact, because the company has for decades refused to compromise on quality, there are orthopedic surgeons who use nothing but Crescordia hardware. And now these customers have begun to clamor for the next generation technology: resorbable hardware. Resorbables offer clear advantages over the traditional hardware. Like dissolving sutures, resorbable plates and screws are made of biodegradable polymers. They hold up long enough to support a healing bone, then gradually and harmlessly disintegrate in the patient's body. Surgeons are especially looking forward to using resorbables on children, so kids won't have to undergo a second operation to remove the old hardware after their bones heal, a common procedure in pediatrics. The new products, however, are not yet reliable; they fail about 8% of the time, sometimes disintegrating before the bone completely heals and sometimes not ever fully disintegrating. That's why Crescordia, mindful of its hard-earned reputation, has delayed launching a line using the new technology. But time is running out. A few competitors have begun to sell resorbables despite their imperfections, and these companies are picking up market share. Should Crescordia join the fray and risk tarnishing its brand? Or should the company sit tight until it can offer a perfect product? Commenting on this fictional case study are Robert A. Lutz, vice chairman of product development at General Motors; Clayton M. Christensen, the Robert and Jane Cizik Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School; Jason Wittes, a senior equity analyst covering medical supplies and devices at Leerink Swann; and Nick Galakatos, a general partner of MPM Capital. PMID:15938437

  13. Spinning in the Scanner: Neural Correlates of Virtual Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies have used spatial reorientation task paradigms to identify underlying cognitive mechanisms of navigation in children, adults, and a range of animal species. Despite broad interest in this task across disciplines, little is known about the brain bases of reorientation. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural…

  14. Enabling health systems transformation: what progress has been made in re-orienting health services?

    PubMed

    Wise, Marilyn; Nutbeam, Don

    2007-01-01

    The Ottawa Charter has been remarkably influential in guiding the development of the goals and concepts of health promotion, and in shaping global public health practice in the past 20 years. However, of the five action areas identified in the Ottawa Charter, it appears that there has been little systematic attention to the challenge of re-orienting health services, and less than optimal progress in practice. The purposes of re-orienting health services as proposed in the Ottawa Charter were to achieve a better balance in investment between prevention and treatment, and to include a focus on population health outcomes alongside the focus on individual health outcomes. However, there is little evidence that a re-orientation of health services in these terms has occurred systematically anywhere in the world. This is in spite of the fact that direct evidence of the need to re-orient health services and of the potential benefits of doing so has grown substantially since 1986. Patient education, preventive care (screening, immunisation), and organisational and environmental changes by health organisations have all been found to have positive health and environmental outcomes. However, evidence of effectiveness has not been sufficient, on its own, to sway community preferences and political decisions. The lack of progress points to the need for significant re-thinking of the approaches we have adopted to date. The paper proposes a number of ways forward. These include working effectively in partnership with the communities we want to serve to mobilise support for change, and to reinforce this by working more effectively at influencing broader public opinion through the media. The active engagement of clinical health professionals is also identified as crucial to achieving sustainable change. Finally we recognize that by working in partnership with like-minded advocacy organizations, the IUHPE could put its significant knowledge and experience to work in leading action to

  15. Visually-induced reorientation illusions as a function of age.

    PubMed

    Howard, I P; Jenkin, H L; Hu, G

    2000-09-01

    We reported previously that supine subjects inside a furnished room who are tilted 90 degrees may experience themselves and the room as upright to gravity. We call this the levitation illusion because it creates sensations similar to those experienced in weightlessness. It is an example of a larger class of novel static reorientation illusions that we have explored. Stationary subjects inside a furnished room rotating about a horizontal axis experience complete self rotation about the roll or pitch axis. We call this a dynamic reorientation illusion. We have determined the incidence of static and dynamic reorientation illusions in subjects ranging in age from 9 to 78 yr. Some 90% of subjects of all ages experienced the dynamic reorientation illusion but the percentage of subjects experiencing static reorientation illusions increased with age. We propose that the dynamic illusion depends on a primitive mechanism of visual-vestibular interaction but that static reorientation illusions depend on learned visual cues to the vertical arising from the perceived tops and bottoms of familiar objects and spatial relationships between objects. Older people become more dependent on visual polarity to compensate for loss in vestibular sensitivity. Of 9 astronauts, 4 experienced the levitation illusion. The relationship between susceptibility to reorientation illusions on Earth and in space has still to be determined. We propose that the Space Station will be less disorienting if pictures of familiar objects line the walls. PMID:10993316

  16. Reorientation of elongated particles at density interfaces.

    PubMed

    Doostmohammadi, A; Ardekani, A M

    2014-09-01

    Density interfaces in the water column are ubiquitously found in oceans and lakes. Interaction of settling particles with pycnoclines plays a pivotal function in nutrient transport between ocean layers and settling rates of marine particles. We perform direct numerical simulations of an elongated particle settling through a density interface and scrutinize the role of stratification on the settling dynamics. It is found that the presence of the density interface tends to turn the long axis of an elongated particle parallel to the settling direction, which is dramatically different from its counterpart in a homogeneous fluid. Although broadside-on settling of the elongated particle is enhanced upon approaching the interface, the long axis rotates toward the settling direction as the particle passes through the interface. We quantify turning couples due to stratification effects, which counteract the pressure-induced torques due to the fluid inertia. A similar behavior is observed for different initial orientations of the particle. It is shown that the reorientation of an elongated particle occurs in both sharp and linear density stratifications. PMID:25314535

  17. Optimal Intermittent Reorientation in Insect Navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peleg, Orit; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan; Applied Math Lab Team

    2015-03-01

    The process of navigation is often accompanied by several cognitive demanding activities, such as motor control, locomotion planning, and multi-sensory acquisition and integration. Organisms with limited cognitive resources must therefore multitask and develop optimal schemes to dynamically allocate resources to the different tasks. An extreme example of task alternations during navigation is the hallmark of ball rolling dung beetles. The beetles need to roll their dung-ball along a straight path away from the dung pile where intense competition occurs. Before initiating a roll, dung beetles climb on top of the ball and rotate about their vertical axis. This action serves as an orientation mechanism that allows them to set an initial bearing, and to regain this bearing if they experience an unintentional disturbance along the way. We developed a model inspired by the beetle's navigational scheme, where an agent performs a random walk intermittent by reorientation events, in which its heading direction is corrected. We show that the resultant paths are a characteristic of correlated diffusion in short time scale, and biased diffusion in the long time scale. We identify optimal alternation schemes and characterize their robustness upon introducing noisy sensory acquisition and rough environmental conditions.

  18. Neural mechanisms of attentional reorienting in three-dimensional space.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qi; Weidner, Ralph; Vossel, Simone; Weiss, Peter H; Fink, Gereon R

    2012-09-26

    How the human brain reconstructs the three-dimensional (3D) world from two-dimensional (2D) retinal images has received a great deal of interest as has how we shift attention in 2D space. In contrast, it remains poorly understood how visuospatial attention is shifted in depth. In this fMRI study, by constructing a virtual 3D environment in the MR scanner and by presenting targets either close to or far from the participants in an adapted version of the Posner spatial-cueing paradigm, we investigated the behavioral and neural mechanisms underlying visuospatial orienting/reorienting in depth. At the behavioral level, although covering the same spatial distance, attentional reorienting to objects unexpectedly appearing closer to the observer and in the unattended hemispace was faster than reorienting to unexpected objects farther away. At the neural level, we found that in addition to the classical attentional reorienting system in the right temporoparietal junction, two additional brain networks were differentially involved in aspects of attentional reorienting in depth. First, bilateral premotor cortex reoriented visuospatial attention specifically along the third dimension of visual space (i.e., from close to far or vice versa), compared with attentional reorienting within the same depth plane. Second, a network of areas reminiscent of the human "default-mode network," including posterior cingulate cortex, orbital prefrontal cortex, and left angular gyrus, was involved in the neural interaction between depth and attentional orienting, by boosting attentional reorienting to unexpected objects appearing both closer to the observer and in the unattended hemispace. PMID:23015426

  19. Spin reorientation of a nonsymmetric body with energy dissipation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cenker, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Stable rotating semi-rigid bodies were demonstrated analytically, and verified in flights such as Explorer 1 and ATS-5 satellites. The problem arises from the two potential orientations which the final spin vector can take after large angle reorientation from minor to major axis, i.e., along the positive or negative axis of the maximum inertia. Reorientation of a satellite initially spinning about the minor axis using an energy dissipation device may require that the final spin orientation be controlled. Examples of possible applications are the Apogee Motor Assembly with Paired Satellites (AMAPS) configuration, where proper orientation of the thruster is required; and reorientation of ATS-5, where the spin sensitive nature of the despin device (yo-yo mechanism) requires that the final spin vector point is a specified direction.

  20. Planar reorientation maneuvers of space multibody systems using internal controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reyhanoglu, Mahmut; Mcclamroch, N. H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a reorientation maneuvering strategy for an interconnection of planar rigid bodies in space is developed. It is assumed that there are no exogeneous torques, and torques generated by joint motors are used as means of control so that the total angular momentum of the multibody system is a constant, assumed to be zero in this paper. The maneuver strategy uses the nonintegrability of the expression for the angular momentum. We demonstrate that large-angle maneuvers can be designed to achieve an arbitrary reorientation of the multibody system with respect to an inertial frame. The theoretical background for carrying out the required maneuvers is briefly summarized. Specifications and computer simulations of a specific reorientation maneuver, and the corresponding control strategies, are described.

  1. Breath holding spell

    MedlinePlus

    ... confronted Breath holding spells are more common in children with: Genetic conditions, such as Riley-Day syndrome or Rett syndrome Iron deficiency anemia A family history of breath holding spells (parents ...

  2. Voltage-driven beam bistability in a reorientational uniaxial dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccardi, Armando; Kravets, Nina; Alberucci, Alessandro; Buchnev, Oleksandr; Assanto, Gaetano

    2016-04-01

    We report on voltage controlled bistability of optical beams propagating in a nonlocal reorientational uniaxial dielectric, namely, nematic liquid crystals. In the nonlinear regime where spatial solitons can be generated, two stable states are accessible to a beam of given power in a finite interval of applied voltages, one state corresponding to linear diffraction and the other to self-confinement. We observe such a first-order transition and the associated hysteresis in a configuration when both the beam and the voltage reorientate the molecules beyond a threshold.

  3. Holding Kids Accountable: Shaming with Compassion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, H. Allen; Revering, Andrew C.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the philosophy and procedures of Police Accountability Conferencing, a restorative justice approach in which police and school authorities, victims, offenders, and families are brought together in a process designed to hold youth accountable for their actions. Details the program's potential for reclaiming youth who have engaged in…

  4. View-based strategy for reorientation by geometry.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-09-01

    Human and non-human animals can use geometric information (metric information and left-right discrimination sense) to reorient themselves in an environment. The hypothesis that in so doing they rely on allocentric (map-like) representations has received wide consensus. However, theoretical models suggest that egocentric representations may represent efficient strategies for visuo-spatial navigation. Here, we provide, for the first time, evidence that a view-based strategy is effectively used by animals to reorient themselves in an array of landmarks. Domestic chicks were trained to locate a food-reward in a rectangular array of either four indistinguishable or distinctive pipes. In the key experimental series, the pipes had four openings, only one of which allowed the chicks to access the reward. The direction of the open access relative to the array was either maintained stable or it was changed throughout training. The relative position of the pipes in the array was maintained stable in both training conditions. Chicks reoriented according to configural geometry as long as the open access pointed in the same direction during training but failed when the positions of the openings was changed throughout training. When the correct pipe was characterized by a distinctive featural cue, chicks learnt to locate the reward irrespective of the stability of the direction to openings, indicating that place-navigation was dissociated from non-spatial learning. These findings provide evidence that view-based strategies to reorient by geometry could be used by animals. PMID:20709927

  5. A Response to Reorienting Teacher Education towards Sustainability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferreira, Jo-Anne; Ryan, Lisa; Tilbury, Daniella

    2014-01-01

    This brief article reflects on progress on reorienting teacher education toward sustainability that has taken place since the publication of the authors' 2007 "Australian Journal of Environmental Education" article, "Planning for Success: Factors Influencing Change in Teacher Education" (EJ833282). It concludes that a key…

  6. Laser induced detachment and re-orientation of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Ling; Ingle, Ninad; Mohanty, Samarendra K.

    2011-03-01

    Re-orientation of adhering cell(s) with respect to other cell(s) has not been yet possible, thus limiting study of controlled interaction between cells. Here, we report cell detachment upon irradiation with a focused near-infrared laser beam, and reorientation of adherent cells. The cell gets detached after irradiation for few seconds, followed by vertical orientation. The detached cell was transported along axial direction by scattering force and trapped at a higher plane inside the media using the same laser beam by Gravito-optical trap. The trapped cell could then be repositioned by movement of the sample stage and reoriented by rotation of the astigmatic trapping beam. The height at which the cell was stably held was found to depend on the laser beam power. The cell could be brought back to the substrate by reducing the laser beam power using a polarizer or blocking the laser beam. Viability of the detached and manipulated cell was found not to be compromised as confirmed by PI fluorescence exclusion assay. The re-oriented cell was allowed to re-attach to the substrate at a controlled distance and orientation with respect to other cells. Further, the cell was found to retain its shape even after multiple detachments and manipulation using the laser beam. This technique opens up new avenues for non-contact modification of cellular orientations that will enable study of inter-cellular interactions and design of engineered tissue.

  7. The World Is Not Flat: Can People Reorient Using Slope?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S.; Shipley, Thomas F.

    2011-01-01

    Studies of spatial representation generally focus on flat environments and visual input. However, the world is not flat, and slopes are part of most natural environments. In a series of 4 experiments, we examined whether humans can use a slope as a source of allocentric, directional information for reorientation. A target was hidden in a corner of…

  8. Light-induced reorientation in the purple membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Wan, C; Qian, J; Johnson, C K

    1993-01-01

    Reorientation of bacteriorhodopsin in the native purple membrane was studied by time-resolved linear dichroism spectroscopy (TRLD) over the millisecond time regime. The time responses observed in TRLD are distinctly different from the isotropic transient absorption (TA) at wavelengths in the range 550-590 nm, where the bacteriorhodopsin ground state absorbs. In contrast, the TA and TRLD responses have nearly identical time dependence at 410 and 690 nm, where the intermediates M and O, respectively, principally contribute. These results demonstrate ground-state bacteriorhodopsin reorientation triggered by the photocycle. The TRLD and TA data are analyzed to test models for reorientational motion. Rotational diffusion of ground-state bacteriorhodopsin cannot account for the details of the data. Rather, the results are shown to be consistent with a reversible reorientation of "spectator" (nonexcited) members of the bacteriorhodopsin trimer in the purple membrane in response to the photocycling member of the trimer. This response may be associated with cooperativity in the trimer. PMID:8218916

  9. A Viewpoint-Independent Process for Spatial Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardini, Marko; Thomas, Rhiannon L.; Knowland, Victoria C. P.; Braddick, Oliver J.; Atkinson, Janette

    2009-01-01

    Reorientation tasks, in which disoriented participants attempt to relocate objects using different visual cues, have previously been understood to depend on representing aspects of the global organisation of the space, for example its major axis for judgements based on geometry. Careful analysis of the visual information available for these tasks…

  10. Structural evidence for reorientation of Miranda about a paleo-pole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappalardo, R.; Greeley, R.

    1993-01-01

    Two structural arguments support the premise that Miranda has reoriented with respect to Uranus over its geologic history. Orientations of major extensional and compressional features are consistent with a major satellite reorientation similar to that previously suggested based on cratering asymmetry. Furthermore, structures within Elsinore Corona provide supporting evidence that this reorientation took place about a paleo-pole located near (-75 deg, 80 deg), suggesting a second minor reorientation of Miranda.

  11. 77 FR 58380 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...) 1 Memorial Drive, Kansas City, Missouri 64198-0001: 1. Yorktown Financial Holdings, Inc., Tulsa..., Tulsa, Oklahoma, and thereby indirectly engage in mortgage lending activities, pursuant to section...

  12. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sulfate reorientations in LiNaSO4.

    PubMed

    Shakhovoy, R A; Rakhmatullin, A; Deschamps, M; Sarou-Kanian, V; Bessada, C

    2016-05-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the sulfate ion reorientations in β-LiNaSO4 has been carried out. The influence of the SO4 reorientational jumps on the quadrupolar interactions of (7)Li nuclei was investigated by a jump reorientational model, which has not previously been applied to sulfates. The activation energy required for the SO4 reorientations was found to be 0.19 eV. It was also revealed that the SO4 reorientational disorder should be associated with a small anomaly of a heat capacity at around 600 K, which was previously observed experimentally. PMID:27028697

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of sulfate reorientations in LiNaSO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakhovoy, R. A.; Rakhmatullin, A.; Deschamps, M.; Sarou-Kanian, V.; Bessada, C.

    2016-05-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance study of the sulfate ion reorientations in β-LiNaSO4 has been carried out. The influence of the SO4 reorientational jumps on the quadrupolar interactions of 7Li nuclei was investigated by a jump reorientational model, which has not previously been applied to sulfates. The activation energy required for the SO4 reorientations was found to be 0.19 eV. It was also revealed that the SO4 reorientational disorder should be associated with a small anomaly of a heat capacity at around 600 K, which was previously observed experimentally.

  14. 77 FR 56210 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... Street, Chicago, Illinois 60690-1414: 1. American Heartland Bancshares, Inc., Sugar Grove, Illinois; to engage de novo through its subsidiary, American Heartland Holdings, LLC, Sugar Grove, Illinois,...

  15. Molecular dynamics simulations of heme reorientational motions in myoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, E R

    1993-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of 2-ns duration were performed on carbonmonoxymyoglobin and deoxymyoglobin in vacuo to study the reorientational dynamics of the heme group. The heme in both simulations undergoes reorientations of approximately 5 degrees amplitude on a subpicosecond time scale, which produce a rapid initial decay in the reorientational correlation function to about 0.99. The heme also experiences infrequent changes in average orientation of approximately 10 degrees amplitude, which lead to a larger slow decay of the reorientational correlation function over a period of hundreds of picoseconds. The simulations have not converged with respect to these infrequent transitions. However, an estimate of the order parameter for rapid internal motions of the heme from those orientations which are sampled by the simulations suggests that the subnanosecond orientational dynamics of the heme accounts for at least 30% of the unresolved initial anisotropy decay observed in the nanosecond time-resolved optical absorption experiments on myoglobin reported by Ansari et al. in a companion paper (Ansari, A., C.M. Jones, E.R. Henry, J. Hofrichter, and W.A. Eaton. 1992. Biophys. J. 64:852-868.). A more complete sampling of the accessible heme orientations would most likely increase this fraction further. The simulation of the liganded molecule also suggests that the conformational dynamics of the CO ligand may contribute significantly to discrepancies between the ligand conformation as probed by x-ray diffraction and by infrared-optical photoselection experiments. The protein back-bone explores multiple conformations during the simulations, with the largest structural changes appearing in the E and F helices, which are in contact with the heme. The variations in the heme orientation correlate with the conformational dynamics of the protein on a time scale of hundreds of picoseconds, suggesting that the heme orientation may provide a useful probe of dynamical processes

  16. Efficient Reorientation Maneuvers for Spacecraft with Multiple Articulated Payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    A final report is provided which describes the research program during the period 3 Mar. 1992 to 3 Jun. 1993. A summary of the technical research questions that were studied and of the main results that were obtained is given. The specific outcomes of the research program, including both educational impacts as well as research publications, are listed. The research is concerned with efficient reorientation maneuvers for spacecraft with multiple articulated payloads.

  17. Image Based Validation of Dynamical Models for Cell Reorientation

    PubMed Central

    Lockley, Robert; Ladds, Graham; Bretschneider, Till

    2016-01-01

    A key feature of directed cell movement is the ability of cells to reorient quickly in response to changes in the direction of an extracellular stimulus. Mathematical models have suggested quite different regulatory mechanisms to explain reorientation, raising the question of how we can validate these models in a rigorous way. In this study, we fit three reaction—diffusion models to experimental data of Dictyostelium amoebae reorienting in response to alternating gradients of mechanical shear flow. The experimental readouts we use to fit are spatio-temporal distributions of a fluorescent reporter for cortical F-actin labeling the cell front. Experiments performed under different conditions are fitted simultaneously to challenge the models with different types of cellular dynamics. Although the model proposed by Otsuji is unable to provide a satisfactory fit, those suggested by Meinhardt and Levchenko fit equally well. Further, we show that reduction of the three-variable Meinhardt model to a two-variable model also provides an excellent fit, but has the advantage of all parameters being uniquely identifiable. Our work demonstrates that model selection and identifiability analysis, commonly applied to temporal dynamics problems in systems biology, can be a powerful tool when extended to spatio-temporal imaging data. PMID:25492625

  18. Image based validation of dynamical models for cell reorientation.

    PubMed

    Lockley, Robert; Ladds, Graham; Bretschneider, Till

    2015-06-01

    A key feature of directed cell movement is the ability of cells to reorient quickly in response to changes in the direction of an extracellular stimulus. Mathematical models have suggested quite different regulatory mechanisms to explain reorientation, raising the question of how we can validate these models in a rigorous way. In this study, we fit three reaction-diffusion models to experimental data of Dictyostelium amoebae reorienting in response to alternating gradients of mechanical shear flow. The experimental readouts we use to fit are spatio-temporal distributions of a fluorescent reporter for cortical F-actin labeling the cell front. Experiments performed under different conditions are fitted simultaneously to challenge the models with different types of cellular dynamics. Although the model proposed by Otsuji is unable to provide a satisfactory fit, those suggested by Meinhardt and Levchenko fit equally well. Further, we show that reduction of the three-variable Meinhardt model to a two-variable model also provides an excellent fit, but has the advantage of all parameters being uniquely identifiable. Our work demonstrates that model selection and identifiability analysis, commonly applied to temporal dynamics problems in systems biology, can be a powerful tool when extended to spatio-temporal imaging data. PMID:25492625

  19. A role of right middle frontal gyrus in reorienting of attention: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Japee, Shruti; Holiday, Kelsey; Satyshur, Maureen D.; Mukai, Ikuko; Ungerleider, Leslie G.

    2015-01-01

    The right middle fontal gyrus (MFG) has been proposed to be a site of convergence of the dorsal and ventral attention networks, by serving as a circuit-breaker to interrupt ongoing endogenous attentional processes in the dorsal network and reorient attention to an exogenous stimulus. Here, we probed the contribution of the right MFG to both endogenous and exogenous attention by comparing performance on an orientation discrimination task of a patient with a right MFG resection and a group of healthy controls. On endogenously cued trials, participants were shown a central cue that predicted with 90% accuracy the location of a subsequent peri-threshold Gabor patch stimulus. On exogenously cued trials, a cue appeared briefly at one of two peripheral locations, followed by a variable inter-stimulus interval (ISI; range 0–700 ms) and a Gabor patch in the same or opposite location as the cue. Behavioral data showed that for endogenous, and short ISI exogenous trials, valid cues facilitated responses compared to invalid cues, for both the patient and controls. However, at long ISIs, the patient exhibited difficulty in reverting to top-down attentional control, once the facilitatory effect of the exogenous cue had dissipated. When explicitly cued during long ISIs to attend to both stimulus locations, the patient was able to engage successfully in top-down control. This result indicates that the right MFG may play an important role in reorienting attention from exogenous to endogenous attentional control. Resting state fMRI data revealed that the right superior parietal lobule and right orbitofrontal cortex, showed significantly higher correlations with a left MFG seed region (a region tightly coupled with the right MFG in controls) in the patient relative to controls. We hypothesize that this paradoxical increase in cortical coupling represents a compensatory mechanism in the patient to offset the loss of function of the resected tissue in right prefrontal cortex. PMID

  20. Portable hand hold device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, Jr., John W. (Inventor); McQueen, Donald H. (Inventor); Sanders, Fred G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A hand hold device (A) includes a housing (10) having a hand hold (14) and clamping brackets (32,34) for grasping and handling an object. A drive includes drive lever (23), spur gear (22), and rack gears (24,26) carried on rods (24a, 26a) for moving the clamping brackets. A lock includes ratchet gear (40) and pawl (42) biased between lock and unlock positions by a cantilever spring (46,48) and moved by handle (54). Compliant grip pads (32b, 34b) provide compliance to lock, unlock, and hold an object between the clamp brackets.

  1. Removable hand hold

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corrigan, Robert D. (Inventor); Hauer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A hand hold utilizes joining mechanisms which comprises two different mounting brackets that are permanently fastened to a supporting structure. A slide plate is disposed at one end of the hand rail or hand hold which mates with one of the mounting brackets. A securing member is disposed at the opposite end of the hand rail/hand hold which connects with the other mounting bracket by means of a locking device. The slide plate has a central tapered tongue with two matching slots disposed on each side thereof.

  2. Breath-Holding Spells

    MedlinePlus

    ... less than a minute before a child regains consciousness and resumes breathing normally. Breath-holding spells can ... spells cause kids to stop breathing and lose consciousness for up to a minute. In the most ...

  3. Preparing Teachers to Engage Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Mary M.; Jacobson, Arminta; Hemmer, Rebecca

    2004-01-01

    Teacher education has the potential to serve as an important forum for overcoming barriers to the engagement of parents in their children?s education. Nevertheless, parent involvement has yet to hold a central role in the teacher education curriculum (Chavkin & Williams, 1987; de Acosta, 1996; Epstein & Dauber, 1991; Hiatt-Michael, 2001) and in…

  4. Molecular reorientation in ortho-carborane studied by dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunkenheimer, P.; Loidl, A.

    1996-03-01

    The dielectric properties of ortho-carborane have been investigated in a broad frequency range of 20 Hz≤ν≤1 GHz and at temperatures 10 K≤T≤380 K. At T≳275 K the ortho-carborane molecules undergo fast and isotropic reorientations with frequencies larger than 1 GHz. Below a phase transition at Tc≊275 K the reorientation is partly restricted and the dynamics of the remaining reorientational motion is reduced. At 160 K, the dielectric results reveal a small anomaly which we assign to a second phase transition. At temperatures 150 K

  5. The Catholic Church, the American military, and homosexual reorientation therapy.

    PubMed

    Lutz, David

    2004-01-01

    Homosexual activist groups have targeted the Catholic Church and the American military as institutions especially in need of transformation. Associations of healthcare professionals are also under assault from homosexual activists. It is, nevertheless, appropriate for the Church and the military to defend themselves against this assault, to affirm that homosexuality is incompatible with Christian ethics and military service, and to help homosexuals free themselves from the vice of homosexuality. Arguments that homosexual reorientation therapy is unethical are unsound. Such therapy is consistent with the Christian virtue of charity. PMID:15764096

  6. Domain faceting in an in-plane magnetic reorientation transition

    SciTech Connect

    Vescovo, E.; Mentes, T.O.; Sadowski, J.T.; Ablett, J.M.; Nino, M.A.; Locatelli, A.

    2010-11-04

    The microscopic structure of the 90{sup o} in-plane magnetic reorientation transition in Fe(110) films is examined using photoemission x-ray microscopy. At the nanoscale, sharp magnetic boundaries are detected. They are indicative of a first-order transition and are consistent with Fe magnetic anisotropy constants. At the micron scale, the magnetic boundary breaks up into triangular patterns whose characteristic angular dependence is revealed by experiments on conical microwedges. This effect, fully accounted by micromagnetic simulations, opens the possibility to control the sharpness of the transition at the microscopic scale.

  7. Reorientable electric dipoles and cooperative phenomena in human tooth enamel.

    PubMed

    Hitmi, N; Lamure-Plaino, E; Lamure, A; LaCabanne, C; Young, R A

    1986-05-01

    A preliminary investigation of electric dipole reorientability in human tooth enamel (TE) in comparison to that in hydroxyapatite (OHAp) has been made with the fractional-polarization form of the thermally stimulated currents (TSC) method. The reorientable dipoles are the structural OH-ions. The OHAp exhibited compensation phenomena at 211.5 degrees C and at 356 degrees C which are associated here with the hexagonal form becoming quasi-statically stabilized and dynamically stabilized, respectively, against the monoclinic form. TE specimens were pretreated at various temperatures. All showed the onset of cooperative motions that could quasi-statically stabilize the hexagonal form at the same temperature, approximately 212 degrees C, as did OHAp, even though the TE was already statically stabilized in the hexagonal form. Parts of the TSC spectra that did not conform to the 212 degrees C compensation changed progressively with pretreatment temperature. Loss of incorporated H2O is identified as the most probable cause of most of these changes. This work shows considerable promise for TSC as a tool for further quantitative investigation of TE. PMID:3013384

  8. Liquid propellant reorientation in a low-gravity environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumner, I. E.

    1978-01-01

    An existing empirical analysis relating to the reorientation of liquids in cylindrical tanks due to propulsive settling in a low gravity environment was extended to include the effects of geyser formation in the Weber number range from 4 to 10. Estimates of the minimum velocity increment required to be imposed on the propellant tank to achieve liquid reorientation were made. The resulting Bond numbers, based on tank radius, were found to be in the range from 3 to 5, depending upon the initial liquid fill level, with higher Bond number required for high initial fill levels. The resulting Weber numbers, based on tank radius and the velocity of the liquid leading edge, were calculated to be in the range from 6.5 to 8.5 for cylindrical tanks having a fineness ratio of 2.0, with Weber numbers of somewhat greater values for longer cylindrical tanks. It, therefore, appeared to be advantageous to allow small geysers to form and then dissipate into the surface of the collected liquid in order to achieve the minimum velocity increment. The Bond numbers which defined the separation between regions in which geyser formation did and did not occur due to propulsive settling in a spherical tank configuration ranged from 2 to 9 depending upon the liquid fill level.

  9. Structure and reorientational dynamics of 1-F-adamantane.

    PubMed

    Ben Hassine, B; Negrier, Ph; Romanini, M; Barrio, M; Macovez, R; Kallel, A; Mondieig, D; Tamarit, J Ll

    2016-04-20

    The polymorphism and the dynamics of a simple rigid molecule (1-fluoro-adamantane) have been studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction and broadband dielectric spectroscopy. At temperatures below the melting point, the molecule forms an orientationally disordered Phase I with a cubic-centered structure (Phase I, Fm3[combining macron]m, Z = 4). This phase possesses eight equilibrium positions for the fluorine atom, with equal occupancy factors of 1/8. A solid-solid phase transition to a low-temperature tetragonal phase (Phase II, P4[combining macron]21c, Z = 2) reduces the statistical disorder to only four possible equivalent sites for the fluorine atom, with fractional occupancies of 1/4. The dynamics has been rationalized under the constraints imposed by the space group of the crystal structure determined by powder X-ray diffraction. The dielectric spectroscopy study reveals that the statistical disorder in Phase II is dynamic in character and is associated with reorientational jumps along the two- and three-fold axes. In the dielectric loss spectra, the cooperative (α) relaxation exhibits a shoulder on the high-frequency side. This remarkable finding clearly reveals the existence of two intrinsic reorientational processes associated with the exchange of the F atom along the four sites. In addition to such "bimodal" relaxation, a secondary Johari-Goldstein relaxation is detected at lower temperatures. PMID:27040739

  10. Tectonics of Vesta: Indication of Spin-up and Reorientation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    The first publicly released images of Vesta taken by the Dawn spacecraft reveal in detail both that which was expected based on Hubble Space Telescope studies -a probable south polar impact basin-and unexpected-large, continuous equatorial "grooves" (possible extensional graben) and ridges near the south pole. I will demonstrate based on numerical models why we may not be so surprised: that impact-induced changes to Vesta's shape and spin state can in fact produce such seemingly enigmatic features. It has been suggested that the impact event that formed the basin might have been sufficient to cause significant reorientation of Vesta's spin axis [1-3]. Such a process affects the asteroid's spin state, and can drive changes in shape that produce strains and surface tectonics. Because Vesta is silicate body and likely cooled quickly, unless the impact was early or created a significant thermal perturbation, it is difficult to produce surface tectonics that are not dominated by thermal contraction [2,3]. That at first glance Vesta's surface appears to be tectonically rich implies a significant change in Vesta's shape that may not be readily explained by an elastic response, since viscous relaxation of the body and the crater may give rise to additional strain as well as distort the feature [2]. I will show that because Vesta's equatorial bulge at its current rotation rate is so large a component of its shape (HST-derived) [1], it stabilizes the body's rotation even after a large impact. This would seem to imply that the location of the impact was indeed near to the south pole and the associated small reorientation has had little effect on Vesta's shape [2,3]. However, such an impact produces equatorial compression and polar extension, inconsistent with first images released by Dawn. De-spinning only enhances equatorial compression [3]. Reorientation and spin-up, however, CAN create the tectonic patterns observed on Vesta [2]. In this presentation I will demonstrate how

  11. Reorientation in the Real World: The Development of Landmark Use and Integration in a Natural Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Alastair D.; Gilchrist, Iain D.; Cater, Kirsten; Ikram, Naimah; Nott, Kylie; Hood, Bruce M.

    2008-01-01

    An influential series of studies have argued that young children are unable to use landmark information to reorient. However, these studies have used artificial experimental environments that may lead to an underestimation of the children's ability. We tested whether young children could reorient using landmarks in an ecologically valid setting.…

  12. Children's Use of Geometry and Landmarks To Reorient in an Open Space.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gouteux, Stephane; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2001-01-01

    Eight experiments examined abilities of 3- to 4-year-olds to reorient themselves and locate a hidden object in an open circular space furnished with landmark objects. Findings showed that children failed to use geometric configuration of objects to reorient themselves. Children successfully located the object in relation to a geometric…

  13. Geometry Three Ways: An fMRI Investigation of Geometric Information Processing during Reorientation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Jennifer E.; Twyman, Alexandra D.; Joanisse, Marc F.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2012-01-01

    The geometry formed by the walls of a room is known to be a potent cue in reorientation, yet little is known about the use of geometric information gleaned from other contexts. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural activity in adults while reorienting in 3 different environments: the typical rectangular walled room, a…

  14. Theta Oscillation Reveals the Temporal Involvement of Different Attentional Networks in Contingent Reorienting

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Fu; Liang, Wei-Kuang; Lai, Chiou-Lian; Hung, Daisy L.; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2016-01-01

    In the visual world, rapidly reorienting to relevant objects outside the focus of attention is vital for survival. This ability from the interaction between goal-directed and stimulus-driven attentional control is termed contingent reorienting. Neuroimaging studies have demonstrated activations of the ventral and dorsal attentional networks (DANs) which exhibit right hemisphere dominance, but the temporal dynamics of the attentional networks still remain unclear. The present study used event-related potential (ERP) to index the locus of spatial attention and Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) to acquire the time-frequency information during contingent reorienting. The ERP results showed contingent reorienting induced significant N2pc on both hemispheres. In contrast, our time-frequency analysis found further that, unlike the N2pc, theta oscillation during contingent reorienting differed between hemispheres and experimental sessions. The inter-trial coherence (ITC) of the theta oscillation demonstrated that the two sides of the attentional networks became phase-locked to contingent reorienting at different stages. The left attentional networks were associated with contingent reorienting in the first experimental session whereas the bilateral attentional networks play a more important role in this process in the subsequent session. This phase-locked information suggests a dynamic temporal evolution of the involvement of different attentional networks in contingent reorienting and a potential role of the left ventral network in the first session. PMID:27375459

  15. Is Language Necessary for Human Spatial Reorientation? Reconsidering Evidence from Dual Task Paradigms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratliff, Kristin R.; Newcombe, Nora S.

    2008-01-01

    Being able to reorient to the spatial environment after disorientation is a basic adaptive challenge. There is clear evidence that reorientation uses geometric information about the shape of the surrounding space. However, there has been controversy concerning whether use of geometry is a modular function, and whether use of features is dependent…

  16. Behavior learning in differential games and reorientation maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satak, Neha

    method is the Direct Approximation of Value Function (DAVF) method. In this method, unlike the CSR method, the player formulates an objective function for the opponent but does not formulates a strategy directly; rather, indirectly the player assumes that the opponent is playing optimally. Thus, a value function satisfying the HJB equation corresponding to the opponent's cost function exists. The DAVF method finds an approximate solution for the value function based on previous observations of the opponent's control. The approximate solution to the value function is then used to predict the opponent's future behavior. Game examples in which only a single player is learning its opponent's behavior are simulated. Subsequently, examples in which both players in a two-player game are learning each other's behavior are simulated. In the second part of this research, a reorientation control maneuver for a spinning spacecraft will be developed. This will aid the application of behavior learning and differential games concepts to the specific scenario involving multiple spinning spacecraft. An impulsive reorientation maneuver with coasting will be analytically designed to reorient the spin axis of the spacecraft using a single body fixed thruster. Cooperative maneuvers of multiple spacecraft optimizing fuel and relative orientation will be designed. Pareto optimality concepts will be used to arrive at mutually agreeable reorientation maneuvers for the cooperating spinning spacecraft.

  17. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    The lineaments on Europa are discussed in terms of the orientation of the lineaments relative to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions and to nonsynchronous rotation. The cracks are noticeable by their darker albedo compared to the presumed water ice surrounding them. The stress trajectories for tidal distortion of a thin elastic shell are superimposed on Mercator projection maps of the lineaments. It is shown that the lineaments are mainly oriented at high angles to the tensile stress trajectories that would be expected for regularly occurring nonsynchronous rotation, i.e., extensional fractures would appear. The reorientation motions which would cause the fractures are estimated. It is suggested that the fractures occur episodically to release stresses built up on the tensile surface of the crust during the continuous nonsynchronous rotation of Europa.

  18. Development of a computational model for astronaut reorientation.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Leia; Willcox, Karen; Newman, Dava

    2010-08-26

    The ability to model astronaut reorientations computationally provides a simple way to develop and study human motion control strategies. Since the cost of experimenting in microgravity is high, and underwater training can lead to motions inappropriate for microgravity, these techniques allow for motions to be developed and well-understood prior to any microgravity exposure. By including a model of the current space suit, we have the ability to study both intravehicular and extravehicular activities. We present several techniques for rotating about the axes of the body and show that motions performed by the legs create a greater net rotation than those performed by the arms. Adding a space suit to the motions was seen to increase the resistance torque and limit the available range of motion. While rotations about the body axes can be performed in the current space suit, the resulting motions generated a reduced rotation when compared to the unsuited configuration. PMID:20472241

  19. Study on Hydride Reorientation in Zry-2 Fuel Claddings during Interim Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Sakamoto, K.; Matsuoka, H.; Takagi, A.; Kashibe, S.

    2007-07-01

    The hydride reorientation during the interim dry storage was examined by hydride reorientation test using unirradiated recrystallized Zry-2 fuel claddings (Zr-lined). In the case of high hydrogen concentration (above 200 ppm), no measurable hydride reorientation was observed under the condition examined. On the other hand, for low hydrogen concentration (30 - 80 ppm), a significant hydride reorientation was observed above 618 K. The effects of thermal cycling and cooling rate were also examined. The mechanical property of the hydride-reoriented specimens was evaluated at room temperature by the ring-tensile test, which showed no degradation of hoop strength and ductility when temperature and hoop stress were not greater than 573 K and 70 MPa, even if the effects of cooling rate and thermal cycling were taken into account. (authors)

  20. Self-Reorientation Following Colorectal Cancer Treatment – A Grounded Theory Study

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Ann-Caroline B; Axelsson, Malin; Berndtsson, Ina; Brink, Eva

    2015-01-01

    After colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment, people reorganize life in ways that are consistent with their understanding of the illness and their expectations for recovery. Incapacities and abilities that have been lost can initiate a need to reorient the self. To the best of our knowledge, no studies have explicitly focused on the concept of self-reorientation after CRC treatment. The aim of the present study was therefore to explore self-reorientation in the early recovery phase after CRC surgery. Grounded theory analysis was undertaken, using the method presented by Charmaz. The present results explained self-reorientation as the individual attempting to achieve congruence in self-perception. A congruent self-perception meant bringing together the perceived self and the self that was mirrored in the near environs. The results showed that societal beliefs and personal explanations are essential elements of self-reorientation, and that it is therefore important to make them visible. PMID:26312124

  1. Tidal reorientation and the fracturing of Jupiter's moon Europa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEwen, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    The most striking characteristic of Europa is the network of long linear albedo markings over the surface, suggestive of global-scale tectonic processes. Various explanations for the fractures have been proposed: Freezing and expansion of an early liquid water ocean1, planetary expansion due to dehydration of hydrated silicates2, localization by weak points in the crust generated by impacts3, and a combination of stresses due to planetary volume change and tidal distortions from orbital recession and orbital eccentricity4,5. Calculations by Yoder6 and Greenberg and Weidenschilling7 have shown that Europa may rotate slightly more rapidly than the synchronous rate, with a rotation period (reorientation through 360??) ranging from 20 to >103 yr if a liquid mantle is present, or up to 1010 yr if the satellite is essentially solid7. Helfen-stein and Parmentier8 modelled the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation, and concluded that this could explain the long fractures in part of the anti-jovian hemisphere. In this note, I present a global map of lineaments with long arc lengths (>20?? or 550 km), and compare the lineament orientations to the tensile stress trajectories due to tidal distortions (changes in the lengths of three principal semiaxes) and to nonsynchronous rotation (longitudinal reorientation of two of the principal semiaxes). An excellent orthogonal fit to the lineaments is achieved by the stresses due to nonsynchronous rotation with the axis radial to Jupiter located 25?? east of its present position. This fit suggests that nonsynchronous rotation occurred at some time in Europa's history. ?? 1986 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Collaborative engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wade, Robert L.; Reames, Joseph M.

    2004-09-01

    A need exists for United States military forces to perform collaborative engagement operations between unmanned systems. This capability has the potential to contribute significant tactical synergy to the Joint Force operating in the battlespace of the future. Collaborative engagements potentially offer force conservation, perform timely acquisition and dissemination of essential combat information, and can eliminate high value and time critical targets. Collaborative engagements can also add considerably to force survivability by reducing soldier and equipment exposure during critical operations. This paper will address a multiphase U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center (AMRDEC) Joint Technology Center (JTC) Systems Integration Laboratory (SIL) program to assess information requirements, Joint Architecure for Unmanned Systems (JAUS), on-going Science and Technology initiatives, and conduct simulation based experiments to identify and resolve technical risks required to conduct collaborative engagements using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGV). The schedule outlines an initial effort to expand, update and exercise JAUS, provide early feedback to support user development of Concept of Operations (CONOPs) and Tactics, Techniques and Procedures (TTPs), and develop a Multiple Unified Simulation Environment (MUSE) system with JAUS interfaces necessary to support an unmanned system of systems collaboartive engagement.

  3. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  4. Engaging Employers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hillier, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    A key factor in the successful development of workplace learning is employer engagement (Leitch, 2006; DfES, 2007). However, despite numerous approaches by government in the United Kingdom to bring together employers, providers and learners so that economic success is generated by a skilled and flexible workforce, there continue to be challenges…

  5. Academic Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swift, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    The academy is defined by a fundamentally uncertain pursuit of certainty. The question of whether academic work is a sufficient form of engagement on its own is inseparable from the contradiction inherent to this pursuit. Like any properly academic question, it lends itself to a forum: a response is nearly obligatory for any professor in the…

  6. Modelling and analysis of bacterial tracks suggest an active reorientation mechanism in Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Rosser, Gabriel; Baker, Ruth E.; Armitage, Judith P.; Fletcher, Alexander G.

    2014-01-01

    Most free-swimming bacteria move in approximately straight lines, interspersed with random reorientation phases. A key open question concerns varying mechanisms by which reorientation occurs. We combine mathematical modelling with analysis of a large tracking dataset to study the poorly understood reorientation mechanism in the monoflagellate species Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The flagellum on this species rotates counterclockwise to propel the bacterium, periodically ceasing rotation to enable reorientation. When rotation restarts the cell body usually points in a new direction. It has been assumed that the new direction is simply the result of Brownian rotation. We consider three variants of a self-propelled particle model of bacterial motility. The first considers rotational diffusion only, corresponding to a non-chemotactic mutant strain. Two further models incorporate stochastic reorientations, describing ‘run-and-tumble’ motility. We derive expressions for key summary statistics and simulate each model using a stochastic computational algorithm. We also discuss the effect of cell geometry on rotational diffusion. Working with a previously published tracking dataset, we compare predictions of the models with data on individual stopping events in R. sphaeroides. This provides strong evidence that this species undergoes some form of active reorientation rather than simple reorientation by Brownian rotation. PMID:24872500

  7. Time course and auxin sensitivity of cortical microtubule reorientation in maize roots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blancaflor, E. B.; Hasenstein, K. H.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetics of MT [microtubule] reorientation in primary roots of Zea mays cv. Merit, were examined 15, 30, 45, and 60 min after horizontal positioning. Confocal microscopy of longitudinal tissue sections showed no change in MT orientation 15 and 30 min after horizontal placement. However, after 45 and 60 min, MTs of the outer 4-5 cortical cell layers along the lower side were reoriented. In order to test whether MT reorientation during graviresponse is caused by an auxin gradient, we examined the organization of MTs in roots that were incubated for 1 h in solutions containing 10(-9) to 10(-6) M IAA. IAA treatment at 10(-8) M or less showed no major or consistent changes but 10(-7) M IAA resulted in MT reorientation in the cortex. The auxin effect does not appear to be acid-induced since benzoic acid (10(-5) M) did not cause MT reorientation. The region closest to the maturation zone was most sensitive to IAA. The data indicate that early stages of gravity induced curvature occur in the absence of MT reorientation but sustained curvature leads to reoriented MTs in the outer cortex. Growth inhibition along the lower side of graviresponding roots appears to result from asymmetric distribution of auxin following gravistimulation.

  8. Holding the Tension.

    PubMed

    Feudtner, Chris

    2016-05-01

    My colleagues and I had been asked by a member of a clinical team to help sort through the ethics of stopping a life-sustaining intervention for a very ill child. We had already talked with the parents, the physicians, and the folks from nursing, social work, and chaplaincy. Terms like "suffering," "cruel," "compassion," and "moral distress" had been uttered, as had terms like "inappropriate," "unethical," "neglectful," and "risk-management." The group had now stuffed all of these polarizing thoughts and feelings into this cramped room with only one door. And everyone was looking at me. What skill, competency, or inner capacity must one possess to hold and manage such tension? PMID:27150423

  9. FREQUENT SPIN REORIENTATION OF GALAXIES DUE TO LOCAL INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Cen, Renyue

    2014-04-10

    We study the evolution of angular momenta of M {sub *} = 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} galaxies utilizing large-scale ultra-high resolution cosmological hydrodynamic simulations and find that the spin of the stellar component changes direction frequently because of interactions with nearby systems, such as major mergers, minor mergers, significant gas inflows, and torques. The rate and nature of change of spin direction cannot be accounted for by large-scale tidal torques, because the rates of the latter fall short by orders of magnitude and because the apparent random swings of the spin direction are inconsistent with the alignment by linear density field. The implications for galaxy formation as well as the intrinsic alignment of galaxies are profound. Assuming the large-scale tidal field is the sole alignment agent, a new picture emerging is that intrinsic alignment of galaxies would be a balance between slow large-scale coherent torquing and fast spin reorientation by local interactions. What is still open is whether other processes, such as feeding galaxies with gas and stars along filaments or sheets, introduce coherence for spin directions of galaxies along the respective structures.

  10. Spin reorientation transition in dysprosium-samarium orthoferrite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Weiyao; Cao, Shixun; Huang, Ruoxiang; Cao, Yiming; Xu, Kai; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We report the control of spin reorientation (SR) transition in perovskite D y1 -xS mxFe O3 , a whole family of single crystals grown by an optical floating zone method from x =0 to 1 with an interval of 0.1. Powder x-ray diffractions and Rietveld refinements indicate that lattice parameters a and c increase linearly with Sm doping concentration, whereas b keeps a constant. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations under zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) processes are studied in detail. We have found a remarkable linear change of SR transition temperature in Sm-rich samples for x >0.2 , which covers an extremely wide temperature range including room temperature. The a -axis magnetization curves under the FC during cooling (FCC) process bifurcate from and then jump back to that of the ZFC and FC warming process in single crystals when x =0.5 -0.9 , suggesting complicated 4 f -3 d electron interactions among D y3 + -S m3 +,D y3 + -F e3 + , and S m3 + -F e3 + sublattices of diverse magnetic configurations. The magnetic properties from the doping effect on SR transition temperature in these single crystals might be useful in the material physics and device design applications.

  11. Shape-assisted body reorientation enhances trafficability through cluttered terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chen; Pullin, Andrew; Haldane, Duncan; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Many birds and fishes have slender, streamlined bodies that reduce fluid dynamic drag and allow fast and efficient locomotion. Similarly, numerous terrestrial animals run through cluttered terrain where 3-D, multi-component obstacles like grass, bushes, trees, walls, doors, and pillars also resist motion, but it is unknown whether their body shape plays a major role. Here, we challenged discoid cockroaches that possess a rounded, thin, nearly ellipsoidal body to run through tall, narrowly spaced, grass-like beams. The animals primarily rolled their body to the side to maneuver through the obstacle gaps. Reduction of body roundness by artificial shells inhibited this side roll maneuver, resulting in a lower traversal probability and a longer traversal time (P < 0.001, ANOVA). Inspired by this discovery, we added a cockroach-like, rounded exoskeleton shell to a legged robot of a nearly cuboidal body. The rounded shell enabled the robot to use passive side rolling to maneuver through beams. To explain the mechanism, we developed a simple physics model to construct an energy landscape of the body-terrain interaction, which allowed estimation of body forces and torques exerted by the beams. Our model revealed that, by passive interaction with the terrain, a rounded body (ellipsoid) rolled more easily than an angular body (cuboid) to access energy valleys between energy barriers caused by obstacles. Our study is the first to demonstrate that a terradynamically ``streamlined'' shape can reduce terrain resistance and enhance trafficability by assisting body reorientation.

  12. Evolved to fail: Bacteria induce flagellar buckling to reorient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    Many marine bacteria swim with a single helical flagellum connected to a rotary motor via a 100 nm long universal joint called the ``hook.'' While these bacteria have seemingly just one degree of freedom, allowing them to swim only back and forth, they in fact exhibit large angular reorientations mediated by off-axis ``flicks'' of their flagellum. High-speed video microscopy revealed the mechanism underpinning this turning behavior: the buckling of the hook during the exceedingly brief (10 ms) forward run that follows a reversal. Direct measurements of the hook's mechanical properties corroborated this result, as the hook's structural stability is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the compressive load from propulsion to the elastic restoring force of the hook. Upon decreasing the Sperm number below a critical value by reducing the swimming speed, the frequency of flicks diminishes sharply, consistent with the criticality of buckling. This elegant, under-actuated turning mechanism appears widespread among marine bacteria and may provide a novel design concept in micro-robotics.

  13. 12 CFR 238.53 - Prescribed services and activities of savings and loan holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... this paragraph and the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3). (1) Engaging de novo in services or... (REGULATION LL) Savings and Loan Holding Company Activities and Acquisitions § 238.53 Prescribed services...

  14. 12 CFR 238.53 - Prescribed services and activities of savings and loan holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... this paragraph and the Board's Rules of Procedure (12 CFR 262.3). (1) Engaging de novo in services or... (REGULATION LL) Savings and Loan Holding Company Activities and Acquisitions § 238.53 Prescribed services...

  15. 17 CFR 250.85 - Service, sales, and construction by registered holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY... company is principally engaged in the business of an operating electric or gas utility company, or...

  16. 17 CFR 250.85 - Service, sales, and construction by registered holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION (CONTINUED) GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS, PUBLIC UTILITY HOLDING COMPANY... company is principally engaged in the business of an operating electric or gas utility company, or...

  17. Deuteron NMR resolved mesogen vs. crosslinker molecular order and reorientational exchange in liquid single crystal elastomers.

    PubMed

    Milavec, J; Domenici, V; Zupančič, B; Rešetič, A; Bubnov, A; Zalar, B

    2016-02-01

    Differences in the temperature behaviour of orientational ordering of structurally equivalent side-chain liquid single crystal elastomers (LSCEs) with (2)H-labelled crosslinker and mesogen have been studied by deuteron quadrupole-perturbed NMR. The impact of nematic director reorientations on the deuteron NMR spectral shapes was analyzed in terms of a discrete reorientational exchange model. This provided for the determination of the degree of nematic director alignment and for the quantification of the influence of the reorientational exchange on the (2)H NMR spectra in terms of two parameters, the nematic director orientational dispersion parameter σθ and the motional effectiveness parameter α. A comparative analysis of model simulations and experimental spectra reveals that mesogenic molecules in LSCEs exhibit faster reorientational dynamics as compared to crosslinker molecules and that mesogens and crosslinkers exhibit a similar and rather substantial static director orientational disorder. PMID:26778188

  18. Intermolecular and intramolecular reorientations in nonchiral smectic liquid-crystalline phases studied by broadband dielectric spectroscopy

    PubMed

    Schacht; Zugenmaier; Buivydas; Komitov; Stebler; Lagerwall; Gouda; Horii

    2000-04-01

    Molecular dynamics has been studied by broadband dielectric relaxation spectroscopy in the Sm-A, Sm-B, and Sm-E phases (Sm denotes smectic) of a homologous series of nonchiral stilbenes. An assignment of modes is presented based on their dependence on temperature and molecular length, and, as far as they obey the Arrhenius law, their activation energy has been determined. In general, reorientations of entire molecules around their short axis are active, whereas reorientations of entire molecules around their long axis are locked out in the Sm-E phase of shorter homologs, yet intramolecular reorientations of polar sites have been established. Strong evidence is presented for an interdependence of reorientations of entire molecules around the short and long axes within the biaxial Sm-E phase of longer homologs. PMID:11088173

  19. TRPV4 channels mediate cyclic strain-induced endothelial cell reorientation through integrin to integrin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Thodeti, Charles K.; Matthews, Benjamin; Ravi, Arvind; Mammoto, Akiko; Ghosh, Kaustabh; Bracha, Abigail L.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2009-01-01

    Cyclic mechanical strain produced by pulsatile blood flow regulates the orientation of endothelial cells lining blood vessels, and influences critical processes such as angiogenesis. Mechanical stimulation of stretch-activated calcium channels is known to mediate this reorientation response, however, the molecular basis remains unknown. Here we show that cyclically stretching capillary endothelial cells adherent to flexible extracellular matrix substrates activates mechanosensitive TRPV4 ion channels that, in turn, stimulate phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase-dependent activation and binding of additional ·1 integrin receptors, which promotes cytoskeletal remodeling and cell reorientation. Inhibition of integrin activation using blocking antibodies and knockdown of TRPV4 channels using specific siRNA suppress strain-induced capillary cell reorientation. Thus, mechanical forces that physically deform extracellular matrix may guide capillary cell reorientation through a strain-dependent ‘integrin to integrin’ signaling mechanism mediated by force-induced activation of mechanically-gated TRPV4 ion channels on the cell surface. PMID:19359599

  20. 12 CFR 225.104 - “Services” under section 4(c)(1) of Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Holding Company Act. 225.104 Section 225.104 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF... Holding Company Act. (a) Section 4(c)(1) of the Bank Holding Company Act, among other things, exempts from the nonbanking divestment requirements of section 4(a) of the Act shares of a company engaged...

  1. ISS Update: SPHERES with Telerobotics Project Manager Terry Fong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Brandi Dean talks with Terry Fong, Telerobotics Project Manager, about how the Synchronized Position, Hold, Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites, or SPHERES, are ...

  2. Android in Space

    NASA Video Gallery

    Can smartphones control robots in space? The Nexus-S upgrade of Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites -- SPHERES -- makes this a reality. By connecting a smartphone ...

  3. SPHERES Smartphone Workbench

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Smart SPHERES space robot (Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites) equipped with an Android smartphone performs a video survey inside of the International Space S...

  4. Spatial reorientation by geometry with freestanding objects and extended surfaces: a unifying view

    PubMed Central

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    The macroscopic, three-dimensional surface layout geometry of an enclosure apparently provides a different contribution for spatial reorientation than the geometric cues associated with freestanding objects arranged in arrays with similar geometric shape. Here, we showed that a unitary spatial representation can account for the capability of animals to reorient both by extended surfaces and discrete objects in a small-scale spatial task. We trained domestic chicks to locate a food-reward from an opening on isolated cylinders arranged either in a geometrically uninformative (square-shaped) or informative (rectangular-shaped) arrays. The arrays were located centrally within a rectangular-shaped enclosure. Chicks trained to access the reward from a fixed position of openings proved able to reorient according to the geometric cues specified by the shape of the enclosure in all conditions. Chicks trained in a fixed position of opening with geometric cues provided both by the arena and the array proved able to reorient according to each shape separately. However, chicks trained to access the reward from a variable position of openings failed to reorient. The results suggest that the physical constrains associated with the presence of obstacles in a scene, rather than their apparent visual extension, are crucial for spatial reorientation. PMID:22237909

  5. Spatial reorientation by geometry with freestanding objects and extended surfaces: a unifying view.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2012-06-01

    The macroscopic, three-dimensional surface layout geometry of an enclosure apparently provides a different contribution for spatial reorientation than the geometric cues associated with freestanding objects arranged in arrays with similar geometric shape. Here, we showed that a unitary spatial representation can account for the capability of animals to reorient both by extended surfaces and discrete objects in a small-scale spatial task. We trained domestic chicks to locate a food-reward from an opening on isolated cylinders arranged either in a geometrically uninformative (square-shaped) or informative (rectangular-shaped) arrays. The arrays were located centrally within a rectangular-shaped enclosure. Chicks trained to access the reward from a fixed position of openings proved able to reorient according to the geometric cues specified by the shape of the enclosure in all conditions. Chicks trained in a fixed position of opening with geometric cues provided both by the arena and the array proved able to reorient according to each shape separately. However, chicks trained to access the reward from a variable position of openings failed to reorient. The results suggest that the physical constrains associated with the presence of obstacles in a scene, rather than their apparent visual extension, are crucial for spatial reorientation. PMID:22237909

  6. Time-optimal three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft via homotopic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing

    2016-05-01

    This paper investigates the time-optimal rest-to-rest three-axis reorientation of asymmetric rigid spacecraft. First, time-optimal solutions for the inertially symmetric rigid spacecraft (ISRS) three-axis reorientation are briefly reviewed. By utilizing initial costates and reorientation time of the ISRS time-optimal solution, the homotopic approach is introduced to solve the asymmetric rigid spacecraft time-optimal three-axis reorientation problem. The main merit is that the homotopic approach can start automatically and reliably, which would facilitate the real-time generation of open-loop time-optimal solutions for attitude slewing maneuvers. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the proposed method. For principle axis reorientation, numerical results and analytical derivations show that, multiple time-optimal solutions exist and relations between them are given. For generic reorientation problem, though mathematical rigorous proof is not available to date, numerical results also indicated the existing of multiple time-optimal solutions.

  7. Holding services to account

    PubMed Central

    Clegg, J

    2008-01-01

    Background Recently, the frequency of audit inspections of health services for people with intellectual disability (ID) in the UK has increased, from occasional inquiries to a systematic audit of all services. From 2008, a process of continuous audit ‘surveillance’ of specialist health services is to be introduced. Similar regimes of inspection are in place for social care services. Aim To explore the conceptual positions which inform audit, through detailed examination of the investigation into the learning disability service at Sutton and Merton. Findings Audit is distinct from evaluation because it neither provides opportunities for service staff to give an account of their work nor represents a search for knowledge. Audit investigates adherence to government policy. In ID, audits measure aspirations derived from normalisation, despite research showing that some of these aspirations have not been achieved by any service. As audit consumes significant public resource, it is questionable whether the dominant finding of the Healthcare Commission's investigation into Sutton and Merton, that the ID service was chronically under-funded, represents value for money. Discussion and conclusions While basic checks on minimum standards will always be necessary, service excellence requires not audit but research-driven evaluation. Audits inhibit rather than open-up debate about improving support to people with ID. They impose an ideology, squander resource, and demoralise carers and staff. Evaluations challenge the implicit management-versus-professional binary enacted by audit, and can inform new care systems which make effective use of all those engaged with people with ID. PMID:18498335

  8. 76 FR 27669 - Automotive Components Holdings, LLC, a Subsidiary of Ford Motor Company, Saline Plant Division...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 65514). The workers are engaged in employment related to the production of interior... Employment and Training Administration Automotive Components Holdings, LLC, a Subsidiary of Ford Motor... Application for Reconsideration for the workers and former workers of Automotive Components Holdings, LLC,...

  9. The Changing Nature of Private Engagement in Public Education: For-Profit and Nonprofit Organizations and Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulkley, Katrina E.; Burch, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have seen a shifting landscape around private engagement in K-12 public education, one that involves a reorientation of education policy and practice around the principles of the marketplace. In this article, we examine the roles of both not-for-profit and for-profit agencies, as distinct from government agencies, in this movement.…

  10. 12 CFR 225.21 - Prohibited nonbanking activities and acquisitions; exempt bank holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... company or a subsidiary may not engage in, or acquire or control, directly or indirectly, voting securities or assets of a company engaged in, any activity other than: (1) Banking or managing or controlling... holding company has obtained the prior approval of the Board for that activity in accordance with...

  11. Chicks, like children, spontaneously reorient by three-dimensional environmental geometry, not by image matching

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Ah; Spelke, Elizabeth S.; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Spatial reorientation by layout geometry occurs in numerous species, but its underlying mechanisms are debated. While some argue that navigating animals' sense of place is based on geometric computations over three-dimensional representations, others claim it depends on panoramic image-matching processes. Because children reorient by subtle three-dimensional perturbations of the terrain and not by salient two-dimensional brightness contours on surfaces or freestanding columns, children's sense of place cannot be explained by image matching. To test image-matching theories in a different species, the present experiment investigates the reorientation performance of domestic chicks (Gallus gallus) in environments similar to those used with children. Chicks, like children, spontaneously reoriented by geometric relationships of subtle three-dimensional terrains, and not by salient two-dimensional brightness contours on surfaces or columns. These findings add to the evidence for homologous navigation systems in humans and other vertebrates, and they cast doubt on image-matching theories of reorientation in these species. PMID:22417791

  12. Effective connectivity during feature-based attentional capture: evidence against the attentional reorienting hypothesis of TPJ.

    PubMed

    DiQuattro, Nicholas E; Sawaki, Risa; Geng, Joy J

    2014-12-01

    The most prevalent neurobiological theory of attentional control posits 2 distinct brain networks: The dorsal and ventral attention networks. The role of the dorsal attentional network in top-down attentional control is well established, but there is less evidence for the putative role of the ventral attentional network in initiating stimulus-driven reorienting. Here, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to test the role of the ventral and dorsal networks in attentional reorienting during instances of attentional capture by a target-colored distracter. In the region of interest analyses, we found that frontal eye field (FEF) was selectively activated by conditions where attention was reoriented (i.e. to spatial cues and target-colored distracters). In contrast, temporoparietal junction (TPJ) responded positively to all stimulus conditions. The DCM results indicated that FEF received sensory inputs earlier than TPJ, and that only the connection from FEF to TPJ was modulated by the appearance of the target-colored distracter. The results provide novel empirical evidence against the idea that TPJ generates stimulus-driven reorientations of attention. We conclude that our results are incompatible with existing theories of TPJ involvement in the stimulus-driven reorientation of attention and discuss alternative explanations such as contextual updating. PMID:23825319

  13. 77 FR 1072 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities The companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y,...

  14. 76 FR 67454 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities The companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y,...

  15. Language Teacher Research Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borg, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a critical analysis of language teacher research engagement. The term "research engagement" here covers both engagement IN teacher research (i.e. by doing it) as well as engagement "with" research (i.e. by reading and using it). Research engagement is commonly recommended to language teachers as a potentially…

  16. Reorientation Response of Magnetic Microspheres Attached to Gold Electrodes Under an Applied Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Los Santos Valladares, L.; Dominguez, A. Bustamante; Aguiar, J. Albino; Reeve, R. M.; Mitrelias, T.; Langford, R. M.; Azuma, Y.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Majima, Y.

    2013-08-01

    In this work, we report the mechanical reorientation of thiolated ferromagnetic microspheres bridging a pair of gold electrodes under an external magnetic field. When an external magnetic field (7 kG) is applied during the measurement of the current-voltage characteristics of a carboxyl ferromagnetic microsphere (4 μm diameter) attached to two gold electrodes by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of octane dithiol (C8H18S2), the current signal is distorted. Rather than due to magnetoresistance, this effect is caused by a mechanical reorientation of the ferromagnetic sphere, which alters the number of SAMs between the sphere and the electrodes and therefore affects conduction. To study the physical reorientation of the ferromagnetic particles, we measure their hysteresis loops while suspended in a liquid solution.

  17. Anisotropic contributions to the transferred hyperfine field studied using a field-induced spin-reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Laura K.; Ryan, D. H.; Venturini, G.

    We report here a comparison between a field-driven spin-flop (TbMn6 Sn5.46In0.54) and a temperature-driven spin reorientation (TbMn6Sn6-x Gax) in order to demonstrate that the anisotropic contribution to Bhf at the Sn sites can be obtained through the moment reorientation and is independent of the driving force. We show that a complete 90° spin reorientation can be achieved at 300 K in an applied field of 0.57(3) T and that the changes in hyperfine field due to the anisotropic contribution exceed 45% at one of the Sn sites. Quantitative values for the anisotropic constant at the three Sn sites are obtained.

  18. Hydrides reorientation investigation of high burn-up PWR fuel cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valance, Stéphane; Bertsch, Johannes

    2015-09-01

    The direction of formation of hydride in fuel cladding tube is a major issue for the assessment of the cladding remaining ductility after service. This behavior is quite well known for fresh material, but few results exist for irradiated material. The reorientation behavior of a Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding (AREVA duplex DX-D4) at a burn-up of around 72 GWd t-1 is investigated here. The increase of the fraction of reoriented hydrides through repeated thermo-mechanical loading is inspected; as well, the possibility to recover a state with a minimized quantity of reoriented hydrides is tested using pure thermal loading cycles. The study is completed by a qualitative assessment of the hydrogen density in the duplex layer, where a dependence of the hydrides density on the hoop stress state is observed.

  19. Ag-induced spin-reorientation transition of Co ultrathin films on Pt(111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F. C.; Wu, Y. E.; Su, C. W.; Shern, C. S.

    2002-11-01

    The surface magneto-optical Kerr effect was used to study the magnetic properties of Co ultrathin films deposited on Pt(111). The easy axis of the magnetization changes from the out-of-plane to the in-plane direction after the coverage of Co is larger than 3.5 ML. The spin can reorient to the normal of the surface when the proper thickness of Ag overlayers is deposited on Co/Pt(111) with the in-plane magnetization. The out-of-plane magnetization and its coercivity as a function of Ag coverage were investigated during the spin-reorientation transition. The easy axis of the magnetization can shift back to the in-plane direction after the Ag overlayers are sputtered out. The chemical compositions of the interfaces were measured by Auger electron spectroscopy. The mechanism of the spin-reorientation transition induced by Ag is discussed.

  20. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field.

    PubMed

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M; Geday, Morten A

    2016-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  1. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  2. Study of spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions in hexagonal manganites through Raman spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang-Bai; Hien, Nguyen Thi Minh; Han, Kiok; Nam, Ji-Yeon; Huyen, Nguyen Thi; Shin, Seong-Il; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S. W.; Lee, D.; Noh, T. W.; Sung, N. H.; Cho, B. K.; Yang, In-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spin-wave (magnon) scattering, when clearly observed by Raman spectroscopy, can be simple and powerful for studying magnetic phase transitions. In this paper, we present how to observe magnon scattering clearly by Raman spectroscopy, then apply the Raman method to study spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions of hexagonal manganite single crystal and thin films and compare directly with the results of magnetization measurements. Our results show that by choosing strong resonance condition and appropriate polarization configuration, magnon scattering can be clearly observed, and the temperature dependence of magnon scattering can be simple and powerful quantity for investigating spin-ordering as well as spin-reorientation transitions. Especially, the Raman method would be very helpful for investigating the weak spin-reorientation transitions by selectively probing the magnons in the Mn3+ sublattices, while leaving out the strong effects of paramagnetic moments of the rare earth ions. PMID:26300075

  3. Study of spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions in hexagonal manganites through Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiang-Bai; Hien, Nguyen Thi Minh; Han, Kiok; Nam, Ji-Yeon; Huyen, Nguyen Thi; Shin, Seong-Il; Wang, Xueyun; Cheong, S W; Lee, D; Noh, T W; Sung, N H; Cho, B K; Yang, In-Sang

    2015-01-01

    Spin-wave (magnon) scattering, when clearly observed by Raman spectroscopy, can be simple and powerful for studying magnetic phase transitions. In this paper, we present how to observe magnon scattering clearly by Raman spectroscopy, then apply the Raman method to study spin-ordering and spin-reorientation transitions of hexagonal manganite single crystal and thin films and compare directly with the results of magnetization measurements. Our results show that by choosing strong resonance condition and appropriate polarization configuration, magnon scattering can be clearly observed, and the temperature dependence of magnon scattering can be simple and powerful quantity for investigating spin-ordering as well as spin-reorientation transitions. Especially, the Raman method would be very helpful for investigating the weak spin-reorientation transitions by selectively probing the magnons in the Mn(3+) sublattices, while leaving out the strong effects of paramagnetic moments of the rare earth ions. PMID:26300075

  4. Bar-holding prosthetic limb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vest, Thomas W. (Inventor); Norton, William E. (Inventor); Belcher, Jewell G. (Inventor); Carden, James R. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A prosthetic device for below-the-elbow amputees is disclosed. The device has a removable effector, which is attached to the end of an arm cuff. The effector is comprised of a pair of C-shaped members that are oriented so as to face each other. Working in concert, the C-shaped members are able to hold a bar such as a chainsaw handle. A flat spring is fitted around the C-shaped members to hold them together.

  5. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-excited slosh waves during propellant reorientation with a geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1992-01-01

    Slosh wave excitation induced by a resettling flowfield activated by 1.0-Hz impulsive thrust during the course of liquid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid-fill levels of 30, 50, 65, 70, and 80 percent has been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves of various frequencies excited by the resettling flowfield are discussed. Slosh wave excitations shift the fluid mass distribution in the container which imposes time-dependent variations in spacecraft moment of inertia. This information is important for spacecraft control during the course of liquid reorientation.

  6. Correlations between liquid crystal director reorientation and optical response time of a homeotropic cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiying; Wu, Thomas X.; Zhu, Xinyu; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-05-01

    Correlations between the director reorientation time and its consequent optical response time (both decay and rise) of a homeotropic liquid crystal (LC) cell under crossed polarizers are derived theoretically based on small angle approximation. Results indicate that the optical response time is linearly proportional to the LC director reorientation time and is weakly dependent on the initial bias voltage. To validate the derived correlations, transient phase and transmittance responses at various bias voltages are analyzed numerically by solving the Erickson-Leslie equation. Pretilt angle is found to make an important contribution to the optical response time. Gray scale switching of the homeotropic cell is also investigated.

  7. Animals' Use of Landmarks and Metric Information to Reorient: Effects of the Size of the Experimental Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sovrano, Valeria Anna; Bisazza, Angelo; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2005-01-01

    Disoriented children could use geometric information in combination with landmark information to reorient themselves in large but not in small experimental spaces. We tested fish in the same task and found that they were able to conjoin geometric and non-geometric (landmark) information to reorient themselves in both the large and the small space…

  8. 12 CFR 225.137 - Acquisitions of shares pursuant to section 4(c)(6) of the Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... group of holding companies, through concerted action, to engage in an activity as entrepreneurs. Section... that of an entrepreneur rather than that of an investor. (g) Accordingly, on the basis of the...

  9. 12 CFR 225.137 - Acquisitions of shares pursuant to section 4(c)(6) of the Bank Holding Company Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... group of holding companies, through concerted action, to engage in an activity as entrepreneurs. Section... that of an entrepreneur rather than that of an investor. (g) Accordingly, on the basis of the...

  10. Reorienting strategies in a rectangular array of landmarks by domestic chicks (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Spatial reorientation in a rectangular array of four landmarks located in the center of a circular enclosure was investigated in domestic chicks (Gallus gallus). One of the landmark possessed unique visual features, indicating the location of a food reward. After training, chicks were tested (a) with the same array as during the training; (b) with four identical landmarks of the type previously nonrewarded, of the type previously rewarded, or of a new type; (c) after having transformed one of the landmarks located at the geometric incorrect location into the type of landmark previously rewarded; or (d) with a fifth landmark of the rewarded type at a new location. Chicks encoded information provided by local featural cues but not the geometric information provided by the shape of the array. Moreover, when trained in a rectangular array of identical landmarks chicks failed to reorient. In a second series of experiments, the array was located in correspondence to the corners of a rectangular enclosure. This time chicks successfully learned to locate the reward using geometric information. However, when the rectangular array was located in the center of a larger rectangular enclosure, chicks failed to reorient, indicating that the geometric information given by the macroscopic layout of arena surfaces was not used to specify different locations. These results suggest that chicks reorient on the basis of a local representation of single landmarks and that encoding of the global aspects of geometry only occurs with respect to the large, extended surfaces of an enclosure. PMID:20476814

  11. Affective Education in the Junior High Schools: A Program for Staff Reorientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Timothy

    The purpose of this paper is to examine ways in which junior high school staff might be reoriented to better function within new objectives, methods, and materials. It is hypothesized that reexamined objectives have indicated a need for greater emphasis in affective-social psychological areas. Staff development within such a context consists of…

  12. Use of Geometric Properties of Landmark Arrays for Reorientation Relative to Remote Cities and Local Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mou, Weimin; Nankoo, Jean-François; Zhou, Ruojing; Spetch, Marcia L.

    2014-01-01

    Five experiments investigated how human adults use landmark arrays in the immediate environment to reorient relative to the local environment and relative to remote cities. Participants learned targets' directions with the presence of a proximal 4 poles forming a rectangular shape and an array of more distal poles forming a rectangular shape. Then…

  13. The Influence of Cue Reliability and Cue Representation on Spatial Reorientation in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Ian M.; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Ratliff, Kristin R.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies of children's reorientation have focused on cue representation (e.g., whether cues are geometric) as a predictor of performance but have not addressed cue reliability (the regularity of the relation between a given cue and an outcome) as a predictor of performance. Here we address both factors within the same series of…

  14. Leadership and Organization in Education: Time for a Re-Orientation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glatter, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The article raises issues about the current direction of the field of educational leadership and management. It argues that we should consider a re-orientation of the field in order to renew its concern with ideas connected with organization, which include viewing organizations as complex adaptive systems and taking an institutional perspective.…

  15. Why Size Counts: Children's Spatial Reorientation in Large and Small Enclosures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learmonth, Amy E.; Newcombe, Nora S.; Sheridan, Natalie; Jones, Meredith

    2008-01-01

    When mobile organisms are spatially disoriented, for instance by rapid repetitive movement, they must re-establish orientation. Past research has shown that the geometry of enclosing spaces is consistently used for reorientation by a wide variety of species, but that non-geometric features are not always used. Based on these findings, some…

  16. Use of Geometry for Spatial Reorientation in Children Applies Only to Symmetric Spaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lew, Adina R.; Gibbons, Bryony; Murphy, Caroline; Bremner, J. Gavin

    2010-01-01

    Proponents of the geometric module hypothesis argue that following disorientation, many species reorient by use of macro-environment geometry. It is suggested that attention to the surface layout geometry of natural terrain features may have been selected for over evolutionary time due to the enduring and unambiguous location information it…

  17. Reorientation in a Rhombic Environment: No Evidence for an Encapsulated Geometric Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hupbach, A.; Nadel, L.

    2005-01-01

    Reorientation behavior of young children has been described as dependent upon a geometric module that is incapable of interacting with landmark information. Whereas previous studies typically used rectangular spaces that provided geometric information about distance, we used a rhombic space that allowed us to explore the way children use geometric…

  18. Terahertz probes of magnetic field induced spin reorientation in YFeO{sub 3} single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Xian; Jiang, Junjie; Ma, Guohong; Jin, Zuanming; Wang, Dongyang; Tian, Zhen; Han, Jiaguang; Cheng, Zhenxiang

    2015-03-02

    Using the terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, we demonstrate the spin reorientation of a canted antiferromagnetic YFeO{sub 3} single crystal, by evaluating the temperature and magnetic field dependence of resonant frequency and amplitude for the quasi-ferromagnetic (FM) and quasi-antiferromagnetic modes (AFM), a deeper insight into the dynamics of spin reorientation in rare-earth orthoferrites is established. Due to the absence of 4f-electrons in Y ion, the spin reorientation of Fe sublattices can only be induced by the applied magnetic field, rather than temperature. In agreement with the theoretical predication, the frequency of FM mode decreases with magnetic field. In addition, an obvious step of spin reorientation phase transition occurs with a relatively large applied magnetic field of 4 T. By comparison with the family members of RFeO{sub 3} (R = Y{sup 3+} or rare-earth ions), our results suggest that the chosen of R would tailor the dynamical rotation properties of Fe ions, leading to the designable spin switching in the orthoferrite antiferromagnetic systems.

  19. The Reorientation Mechanism of Hydroxide Ions in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiuquan; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Dang, Liem X.

    2009-10-19

    simulations with polarizable potential models. Two major solvation structures of OH- were suggested by our study. One of which has four accepted hydrogen bonds from water and the other has five accepted hydrogen bonds. A weak hydrogen bond donated by the hydroxide ion was observed in our simulations. The simulated reorientation relaxation times of OH- are in qualitative agreement with CTTS experiments. We propose a two-step mechanism for the reorientation of hydroxide ions in water. First, the reorientation of OH- is initiated by the coupled translation with water molecules in its first solvation shell. Second, the OH- hydrogen relaxes to the minimum energy state. The rate-limiting step in this mechanism is the first step, translation diffusion of the first solvation shell water molecules. The activation energies of reorientation of OH- and translation of H2O determined from our simulations are 22.5 and 18.5 kJ/mol, respectively. These values fall in the range of the measured data. This work was supported by the US Department of energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest national Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

  20. Programmed schedule holds for improving launch vehicle holds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gralow, F. H.; Hayes, J. D.; Streiff, M. A.; Temple, A. G.; Venditti, R. A.

    1969-01-01

    Baseline definition and system optimization are used for the analysis of programmed holds developed through prelaunch system analysis. Identification of design specifications for ground support equipment and maintenance concepts, and design specifications are used to describe the functional utilization of the overall flow process.

  1. Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors involved in cyclic-stretch-induced reorientation of vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abiko, Hiyori; Fujiwara, Sachiko; Ohashi, Kazumasa; Hiatari, Ryuichi; Mashiko, Toshiya; Sakamoto, Naoya; Sato, Masaaki; Mizuno, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic stretch is an artificial model of mechanical force loading, which induces the reorientation of vascular endothelial cells and their stress fibers in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis. Rho family GTPases are crucial for cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation; however, the mechanism underlying stretch-induced activation of Rho family GTPases is unknown. A screen of short hairpin RNAs targeting 63 Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Rho-GEFs) revealed that at least 11 Rho-GEFs – Abr, alsin, ARHGEF10, Bcr, GEF-H1 (also known as ARHGEF2), LARG (also known as ARHGEF12), p190RhoGEF (also known as ARHGEF28), PLEKHG1, P-REX2, Solo (also known as ARHGEF40) and α-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6) – which specifically or broadly target RhoA, Rac1 and/or Cdc42, are involved in cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells. Overexpression of Solo induced RhoA activation and F-actin accumulation at cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion sites. Knockdown of Solo suppressed cyclic-stretch- or tensile-force-induced RhoA activation. Moreover, knockdown of Solo significantly reduced cyclic-stretch-induced perpendicular reorientation of endothelial cells when cells were cultured at high density, but not when they were cultured at low density or pretreated with EGTA or VE-cadherin-targeting small interfering RNAs. These results suggest that Solo is involved in cell-cell-adhesion-mediated mechanical signal transduction during cyclic-stretch-induced endothelial cell reorientation. PMID:25795300

  2. Specificity of endothelial cell reorientation in response to cyclic mechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P; Wille, J; Yin, F C

    2001-12-01

    Evidence suggests that cellular responses to mechanical stimuli depend specifically on the type of stimuli imposed. For example, when subjected to fluid shear stress, endothelial cells align along the flow direction. In contrast, in response to cyclic stretching, cells align away from the stretching direction. However, a few aspects of this cell alignment response remain to be clarified: (1) Is the cell alignment due to actual cell reorientation or selective cell detachment? (2) Does the resulting cell alignment represent a response of the cells to elongation or shortening, or both? (3) Does the cell alignment depend on the stretching magnitude or rate, or both? Finally, the role of the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules in the cell alignment response remains unclear. To address these questions, we grew human aortic endothelial cells on deformable silicone membranes and subjected them to three types of cyclic stretching: simple elongation, pure uniaxial stretching and equi-biaxial stretching. Examination of the same cells before and after stretching revealed that they reoriented. Cells subjected to either simple elongation or pure uniaxial stretching reoriented specifically toward the direction of minimal substrate deformation, even though the directions for the two types of stretching differed by only about 20 degrees. At comparable stretching durations, the extent of cell reorientation was more closely related to the stretching magnitude than the stretching rate. The actin cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell subjected to either type of stretching was reorganized into parallel arrays of actin filaments (i.e., stress fibers) aligned in the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Furthermore, in response to equi-biaxial stretching, the actin cytoskeleton was remodeled into a "tent-like" structure oriented out of the membrane plane-again towards the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Finally, abolishing microtubules prevented neither the

  3. 75 FR 81405 - Portfolio Holdings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ... adopts FHFA's interim final rule on portfolio holdings, without change. See 74 FR 5609, January 30, 2009...: Effective December 28, 2010, the interim final rule published on January 30, 2009 (74 FR 5609), which was... final regulation which added new subchapter C of part 1252 to 12 CFR Chapter XII. See 74 FR 5609....

  4. Treatment of Chronic Breath-Holding in an Adult with Severe Mental Retardation: A Clinical Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Derek D.; Martens, Brian K.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a clinical case study surrounding the behavioral assessment and operant treatment of, an adult with severe mental retardation who engaged in chronic breath-holding. In this clinical case, previous neurological and medical testing had ruled out biological bases for the individual's breath-holding. A functional behavioral assessment…

  5. 31 CFR 800.217 - Hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.217 Hold. The terms hold(s) and holding mean legal or beneficial ownership, whether direct or indirect, whether through fiduciaries, agents, or other means....

  6. 31 CFR 800.217 - Hold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF INVESTMENT... FOREIGN PERSONS Definitions § 800.217 Hold. The terms hold(s) and holding mean legal or beneficial ownership, whether direct or indirect, whether through fiduciaries, agents, or other means....

  7. Differential Gene Expression in Brassica rapa Roots After Reorientation and Clinorotation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edge, Andrea; Hasenstein, Karl H.

    Seedlings align their growth axes parallel to the gravity vector. Any growth adjustment affects genes. We examined these changes in Brassica rapa roots that were reoriented and clinorotated. Gene expression levels related to the actin cytoskeleton (ACT7 and ADK1) and auxin transport (IAA5, PIN1, PIN3, AGR1, ARG1) were assessed in roots grown for 42 hours and then either reoriented to 90° for 15 min, 1, 2 and 3 hours or clinorotated vertically or horizontally for 42 hrs at 2 rpm. After these treatments, roots from 20 seedlings were divided into three sections, the root tip, elongation zone, and maturation zone. The samples from corresponding treatments were combined for RNA extraction, reverse transcription and analysis by quantitative PCR. The results show that gene expression changes in response to duration of reorientation and orientation during clinorotation. All genes, except PIN1 and AGR1 were upregulated in the tip after 2 hours of reorientation. Expression of genes also varied between the root sections except for PIN1, which was uniformly expressed. ADK1 was the only gene that showed consistent down-regulation in all three root regions in vertically and horizontally clinorotated roots (ca 30% of controls). In contrast, ADK1 was upregulated (more than 150 fold) in the tip of roots that were reoriented for 2 hours but little upregulation after one hour (less than 2 fold compared to controls). Our results indicate that gene expression during the gravitropic response changes over time with the tip region being the most dynamic tissue in the root. The large upregulation of ADK1 at 2 h after reorientation may be related to the persistence of the gravitropic response. Because of the variability of the expression profiles, analyses that are based on the entire root miss tissue specific changes in gene expression. Differences in gene expression after vertical and horizontal clinorotation indicates that the graviresponse system is sensitive not just to the magnitude

  8. Paleomagnetic Reorientation of Structural Elements in Drill Cores: an example from Tolhuaca Geothermal Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Flores, P.; Veloso, E. E.; Cembrano, J. M.; Sánchez, P.; Iriarte, S.; Lohmar, S.

    2013-12-01

    Reorientation of mesoscopic faults, veins and fractures recovered from drilling is critical to construct reliable structural models that can account for their architecture and deformation regime. However, oriented cores are expensive and time consuming to drill. Some techniques achieve reorientation by introducing tools into the borehole. Problems arise when boreholes are unstable or collapse. One alternative technique allowing reorientation is to obtain reliable paleomagnetic vectors to reorient each core piece after drilling. Here, we present stable and reliable remnant magnetic vectors calculated from the Tol-1 core to analyze the geometry of the fracture network and its relationship to regional tectonic. Tol-1 core is a vertical, 1073 m deep geothermal well, drilled at the Tolhuaca Geothermal Field in the Southern Volcanic Zone of the Andes by MRP Geothermal Chile Ltda (formerly GGE Chile SpA) in 2009. The core consists of basaltic/andesitic volcanic rocks with subordinate pyroclastic/volcaniclastic units, with probable Pleistocene age. Fault planes with slickenlines and mineral fiber kinematic indicators are common in the upper 700 m of the core. Calcite, quartz and calcite-quartz veins are recognized along of entire core, whereas epidote-quartz and calcite-epidote veins occur in the last 350 m, minor chlorite, anhydrite and clay-minerals are present. Orientations of structural features in the core were measured with a goniometer using the core's axis and a false north for each piece; hence, orientation data has a false strike but a real dip. To achieve total reorientation of the pieces, we collected 200 standard-size paleomagnetic specimens, ensuring that at least four of them were recovered from continuous pieces. Thermal (up to 700°C) and alternating field demagnetization (up to 90mT on steps of 2mT) methods were used to isolate a stable remnant magnetization (RM) vector, and each technique yielded similar results. RM vectors were recovered between 0 to 25

  9. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  10. A Holding Function for Conflict Probe Appiications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNally, Dave; Walton, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Conflict Alerts for aircraft in holding patterns are often missed or in error due to fact that holding trajectories are not modeled in Conflict Alert or Conflict Probe logic. In addition, a controller in one sector may not know when aircraft are holding in a neighboring sector. These factors can lead to an increased potential for loss of separation while aircraft are flying in holding patterns. A holding function for conflict probe applications has been developed and tested with air traffic data from Fort Worth Center. The holding function automatically determines when an aircraft enters a holding pattern, builds a holding region around the pattern and then probes the region for conflict with other traffic. The operational concept of use assumes that air traffic controllers are very busy during periods when aircraft are in holding and therefore don't have time to manually enter information which defines a holding pattern and activates conflict probing. For this reason, it is important the holding function automatically detect aircraft in holding and compute a holding region for conflict analysis. The controller is then alerted if other aircraft are predicted to fly through the holding region at the holding altitude.

  11. Optical trapping induced by reorientational nonlocal effects in nematic liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucchetti, L.; Criante, L.; Bracalente, F.; Aieta, F.; Simoni, F.

    2011-08-01

    We report a detailed analysis of optical trapping of low index particles in liquid crystals under experimental conditions that prevent the effect of conventional trapping originated by optical gradient forces. The observation of stable, long-range trapping shows that this phenomenon in liquid crystals is regulated by a completely different mechanism than in isotropic media. In particular, the role of the nonlocality of optical reorientation is highlighted by showing the dependence of the trapping force on the size of the reoriented area. A model based on the actual form of the Gaussian focused beam impinging on the liquid-crystalline medium in the trapping experiment is also reported, with good agreement with experimental data.

  12. Medium-frequency impulsive-thrust-activated liquid hydrogen reorientation with Geyser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.

    1992-01-01

    Efficient technique are studied for accomplishing propellant resettling through the minimization of propellant usage through impulsive thrust. A comparison between the use of constant-thrust and impulsive-thrust accelerations for the activation of propellant resettlement shows that impulsive thrust is superior to constant thrust for liquid reorientation in a reduced-gravity environment. This study shows that when impulsive thrust with 0.1-1.0-, and 10-Hz frequencies for liquid-fill levels in the range between 30-80 percent is considered, the selection of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive thrust over the other frequency ranges of impulsive thrust is the optimum. Characteristics of the slosh waves excited during the course of 1.0-Hz-frequency impulsive-thrust liquid reorientation were also analyzed.

  13. A structured continuum modelling framework for martensitic transformation and reorientation in shape memory materials.

    PubMed

    Bernardini, Davide; Pence, Thomas J

    2016-04-28

    Models for shape memory material behaviour can be posed in the framework of a structured continuum theory. We study such a framework in which a scalar phase fraction field and a tensor field of martensite reorientation describe the material microstructure, in the context of finite strains. Gradients of the microstructural descriptors naturally enter the formulation and offer the possibility to describe and resolve phase transformation localizations. The constitutive theory is thoroughly described by a single free energy function in conjunction with a path-dependent dissipation function. Balance laws in the form of differential equations are obtained and contain both bulk and surface terms, the latter in terms of microstreses. A natural constraint on the tensor field for martensite reorientation gives rise to reactive fields in these balance laws. Conditions ensuring objectivity as well as the relation of this framework to that provided by currently used models for shape memory alloy behaviour are discussed. PMID:27002064

  14. Planar reorientation of a free-free beam in space using embedded electromechanical actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V.; Mcclamroch, N. Harris

    1993-01-01

    It is demonstrated that the planar reorientation of a free-free beam in zero gravity space can be accomplished by periodically changing the shape of the beam using embedded electromechanical actuators. The dynamics which determine the shape of the free-free beam is assumed to be characterized by the Euler-Bernoulli equation, including material damping, with appropriate boundary conditions. The coupling between the rigid body motion and the flexible motion is explained using the angular momentum expression which includes rotatory inertia and kinematically exact effects. A control scheme is proposed where the embedded actuators excite the flexible motion of the beam so that it rotates in the desired sense with respect to a fixed inertial reference. Relations are derived which relate the average rotation rate to the amplitudes and the frequencies of the periodic actuation signal and the properties of the beam. These reorientation maneuvers can be implemented by using feedback control.

  15. Fe Spin Reorientation across the Metamagnetic Transition in Strained FeRh Thin Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordel, C.; Juraszek, J.; Cooke, David W.; Baldasseroni, C.; Mankovsky, S.; Minár, J.; Ebert, H.; Moyerman, S.; Fullerton, E. E.; Hellman, F.

    2012-09-01

    A spin reorientation accompanying the temperature-induced antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) phase transition is reported in strained epitaxial FeRh thin films. Fe57 conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry showed that the Fe moments have different orientations in FeRh grown on thick single-crystalline MgO and in FeRh grown on ion-beam-assist-deposited (IBAD) MgO. It was also observed, in both samples, that the Fe moments switch orientations at the AFM to FM phase transition. Perpendicular anisotropy was evidenced in the AFM phase of the film grown on IBAD MgO and in the FM phase of that grown on regular MgO. Density-functional theory calculations enabled this spin-reorientation transition to be accurately reproduced for both FeRh films across the AFM-FM phase transition and show that these results are due to differences in strain.

  16. Fe spin reorientation across the metamagnetic transition in strained FeRh thin films.

    PubMed

    Bordel, C; Juraszek, J; Cooke, David W; Baldasseroni, C; Mankovsky, S; Minár, J; Ebert, H; Moyerman, S; Fullerton, E E; Hellman, F

    2012-09-14

    A spin reorientation accompanying the temperature-induced antiferromagnetic (AFM) to ferromagnetic (FM) phase transition is reported in strained epitaxial FeRh thin films. (57)Fe conversion electron Mössbauer spectrometry showed that the Fe moments have different orientations in FeRh grown on thick single-crystalline MgO and in FeRh grown on ion-beam-assist-deposited (IBAD) MgO. It was also observed, in both samples, that the Fe moments switch orientations at the AFM to FM phase transition. Perpendicular anisotropy was evidenced in the AFM phase of the film grown on IBAD MgO and in the FM phase of that grown on regular MgO. Density-functional theory calculations enabled this spin-reorientation transition to be accurately reproduced for both FeRh films across the AFM-FM phase transition and show that these results are due to differences in strain. PMID:23005667

  17. Influence of an electric field on the spin-reorientation transition in Ni/Cu(100)

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard, Lukas; Bonell, Frédéric; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Wulfhekel, Wulf

    2014-10-13

    Magnetoelectric coupling offers the possibility to change the magnetic state of a material by an applied electric field. Over the last few years, metallic systems have come up as simple prototypes for this interaction. While the previous studies focused on Fe and Co thin films or their alloys, here we demonstrate magnetoelectric coupling in a Ni thin film which is close to a spin-reorientation transition. Our magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements on 10 ML of Ni/Cu(100) show a considerable influence of the applied electric field on the magnetism. This rounds off the range of magnetic metals that exhibit magnetoelectric coupling, and it reveals the possibility of an electric field control of a spin-reorientation transition.

  18. Mesenchymal cell re-modeling during mouse secondary palate re-orientation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jiu-Zhen; Tan, Min; Warner, Dennis R.; Darling, Douglas S.; Higashi, Yujiro; Gridley, Thomas; Ding, Jixiang

    2010-01-01

    The formation of mammalian secondary palate requires a series of developmental events such as growth, elevation and fusion. Despite recent advances in the field of palate development, the process of palate elevation remains poorly understood. The current consensus on palate elevation is that the distal end of the vertical palatal shelf corresponds to the medial edge of the elevated horizontal palatal shelf. We provide evidence suggesting that the prospective medial edge of the vertical palate is located toward the interior side (the side adjacent to the tongue), instead of the distal end, of the vertical palatal shelf and that the horizontal palatal axis is generated through palatal outgrowth from the side of the vertical palatal shelf rather than rotating the pre-existing vertical axis orthogonally. Since palate elevation represents a classical example of embryonic tissue re-orientation, our findings here may also shed light on the process of tissue re-orientation in general. PMID:20549719

  19. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 examined by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weekes, H. E.; Jones, N. G.; Lindley, T. C.; Dye, D.

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stress-reorientation has been investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction during the thermomechanical cycling of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tensile specimens. Results have shown that loading along a sample's transverse direction (TD) leads to a greater degree of hydride reorientation when compared to rolling direction (RD)-aligned samples. The elastic lattice micro-strains associated with radially oriented hydrides have been revealed to be greater than those oriented circumferentially, a consequence of strain accommodation. Evidence of hydride redistribution after cycling, to α-Zr grains oriented in a more favourable orientation when under an applied stress, has also been observed and its behaviour has been found to be highly dependent on the loading axis. Finally, thermomechanical loading across multiple cycles has been shown to reduce the difference in terminal solid solubility of hydrogen during dissolution (TSSD,H) and precipitation (TSSP,H).

  20. Lagrangian topology of a periodically reoriented potential flow: symmetry, optimization, and mixing.

    PubMed

    Lester, D R; Metcalfe, G; Trefry, M G; Ord, A; Hobbs, B; Rudman, M

    2009-09-01

    Scalar transport in closed potential flows is investigated for the specific case of a periodically reoriented dipole flow. Despite the irrotational nature of the flow, the periodic reorientations effectively create heteroclinic and/or homoclinic points arising from the joining of stable and unstable manifolds. For scalar advection, Lagrangian chaos can be achieved with breakdown of the regular Hamiltonian structure, which is governed by symmetry conditions imposed by the dipole flow. Instability envelopes associated with period-doubling bifurcations of fixed points govern which regions of the flow control parameter space admit global chaos. These regions are further refined via calculation of Lyapunov exponents. These results suggest significant scalar transport enhancement is possible within potential flows, given appropriate programming of stirring protocols. PMID:19905201

  1. Inexperienced newborn chicks use geometry to spontaneously reorient to an artificial social partner.

    PubMed

    Chiandetti, Cinzia; Spelke, Elizabeth S; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2015-11-01

    A fundamental process underlying navigation behaviour, shown to occur in every species tested, uses geometric properties of the environment for location memory and orientation. Here we employ a new method to ask whether this basic geometric orientation ability is innately predisposed in the brain or depends on specific experiences navigating in a geometrically rich environment. Using the newborn domestic chick as a model system, we present a working memory task testing reorientation towards a filial imprinting object under rigorous controlled rearing conditions. In the absence of any previous exposure to a geometrically rich environment, newly hatched chicks spontaneously recovered their bearings by making use of distances and directional relations to reorient themselves to an artificial social partner. These findings provide evidence for an innate capacity to navigate by the geometric structure of the environment. PMID:25530027

  2. Dark spatial solitons in bulk azo-dye-doped polymer using photoinduced molecular reorientation

    SciTech Connect

    Bian Shaoping; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2004-08-16

    We report the generation of dark spatial solitons in bulk Disperse Red 1 doped poly(methyl methacrylate) using photoinduced reorientation of azo-dye molecules. Planar solitions are formed when illuminated with a continuous-wave laser at intensities of the order of hundreds of miliwatts per square centimeter. The width of the soliton saturates to a minimum value at high intensity; and when the width of the initial dark notch is reduced, the equilibrium minimum width is unchanged.

  3. Hysteresis upon light-induced hydrodynamic reorientation of the director of a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Akopyan, R S; Alaverdyan, R B; Vardanyan, A S; Chilingaryan, Yu S

    2000-08-31

    Oscillations and hysteresis in the behaviour of the director of a nematic liquid crystal were observed upon its light-induced hydrodynamic reorientation caused by direct volume expansion. The light propagated through the liquid crystal placed between crossed polarisers provides the feedback. This light falls back on the liquid crystal and is absorbed by producing the volume expansion. A theory is suggested that describes the observed behaviour of the director of the nematic liquid crystal. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  4. Is height a core geometric cue for navigation? Young children's use of height in reorientation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qingfen; Zhang, Jing; Wu, Di; Shao, Yi

    2015-02-01

    With respect to reorientation, children older than 1.5 to 2 years can use geometric cues (distance and left/right sense). However, because previous studies have focused mainly on the plane geometric properties, little is known about the role of information with respect to vertical dimension in children's reorientation. The current study aimed to examine whether and how 3- and 4-year-old children use height information to search for a hidden toy when disoriented in a small enclosure. In a slant-ceiling rectangular room and a slant-ceiling square room, 4-year-olds were able to use height information to reorient and search for the toy in the correct corner, whereas 3-year-olds were not able to do so. Our results suggest that children can, at least by the age of 4 years, use height information and that height is not used as early as other geometric properties that are in the core geometry system for navigation. PMID:25462036

  5. Stable Panoramic Views Facilitate Snap-Shot Like Memories for Spatial Reorientation in Homing Pigeons

    PubMed Central

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Gagliardo, Anna; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Following spatial disorientation, animals can reorient themselves by relying on geometric cues (metric and sense) specified both by the macroscopic surface layout of an enclosed space and prominent visual landmarks in arrays. Whether spatial reorientation in arrays of landmarks is based on explicit representation of the geometric cues is a matter of debate. Here we trained homing pigeons (Columba livia) to locate a food-reward in a rectangular array of four identical or differently coloured pipes provided with four openings, only one of which allowed the birds to have access to the reward. Pigeons were trained either with a stable or a variable position of the opening on pipes, so that they could view the array either from the same or a variable perspective. Explicit mapping of configural geometry would predict successful reorientation irrespective of access condition. In contrast, we found that a stable view of the array facilitated spatial learning in homing pigeons, likely through the formation of snapshot-like memories. PMID:21818360

  6. Stable panoramic views facilitate snap-shot like memories for spatial reorientation in homing pigeons.

    PubMed

    Pecchia, Tommaso; Gagliardo, Anna; Vallortigara, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Following spatial disorientation, animals can reorient themselves by relying on geometric cues (metric and sense) specified both by the macroscopic surface layout of an enclosed space and prominent visual landmarks in arrays. Whether spatial reorientation in arrays of landmarks is based on explicit representation of the geometric cues is a matter of debate. Here we trained homing pigeons (Columba livia) to locate a food-reward in a rectangular array of four identical or differently coloured pipes provided with four openings, only one of which allowed the birds to have access to the reward. Pigeons were trained either with a stable or a variable position of the opening on pipes, so that they could view the array either from the same or a variable perspective. Explicit mapping of configural geometry would predict successful reorientation irrespective of access condition. In contrast, we found that a stable view of the array facilitated spatial learning in homing pigeons, likely through the formation of snapshot-like memories. PMID:21818360

  7. Neural mechanisms underlying pain's ability to reorient attention: evidence for sensitization of somatic threat detectors.

    PubMed

    Dowman, Robert

    2014-06-01

    Pain typically signals damage to the body, and as such can be perceived as threatening and can elicit a strong emotional response. This ecological significance undoubtedly underlies pain's well-known ability to demand attention. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this ability are poorly understood. Previous work from the author's laboratory has reported behavioral evidence suggesting that participants disengage their attention from an incorrectly cued visual target stimulus and reorient it toward a somatic target more rapidly when the somatic target is painful than when it is nonpainful. Furthermore, electrophysiological data suggest that this effect is mediated by a stimulus-driven process, in which somatic threat detectors located in the dorsal posterior insula activate the medial and lateral prefrontal cortex areas involved in reorienting attention toward the painful target. In these previous studies, the painful and nonpainful somatic targets were given in separate experiments involving different participants. Here, the nonpainful and painful somatic targets were presented in random order within the same block of trials. Unlike in the previous studies, both the nonpainful and painful somatic targets activated the somatic threat detectors, and the times taken to disengage and reorient attention were the same for both. These electrophysiological and behavioral data suggest that somatic threat detectors can become sensitized to nonpainful somatic stimuli that are presented in a context that includes painful stimuli. PMID:24366657

  8. Highly-sensitive liquid crystal biosensor based on DNA dendrimers-mediated optical reorientation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hui; Li, Xia; Liao, Shuzhen; Yu, Ruqin; Wu, Zhaoyang

    2014-12-15

    A novel highly-sensitive liquid crystal (LC) biosensing approach based on target-triggering DNA dendrimers was developed for the detection of p53 mutation gene segment at the LC-aqueous interface. In this study, the mutant-type p53 gene segment was the target to trigger the formation of DNA dendrimers from hairpin DNA probes by hybridization chain reaction, and the latter as a 'signal enhancement element' further induced the LC reorientation from tilted to homeotropic alignment, resulting in a corresponding optical changes of LC biosensors from birefringent to honeycombed textures or dark framework. The distinct optical reorientational appearances can serve as a characteristic signal to distinguish target concentrations ranging from 0.08 nM to 8 nM. Moreover, these optical phenomena suggest that the LC reorientation is related to the electric-dipole coupling between the adsorbed DNA and LC molecules, the conformational constraints of DNA and the internal electric field induction upon hybridization. This label-free LC biosensing strategy can open up a new platform for the sensitive detection of specific DNA sequences and enrich the application scope of an LC biosensing technique. PMID:24984288

  9. Molecular Reorientation Dynamics Govern the Glass Transitions of the Amorphous Ices.

    PubMed

    Shephard, J J; Salzmann, C G

    2016-06-16

    The glass transitions of low-density amorphous ice (LDA) and high-density amorphous ice (HDA) are the topic of controversial discussions. Understanding their exact nature may be the key to explaining the anomalies of liquid water but has also got implications in the general context of polyamorphism, the occurrence of multiple amorphous forms of the same material. We first show that the glass transition of hydrogen-disordered ice VI is associated with the kinetic unfreezing of molecular reorientation dynamics by measuring the calorimetric responses of the corresponding H2O, H2(18)O, and D2O materials in combination with X-ray diffraction. Well-relaxed LDA and HDA show identical isotopic-response patterns in calorimetry as ice VI, and we conclude that the glass transitions of the amorphous ices are also governed by molecular reorientation processes. This "reorientation scenario" seems to resolve the previously conflicting viewpoints and is consistent with the fragile-to-strong transition from water to the amorphous ices. PMID:27243277

  10. Relocation of a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase activity during pollen tube reorientation

    PubMed Central

    Moutinho, A; Trewavas, AJ; Malho, R

    1998-01-01

    Pollen tube reorientation is a dynamic cellular event that is crucial for successful fertilization. We have shown previously that pollen tube orientation is regulated by cytosolic free calcium ([Ca2+]c). In this paper, we studied the activity of a Ca2+-dependent protein kinase during reorientation. The kinase activity was assayed in living cells by using confocal ratio imaging of BODIPY FL bisindolylmaleimide. We found that growing pollen tubes exhibited higher protein kinase activity in the apical region, whereas nongrowing cells showed uniform distribution. Modification of growth direction by diffusion of inhibitors/activators from a micropipette showed the spatial redistribution of kinase activity to predict the new growth orientation. Localized increases in [Ca2+]c induced by photolysis of caged Ca2+ that led to reorientation also increased kinase activity. Molecular and immunological assays suggest that this kinase may show some functional homology with protein kinase C. We suggest that the tip-localized gradient of kinase activity promotes Ca2+-mediated exocytosis and may act to regulate Ca2+ channel activity. PMID:9724696

  11. The ethics of sexual reorientation: what should clinicians and researchers do?

    PubMed

    Aas, Sean; Delmas, Candice

    2016-06-01

    Technological measures meant to change sexual orientation are, we have argued elsewhere, deeply alarming, even and indeed especially if they are safe and effective. Here we point out that this in part because they produce a distinctive kind of 'clinical collective action problem', a sort of dilemma for individual clinicians and researchers: a treatment which evidently relieves the suffering of particular patients, but in the process contributes to a practice that substantially worsens the conditions that produce this suffering in the first place. We argue that the role obligations of clinicians to relieve the suffering of their patients put them in a poor position to solve this problem, though they can take measures to avoid complicity in the harms that would result from widespread use of individually safe and effective reorientation biotechnology. But in the end the medical community as a whole still seems obligated to provide these measures, if they become technologically feasible. Medical researchers are in a better position to prevent the harms that would result if reorientation techniques were safe, effective and widely available. We argue that the harms attendant on the development of safe and effective re-orientation techniques give researchers reason to avoid 'applied' research aimed at developing these techniques, and to be careful in the conduct of basic orientation research which might be applied in this way. PMID:27145812

  12. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  13. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION... mutual holding companies. (a) Requirements. No subsidiary holding company of a mutual holding company...

  14. Measuring Pupil Engagement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Kenneth G.; Capie, William

    This paper advocates categorization of engagement on the basis of a logical relationship with the outcomes of a study and the use of student attributes that are logically related to engagement and/or achievement as covariables. Results from a study involving nine engagement categories, measures of formal reasoning ability, locus of control and…

  15. Engaging Your Beginners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Teachers love to see the spark of engagement when students eagerly engage in learning. But when teachers work with English language learners in the earliest stages of language acquisition, they're often unsure how to foster challenge and engagement with students who know such sparse English. Hill shares six key do's and don'ts for classroom…

  16. Improving Student Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Jim; Taylor, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews research literature in the area of student engagement to discover curricular and pedagogical ideas educators might successfully use to better engage student learning. Student engagement has historically focused upon increasing achievement, positive behaviors, and a sense of belonging to help students remain in school. The…

  17. A Dialogue for Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Malcolm

    2010-01-01

    Student engagement is perhaps the key element for almost any learning context. When engaged, learners are enthusiastic and excited about the subject. Their work is informed by the enjoyment of discovery. Engaged learners work willingly, instead of by coercion, and approach their assignments as something that matters to them personally. The spirit…

  18. Engagement and Institutional Advancement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weerts, David; Hudson, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that institutional commitment to community engagement can be understood by examining levels of student, faculty, and community involvement in engagement; organizational structure, rewards, and campus publications supporting engagement; and compatibility of an institution's mission with this work (Holland, 1997). Underlying all of…

  19. Engaging Scholarship with Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Núñez, Guillermina Gina

    2014-01-01

    A pedagogy of engagement links faculty and students to the needs of local communities while promoting academic success through higher retention and graduation rates in higher education. This work describes engaged scholarship and shares guidelines for documenting student engagement and critical reflection across the higher education curriculum.…

  20. Rotational reorientation dynamics at high pressures: rhodamine 6G in ethanol from 1 bar to 6 kbar

    SciTech Connect

    Philips, L.A.; Webb, S.P.; Yeh, S.W.; Clark, J.H.

    1985-01-03

    Picosecond, time-resolved fluorescence depolarization spectroscopy has been used to measure the rotational reorientation time (tau/sub or/) of electronically excited rhodamine 6G. When the dependence of tau/sub or/ on solvent viscosity for a series of linear alcohols is compared with that for ethanol as a function of pressure over the range from 1 bar to 6 kbar, substantially different rotational reorientation dynamics are found for identical macroscopic viscosities. 31 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  1. Digital first order hold circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Fred N. (Inventor); Wensley, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    There is provided a digitally controlled first order hold circuit and waveform synthesizer for digitally controlling the representation of a function over an approximation interval. In accordance with the operation of the invention, the first order hold circuit and waveform generator receives a digital data input signal which contains initial condition data, up/down data, and slope data for the approximation interval. The initial condition data is loaded into an up/down counter which is incremented using counting data at a rate depending on the value of the slope data and in a direction depending on the value of the up-down data. In order to minimize delays arising from data acquistion, two frequency synthesizer circuits are provided such that one frequency synthesizer provides counting data while the other frequency synthesizer receives slope data. During alternating intervals, the other frequency synthesizer circuit provides counting data while the other circuit receives slope data. In addition, long length data input signals covering a plurality of approximation intervals are provided to reduce the demands on a main system central processing unit.

  2. 12 CFR 34.82 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Holding period. 34.82 Section 34.82 Banks and... Real Estate Owned § 34.82 Holding period. (a) Holding period for OREO. A national bank shall dispose of OREO at the earliest time that prudent judgment dictates, but not later than the end of the...

  3. 12 CFR 34.82 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Holding period. 34.82 Section 34.82 Banks and... Real Estate Owned § 34.82 Holding period. (a) Holding period for OREO. A national bank shall dispose of OREO at the earliest time that prudent judgment dictates, but not later than the end of the...

  4. 47 CFR 73.7005 - Holding period.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Holding period. 73.7005 Section 73.7005... Applications for Noncommercial Educational Stations on Non-Reserved Channels § 73.7005 Holding period. (a... holding period. From the grant of the construction permit and continuing until the facility has...

  5. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If any dealer or exhibitor obtains the...

  6. 9 CFR 2.102 - Holding facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Holding facility. 2.102 Section 2.102 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Compliance With Standards and Holding Period § 2.102 Holding facility. (a) If...

  7. 76 FR 20458 - Mutual Holding Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-12

    ... Office of Thrift Supervision Mutual Holding Company AGENCY: Office of Thrift Supervision (OTS), Treasury... collection. Title of Proposal: Mutual Holding Company. OMB Number: 1550-0072. Form Numbers: MHC-1 (OTS Form... whether the applicant meets the statutory and regulatory criteria to form a mutual holding company...

  8. Functional Analysis and Intervention for Breath Holding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kern, Lee; And Others

    1995-01-01

    A functional analysis of breath-holding episodes in a 7-year-old girl with severe mental retardation and Cornelia-de-Lange syndrome indicated that breath holding served an operant function, primarily to gain access to attention. Use of extinction, scheduled attention, and a picture card communication system decreased breath holding. (Author/SW)

  9. 12 CFR 225.141 - Operations subsidiaries of a bank holding company.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... company. 225.141 Section 225.141 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS... company. In orders approving the retention by a bank holding company of a 4(c)(8) subsidiary, the Board... owned subsidiary of an approved 4(c)(8) company to engage in activities that such a company could...

  10. Spatial reorientation experiments for NMR of solids and partially oriented liquids.

    PubMed

    Martin, Rachel W; Kelly, John E; Collier, Kelsey A

    2015-11-01

    Motional reorientation experiments are extensions of Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) where the rotor axis is changed in order to average out, reintroduce, or scale anisotropic interactions (e.g. dipolar couplings, quadrupolar interactions or chemical shift anisotropies). This review focuses on Variable Angle Spinning (VAS), Switched Angle Spinning (SAS), and Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS), all of which involve spinning at two or more different angles sequentially, either in successive experiments or during a multidimensional experiment. In all of these experiments, anisotropic terms in the Hamiltonian are scaled by changing the orientation of the spinning sample relative to the static magnetic field. These experiments vary in experimental complexity and instrumentation requirements. In VAS, many one-dimensional spectra are collected as a function of spinning angle. In SAS, dipolar couplings and/or chemical shift anisotropies are reintroduced by switching the sample between two different angles, often 0° or 90° and the magic angle, yielding a two-dimensional isotropic-anisotropic correlation spectrum. Dynamic Angle Spinning (DAS) is a related experiment that is used to simultaneously average out the first- and second-order quadrupolar interactions, which cannot be accomplished by spinning at any unique rotor angle in physical space. Although motional reorientation experiments generally require specialized instrumentation and data analysis schemes, some are accessible with only minor modification of standard MAS probes. In this review, the mechanics of each type of experiment are described, with representative examples. Current and historical probe and coil designs are discussed from the standpoint of how each one accomplishes the particular objectives of the experiment(s) it was designed to perform. Finally, applications to inorganic materials and liquid crystals, which present very different experimental challenges, are discussed. The review concludes with perspectives

  11. A nonlinear biphasic fiber-reinforced porohyperviscoelastic model of articular cartilage incorporating fiber reorientation and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Seifzadeh, A; Wang, J; Oguamanam, D C D; Papini, M

    2011-08-01

    A nonlinear biphasic fiber-reinforced porohyperviscoelastic (BFPHVE) model of articular cartilage incorporating fiber reorientation effects during applied load was used to predict the response of ovine articular cartilage at relatively high strains (20%). The constitutive material parameters were determined using a coupled finite element-optimization algorithm that utilized stress relaxation indentation tests at relatively high strains. The proposed model incorporates the strain-hardening, tension-compression, permeability, and finite deformation nonlinearities that inherently exist in cartilage, and accounts for effects associated with fiber dispersion and reorientation and intrinsic viscoelasticity at relatively high strains. A new optimization cost function was used to overcome problems associated with large peak-to-peak differences between the predicted finite element and experimental loads that were due to the large strain levels utilized in the experiments. The optimized material parameters were found to be insensitive to the initial guesses. Using experimental data from the literature, the model was also able to predict both the lateral displacement and reaction force in unconfined compression, and the reaction force in an indentation test with a single set of material parameters. Finally, it was demonstrated that neglecting the effects of fiber reorientation and dispersion resulted in poorer agreement with experiments than when they were considered. There was an indication that the proposed BFPHVE model, which includes the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the nonfibrillar matrix (proteoglycan), might be used to model the behavior of cartilage up to relatively high strains (20%). The maximum percentage error between the indentation force predicted by the FE model using the optimized material parameters and that measured experimentally was 3%. PMID:21950897

  12. 12 CFR 239.24 - Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Issuances of stock by subsidiary holding companies of mutual holding companies. 239.24 Section 239.24 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM (CONTINUED) MUTUAL HOLDING COMPANIES (REGULATION MM) Subsidiary Holding Companies §...

  13. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-01

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV /u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities.

  14. Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

    2009-05-14

    We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

  15. Slosh wave excitation due to cryogenic liquid reorientation in space-based propulsion system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Shyu, K. L.; Lee, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the cryogenic fluid management of the spacecraft propulsion system is to develop the technology necessary for acquistion or positioning of liquid and vapor within a tank in reduced gravity to enable liquid outflow or vapor venting. In this study slosh wave excitation induced by the resettling flow field activated by 1.0 Hz medium frequency impulsive reverse gravity acceleration during the course of liquid fluid reorientation with the initiation of geyser for liquid filled levels of 30, 50, and 80 percent have been studied. Characteristics of slosh waves with various frequencies excited are discussed.

  16. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H[sub 2](B)

    SciTech Connect

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H[sub 2], HD, and D[sub 2] B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +] by [sup 4]He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H[sub 2], HD and D[sub 2] (B [sup 1][Sigma][sub u][sup +]. v[prime]=0, J[prime]=1, M[sub J]=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H[sub 2](X [sup 1][Sigma][sub g][sup +]) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250[plus minus]40 cm[sup [minus]1], and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H[sub 2](B) and the H[sub 2]-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140[plus minus]80 cm[sup [minus]1]. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H[sub 2], HD, D[sub 2] with He and Ne were found to be about 30 [Angstrom][sup 2] and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D[sub 2] in collisions with Ar were 10.6[plus minus]2.0 and 13.9[plus minus]3.0 [Angstrom][sup 2], respectively. Reorientation of D[sub 2](B) in collisions with room temperature H[sub 2](X) occurs with a 7.6[plus minus]3.4 [Angstrom][sup 2] cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H[sub 2](B) and D[sub 2](B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  17. Reaction and reorientation of electronically excited H{sub 2}(B)

    SciTech Connect

    Pibel, C.D.

    1992-09-01

    The room temperature rate (TR) constants for fluorescence quenching fluorescence of H{sub 2}, HD, and D{sub 2} B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +} by {sup 4}He were measured as a function of the initially excited rotational and vibrational level of the hydrogen molecule, and the RT rate constants for molecular angular momentum reorientation of H{sub 2}, HD and D{sub 2} (B {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}. v{prime}=0, J{prime}=1, M{sub J}=0) in collisions with He, Ne, Ar and H{sub 2}(X {sup 1}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}) were also measured. Vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross sections fits a vibrationally adiabatic model of the quenching process. From the vibrational state dependence of the quenching cross section, the barrier height for the quenching reaction is found to be 250{plus_minus}40 cm{sup {minus}1}, and the difference in the H-H stretching frequencies between H{sub 2}(B) and the H{sub 2}-He complex at the barrier to reaction is 140{plus_minus}80 cm{sup {minus}1}. The effective cross sections for angular momentum reorientation in collisions of H{sub 2}, HD, D{sub 2} with He and Ne were found to be about 30 {Angstrom}{sup 2} and were nearly the same for each isotope and with He and Ne as collision partners. Cross sections forreorientation of HD and D{sub 2} in collisions with Ar were 10.6{plus_minus}2.0 and 13.9{plus_minus}3.0 {Angstrom}{sup 2}, respectively. Reorientation of D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with room temperature H{sub 2}(X) occurs with a 7.6{plus_minus}3.4 {Angstrom}{sup 2} cross section. Calculated cross sections using semiclassical and quantum close coupled methods give cross sections for reorientation of H{sub 2}(B) and D{sub 2}(B) in collisions with He that agree quantitatively with experiment. Discrepancy between the calculated and experimental cross sections for HD(B)-HE are likely due to rotational relaxation in HD a Turbo PASCAL version of the data-taking program is included.

  18. From lipid second messengers to molecular motors: microtubule-organizing center reorientation in T cells

    PubMed Central

    Huse, Morgan; Le Floc'h, Audrey; Liu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Summary In T lymphocytes, polarization of the microtubule-organizing center (MTOC) to the immunological synapse enables the directional secretion of cytokines, cytolytic factors, and other soluble molecules toward the antigen-presenting cell. This is likely to be crucial for maintaining the specificity of T-cell effector responses. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of MTOC reorientation in T cells, focusing first on the importance of diacylglycerol and protein kinase C isozymes and then on the molecular motor proteins that function downstream to drive MTOC movement. PMID:24117815

  19. Continuous spin reorientation transition in epitaxially grown antiferromagnetic NiO thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.; Arenholz, E.; Meng, Y.; Tan, A.; Park, J.; Jin, E.; Son, H.; Wu, J.; Jenkins, C. A.; Scholl, A.; Hwang, Chanyong; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2011-03-01

    Fe/NiO/MgO/Ag(001) films were grown epitaxially, and the Fe and NiO spin orientations were determined using x-ray magnetic dichroism. We find that the NiO spins are aligned perpendicularly to the in-plane Fe spins. Analyzing both the in-plane and out-of-plane spin components of the NiO layer, we demonstrate unambiguously that the antiferromagnetic NiO spins undergo a continuous spin reorientation transition from the in-plane to out-of-plane directions with increasing of the MgO thickness.

  20. Dynamic Isovector Reorientation of Deuteron as a Probe to Nuclear Symmetry Energy.

    PubMed

    Ou, Li; Xiao, Zhigang; Yi, Han; Wang, Ning; Liu, Min; Tian, Junlong

    2015-11-20

    We present the calculations on a novel reorientation effect of deuteron attributed to isovector interaction in the nuclear field of heavy target nuclei. The correlation angle determined by the relative momentum vector of the proton and the neutron originating from the breakup deuteron, which is experimentally detectable, exhibits significant dependence on the isovector nuclear potential but is robust against the variation of the isoscaler sector. In terms of sensitivity and cleanness, the breakup reactions induced by the polarized deuteron beam at about 100 MeV/u provide a more stringent constraint to the symmetry energy at subsaturation densities. PMID:26636849

  1. Reorientation of the Stripe Phase of 2D Electrons by a Minute Density Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueed, M. A.; Hossain, Md. Shafayat; Pfeiffer, L. N.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.; Shayegan, M.

    2016-08-01

    Interacting two-dimensional electrons confined in a GaAs quantum well exhibit isotropic transport when the Fermi level resides in the first excited (N =1 ) Landau level. Adding an in-plane magnetic field (B||) typically leads to an anisotropic, stripelike (nematic) phase of electrons with the stripes oriented perpendicular to the B|| direction. Our experimental data reveal how a periodic density modulation, induced by a surface strain grating from strips of negative electron-beam resist, competes against the B||-induced orientational order of the stripe phase. Even a minute (<0.25 %) density modulation is sufficient to reorient the stripes along the direction of the surface grating.

  2. Large Noncollinearity and Spin Reorientation in the Novel Mn2RhSn Heusler Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshcheriakova, O.; Chadov, S.; Nayak, A. K.; Rößler, U. K.; Kübler, J.; André, G.; Tsirlin, A. A.; Kiss, J.; Hausdorf, S.; Kalache, A.; Schnelle, W.; Nicklas, M.; Felser, C.

    2014-08-01

    Noncollinear magnets provide essential ingredients for the next generation memory technology. It is a new prospect for the Heusler materials, already well known due to the diverse range of other fundamental characteristics. Here, we present a combined experimental and theoretical study of novel noncollinear tetragonal Mn2RhSn Heusler material exhibiting unusually strong canting of its magnetic sublattices. It undergoes a spin-reorientation transition, induced by a temperature change and suppressed by an external magnetic field. Because of the presence of Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya exchange and magnetic anisotropy, Mn2RhSn is suggested to be a promising candidate for realizing the Skyrmion state in the Heusler family.

  3. Quadrupole moment of the first 2+ excited state in 136Ba through the reorientation effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechara, M. J.; Dietzsch, O.; Hirata, J. H.

    1984-05-01

    Measurements of the Coulomb excitation probability of the first 2+ state of 136Ba were carried out using back-scattered ions of 4He and 16O. The static quadrupole moment Q2+ and the reduced transition probability B(E20+-->2+) have been determined using the reorientation effect. It is found that Q2+=+0.01+/-0.05 e b (+0.25+/-0.05 e b) for the positive (negative) sign of the 2+' interference term, and B(E20+-->2+)=0.399+/-0.003 e2b2.

  4. A Call for Civically Engaged Educational Policy-Related Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weis, Lois; Nozaki, Yoshiko; Granfield, Robert; Olsen, Nils

    2007-01-01

    At a time when higher education is undergoing great challenges and diminished public support, the civically engaged university holds the promise of reclaiming the meaning and the purpose of higher education, where contributions toward promoting democratic public life through research and education become central institutional priorities. The…

  5. Faculty Perceptions of Institutional Commitment to the Scholarship of Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huyser, Mackenzi A.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined social perceptions that full-time faculty hold about their institutional commitment to the scholarship of engagement. The sample included full-time faculty (n = 274) serving in member institutions of the Association of Reformed Institutions in Higher Education (ARIHE) in the United States. Two primary research questions were…

  6. A three-dimensional model of magneto-mechanical behaviors of martensite reorientation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue; Moumni, Ziad; He, Yongjun; Zhang, Weihong

    2014-03-01

    The large strain in Ferromagnetic Shape Memory Alloys (FSMA) is due to the martensite reorientation driven by mechanical stresses and/or magnetic fields. Although most experiments studying the martensite reorientation in FSMA are under 1D condition (uniaxial stress plus a perpendicular magnetic field), it has been shown that the 2D/3D configurations can improve the working stress and give much flexibility of the material's applications [He, Y.J., Chen, X., Moumni, Z., 2011. Two-dimensional analysis to improve the output stress in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys. Journal of Applied Physics 110, 063905]. To predict the material's behaviors in 3D loading conditions, a constitutive model is developed in this paper, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes with internal variables. All the martensite variants are considered in the model and the temperature effect is also taken into account. The model is able to describe all the behaviors of martensite reorientation in FSMA observed in the existing experiments: rotating/non-rotating magnetic-field-induced martensite reorientation, magnetic-field-assisted super-elasticity, super-elasticity under biaxial compressions and temperature-dependence of martensite reorientation. The model is further used to study the nonlinear bending behaviors of FSMA beams and provides some basic guidelines for designing the FSMA-based bending actuators.

  7. From Engaging Liaison Librarians to Engaging Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenney, Anne R.

    2015-01-01

    Kara J. Malenfant wrote in her 2010 article "Leading Change in the System of Scholarly Communication: A Case Study of Engaging Liaison Librarians for Outreach to Faculty" that it would be interesting to revisit the University of Minnesota (UMN) Libraries in three years and see how they are doing. Malenfant had documented a culture shift…

  8. 78 FR 52768 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-26

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  9. 77 FR 61607 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  10. 77 FR 33460 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  11. 76 FR 69739 - Notice of Proposals To Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  12. 76 FR 78658 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  13. 76 FR 82298 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-30

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  14. 76 FR 71344 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  15. 77 FR 12304 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-29

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  16. 78 FR 70946 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  17. 77 FR 6564 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  18. 76 FR 76413 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-07

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  19. 78 FR 8534 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y ] (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  20. 78 FR 35271 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  1. 77 FR 29348 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  2. 78 FR 29134 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in or to Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  3. 76 FR 78924 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  4. 78 FR 27239 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-09

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  5. 77 FR 36543 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  6. 78 FR 41929 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-12

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  7. 78 FR 9051 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-07

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  8. 78 FR 1212 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-08

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  9. 77 FR 46437 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  10. 77 FR 35387 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-13

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  11. 76 FR 68188 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y ] (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  12. 78 FR 62303 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-15

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  13. 77 FR 43285 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  14. 77 FR 60119 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  15. 77 FR 23483 - Notice of Proposals To Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  16. 78 FR 52915 - Notice of Proposals to Engage In or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  17. 77 FR 64994 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in or To Acquire Companies Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... companies listed in this notice have given notice under section 4 of the Bank Holding Company Act (12 U.S.C. 1843) (BHC Act) and Regulation Y, (12 CFR Part 225) to engage de novo, or to acquire or control voting... Regulation Y (12 CFR 225.28) or that the Board has determined by Order to be closely related to banking...

  18. Civic Learning and Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanter, Martha; Schneider, Carol Geary

    2013-01-01

    For decades, the US education system has failed to adequately combat a decline of civic engagement and awareness, resulting in what many are now calling a "civics recession." The good news is that there is growing awareness, at all levels, that we need new and concerted efforts to make civic learning and engagement a core component of every…

  19. Engaging with Drama

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a multi-site global, ethnographic, and mixed methods study on student engagement. Our research has closely examined how engagement and disengagement operate subtly, simultaneously and relationally in the places and spaces where drama is made. Through years of qualitative time in high school classrooms and two different…

  20. Student Engagement. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    Teachers, more than any other person in the school, have the greatest potential to get students engaged in school and in learning. Creating student-directed learning experiences that challenge, stimulate, and engage kids not only raises test scores, it also fosters life-long learners prepared for success in today's globally connected world. This…

  1. Civic Engagement Comes Alive

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kruempel, Beverly J.; Gentzler, Yvonne S.; Hausafus, Cheryl O.; Keino, Leah C.

    2006-01-01

    This article discusses how civic engagement came alive in a Family and Consumer Social Issues class. College students are at a critical age to develop a lifelong interest in civic engagement. Students in a Family and Consumer Social Issues class were required to attend two meetings of a public board or agency of their choice. Their assignment was…

  2. Engagement Means Everyone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Employee engagement is not just HR's responsibility. While HR is responsible for the process of measuring and driving engagement, improving it is actually everyone's responsibility. And that means reducing the barriers to productivity to drive business performance. Training departments can play a pivotal role. Their job is to enhance curriculum or…

  3. The Impact of Task Difficulty and Performance Scores on Student Engagement and Progression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Raymond; Patten, James Vincent; Hennessy, Jennifer

    2013-01-01

    Background: This article considers the impact of differential task difficulty on student engagement and progression within an Irish primary school context. Gaining and maintaining student engagement during learning tasks such as homework is a significant and understandable on-going challenge for teachers. The findings of this study hold the…

  4. Ion induced magnetization reorientation in Co/Pt multilayers for patterned media

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, D.; Baglin, J.E.E.; Kellock, A.J.; Hannibal, K.A.; Toney, M.F.; Kusinski, G.; Lang, S.; Best, M.E.; Terris, B.D.

    2000-01-01

    Co/Pt multilayer films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and large out-of-plane coercivities of 3.9 - 8.5 kOe have been found to undergo a spin reorientation transition from out-of-plane to in-plane upon irradiation with 700 keV nitrogen ions. X-ray reflectivity experiments show that the multilayer structure gets progressively disrupted with increasing ion dose, providing direct evidence for local atomic displacements at the Co/Pt interfaces. This effectively destroys the magnetic interface anisotropy, which was varied by about a factor of two, between KS@ 0.4 erg/cm2 and KS@ 0.85 erg/cm2 for two particular films. The dose required to initiate spin-reorientation, 6x1014 N+/cm2 and 1.5x1015 N+/cm2, respectively, scales with KS. It is roughly equal to the number of Co interface atoms per unit interface area contributing to KS.

  5. Polarization Sensitive Measurements of Molecular Reorientation in a Glass Capacitor Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Nathan; Lawhead, Carlos; Anderson, Josiah; Shiver, Tegan; Prayaga, Chandra; Ujj, Laszlo

    2014-03-01

    It is well known that molecules having a permanent dipole moment tend to orient in the direction of the electric field at room temperature. The reorientation can be probed with the help of linear spectroscopy methods such as fluorescence anisotropy measurements. We have used nonlinear polarization sensitive Raman scattering spectroscopy to quantify the orientation effect of the dipoles. Vibrational spectra of the molecules has been recorded as a function of the external electric field. The polarization changes observed during the measurement are directly linked to the molecular reorientation rearrangement. Spectra has been recorded with a laser spectrometer comprised of a Nd:YAG laser and an optical parametric oscillator and an imaging spectrometer with a CCD detector. In order to make this measurement we have constructed a glass capacitor cell coated in TiO and applied a significant electric field (0-3 kV/mm) to the sample. Our measurements showed that the orientation effect is most significant for liquid crystals as observed previously with non-polarization sensitive CARS spectroscopy.

  6. Target berthing and base reorientation of free-floating space robotic system after capturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wenfu; Li, Cheng; Liang, Bin; Xu, Yangsheng; Liu, Yu; Qiang, Wenyi

    2009-01-01

    Space robots are playing an increasingly important role in on-orbital servicing, including repairing, refueling, or de-orbiting the satellite. The target must be captured and berthed before the servicing task starts. However, the attitude of the base may lean much and needs re-orientating after capturing. In this paper, a method is proposed to berth the target, and re-orientate the base at the same time, using manipulator motion only. Firstly, the system state is formed of the attitude quaternion and joint variables, and the joint paths are parameterized by sinusoidal functions. Then, the trajectory planning is transformed to an optimization problem. The cost function, defined according to the accuracy requirements of system variables, is the function of the parameters to be determined. Finally, we solve the parameters using the particle swarm optimization algorithm. Two typical cases of the spacecraft with a 6-DOF manipulator are dynamically simulated, one is that the variation of base attitude is limited; the other is that both the base attitude and the joint rates are constrained. The simulation results verify the presented method.

  7. Deuteron quadrupole coupling constants and reorientational correlation times in protic ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Strauch, Matthias; Bonsa, Anne-Marie; Golub, Benjamin; Overbeck, Viviane; Michalik, Dirk; Paschek, Dietmar; Ludwig, Ralf

    2016-07-21

    We describe a method for the accurate determination of deuteron quadrupole coupling constants χD for N-D bonds in triethylammonium-based protic ionic liquids (PILs). This approach was first introduced by Wendt and Farrar for O-D bonds in molecular liquids, and is based on the linear relationship between the deuteron quadrupole coupling constants χD, and the proton chemical shifts δ(1)H, as obtained from DFT calculated properties in differently sized clusters of the compounds. Thus the measurement of δ(1)H provides an accurate estimate for χD, which can then be used for deriving reorientational correlation-times τND, by means of NMR deuteron quadrupole relaxation time measurements. The method is applied to pure PILs including differently strong interacting anions. The obtained χD values vary between 152 and 204 kHz, depending on the cation-anion interaction strength, intensified by H-bonding. We find that considering dispersion corrections in the DFT-calculations leads to only slightly decreasing χD values. The determined reorientational correlation times indicate that the extreme narrowing condition is fulfilled for these PILs. The τc values along with the measured viscosities provide an estimate for the volume/size of the clusters present in solution. In addition, the correlation times τc, and the H-bonded aggregates were also characterized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. PMID:27067640

  8. Mechanism of dynamic reorientation of cortical microtubules due to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Muratov, Alexander; Baulin, Vladimir A

    2015-12-01

    Directional growth caused by gravitropism and corresponding bending of plant cells has been explored since 19th century, however, many aspects of mechanisms underlying the perception of gravity at the molecular level are still not well known. Perception of gravity in root and shoot gravitropisms is usually attributed to gravisensitive cells, called statocytes, which exploit sedimentation of macroscopic and heavy organelles, amyloplasts, to sense the direction of gravity. Gravity stimulus is then transduced into distal elongation zone, which is several mm far from statocytes, where it causes stretching. It is suggested that gravity stimulus is conveyed by gradients in auxin flux. We propose a theoretical model that may explain how concentration gradients and/or stretching may indirectly affect the global orientation of cortical microtubules, attached to the cell membrane and induce their dynamic reorientation perpendicular to the gradients. In turn, oriented microtubule arrays direct the growth and orientation of cellulose microfibrils, forming part of the cell external skeleton and determine the shape of the cell. Reorientation of microtubules is also observed in reaction to light in phototropism and mechanical bending, thus suggesting universality of the proposed mechanism. PMID:26422460

  9. Rotational reorientation dynamics of Aerosol-OT reverse micelles formed in near-critical propane

    SciTech Connect

    Heitz, M.P.; Bright, F.V.

    1996-06-01

    The rotational reorientation kinetics of two fluorescent solutes (rhodamine 6G, R6G, and rhodamine 101, R101) have been determined in sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (Aerosol-OT, AOT) reverse micelles formed in liquid and near-critical propane. We show that the amount of water loading ([water]/[AOT], R), continuous phase density, and temperature all influence the solute rotational dynamics. In all cases, the decay of anisotropy data (i.e., frequency-dependent differential polarized phase angle and polarized modulation ratio) are well described by a bi-exponential decay law. We find that the faster rotational correlation times are similar to but slightly less than the values predicted for an individual AOT reverse micelle rotating in propane. The recovered rotational correlation times range from 200 to 500 ps depending on experimental conditions. This faster rotational process is explained in terms of lateral diffusion of the fluorophore along the water/headgroup interfacial region within the reverse micelle. The recovered values for the slower rotational correlation times range from 7 to 18 ns. These larger rotational reorientation times are assigned to varying micelle-micelle (i.e., tail-tail) interactions in the low-density, highly compressible fluid region. We also quantify the contribution of the reverse micellar {open_quotes}aggregate{close_quotes} to the total decay of anisotropy. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  10. Doping controlled spin reorientation in dysprosium-samarium orthoferrite single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shixun; Zhao, Weiyao; Kang, Baojuan; Zhang, Jincang; Ren, Wei

    2015-03-01

    As one of the most important phase transitions, spin reorientation (SR) in rare earth transition metal oxides draws much attention of emerging materials technologies. The origin of SR is the competition between different spin configurations which possess different free energy. We report the control of spin reorientation (SR) transition in perovskite rare earth orthoferrite Dy1-xSmxFeO3, a whole family of single crystals grown by optical floating zone method from x =0 to 1. Temperature dependence of the magnetizations under zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling (FC) processes are studied. We have found a remarkable linear change of SR transition temperature in Sm-rich samples for x>0.2, which covers an extremely wide temperature range including room temperature. The a-axis magnetization curves under FCC process bifurcate from and then jump down to that of warming process (ZFC and FCW curves) in single crystals when x =0.5-0.9, suggesting complicated 4f-3d electron interactions among Dy3+-Sm3+, Dy3+-Fe3+, and Sm3+-Fe3+ sublattices of diverse magnetic configurations for materials physics and design. The magnetic properties and the doping effect on SR transition temperature in these single crystals might be useful in the spintronics device application. This work is supported by the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB921600), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, Nos. 51372149, 50932003, 11274222).